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5 - Promises of Delivery

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PROMISES OF DELIVERY

This chapter sets out the Access Radio projects‟ aspirations regarding the social gains
promised to the Radio Authority and their actual achievements as of January 2003. It
draws on, and usually quotes, the Evaluation Questionnaires completed by the Access
Radio projects. Projects were not required to set targets under every heading. It should be
noted that in a number of cases the pilot projects are still only a part of the way through
their licences and final outcomes are likely to be greater than recorded here.


4.1 A significant feature of the Access Radio pilot projects selected by the Radio
Authority, as revealed in their original submissions and in the Evaluation Questionnaires,
is their intention to deliver significant and usually quantifiable social gains, especially in
the field of radio and life skills training of disadvantaged or socially excluded individuals.
 4.2 The extent to which the projects are rooted in their local communities and are
committed to radio as a means of community and individual development can be
measured
by the web of partnerships or links with community organisations, local authorities,
schools and colleges and public agencies
such the police, to which they lay claim.
 4.3 Below are set out in summary form the social gain targets the Access Radio projects
have set themselves and the actual outcomes, based on recording procedures set up by the
projects, as reported at the end of 2002.


4.4 ANGEL RADIO TARGETS BY LICENCE END, 1 MARCH 2003
DELIVERY – JANUARY 2003

AIM
 4.4.1 Angel Radio will benefit the older community (aged 60 or over), living in the
Borough of Havant, by becoming a focal point of entertainment, information and
stimulation of direct relevance to its target audience, and by enabling that audience to
have direct access to training programmes, work experience and input into the day-to-day
running of the station.
 4.4.2 If Angel Radio‟s Access Radio project was able to become a permanent feature in
the Borough of Havant it would become as integral a part of the everyday lives of older
people as Social Services, and able to operate a wide variety of projects for the benefit of
older people.
 4.4.3

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

Targets
– 12 persons to complete training to present programmes during the project.
– 12 persons to complete training in basic use of iMac computer during the project.
– 12 persons to complete training in use
of the record library during the project.

Outcomes
– 42 persons have completed training to present programmes.
– 18 persons have completed training in basic use of iMac computer.
– 29 persons completed training in use of the record library.
 4.4.4

WORK EXPERIENCE OPPORTUNITIES

Targets
– 1 person to experience general duties at the station, but not undergoing formal training,
each month.

Outcomes
– 5 people experienced general duties at the station, but not undergoing formal training.

4.4.5 CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIAL INCLUSION

Targets
– 10 responses (written) from house-bound people each month.
– 10 responses (telephone) from house-bound people each month.
– 1 house-bound person receiving new contacts via Angel Radio each month.
– 100 people, living alone, attending Angel Radio events during the project.
– 100 people, living alone, joining Angel Radio Friendship Club during the project.
– 5 new pen pals appearing on the Angel Radio list each month.
– 5 new phone pals appearing on the Angel Radio list each month.
– 2 Angel Radio „Home Groups‟ starting up/meeting during the project.


Outcomes
– 25 responses (written) from house-bound people.
– 13 responses (telephone) from house-bound people.
– 13 house-bound persons have received new contacts via Angel Radio.
– To date, 126 people, living alone, have attended Angel Radio events.
– No new members of Angel Radio Friendship Club.
– 25 new pen pals have appeared on the Angel Radio list.
– 25 new phone pals have appeared on the Angel Radio list.
– No Angel Radio „Home Groups‟ started up.

4.4.6 CONTRIBUTION TO LOCAL EDUCATION

Targets
– 10 people attending educational courses advertised on Angel Radio each month.
– 10 education courses advertised on Angel Radio during the project.
– 1 education programme broadcast on Angel Radio during the project.
– 1 education course set up by Angel Radio during the project.
– 2 nursing homes accessing new information via Angel Radio each month.
– 2 day-care centres accessing new information via Angel radio each month.

