A Career Guide to Dental Hygiene

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A Career Guide to Dental Hygiene
An Informational Report

Submitted to Dr. David Dayton, Ph.D. Department of English Towson University

by

Stephanie Wise
ENGL 318 May 2009

Abstract This career guide has been created for Towson University students with undecided majors. The document describes the dental hygiene profession, the benefits it provides, and the education required to become a licensed health care professional of this kind. A career guide to dental hygiene will inform students about the appealing profession and encourage them to consider it as their own.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Executive Summary ....................................................................................................... iii I. Description of Dental Hygiene ...................................................................................... 1 Skills Required ............................................................................................................. 2 Modes of Practice ........................................................................................................ 3 A Typical Day in the Life of a Dental Hygienist ............................................................. 4 II. Benefits of Dental hygiene........................................................................................... 4 Great Flexibility ............................................................................................................ 5 A Variety of Professional Settings ............................................................................. 5 Attractive Salary ........................................................................................................... 5 Strong Demand for Dental Hygienists .......................................................................... 7 Career Potential ........................................................................................................ 7 Rewards of Keeping People Healthy ............................................................................ 8 Being a Licensed Health Care Professional .............................................................. 8 III. Becoming a licensed dental hygienist ......................................................................... 8 Degree Programs ......................................................................................................... 9 University of Maryland, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery ..................................... 10 The Dental Hygiene Program.................................................................................. 10 Keeping an Active License ......................................................................................... 11

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Tables ............................................................................................................................... Industries with the Highest Levels of Employment in this Occupation .......................... 6 Top Paying Industries for this Occupation .................................................................... 6 Average Salaries Based on Location ........................................................................... 6

Figures .............................................................................................................................. Professional Roles of the Dental Hygienist ................................................................... 3 Digital X-Rays .............................................................................................................. 2 University of Maryland, Baltimore Dental School ........................................................ 10

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Executive Summary
This career guide has been created for Towson University students with undecided majors. A career guide to dental hygiene will inform students about the appealing profession and encourage them to consider it as their own. The document describes the dental hygiene profession, the benefits it provides, and the education required to become a licensed health care professional of this kind. Dental hygienists provide preventive oral health care for patients; this consists of oral examination, routine cleaning, taking x-rays, and educating about oral health. Dental hygienists work in close collaboration with dentists, other hygienists and dental assistants. It is important that dental hygienists work well with others in addition to being responsible, professional and well mannered individuals. Having an interest in science and health is also an advantage in this career, as they contribute to most of the education required to earn a degree. Dental hygienists are able to work in a variety of professional settings depending on the degree they earn. Having a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree can provide opportunities to be employed as educators, researchers, administrators, advocates and clinicians. The profession of dental hygiene provides many benefits inside and outside of the workplace. Some of the greatest aspects of dental hygiene are the flexibility, attractive income and stability it provides. Part-time, full-time, evening and weekend employment is available for dental hygienists. Often, hygienists are able to choose the days, and sometimes hours, which they work. The flexibility of the career is ideal for parents with young children in school. In 2007, dental hygienists earned an average annual income of $64,910. Salary is based on years of experience and location of the workplace. Salaries as well as demand for dental hygienists have increased over the past years and are expected to do so for years to come. One can earn an Associate’s, Bachelor’s or Master’s Degree in dental hygiene. The University of Maryland, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is the only school to provide students with Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees. The school is also part of the world’s first dental school and is renowned for its exceptional educational programs and state of the art technology. Students who attend UMB will receive an excellent education at a school that is the best of its’ kind. Dental hygiene is an ideal profession for those with children, living on single incomes, or who would prefer working part-time. The career is one of the fastest growing occupations in the world today and is expected to grow well into the future. Even in today’s economy, dental hygiene provides stability, a good income and extreme flexibility. Students with undecided majors would be making a wise choice by looking into the profession of dental hygiene and considering it as their own.

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Introduction
This document is a career guide to dental hygiene created for Towson University students with undecided majors. The purpose of the report is to inform students about the appealing career so that they may consider it as their own. The report provides a description of dental hygiene, the benefits the profession provides and how to become a licensed dental hygienist. The career guide also discusses the different modes of practice and the variety of professional settings for dental hygienists. Dental hygiene is an ideal career option, as it provides flexibility, stability, attractive salary and the rewards of keeping people healthy. Both primary and secondary research was conducted upon creation of this career guide. Much of the information cited throughout the document is from the American Dental Hygienists’ Association website. Another majority of information was collected from the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Dental School website. I conducted an interview with Ms. Manski, the school’s Director of Admissions for the dental hygiene program, as well as an assistant professor. I created a questionnaire for a group of three dental hygienists, and conducted a separate interview with one of them. These health care professionals provided their knowledge and experiences of dental hygiene for Towson University students with undecided majors.

