State Bank of India Clerical Recruitment Form 2009

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					The Plan to Attract Retirees and
    Future Retirees to the
    Paso del Norte Region

   Executive Summary



   The City of El Paso

                                   1
Executive Summary

The Vision and Mission of The Paso del Norte Group to Attract Retirees to the Region

      The Paso del Norte Group has defined a vision and mission statement for the development of a retiree
attraction program for the Paso del Norte region.

     Vision. The Paso del Norte region will be a premier retirement destination location chosen because of its
     quality of life, climate, lifestyle and opportunities for 50+ households.

     Mission Statement. The Paso del Norte Group will support efforts necessary to create public and private
     sector development opportunities that enhance the quality of life of the region; and promote marketing
     and advertising strategies necessary to establish the Paso del Norte region as a retirement destination.

Included in the Report

      This report provides background information that overviews what 50+ consumers want in their home and
community; identifies the strengths and challenges to attract retirees to the region; estimates demand for age-
qualified housing among households living within and beyond the Paso del Norte region; and, outlines a
comprehensive plan to initiate the Retiree Attraction Program for the Paso del Norte region.

     The following pages highlight some of the key information included in this report.




                                                                                                                  2
Executive Summary – Highlights of the Report

The Paso del Norte Region

   The Paso del Norte region has not enjoyed the influx of retirees that has been apparent in other areas of
    Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. This is likely because the community has focused on its responsibilities to
    Ft. Bliss and has not concentrated efforts on attracting retirees.

   The Paso del Norte region has an abundance of natural, cultural, educational and recreational attributes, in
    addition to the extremely favorable cost of living, that are likely to attract retirees.

   The Paso del Norte region is somewhat rough around the edges, lacks attractive streetscapes and suffers
    from the perception that it is a dusty border town.

   The Paso del Norte region has significant competition in the southwest and other areas that are attractive
    destinations for retirees; have affordable housing, and have decades of a head start in attracting retirees to
    their regions.

The Benefits of Attracting Retirees

   Retirees are an attractive economic development strategy because they bring transfer income to the
    community. Each household is equivalent to 3.1 manufacturing jobs in its economic impact and the retiree
    households put comparatively little strain on the community resources and infrastructure particularly when
    contrasted to younger households with children.

   Many retirees contribute thousands of volunteer hours to their adopted communities and they spend their
    transfer income on goods and services in the community.




                                                                                                                     3
Executive Summary – Highlights of the Report
There are Four Primary Target Market Sectors for the Retiree Attraction Program
   Retiree households in the market area;
   Military retirees and veterans -- there are 48,266 military veterans in the Paso del Norte region who are 45+
    years of age. (Note: there are more than 78,000 military veterans in the region. That number includes
    veterans who are younger than 45 years of age.)
   UTEP alumni -- there are 22,879 UTEP alumni, not necessarily living in the area, estimated to be between
    the ages of 50 and 74 years.
   Travelers to the region – there are more than 30,000 visits to the region each year.


Evaluation of Migration Data
   Compared to other counties in the Southwestern region, El Paso County has negligible in-migration from
    other states.
   El Paso County has a positive net in-migration (in-migration – out-migration). The positive in-migration is
    totally a result of foreign households entering the county.
   El Paso County’s in-migration counted for 0.2 percent (two-tenths of 1 percent) of its total population
    growth.




                                                                                                                  4
Executive Summary – Demand for Active Adult and All-Age Housing
Estimates of Demand for Age-Qualified Active Adult Housing
   It is estimated that the annual demand for active adult housing in the Paso del Norte region for the year
    2007 (if active adult housing were to be marketed) is approximately 486 households. The demand increases
    to 583 households in 2011. This is the demand that will move to a new residence in a given year and likely
    to move to an active adult community (if one is available).
   A second estimation focused on demand for a ―destination‖ active adult community that would attract
    households from both within and beyond the market area. This estimate yielded an estimated demand for
    524 homes in an active adult community in 2007 and an annual demand for 645 homes in 2011. This would
    be in addition to the demand cited above.
   A third estimate of demand reveals there are probably 531 households who are 55 to 79 years of age in the
    Paso del Norte region who will move to a different residence in an all-age community and there are 417
    households (55 to 79 years of age with $50,000+ annual income) who may move to an all-age destination
    resort community in the Paso del Norte region annually.
   At present there is one single property with an active adult section (Sonoma Ranch) in the Paso del Norte
    region.


Conclusions
   The demand within the Paso del Norte area is sufficient to support development of active adult communities.
   The Retiree Attraction Program should augment the demand and should increase the opportunity for
    developers over time.
   The retired military and veterans populations and potential opportunities for development of a military-
    focused retirement community on or near the base should be very attractive to developers.
Executive Summary – Demand for Independent Living and Assisted Living
Estimates of Demand for Independent Living and Assisted Living Housing


   There are six properties in the Paso del Norte region that have independent living residences and services
    and 17 properties that offer assisted living services.
   El Paso County yields a total demand for 356 units of independent living housing beginning in 2007, with an
    excess of demand over supply (market opportunity) of approximately 197 units. Similarly, El Paso County
    has a total estimated demand of 447 assisted living residences with an unmet need of 251 residences. This
    is an attractive proportion of demand over supply.
   We must exercise caution when evaluating the demand for independent living and assisted living residences
    because we do not have data that reveals the extent to which these products are adopted by Hispanic
    households. According to the US Census (2006) 55 percent of the 55 to 74 year age group households in El
    Paso are Hispanic.
   The demand estimates for all forms of age-qualified housing suggest there is strong market opportunity.


Conclusions
   There is excess demand over supply for independent living and assisted living residences in El Paso County.
   If the Hispanic households adopt this housing product at the same rate as non-Hispanic households, there is
    significant opportunity for developing new independent and assisted living communities.
   The opportunity to develop a continuing care retirement community with Ft. Bliss should be explored
    aggressively. The military veteran market enhances the market opportunities in the area.
Executive Summary – The Implementation Program

The Implementation Program to Attract Retirees to the Paso del Norte Region

   A four year ―start up‖ retiree attraction program is outlined in the implementation plan. The program has a
    budget of roughly $176,000 that should extend through approximately an 18 month period.

   The program calls for a full-time Director and a paid part-time staff person to manage volunteers.

   We believe the program has a realistic goal of earning approximately 575 retiree households for the area
    within a four year period. It assumed that these households are moving to the area to live in conventional
    or age-qualified housing. Note: This is not existing demand, but rather demand captured from
    outside the market area because of the retiree attraction program. This estimate was developed
    assuming that an active adult community may or may not be developed within this time frame and that
    these retirees would be attracted to the Paso del Norte region because of its inherent benefits. This would be
    equivalent to 1,782 manufacturing jobs. If we assume the expenditure for the retiree attraction program is
    $125,000 per year for each of the four years for a total of $500,000, then the cost per equivalent
    manufacturing job is $281. The cost per retiree households is $869.

   It is estimated that the program could continue to attract 400+ households per year and should increase as
    friends tell friends to move to the region. Four hundred households at $50,000 annual household income (a
    conservative estimate) is $20,000,000 more funds being deposited and spent in the area each year. Four
    hundred retiree households per year is equivalent to 1,240 manufacturing jobs.

   The retirees have not yet found the Paso del Norte region. It is unlikely that this region will compete
    successfully without fully implementing the retiree attraction program.

   Retirees are a clean, lucrative, economically sound investment that contribute much more than money to
    the community. The Paso del Norte Region will be rewarded many times over for your decision to develop
    this industry.



                                                                                                                  7
Overview of the Report




                         8
Overview
       This report, provides a wide range of information and is intended to serve as a reference tool; an estimate
of the opportunity for active adult, independent living and assisted living housing; and, a plan to develop a
retiree attraction program.

      This report responds to the request for proposal from The Paso del Norte Group that solicited proposals for
a Feasibility Study for the Paso del Norte region to contain the following elements listed in the RFP:

  1.   What is Retirement? It is a word that is widely used and has come to mean so many things to different
       audiences. For the purposes of this study, what are the important retirement product segments and which
       segments are the most critical for stimulating growth for the region?

  2.   Current number of retirees in the region (Las Cruces, New Mexico, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico and El
       Paso County, Texas) to be broken down by community.

  3.   Documentation of recent (within the past 12 to 18 months) articles/periodicals relating to retirement for this
       region and the conclusions of them.

  4.   Determine if there are enough retirees (locally and/or regionally) at income levels sufficient to build and
       financially support planned retirement developments.

  5.   Strategies deployed in other US cities to recruit retirees, with short case studies that provide models and
       examples of other regions that have grown into important retirement regions.

  6.   Information that would help a local or out-of-town developer with basic information they would need to have
       in order to consider retirement community development. This might include such things as land costs and
       amenities for the retirement population.

  7.   Recommendations for regional and local-level incentives that could be provided to further stimulate retirement
       growth, with examples of long-term economic impact and value of a growing retirement market for the region.

  8.   Steps for implementation. If we can take a ten year approach, what are the most critical steps toward
       success in stimulating controlled and effective growth.


                                                                                                                     9
Scope of Report
Retiree Attraction Programs

      This report does not include an overview of other retiree attraction programs, but rather we used the
information that we gleaned from more than 16 communities that have some form of retiree attraction program and
from more than 110 municipalities and/or chambers that have a concentration of retirees, but do not have a specific
retiree attraction program to develop the program that is described as The Implementation Plan in Section 7.

      We have taken the best ideas we could find from all of the various programs and groups we interviewed and
studied. We believe we are delivering a comprehensive retiree attraction program that, if implemented, will help
shorten the time required to develop a retiree migration stream. It will require the collaboration and confluence of
many elements, however, to effect the program that will provide a measurable and noticeable influx of retirees to
the region.

The Right Language

     Retirees don’t just get up one morning and become a different person, nor decide that they are on the
downward slide of life. Rather, many get up and have a sense of freedom, excitement and anticipation that they
may not have experienced for decades, or perhaps ever. It is great to know that you have nothing to prove, but
everything at your disposal to learn, try, and enjoy.

      Retirees, those nearing retirement, and those just mildly thinking about retirement but perhaps looking for an
investment or a second home today are part of our target market. They should be thought of as customers, future
home buyers, tax payers, volunteers, crazy and fun people, prospective friends, people perhaps who will someday
invest in the community; and, folks with a history and a family, accomplishments, good days and bad – each with a
diverse past and dreams for the future. All are eager to get to know their new community and new friends, and for
their new community to get to know them. They don’t prefer to be labeled, particularly with ageist terms, like
seniors. We implore that you adopt from the beginning a language that is not ageist. Do not label any of the
prospective newcomers to your community with any term that has any meaning or implication related to age.


                                                                                                                10
 The Paso del Norte Region ….
                                Otero County 61,600



  The areas and population of
  the Paso del Norte region.                      El Paso County

                                                      723,300

Don Ana
County

189,900




            Cd Juarez

            1.6 million                                            11
Situation Analysis




                     12
Situation Analysis
      The situation analysis includes two primary areas: an analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) of the Paso del Norte region as a retirement destination and a comparison of
El Paso and/or the Paso del Norte region with other retirement destination areas.



In This Section

   SWOT Analysis
   Competitive retirement destinations and comparisons with El Paso and the Paso del Norte region




                                                                                                                13
Texas is the #2 Retiree Destination State in the US
      Texas attracted 6.8 percent of America’s migrant retirees in 2005 (Moos, 2007) according to migration
data analyzed by the National Center for Creative Retirement. Texas trailed behind Florida, but passed Arizona
and California in the number of retirees attracted to the state. In 2000, Texas had half as many retiree
households moving to the state than did Arizona (Texas 47,000 and Arizona 90,000).

       Many households are attracted to Texas because of the relatively low cost of living when compared to
California, Arizona and Florida.

        The Paso del Norte region, particularly the El Paso area has not seen a measurable influx of retirees. This
is likely a result of the lack of attention paid to this market sector because of the primary focus on military
personnel. It is not that retirees would not choose the Paso del Norte region, but rather it is that attracting this
market sector has not been on the radar screen and the infrastructure to capture this market has not been
developed.

       It is reasonable for the community to focus on Ft. Bliss, the primary driver of its economy, but it would be
wise for the Paso del Norte region to diversify its population base and economic drivers by recruiting a market
sector that will not necessarily be subject to a single commandment to increase the forces on the base, deploy
the forces or transfer sections of the base command to other areas. As the area has witnessed, these decisions
made far from the region have a significant impact on the region.




                                                                                                                   14
SWOT Analysis: Strengths
   Climate
         Temperate
         Low humidity

   Cost of living
          Low cost of housing
          Variety of entertainment at affordable prices
          Quality food and dining options at reasonable prices
          Medications available, particularly by crossing the border, at significantly lower prices than in the US

   Proximity to Mexico
         Access to another culture
         Access to low cost medications

   Low Crime (see crime rate comparisons in Competition)

   Mountains and mountain views

   Recreation Opportunities
         Hiking in Franklin Mountains
         Horse races at Sunland Park

   Culture is a blend of Hispanic and Old West

   Expansion of military presence at Ft. Bliss (increase of 20,000 military and 30,000 dependents)
         Increase in high tech sector jobs
         Increase in economy
         Increase in number of households who will call El Paso area home at least for a period of time

   Availability of fresh water and management of the fresh water supply (Broedehoeft, 2004)

   Availability of domestic assistance at reasonable rates




                                                                                                                      15
SWOT Analysis: Strengths

   Universities and Colleges – provide opportunities for households locating to the area and provide a source of
    households to return to this area upon retirement.
        University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP)
               The UTEP Center for Lifelong Learning Program has 40+ classes available for the 50+ individual
                with a modest membership and enrollment fee.
               UTEP has recently begun to focus on forming relationships with its alumni. The Alumni
                Association should be a key component of the Paso del Norte Retiree Attraction Plan.
               UTEP has almost 23,000 alumni between the ages of 50 and 79 years
        El Paso Community College has continuing education programs available and are identified as a part of
         a lifelong learning program
        Texas Tech Health Sciences Center Medical School will have advanced medical care and possible
         employment opportunities.

   The first four-year medical school on the U.S./Mexico border will graduate its first four year class in 2009
    and is expected to improve the local economy by $1.31 billion by the year 2013. TTUHSC at El Paso will also
    fill a niche in border and Hispanic health with leading research that will have a huge impact on the nation by
    contributing to literature dealing with Hispanics and diseases that affect the El Paso area – diabetes, obesity
    and depression (Hunt, 2006).
    El Paso is one of the first Texas cities to turn around its air quality

    profile, and one of the few U.S. cities to go from non-attainment to
    attainment for more than one pollutant, according to the Texas
    Commission on Environmental Quality. The Environmental
    Protection Agency (EPA) designated El Paso County as being in
    attainment for ozone under the new eight hour ozone standard as of
    June 15, 2004. On January 11, 2006, TCEQ commissioners also
    approved El Paso’s request to the EPA for carbon monoxide
    attainment status. The EPA is reviewing the request, which may
    take several months. El Paso remains in non-attainment for PM10
    (particulate matter of ten microns in size or smaller) (Hunt, 2006).
                                                                                                                 16
SWOT Analysis: Weaknesses
   Perception s of the region
         People within region have accepted the status of the region and may believe that the area cannot be improved.
         People outside of region know little about El Paso and have formed opinions based on it being a border town.

   Border town and proximity to Mexico

   Lack of knowledge about El Paso
         El Paso, and the other areas of the region are isolated and relatively forgotten by the rest of the state.

   Quality of neighborhoods in some areas
         Many neighborhoods particularly in the northeastern area have lower quality homes, lack amenities and have
          little if any green areas. They have a ghetto-like appearance. Even areas in designated historic districts do not
          have attractive streetscapes.
         Many streetscapes throughout the area lack aesthetic appeal in that businesses and/or homes may have a
          rundown, ill-kempt appearance. These may be next door to a nice home, adjacent to UTEP or in or near
          historical, central and/or the suburban areas of the city.

   Expansion of military presence at Ft. Bliss (increase of 20,000 military and 30,000 dependents)
        Construction worker shortage.
        Focus on entertainment for young families.

   Air quality in El Paso
         El Paso is classified as a non-attainment area, because El Paso fails to meet the Environmental Protection
          Agency's (EPA) Air Quality Standards for one pollutant: Particulate Matter.

   Employment opportunities for individuals with higher education are limited.

   Employers typically pay less in El Paso than in other areas


                                                                                                                          17
 Your Money Buys More in El Paso
       For the most part, the economy in El Paso means that household income goes farther than in many other
 retirement destination area communities in the region and in the US. In some instances, if someone preferred to
 work, it is possible that they would not have an economic gain in El Paso compared to places such as Riverside,
 California or San Antonio, Texas (two areas with military-focused retirement communities) because of the lower
 wages paid in El Paso.

   Comparison of Cost of Living in El Paso, Texas with Cost of Living in Selected Competitive Locations
                               Assume $50,000 Annual Income in El Paso
                                                         Net
                       Cost of                                                                            Net
                                      Income         Difference      Pay Scale        Comparable
                       Living                                                                         Difference
                                    Required to           in        Compared to        Salary (if
                     Compared                                                                              in
                                       Equal         Disposable       El Paso –       working) to
       City          to El Paso                                                                       Disposable
                                      $50,000        Income if       Employers         $50,000        Income if
                     More (+)        Income in        on Fixed      Pay More (+)      Salary in El     Working
                      Less (-)        El Paso         Income         or Less (-)         Paso
                                                                                                      In El Paso
                                                     In El Paso
Tucson, AZ            +16.4 %          $58,179         $8,179           +6.1%           $53,049         $5,130
Riverside, CA          +16.0%          $58,017         $8,017          +22.6%           $61,277        ($-3,259)
Ft. Myers, FL          +14.4%          $57,204         $7,204           +6.4%           $53,222         $3,982
Baton Rouge, LA        +11.1%          $55,525         $5,525           +7.6%           $53,797         $1,727
Reno, NV               +17.9%          $58,938         $8,938          +19.1%           $59,551         ($-612)
Las Cruces, NM         +13.0%          $56,500         $6,500           -2.6%           $48,676         $7,823
Santa Fe, NM           +23.4%          $61,700         $1,700           +8.4%           $54,200         $7,500
Albuquerque, NM        +11.8%          $55,904         $5,904           +7.8%           $53,912         $1,992
San Antonio, TX        +2.1%           $51,029         $1,029           +5.4%           $52,704        ($-1,675)

                                                  Source: http://swz.salary.com
                                                                                                             18
SWOT Analysis: Opportunities
   El Paso Downtown Revitalization Plan

   Collaboration among government, civic, business and military entities

   New Medical School

   Expansion of Ft. Bliss

   Old Beaumont Hospital site – this site is a perfect size, has significant views of the mountains and is a
    perfect location for a military retirement community. Given the significant number of veterans and military
    retirees in the region – this is an opportunity that should be exploited immediately.

   Military Retirees and Veterans

   UTEP Alumni




                                                                                                              19
SWOT Analysis: Threats
   Coming out of the shoot too soon – the region needs to develop its ―product‖ and put its program together
    carefully before launching into marketing. It is the experience that people have when they arrive that
    dictates whether or not they will move.

   Not implementing the plan

   Backlash of illegal immigrant controversy

   Threats from other retirement destination locations (the competition)
        Markets that have developed retirement destination active adult communities will have a built-in,
         word-of-mouth migration stream developed that will be challenging.




                                                                                                                20
        Competition
Other Retirement Destinations
Retirement Destination Ratings

       Ranking among the top retirement destinations or cities is a coveted position because it brings visibility
and web-site traffic to the towns that make the grade. There are no specific criteria to be identified as a
retirement destination and part of the trick of being listed is catching the attention of the organization’s editors
writing the articles and preparing the list of top retirement destinations. Money Magazine and US News and
World Report are three organizations that rank top retirement destinations each year. AARP has listed
communities in the past (2003), but does not provide an annual ranking.
       The rankings are usually based on the weather, healthcare services, cost of housing, recreational and
cultural activities, size of the community, and crime statistics.
    US News and World Report
         Weather
               Temperature
               Humidity
         Healthcare (ease of access to healthcare)
         Cost of housing
         Social environment
               City or rural living
               Age group
               Near college or university
         Recreational & cultural activities
               Recreational (golf, sailing and boating, fishing, swimming, physical fitness and exercise)
               Adult/continuing education, charity and volunteer, religious worship, cultural & arts events
         Crime
Towns in Three States Listed in US News & World Reports
Best Places to Retire in 2007              Texas                         New Mexico      Arizona
                                      Alvin            Lewisville       Alamogordo    Casas Adobes
      US News & World Reports         Amarillo         Longview         Carlsbad      Catalina
identified 1,000 cities, towns and    Angleton         Lubbock          Las Cruces    Foothills
neighborhoods as retiree friendly.    Arlington        Mansfield        Rio Rancho    Chandler
Fifty-seven communities in Texas,                      McKinney                       Flagstaff
                                      Atascocita                        Santa Fe
five communities in New Mexico                         Midland                        Fountain Hills
                                      Austin
and twenty-two communities in
                                      Bedford          Nederland                      Glendale
Arizona made the list.
                                      Benbrook         North Richland                 Green Valley
      The common attribute            Burleson         Hills                          Lake Havasu
among most of the communities         Canyon Lake      Pearland                       City
that were identified as best places                    Plano                          Marana
                                      Carrollton
to retire is the cost of housing.                      Portland                       Mesa
                                      Deer Park
                                      Denton           Richardson                     Oro Valley
                                      Dickinson        Rockwall                       Peoria
                                      El Paso          Rowlett                        Prescott
                                      Euless           Saginaw                        Prescott Valley
                                      Farmers Branch   San Angelo                     Scottsdale
                                      Friendswood      Schertz                        Sierra Vista
                                      Georgetown       Spring                         Sun City
                                      Grand Prairie    Stafford                       Sun Lakes
                                      Grapevine        Sugar Land                     Tanque Verde
                                      Groves           Temple                         Tempe
                                      Huntsville       The Woodlands                  Yuma
                                      Hurst            Tyler
                                      Irving           Universal City
                                      Keller           Victoria
                                      Lake Jackson     Watauga
                                      La Porte         Waxahachie
                                      League City      Weatherford
                                                       Wichita Falls
El Paso’s Listing in US News & World Report
El Paso, Texas
This city is the site of the world’s largest equestrian bronze statue.
Climate
       Desert weather and over 305 days of sunshine per year are typical in ―Sun City.‖
Cultural Attractions
       The city boasts the University of Texas-El Paso as well as many historical sites, including the Mission Ysleta,
             Camino Real, and Concordia Cemetery.
Geography
       El Paso sits in the Franklin Mountains, along the Rio Grande and the Mexican border.
Historical
       The Mission Ysleta was used as a Pueblo Indian refugee camp in 1675 and is the oldest continuously used
             church in the United States.
Recreation
       El Paso’s Franklin Mountains State Park is the nation’s largest urban park, while Juarez, Mexico, is just across
             the border.
Location Details
Weather : Average January high/low temperature 57.2° / 32.9°. Average July high/low temperature 94.5° / 72°.
     Precipitation 9.43 in./yr. Index score for various storm types: 13.
Cost of Living: Median home price $140,980; Median household income $32,655. Maximum state income tax N/A.
     State sales tax is 8.25%.
Recreational & Cultural Activities: Area of square miles of parkland/greenspace is 22.03 mi.². Number of public
     golf courses within the county 4. Number of private golf courses within the county 5. Number of sports teams
     within the county 0. Number of movie theaters within the county 14. Number of libraries within the county 16.
     Number of museums within the county 11. Number of college and universities that reside within the county 1.
Population & Demographics: Total population 598,590. Population density 2,347 people/mi.². Population trends
     (Percentage growth/decline of the 55+ population) 41.2% growth. Population over 55 is 119,829. Education
     20 % have a college degree.
Health: Number of hospitals within the county 31. Number of clinics within the county 187. Number of elder care
     facilities within the county 19.
Las Cruces, New Mexico Listing in US News & World Report
Las Cruces, New Mexico
This city is home to New Mexico State University.
Climate
       Las Cruces enjoys hot summers and mild winters, with 350 days of sunshine.
Cultural Attractions
       Las Cruces and the surrounding area is home to over 40 art galleries and a number of museums that focus
            on the Mesilla Valley.
Geography
       The city sits in the Mesilla Valley on the edge of the Chihuahuan Desert along the Rio Grande River.
Historical
       The Smithsonian Institution declared "the world's best-fossilized footprints from the Permian Period" to be
            those found in town in the late 1980s by a local paleontologist.
Recreation
       The city hosts the annual Southern New Mexico Wine Festival, celebrating the many wineries in the area.