Outcomes
– More than 50 people have attended educational courses advertised on Angel Radio.
– 10 education courses have been advertised on Angel Radio during the project.
– 38 education programmes have been broadcast on Angel Radio.
– 3 education courses have been set up by Angel Radio.
– More than 20 nursing homes have accessed new information via Angel Radio.
– More than 10 day-care centres have accessed new information via Angel Radio.

4.4.7 SERVICE TO NEIGHBOURHOOD OR INTEREST GROUPS

Targets
– 5 local information programmes broadcast each month.
– 1 local information free-ad broadcast each month.
– 1 local start-up completed during the project.
– 2 local charities/community groups featured each month.
– 1 charity/community group fund-raising event covered each month.
– 2 home safety initiatives broadcast during the project.

Outcomes
– 194 local information programmes have been broadcast.
– 1,028 local information free-ads have been broadcast.
– 1 local start-up has been completed.
– 32 local charities/community groups have been featured.
– 23 charity/community group fund-raising events have been covered.
– 12 home safety initiatives broadcast.

4.4.8 ACCESS TO THE PROJECT BY LOCAL PEOPLE

Targets
– 1,000 responses (written) during the project.
– 5,000 responses (telephone) during the project.
– 100 responses (email) during the project.
– 100 visitors to studio/offices during the project.
– 8 Angel Radio Committee members, drawn from new audiences, during the project.
– 100 people offering advisory input during the project (all reasonable inputs to be acted
on).
– 5 public consultation meetings during the project.
– 2 public surveys asking „What would you change about Angel radio?‟ during the
project.

Outcomes
– 369 responses (written).
– 11,556 responses (telephone).
– 51 responses (email).
– 43 visitors to studio/offices.
– No new Angel Radio Committee members, drawn from new audiences, have been
appointed.
– 18 people offering advisory input (all reasonable inputs to be acted on).
– 447 people have taken part in consultation exercises.
– 2 public surveys have been conducted.

4.4.9 LINGUISTIC IMPACT

Targets
– 12 presenters, new to radio, taking part in broadcasts during the project.
– 500 telephone callers, new to radio, taking part in broadcasts during the project.

Outcomes
– 32 presenters, new to radio have taken part in broadcasts.
– 28 telephone callers, new to radio, have taken part in broadcasts.



4.5 AWAZ FM TARGETS BY LICENCE END, 29 APRIL 2003
DELIVERY – JANUARY 2003

AIM
 4.5.1 To serve a community of ethnic diversity originating from the Indian subcontinent
(Pakistan and India), delivering local, national and international news, along with
community issues in
bi-lingual format (40%). To provide entertainment through a variety of music, poetry and
artistic talent (60%).
 4.5.2 In the long run, also to serve all communities in Glasgow from all ethnic groups,
training in media skills – radio presenting and production, computer IT skills; and to
work in joint collaboration
with local social groups, Ethnic Minorities Employment Council (Emec) and Glasgow
Anti Racist Alliance (Gara).

4.5.3 TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

Targets
– Learning presentation skills on air: operation of equipment, production techniques
(editing, recording of source material and news production).
Outcomes
– The planned training programme has not taken place owing to the failure of a grant
application to the Community Fund. However, on-going training in on-air presentation
has been given to all presenters.
– A newly acquired desk will release equipment and increase the volume of training
offered.

4.5.5 WORK EXPERIENCE OPPORTUNITIES

Targets
– Providing radio broadcasting experience to at least 25 school children and college
students and 50 unemployed adults during the project.

Outcomes
– Work experience has been provided for
7 school children (generating their further involvement with the project).

4.5.6 CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIAL INCLUSION

Targets
– Glasgow Health Board, Emec and Gara to enhance their aims and objectives by
delivering information through Awaz FM‟s community programming strand (2 hours per
day).
– An in-house team to give individuals similar opportunities.