I. Description of Dental Hygiene
“Dental hygienists are licensed oral health professionals who focus on preventing and treating oral diseases-both to protect teeth and gums, and also to protect patients' total health” (“Important Facts,” 2009). As a part of providing preventive oral care, dental hygienists may:      

Perform oral assessments, screenings and evaluations Expose, process and interpret oral x-rays Remove plaque and tartar from the teeth using dental instruments Apply cavity-preventive agents such as fluoride and sealants Administer local anesthetic and/or nitrous oxide analgesia Educate and counsel patients about proper oral hygiene

(“Important Facts,” 2009) The profession of dental hygiene is practiced in a variety of professional settings. This next section of the report will discuss the required skills, the different modes of practice and a typical day in the life of a dental hygienist.

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Skills Required
Dental hygiene is a career in which communication, collaboration and technology are used daily. Those interested in dental hygiene are required to be:       

Professional Responsible Well-mannered Good communicators Personable Interested in science and health (Clark, 2008) Technology savvy

Individuals who possess these skills prior to seeking an education in dental hygiene will have a much easier time adapting to the professional setting. Dental hygienists communicate with patients, other fellow hygienists, dental assistants, and dentists each day. Often times, dental hygienists work in close collaboration with their co-workers, assisting with filling cavities, etc. The group of dental hygienists, who responded to my questionnaire, agreed that communication skills as well as personality are very important to be successful in the profession. One suggested that being friendly and compassionate will better relationships with patients, while another said the ability to listen to your patients is highly important. It is also important that those seeking this career are open to learning and working with new technology. Many private practices are upgrading to the advanced technology in dental care, such as digital x-rays like the one displayed in Figure 1. “Chartless practices” are becoming much more common, where all patient information is stored on a computer rather than kept in paper charts. As with any profession, it is important that these routines be carried out responsibly and with a positive and professional attitude.

Figure 1 Digital X-Rays Source: Complete Care Dental (2008).

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Modes of Practice
Based on one’s level of education, licensed Dental Hygienists have different career options. Figure 2 displays the different career paths for dental hygienists in the field of public health. “In addition to treating patients directly, dental hygienists may also work as educators, researchers, and administrators” (“Education and Careers,” 2009). They can also work in a variety of professional settings such as:        

Private dental offices Schools Public health clinics Hospitals Managed care organizations Correctional institutions Nursing homes Corporate environments

(“Important Facts,” 2009)

Figure 2 Professional Roles of the Dental Hygienist Source: Massachusetts Dental Hygienists’ Association. (2006).

The majority of dental hygienists have an Associate’s Degree and are employed in private dental offices. Having a Masters degree in dental hygiene provides many opportunities beyond working in the most common setting of a private practice. The Director of Admissions for the dental hygiene program at University of Maryland, Baltimore noted the opportunities provided by having a Masters degree in a personal interview. Ms. Manski stated, “The Masters has allowed me to go beyond clinical hygiene, participate in research, scholarly activities, teach and be an administrator. Having my Masters Degree has allowed me to advance to my current position; Director of Admissions and Assistant Professor.”

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A Typical Day in the Life of a Dental Hygienist
As you now know, there are many different ways to practice dental hygiene in today’s world. However, almost all dental hygienists are employed in private dental offices all over the country (“Occupational Outlook Handbook,” 2000). Private practices can provide care for people of all ages or can be pediatric, specializing in and providing only for children. A typical day in a private practice begins around 8:00 a.m. for dental hygienists. Each hygienist has patients scheduled throughout the day, the first around a half hour into the morning. Dental hygienists begin observing a patient based on their previous health records kept on file. Hygienists usually begin their preventive care treatment by removing plaque and tartar from the teeth. Sometimes, fluoride and other preventive agents are applied. When necessary, dental hygienists take x-rays of the teeth to analyze for cavities and other problems. The dentist follows up with the patient, checking the hygienist’s work while the hygienist communicates and updates the patient’s records. One hygienist, Jennifer, shared over a phone interview, that in a typical day she will see about seven patients. She guessed that on average, only one of those patients is a new one and one may be a child. Jennifer said she sees her first patient around 8:45 and her last at 3:00. She begins by updating the patient’s medical history then proceeds to the routine cleaning and check-up. Jennifer then added that she will take the patient’s x-rays when necessary.