Location Details
Weather: Average January high/low temperature: 56.8° / 21.1°. Average July high/low temperature: 94.9°
    /62.5°. Precipitation: 11.44 in. /yr. Index score for various storm types: 9.
Cost of Living: Median home price $184,870; Median household income $37,263. Maximum state income tax
    5.3%; State sales tax 7.13% .
Recreational & Cultural Activities: Area of square miles of parkland/greenspace N/A. Number of public golf
    courses within the county 4. Number of private golf courses within the county 3. Number of sports teams
    within the county 0. Number of movie theaters within the county 4. Number of libraries within the county
    7. Number of museums within the county 12. Number of college and universities that reside within the
    county 1.
Population & Demographics : Total population 82,671. Population density 996 people/mi.². Population trends
    (Percentage growth/decline of the 55+ population) 53.8% growth. Population over 55 18,500 people.
    Education 24% have a college degree.
Health: Number of hospitals within the county 6; Number of clinics within the county 38; Number of elder care
    facilities within the county 9.
Top 25 Places to Retire Based on Home Sale Price
Money Magazine 2007
Rank    Town                     Median home sale price in 2006
1       Northbrook, OH           $ 83,760
2       Blacklick Estates, OH    $ 83,480         Money magazine provides a web-site with a search
3       Tonawanda, NY            $ 74,878   capability. Prospective movers can search for their ideal
                                            retirement destination by any of the criteria. This listing
4       Shiloh, OH               $ 79,722
                                            demonstrates that if the household focuses solely on cost
5       West Mifflin, PA         $ 81,113   of housing, the search will not identify El Paso as one of
6       North College Hill, OH   $ 80,761   the top 25 municipalities.
7       Maple Heights, OH        $ 84,597
8       Kenmore, NY              $ 93,413         The following six pages list municipalities by
                                            ascending home sales price. These results reveal that 43
9       Penn Hills, PA           $ 84,915
                                            out of the 79 municipalities with the lowest home prices
10      Brentwood, PA            $ 86,878
                                            are in the northern tier of the US. Fifteen of the 79
11      Depew, NY                $ 90,149   municipalities with the lowest home prices are in Texas.
12      Irmo, SC                 $119,000
13      Corning, NY              $ 83,198         El Paso is listed as 62nd relative to the home sales
                                            price, but it is 157th relative to the affordability of the
14      Lancaster, NY            $ 98,883
                                            homes. Affordability takes into consideration the median
15      Bellevue, OH             $ 91,322   household income and the proportion of the population
16      Gates-North Gates, NY    $ 99,612   who would be able to afford the homes being sold at the
17      Cheektowaga, NY          $ 88,239   median homes sales price. Because wages in El Paso are
18      Cheviot, OH              $ 92,038   low, El Paso has a relatively low ranking in the Housing
19      Boardman, OH             $103,175   Opportunity Index.
20      Lincoln Park, MI         $ 96,579
21      Melvindale, MI           $ 90,302
22      Storm Lake, IA           $ 85,830   What this means. El Paso and the Paso del Norte region
23      Garfield Heights, OH     $ 93,116   will have to compete as much on the other merits of the
                                            area as on the cost of housing.
24      Kokomo, IN               $ 87,148
25      Harper Woods, MI         $110,486
Housing Opportunity Index Sorted by Median Sales Price -1

             Housing Opportunity Index: 2nd Quarter 2007 By Affordability Rank
                                           HOI 2nd Qtr 2007    2007    2nd Qtr 2007      2nd Qtr 2007
     Metro Area                            Share of Homes     Median     Median          Affordability
                                            Affordable for    Family      Sales              Rank
                                           Median Income      Income      Price       National   Regional
                                                              (000s)      (000s)
1    Utica-Rome, NY                              78.8          52.4        82           33          6
2    Bay City, MI                                90.0          54.4        84            2          2
3    Lima, OH                                    86.3          51.4        85            9          9
4    Springfield, OH                             87.0          52.5        87            7          7
5    Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA           85.9          51.4        87           11          11
6    Battle Creek, MI                            84.4          52.8        88           14          12
7    Saginaw-Saginaw Township North, MI          87.5          52.3        89            5          5
8    Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY                   84.8          59.3        89           13          1
9    Mansfield, OH                               87.7          52.1        90            4          4
10   Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, IA-IL         87.4          57.2        90            6          6
11   Binghamton, NY                              80.0          52.8        90           30          5
12   Cumberland, MD-WV                           85.2          46.6        91           12          1
13   Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, MI                86.0          53.8        92           10          10
 Housing Opportunity Index Sorted by Median Sales Price -2

                 Housing Opportunity Index: 2nd Quarter 2007 By Affordability Rank
                                  HOI 2nd Qtr 2007    2007    2nd Qtr 2007       2nd Qtr 2007
     Metro Area                   Share of Homes     Median     Median           Affordability
                                   Affordable for    Family      Sales               Rank
                                   Median Income     Income      Price       National    Regional
                                                     (000s)      (000s)
14   Syracuse, NY                       81.0          58.7        95           22            2
15   Kokomo, IN                         90.9          59.7        96            1            1
16   Erie, PA                           80.8          53.9        96           24            4
17   Wichita Falls, TX                  72.8          49.2        104          52           11
18   Sherman-Denison, TX                80.1          52.7        105          28            2
19   Canton-Massillon, OH               84.2          53.0        106          16           14
20   Brownsville-Harlingen, TX          38.4          30.0        107          132          54
21   Dayton, OH                         83.0          58.7        108          19           17
22   Sandusky, OH                       81.5          55.4        108          21           19
23   San Angelo, TX                     76.7          49.1        108          38            4
24   Lansing-East Lansing, MI           89.8          64.0        109           3            3
25   Flint, MI                          80.6          57.2        109          25           20
26   Toledo, OH                         83.1          57.6        111          18           16
27   Elizabethtown, KY                  79.3          50.6        116          32            3
Housing Opportunity Index Sorted by Median Sales Price -3

              Housing Opportunity Index: 2nd Quarter 2007 By Affordability Rank
                                   HOI 2nd Qtr 2007    2007    2nd Qtr 2007      2nd Qtr 2007
     Metro Area                    Share of Homes     Median     Median          Affordability
                                    Affordable for    Family      Sales              Rank
                                    Median Income     Income      Price       National   Regional
                                                      (000s)      (000s)
28   Rochester, NY                       78.2          62.0        116          35           7
29   Peoria, IL                          81.6          61.8        118          20          18
30   Akron, OH                           78.1          60.3        118          36          26
31   Kalamazoo-Portage, MI               80.1          58.9        119          28          23
32   Oklahoma City, OK                   75.5          53.6        119          43           5
33   Rockford, IL                        79.8          58.6        120          31          24
34   Duluth, MN-WI                       77.6          55.5        120          37          27
35   Pittsburgh, PA                      74.6          57.9        120          46           8
36   Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI            84.3          59.1        121          15          13
37   Indianapolis-Carmel, IN             86.8          63.8        122           8           8
38   Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, OH         78.7          60.7        122          34          25
39   Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX            62.7          50.2        122          68          23
40   Victoria, TX                        62.9          48.8        123          67          22
Housing Opportunity Index Sorted by Median Sales Price -4
              Housing Opportunity Index: 2nd Quarter 2007 By Affordability Rank
                                          HOI 2nd Qtr 2007    2007    2nd Qtr 2007      2nd Qtr 2007
     Metro Area                           Share of Homes     Median     Median          Affordability
                                           Affordable for    Family      Sales              Rank
                                          Median Income      Income      Price       National   Regional
                                                             (000s)      (000s)
41   Waco, TX                                   64.5          50.4        124          63          19
42   Fayetteville, NC                           66.3          47.5        126          61          17
43   Amarillo, TX                               60.9          49.4        128          77          27
44   Tulsa, OK                                  72.4          52.5        129          54          13
45   Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN         74.9          57.5        130          44           6
46   Chattanooga, TN-GA                         73.0          53.4        130          50          10
47   St. Louis, MO-IL                           76.1          63.3        132          41          30
48   Elkhart-Goshen, IN                         80.3          56.5        133          26          21
48   Birmingham-Hoover, AL                      72.7          55.5        133          53          12
50   Pueblo, CO                                 69.2          48.0        134          57           1
51   Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN            76.5          63.6        135          39          28
52   Wichita, KS                                72.9          56.6        135          51          33
53   Springfield, IL                            70.9          63.7        135          55          34
Housing Opportunity Index Sorted by Median Sales Price -5
                 Housing Opportunity Index: 2nd Quarter 2007 By Affordability Rank
                                     HOI 2nd Qtr 2007    2007    2nd Qtr 2007      2nd Qtr 2007
     Metro Area                      Share of Homes     Median     Median           Affordability
                                      Affordable for    Family      Sales               Rank
                                     Median Income      Income      Price       National    Regional
                                                        (000s)      (000s)
54   Greensboro-High Point, NC             74.4          53.6        136          47            8
55   Champaign-Urbana, IL                  75.7          60.6        138          42           31
56   Columbus, OH                          76.4          64.2        140          40           29
57   Columbia, SC                          73.7          58.2        140          49            9
58   Memphis, TN-MS-AR                     64.5          53.2        140          63           19
59   Winston-Salem, NC                     74.7          56.1        141          45            7
60   Harrisburg-Carlisle, PA               80.9          65.6        142          23            3
61   Knoxville, TN                         70.3          54.8        142          56           14
62   El Paso, TX                           29.1          36.5        143          157          63
63   Monroe, MI                            84.1          68.7        144          17           15
64   Pocatello, ID                         63.7          49.7        148          65            2
65   Greenville-Mauldin-Easley, SC         66.5          52.9        150          58           15
66   Tyler, TX                             56.6          50.9        150          87           30
Housing Opportunity Index Sorted by Median Sales Price -6
              Housing Opportunity Index: 2nd Quarter 2007 By Affordability Rank
                                        HOI 2nd Qtr 2007    2007    2nd Qtr 2007      2nd Qtr 2007
     Metro Area                         Share of Homes     Median     Median          Affordability
                                         Affordable for    Family      Sales               Rank
                                        Median Income      Income      Price       National   Regional
                                                           (000s)      (000s)
67   Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton, NJ         56.6          55.8        150          87           14
68   Corpus Christi, TX                       40.6          45.8        150          129          53
69   Fort Worth-Arlington, TX                 64.6          60.5        153          62           18
70   Great Falls, MT                          58.2          50.2        153          81           6
71   Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, MI         80.2          76.4        155          27           22
72   Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, FL           61.2          52.5        158          75           26
73   College Station-Bryan, TX                47.7          51.0        159          113          44
74   Ocala, FL                                43.3          42.7        160          121          47
75   San Antonio, TX                          48.9          53.7        164          105          39
76   Tallahassee, FL                          63.3          58.2        165          66           21
77   Yuma, AZ                                 34.5          40.7        171          143          16
78   Lancaster, PA                            66.4          64.0        172          60           9
79   Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX           48.8          57.3        173          107          40
   Taxes

                   State Individual Income Taxes (Tax rates for tax year 2007 - as of January 1, 2007)

Top 10 States                  Tax Rates             # of              Income Brackets                          Personal Exemption
65+Population                                      Brackets
                             Low        High                           Low                High           Single        Married        Children
California (a)               1.0      9.3 (w)           6           6,622 (b)        43,468 (b)          91(c)          182 (c)       285 (c)
Florida                                                                  No State Income Tax
New York                     4.0        6.85            5           8,000 (b)        20,000 (b)             0              0              1,000
Texas                                                                    No State Income Tax
Pennsylvania                3.07                        1                     Flat rate                                 None
Ohio (a)                    0.649      6.555            9             5,000            200,000         1,400 (p)      2,800 (p)      1,400 (p)
Illinois                     3.0                        1                     Flat rate                  2,000           4,000            2,000
Michigan (a)                 3.9                        1                     Flat rate                  3,300           6,600            3,300
New Jersey                   1.4        8.97            6            20,000            500,000           1,000           2,000            1500
North Carolina (n)           6.0         8.0            4          12,750 (n)        120,000 (n)       3,400 (d)      6,800 (d)      3,400(d)
  a. 17 states have statutory provision for automatic adjustment of tax brackets, personal exemption or standard deductions to the rate
     of inflation.
  b. For joint returns, the taxes are twice the tax imposed on half of the income.
  c. Tax credits.
  d. These states allow personal exemption or standard deductions as provided in the IRC. Utah allows a personal exemption equal to
     three-fourths the federal exemptions.
  n. The tax brackets reported are for single individuals. For married taxpayers, the same rates apply to income brackets ranging from
     $21,250 to $200,000. Lower exemption amounts allowed for high income taxpayers. Tax rate scheduled to decrease after tax year
     2007.
  p. Plus an additional $20 per exemption tax credit.
  w. An additional 1% tax is imposed on taxable income over $1 million.

                                                                                                                                          33
     Taxes
                          State Individual Income Taxes (Tax rates for tax year 2007 - as of January 1, 2007)

    Top 10 with                    Tax Rates                               Income Brackets                        Personal Exemption
                                                        # of
 Population over 65
                                                      Brackets
 compared to Texas            Low         High                           Low                 High           Single         Married        Children
Texas                       No State Income Tax
Florida                     No State Income Tax
Pennsylvania                  3.07                         1                     Flat rate                                 None
West Virginia                  3           6.5             5            10,000           60,000             2,000           4,000          2,000

Iowa (a)                      .36         8.98             9            1,343            60,436             40 (c)          80 (c)         40 (c)
North Dakota (a)              2.1       5.54 (o)           5          30,650 (o)       336,550 (o)        3,400 (d)       6,800 (d)      3,400 (d)
Rhode Island                25.0% Federal tax Liability
Maine (a)                     2.0          8.5             4          4,550 (b)        18,250 (b)           2,850           5,700          2,850
South Dakota                No State Income Tax
Arkansas (a)                  1.0        7.0 (e)           6            3,599            30,100             22 (c)           44 (c)         22 (c)

Connecticut                   3.0          5.0             2          10,000 (b)       10,000 (b)        12,750 (f)        24,500 (f)          0

a.   17 states have statutory provision for automatic adjustment of tax brackets, personal exemption or standard deductions to the rate of inflation.
b.   For joint returns, the taxes are twice the tax imposed on half of the income.
c.   Tax credits.
d.   These states allow personal exemption or standard deductions as provided in the IRC. Utah allows a personal exemption equal to three-fourths
     the federal exemptions.
e.   A special tax table is available for low income taxpayers reducing their tax payments.
f.   Combined personal exemptions and standard deduction. An additional tax credit is allowed ranging form 75% to 0% based on state adjusted
     gross income.
o.   The tax brackets reported are for single individuals. For married taxpayers the same rates apply to income tax brackets ranging from 51,200 to
     336,551.
s.   Federal tax liability prior to the enactment of Economic Growth and Tax Relief Act of 2001.
                                                                                                                                             34
Crime Rate Comparison El Paso and Santa Fe
Crime Rate per 100,000 People




                  http://www.areaconnect.com/crime/compare.htm
                  Crime data are from 2005 FBI Crime Statistics
                  Formula used for chart: ((Crimes Reported) / (Population)) X 100,000)
                  Chart shown is a statistical comparison of the crime rates per 100,000 people.
Crime Rate Comparison El Paso and Horizon City
Crime Rate per 100,000 People




                            http://www.areaconnect.com/crime/compare.htm
                            Crime data are from 2005 FBI Crime Statistics
                            Formula used for chart: ((Crimes Reported) / (Population)) X 100,000)
                            Chart shown is a statistical comparison of the crime rates per 100,000 people.
Crime Rate Comparison El Paso and San Antonio
Crime Rate per 100,000 People




                            http://www.areaconnect.com/crime/compare.htm
                            Crime data are from 2005 FBI Crime Statistics
                            Formula used for chart: ((Crimes Reported) / (Population)) X 100,000)
                            Chart shown is a statistical comparison of the crime rates per 100,000 people.
Crime Rate Comparison El Paso and Las Cruces
Crime Rate per 100,000 People




                            http://www.areaconnect.com/crime/compare.htm
                            Crime data are from 2005 FBI Crime Statistics
                            Formula used for chart: ((Crimes Reported) / (Population)) X 100,000)
                            Chart shown is a statistical comparison of the crime rates per 100,000 people.
Crime Rate Comparison El Paso and Phoenix
Crime Rate per 100,000 People




                            http://www.areaconnect.com/crime/compare.htm
                            Crime data are from 2005 FBI Crime Statistics
                            Formula used for chart: ((Crimes Reported) / (Population)) X 100,000)
                            Chart shown is a statistical comparison of the crime rates per 100,000 people.
Comparison of El Paso to Areas Often Thought of as Retirement Destinations
Many areas identified as retirement destinations are smaller cities and towns. Despite being a larger city, El
Paso compares favorably with many smaller areas and is superior to other large communities often thought
to be retirement areas - particularly related to housing values, climate, health, and personal safety.
Tourism Creates Movers

     Tourism and retiree migration are symbiotic. If the                Top Ten States for Inquiries
volume of one increases so does the other.                               About Tourism in El Paso
     The El Paso Convention and Visitors Bureau                                            Number of
captured data from 20,590 visitors to El Paso in the 12          Name of State
                                                                                           Inquiries
month period between September 1, 2006 and August
                                                             Texas                           11,907
31, 2007. More than half of the visitors (11,907) are
from Texas. Four of the other top 10 states contributing     California                       1,583
the most visitors to El Paso are in the southern tier (CA,
FL, OK and NM), three are from the northeast (NY, PA         Florida                          1,291
and OH) and one is in the Midwest (IL).
                                                             Illinois                         1,011
     The Convention and Visitors Bureau handled
33,729 inquiries about El Paso in the 12 month time          New York                         974
period. The fourth largest source for inquiries (3,019
leads) was from advertisements in the AARP magazine.         Oklahoma                         843

                                                             Pennsylvania                     839

                                                             Ohio                             780

                                                             New Mexico                       766

                                                             Louisiana                        750

                                                             Source: El Paso Convention and Visitors Bureau




                                                                                                         41
Preferences of Retirees and Future Retirees




                                              42
Who are Retirees?
      It is somewhat easy to define people
who are retired, because retirement is the
period of time when one is not gainfully
employed. The greatest proportion of
individuals who are retired are 65+ years of
age. Approximately 50 percent of the middle
American households between 55 and 64
years of age work either full or part-time.
Fifteen percent of the individuals 65 to 74
years of age and 7 percent who are 75+ years
of age continue to work.

       The Term Retirees May Limit the
Market Potential. It may be somewhat risky
using the term ―retirees‖ to refer to the
households targeted by the ―retiree attraction
program.‖ The program should target
households who are of any age who have
sufficient wealth to purchase a retirement
home and/or to purchase a second home (or
third) as a vacation home and perhaps as a
future retirement home.

       The goal is to attract households of some
means to spend time and money in the Paso
del Norte region. Some may do this by
moving to the region permanently and others
may purchase a second or vacation home and Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328
visit periodically.                              households. Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of
                                                 $50,000 or higher and households 65+ years of age had incomes of
                                                 $30,000 or higher.                                          43
Why Retirees are Targeted

       Retirees with middle incomes or higher are targeted in the retiree attraction program because they offer
the greatest opportunity for economic growth, and increase in retail and property tax base. These households
typically own at least one home and have some form of retirement income that may be supplemented by part-
time employment and social security (for those who are 62+ years of age).



Specific benefits realized by communities that target 50+ households include:
      Increase in retail and property tax base
      Increase in taxpayers with little drain on community services
      Increase in bank deposits
      Increase in retail sales
      Increase in local expertise
      Increase in volunteers and contributors in churches and local service organizations
      Increase in tourism
      Increase in households who can afford to pay for their healthcare




                                                                                                                  44
Why the 55+ for Economic Development?


Why Retirees?

     Retirees are targeted because as a group
they have many more positive attributes than
negative attributes when compared to other
economic development initiatives and when
compared to other target market sectors.



    55+ in-migration households are a clean
     business
    One 55+ in-migration retiree household is
     equivalent to 3.1 factory jobs
    Households who move at retirement
     typically have higher incomes and greater
     wealth
    Households who move are typically more
     educated than non-movers




                                                 Source for Wages: www.elpasoredco.org
                                                                                     45
Households with Higher Incomes
have Completed More Education
       Targeting households with higher incomes means increasing the base of households with higher
educational achievement. Typically households with more education support economic initiatives to support
public schools.




                                      Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                                      Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                                      households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.
                                                                                                            46
Home Ownership is High Among Middle Americans

     Home ownership is strong among all middle American households, but it increases slightly with
educational level.




                          Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                          Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                          households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.              47
Mobility of 55+ Households




         Today, more than in the past, a higher
  percentage of middle American households say
  they are likely to move from their home some
  day. The proportion who are likely to move
  will increase as more baby boomers move into
  their ―retirement‖ years because boomers
  have been more mobile than their parents.




Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328
households. Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of
$50,000 or higher and households 65+ years of age had incomes of
$30,000 or higher.


                                                                   48
Mobility of 55+ Households

     Approximately 7 percent of the 50 to 64 year age group households (of all incomes) move in a given
year. The proportion decreases by age up to about 70 years and then remains at slightly above 4 percent
who move per year.




                             Source: US Census, American Housing Survey, 2004                             49
Likelihood of Moving in the Future

     The proportion who are likely to move will increase as more baby boomers move into their ―retirement‖
years because boomers have been more mobile than their parents.