Outcomes
– The collaboration with the Glasgow Health took place successfully (the Board gave
time off for radio work to an employee
who presents for Awaz FM. However, there has been little input from Gara and Emec,
although a working relationship has been maintained.
– Many members of Positive Action , an organisation aiming to unite black and
ethnic minority groups in Glasgow, use Awaz FM as a channel to deliver their
information.
– Awaz FM took part in the Scottish Executive campaign on race, which ran through
October and November 2002.
– During the month of Ramadan, debate programmes were broadcast on Islamic issues.

4.5.7 CONTRIBUTION TO LOCAL EDUCATION

Targets
– Students of at least 2 local colleges, offering media skills courses, to take
part in programming to community groups, as part of their course work. Numbers of
students to be determined later.

Outcomes
– Partnerships with local colleges have not yet taken place, but an initiative is being
planned for the new term.
– Some programmes have had children‟s sections, with about 30 children per programme
taking part in recitals and poetry readings.
4.5.8 SERVICE TO NEIGHBOURHOOD OR INTEREST GROUPS

Targets
– Awaz FM is in the process of linking up with individuals and groups.

Outcomes
– Various small community groups have come on board since April 29th 2002, such
groups include
• Govanhill Action Group, set up to reclaim back its neighbourhood from litter and
vandalism from people living outside the area.
• Young Career Services Association (YCSA),
an Asian based organisation serving Asians throughout Glasgow.
• The Kinning Park Complex runs a small community learning and playgroup centre.
In October Awaz FM provided entertainment and bazaar day for local residents.
• Support for a local cricket team, Giffnock Cricket Club.
• Service Plus, which has provided an immigration service on air. Also a solicitor service
based in Manchester worked with Awaz FM for a period of 4 weeks answering people‟s
queries.
• Mel Milap Centre, run by women from the
Sikh Community.
• The Aldebi Poetry Society, whose aim is to keep Urdu poetry alive, collaborated with
Awaz FM on various programmes.
• The Qaid-E-Azam Society.
• The project worked with local Gurdwara (Sikh), Mandir (Hindu), Mosques (Islam) and
Churches in delivering faith information and events.

4.5.9 ACCESS TO THE PROJECT BY LOCAL PEOPLE

Targets
– Each group presenting community slots will have direct input under guidance.
Presenters will have direct input on how programming reflects audience wishes and
needs.
– Every individual expressing a detailed interest and commitment to broadcasting will be
allowed access to the project. From previous RSL experience, at least 5 people per month
will take part in addition to the core volunteers.

Outcomes
– Overall, 37 „core‟ presenters have been recruited and 18 other volunteers.
– Presenters are given a free hand within the project‟s Charter of Service. Their views on
the project‟s management are sought and taken into account.

4.5.10 LINGUISTIC IMPACT

Targets
– At least 20% increase in the ratio of words to music to be achieved by the end of the
project. Urdu and Panjabi are the dominant languages. Programmes in Arabic and (for
Afghan listeners) Pushtu are broadcast. Individuals to become more aware of spoken
delivery and grammar.

Outcomes
– The use of good quality Panjabi and Urdu
on the station has exceeded expectation.
– An Arabic programme is broadcast once a week.
– Plans are in hand to present programmes
in Kurdish and Farsi.
– The project has received positive feedback on the importance of preserving Asian
languages; parents are especially interested in radio as a means of ensuring that their
children maintain an interest in their
mother tongue.

4.6 BRADFORD COMMUNITY BROADCASTING TARGETS BY LICENCE END, 1
MARCH 2003
DELIVERY – JANUARY 2003
AIM

4.6.1
1. To develop an accessible community radio station, providing unique and appropriate
Bradford focused programming, training local people to make programmes that meet the
needs of their own communities.
2. With a longer term licence, BCB would be able to respond to the needs of the
communities more fully and at their pace, help participants to develop further their
programme making skills (especially journalistic skills), and involve a greater number of
those „hardest to teach‟ groups.

4.6.2
training opportunities

Targets
– 40 people to receive training, including ICT.