II. Benefits of Dental Hygiene
“The dental hygiene profession can provide many satisfying opportunities, including: being a licensed health care professional, the rewards of keeping people healthy, a flexible work schedule, a variety of professional settings, the opportunity to work nationwide or abroad, pleasant surroundings, career potential, attractive income and professional stability” (“Education and Careers,” 2009). Dental hygiene is a wonderful, stable profession to be a part of. There are many rewarding aspects of dental hygiene that exist inside and outside of the workplace. This career is ideal for those raising families and living on single incomes. With great flexibility, an attractive salary and increasing demand, dental hygiene is a profession of stability.

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Great Flexibility
The profession of dental hygiene provides extreme flexibility in terms of working days, hours and locations. Full-time, part-time, evening and weekend work is available for dental hygienists. Often times, dentists hire hygienists to work 2 to 3 days a week, allowing hygienists to be employed at more than one office (“Occupational Outlook Handbook,” 2000). Ms. Manski confirmed that she only worked when she wanted to, which was usually 2 or 3 days a week. A group of interviewed hygienists all answered that flexibility is the number one greatest aspect of the profession. Many times dental hygienists can choose the days and hours they are willing to work. This flexibility is especially crucial for those with young children. One hygienist of over 35 years says, “no matter if I want to work 1,2,3,4 days is up to me. I can control my work schedule to work around family.” When Ms. Manski worked in private practice from 8-2, it allowed her to pick up her children from school. Another dental hygienist said that because she works during her children’s school hours, she is able to be active in after school meetings and events.

Variety of Professional Settings
Dental hygienists also have flexibility in deciding what type of setting to practice in. In addition to the typical dental office environment, hygienists can choose to work for hospitals, clinics, institutions, nursing homes, schools, and corporate environments (“Important Facts,” 2009). Students should know what type of professional setting they would most enjoy because it might require a certain degree. Dental hygiene also allows one to work nationwide or abroad. For those wanting to work in the country, dental hygiene can be practiced in every state and nearly every town! Dental hygiene is an incredibly stable job, providing opportunities for work all over the country and other parts of the world.

Attractive Salary
The national average annual salary for dental hygienists in May 2007 was $64,910 (“Occupational Employer Statistics,” 2007). However, income is based on years of experience and varies by location and employment setting. The following tables provide income information based on industry and location from May 2008. The tables show that an outstanding majority of dental hygienists are employed in private dental offices, earning an annual mean wage

6 of $65,140. The top paying professional settings for dental hygienists are Employment Services and Office Administrative Services, at an annual mean wage of over $69,000 each. The national average for all dental hygienists in the nation is $64,910 and $65,880 for the state of Maryland. Industries with the highest levels of employment in this occupation:

Industry Offices of Dentists Employment Services Offices of Physicians General Medical and Surgical Hospitals Outpatient Care Centers

Employment 161,920 1,640 1,610 480 470

Hourly mean wage $31.32 $33.53 $27.15 $26.43 $32.98

Annual mean wage $65,140 $69,730 $56,470 $54,970 $68,590

Occupational Employer Statistics. (2007, May). Retrieved April 30, 2009 from the United States Department of Labor Web Site: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes292021.htm

Top paying industries for this occupation:
Industry Employment Services Office Administrative Services Outpatient Care Centers Management, Scientific, and Technical Consulting Services Offices of Dentists Employment 1,640 160 470 (8) 161,920 Hourly mean wage $33.53 $33.24 $32.98 $32.38 $31.32 Annual mean wage $69,730 $69,140 $68,590 $67,340 $65,140

Occupational Employer Statistics. (2007, May). Retrieved April 30, 2009 from the United States Department of Labor Web Site: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes292021.htm

Average Salaries based on Location:

Area Name National Maryland

Employment 168,600 2,750

Hourly Mean Wage $20.42 $31.67

Annual Mean Wage $64,910 $65,880

Occupational Employer Statistics. (2007, May). Retrieved April 30, 2009 from the United States Department of Labor Web Site: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes292021.htm