       Boomers are less likely to be attached to their homes than their parents or their grandparents. Boomers,
on average, have owned already in their lifetime as many homes as their grandparents owned in their entire
lifetime. Both groups – those in the GI Generation and Boomers have owned during their lifetimes three
homes.




                               Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                               Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                               households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.
                                                                                                                  50
Where People Move
      Most migrants move to a home within their same county (53 percent). A little more than one-fifth move
to a different county in the same state and 24 percent move to a different state. Two percent move to a
foreign country. These data, which are from the US Census include households of all incomes. Households
with higher incomes are twice as likely to move to another country than households with lower incomes.




                                        Source: US Census, American Housing Survey, 2004

                                                                                                              51
Where People Move by Age
      Higher proportions of households move between the ages of 60 and 64 and between the ages of 80 to
84 than other age groups. These moves are likely related to young retirees moving to a retirement
destination in their early 60’s and moving to be closer to family or back to their native community when they
are in their 80’s.




                               Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                               Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                               households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.                    52
Number of Miles Moved by Middle Americans by
Age Group


        Households headed by someone
between 45 and 74 years of age are more
likely to move distances greater than
households headed by someone 75+ years
of age.

      The proportion who move fewer than
20 miles increases with age. Forty-five
percent of the 45 to 54 year age group
compared to 63 percent of the 75+ age
group moved less than 20 miles.

      These proportions are used in
estimating the numbers of households that
may be attracted from other market areas.




                            Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                            Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                            households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.           53
Location of Home
      Where people want to live is fairly evenly distributed across the types of locations from urban to rural areas
in the country. Younger households are more likely to prefer a more rural environment than households in their
80’s. Households whose head is 80+ years of age living in a rural area are more likely to move to a small town or
suburb to be closer to services, shopping and other amenities.




                              Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                              Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                              households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.
                                                                                                                 54
Tenure in Residence

      Households who have lived in their homes for shorter periods of time are more likely to move from their
homes than those who have lived in their homes for 20 years or more. Boomers have been more mobile than
their parents and will be more likely to move in future years because their attachment to the home will not be
as strong.




                        Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                        Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                        households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.                            55
Mean Home Value
     The mean home value of middle American households is $300,736 (September 2006). This value
suggests that on average, the middle American household would be able to afford a home in the Paso del
Norte region.




                           Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                           Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                           households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.                 56
Middle American Retirees Among 45+ Age Group

      Half of the individuals who are 45+ years of age in the middle or higher income categories are retired.
The time period around retirement (before, during and after) are the years when households start to explore
where they might move and purchase second and/or retirement homes.




                             Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                             Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                             households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.
                                                                                                                57
Golf Course or a View of the Mountains?


       Despite the belief that most
households want to live on a golf
course, the results of the 2006 study
of preferences of where movers
wanted to live revealed that living on a
green space or having a view of green
space or having a view of the
mountains was desired by 16 times the
number of survey respondents than
those who said they wanted to live on
the golf course or have a view of a golf
course.

       Developers in the Paso del Norte
region need to plan communities so
that the home owners will have a view
of the mountains. If they can’t have a
view of the mountains, then they need
a view of a green area.




                              Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                              Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                              households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.
                                                                                                      58
Households are More Likely to Prefer a
Conventional Neighborhood to a Master Planned Community

      The majority of home buyers prefer a home in a traditional neighborhood as opposed to a home in a
master planned community. These proportions are likely to change over time as more master planned
communities are developed across the country. The point is, however, that many of the households moving
to the Paso del Norte region will be happy to purchase an existing home in an older neighborhood instead of a
new home in a planned 55+ community.




                               Source: ProMatura Group, LLC 2006. From a survey of 6,328 households.
                               Households 45 to 64 years of age had incomes of $50,000 or higher and
                               households 65+ years of age had incomes of $30,000 or higher.
                                                                                                                59
Attributes of Homes and Communities that Rated 5 or 6
on a 6-point Scale of Desirability

        Baby Boomers between the ages of 50 and 60 years of age don’t necessarily want the same thing.
 Almost two-thirds want everything they need on a single floor and an energy efficient home. Some prefer to
 live in a college town (30 percent) while others prefer to live in an urban center area (26 percent).
      A smaller proportion have a strong preference to live in an age-qualified community (13 percent).
       The Paso del Norte region is not hampered by not having an age-qualified community – at this time. A
 destination community would provide greater visibility to the area because the developer would market the
 community in variety of media outlets to attract prospective customers to the development. Marketing the
 development is also marketing the area.

        Percent Who Rated the Attributes of the Home or Community as a 5 or 6 on a 6-Point Scale
                              Where the “6” Was of Highest Importance
Characteristic                                                                                                   Percent
Having everything you want or need on one floor                                                                    66 %
Energy-efficient home                                                                                              65 %
Maintenance service for home that includes exterior upkeep, landscaping                                            54 %
A ―green‖ environmentally friendly home                                                                            51 %
Being within walking distance of food store, restaurants                                                           43 %
Living in a college town                                                                                           30 %
Living in downtown or urban center where you have access to the arts, culture, restaurants,
                                                                                                                   26 %
entertainment, sporting events
Living in a community that only has people your age or at your life stage                                          13 %

                      Source: Hanley Wood, 2006 – quantitative survey of 2,000 baby boomers who are between 50 and 60
                      years of age with household incomes of $100,000 or higher.
                                                                                                                        60
The Benefits of Active Adult Housing
Vehicles Per Household by Age of Household Head




        Households headed by someone 55
 to 64 years of age have slightly fewer
 vehicles per household than those 35 to 54
 years of age, but households headed by
 someone 75 years of age and older have
 approximately 20 percent fewer vehicles
 per household.

         Additionally, 55+ households are
 significantly less likely to travel on
 roadways during morning and evening
 commute times. If they don’t have to
 travel at those times, they don’t.




                                              Source: Emrath, P., Approving Seniors Housing: Facts That
                                              Matter. Builderbooks.com, National Association of Home
                                              Builders, 1201 15th Street NW, Washington, DC 2005-2800




                                                                                                      61
  The Benefits of Active Adult Housing
  Low Crime Rates




        Households headed by someone 55
years of age and older are significantly less
likely to be involved in crime. As age
increases, the number of arrests per 1,000
individuals decreases.




                                                Source: Emrath, P., Approving Seniors Housing: Facts That
                                                Matter. Builderbooks.com, National Association of Home
                                                Builders, 1201 15th Street NW, Washington, DC 2005-2800




                                                                                                            62
The Benefits of Active Adult Housing
Low Use of Community Resources




Less Impact on Water and Sewer
Services

      Local governments spend less
on water and sewer services for
residential developments that are
age-qualified or age-targeted than
they do on average households.

      The simple explanation is that
there are fewer people in the
household.




                                       Source: Emrath, P., Approving Seniors Housing: Facts That
                                       Matter. Builderbooks.com, National Association of Home
                                       Builders, 1201 15th Street NW, Washington, DC 2005-2800




                                                                                                   63
Growth in Active Adult Housing in the United States

        There are no censuses of active adult housing in the United States, with the exception of age-qualified
 senior apartments that are tracked by the American Seniors Housing Association. It is difficult to determine
 the number of active adult housing units and to monitor the growth of this sector of the industry for a variety
 of reasons.


1.    Active adult housing developments that provide single-family homes are not monitored by any of the trade
      associations and are not required to register with any governmental agency. Consequently, there is not a
      central repository for information about active adult housing in the U.S.
2.    Active adult housing developments range in size from as few as a dozen or so homes up to as many as
      23,000 homes. Small builders of active adult properties, often do not advertise and simply sell their age-
      targeted homes by word of mouth.
3.    Many developers, particularly those who develop age-targeted housing that is not in compliance with the
      Housing for Older Persons Act, do not use terms such as, active adult, 55+, age-qualified, or retirement
      community when promoting their product.
4.    Age-targeted housing communities avoid using terms that define them as being for persons who are 55
      years of age and older, even though that is the market they are trying to attract. Sometimes these
      developments can be identified via the words used to market them, such as carefree living, maintenance-
      free housing, ranch-style homes and lifestyle communities.
5.    Often when many, if not most, of the active developments sell all of their homes, the central amenities are
      deeded to the homeowners association and the builder no longer markets the property. Thus, there is
      often not a central telephone number associated with the community, the community is not listed in the
      yellow pages directory for the area, and homes are sold by individual realtors or by the homeowners.




                                                                                                                   64
 Directories of Active Adult Housing

      There are two directories of active adult housing in the US that are fairly complete relative to the
properties that are presently selling homes. These directories are:

     The National Directory of Lifestyle Communities, 2005, published by Parks Development Consulting, Inc.,
      8912 East Pinnacle Peak, Suite 459, Scottsdale, AZ 85255. This directory lists 1,263 communities and
      includes all of the active adult properties in Prince George’s County that have been identified. The National
      Directory lists all of the active adult properties in Prince George’s County.

     The Active Adult Living Directory, available at www.activeadultlivingdirectory.com. This on-line directory
      lists 865 active adult communities.




                                                                                                                   65
  Growth in Number of Builders Targeting 50+ Households
        The National Association of Home Builders has
 conducted two surveys of home builder members, one in
 1998 and one in 2002, that asked the proportion of the
 builder’s construction that was age-targeted or age-
 qualified. While these studies are not representative of the
 entire builder market, the results suggest growth in the
 number of builders targeting mature households.

        In 1998, 19 percent of the 1,010 builder survey
 respondents said they built active adult housing within the
 previous two years and 26 percent planned to build it in the
 next two years. In 2002, significantly fewer builders
 completed the survey (500 respondents). Among these
 respondents 56 percent said they built age-restricted
 single-family housing in 2002 and 58 percent said they
 planned to build it in the future.

        While these two studies do not allow an apples to
 apples comparison, they suggest that the number of
 builders targeting 50+ households grew by at least 9
 percent per year between 1998 and 2002.



Source: NAHB, 1999, Builder Member Survey on Seniors
Housing; and NAHB, 2003, 2003 Builder Survey: An Industry
Update of Current Trends of Age-Restricted, Age-Targeted
and Independent Living Communities.



                                                                66
Senior Apartments Market Rate
(endorsed definition)

Age-Targeted Community/Senior Apartments

        Definition. Senior apartments are multifamily residential rental properties restricted to adults at
least 55 years of age or older. These properties do not have central kitchen facilities and generally do not
provide meals to residents, but may offer community rooms, fitness centers, swimming pools and social
activities and other amenities. The apartments discussed in this section do not include subsidized
apartments such as HUD 202 or Section 8 properties.

      The number of senior apartments built in the last five years has increased substantially, particularly
because this product has shown significant success across the United States. Developers of senior
apartments are attracted to this product for the following reasons:

             Older renters have a longer tenure than younger renters;
             Older renters have less impact (wear and tear) on the building than younger renters;
             Senior apartments require fewer employees than service-enriched age-qualified housing
              such as independent living;
             Senior apartments, because they do not include a central kitchen and dining room, are less
              expensive to construct than independent living communities; and
             Senior apartments have enjoyed faster fill-up rates than independent living apartments,
              probably because they are less expensive than communities that include services in their
              monthly fees.




                                                                                                               67
Example of Senior Apartments


      In 2001 a large number of senior apartments were
 financed through the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit
 program, while approximately one-fourth were bond
 financed. The properties focused on in this report, however,
 are market rate properties that do not rely on subsidies.

      There has been an increase in the number of market
 rate senior apartments in the U.S. for several reasons. Many
 service-enriched communities, particularly those
 experiencing occupancy problems have begun to lease their
 apartments without services to attract a younger clientele
 and to fill vacant units.

      Senior apartments may compete significantly with
 independent living residences. They are not likely to have a
 strong impact on the market for single-family homes among
 the 55+ market sector. Renting is not an alternative for
 someone who wishes to purchase a home. A senior
 apartment, on the other hand, is an alternative to an
 apartment in an independent living community when the
 household does not wish to pay for additional services.




                                                                68
Profile of Residents in Senior Apartments

   Average Age: 77.6 years; (this age is younger than households in independent living residences)
   Gender: 73 percent are women, 27 percent are men;
   Marital Status: 20 percent are married; 38 percent are widowed; 41 percent single or divorced;
   Race/Ethnicity: 91 percent are Caucasian.


Source: Understanding Seniors Housing: Demand, Choices and Behavior, 2003, National Investment
Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries.




                                                                                                      69
Continuing Care Retirement Communities (endorsed definition)

Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs)

       Definition. Age-restricted properties that include a combination of independent living, assisted living
and skilled nursing (or independent and skilled nursing) available to residents all on one campus. Resident
payment plans vary and include entrance fee, condo/co op and rental programs. The majority of the units are
not licensed skilled nursing beds.

       Continuing Care Retirement Communities are the second largest sector of senior housing construction
after senior apartments. The number of units in CCRCs is growing rapidly for two reasons: this product is
preferred by investors because as a group the product is successful and those who develop this product are
seasoned builders and operators of senior housing. Another reason CCRCs occupy the second highest
construction rate of senior housing products in the U.S. is because of one developer, John Erickson, Founder,
Chairman of the Board and CEO of Erickson Retirement Communities. Erickson has more than 14,000
residents in 12 CCRCs that continue to grow. They are the largest developer of CCRCs in the world.

      Entrance Fee versus Rental CCRCS. Some CCRCs charge residents an upfront fee, often called an
entrance fee, that typically ranges from a low of $30,000 to more than $1,000,000 in some instances. The
entrance fee is used by the developer to reduce the amount of debt on the community. Residents who pay an
entrance fee usually have lower monthly service fees than those who do not pay an entrance fee.




                                                                                                                 70
CCRCs Variation by Contract Type

       CCRCs vary in the type of contracts that they have with their residents. These contracts differ relative
to the amount of money the resident pays when entering the community and subsequently in monthly fees,
and they vary relative to the types of services included in the contract.

       Type A Contract: A resident typically pays an upfront fee and an ongoing monthly fee in exchange for
the right to lifetime occupancy of an independent living unit and certain services and amenities. Residents
who require assisted living or nursing care may transfer to the appropriate level and continue to pay
essentially the same monthly fee as they were paying for independent living. This Type A contract is
sometimes referred to as “Lifecare.”

       Type B Contract: Under a Type B (Modified) contract, a resident typically pays an upfront fee and an
ongoing monthly service fee for the right to stay in an independent living unit and receive certain services and
amenities. A modified contract obligates a CCRC to provide the appropriate level of assisted living or nursing
care to residents of independent living units, as in a life care contract, but only for a specified period of time
at a specified rate that may or may not be tied directly to the independent living rate.

       Type C Contract: A fee-for-service contract requires an entrance fee but does not include any
discounted health care or assisted living services. Typically residents receive priority admission or guaranteed
admission for these services. Under this contract, residents who require assisted living or nursing care pay
the regular per diem rate paid by those admitted from outside the CCRC.


 Source: American Seniors Housing Association, The State of Seniors Housing, 2007.




                                                                                                                     71
 Size of CCRCs in Number of Units/Beds




       CCRCs range in size from fewer than 200
apartments or beds to more than 1,500 apartments
or beds. The units are generally counted as
apartments in independent living and beds in
assisted living and nursing care. The total count of
units in CCRCs is the count of apartments in
independent living and beds in assisted living and
nursing care.




                                                       Source: American Seniors Housing Association, The
                                                       State of Seniors Housing, 2007.



                                                                                                      72
Profile of Residents in CCRCs


   Average age: 77.3 years.
   Gender: 68.3 percent female, 31.7 percent male
   Marital status: 47 percent married, 44 percent widowed, 9 percent single or divorced
   Race/Ethnicity: 99 percent Caucasian
   Work for pay (part-time or full-time)
         0 percent full-time
         2 percent part-time




 Source: Understanding Seniors Housing: Demand, Choices and Behavior, National
 Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries 2003.
 American Seniors Housing Association, The Independent Living Report, 2004.




                                                                                           73
Independent Living (endorsed definition)

Congregate Care/Independent Living Communities

       Definition. Age-qualified multifamily rental properties with central dining facilities that provide
residents, as part of their monthly fee, access to meals and other services such as housekeeping, linen
service, transportation, and recreational activities. Such properties do not provide, in a majority of the units,
assistance with daily living such as supervision of medication, bathing, dressing, toileting, etc. There are no
licensed skilled beds in the property.

       Variation in Independent Living Communities. Independent living communities vary by their size,
whether or not they are freestanding structure or are combined with other services, their amenities and
services, and whether or not the resident may ―age in place‖ and receive assisted living services in their
apartment.

       Fees. The median monthly revenue from independent living apartments is $1,832. Fees range from
as low as $600 per month in a community with an entrance fee up to $7,500 for a two-bedroom apartment in
a luxury community.



Note: The term ―congregate care‖ is used only infrequently.




                                                                                                                    74
Trends in Independent Living Communities




         Independent living properties range in
  size from perhaps as small as a dozen
  apartments (units) up to 1,500 or more. The
  median number of independent living
  apartments is 124.




                                                  Source: American Seniors Housing Association, The
                                                  State of Seniors Housing, 2007.


                                                                                                 75
 Variations in Independent Living Properties

       A freestanding independent living community
is one that provides only independent living housing
and services. In contrast, there are properties that
provide both independent living and assisted living       Independent Living Community in
housing and services.
                                                                   El Paso, Texas

        There are two types of properties that
provide both independent living and assisted living.
One type segregates the independent living from
the assisted living residents in separate buildings or
wings. Most do not intermingle the groups for
activities and dining. While this seems
discriminatory, it is usually at the request of
independent living residents. Contrary to what you
might expect, many older adults are intolerant of
other older adults with diminished capacities and do
not want to be in the same areas or dining rooms
with them. It is almost that they fear the
difficulties of the other person is contagious, or if
they are seen with other people with diminished
capacity, they will be viewed the same.

        Additionally, when you are in your advanced
years and your friends begin to fail, it is depressing.
Many prospective residents enter an independent
living community and see people using walkers,
canes and wheelchairs and cannot accept the living
environment because it is hitting too close to their
fears.
                                                                                            76
Variations of Independent Living: Aging in Place

        Some independent living properties by plan or by default allow independent living residents to continue
living in their apartments, even though they cannot live independently any longer. Instead of moving the
resident to assisted living they provide assisted living services to the resident in his/her independent living
apartment. This is usually preferred by the resident receiving the services because he/she is not required to
move and is able to stay in the apartment to which he/she has become accustomed.

       Unfortunately, many independent living neighbors of individuals who are receiving assisted living services
in what used to be an independent living apartment are unhappy by the presence of their neighbor with
diminished capacities. Their unhappiness is often caused by two primary circumstances. The first is that they
must encounter the person with diminished capacities in the common areas of the community. The second, is
that often they are called upon to assist a resident with diminished capacities.

       From focus groups conducted with independent living residents living in an ―aging in place‖ community,
ProMatura has documented many instances where a neighbor had to go to the rescue of their frailer assisted
living neighbor who had fallen, become ill, or who was disoriented and wandering the halls, etc. While the
independent living resident sympathizes with their assisted living neighbor, they do not believe that it is fair that
they should be the ones to have to look out for their frailer neighbor and they are often concerned about their
neighbor. It is not the intention of the communities to have the residents look out for one another relative to
their health and safety; however, most independent living residences are larger and not well-designed for closely
monitoring residents 24 hours per day.




                                                                                                                   77
Profile of Independent Living Residents

   Average age: 82.6 years
   Gender: 69 percent female, 31 percent male
   Marital status: 31 percent married, 52 percent widowed, 16 percent single or divorced
   Race/Ethnicity: 99 percent Caucasian
   Work for pay (part-time or full-time)
        0 percent full-time
        2 percent part-time




Source: Understanding Seniors Housing: Demand, Choices and Behavior, National
Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries 2003.
American Seniors Housing Association, The Independent Living Report, 2004.




                                                                                            78
Assisted Living (endorsed definition)

Assisted Living Residence

       Definition. State-regulated rental properties that provide the same services as independent living
communities, but also provide, in a majority of the units, supportive care from trained employees to residents
who are unable to live independently and require assistance with activities of daily living, including
management of medications, bathing, dressing, toileting, ambulating and eating. Many of these properties
include wings or floors dedicated to residents with Alzheimer’s or other forms of Dementia.

      Size of Residences. Assisted living residences range in size from a few units to up to 300
apartments. The median size of assisted living residences is 54 units (apartments).

       Fees. The median monthly fee charged by assisted living residences in the U.S. is $2,695. This fee
usually pays for the room and board and personal care services (as listed above). There are variations in the
way assisted living communities charge for their services. Some have a single all inclusive price. Other
assisted living residences charge a base price for room and board and charge separately for each additional
service such as medication management, bathing, assistance with toileting, escort service to meals. And,
some assisted living properties have tiered pricing based on the amount of service (or assistance) provided.




                                                                                                                79
Variations in Assisted Living: Type of Property


          Assisted living services are
   provided in freestanding properties
   where only assisted living care is
   provided in properties where other
                                           Assisted Living Morningside House at Laurel
   services are provided. Many
   assisted living properties include
   separate areas or wings where
   residents with Alzheimer’s Disease
   or some other form of Dementia are
   provided care.

          Some assisted living
   Alzheimer’s care centers are
   freestanding and only serve persons
   with this disorder.

          Assisted living is often
   provided in communities that also
   offer nursing care, and it is usually
   provided in continuing care
   retirement communities.




                                                                                    80
Profile of Assisted Living Residents

    Average age: 85 years
    Gender: 79 percent female, 21 percent male
    Race/Ethnicity: 99 percent Caucasian




                             Assisted Living Residents’ Needs for Assistance

                     Need help with medications                        86 percent

                     Need help with bathing                            72 percent

                     Need help with dressing                           57 percent

                     Need help with toileting                          41 percent

                     Need help with transferring                       36 percent

                     Need help with eating                             23 percent



National Center for Assisted Living, Facts and Trends: The Assisted Living Sourcebook, 2001.




                                                                                               81
Nursing Care: Skilled and Unskilled
(endorsed definition)

       Nursing Home. Licensed daily rate or rental properties that are technically referred to as a skill
nursing facility or nursing facility where the majority of individuals require 24-hour nursing and/or medical
care. In most cases, these properties are licensed for Medicaid and/or Medicare reimbursement. These
properties may contain a minority of assisted living units.

        Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF). These state-licensed long-term care facilities offer 24-hour
medical care provided by registered nurses (RN), licensed practical nurses (LPN) and certified nurse
assistant (CNA). They also are required to have a house physician. This facility cares for the very frail
residents who are totally dependent on nursing care. This facility typically has a short-term rehabilitation
unit for residents needing rehab between hospital and home.

        Nursing care properties vary in the level and type of care they provide. Some provide intermediate
care that has limited nursing care and provides personal care services. Skilled nursing facilities provide
higher levels of care and many may offer special services.

        Some nursing care providers have short-term stay facilities and cater to individuals recovering from
injury, surgery or illness. Others serve a broader range of nursing care needs and may offer palliative care
for persons near death.

      Services. Nursing homes provide personal care and nursing care services. They vary in the
amount and depth of nursing care provided.

      Fees. The median per diem rate for a private nursing care bed in metropolitan areas in the U.S. is
$190 or approximately $5,795 per month.