Outcomes
– In total, BCB trained 57 individuals in a range of radio production and presentation
skills between Sept 2001 and Dec 2002. Up to
50 people are on a waiting list for training
(as resources/facilities permit). New courses are planned, with a focus on unemployed
people, from January 2003.
– ICT: one of BCB‟s priorities was to
upgrade the skills of the existing presenters/producers/volunteers. Many individual
training sessions have been
held and small group workshops supported in using ICTs for radio.
– Many volunteers were not computer-literate. Others were only used to office-based
applications. Their involvement in community radio gave them the motivation for
accessing and regularly using ICT in a creative and practical context.
– Individual training: Some individual studio training has been provided for people
who came to BCB with a new programme proposal and subsequently had the
idea accepted, or people from outreach projects who wanted to develop further individual
skills.
– Other radio skills training:
– Radio Venus Workshops: weekly radio skills workshops for women to develop their
skills.
– Refugee radio skills training course.
– Introduction to Radio: outreach courses at Whetley Hill centre (see below) for both
Whetley Hill group and 119 group.
– Studio management training: several workshops were held for existing volunteers to
gain studio management skills - to be developed further in 2003.
– Training is currently overseen by the
Director and Broadcast Manager, with input from all other staff. Some sessional tutors
are also employed.

4.6.3
work experience opportunities

Targets
– 8 periods of work experience have been held.

Outcomes
– 6 periods of work experience have been offered to students from school, colleges and
universities.

4.6.4
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– 10 programme teams to be formed, producing regular programmes on
BCB, involving
•       Shipley Communities on Line – community access to ICT
•       Powerhouse Project –
community development project
•       Ripple Project – drugs project
•       Bridge Project – drugs project
•       Assisi Project –
homeless and alcohol project
•       City Centre Project – young homeless project
•       HOPES centre –
training and employment centre
•       1 in 12 club – „anarchists and the like‟!
•       Bangladesh Porishad –
Bengali community centre
•       Age Concern – older people
•       119 project – people with learning difficulties
•       Whetley Hill Centre –
centre for disabled people
•       Frontline Initiative –
African Caribbean Project
•       BIASAN – refugee support
•       CCE – Irish cultural organisation
•       Ukrainian Centre
•       Artworks – arts and regeneration project
•       Asian Disability Network
•       Bradford Volunteer Bureau
– 800 people have been interviewed re: social inclusion, regeneration, community issues
and projects, opportunities, local achievements etc.