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Strong Demand for Dental Hygienists
The demand and employment rate for dental hygienists has been increasing over the past few years. The dental hygiene profession is ranked as one of the fastest growing occupations and is expected to grow 30% through 2016. This growth, which is much faster than the average for all occupations, is a result of the increased demand for dental care and therefore, hygienists (“Dental Hygienists,” 2009). Ms. Manski of UMB explains that dental hygienists are improving the health of Americans as the public increases their access to healthcare. Today’s world has a much better understanding of the importance of oral care. Therefore, people are able to maintain healthier teeth for a longer time. As more people are retaining their teeth, the need and use of dental hygienists increases. Each dental hygienist that was interviewed answered that they have never had trouble finding employment in their career. Even in today’s economy, dental hygienists feel very stable with their careers. One hygienist said she hasn’t had a change in her working schedule, as people are still coming in for their routine care. The Director of Admissions for UMB agrees that “the profession is on the cutting edge.” This job provides a stable outlook with the increasing demand for oral health care in our world today.

Career Potential
Dental hygiene is a career that offers more opportunities with an increase in education and/or work experience. Hygienists can easily go back to school to earn a higher degree if the career isn’t what they had expected. By earning a Bachelor’s or Master’s, dental hygienists can broaden their employment as:
 Dental Hygiene Instructor  Public Health Hygienist  Dental Laboratory Technician  Dental Sales Representative  Member of Dental Examining Board  Public School Hygienist  Dental Hygiene Administrator in hospital-type setting

(“Career Potential,” n.d.)

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Rewards of Keeping People Healthy
Knowing that you’re improving someone’s health and making a difference in their life is rewarding all the same. Three of the four people interviewed included the relationship with their patients as one of the greatest aspects of their career. Ms. Manski believes the one on one care with patients is a major advantage of choosing dental hygiene over other health professions. When patients are shown that their providers truly care for them, trusting relationships develop. One hygienist added that patients sometimes need them to listen to their problems. Another hygienist said her patients often schedule their next appointment based on the days and hours she works. Dental hygienists agree it’s rewarding to have the ability to change the way someone feels about themselves. A dental hygienist from Westchester, New York shared her relationships with her patients in an article in Modern Hygienist. She says, “It was my patients that helped fill my days with a sense of accomplishment. They were “parents and grandparents” to me, as mine had died when I was young. They were so much more than charts to write up and mouths to clean; I never felt anything other than devotion to them and I got so much more in return” (Carter, 2009). This profession is rewarding in that it can provide a sense of trust, love, and devotion between patient and provider.

Being a Licensed Health Care Professional
Health care professionals are respected and trusted for their education, knowledge and care with which they provide the public. Dental hygienists are always learning more about health care by attending courses to earn credits required to keep an active license. Ms. Manski believes another great aspect of being a dental hygienist is that you are “the only other dental professional in the office who is boarded and licensed.” Having a license in the field of health is a true accomplishment that is greatly respected.

III. Becoming a Licensed Dental Hygienist
To earn a degree in dental hygiene, one needs to be accepted into a dental hygiene program at the college level. There are only three schools in Maryland with a dental hygiene program:  

University of Maryland Dental School Allegany College of Maryland

9  Baltimore City Community College

(“Entry-Level,” 2009).

Degree Programs
An Associate’s Degree, Bachelor of Science, or Master of Science can be earned in dental hygiene. Private dental offices require their hygienists to have a minimum of an Associate’s Degree or certificate in dental hygiene (“Dental Hygienists,” 2009). Of the dental hygienists interviewed, one earned an Associate’s Degree while the other two earned a Bachelor’s Degree. Those with Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees are the dental hygienists who are able to go beyond clinical practice. Dental hygiene education is a minimum of two years but can be as long as four years. Two year programs offer a certificate or Associate’s Degree; four year programs offer a Baccalaureate Degree. Those interested in earning a Master’s Degree can expect to complete the program in an additional 18-36 months (“Baltimore College,” 2009). The dental hygiene curriculum consists of:     

General education courses Basic science courses Dental science courses Dental hygiene science courses Supervised instruction in pre-clinical and clinical practice

(“Earning a Dental Hygiene Education,” 2009). Most dental hygiene programs offer an Associate’s Degree or certificate; only some offer a Bachelors Degree. The University of Maryland, Baltimore, is the only school in the state that offers a Bachelor’s Degree, as well as a Master’s (“Entry-Level,” 2009). The dental hygienists interviewed with a Bachelor’s Degree earned their degree at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

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University of Maryland, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery

The dental school at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) is the best of its kind and conveniently located in downtown Baltimore. “The Dental School has the dual distinction of being the first dental college in the world and a recognized leader in scholarship, research, and service” (“Baltimore College,” 2009). The school provides a state-of-the-art learning Figure 3 Baltimore College of Dental Surgery environment for students in the dental hygiene program. A new dental school building was opened in the fall of 2006 at a total cost of $142 million dollars, pictured in Figure 3. The University of Maryland, Baltimore provides its students with outstanding educational programs, offering online classes as well as programs in other counties (“Baltimore College,” 2009).