                                                                                                                82
  Nursing Care: Change on the Horizon
   Nursing homes have long been dreaded by everyone. One fears spending the end of life there, and family
members suffer guilt when placing their loved one in a nursing center. Most even fear having to visit someone in a
nursing home. Since, 1991, Dr. Bill Thomas has led a small but progressively growing movement to change nursing
homes. Called the Eden Alternative, his movement focuses on making sure that despite their health and/or physical
condition, residents of a nursing home have an opportunity for growth.

THE EDEN ALTERNATIVE TEN PRINCIPLES
1. The three plagues of loneliness, helplessness and boredom account for the bulk of suffering among our elders.
2. An elder-centered community commits to creating a human habitat where life revolves around close and
    continuing contact with plants, animals and children. It is these relationships that provide the young and old alike
    with a pathway to a life worth living.
3. Loving companionship is the antidote to loneliness. Elders deserve easy access to human and animal
    companionship.
4. An elder-centered community creates an opportunity to give as well as receive care. This is the antidote to
    helplessness.
5. An elder-centered community imbues daily life with variety and spontaneity by creating an environment in which
    unexpected and unpredictable interactions and happenings can take place. This is the antidote to boredom.
6. Meaningless activity corrodes the human spirit. The opportunity to do things that we find meaningful is essential
    to human health.
7. Medical treatment should be the servant of genuine human caring, never its master.
8. An elder-centered community honors its elders by de-emphasizing top-down bureaucratic authority, seeking
    instead to place the maximum possible decision-making authority into the hands of the elders or into the hands of
    those closest to them.
9. Creating an elder-centered community is a never-ending process. Human growth must never be separated from
    human life.
10. Wise leadership is the lifeblood of any struggle against the three plagues. For it, there can be no substitute.




                                                                                                                    83
Nursing Care: A New Alternative, the Green House


       Dr. William Thomas initiated another
innovation in nursing home care with
Mississippi Methodist Services. The first four
Green Houses in the nation have been housing
elders since May 2004 in Tupelo, Mississippi.
Conceived as part of a movement to change
the culture of long-term care in America, they
are designed to feel more like home than
today's typical nursing home and to blend
easily into their community or surroundings.

       The Eden Alternative is a way to
humanize existing nursing homes that were
designed to the institutional standards in
existence when they were built. The Green
House is a new design for the physical plant of
a nursing home and a new form for the delivery
of service to residents.

 Source: www.thegreenhouseproject.com




                                                   84
 Nursing Home: Trends and Innovation

       The Green House is a small intentional
community for a group of elders and staff and is
intended to be a vessel for the enactment of the
most positive elderhood possible. It is a place
that focuses on life, and its heart is found in the
relationships that flourish there. A radical
departure from traditional skilled nursing homes
and assisted living facilities, the Green House
alters facility size, interior design, staffing
patterns, and methods of delivering skilled
professional services.

         Developed by Dr. William Thomas and
rooted in the tradition of the Eden Alternative, a
model for cultural change within nursing facilities,
the Green House is intended to de-institutionalize
long-term care by eliminating large nursing
facilities and creating habilitative, social settings.
Its primary purpose is to serve as a place where
elders can receive assistance and support with
activities of daily living and clinical care, without
the assistance and care becoming the focus of
their existence.


   Source: www.thegreenhouseproject.com




                                                         85
Nursing Home: Trends and Innovation

       Each elder enjoys a private room with a
private bath which they decorate with their own
belongings. There is easy access to all areas of the
house including the kitchen and laundry, outdoor
garden and patio. Safety features are built into the
house to minimize injury. The small size of the
Green House promotes less use of wheelchairs.

        The elder is free from the limitations of an
institutional schedule and lives a comfortably daily
life - sleeping, eating, and engaging in activities as
they choose. Meals are prepared in the kitchen and
served at a large single dining table where staff
and elders and visitors enjoy a pleasant dining
experience called - CONVIVIUM. This is
characterized by good fresh food, a well-set table
often with music and flowers, and good
conversation with people who care about one
another. Meal times can be over an hour and
appetites are good.


  Source: www.thegreenhouseproject.com




                                                         86
Profile of Nursing Home Residents




    Average age: 76.5 years
    Gender: 55 percent female, 45 percent male
    Race/Ethnicity: 92 percent Caucasian; 3 percent African American, 5 percent other.




    Source: Understanding National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries
    Seniors Housing: Demand, Choices and Behavior, 2003.




                                                                                                 87
Target Markets for Age-Qualified and
       All-Age Housing and
      The Market Opportunity




                                       88
The Target Market

       The primary market sector is relatively easy to describe. It is any household 50+ years of age that is
interested in purchasing either a primary or secondary home in the Paso del Norte region. The bulk of the market
will come from within a region of approximately 100 miles surrounding the area, but marketing should be
directed beyond this distance.

      The ideal market will have a minimum of $100,000 annual household income and a minimum net worth of
$ 500,000. This market will be able to afford just about any type of housing and will have sufficient funds to
purchase just about all the goods and services that they want.

Focus on Key Market Sectors

       We recommend focusing on markets that are likely to pay off more quickly and will require less marketing
and hand holding. These markets will already be familiar with and have ties to the Paso del Norte region. As the
retiree attraction program increases its spread and households begin to move to the region, then the net can be
cast to capture a broader market sector.
Target Markets

 Four markets have been identified as key target markets for the initiation of the Paso del Norte Region
 Retiree attraction Program. These markets are targeted because all have a connection El Paso.

    1.   Households in the market area. The goal is to keep these households in the market area and not to
         lose them to other retirement destination areas.
    2.   Military retirees and veterans. Thousands of retired military personnel and veterans have spent time
         at Fort Bliss in the Paso del Norte region. There are 48,266 military veterans in the Paso del Norte
         region who are 45+ years of age.
    3.   UTEP Alumni. It is estimated there are 22,879 UTEP alumni between the ages of 50 and 74 years of
         age.
    4.   Travelers to the region.

    The following pages provide details about these housing market sectors.



    Additional sub-markets that may yield new households to move to the Paso del Norte region include:

    1.   Households interested in the Hispanic culture

    2.   Households who attend the Sun Bowl

    3.   Households who are engaged in or enjoy thoroughbred racing at Sunland Park

    4.   Households who enjoy gaming




                                                                                                                90
Military Retirees and Veterans
       The military has provided a significant number of retirees to the Paso del Norte region. In 2007 there
 are 27,624 veterans or retirees between 45 and 64 years of age, 11,237 between 65 and 84 years of age and
 2,800 who are 85+ years of age in the region. Of the new retirees and veterans moving into the area, the
 numbers in the 45 to 84 year age groups will decline between now and 2012, while those in the 85+ age
 group will increase.
        Ft. Bliss has acreage that would be ideal for a military retiree and veteran active adult and continuing
 care retirement community. A quality community would attract veterans from across the country. It is likely
 that a number of qualified and experienced developers would be interested in the opportunity to develop and
 manage this community. See the appendix at the end of this section for brief descriptions of other military-
 oriented retirement communities.

                 Number of Veterans by Age and County in the Paso del Norte Region
     Source: Veterans Administration (http://www1.va.gov/vetdata/docs/Living_County_By_VISN.xls)
45 to 64       Sept 30 2007  Sept 30 2008    Sept 30 2009 Sept 30 2010   Sept 30 2011  Sept 30 2012
Dona Ana          5,674          5,561          5,445         5,305          5,074         4,821
Otero             3,382          3,328          3,272         3,178          3,025         2,869
El Paso           18,568        18,184          17,794       17,272         16,409        15,655
65 to 84
Dona Ana          4,338          4,228          4,119         4,045          4,074         4,111
Otero             2,248          2,215          2,115         2,124          2,109         2,103
El Paso           11,237        10,843         10,561`       10,371         10,600        10,826
85+
Dona Ana            520           550             578          603            628           647
Otero               268           287             307          325            341           355
El Paso           2,012          2,125          2,216         2,323          2,439         2,578
TOTAL             48,266        47,320          46,412       45,546         44,700        43,903


                                                                                                                   91
UTEP Alumni
                                           Number of UTEP Alumni by Class Year, Estimated Year of
                                                               Birth and Age
                                           (Assumes Students were 22 Years of Age at Graduation)
       UTEP Alumni are likely to be a
                                                          Estimated       Estimated
significant source for in-migration to      Class Year                                  Number
                                                          Year Born          Age
the Paso del Norte region. Most of the
former students will have lived in the         1955          1933             74          217
region prior to and during their               1956          1934             73          284
education at UTEP. Many are likely to          1957          1935             72          303
have moved away from the region                1958          1936             71          351
upon graduation because they were              1959          1937             70          313
unable to find employment. These               1960          1938             69          331
alumni are likely to have family in the        1961          1939             68          339
area, are familiar with the region and
                                               1962          1940             67          403
are likely to be Hispanic. They will not
need to be sold on the attributes of the       1963          1941             66          506
Hispanic culture.                              1964          1942             65          612
                                               1965          1943             64          797
      Richard Daniel, the new Assistant
                                               1966          1944             63          776
Vice President for Alumni Relations will
lead the department responsible for            1967          1945             62          729
keeping the 78,000+ alumni connected           1968          1946             61          927
to UTEP. Mr. Daniel will be pleased to         1969          1947             60         1,135
be part of the Retiree Attraction              1970          1948             59         1,331
Program and should be a key source in          1971          1949             58         1,979
helping to create relationships and            1972          1950             57         1,578
recruit UTEP alumni to return to the
                                               1973          1951             56         1,506
area.
                                               1974          1952             55         1,602
                                               1975          1953             54         1,424
Source: Data provided by Mr. Richard           1976          1954             53         1,443
Daniel                                         1977          1955             52         1,515
                                               1978          1956             51         1,483
                                               1979          1957             50         1,607 92
UTEP Center for Lifelong Learning


      UTEP’s Center for Lifelong
Learning has an impressive array of
educational opportunities for
individuals 50+ years of age. The 15
page Fall 2007 catalog includes
courses that have durations of one to
nine sessions. There is a flat fee to
join the Center of $20, a $60 flat fee to
enroll in the Fall programs, and
charges of $20 for some of the classes
that have expendable supplies.
Essentially for a fee of $60 you can
take as many of the 40+ classes you
can fit into your schedule.




                                            93
Population Estimates by ZIP Code (2007)

      The majority of the regional population is concentrated in El Paso and Las Cruces. Smaller concentrations
of population are located east of El Paso along Highway 180 toward Salt Flat.


                                                                                                Projections do not
                                                                                                reflect the influx
                                                                                                of households to
                                                                                                the base.




                                                                                              Population Estimates 2007




                                                                                                               94
  Change in Population by ZIP Code (2007 to 2012)
      The population in the ZIP code areas of EL Paso are projected to decline in number over the next five years.
ZIP code areas located in the north and south of the city are projected to grow. This may show that the
population in downtown El Paso is projected to decline.

                                                                                                    Projections do not
                                                                                                    reflect the influx
                                                                                                    of households to
                                                                                                    the base or any
                                                                                                    impact from the
                                                                                                    downtown
                                                                                                    revitalization plan.




                                                                                                  Change in Population
                                                                                                     (2007 to 2012)




                                                                                                                     95
55+ Population by ZIP Code (2007)
       There is a significant amount of 55+ population north and northwest of El Paso in Deming, Las Cruces and
Alamogordo ZIP code areas. Some caution should be used when interpreting the data based on the varying size
of the ZIP codes.

                                                                                                Projections do not
                                                                                                reflect the influx
                                                                                                of households to
                                                                                                the base.




                                                                                                55+ Population
                                                                                                    (2007)




                                                                                                                 96
Change in 55+ Population by ZIP Code (2007 to 2012)
       The 55+ population in all ZIP code areas in El Paso are projected to increase from 2007 to 2012 with the
exception of the ZIP Code area 79916 which is projected to marginally decrease by between 1 to 185 people.
This increase in the 55+ population is essentially the proportion of the population that will turn 55 in the next 5
years. It does not represent an influx of retirees moving to the area.




                                                                                                    Change in 55+ Population
                                                                                                         (2007 to 2012)




                                                                                                                      97
   Size of Mature Market
     The proportion of households 55+, 65+, 75+ and 85+ relative to the total population are similar to the
proportions in the total US. Otero County has a slightly higher proportion of households than El Paso and Dona
Ana counties.


                      Percent of Households 55+, 65+, 75+ and 85+
                         as a Percent of Total Households 2007

              United States     Paso Del Norte Region      El Paso County      Otero County      Dona Ana County

  50%
             38%            38%36%
  40%
                 36% 35%
  30%                                 21% 20% 20%         20%
                                                       23%
  20%
                                                                   10% 9% 9% 10% 9%
  10%
                                                                                               3% 2% 2% 2% 2%
    0%
                      55+                        65+     Households         75+                        85+




                                                                                                                 98
Growth of Mature Market
     The projected growth patterns of the 55+ market sectors in the Paso del Norte region differ from those of
the US. The county data reveal greater growth among households 85+ eight times higher than the national
average. And, significantly lower growth projections of the 55+, 65+ and 75+ households than national
average. This supports the need for a more proactive approach in attracting households 55 to 84 in the coming
years.




                                                                                                                 99
Growth of Adult Child Market (2007 to 2012)
        The growth in the proportion of households incomes above $75,000 and $100,000 in the market area are
projected to grow at rates greater than the national average. This growth rate, unfortunately, may not reflect a
significant increase in number of affluent households, but rather a proportionate increase that looks large
because the base to which the increase is compared may be small.




                                                                                                             100
Growth of 75+ Households by Income Group (2007 to 2012)

      In general the growth in 75+ households by income level is similar to that of the national average.
Comparing the counties shows higher projected growth rates among the 75+ households $50,000+ and
$75,000+ in Dona Ana County than the other counties in the region and the national averages. This increase
may be a direct result of the retiree attraction efforts.




                                                                                                             101
Growth Projections
       This table shows the proportionate increase of households within specific age ranges and income levels.
The 45 to 54 and 60 to 64 age groups will have the largest proportionate increase among households with
$100,000. The 65 to 79 age group will have about a 33 percent increase in the proportion of households with
$75,000 and $100,000+ incomes and the 75+ households will have the greatest increase among households with
lower incomes, with the exception of Dona Ana County that will also show growth among the 75+ with
$100,000+ incomes.

           The Projected Growth Rate of Households by Age and Income 2007 - 2012
                                                                 Dona Ana
                                 Paso del Norte    El Paso                   Otero County,
  Age Group and Income Sectors                                    County,
                                    Region      County, Texas                 New Mexico
                                                                New Mexico
         45-54 $35,000+              6.3%           5.9%           9.1%          2.9%
         45-59 $35,000+              13.3%          13.1%          15.5%         9.1%
         45-59 $50,000+              9.1%           7.9%           13.0%         9.2%
         45-59 $75,000+              9.3%           7.4%           14.0%         13.9%
         45-59   $100,000+                25.2%            24.1%            28.3%            26.3%
         60-64    $50,000+                8.2%             8.3%             7.4%             9.9%
         60-64    $75,000+                11.9%            12.2%            11.0%            11.1%
         60-64   $100,000+                16.5%            16.9%            15.8%            14.8%
         65-79    $50,000+                24.0%            23.7%            23.0%            30.3%
         65-79    $75,000+                33.1%            32.3%            34.3%            38.5%
         65-79   $100,000+                35.3%            36.9%            34.4%            26.0%
          75+    $25,000+                 41.9%            42.7%            39.4%            42.5%
          75+    $35,000+                 49.1%            49.1%            47.0%            60.8%
          75+    $50,000+                 20.8%            18.4%            26.2%            26.2%
          75+    $75,000+                 25.8%            22.9%            33.6%            31.0%
           75+   $100,000+                33.4%            29.4%            44.5%            41.3%

                                                                                                         102
Number of Households by Age and Income

        The future strength of the Paso del Norte region as a retiree destination is supported by the projected
growth in both the adult child market (those households 45 to 64) and households 75+ (target market for age-
qualified housing) over the next five years. These changes may not represent an influx of households to the
market area, but rather are likely the aging of boomers in the market into the ―mature‖ sectors.
        These strong numbers suggest that this segment of the market has strong growth projected in the near
term.

                      Number of Current Households by Age and Income Segment and
                                  Projected Change from 2007 to 2012
                                                                Market Area
                           Paso del Norte
                                                  El Paso County         Dona Ana County          Otero County
  Age        Income           Region
Segment      Segment                 Change                 Change                  Change                Change
                           2007       2007-       2007       2007-       2007        2007-       2007      2007-
                                      2012                   2012                    2012                  2012
                All      118,371     +11,717     85,783      +8,765      24,034     +2,395      8,554       +557
Households   $50,000+     52,158     +10,221     37,557      +7,493      10,754     +2,079      3,847       +649
 45 to 64    $75,000+     30,006     +8,052      21,804      +5,794      6,328      +1,651      1,874       +607
             $100,000+    17,139     +6,118      12,653      +4,415      3,567      +1,317       919        +386
                All       30,352     +2,818      21,564      +1,592      6,417       +897       2,371       +329
             $25,000+     15,845     +2,745      10,972      +1,670      3,705       +735       1,168       +340
Households
             $35,000+     11,521     +2,297       7,915      +1,347      2,788       +669        818        +281
   75+
             $50,000+      7,221     +1,716       5,025      +1,015      1,743       +526        453        +175
             $75,000+      3632      +1,061       2607        +634        810        +319        215        +108


                                                                                                              103
Households by Income
     The three counties that make up the Paso del Norte region have similar median incomes by age group.
Comparing the region to national averages shows that younger households have lower median incomes than the
same age and income group in the U.S. As the age of the household increases in the Paso del Norte region the
median incomes are closer to national averages. Dona Ana County and Otero County show higher incomes
among households 60 to 79 years of age than does El Paso County.



                      2007 Median Household Income by Age of Head of Household
                                                                                          Otero
                                                          El Paso       Dona Ana
                           United        Paso del                                        County,
            Age of                                        County,        County,
                           States      Norte Region                                        New
                                                           Texas       New Mexico
                                                                                         Mexico
           45 to 54        $58,644        $39,211         $39,339         $38,717        $39,284
           55 to 59        $65,623        $46,529         $47,080         $43,958        $47,296
           60 to 64        $57,386        $41,828         $40,052         $47,211        $43,670
           65 to 69        $53,449        $39,002         $37,416         $44,533        $42,026
           70 to 74        $38,536        $32,639         $31,750         $35,661        $32,656
           75 to 79        $36,411        $30,692         $29,520         $33,765        $31,909
           80 to 84        $29,673        $29,130         $28,333         $33,023        $26,425
             85+           $27,089        $25,745         $24,937         $29,214        $24,236
              ALL          $23,744        $22,057         $21,220         $25,421        $21,563
         Source: Claritas, Inc.


                                                                                                          104
Median Household Income by ZIP Code (2007)
      Median household incomes are highest north of El Paso, particularly in and around Las Cruces . Incomes
range from $48,000 to $75,138.




                                                                                               Median (2007)




                                                                                                           105
Median Home Values by ZIP Code (2007)
      El Paso has lower median home values than other areas in the region. This maybe attractive to retirees
looking for more affordable housing options.




                                                                                               Median Home Values (2007)




                                                                                                               106
Median Home Values in 2007 in US, Region and Counties

     Median home values in the Paso del Norte region are around half of the median home value in the US.
Dona Ana County has the highest median home value of $106,166 and El Paso County has the lowest of $83,828.
Change in Median Home Values (2007 to 2012)

      With the exception of Dona Ana County, the Paso del Norte region is projected to have approximately 25
percent lower appreciation in median home values over the next five years than is projected for the US average
increase in appreciation.
Distribution of Number of Homes by Value (2007)
      The following table shows the number and proportion of homes by value for the Paso del Norte region and
the counties that comprise the region. Eighty-eight percent of the homes in El Paso County have values less than
$150,000 and 81 percent of the homes in Dona Ana and Otero Counties have values less than $150,000.


                                  Distribution of Number of Homes by Value
                                     Total Owner Occupied Units (2007)
                                                    Number and Percent of Homes
                          Paso del Norte
   Value of Homes                                El Paso County       Dona Ana County           Otero County
                             Region
                        Number      Percent    Number      Percent    Number     Percent     Number     Percent
Total units             212,518                149,729                 46,650                 16,139
Less than $100,000      133,102      62.6%     101,671     67.9%       21,927     47.0%       9,504      58.9%
$100,000 to $149,999     45,416      21.4%      30,284     20.2%       11,337     24.3%       3,795      23.5%
$150,000 to $199,999     15,908      7.5%       9,034       6.0%       5,476      11.7%       1,398       8.7%
$200,000 to $299,999     11,679      5.5%       5,649       3.8%       5,062      10.9%        968        6.0%
$300,000 to $399,999      3,401      1.6%       1,634       1.1%       1,477       3.2%        290        1.8%
$400,000 to $499,999      1,414      0.7%        711        0.5%        658        1.4%         45        0.3%
$500,000 to $749,999      1,075      0.5%        480        0.3%        541        1.2%         54        0.3%
$750,000 to $999,999       338       0.2%        202        0.1%        102        0.2%         34        0.2%
$1,000,000+                185       0.1%         64        0.0%         70        0.2%         51        0.3%




                                                                                                           109
Building Permits
        Unlike most of the US, the number and average cost of single-family building permits issued annually has
 increased significantly from 2000 to 2005, approximately an 11 percent decline in the number of permits issued
 in 2006. Dona Ana County while not issuing as many permits as El Paso County has higher average costs per
 home. El Paso has a lower average unit cost but has shown the largest increase in home costs, while those in
 Dona Ana County have declined by about $18,000 per home between 2004 and 2006.


                                 Residential Building Permits by Year
                                                         Market Area
                         El Paso County               Dona Ana County                 Otero County
      Year
                                    Average                       Average                       Average
                      Number                       Number                        Number
                                     Cost                          Cost                          Cost
       2000            2,413         $53,497          730         $117,668             Unavailable
       2001            3,124         $54,900          744         $124,826             Unavailable
       2002             721          $53,392          866         $151,212             Unavailable
       2003            4,829         $59,822         1,231        $164,059             Unavailable
       2004            3,404         $82,162         1,230        $192,612             Unavailable
       2005            3,918        $109,976         2,139        $179,923             Unavailable
       2006            3,467        $124,435         2,049        $174,173             Unavailable




                                                                                                           110
Home Sales by Value

      Based on home sales data from Melissadata.com the largest proportion of homes sold during the year
ending November 6, 2007 were valued less than $150,000. Dona Ana County has the greatest percentage of
homes (29 percent) priced at or above $200,000. Two-thirds of the homes in El Paso County, 43 percent in Dona
Ana County and all of the homes in Otero County sold for less than $150,000 in 2007.

