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MTVs 16 and Pregnant Discussion Guide Kayla by fdh56iuoui

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									                                                                              Season 2
                                                                                               - Episode
                                                                                                                 17
                                                                               “Kayla”
Kayla is an Alabama southern belle with great friends, pageant crowns, horses, and a
devoted boyfriend named J.R. But now that she’s pregnant, this princess has to start
making her own tough decisions about marriage and whether or not she’s ready to
leave home.



                                                                                                                      lan
      With so much love and support from their families (plus a cute, healthy baby),
                                                                                                        Kayla & Ry
      you’d think Kayla and J.R. would be having an easy time—but they’re not. Even  n
      though they have a beautiful house just waiting for them to move into, Kayla
      doesn’t want to leave her own parents’ home and start her grown-up life yet. She
      says she and J.R. weren’t ready to be parents and they needed more time for their relationship to grow. J.R. still
      wants to take the next step and get married but Kayla wants her life to slow down. Do you think they’ll make
      it? What will have to happen for them to work it out?

              Having a baby means a lot less time to work on your relationship, even when you’re truly in love. That’s
              why it’s important to make sure you and your partner are committed to each other and to raising a
              family together before you have a baby. In addition to making sure your relationship is solid, what else
              do you want to have in place before starting a family?

      Now that she’s a mom, Kayla is no longer eligible to compete in pageants, she can’t ride horses like she used
      to, she feels like she’s growing apart from her high school friends, and she’s sad about how fast her childhood
      and teen years have disappeared. Being a mom is hard, time-consuming, and exhausting. It’s a lot to handle
      even for the most experienced parent, and it can be nearly impossible for a teenager—even one who has lots
      of help from family. How do you think your life would change if you had a baby now? What would you have to
      put on hold or drop all together in order to care for a child?

              Nearly all teen moms—including the ones on 16 and Pregnant and all the other hundreds of thousands
              of teens who become parents every year—say that while they love their babies, they really wish they
              would have waited.

      Kayla says there have always been pregnant girls at her school but she never thought she’d be one of them.
      That’s how nearly all pregnant teens feel—they never expected it would happen to them. But if you’re having
      unprotected sex you are putting yourself at risk for an unplanned pregnancy. Kayla’s advice to friends is to
      “always wear a raincoat.” What’s the best advice you’ve gotten about preventing pregnancy?

              ”Raincoats” (or condoms) are the only method contraception that prevents STDs, but there are lots of
              other ways to prevent pregnancy. Find out what works and what doesn’t at www.itsyoursexlife.com.
              If you need help picking the best birth control method for you, or you need support using a particular
              method, check out www.Bedsider.org.
      When baby Rylan comes 5 weeks early Kayla’s main thought is whether he’ll have complications from his
      premature birth. Her friends seem more focused on her having an extra month to get her body back in shape
      before prom season. Teen moms often drift apart from their high school friends, as it can be hard to maintain
      connections with people when your priorities are shifting. How do you think Kayla’s friends could be more
      supportive of her in this new phase of her life?




      3 out of 10 girls in the U.S. get pregnant before age 20.

      The number of pregnant and parenting teens is on the rise after 15 years of decline.

      The vast majority of teens who get pregnant don’t do it on purpose—they just don’t think it will happen to
      them.

      The majority of girls who have babies before age 18 do not graduate from high school.

      8 out of 10 fathers don’t marry the teen mother or their baby. Most of the couples don’t even stay together at
      all.

      Once there is a pregnancy, every road ahead is hard—whether the choice is to become a teen parent, make an
      adoption plan, or have an abortion—all of those are really difficult. Preventing a pregnancy is easy.

      It takes two people to get pregnant, but only one to prevent it. Be that one!




Have questions or need to know where to go? Check out these trusted sites and hotlines:

      Think you might be pregnant or need to find a clinic? Call Planned Parenthood at 1-800-230-PLAN or visit
      www.PlannedParenthood.org.

      Have questions about sex, pregnancy, dating, STIs, or anything else you can imagine? Go to Planned Parent-
      hood’s Teen Talk at www.PlannedParenthood.org/teen-talk.

      Do you need information on any sort of reproductive health care topic? Check out the Association of Repro-
      ductive Health Professionals’ website at www.arhp.org.

      Questions about Plan B / Emergency Contraception? 1-800-330-1271 or visit www.planbonestep.com.

      Questions about sexual health, STIs, getting tested, etc.? Check out MTV’s www.itsyoursexlife.com.

      Want more facts and tips on teen pregnancy and how to prevent it (waiting, contraception, talking with par-
      ents, talking with peers, etc.)? Check out www.StayTeen.org (for teens) and www.TheNationalCampaign.org.

								
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