Outcomes
– The project has worked with local groups to widen participation in community radio
and their involvement in the station. Most of the groups below are regular broadcast
teams.
– Whetley Hill Resource Centre – a centre for people with physical disabilities. BCB has
developed a fully accessible outreach radio studio at the Whetley Hill centre, which is
used for regular training sessions and programme production. BCB is about to
link it by ISDN to make it a live broadcast venue. There is now a production group
which, with BCB support, produces fortnightly programmes on BCB. There
is also another programme team that independently produces a weekly programme from
the studio.
– Shipley Community Radio – the group continues to meet fortnightly and produce
regular programmes on BCB, including
the Shipley Corner fortnightly programme. On-going training sessions are held with
the group. Individual members of SCR
also produce and present a range of other programmes on BCB. BCB has recently created
a new outreach studio in the New Start centre in Shipley, which has become the home for
Shipley Community Radio and a community-based training base.
– Powerhouse on Air – community development project. The group from the Newlands
SRB area has regular training sessions and produces a monthly neighbourhood radio
programme.
– The Assisi House Project – project for supporting the homeless. BCB is running regular
training sessions for the group,
which is starting to produce programmes
for broadcast.
– City Centre project – project supporting young homeless people. Training sessions have
been held together with occasional programme production.
– The Frontline Initiative – African-Caribbean Community Project. BCB offered a series
of training sessions which led to the production of several programmes, and also people
involved in the training are now regularly taking part in other programme teams.
– The Ripple Project – community based drugs project. BCB continues to offer support to
the radio aspect of this project and supported its RSL in September 2002. The Ripple
Project has produced occasional programmes for broadcast on BCB, with some
individuals starting to become involved with BCB.
– Shipley Communities on Line – community
IT project. It now produces a monthly IT programme on BCB. BCB will be linking the
new training at the New Start Centre to the other Shipley Communities on Line projects.
– 119 Project – project for supporting people with learning difficulties. Following a pilot
project at the Whetley Hill Centre, BCB
has now helped to establish a radio studio
at 119 and has started delivering training projects to enable them to produce regular
pieces for broadcast.
– Coltas Cyotory Air-an – Irish Cultural Association. BCB ran a training project for the
group, which is now producing regular weekly programme Siamsa and has also produced
the first of a series of documentaries on Irish migration to Bradford.
– HOPES – Holme Wood-based training project. BCB ran training project and
the group is now producing a monthly programme for broadcast on BCB.
– Bradford South „Live at home project‟ – older peoples project. Started weekly training
sessions with BCB in September 2002 – Radio Reminiscences project. Produced first
hour long Wartime Memories programme in Dec 2003. Six programmes planned.
– MAPA – African Caribbean Youth Project. Weekly training sessions since Oct 2002 –
no programmes produced yet.
– 1 in 12 club – unemployed support project/social project. Produces fortnightly radio
programme.
– Bradford Mental Heath Action Group – worked with a small group of people to
produce a series of programmes focusing
on mental health issues.
– Other groups BCB has worked with include: Odsal Community Centre, Fagley
Community Centre, Frizinghall Community Centre, Bradford West Youth Team,
Springfield Community Gardens, The Grove Project.
– The project has negotiated to make a series of 6 issue-based programmes with the West
Yorkshire Police. The programmes will
be made by groups themselves who are concerned with those specific issues ( youth,
drugs, community safety, homeless, personal safety etc) – not as public relations for the
police but as an opportunity to bring together the police and the communities. A similar
health-based project is being planned with local PCTs.

4.6.5
contribution to local education

Targets
– BCB will link with local schools, colleges and the university offering practical work
experience opportunities for people on courses – and, where appropriate, on completion
of their course.
– The training opportunities at BCB are
not offered locally by colleges or other institutions and are therefore complementary to
other educational provision.

Outcomes
– BCB has offered work experience placements to school students; has formed links with
Beckfoot school radio project; and Keighley College Internet radio project, visits from
classes and groups of students.Considerable interest from schools in terms of creative
and innovative ways of delivering National Curriculum Objectives through making radio
programmes. The project aims to employ
an education worker to deal specifically
with schools projects and programming.

4.6.6
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– BCB will offer regular broadcast opportunities to all local community and voluntary
and neighbourhood groups to publicise activities, raise issues, etc.

Outcomes
– BCB provides daily broadcast opportunities for local community and neighbourhood
organisations and interest group to publicise projects, events, etc. Average of 15 - 20
groups per week have broadcast time on BCB – see social inclusion.

4.6.7
access to the project by local people

Targets
– Volunteering opportunities to 100 people, both in broadcast and non broadcast roles.
– 4 new people to be encouraged to join Management Committee.

Outcomes
– Since the start of the full time licence period, March 2002, there has been an increase in
volunteers. 131 volunteers, ranging in age from their teens to their 80s and drawn from a
range of diverse communities, have presented programmes on the station; on average 56
volunteers present at least one programme per week, and 65 volunteers per week are
involved with the station.
– Nearly 3,000 people were interviewed on BCB, either live or by telephone.
– BCB has a small working scheduling group, drawn from volunteers, that meets
regularly. The group consults with the project‟s 200 members through the newsletter,
members‟ meetings and through a six-month review questionnaire conducted in Autumn
2002.
4.6.8
linguistic impact

Targets
– Community languages:
• BCB will use community radio to promote cultural expression in community languages.
We aim for communities
to broadcast in the language that is
most appropriate to their target audience. Some programmes may integrate more than one
language.
• Likely programming in Urdu, Bengali, Panjabi, with the provision and encouragement
for programming in any language that the communities feel is appropriate. This could
include Italian, Ukrainian, Polish etc.
• Presenters in community languages
will be encouraged and supported in developing their presentation style, delivery and
confidence.
– Local Accent and expression:
• Community radio broadcasting on BCB will help to celebrate the different accents and
ways that people express themselves within the Bradford District.
• Through involvement in BCB we will actively encourage people to develop confidence
in their expression, reflecting and giving validity to the many ways that people
communicate and express themselves within the city.
• There will be 10 hours per week community language programming.