                               Home Sales by Value for Year Ending 11/6/2007

                                           El Paso County,    Dona Ana County,       Otero County,
                     Home Value                 Texas           New Mexico            New Mexico

                                          Number    Percent   Number     Percent   Number    Percent

             0- $100,000                   2,501     32.6%       461      14.6%       3       60.0%

             $100,000 - $150,000           2,660     34.6%       916      28.9%       2       40.0%

             $150,000 - $200,000           1,408     18.3%       858      27.1%       0        0.0%

             $200,000 - $300,000            777      10.1%       578      18.2%       0        0.0%

             $300,000 - $400,000            235       3.1%       184      5.8%        0        0.0%

             $400,000 - $500,000             56       0.7%       91       2.9%        0        0.0%

             $500,000+                       44       0.6%       80       2.5%        0        0.0%

             Total                         7,681                3,168                 5

             Source: Melissadata.com




                                                                                                         111
Migration Comparisons by Location of In Migration
      Migration trends for El Paso County reveal that it has a higher proportion of migration from another country
than the other southwestern counties. Brownsville, Laredo and Santa Fe are in counties that also border Mexico,
but they do not reflect the same level of migration.

                                                                             Percent of In Migration From:
                                   Largest City in          Net
    County           State                                                               Different
                                      County             Migration      Same State                       Foreign
                                                                                           State
    El Paso                             El Paso             520             20%             68%            12%
     Bexar                           San Antonio           7,002            46%             50%             4%
                     Texas
     Webb                               Laredo               -9             56%             37%             7%
   Cameron                            Brownsville           -217            52%             44%             4%
   Maricopa                            Phoenix             24,803           13%             85%             2%
                     Arizona
     Pima                               Tucson             4,469            22%             74%             4%
   Bernalillo                        Albuquerque           2,108            37%             60%             3%
   Dona Ana       New Mexico          Las Cruces            664             26%             70%             4%
   Santa Fe                            Santa Fe              73             33%             65%             2%




                                                                                                             112
   Migration Streams in the Southwestern States

This section includes an analysis of migration to and from several counties in the Southwestern United States,
particularly areas that are considered competitors of the Paso del Norte region. It is possible that the Paso del
Norte region may be able to tap into the migration streams that are moving to other areas in the southwestern
portion of the US.




                                                                                                               113
Map of Counties in Texas




                           114
Map of Counties in New Mexico




                                115
County Migration Data - El Paso County, Texas 2005 to 2006
 Migration of El Paso County
                                         Internal Revenue Service Migration Data for El Paso County, Texas
                                                                      2005 to 2006
       El Paso County had 2,649
                                    Households Moving Into and Out of El Paso                             Net
 households move to the county                                                            In     Out
                                    County and Net Migration                                           Migration
 and 12,129 move from the
                                     TX El Paso County Total Migration-US & Foreign    12,649  12,129     520
 county for a net gain of 520        TX El Paso County Total Migration-US              11,157  11,483    -326
 households. El Paso loses more      TX El Paso County Total Migration-Same State       2,529   3,113    -584
 households to other areas in        TX El Paso County Total Migration-Different State  8,628   8,370     258
 the U.S. than it gains for a net    TX El Paso County Total Migration-Foreign          1,492    646      846
 loss of 326 households within       TX El Paso County Non-Migrants                    227,935 227,935     0
 the US. On the other hand, El       FR Foreign - APO/FPO ZIPs                          1,196    562      634
 Paso county had a net gain of       NM Dona Ana County                                  748     905     -157
 846 households from a foreign       CA Los Angeles County                               439     225      214
 country.                            AZ Maricopa County                                  381     625     -244
                                     TX Bexar County                                     318     544     -226
        Migration to El Paso         TX Bell County                                      273     116      157
 County contributed .2 percent       CA San Diego County                                 222     163       59
 growth to the county. Sixty-        TX Harris County                                    204     248      -44
 eight percent of El Paso’s in-      HI  Honolulu County                                 200     105       95
 migration comes from a variety      TX Tarrant County                                   180     315     -135
 of other states, but                TX Dallas County                                    178     292     -114
 unfortunately it loses more         NM Bernalillo County                                173     307     -134
 households to other states than     CA San Bernardino County                            162      78       84
 it gains.                           SS Other Flows - Same State                         315     317       -2
                                     DS Other Flows – Different State                   2,349   2,191     158
      El Paso loses the greatest     DS Other Flows - Northeast                          378     286       92
 number of households to             DS Other Flows - Midwest                            656     620       36
 Maricopa County, AZ and Bexar       DS Other Flows - South                              870     842       28
 County, TX. Both of these           DS Other Flows - West                               445     443       2
 areas have military bases.          FR Foreign - Other flows                            284      66      218

                                                                                                           116
County Migration Data (Santa Fe County, New Mexico)
                                      Internal Revenue Service Migration Data for Santa Fe, New Mexico
                                                                    2005 to 2006
 Migration of Santa Fe County                                                                         Net
                                  Households Moving Into and Out of Santa Fe
                                                                                         In   Out   Migrati
                                  County and Net Migration
                                                                                                       on
       Santa Fe County had a
                                   NM Santa Fe County Total Migration-US               3,915 3,842     73
 modest net in-migration of 73
                                   NM Santa Fe County Total Migration-US               3,865 3,806     59
 households between 2005 and
                                   NM Santa Fe County Total Migration-Same State       1,304 1,831   -527
 2006. Santa Fe County had only
                                   NM Santa Fe County Total Migration-Different State  2,561 1,975    586
 a net migration of 14 foreign
                                   NM Santa Fe County Total Migration-Foreign            50    36      14
 households.
                                   NM Santa Fe County Non-Migrant                     46,638 46,638     0
                                   NM Bernalillo County                                 541   812    -271
      Migration to Santa Fe
                                   NM Rio Arriba County                                 194   198      -4
 County contributed .16 percent
                                   CA Los Angeles County                                125    77      48
 growth to the county.
                                   NM Sandoval County                                   113   331    -218
                                   NM San Miguel County                                 110    87      23
      The largest out-of-state
                                   AZ Maricopa County                                    77    94     -17
 migration stream to Santa Fe
                                   NM Los Alamos County                                  76    65      11
 County comes from Los Angeles
                                   NM Dona Ana County                                    62    67      -5
 County, California.
                                   CA San Diego County                                   60    30      30
                                   IL Cook County                                        55    19      36
                                   NM Taos County                                        41    29      12
                                   AZ Pima County                                        40    39       1
                                   NM Torrance County                                    37    53     -16
                                   SS Other Flows - Same State                           66    78     -12
                                   DS Other Flows - Different State                    1,257 1,154    103
                                   DS Other Flows - Northeast                           246   162      84
                                   DS Other Flows - Midwest                             269   196      73
                                   DS Other Flows - South                               444   433      11
                                   DS Other Flows - West                                298   363     -65
                                   FR Foreign - Other flows                              33    36      -3
                                                                                                     117
County Migration Data (Dona Ana, New Mexico)

                                       Internal Revenue Service Migration Data for Dona Ana, New Mexico
Migration of Dona Ana County                                         2005 to 2006
                                   Households Moving Into and Out of Dona Ana, NM                       Net
     Dona Ana County had a net                                                           IN     Out
                                   County                                                            Migration
in-migration of 664 households      NM Dona Ana County Total Migration-US               4,813  4,149    664
between 2005 and 2006. In           NM Dona Ana County Total Migration-US               4,651  4,090    561
contrast to El Paso County which    NM Dona Ana County Total Migration-Same State       1,250  1,150    100
has a net loss to other areas in    NM Dona Ana County Total Migration-Different State  3,401  2,940    461
the US, 69 percent of the           NM Dona Ana County Tot Migration-Foreign             162     59     103
migration to Dona Ana County        NM Dona Ana County Non-Migrant                     57,181 57,181      0
comes from other areas in the       TX El Paso County                                    905    748     157
US.
                                    NM Bernalillo County                                 202    369    -167
                                    NM Otero County                                      176    125      51
      Migration to Dona Ana
                                    AZ Maricopa County                                   138    203     -65
County contributed 1.16 percent
                                    CA Los Angeles County                                112     51      61
to the number of households in
                                    NM Grant County                                      104     51      53
the county.
                                    NM Luna County                                       101     70      31
                                    CA San Diego County                                   76     50      26
     The largest out-of-state
                                    NM Chaves County                                      74     44      30
migration stream to Santa Fe
                                    NM Sierra County                                      70     41      29
County comes from Los Angeles
                                    NM Eddy County                                        68     35      33
County, California.
                                    NM Santa Fe County                                    67     62       5
                                    NM Lincoln County                                     60     36      24
                                    SS Other Flows - Same State                           38     44      -6
                                    DS Other Flows - Different State                    1,426  1,170    256
                                    DS Other Flows - Northeast                           155     98      57
                                    DS Other Flows - Midwest                             321    241      80
                                    DS Other Flows - South                               552    513      39
                                    DS Other Flows - West                                398    318      80
                                                                                                            118
County Migration Data (Bexar County, Texas)

Migration of Bexar County                    Internal Revenue Service Migration Data for Bexar County, Texas
                                                                        2005 to 2006
     Bexar County had a net in-        Households Moving Into and Out of Bexar                              Net
                                                                                           In     Out
migration of 7,002 households          County, TX and Net Migration                                      Migration
between 2005 and 2006. In              TX Bexar County Total Migration-US & Foreign     34,867   27,865    7,002
contrast to El Paso County which       TX Bexar County Total Migration-US               33,348   26,705    6,643
has a net loss to other areas in the   TX Bexar County Total Migration-Same State       15,991   15,140      851
US, 83 percent of the migration to     TX Bexar County Total Migration-Different State  17,357   11,565    5,792
Bexar County comes from other          TX Bexar County Total Migration-Foreign           1,519   1,160       359
areas in the US.                       TX Bexar County Non-Migrants                    500,874 500,874        0
                                       TX Harris County                                  1,297   1,229        68
      Migration to Bexar County        FR Foreign - APO/FPO ZIPs                         1,149   1,040       109
contributed 1.4 percent to the         TX Travis County                                  1,120   1,299      -179
number of households in the            LA Orleans Parish                                 1,051     15      1,036
county.                                TX Guadalupe County                                948    1,632      -684
                                       CA Los Angeles County                              793     273        520
       The largest out-of-state        TX Comal County                                    781    1,180      -399
migration stream to Bexar County       TX Nueces County                                   731     436        295
came from Orleans Parish, LA. This
                                       TX   Dallas County                               715       658        57
is likely a direct result of the
                                       TX   Atascosa County                             559       544        15
Hurricane Katrina Diaspora.
                                       TX   El Paso County                              544       318       226
                                       TX   Tarrant County                              518       502        16
      Los Angeles County is the only
                                       TX   Hidalgo County                              508       307       201
other area in the US that had a
                                       TX   Webb County                                 490       229       261
large in-migration to Bexar County.
                                       TX   Medina County                               481       552       -71
The other flows from other states,
                                       TX   Wilson County                               448       603      -155
however is quite large and suggests
                                       SS   Other Flows - Same State                    427       400        27
that Bexar County draws from a
                                       DS   Other Flows - Different State              2,959     2,522      437
wide area of the US.
                                       DS   Other Flows - Northeast                     421       379        42
                                       DS   Other Flows - Midwest                       916       753       163
                                                                                                             119
County Migration Data (Webb County, Texas)

 Migration of Webb County           Internal Revenue Service Migration Data for Webb County, Texas - 2005 to 2006
                                   Households Moving Into and Out of Webb County, TX                       Net
       Webb County, another                                                                In    Out
                                   and Net Migration                                                    Migration
 border county had 2,254            TX Webb County Total Migration-US & Foreign          2,254  2,263        -9
 households move to the county      TX Webb County Total Migration-US                    2,085  2,213      -128
 and 2,263 move from the            TX Webb County Total Migration-Same State            1,260  1,587      -327
 county for a net loss of 9         TX Webb County Total Migration-Different State        825    626        199
 households. Webb County loses      TX Webb County Total Migration-Foreign                169     50        119
 more households to other areas     TX Webb County Non-Migrants                         64,795 64,795         0
 in the U.S. than it gains for a    TX Bexar County                                       229    490       -261
 net loss of 327 households         TX Harris County                                      167    173         -6
 within the US. On the other        TX Dallas County                                      105     76         29
 hand, Webb county had a net        TX Hidalgo County                                      74    117        -43
 gain of 119 households from a      TX Nueces County                                       61     65         -4
 foreign country.                   TX Cameron County                                      51     39         12
                                    TX Zapata County                                       48     30         18
      Thirty-six percent of
                                    TX Tarrant County                                      46     38          8
 Webb County’s in-migration
                                    TX Travis County                                       45     89        -44
 comes from a different state, 7
                                     IL Cook County                                        41     20         21
 percent of Webb County’s in-
                                    CA San Diego County                                    32     16         16
 migration comes from a foreign
                                    TX Maverick County                                     31     21         10
 country and 44 percent comes
                                    FR Foreign - APO/FPO ZIPs                              27     0          27
 from Texas.
                                    TX El Paso County                                      23     36        -13
                                    SS Other Flows - Same State                           212    191         21
       Webb County loses the
                                    DS Other Flows - Different State                      673    525        148
 greatest number of households
 to Bexar County.                   DS Other Flows - Northeast                             74     44         30
                                    DS Other Flows - Midwest                              214    131         83
                                    DS Other Flows - South                                206    198          8
                                    DS Other Flows - West                                 179    152         27

                                                                                                         120
County Migration Data (Cameron County, Texas)
                                           Internal Revenue Service Migration Data for Cameron County, Texas
 Migration of Cameron County                                           Webb 2005 to 2006
                                       Households Moving Into and Out of Cameron                            Net
        Cameron County, another                                                             In     Out
                                       County, TX and Net Migration                                      Migration
 border county had 4,779               TX Cameron County Total Migration-US & Foreign     4,779   4,996    -217
 households move to the county         TX Cameron County Total Migration-US               4,612   4,920    -308
 and 4,996 move from the county        TX Cameron County Total Migration-Same State       2,507   3,072    -565
 for a net loss of 217 households.     TX Cameron County Total Migration-Different State  2,105   1,848     257
 Cameron County loses more             TX Cameron County Total Migration-Foreign           167      76       91
 households to other areas in          TX Cameron County Non-Migrants                    104,349 104,349     0
 Texas, than it gains for a net loss   TX Hidalgo County                                   592     712     -120
 of 565 households within the
                                       TX Harris County                                    404     492      -88
 state. On the other hand,
                                       TX Bexar County                                     243     416     -173
 Cameron county had a net gain of
                                       TX Willacy County                                   143      83       60
 91 households from a foreign
                                       TX Travis County                                    136     175      -39
 country and 257 households from
                                       TX Dallas County                                    112     136      -24
 other states.
                                       TX Nueces County                                    106     124      -18
                                       TX Tarrant County                                    62      87      -25
      Ninety-six percent of
                                       FR Foreign - APO/FPO ZIPs                            60      55       5
 Cameron County’s in-migration
                                       CA San Diego County                                  59      33       26
 comes from the US (a little more
                                       FL Palm Beach County                                 40      26       14
 than half from Texas), and 3.5
 percent of Cameron County’s in-       CA Los Angeles County                                39      20       19
 migration comes from a foreign        FL Lee County                                        39      25       14
 country.                              TX Webb County                                       39      51      -12
                                       SS Other Flows - Same State                         252     273      -21
       Cameron County loses the        DS Other Flows – Different State                   1,464   1,418      46
 greatest number of households to      DS Other Flows - Northeast                          100      88       12
 Bexar County and Hidalgo              DS Other Flows - Midwest                            577     509       68
 County.                               DS Other Flows - South                              499     570      -71
                                       DS Other Flows - West                               288     251       37
                                       FR Foreign - Other flows                            107      21       86
                                                                                                           121
County Migration Data (Maricopa County, Arizona)
Migration of Maricopa County,               Internal Revenue Service Migration Data for Maricopa County, Arizona
Arizona                                                                   2005 to 2006
      Maricopa County had 84,709       Households Moving Into and Out of Maricopa                                 Net
                                                                                                In      Out
households move to the county          County, AZ and Net Migration                                            Migration
and 59,899 move from the county         AZ Maricopa County Total Migration-US                84,702    59,899   24,803
for a net gain of 24,803                AZ Maricopa County Total Migration-US                83,007    58,967   24,040
households. Maricopa gains more         AZ Maricopa County Total Migration-Same State        11,294    16,222   -4,928
households from other areas in the      AZ Maricopa County Total Migration-Different State   71,713    42,745   28,968
U.S. than it loses for a net gain of    AZ Maricopa County Total Migration-Foreign            1,695     932       763
28,968 households within the US.        AZ Maricopa County Non-Migrant                     1,095,956 1,095,956      0
Maricopa County had a net gain of       CA Los Angeles County                                 5,388    1,456     3,932
763 households from a foreign           AZ Pinal County                                       2,874    8,078    -5,204
country.                                AZ Pima County                                        2,691    1,925      766
                                        CA San Diego County                                   2,637    1,224     1,413
      Migration to Maricopa
                                        CA Orange County                                      2,333     715      1,618
contributed 2.3 percent growth to
                                        IL Cook County                                        1,598     664       934
the county. Eighty-six percent of
                                        NV Clark County                                       1,554    1,246      308
Maricopa County’s in-migration
                                        CA Riverside County                                   1,283     518       765
comes from a variety of other
                                        AZ Yavapai County                                     1,277    1,966     -689
states and just under 1 percent
                                        AZ Coconino County                                    1,213     945       268
(.9 percent) came from a foreign
                                        CA San Bernardino County                              1,175     392       783
country.
                                       WA King County                                          926      667       259
      Maricopa County loses the         CA Santa Clara County                                  818      352       466
greatest number of households to        CA Ventura County                                      740      176       564
other counties in Arizona,              AZ Navajo County                                       698      848      -150
particularly Pinal County.              SS Other Flows - Same State                             28       39       -11
      Significant out-of-state          DS Other Flows - Different State                      5,030    5,142     -112
migration flows come from               DS Other Flows - Northeast                             392      436       -44
southern California, Cook County,       DS Other Flows - Midwest                              1,995    1,983       12
IL, Clark County, NV and King           DS Other Flows - South                                2,010    1,992       18
County, WA.                             DS Other Flows - West                                  633      731       -98
                                                                                                                   122
 County Migration Data (Bernalillo County, New Mexico)
                                          Internal Revenue Service Migration Data for Bernalillo County, New Mexico
Migration of Bernalillo County,                                             2005 to 2006
NM                                     Households Moving Into and Out of Bernalillo                             Net
                                                                                               In      Out
      Bernalillo County had 16,189     County NM and Net Migration                                           Migration
households move to the county          NM Bernalillo County Total Migration-US              16,189    14,081   2,108
and 14,081 move from the county        NM Bernalillo County Total Migration-US              15,720    13,799   1,921
for a net gain of 2,108 households.    NM Bernalillo County Total Migration-Same State       6,037    5,343     694
Bernalillo County gains more           NM Bernalillo County Total Migration-Different State  9,683    8,456    1,227
households from other areas in the     NM Bernalillo County Total Migration-Foreign           469      282      187
U.S. than it loses for a net gain of   NM Bernalillo County Non-Migrant                     209,181  209,181     0
1,921 households from within the       NM Sandoval County                                    1,711    2,259    -548
US. Bernalillo County had a net        NM Santa Fe County                                     812      541      271
gain of 180 households from a          NM Valencia County                                     795      738       57
foreign country.                       AZ Maricopa County                                     426      676     -250
     Migration to Bernalillo           CA Los Angeles County                                  423      217      206
County contributed 1.0 percent         NM Dona Ana County                                     369      202      167
growth to the county. Fifty-nine       NM Mckinley County                                     369      211      158
percent of Bernalillo County’s in-     TX El Paso County                                      307      173      134
migration comes from other states      NM San Juan County                                     296      216       80
and 2.9 percent is from a foreign      FR Foreign - APO/FPO ZIPs                              256      194       62
country. The balance, 38 percent,      CA San Diego County                                    251      160       91
comes from within the state.           NV Clark County                                        213      262      -49
                                       NM Cibola County                                       202      123       79
     Bernalillo loses the greatest
                                       NM Torrance County                                     188      181       7
number of households to Sandoval
                                       NM San Miguel County                                   151       90       61
County, NM. Migration streams to
                                       SS Other Flows - Same State                             25       17       8
Bernalillo County come from
                                       DS Other Flows – Different State                      2,625    2,464     161
Maricopa County, AZ; Los Angeles
                                       DS Other Flows - Northeast                             403      387       16
County, and El Paso County.
                                       DS Other Flows - Midwest                               691      590      101
                                       DS Other Flows - South                                 992     1,050     -58
                                       DS Other Flows - West                                  539      437      102
                                                                                                               123
County Migration Data (Pima County, Arizona)
                                             Internal Revenue Service Migration Data for Pima County, Arizona
 Migration of Pima County, AZ                                            2005 to 2006
                                       Households Moving Into and Out of Pima                                 Net
       Pima County had 21,038                                                               In     Out
                                       County, AZ and Net Migration                                        Migration
 households move to the county          AZ Pima County Total Migration-US & Foreign      21,038   16,569     4,469
 and 16,569 move from the               AZ Pima County Total Migration-US                20,139   16,081     4,058
 county for a net gain of 4,469         AZ Pima County Total Migration-Same State         4,552   4,910       -358
 households. Pima County gains          AZ Pima County Total Migration-Different State   15,587   11,171     4,416
 more households to other areas         AZ Pima County Total Migration-Foreign             899     488         411
 in the U.S. than it loses for a net    AZ Pima County Non-Migrants                     294,297  294,297         0
 gain of 4,058 households from          AZ Maricopa County                                1,925   2,691       -766
 within the US. Pima County had a
                                        AZ Cochise County                                  735     529         206
 net gain of 411 households from
                                        CA Los Angeles County                              724     357         367
 a foreign country.
                                        CA San Diego County                                588     358         230
                                        AZ Pinal County                                    460     510         -50
       Migration to Pima County
                                        FR Foreign - APO/FPO ZIPs                          415     366          49
 contributed 1.8 percent growth to
                                        AZ Santa Cruz County                               394     280         114
 the county. Seventy-four percent
                                        NV Clark County                                    367     340          27
 of Pima County’s in-migration
                                        CA Orange County                                   291     130         161
 comes other states and 1.9
                                        CA Riverside County                                281     116         165
 percent is from a foreign country.
                                        AZ Coconino County                                 255     188          67
 The balance of 24 percent comes
 from within state.                     CA San Bernardino County                           227      95         132
                                       WA King County                                      194     179          15
      Pima loses the greatest           IL Cook County                                     191     119          72
 number of households to                AZ Yavapai County                                  179     167          12
 Maricopa County, AZ. Migration         SS Other Flows - Same State                         12      15          -3
 streams to Pima County come            DS Other Flows - Different State                  3,390   3,230        160
 from southern California, Clark        DS Other Flows - Northeast                         473     480          -7
 County, NV, King County, WA and        DS Other Flows - Midwest                          1,120    901         219
 Cook County, IL.                       DS Other Flows - South                            1,193   1,220        -27
                                        DS Other Flows - West                              604     629         -25
                                                                                                             124
Summary of Migration Trends in the Southwestern US

      The chart shows the contribution of net-in-
migration to each of the counties included in this
analysis.
       Despite being large metropolitan areas, Pima
and Maricopa Counties in Arizona continue to grow
their population base with in-migration.
       It is clear that Dona Ana and Bernalillo Counties
in New Mexico have developed migration streams that
are likely based on retiree attraction. They have a
strong influx of households from other states that are
derived to a great extent from the same areas as that
of Pima and Maricopa counties in Arizona.
       Santa Fe County was a bit of a surprise in that
it does not have a significant in-migration stream and
it may be more of a tourist destination as opposed to
a retiree attraction area. We have not studied this,
but have only looked at the migration data for this
area.
       Net in-migration to El Paso has a small impact
on its growth. The growth is from foreign countries
and is not from other states. The out-migration from
El Paso to other states needs to be better understood.
As an outside observer, it may be because there
appear to be better neighborhoods in other locations
than in El Paso County.
       El Paso County has low-cost housing, but that
housing is located in neighborhoods that do not have
streetscapes, green areas, play grounds or parks.
There are few neighborhoods in El Paso that give you
the opportunity to walk to a restaurant, park, coffee
shop or other destination.
 Migration Streams to Southwestern US States

      Migration to Southwestern states is dominated by streams from Los Angeles County and San Diego County. El
Paso County has a measurable migration stream from these areas.
      Other California counties that contribute to migration streams to these counties include Orange, Riverside, San
Bernardino, Ventura and Santa Clara counties. All of the California counties, with the exception of Santa Clara are in
southern California. Santa Clara county is just below San Francisco.
      Other counties that show migration streams to the Southwestern counties include Clark County, NV; Cook
County, IL; Maricopa and Pima Counties in Arizona; and King County, Washington. Interestingly, Cameron County
shows a small migration stream from two counties in Florida Palm Beach and Lee counties.
       These areas that have migration streams to counties in Southwestern cities should be targeted in marketing
efforts.