The Dental Hygiene Program
The university’s website describes the program,: “An outstanding clinical education program featuring patient-centered and student-centered General Practices simulates the responsibilities of a dental practice. Dental and dental hygiene students provide comprehensive patient care under the supervision of clinical faculty. Small class sizes, modern clinical facilities, an innovative curriculum and faculty members who care-all characterize the dental hygiene program” (“Baltimore College,” 2009). The Director of Admissions, also an Assistant Professor at UMB, explained that their dental hygiene program offers a lot that other schools don’t. Ms. Manski said the entry level program provides students with hybrid online learning and is the only program to do so. She described the program as cutting edge and assured that students are gaining an excellent education at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

11 Ms. Manski advised students interested in earning a degree in dental hygiene to give the program everything they’ve got. She explained the importance of time management and organization upon completing the rigorous program. Ms. Manski later added, “Enjoy all that UMB has to offer, your 2 years will amazingly go by very quickly!” Although the program involves a lot of work, Ms. Manski says that most students are successful in the dental hygiene program. She explained that the professors devote themselves to the student’s success. “Our goal is to graduate every student that is in our program. Their success is ours!”

Keeping an Active License
Once you are a licensed hygienist, you must keep their license active by earning “continuing education” credits. Most states, including Maryland, require dental hygienists to renew their license every two years. Continuing education credits can be earned by taking online courses and attending seminars (“Continuing Education,” 2009). One dental hygienist is a member of a study club which allows her to attend any monthly classes offered for one flat fee. She said dental hygienists are always getting information in the mail about continuing education courses and credits. Ms. Manski said, “every 2 years you must earn continuing education credits to keep your license, so it is a profession devoted to lifelong learning, which is why the personalities of hygienists tend to be the same: devoted, excited learners, critical thinkers, high standards and true professionals.” Dental hygiene is truly a job of the future with its increasing demand as people take more interest in the health of their teeth and gums. The University of Maryland, Baltimore will provide the best education possible in preparing you for the world of dental hygiene. Those who choose to pursue dental hygiene as their career can expect an attractive salary, a flexible yet stable lifestyle, and recognition as a respectable health care professional.

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Appendix A
An assistant professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery was interviewed for this document. Ms. Manski is also the Director of Admissions for the dental hygiene program at UMB and has been a dental hygienist for 26 years. Q: What do you think are the greatest aspects of being a licensed dental hygienist? A: The ability to build rapport with your own patients, being part of an exciting dental health team devoted to the prevention of disease. Besides the dentist, you are the only other dental professional in the office who is boarded and licensed. Q: Are there any particular advantages of choosing dental hygiene over another health profession such as nursing? A: Flexibility of time, great salary, no homework! One on one care with your patient. Q: When working in private practice, has your career provided flexibility? If so, how? A: When I worked in private practice I worked 8-2 and was able to pick up my children from school when they were young. It was flexible; I only worked when I wanted to: 2 or 3 days a week. Q: How has having a Masters degree allowed you to go beyond practicing dental hygiene? A: Having my Masters Degree has allowed me to advance to my current position; Director of Admissions and Assistant Professor. I “practice” now in clinic with my students on their patients, thus helping them to build their clinical skills. The Masters has allowed me to go beyond clinical hygiene, participate in research, scholarly activities, teach and be an administrator. It has also enhanced my critical thinking skills. I had to write a thesis which was a huge part of my Masters and it was intense, but it strengthened my skills, and gave me the satisfaction of completing a research study. Q: What does the dental hygiene program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore provide that other schools don’t? A: The University of Maryland’s dental hygiene program provides hybrid online entry level learning; the only entry level dental hygiene program to do that. It is cutting edge with faculty devoted to the success of their students by innovative teaching. We are also housed within the Dental School (1st dental school in the world), so we have access to the new 2006 school which is state of the art, with the latest technologies, renowned faculty and share the campus with the medical, law, nursing, pharmacy, social work schools on our campus.