Outcomes
– BCB encourages community language broadcasters and produces 8 hours per week of
community language broadcasting. Many came to BCB as trainees on one of its Radio
Skills training courses or as individuals with some broadcast experience. They continue
to produce individual weekly programmes. We have however worked
with targeted groups to help develop
specific programme strands. This includes:
• The Bangladesh Porishad – a series
of training sessions in 2002. The first programmes were planned for
January 2003.
• Al Arquam – Arabic programming group. Training sessions led to the production
of its first weekly programmes broadcast during Ramadan 2002.
• Refugee broadcasting project. Leading up to Refugee Week in July 2002, BCB ran a
training project with groups of refugees
and asylum seekers from several countries. It then broadcast a series of programmes
in Russian, Xhona, Ndebele, Farsi and other minority languages. This will be further
developed in 2003.
• Sabrang Radio. BCB ran a series of radio training sessions for the Panjabi radio group
who run RSLs twice a year. Two members of this group now produce weekly
programmes on BCB.
• Millan Womens Centre – Outreach training course, targeting Asian women, starting
January 2003.



4.7 CROSS RHYTHMS CITY RADIO
TARGETS BY LICENCE END, 28 FEBRUARY 2003
Delivery – January 2003

Aim
 4.7.1 Serving the needs of the Christian Community and acting as a bridge between that
community and the community at large.
 4.7.2 In the longer term, to establish the Christian Community as a recognised group
within the city and at the same time to promote dialogue and integration with the
community at large.

 4.7.3
training opportunities

Targets
– Up to 30 people to volunteer and receive training in broadcasting skills as well
as related areas such as marketing, administration and IT. Trainees will be tested in a real
working environment
and will have advantages in applying
for employment opportunities at
Cross Rhythms.

Outcomes
– During the year 47 people have worked
as volunteers and received training. Cross Rhythms provided a radio training session
in the „Open Doors‟ training day attended
by more than 150 students from schools across the county. 19 of the children
involved recorded programming which
was played on air later.

4.7.4 WORK EXPERIENCE OPPORTUNITIES

Targets
– As above.

Outcomes
– 2 volunteers are involved in the Millennium Volunteers Project, which will enable them
to gain a certificate/diploma after completing a required amount of work experience.
– 4 people connected with schools/universities are undergoing periods of work
experience.
 4.7.5
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– With a view to publicising the work of
the organisations below and to raise awareness of the issues with which
they are concerned.
– 1 interview a week with a police representative to publicise their work
and explain issues.
– 2 to 3 interviews a year with Race Equality Council.
– 2 to 3 interviews a year with U Matter, an organisation aiming to realise the potential of
young people in Stoke-on-Trent.
– Health Action Zone – 2 interviews a month with organisations in this umbrella group.
At least 20 organisations to be involved over the year.
– Employment Service – at least one interview a week on employment issues.
– Citizens‟ Advice Bureau – 1 interview a week on legal issues and the provision of legal
services to socially deprived groups.
– Girls International – this Christian organisation, which runs various schemes including
one related to health, drug use etc., to be featured for an hour a week and also in
interviews elsewhere, at least
4 or 5 times a year.
– Homeless Projects – at least 2 to 3 interviews a year with the Potteries Housing
Association (working with
the homeless).
– Samaritans – 2 to 3 interviews a year with representatives of the local service.
– North Staffs Victim Support – Support for Victims of Crime – 2 to 3 interviews a year.