                                Migration Streams to Counties (in Bold) from Out-of-State Counties

  El Paso       Bernalillo     Dona Ana       Santa Fe        Bexar        Webb      Cameron         Maricopa               Pima

Los Angeles    Maricopa, AZ   El Paso        Los Angeles    Orleans, LA   Cook, IL  San Diego     Los Angeles         Los Angeles
Maricopa, AZ   Los Angeles    Maricopa, AZ   Maricopa, AZ   Los Angeles   San Diego Palm Beach    San Diego           San Diego
San Diego      El Paso        Los Angeles    San Diego                              Los Angeles   Orange, CA          Clark, NC
Bernalillo     San Diego      San Diego      Cook, IL                               Lee, FL       Cook, IL            Orange, CA
               Clark, NV                     Pima, AZ                                             Clark, NC           Riverside, CA
                                                                                                  Riverside, CA       San Bernadino, CA
                                                                                                  San Bernadino, CA   King, WA
                                                                                                  King, WA            Cook, IL
                                                                                                  Santa Clara, CA
                                                                                                  Ventura, CA
         Assessment of Demand by Product Type

Special Note: These demand estimates are preliminary and should not to be used for the development or financing of age-
qualified housing. These demand estimates represent a general overview and are not site specific.
Terms Used in This Section
Qualified Households: the households who are within the age and income groups specified.
Demand: an estimate of the number of households that will purchase or rent (if applicable) the product for which demand is
estimated.
ProMatura Demand Model: The ProMatura Demand Model was developed from a comprehensive survey of a national
sample of households who had made the decision to move and who were in the process of shopping for age-qualified housing
or a retirement community. The study by ProMatura showed the proportion of households who moved to each type of age-
qualified housing community varies significantly by age and income. The ProMatura Model uses 63 numeric multipliers (seven
age groups by nine incomes groups) to project the proportion of households who are likely to make the decision to move to
each type of age-qualified housing community, and the proportion who are shopping for and have a high probability of
moving to each type of age-qualified housing community.
Annual Demand: the demand projections are estimated for a 12 month time period. It is assumed that the demand is
renewed continually. If market conditions change and if there is population growth or decline, the demand estimates would
be adjusted accordingly.
                                                                                                                     127
Market Opportunity: market opportunity is the estimate of excess demand over supply.
    Demand Among 55 to 79 Year Age Group Households
    in Active Adult Communities and All-Age Housing 2007
       It is estimated there is annual total demand for 486 homes in active adult communities among all households
  headed by someone 55 to 79 years of age with an annual household income of $50,000 or more in the region and
  931 homes among the target market sector for homes in all-age (conventional neighborhoods).
        It is estimated that 46 percent of households in El Paso County between 55 and 79 years of age with $50,000
  annual household income are Hispanic (2006 US Census Data). Applying this estimate to demand estimates for
  active adult housing in El Paso County (356) yields approximately 164 of the households who may be Hispanic.
        Historically active adult housing and other forms of age-qualified housing have been occupied almost exclusively
  by non-Hispanic Caucasians. Some have suggested that the cultural differences among Hispanic and non-Hispanic
  households may result in a different rate of adoption of age-qualified housing. We do not know if this is true. But it
  is wise to err on the side of caution until data are available to document the rate of adoption of age-qualified housing
  by Hispanic households is available.
                  Annual Demand for Age-Qualified Active Adult and All-Age Housing in El Paso from Multiple Locations
                                             Among Those 55 to 79 $50,000+ Income in 2007
         Line               A             B             C             D              E             F             G               H
                                                                                                           Percent who
                                                                               Prefer Either
                                                                                                            will Move     Total who may
                                                                 Prefer Age-       Age-
                       Qualified     Number of     Number of                                   Prefer All- Out of State,    move to El
         Area                                                      qualified   Qualified or
                      Households Homeowners         Movers¹                                   Age Housing County, or Paso (Line D+E
                                                                   housing²      Non-Age-
                                                                                                               Same         * Line G)
                                                                                 Qualified²
                                                                                                             County¹
                                                                                                               50.2%
El Paso County, TX       24,596       23,660          1,272          211            498           563          (Same            356
                                                                                                              County)
Hudspeth County, TX         76            73             3             0             1              2          21.0%              0
Reeves County, TX          271           261            14             3             5              6        (Different           2
Jeff Davis County, TX      152           146             8             0             3              5      County, Same           1
Presidio County, TX        182           175            10             1             4              5          State)             1
Dona Ana County, NM       8,168         7,859          422            69            165           188                            67
Otero County, NM          2,834         2,727          147            25             58            64          28.8%             24
Chaves County, NM         2,285         2,199          117            20             46            51      (Out of State)        19
Lea County, NM            2,045         1,968          105            17             41            47                            16
Total                    40,609       39,068          2,098          346           821            931                           486
¹ Source: 2005 American Housing Survey, U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development
² Source: 2006 ProMatura Housing Survey    Special Note: These demand estimates are preliminary and should not to be
                                         used for the development or financing of age-qualified housing. These demand
                                         estimates represent a general overview and are not site specific.
 Demand Among 55 to 79 Year Age Group Households
 in Active Adult Communities and All-Age Housing 2011

      It is estimated that in 2011 there may be annual total demand for 583 homes in active adult communities
among all households headed by someone 55 to 79 years of age with an annual household income of $50,000 or
more in the region and 1,122 homes among the target market sector for homes in all-age (conventional
neighborhoods).
   Annual Demand for Active Adult and All-Age Housing in El Paso from Multiple Locations Among Those 55 to 79 $50,000+ Income in 2011

           Line                  A             B             C           D              E               F             G                 H

                                                                                                              Percent who
                                                                                  Prefer Either                                   Total who may
                                                         Number     Prefer Age-                             will Move Out of
                            Qualified     Number of                               Age-Qualified Prefer All-                       move to El Paso
           Area                                            of        qualified                               State, County,
                           Households    Homeowners                                or Non-Age- Age Housing                          (Line D+E)
                                                         Movers¹     housing²                                    or Same
                                                                                    Qualified²                                       (Line G)
                                                                                                                 County¹

                                                                                                                    50.2%
El Paso County, Texas         29,646         28,518        1,543        254            606            683                              432
                                                                                                                 (Same County)

Hudspeth County, Texas          98             94            5           1              2               2                               2
                                                                                                                    21.0%
Reeves County, Texas           297            286           15           2              6               7                               1
                                                                                                                   (Different
Jeff Davis County, Texas       176            170            9           1              4               4        County, Same           1
                                                                                                                     State)
Presidio County, Texas         231            222           12           2              5               5                               1

Dona Ana County, New
                               9,807         9,436          507          84            199            224                               82
Mexico

Otero County, New Mexico       3,436         3,307          177          29             69             79           28.8%               21

Chaves County, New                                                                                               (Out of State)
                               2,617         2,518          134          22             52             60                               22
Mexico

Lea County, New Mexico         2,519         2,423          130          21             51             58                               21

Total                         48,827         46,974       2,532         416            994           1,122                             583

¹ Source: 2005 American Housing Survey, U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development
² Source: 2006 ProMatura Housing Survey
                                         Special Note: These demand estimates are preliminary and should not to be
                                         used for the development or financing of age-qualified housing. These demand
                                         estimates represent a general overview and are not site specific.
    Demand for Age-Qualified Active Adult and All-Age Housing
    Among 55 to 79 Year Age Group Households by State (2007)
           If we assume that a compelling destination resort community is developed in the Paso del Norte region and
    the appropriate marketing is successful, it is estimated there may be demand for as many as 524 age-qualified
    housing units annually in an age-qualified active adult community and 417 in an all-age resort community. This
    is in addition to the demand for 356 age-qualified housing units from people already living in El Paso County.
           The estimate of 1.5 percent of the age and income-qualified households who would move to an age-
    qualified community in a given market who would move to a destination resort community was derived from
    several projects that ProMatura Group has completed for destination resort communities. Our estimates of the
    proportion of the qualified households who will move to a destination resort community have ranged from 1.88
    percent 2.1 percent of the qualified target market households. We used a conservative proportion of 1.5 percent
    of the qualified target households in this demand estimate.
   Annual Demand for a Destination Resort Active Adult and All-Age Housing by State/ Region Among Those 55 to 79
                                             $50,000+ income in 2007
          Line             A             B           C          D            E        F          G                H             I
                                                                                                            Total who may   Total who
                                                              Prefer Either             Percent who          move to an   may move to
                                                     Prefer
                                            Number                Age-      Prefer All- will Move Out        Active Adult  an All-Age
                       Qualified  Number of           Age-
   State/ Region                              of              Qualified or     Age       of State, or        Community     Community
                      Households Homeowners         Qualified
                                            Movers¹            Non-Age-      Housing     Remain in            (Line D+E)
                                                    Housing²                                                              (Line F *Line
                                                               Qualified²                   State¹
                                                                                                               (Line G)        G)
                                                                                                71.2%
Texas                  1,082,197    1,040,748      56,946     9,339        22,427   25,180                     22,617         17928
                                                                                             (Same State)
Arizona                327,495       315,181       16,951     2,801        6,642    7,508      28.8%            2,720         2162
New Mexico             101,833        97,959       5,317       873         2,089    2,355      28.8%             853           678
Southern California    1,055,121    1,014,722      55,435     9,097        21,824   24,514     28.8%            8,724         7060
Total                  2,566,646    2,468,610     134,649    22,110        52,982   59,557                     34,914         27829
Percent who would move to a destination location active adult community¹                                        1.5%          1.5%
Number who would move to a destination location active adult community                                           524           417
¹ Source: 2005 American Housing Survey, U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development
² Source: 2006 ProMatura Housing Survey    Special Note: These demand estimates are preliminary and should not to be used for the
                                             development or financing of age-qualified housing. These demand estimates represent a
                                             general overview and are not site specific.
Demand for Boomers and Beyond Housing by State or Region (2011)
        This table shows the estimates for annual demand of 645 for an active adult destination resort community
  in 2011. In addition, there would be an estimated annual demand for an all-age destination resort community of
  511.
                             Annual Demand for Active Adult and All-Age Housing in Destination Resort Community
                                     by State/ Region Among Those 55 to 79 $50,000+ Income in 2011

        Line        A             B           C           D             E              F              G                H                 I

                                                                                                                  Total who may      Total who
                                                                   Prefer Either                 Percent who         move to a     may move to
                                           Number    Prefer Age-       Age-        Prefer All-   will Move Out     Boomers and      an All-Age
                 Qualified    Number of                                                                                             Community
State/ Region                                of       Qualified    Qualified or       Age         of State, or        Beyond
                Households   Homeowners
                                           Movers¹    Housing²      Non-Age-        Housing        Remain in        Community      (Line F *Line
                                                                    Qualified²                       State¹      (Line D+E)(Line        G)
                                                                                                                        G)

                                                                                                    71.2%
                 1,343,03
Texas                         1,291,961     70,650     11,578        27,831         31,241          (Same            28,060           22,244
                     9
                                                                                                    State)

Arizona          404,799       389,660      20,921      3,457         8,195          9,269          28.8%            3,356             ,2669

New Mexico       126,162       121,396      6,577       1,082         2,584          2,911          28.8%            1,056             838

Southern         1,248,57
                              1,200,998     65,725     10,767        25,899         29,059          28.8%            10,560            8369
California           6

                 3,122,57                   163,87
Total                         3,004,015                26,884        64,509         72,480            2              43,032            3,120
                     6                        3

Percent who would move to a destination location active adult community¹                                             1.5%              1.5%

Number who would move to a destination location active adult community                                                645              511

¹ Source: 2005 American Housing Survey, U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development
² Source: 2006 ProMatura Housing Survey
                                          Special Note: These demand estimates are preliminary and should not to be used
                                          for the development or financing of age-qualified housing. These demand estimates
                                          represent a general overview and are not site specific.
 Existing Supply of Independent Living Properties by County

     Five properties that offer independent living housing and services were identified in El Paso County and one
property was identified in Dona Ana County. There are a total of 511 independent living apartments in El Paso
County and 129 apartments in Dona Ana County.




                                   Independent Living Properties in the Region
              Property                   Address               City      State    ZIP    Property Type     Units
                                               El Paso County, Texas
  Rio Norte                      1941 Saul Kleinfeld Dr      El Paso      TX     79936    Freestanding      119
  Royal Estates of El Paso       435 S Mesa Hills Dr         El Paso      TX     79912      Combined        74
  The Monte Vista at Coronado    1575 Belvedere St           El Paso      TX     79912        CCRC          200
  The Palisades                  1831 Murchison Dr           El Paso      TX     79902      Combined        95
  White Acres Village            7304 Good Samaritan Ct      El Paso      TX     79912        CCRC          23
  Total                                                                                                     511
  Dona Ana County, New Mexico
  Golden Mesa                    151 N Roadrunner Pkwy      Las Cruces    NM     88011                      129
  Total                                                                                                     129
  Otero County, New Mexico
  N/A                            N/A                           N/A       N/A      N/A          N/A           0
  Total                                                                                                      0




                                                                                                                 132
 Assessment of Independent Living Demand
      There is a significant amount of opportunity for additional independent living units in EL Paso, Dona Ana
and Otero Counties. These demand estimates assume that 10 percent of the demand would come from outside of
the prospective county.
      These data must be interpreted cautiously because 70.5 percent of the population 65+ years of age are
Hispanic. Prudence suggests that this market sector may not adopt independent living as readily as the non-
Hispanic market sector.
                     Estimates of Annual Market Opportunity for Independent Living
          in El Paso County, Dona Ana County and Otero County among 75+ $35,000+ Income
                                            2007 and 2012
                                                        El Paso County       Dona Ana County         Otero County
                                                        2007       2012        2007       2012       2007        2012
A   Total qualified market (75+ Households)             7,915      9,262      2,788       3,457       818        1,099
B   Total demand in the PMA                              324        365         111        134        33          43
C   Households drawn from outside the PMA +10%            32         36         11         13          3          4
D Total estimated market opportunity                     356        401        122        147         36          47
E   Competitive units in market                          511        511         129        129         0          0
F   Turnover in competitive units (48.3%)                159        159         40         40          0          0
G   Independent living units in planning                   0          0          0          0          0          0
H   Independent living units to be filled (F + G)        159        159         40         40          0          0
I   Annualized Market Opportunity                        197        242         82        107         36          47


                                  Special Note: These demand estimates are preliminary and should not to be
                                  used for the development or financing of age-qualified housing. These demand
                                  estimates represent a general overview and are not site specific.
                                                                                                                   133
Assisted Living Properties by County
                                           Assisted Living Properties in the Region
               Property                         Address                City      State     ZIP      Property Type     Units
                                                     El Paso County, Texas
 Cambria                                1991 Saul Kleinfeld Dr        El Paso      TX     El Paso     Combined         60
 Loving Care Assisted Living            180 Centre Croom Road         El Paso      TX     El Paso    Freestanding      24
 Regency of El Paso                     221 Bartlett Dr               El Paso      TX     El Paso    Freestanding      60
 Royal Estates of El Paso               435 S Mesa Hills Dr           El Paso      TX     El Paso     Combined         68
 The Palisades                          1831 Murchison Dr             El Paso      TX     El Paso     Combined         61
 Village Oaks at Cielo Vista            7949 Sunmounts Drive          El Paso      TX     El Paso    Freestanding      65
 White Acres                            7304 Good Samaritan Ct        El Paso      TX     El Paso       CCRC           24
                                                           Total                                                      362
                                                Dona Ana County, New Mexico
 Cottonbloom Assisted Living            5525 Cottonbloom Court      Las Cruces     NM     88007      Freestanding      45
 Arbors of Del Rey                      3731 Del Rey                Las Cruces     NM     88012       Combined         24
 Las Cruces Village                     3025 Terrace Drive          Las Cruces     NM     88011       Combined         42
 Heritage                               846 Lettuce lane            Las Cruces     NM     88001      Freestanding      12
 Adobe Assisted Living I-III            1111 East Mountain          Las Cruces     NM     88001       Combined         37
 Aristocrat Assisted Living             2969 Claude Dove Dr         Las Cruces     NM     88011       Combined         45
 Village at Northrise- Morning          2880 N Roadrunner Pkwy      Las Cruces     NM     88011      Freestanding      100
 Village at Northrise- Desert Willows   2884 N Roadrunner Pkwy      Las Cruces     NM     88011       Combined         20
                                                           Total                                                      325

                      Special Note: These demand estimates are preliminary and should not to be used for the
                      development or financing of age-qualified housing. These demand estimates represent a general   134
                      overview and are not site specific.
Assisted Living Properties by County (Continued)




                           Assisted Living Properties in the Region
             Property           Address              City      State   ZIP     Property Type   Units
                                  Otero County, New Mexico
Betty Dare              3101 N. Florida           Alamogordo    NM     88310    Freestanding    90
Mescalero Care Center   180 Centre Croom Road     Mescalero     NM     88340    Freestanding    40
                                          Total                                                130




                                                                                                135
Assessment of Assisted Living Demand

       There appears to be unmet market opportunity for El Paso County while Dona Ana and Otero Counties are
markets that are either overbuilt or show little need for additional assisted living. These data must be
interpreted cautiously because 70.5 percent of the population 65+ years of age are Hispanic. Prudence suggests
that this market sector may not adopt assisted living as readily as the non-Hispanic culture.
       Statistically valid consumer research would be appropriate to define the estimated demand from among



    Estimates Annual Market Opportunity for Assisted Living for El Paso County, Dona Ana County
                                        and Otero County
                               Among Those 75+ with $35,000+
                                          2007 and 2012
                                                                El Paso         Dona Ana
                                                                                               Otero County
                                                                County           County
                                                              2007    2012    2007     2012    2007        2012
     A.   Total qualified market (75+ Households)             7,915   9,262   2,788    3,457    818        1,099
     B.   Total demand in the market                           306     378     109      141      33         46
     C.   Placed by family member (32.8%)                      100     124      36      46       11         15
     D.   Households drawn from outside the PMA (+20%)         41       50      15      19        4         6
     E.   Total estimated demand (B+C+D)                       447     552     160     206       48         67
     F.   Competitive units in market                          362     362     325      325     130        130
     G.   Turnover in competitive units (Annual = 54.2%)       196     196    2,788    3,457     70         70
     H.   Annual Market Opportunity                            251     356     -16      30      -22         -3

                               Special Note: These demand estimates are preliminary and should not to be
                               used for the development or financing for age-qualified housing. These
                               demand estimates represent a general overview and are not site specific.
                                                                                                                   136
Appendices




             137
Appendix A - Military Retirement Communities

The Air Force Villages in San Antonio, Texas are active-living, accredited communities for retired and honorably separated
    officers of ALL uniformed services and their spouses, widow(er)s and senior family members, age 62 and better!

We have happy residents, friendly staff, a feeling of being part of a large family. You will enjoy full service retirement living
    in a fun, non-profit community where you will have all the independence or support you desire. Nearly everything is
    taken care of, so you can be as active or relaxed as you want to be. We have something for everyone!

Both Village I and Village II have over 25 fun activities on site to help keep you active, healthy, sociable, and alert. The
     Village has great food, guest rooms for relatives and friends who may visit, its own beauty and barbershop, and
     covered parking and extra storage are available.

If needed, an exceptional continuum of health care is available which includes wellness clinics, on-site outpatient clinics,
      home health services, assisted living, Alzheimer’s Care residences, and skilled Nursing care.

Village I has a 90% Refund Estate Preservation program which will return nearly all the Entrance Fee to you or your estate!

Both Village I and II are near Lackland AFB and Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center.

For more information about the Villages, visit http://www.airforcevillages.com/.

The Fairfax is ideal for seniors who value their independence and appreciate the good life, is an independent full-service
     community for retired military officers, spouses and surviving spouses of all United States Armed Forces.
Our community features a comfortable lifestyle, superb amenities and the highest standards of hospitality and service. It is
     not surprising, then, that our residents willingly exchange the responsibilities of household maintenance for the
     freedom of living at our community. The community offers a broad range of services and care options including:
     Independent Living, Assisted Living, and Nursing and Rehabilitative Care.
For more information about The Fairfax, visit http://www.sunriseseniorliving.com/Home.do.
Military Retirement Communities (continued)
Falcons Landing is the premier CCRC for retired military officers, their spouses and unremarried surviving spouses. Our
     not-for-profit community is located just 15 miles west of Tysons Corner and the beltway in an elegant, 33-acre gated
     setting of duplex, single homes and apartments. The comprehensive program of services and amenities include meals,
     transportation, utilities (except phone), housekeeping, maintenance, security, bank, beauty/barber shop, chapel,
     library, indoor pool, tennis, activities, classes, trips, and our on-site health center.

     For more information about Falcons Landing, visit http://www.falconslanding.org/.