13 Q: Overall, would you say that most students are successful in the dental hygiene program? A: Yes. Our goal is to graduate every student that is in our program. Their success is ours! Q: If you could give one piece of advice to a student interested in earning a degree at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, what would it be? A: My advice is to be a good manager of time, be organized, and devote your entire tenure here to school, as it is a rigorous program. You are gaining an excellent education here, so absorb it all, but manage your time wisely. Stay on top of the schedule, note all due dates etc. Ask questions if you don’t know; it is a learning experience every time. As you are part of this program, which is a professional program, you need to know that now you represent not only the University of Maryland Dental Hygiene program but your future profession too. Get involved in our professional association, the American Dental Hygienists’ Association, network with professionals, enjoy all that UMB has to offer, your 2 years will amazingly go by very quickly! Q: Is there anything else you would like to add about the dental hygiene profession or required education? A: As an RDH [Registered Dental Hygienist], MS for 26 years it has been the most rewarding profession, I enjoy my patient interactions, the ability to be the preventive oral health care provider. Not only helping patients achieve good oral health, but educating and working with them to achieve overall health, as the oral health relates to a person’s overall health; seeing the “light bulb” go on for patients and my students is so rewarding. The profession is on the cutting edge, as we can be the change agents for our patients. Access to care is a big buzz word in healthcare; we can be that void that fills spaces where dentists cannot provide the care; expanding our scope of practice to meet the unmet needs of the public will only help to improve the health of Americans. The education is rigorous; no matter a BS or AS degree; it’s so much information. Not only are you learning a new skill, using your hands much differently than you ever have, but you are learning the language of dentistry---a whole new language. You are required to learn; in clinic, in the lab, in the classroom, online etc. Then you are required to take a National written board, then a clinical board, graduate, then you have to take an exam to be licensed in the state you wish to practice. THEN every 2 years you must earn continuing education credits to keep your license; so it is a profession devoted to lifelong learning, which is why the personalities of hygienists tend to be the same: devoted, excited learners, critical thinkers, high standards and true professionals.

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Bibliography
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. (2009). [Image of new dental school building]. Dental School. Retrieved from http://www.dental.umaryland.edu/dentaloffices/alumni/building/ Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School. (2009). Retrieved April 15, 2009 from the University of Maryland, Baltimore Web Site: http://www.dental.umaryland.edu/ Career Potential. Retrieved May 6, 2009 from the Madison Area Technical College Web Site: http://matcmadison.edu/matc/offerings/programs/dental-hygienist/ Carter, T. (2009, February). How Single Moms Make it Work. Modern Hygienist, 34. Clark, B. (2008). Dental Hygienists: Spreading Smiles. Current Health, 34(7), 32. Retrieved April 16, 2009 from Health Source: Consumer Edition database (0163156X). Complete Care Dental. (2008). [Image showing dental hygienist with digital xrays]. We are going green! Introducing Digital X-Rays. Retrieved from http://www.completecaredental.com/content/we-are-going-greenintroducing-digital-x-rays Continuing Education Resources. (2009). Retrieved April 15, 2009 from the American Dental Hygienists Association Web Site: http://www.adha.org/careerinfo/continuing_education.htm Dental Hygienists. (2009). Retrieved April 16, 2009 from the United States Department of Labor Web Site: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos097.htm. Earning a Dental Hygiene Education. (2009). Retrieved April 15, 2009 from the American Dental Hygienists Association Web Site: http://www.adha.org/careerinfo/rdhedu.htm Education and Careers. (2009). Retrieved April 15, 2009 from the American Dental Hygienists Association Web Site: http://www.adha.org/careerinfo/index.html Entry-Level Dental Hygiene Programs. (2009). Retrieved April 15, 2009 from the American Dental Hygienists Association Web Site: http://www.adha.org/careerinfo/entry/md.htm Important Facts About Dental Hygienists. (2009). Retrieved April 15, 2009 from the American Dental Hygienists Association Web Site: http://www.adha.org/careerinfo/dhfacts.htm Massachusetts Dental Hygienists’ Association. (2006). [Chart showing professional roles of the dental hygienist]. Our Mission. Retrieved from http://www.massdha.org/about-mdha/ Occupational Employer Statistics. (2007, May). Retrieved April 30, 2009 from the United States Department of Labor Web Site: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes292021.htm

15 Occupational Outlook Handbook. (2000, March 30). Retrieved April 30, 2009 from the University of Missouri- St. Louis Web Site: http://www.umsl.edu/services/govdocs/ooh20002001/268.htm


				
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Description: A Career Guide to Dental Hygiene describing the profession, its' benefits and required education.