Outcomes
– Regular weekly slot on the police, covering their press releases and interviewing related
persons about issues the police have currently highlighted.
– 2 interviews with the Race Equality Council.
– 1 interview with U Matter.
– Interview with Employment Service representative every two or three weeks;
information provided by the service is covered in a weekly slot.
– 1 interview a week with Citizens‟ Advice Bureaux representative until August, when
he was elected Mayor. Now 1 interview
per month.
– 1 interview to date with North Staffs Victim Support.
– Weekly interviews with Amenities Manager
of Stoke-on-Trent City Council.
– Engagement with/coverage of
• Volunteer Reading Help
• Re-Solv
• Youth Offending Team, Youth Justice Board
• Sure Start Stoke-on-Trent
• Childrens Fund for Stoke
• Media Action Group for Mental Health
• „Create‟ (work placements for young people with learning disabilities)
• Disability Solutions
• Frontline Dance Company (for disabled and able-bodied people)
• North Staffs Dyslexia Association
• Potteries Association for the Blind
• Beth Johnson Foundation (help for
older people)
• North Staffs Carers Association
• Union of African and African Caribbean Organisations
• North Staffs African and Caribbean Association
• Tear Fund
• St Johns Welcome Centre
• Salvation Army, Tunstall
• Baptist Union Initiative for People with Learning Disabilities
• The Ark (drop-in centre for the homeless)
• Groundwork Stoke-on-Trent
• Community Warden‟s Project, Burslem South
• Special features included programmes on cancer, refugees and Iraq.

4.7.6
contribution to local education

Targets
– With a view to publicising the work
of the organisations below and raise awareness of the issues with which
they are concerned.
– 1 education programme a week involving representatives of the Local Education
Authority and other relevant bodies. Projects to be featured include St Johns Welcome
Centre and Cyber Café (for children with special needs), the North Staffs Dyslexia
Association, Volunteer Reading Help and Staffs Careers Service.
– 1 weekly programme with North Staffs YFC, a Christian organisation involved in
educational work, with a monthly up-date on their activities.
– Profiling the schools work of The Saltbox, a local non-denominational Christian
umbrella ginger group.
– Twice daily up-dates on relevant educational projects and events.

Outcomes
– 2 or 3 interviews per month with Local Education Authority and other relevant bodies.
– 1 up-date per month with the North Staffs YFC.
– Saltbox interview once a fortnight.

4.7.7
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– Neighbourhood or interest groups served will include
• local churches (200 representing 30 denominations)
• The Saltbox
• North Staffs YFC
• Girls International
• City Vision Ministries
• Undignified (a youth event)
• Women Aglow (which centres on the needs of Christian women)
• Full Gospel Business Men‟s Fellowship
• United Christian Broadcasters
• Voluntary Action
• Action Line (a local charity that provides on-air publicity for local organisations).

Outcomes
– The project supported all the organisations targeted except for Voluntary Action and
Action Line.
– Additional organisations supported include
– Sowing Seeds for Revival (week of interdenominational prayers)
– GSUS Live (initiative of North Staffs Youth
for Christ)
– Spring Harvest (Christian holidays)
– Soul Survivor (Christian Youth event)
– The project gave detailed, live coverage to the mayoral/local elections. Mayor gives
fortnightly interview.
– All five local MPS have been interviewed.
– Ekklesia, a Christian thinktank, gives weekly up-date of parliamentary issues of interest
to Christians.

 4.7.8
access to the project by local people

Targets
– Members of the station management team will be attending the regular monthly
meetings of local Christian leaders so
that opportunity will exist for them to input into the running of the station. One-to-one
meetings to be held with key people such as workers for The Saltbox, local heads
of Christian denominations and others to feed their views into the Cross Rhythms
decision-making process.
– About 10 volunteers to be involved in broadcasting on a regular weekly basis (i.e. in
producing and presenting programmes).
– Up to 100 people over the year to access the airwaves with their contributions in
features or interviews.