Knollwood opened its doors in 1962 following a groundbreaking ceremony by Mamie Eisenhower. This unique community
     was the result of the dedication of two special women, Mrs. Maxwell Taylor, the wife of then Chief of Staff of the Army,
     and Mrs. Hoy Davis. These ambitious ladies enlisted the help of thousands of Army wives around the world. Their goal
     was to provide affordable, secure retirement housing and health care services for Army widows who, at the time,
     received minimal benefits from the government. This unique community has been capably managed by the Army
     Distaff Foundation, a non-profit corporation for over 40 years. Knollwood offers a continuum of care to best fulfill the
     physical and emotional needs of each resident.
Knollwood is situated on 16 exquisite acres in Washington, DC. The estate is graced by azaleas, dogwoods and stately oaks
     on a knoll overlooking Rock Creek Park. Our residents thrive on the energy and exciting opportunities offered by living
     in the nation’s capital. The city’s amenities are only minutes away. An enjoyable day at the Smithsonian museum, an
     evening at the Kennedy Center, or just dining in Georgetown are just a few of the many treasures one can appreciate
     in the nation’s capital.
At Knollwood, male and female officers of all uniformed services and their female relatives have the opportunity to live with
     others who have experienced the unique life of the military. Old friendships are renewed and new friends are
     discovered. It is a community in which one instantly feels "at home."
For more information about Knollwood, visit http://www.armydistaff.org/.

Vinson Hall is a not-for-profit Continuing Care Retirement Community established in 1969 by Navy Marine Coast Guard
     Residence Foundation. AT VINSON HALL the choices of activities and lifestyle are as varied as the people who live here.
     The residents themselves organize activities according to their interests. Some prefer jazz sessions, football parties,
     music concerts and cocktail parties. Others prefer book clubs, oil painting, wood carving, bridge and cribbage. Some
     like to spend quiet evenings at home in their own apartments; others like to go out to community events or concerts at
     the Kennedy Center. Still others travel a good part of the year and use Vinson Hall as their home base.
For more information about Vinson Hall, visit http://www.vinsonhall.org/.
   The Implementation
Plan to Attract Retirees and
   Future Retirees to the
  Paso del Norte Region




                               140
Overview of the Implementation Plan

Parts of the Plan
  The implementation plan has seven parts:

  1.   Measurable Objectives
  2.   Keys to Success
  3.   Committees
  4.   Marketing Plan
  5.   Prospect Package
  6.   The Paso del Norte Region Personal Touch Follow-Up Program
  7.   Travel Writer Program




                                                                    141
Objectives of the Implementation Plan – 2008 to 2011
Objective 1. The program will be funded.
Objective 2. The Director will be employed within three months.
Objective 3. The program will be ready to launch within 12 months (by the Christmas Sun Bowl season of
             2008).
       Partnerships are formed with:
              UTEP Alumni Association
              Ft. Bliss                                                         The total of 575 retiree households
              Local Realtors                                                    will have the economic equivalent
              Local Hotel/Motel Association, Local Restaurant Association       of 1,782 manufacturing jobs, and
       Production of new improved walking and driving tours                     at a minimum should bring a
       Web-site                                                                 minimum of $28,750,000 transfer
       Marketing                                                                income to the area based on an
       Volunteer system                                                         average household income of
       Just/Been Club (Just arrived/Been here a while)                          $50,000.
       Tracking program in place
       Hire part-time Director of Volunteers
       Identify ―friendly‖ travel writers and initiate Familiarization (FAM) tour for targeted travel writers
Objective 4. By the third year 50 percent of the leads will be earned through referrals.
Objective 5. By the end of 2011 575 households will have moved to the Paso del Norte region as a direct result
    of the retiree attraction program. A minimum of 75 households will move to the Paso del Norte region by
    the end of year two (2009), an additional 100 households will move in 2010, and 400 households will move
    to the Paso del Norte region in 2011.

    Number of Visitors, Number and Percent Interested in Retirement Move, and Number and Percent Captured
       Number               Number      Percent    Number      Percent  Number              Number
                  Percent                                                         Percent
Year      of                                                                                            Total
                  Interest  Interest   Captured Captured Referrals Referrals Capture        Captured
       Visitors
2008                                        Program in Development
2009    30,000       5%       1,500       5%          75                                                  75
2010    40,000       5%       2,000       5%          100                                                100
2011    40,000      10%       4,000       5%          200       50%      2,000     10%        200        400
                                                                                                               142
Keys to Success
   There is nothing prohibiting the Paso del Norte region from becoming a retirement destination. On the contrary, there
   are many reasons why this area should be successful. The success will be dependent, however, on funding and
   implementation of the plan, reliability, follow-through, commitment and perseverance.

1. Identify and Constantly Monitor the Markets. The market(s), both the markets to target initially and the markets to
   target in a second phase of effort have been defined. These definitions and characteristics of markets should be
   monitored constantly to ensure that the marketing messages and platforms appeal to the prospects most likely to move
   to the area.

2. Funding for the Program. The program should be funded, generously. A shoestring budget will not have an impact
   and will not initiate the retirement migration stream that is desired. The Paso del Norte region is behind much of the rest
   of Texas and the southwestern region in its retirement attraction development, but by doing it right and focusing on the
   market sectors most likely to move to the area the initial streams can be developed. As we have seen with other areas
   that have become retiree magnets, little streams can almost become floods once they get started.

3. Get the Area Ready for the Retiree Business. The Paso del Norte region must get the product ready to be sold. The
   region has much to be offer, but the manner in which is offered must be done carefully so that the visitor(s) to the Paso
   del Norte region will have a successful interaction with the community. El Pasoans are friendly and the community has
   many attractions. Care must be taken to highlight the attractions at the appropriate times so that visitors will find the
   attractions open and have a positive experience.

4. Marshall the Talents of Volunteers. Establish an active volunteer committee to meet and greet prospects. These
   people are critical to the success of the program and should be friendly, outgoing, interested in meeting people and
   having fun. Make responses by the volunteers to inquiries by prospective visitors personal, repetitive, fun and uniquely
   of the Paso del Norte region. The prospects should leave with the opinion that they have never encountered a
   community that is friendlier or more open.
           A volunteer who knows the region well, should follow-up with each inquiry, personally.
           Volunteers should offer to meet with prospects interested in the area for coffee, a drink, a quick get together;
            invite the prospect to a ―Just/Been event‖ if one will be underway while the visitor is in town; and
           Volunteers should maintain the contact with the prospect once they have returned to their homes.
                  A small remembrance token can be mailed;
                  A photograph of their visit can be emailed; and,
                  A phone call to tell them how much their visit was enjoyed.
           Create a unique name for the volunteers that speaks of the region’s history – Conquistadores', rustlers,
            wranglers, marshals, or something else that is distinctively different.
                                                                                                                          143
Keys to Success - 2
5.   Market the Region with Messages that Resonate with the Target Market(s). The Paso del Norte
     region, once the products are prepared and defined, must be marketed well and in a manner consistent with
     the lifestyle preferences of the target market sectors. The market sectors will differ. Marketing messages
     and images must be consistent with who they are and what they want. A military retiree may look for
     something different than the UTEP graduate, and the retiree without a specific affinity group in the region
     may be looking for an entirely different experience.

6.   Start With and Maintain Strong Tracking Programs. Managing and tracking leads, visits, and sales will
     be critical. Information and feedback on the marketing messages, events, and their successes (or lack
     thereof) will be critical to ensure resources are used well and planning will be based on results.

7.   Your Core of Volunteers are Your Most Important Asset. Establish a ―Just/Been‖ club for those who
     have ―Just Arrived‖ and those who have ―Been Here‖ awhile that your volunteer staff, look forward to and
     enjoy. Newcomers are automatically members. The purpose of the club is to provide newcomers with an
     instant group of friends and plenty of places where they will be welcomed. The club gets the newcomers
     ―worked‖ into the community as quickly as possible. The club needs to create opportunities for new people
     to get together with each other and with old-timers. The club should run itself, but it needs to be in place
     early, rather than later.
          The club must create a new, neutral platform for long-time residents and newcomers to get together.
           The club is not political, cliquish or exclusionary. The primary goals of the club are to welcome
           everyone, help stimulate relationships and friendships, and to connect people of similar interests.
          The club sponsors traditional fun (and crazy) events for newcomers and old-timers (depending on the
           tastes and lifestyles of the various groups within the club.
          The club needs to be fluid and try to pair people who have similar attitudes and outlooks.
          The club should prepare a simple newsletter (sent to prospects as well as club members) of the club
           events.
          New club members become part of the retiree attraction volunteers so that they can smooth the
           transition for new people and show them the ropes.
          The right chemistry in the club, and sub-group within the club will be an amazing asset to the
           attraction program and to lifelong residents as well as the newcomers.


                                                                                                               144
Keys to Success - 3
8.   Clean Up and Spruce Up El Paso. El Paso’s appearance and reputation need work. To be blunt: El Paso
     has few streetscapes that are attractive, many areas are ill-kempt and dirty, there are few parks and green
     spaces in neighborhoods, and many areas look tattered, plastic and neon. As an example, this ill-kempt
     appearance is evident in the areas immediately adjacent to the UTEP campus. Even though there is a small
     area of restaurants that are somewhat trendy looking, the area around this small enclave almost completely
     masks the nicer appearance.

     El Paso needs to invest in its streetscapes, and prepare and enforce reasonable ordinances. Some places
     establish ―Tool Libraries‖ that loan the necessary implements for people to be able to keep their yards and
     lawns intact.

      Civic clubs should be asked to adopt areas of the community to create streetscapes, add landscaping
     (desert landscaping is fine), and to maintain the areas. Perhaps a community wide contest among and
     between civic clubs, neighborhoods and businesses could be initiated to pick up, fix up and spruce up their
     defined areas.

     Perhaps a grant program can be established to assist neighborhoods create attractive streetscapes.




                                                                                                               145
Five Critical Steps

1.   Establish Committees. The Paso del Norte region should develop a general Retiree Attraction Committee
     with a minimum of four subcommittees: community relations/ fundraising, marketing/promotion,
     ambassadors, and program evaluation.

2.   Write a Marketing Plan. The purpose of this plan is to detail the communications needed to successfully
     implement a program, focusing on the types of retirees the Paso del Norte region desires and how you
     expect to achieve its goals. You will want to augment and refine the ideas in this document.

3.   Create the Paso del Norte Region Touch – the system and personnel to ensure that contacts with the
     Paso del Norte region that will ensure that the prospect sees the best of the Paso del Norte region and meets
     people who represent the spirit of the Paso del Norte region.

4.   Create a Prospect Package. Prepare the packaging of the Paso del Norte region to ensure successful
     encounters so that the positive aspects of the Paso del Norte lifestyle is reinforced.

5.   Follow-up and Fun Follow-Up. Ensure the program is relentless in consistency of contacts with
     prospects. Volunteers must send relevant information to prospective retirees in a timely manner and
     maintain contact through regular and systematic fun follow-up.




                                                                                                              146
Establish Committees




                       147
Retiree Attraction Committee
    The Retiree Attraction Committee in the primary committee that plans and oversees the work of the sub-
    committees.

   Each committee member should be knowledgeable about the committee’s goals regarding program
    development and the steps involved in establishing the program and have the commitment to succeed.

   The program should be developed and operated through five subcommittees.

   Support for the program’s efforts should be sought from the local governing body, businesses, and the
    community at large.

   Support should be built through the designation of a sponsoring organization and a resolution of official
    community support.




                                                                                                                148
Retiree Attraction Committee
Committee membership should come from the following areas:

   Chambers of commerce
   Elected offices
   Health care industry
   Banks and financial institutions
   Local media
   Recreation and leisure services
   Retirees, with a mix of lifelong residents and in-migrant retirees
   Volunteer organizations
   Real estate
   Utility companies
   Economic development and research organizations
   Programs for seniors
   Restaurant, food, and hospitality services
   Local colleges and universities




                                                                         149
The Community Relations/Fundraising Subcommittee
The members of this subcommittee will do the following:
   Locate and maintain contact with current resident and in-migrant retirees in the Paso del Norte region.
   Act as salespeople for the program and build local support by creating awareness of the program through
    speaking engagements, media interviews, and other means.
   Raise the funds necessary to run the program.
   Organize special events, such as golf tournaments, dances, and other activities, to introduce newcomers to
    current residents and raise funds for the program.
   Promote and coordinate the program with local entities such as:
         Bankers
         Builders
         Chambers of Commerce
         Churches
         Civic clubs
         Elected Officials
         Media
         Merchants
         Private Industry
         Realtors
         Service Clubs
         Sports and Hobby Clubs
         Subdivision Associations
         Veterans Organizations
         Colleges and Universities




                                                                                                            150
The Community Relations/Fundraising Subcommittee
 Members of this subcommittee should be knowledgeable on the following three key points:

 (1)   The mission of the retirement attraction committee;
 (2)   How the Paso del Norte region can become involved in the overall retiree attraction program; and,
 (3)   The economic and civic advantages of having retirees move into the Paso del Norte region.

        It should be noted that not only should the economic benefits of attracting retirees be stressed, but it is
 also important to stress the civic contributions retirees make to the community. Because of the link between
 this subcommittee and those who stand to gain from the attraction of retirees—bankers, real estate
 professionals, shop owners, and other business professionals—it is natural that fundraising should be one of
 this subcommittee’s primary responsibilities.
        The spending patterns of the attracted retirees help identify the immediate beneficiaries of a
 successful retiree attraction program. These retirees drive late-model automobiles, are homeowners who
 tend to pay cash for a house, enjoy eating out on a regular basis, and have a considerable amount of
 discretionary income. Possible sources of funding include the following:

      Banks
      Commercial
      Health care provider’s establishments
      Public and private clubs
      Insurance companies
      Restaurants
      Real estate companies
      Utility companies
       Primary beneficiaries such as these should prove helpful in raising funds needed to promote the Paso del
Norte region as a retirement destination. They should have a good understanding of the relationship between
their businesses and the impact of having a significant number of retirees entering the Paso del Norte region.




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 Ambassador Sub-Committee
      Ambassadors should be the most visible and important participants in the retiree recruitment process.
They will not only make the first contact with the prospective retiree by letter or telephone but will probably
serve as tour guides when the prospects visit the Paso del Norte region.

      The level of involvement displayed by the Ambassadors will ultimately determine the success of the
program. Ideal ambassadors are retirees who have relocated to the Paso del Norte region in the past five years.
Because of this, they often have interesting stories to tell prospects regarding their move to the Paso del Norte
region. The most successful ambassadors are retired couples who tour other married couples.

The duties of the Ambassador include the following:

     Respond to inquiries by mail and telephone
     Maintain a log of all contacts made
     Provide tours of the Paso del Norte region to visiting prospects
     Invite prospects to special events — those that might attract visitors to the area
     Maintain continual contact with the prospect until the prospect’s status changes (makes a relocation
      decision or asks not to be contacted again)
     Actively participate in the Just/Been Committee




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Program Evaluation Sub-Committee

       The Program Evaluation Subcommittee should be comprised of representatives from the other four
subcommittees. The retiree attraction program should be a dynamic organization developing and maturing
over time. Many facets of the program will require self-evaluation and maintenance, especially in the early,
formative months. Program evaluation will help to review and clarify the progress of the Retiree Attraction
Program and should be used to direct future program efforts.

This subcommittee’s responsibilities include being accountable for the following:

    A progress review based on previously set goals
    The establishment of a retiree tracking system
    Track the in-migration patterns of retirees who have already settled in the Paso del Norte region. By
     discovering where these new residents have migrated from, the program can determine effective
     avenues for the advertising message and promotional efforts.
    Develop and use a simple survey to track the participants reactions and perceptions of their experiences
     in the Paso del Norte region.

       One major outcome of the evaluation efforts by this subcommittee should be the accurate accounting of
how the overall program has fared within an established time frame. This is usually one to two years since the
goal of the program should be the attraction of a set number of retirees within a given time frame. (The
Retiree Attraction Committee should set a realistic goal for the first two years of the number of retirees the
community can realistically expect to attract.)

       The other major task of this subcommittee is the establishment of a system to track retirees to the
Paso del Norte region to determine if their relocation is a result of the efforts of the program. By measuring
the program’s progress, this subcommittee can determine how near it came to reaching its goal, and it will
also have an invaluable resource directory of new retiree residents as evidence that retirees are indeed
relocating to the area. The database of retirees resulting from these tracking efforts will then prove to be a
valuable resource for newcomer volunteers to serve as ambassadors as part of the effort to continue retiree
attraction.


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Market the Paso del Norte Region




                                   154
Marketing the Paso del Norte Region
Product
      The product is the Paso del Norte region as a place to live. The product consists of housing in an active
adult community development or in a traditional neighborhood and the lifestyle. A slightly greater proportion will
prefer to live in an all-age neighborhood as opposed to an active adult community.

Price
       The price is the total value proposition of living in the Paso del Norte region. It is the cost of housing, cost
of living, cost of traveling to and from their existing location (and/or children), cost of moving; and the cost or
benefit of losing or gaining new friends and an exciting and vibrant lifestyle.

Promotion
      The promotional strategy will need to explicitly depict both the product and value of the Paso del Norte
region. A significant part of the value of the Paso del Norte region will be the people, culture and fun that make
this region what it is.

Place
      This is the distribution system that gets the buyer with the product in a mood to buy. The promotional
materials will need to help bring the prospect to the Paso del Norte region and to the thought – ―I could live in
this wonderful place among these wonderful people.‖




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Marketing/Promotion Sub-Committee
Getting Their Attention
      Members of this subcommittee should be creative idea people whose enthusiasm level is equal to the task.
Those individuals with backgrounds in the media or advertising typically make good candidates for committee
membership as do those whose businesses depend on advertising.

Marketing/Promotion Subcommittee members do the following:

          Evaluate target markets and determine effective and affordable methods to reach those markets
          Create and market the desired image to those markets
          Develop and distribute promotional material
          Coordinate advertising and public relations campaigns with other entities such as the Convention and
           Visitors Bureau, Ft. Bliss, UTEP, and businesses – particularly those related to tourism, entertainment,
           banking, real estate, restaurants, etc.




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Key Marketing Ideas
UTEP
  Partner with the UTEP Alumni Association
  Send mailings to the classes that graduated before 1970
  Become a Gold or Silver Sponsor of UTEP Homecoming
  Co-host functions with the UTEP Alumni Association during homecoming
  Be sure the Just/Been club newsletters (on-line) get to members of the UTEP Alumni Association
  Invite parents of out of town freshmen to a reception in their honor to meet Ambassadors

Ft. Bliss
    Partner with the Ft. Bliss office that handles retirees
    Advertise in the Ft. Bliss Monitor
    Write editorials for the Ft. Bliss Monitor
    Offer to write a weekly or monthly column for Ft. Bliss Monitor about living (retiring) in the Paso del Norte
     region
    Advertise coming home to El Paso

Create unique campaign slogan just for UTEP and Ft. Bliss retirees that conveys Come Back Home to the Paso
    del Norte region.

Create Tours (that will guarantee the tourists will have a successful experience)
   Knowledgeable locals must plan and define routes and stops with points of interest (these routes must begin
    and end at the same place)
   Knowledgeable locals must research the area, solicit participation with local attractions, businesses,
    museums, etc., and monitor the participation and experiences of visitors to the points of interest stops on
    the routes
   Knowledgeable locals who can write should assist with creating brochures (print and on-line) defining when
    and where to go, what to do, what not to miss, etc.
   Knowledgeable locals should be identified and taught to conduct tours of the area. Tours should be available
    on a schedule, and available on-demand, if a guide is available.

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Key Marking Ideas - 2
Travel and Leisure Writers
   Find an angle about El Paso that will be new and fresh. Entice writers with elements of El Paso they can’t
    see somewhere else. Don’t try to make El Paso like every other retirement destination. Find the aspects of
    El Paso that you have and the other areas don’t
   Locate area travel and leisure writers
   Locate regional travel and leisure writers
   Send them a teaser when you have found your fresh angle

Travel and Trade Shows
The Retiree Attraction Committee could work travel and trade shows to promote the Paso del Norte region as a
    retirement destination and to provide the program a learning and information gathering experience, gaining
    first-hand knowledge of what retirees are seeking in a retirement destination. This could best be
    accomplished by having the program director attend these shows with possible assistance from selected
    members of the Marketing/Promotion Subcommittee as well as the Ambassadors Subcommittee.

Create Fact Sheet
   How far will your dollar go in the Paso del Norte region?
   Compare the Paso del Norte region with like-size cities: housing, utilities, groceries, health care,
    entertainment, restaurants, etc.
   How safe will you be?
   What annual activities, facilities do you have (be realistic!) that will bring people to the Paso del Norte
    region.

Answering and Fulfilling Requests
  Knowledgeable local people to answer the phone and give concise, accurate answers to questions
  People to fulfill mailed or e-mailed requests
  The key here is promptness, accuracy, and honesty




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Marketing the Paso del Norte Region to Retirees

    The initial promotional message can be sent effectively to the target audience through the
    following:

   Print media. Utilize both magazines and newspapers for advertising and publicity.
   Brochures. Promote the Paso del Norte region as a retirement destination with brochures to be placed in
    state and local tourist attractions, state welcome centers, and local visitors’ centers.
   Travel and trade shows. These shows are not only excellent ways to promote the local program, but they
    provide opportunities to meet with retirees and gain further understanding of what they seek.
   Direct mail. Examples include newsletters, invitations to special events, special letters to local high school
    and college graduates.
   Promotional video/DVD. This would highlight the Paso del Norte region, be placed in libraries throughout the
    target market area, and be available through special order.
   Internet. Develop an Internet web site to promote the area.
   Broadcast media. Create radio and television advertising, particularly cable television, and publicity.
   Welcome center kiosks. Supply welcome centers with materials for their kiosks.
   Billboards. Develop an outdoor advertising campaign.

    Each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages in cost, penetration, and exposure frequency of
    the message. Each must be carefully weighed within the context of the overall promotional budget. Two of
    these areas, print media and brochures, are discussed on the next pages.




                                                                                                               159
Create Prospect Packages
   Develop a series of ―packages‖ of tours and places to visit that you know will create a successful visit.
         These can be designed such in the following formats‖
                If you have two hours
                If you have half of a day (morning)
                If you have half of a day (afternoon)
                If you have a whole day and one evening
                If you have two days and one night
                If you have three days
                If you have four days
                If you have five days, etc.
         The goal is to have several packages developed and not to leave their visit to chance.
         Develop packages around different types of interests
                Antiquing
                Horse racing
                Mexican art, crafts and culture
                Performing arts
                Visual arts
                Spas
                Golf
   Provide an overnight guesthouse, complimentary lodging, or other amenities, such as a free meal, a round
    of golf, or a mission tour to visiting retiree prospects.
   Develop an entire coupon book filled with items such as passports for retiree prospects.
   Develop a driving tour of the Paso del Norte region featuring historical sights, amenities, and neighborhoods
    that may be of interest to potential in-migrant retirees. The tour can be especially effective if it is available
    on audiocassette or CD. Potential retirees can listen to the community’s story and take the audiocassette
    home as a souvenir.




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Marketing/Promotion Sub-Committee
Getting Their Attention

      The marketing should be completely ―paso.‖ It should be like no one else’s marketing program and should
convey the essential ―paso‖ of Paso del Norte.
     Paso del Norte should develop a unique selling proposition—something belonging entirely to the Paso del
      Norte region, a statement of beliefs unique to the region—to be used in the marketing program.
     Consider several points when developing strategies to elicit the desired response from the target market.
      Even though this process will be part of the overall development of the marketing program, all of the
      committees should have the opportunity to participate.
     Produce a complete community profile that would provide valuable information to potential retirees. They
      would be involved later in the dissemination of this information to prospective in-migrant retirees.
     Develop a quality brochure that provides pertinent information to create interest in the region. Include a
      postage-paid response card with a telephone number (preferably a toll-free 800 number) to call for further
      information. For a small fee, most magazines will provide a listing for the program in their response card
      section and will provide mailing labels for those requesting more information about the program.
     Develop a media kit on the Paso del Norte region. Write newspaper- and magazine-length articles with
      photos to include in the kit. Provide permission for the media to use them.
     Create a DVD featuring the Paso del Norte region as a potential retirement destination and allowing
      interested individuals to visit without leaving their current homes. Be sure the content is appropriate to
      the 55+ consumer. Not ageist content, but content that appeals to the four target market sectors.
     Write a comprehensive story for the local newspaper explaining to the community the benefits of a retiree
      in-migration effort. This story should also suggest that local residents contact family members and
      business associates to do the same.
     Develop a Web site for tourism-based kiosk systems.




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Print Media

    While each method has the ability to deliver a uniquely different audience, the most frequently used media
    source is print. Using print media affords the target audience the luxury of exposure at a leisurely pace. If
    interested, the reader can take time to read long news articles (publicity) or detailed advertisements. Print is
    far more selective than television, radio, and billboards since it allows the targeting of a specific geographic
    market and age group. Because there are so many different types of magazines and newspapers available,
    either in a particular market or region, the message can be tailored to fit the interests of a specific audience.
    Following is a list of publications that are of special interest to the 50 and over market. Examining these
    magazines will provide an idea of what type of public relations stories and advertising commonly appear, as
    well as provide additional insight to that market. Some of these publications are targeted to retirees in
    general; some are targeted to specific audiences, such as travelers or golfers; and some even publish
    special retirement issues.
   Fortune
   Kiplinger’s                                     One long-term goal of the promotional strategy
   Mature Outlook                                  may be to have the Paso del Norte Region
                                                    mentioned or even be the focus of a story in a
   Modern Maturity
                                                    noted national publication, such as the Wall
   Money Magazine                                  Street Journal. Such a goal is definitely
   New Choices                                     achievable, but it will require both time and
   Senior Golfer                                   money: time to develop and promote the initial
   Trailer Life                                    program and money to make repeated visits to
                                                    the offices of the desired media. The end result of
   Travel 50 and Beyond
                                                    obtaining ―free‖ publicity in local, regional, and
   U.S. News & World Report                        even national publications will be the same as if
   Vacations                                       advertising were purchased. People in the target
   Where to Retire                                 audience will read and understand why the Paso
                                                    del Norte region should be their retirement
                                                    destination. This type of publicity has little or no
                                                    cost to the retiree attraction program.



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Brochures

        A brochure is an effective way to promote the Paso del Norte region. Brochures must be tailored to the
retiree and those factors that retirees believe to be necessary in choosing a retirement destination. The seven
criteria critical to attracting retirees—money matters, housing, climate, personal safety, services, work
opportunities, and leisure activities—should be addressed in the brochure. All of the amenities identified through
the community assessment profile should be considered for the brochure. Include as much factual information as
possible. Example: A statement in the brochure that reads ―plenty of affordable housing‖ isn’t as useful as one
that reads ―housing costs in the more desirable areas of the community start at $100,000.‖ This could be
powerful information if the prices of desirable homes in the retiree’s present location start at $175,000. The four
goals of the brochure should be to target, to reach, to inform, and to generate a positive response—make the
telephones ring. To help achieve these goals, a brochure should do the following:

    Target the active retiree and pre-retiree mature adult market and present factors that this market believes to
     be important when choosing a retirement destination.
    Use an easy-to-read format, such as a tri-fold or quad-fold style in 12- to 14-point type with minimal copy.
    Feature color photographs of active and mature adults, local events, facilities, and scenery.
    Include short statements or bulleted information about the lifestyles and amenities of the Paso del Norte
     region.
    Include a tear-off, postage paid return panel to provide interested parties with more information about
     housing, taxes, recreation, shopping, etc.
    Provide a telephone number (preferably a toll free 800 number) for prospects to call for more information.
    Feature a map of the Paso del Norte region.



       The overall impact of the brochure will be a call to action that is simple, direct, and easy for the in-migrant
 retiree prospect to follow through.




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Budget
Program Director
     The program must have a full-time director whose responsibilities are solely to build and establish this
program. If the director is successful it is likely at least one clerical staff person will be required to assist (unless
volunteers are able to provide this support).

Promotional Materials
     A web-site is great, but an attractive, interesting and informative package that includes the ―packages‖ for
successful visits that can be mailed to a prospect with a personal letter will help initiate the personal relationship.

Office expenses
     Telephones, 800 incoming service, postage, computer and lead tracking software (ACT is a good,
inexpensive off-the shelf product).

Advertising
    Advertising in military, travel and alumni publications.

Travel
     Staff should attend ―retirement‖ trade shows. The AARP biannual show may be a good opportunity to show
case Paso del Norte’s attributes.

Gifts
     A small gift (chile pepper ceramic) or another fun remembrance is good to send home with the prospect or
to mail to them two to three weeks after their visit, to remind them of the fun they had while in the area.




                                                                                                                      164
Paso del Norte Personal Touch
Follow-Up Response
The next step in the marketing process is handling the response. The response process follows these steps:

   Initial follow-up
   Telephone follow-up
   Long-term follow-up
   Visit by the prospect
   Decision time
   Long-term success through assimilation

 Initial Follow-UP
               The first step in handling the response is through initial follow-up. Two alternatives exist regarding
     the initial response to a prospect contact. The alternative should be chosen based on the budget of your
     program, the source of program exposure to the prospect, and the type of information requested. Whichever
     choice is made, it is strongly recommended that the mailing be sent within two days of receipt of the lead.
     The alternatives are to send a general brochure with telephone number and tear-off reply card that the
     prospect can use to request specific information or to send a general information packet that will answer
     most questions a prospect would have including the following:
    Cost of living. This should be kept simple. For example, give the exact property taxes on a $100,000 home.
    Climate data. Average seasonal temperatures, precipitation, etc.
    Medical services. The number of physicians and hospital information.
    Recreational opportunities.
    Attractions and events in or near the Paso del Norte region.
    Commercial and public transportation availability.
    Cultural offerings.
    Educational opportunities for adults.
    Shopping.
    Housing availability and rental information.
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Paso del Norte Personal Touch
Follow-Up Response - 2

        Personal Letter
        A personal letter from the Director, Retiree Attraction Committee chairperson, Mayor, can also be included.
When compiling material for the information packet, take a hard look at it from the standpoint of the prospect.
Resist loading the package with materials from various merchants and chamber of commerce members. Too
much medical data, nursing home, or funeral home information may cause prospects to think about the dark side
of retirement, unwittingly causing them to think about staying where they are or moving near their children
rather than to the Paso del Norte region.

      Telephone Follow-Up
      After the initial brochure or information packet has been mailed (within two days of receipt of the lead),
the second step is the telephone follow-up call placed by an ambassador, someone so designated on the
Ambassadors Subcommittee. The telephone follow-up call should be made within 7 to 10 days after the
information packet has been sent. The purpose of the call is to:

     Ensure that the prospect received the material
     Answer any questions the prospect may have
     Determine if further information is required by the prospect
     Gather demographic information, such as profession, hobbies, interests, etc., for a prospect file
     Encourage a local visit by the prospect
     Tell the prospect of upcoming events of the Just/Been Club or in the area
     Ask the prospect if he/she would like to visit
     Make a prospect feel that he or she already has a friend in the Paso del Norte region




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Paso del Norte Personal Touch
Follow-Up Response - 3

   While this contact could result in a prospect visit in a few days, hopefully an ongoing relationship evolves
    over weeks, months, or even years. Providing this personal touch is essential to building a successful retiree
    attraction program.

   A regular schedule should be maintained for ambassadors to make these calls. Some calls will need to be
    made in the evening to reach those prospects who work during the day. It is the responsibility of the
    ambassadors to qualify each prospect in regard to a proper fit with the Paso del Norte region. Over time,
    these ambassadors will discover what prospects desire in a retirement destination, whether the Paso del
    Norte region has the ability to satisfy their desires, and how to improve the program.

   The third step in the response process is through long-term follow-up, and the reinforcement process
    begins. The Paso del Norte region can maintain this follow-up through several methods:

        A quarterly mailing in newsletter form, featuring events that will be of interest to new retirees.

        Invite prospects to special events throughout the year.

        Whatever the form of contact chosen, whether written or by telephone, contact must be maintained
         with a prospect until he or she has moved or has requested that contact be terminated. Do not let a
         prospect slip away because of a lack of interest on your part.




                                                                                                                167
Paso del Norte Personal Touch
Follow-Up Response - 4

   The fourth step in the response process will be a visit by the prospect to the Paso del Norte region. The
    prospect’s ambassador should conduct the tour, which should highlight the following:

        Attractions and history
        Shopping
        Medical facilities
        Colleges and universities
        Overview of available housing
        Recreational opportunities, such as public and private golf, swimming, tennis, and walking facilities;
         parks, lakes, etc.
        Transportation facilities, such as airports, bus stations, or train depots

        The prospect may request specific information about churches or certain types of housing. The
         ambassador can add these to any tour. All tours should be reasonable in both scope and time.

   The fifth step in the response process is decision time. After the prospect visit to Paso del Norte Region, one
    of three things will occur:

        They will eliminate the Paso del Norte region from their list of choices.
        They will want to know more about the Paso del Norte region and plan another visit.
        They will move to the Paso del Norte region.




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Paso del Norte Personal Touch
Follow-Up Response - 5
   Should the prospect decide against moving, the Ambassador and/or surveys by the Program Evaluation
    Committee should attempt to discover why. The reasons behind their decision should be honestly probed,
    without offending the prospect. They should be told that the Paso del Norte region has a desire to improve
    and wishes to know the reason they decided against relocation. If known, prospects will usually disclose it,
    but it should not be surprising if they themselves do not know.

   After the initial visit, the prospect may want more information and plan another visit. Supply any requested
    information since it may serve to reinforce the decision-making process. At this stage, prospects will realize
    that they have a contact in the Paso del Norte region on whom they can rely for answers.

   The most desirable action is that prospects have found that the Paso del Norte region meets their needs and
    desires. They have chosen the Paso del Norte region as their retirement destination and they move. The
    final step of the response process is to ensure newcomers are welcome. This will lead to long-term success
    through assimilation, which can be achieved through several methods:

        Newcomer events, such as picnics, dances, golf tournaments
        Special organizations for both in-migrant and in-place retirees
        Institute for Learning in Retirement in connection with the local college or university
        Special projects, such as environmental, educational, and community activities sponsored by the local
         ambassadors. These might include beautification or adopt-a-school projects.




                                                                                                                169
 The Tracking Process
      It is essential to maintain a complete and detailed record of each contact made. Ideally, this tracking system
should be maintained on a computer database that can easily be updated as each new follow-up contact is
recorded. No matter how this database is maintained, the following information should be documented:


       Prospect’s name, address, and telephone number
       Date of initial contact
       How the prospect first learned of the local program
       What type of information the prospect requested and when it was mailed
       Date of follow-up contact, by whom, and any comments
       Demographic profile of prospect, including profession, hobbies, interests, etc.
       Dates of all additional contacts and follow-ups with related information
       Date the prospect is to tour the local community
       Comments following the tour
       Date the prospect relocates to the community or asks to no longer be considered as a prospect

      Some of these sources may provide information on an ongoing basis, others may require periodic information
requests, and some may resist information gathering efforts. It is vital to be aware of any interest the program is
generating; tracking can provide this awareness. Tracking not only reassures committee members that the
program is working, but it also proves the value of the program to those providing funding. Use a quarterly
tracking report to help the local program with long-term tracking efforts. This report should show progress both
with statistics and by committee activity. The quarterly tracking report can provide the following:

         Accountability. It is very useful to have accurate, timely, and cumulative data to justify the existence of the
          program.
         Sources of leads. Effectively assess the marketing strategy by being aware of both how the message
          reached the prospect and where the prospect resides.
         Program improvement ideas. Timely reports can assist the local program in discovering any areas where
          assistance or improvements may be needed.

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The Program for Travel Writers
Purpose

      The goal of this program is to find, court, and find the best travel writers possible for the Paso del
Norte region.

       Travel writers can have an amazing impact on the number of people who visit the community and
ultimately move to the community. The purpose of the program for travel writers is to carefully prepare,
plan and execute the program so that the Paso del Norte region will not only be featured once by the
travel writer, but rather to engage the travel writer so thoroughly in the opportunities and changes of the
Paso del Norte region that they will become frequent writers about the region.

       There are two documents in the Appendices of this section that provide details about conducting
programs for travel writers.
       You must be sure you are ready to have Travel Writers scrutinize the area before you invite them
to the area. You don’t want a perfunctory description of the area, you want a rousing endorsement and
the opinion that ―now‖ is the time to travel to the Paso del Norte region because…‖

The Travel Writers Visit

      Put them in the nicest hotel, take them to all points of interest not just the ―Chamber of
Commerce‖ spots, but the charming extraordinary out of the way spots. Take them to the funky places
and the elegant places.

       Remember El Paso is a ―Wild West‖ town. Don’t try to be Chicago, Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles,
San Francisco, Dallas or any other town. Be yourself and know who you are and where you’re from (your
history).

       Take them to eat at the elegant places and the fun out of the way places. Show off your theatre
and culture. But remember what they want to see and hear and smell are all the things that make you
different and stand out from any other place. They have to have a story they can sell so it has to have a
twist that will get the editor to agree to pay money for it.
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Plan a Familiarization “FAM” Tour for Travel Writers

    A Familiarization or ―FAM‖ tour is planned visit where you plan and execute a visit to the area for five or six
    travel writers at a time. Your goal is to develop personal relationships with the travel writers, but to use
    your time efficiently by touring more than writer at a time.

Find people 55+ who have moved to the Paso del Norte region to visit with Travel Writers.

     When the travel writers visit be sure to have series of people 55+ lined up to visit with them one-on-one.
Get a good mix of people who:
    Never lived in the Paso del Norte region or Texas
    Lived in the Paso del Norte region at one time
    Were Stationed in Texas
    Came to the Paso del Norte region to start a second career
    Always lived in the Paso del Norte region and never wants to move




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The FAM Tour for Travel Writers
   To organize a FAM Tour you must have airlines on board with you or have the money to fly the writers in.

   The best hotel in town must be on board so that the service is top notch. That means that it is not just the
    manager that is involved, but all of the people from the front desk to the maids.

   All of the restaurants should be well aware of who is coming and who they are with.

   Have every minute planned, but include free time for them.

   Do not have any more than 6 writers at any one time. You must be able to make each one of them feel
    special. Try to make sure they aren’t competing for the same story.

   Here are some quotes about why not to come to something that is ―scheduled‖
        ―The programs never have time for us to really work!"
        "The sites try to show us too many things in too little time."
        "I never have time to work on my own, at my own pace, and do MY kind of story."
        "The days are so full I don't have time to even keep my notes straight or call home."
        ―`I'm a photographer and can't tell you how many times I've missed great shots because I had to be
         at some scheduled cocktail party or dinner or go hungry."
        "I don't write about hotels. However, my last FLC trip included four site inspections; we're not travel
         agents, and I resent being treated like one."
        "Too much time is spent going from place to place."




                                                                                                               173
The Program for Travel Writers
   Don’t start off too ambitious. You need to get some practice in with maybe some journalists you know or
    who are from the area. They will then be able to give you some feed-back. They are also the people that
    think they know all there is to know about the Paso del Norte region so you will really have to hustle to get
    them an interesting tour.

   The appendices for this section include list of magazines and newspapers to contact. Send them story ideas
    and see what you get.

   Also choose carefully magazines and newspapers in which to advertise and start as aggressive a campaign
    as you can budget with the advantages of moving to the Paso del Norte region. Consider certain times of
    the year when the hotels are not fully booked to offer specials to people 55+. These should include a tour
    with other 55+ people that live in the Paso del Norte region, discounts at hotels and restaurants and other
    places of entertainment. Be sure they are taken to interesting and fun places, not the hospitals and such
    that could remind them of their ―age‖. Make sure their tour guide is upbeat and ―young‖. Someone they
    would want to be friends with. When trying to attract these people you want to be sure you are reaching
    the market you desire, so choose your placement wisely.




                                                                                                               174
Appendices




             175
   Appendix A. Travel Writers
North American Travel Journalists Association: www.natja.org
Travel Industry Association: www.tia.org
Travel Media and Public Relations Links
To assist public relations professionals, writers and researchers including media and public relations organizations, TIA has
compiled many helpful resources. Simply explore the travel media and public relations links below for specific information.
Want to add an organization to the list? Please send an e-mail with the link.
Adventure Travel Media Source: http://www.atmstravelnews.com
American Society of Journalists and Authors: http://www.asja.org/
Association de Journalistes des Tourismse (France): http://www.ajt.net/
Australian Society of Travel Writers: http://www.astw.org/au
British Guild Of Travel Writers: http://www.bgtw.metronet.co.uk/
Council of Writers Organizations: http://www.councilofwriters.com/memb.html
Eccentric America: http://www.eccentricamerica.com/
European Federation of the Tourism Journalists Associations (FEDAJT): http://www.traveljournalists.org/
GIST (Italy): http://www.gist.it/
Media Kitty: http://mediakitty.com/
Midwest Travel Writers Association: http://www.mtwa.org/
NEOS (Italy): http://www.neonews.com/
North American Travel Journalists Association [NATJA]: http://www.natja.org/
Outdoor Writers Association of America: http://owaa.org/
Pacific Area Travel Writers Association (PATWA): http://www.patwainternational.com/
Public Relations Society of America - Travel and Tourism Section: http://www.travel.prsa.org/
Society of American Travel Writers: http://www.satw.org/
The Connection For Travel Media Professionals: http://www.writersmarketplace.com/ Tourpress Holland http://www.tourjour.nl/
Travel Journalists Guild: http://www.tjgonline.com
Travel Media Association of Canada: http://www.travelmedia.ca
Travel Media Directory: http://www.scottamerican.com
Travel Media Forum (India): http://www.travelmediaforum.com
Travel Media Showcase: http://www.travelmediashowcase.com
Travel Publicity Leads: http://www.travelpublicityleads.com
TravelWriters.com: http://www.Travelwriters.com
Travelwriter Marketletter: http://www.travelwriterml.com
Travel Writers Spot: http://www.inkspot.com/genres/travel/
World Federation of Journalists and Travel Writers http://www.fijet.org/
www.travelwriters.com
Society of American Travel Writers: www.satw.org
http://www.travelpublicationsupdate.com/publications.asp
Society of American Travel Writers
SATW Western Chapter
Executive Committee 2006-08                                     SATW Western Chapter
Stan Wawer, Active                                              Sites Committee
Chair                                                           Richard Irwin, Active
Ph: 626‐962‐8811                                                Sites Chair
stanthewritingman@yahoo.com                                     Seal Beach, California
                                                                Ph: 562-598-0915
Kerrick James, Active (photographer)                            richard.irwin@sgvn.com
First Vice Chair
Ph: 602-276-3111                                                Debbie Dusenbery, Associate (Writer, didn’t see any travel)
kjames5@cox.net                                                 Farmington, New Mexico
Christine Loomis, Active (Children’s writer Boulder, CO)        Ph: 505-326-7602
Second Vice Chair                                               dusenbery@earthlink.net
Ph: 303‐862‐6136 cloom@comcast.net
                                                                Fred Gebhart, Active (Ghostwriter, writes for pay for clients)
Linda DuVal, Active (Colorado Springs Gazette writer)           San Francisco, California
Secretary                                                       Ph: 415-681-3018
Ph: 719-636-0371                                                fgebhart@pobox.com
lindaduval@adelphia.net
                                                                Dan Leeth, Active (Lots of Texas travel news paper articles)
Nancy Daniels, APR, Associate (nothing)                         Aurora, Colorado
Treasurer                                                       Ph: 303-337-5565
Ph: 808-921-6839                                                dan@danleeth.com
nancy.daniels@outrigger.com
                                                                Lori Michimoto, Associate (Media PR)
John Poimiroo, Associate (travel editor, California magazine)   Honolulu, Hawaii
Associate Representative                                        Ph: 808-636-3263
Ph: 916-933-8860                                                michimotopr@hawaii.rr.com
john@poimiroo.com
                                                                Carol Waller, Associate (Exec. Dir. CVB)
Jimm Budd, Active (semi retired travel writer in Mexico City)   Sun Valley, Idaho
Active-at-Large                                                 Ph: 208-725-2111
Ph: 555-559-0462                                                cwaller@visitsunvalley.com
jimm@jimmbudd.com
                                                                Bob Schulman, Associate (Travel writer, also Mature mag)
Gaylene Ore, Associate (Ore Communications)                     Denver, Colorado
Associate-at-Large                                              Ph: 303-741-4306
Ph: 970-887-2536                                                rmschulman@earthlink.net
gaylene@orecommunications.com

Steve Giordano, Active (nothing)
Immediate Past Chair
Ph: 360-733-0249
rsgiordano@aol.com
                                                                                                                                 177
Items on CD

1.   How to Host a FAM Tour
2.   Western Meeting Bid Planning
3.   Fair Housing Pocket Guide
4.   Approving Seniors Housing




                                    178
References




             179
References

Bredehoeft, J.; Ford, J.; Harden, B; Mace, R.; and Rumaugh, J. Review and Interpretation of the Hueco Bolson
    Groundwater Model, Prepared for El Paso Water Utilities, March 2004.

Hunt, H., El Paso Gears Up for the Future. Technical Report 1767, Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University,
    2006.

Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática (INEGI) Principales resultados por localidad 2005
      (http://www.inegi.gob.mx/).

Lowcountry Council of Governments Planning Department, The People and the Economy of the Lowcountry: A
    demographic Overview, (The Lowcountry of South Carolina including Beaufort, SC) Revised August, 2006.

Money Magazine, http://money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/bplive/2007

Moos, B., Texas leaps to No.2 as place to retire., The Dallas Morning News, May 29, 2007.

National Association of Home Builders, Housing Opportunity Index, Housing Opportunity Index: 2nd Quarter 2007 By
     Affordability Rank, 2nd Quarter 2007, http://www.nahb.org, 2007.

National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, Higher Education and the Economic Future of El
     Paso, January 2007.
Real Estate center at Texas A&M University, Real Estate Center Market Overview 2007: El Paso Texas, 2007.

Schauer, D. and D. Soden, Economic Impact of UTEP Retirees on the El Paso Economy, Institute for Policy and
    Economic Development, IPED Technical Reports, University of Texas at El Paso, 2003.



                                                                                                                   180
References

US Department of Veterans Affairs, 1111.va.gov/living_county_by_state.xls

US News & World Report, http://www.usnews.com/listings/retirement, 2007.




                                                                            181

				
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