Outcomes
– As planned, management attends monthly local church leaders‟ meetings to receive
feedback. Meetings also held with the Saltbox and individual local church leaders. The
project has attended local Youth Leadership meetings.
– 15 volunteers have been involved in broadcasting.
– More than 50 people have contributed
to features or taken part in interviews.

4.7.9
linguistic impact

Targets
– To encourage local broadcasters to maintain their accents and dialects
while remaining clear and intelligible
to all – thus ensuring that broadcast output relates to as many local people
as possible.

Outcomes
– The project has maintained a consistent policy of not encouraging people to change the
way they speak on air. It aims for people to be clear and intelligible. It had placed
no particular emphasis on local accents.
– Interviewees, some of whom have done
no previous public speaking or radio work,
have found the interview process to be confidence-building. This was particularly
noticeable in extended interview programmes, such as Close Encounters.
– Historically, the Church has not been very successful in understanding and making use
of the language of contemporary media; Cross Rhythms has helped the Church to engage
verbally with the wider community
in a more appropriate way.



4.8 DESI RADIO TARGETS FOR LICENCE END, 10 MAY 2003
OUTCOMES – JANUARY 2003

Aim
 4.8.1 To unify, entertain, educate,
inform and include the socially excluded Panjabi community in West London, by
broadcasting Panjabi news, drama,
debates on health, social issues, education, recreation and other relevant subjects
of interest to the Panjabi community in
West London.

4.8.2
training opportunities

Targets
– Desi Radio training programmes are designed to give people practical skills, literacy
skills, ICT skills, and confidence, and to encourage innovation and the ability to use their
initiative and to transfer their skills to other vocations.
– The project will provide training in
media skills (presentation and production,
ICT skills, legal issues, script writing, production of advertisements, jingles,
cool edit, casting web and improvement
in written and spoken English etc.) for at least 20 Panjabis and 4 Somalis (2 x 18 week
courses over the year). There will also be short taster courses (2 x 6 hours
at weekends); by the end of the year at least 50 radio people will be trained in production
and presentation.

Outcomes
– From January 2002 till December 2002
40 people have been trained:
19 on two taster courses.
21 on eighteen weeks x 2 courses.
– All have now had work experiences live on Desi Radio and most of them are working
voluntarily, presenting on the Radio.
– The next 18-week course to begin in February 2003, funded by Learning Skills
Council.
– A taster course was held in February 2003.
3 such courses may be held.
– 24 people to take part in the 2 x 18 weeks courses in 2003.
– By December 2003 the project will have trained 54 people.

4.8.3
work experience opportunities

Targets
– As part of the 18-week courses, the project will provide four-week placements on
Desi Radio for beginners and those with more experience.

Outcomes
– As part of the first round of 18-week courses, the project provided four-week
placements on Desi Radio for beginners and other more experienced people. The same
will apply to the forthcoming round.

 4.8.4
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– The project aims to broadcast to 200,000 Panjabi-speakers in the six boroughs of West
London, excluded from mainstream media activities due to language, culture and lifestyle
differences.
– The project is helping the Somali Refugee Development Group in Southall to establish
a radio project of their own
and eventually to run an RSL.

Outcomes
– The project is broadcasting to 200,000 Panjabi speakers in the six boroughs of
West London, excluded from mainstream media activities due to language, culture
and lifestyle differences.
– The project is also helping the Somali Refugee Development Group in Southall
to establish a radio project of its own
and eventually to run an RSL.
– Three Somali groups (one of which is
a woman‟s group) have made contact
with Desi Radio, which has given them
initial information about RSLs and how
to set them up.
– A group from Luton visited the project last November seeking information and advice
on community radio.
– Two TVU students, waiting to set up an access radio on “Parents and Children”
in Ealing, visited the project last December
for information and advice too.

4.8.5
contribution to local education

Targets
– By reaching local schools and colleges, more than 100 young people between the ages
of 10 and 19 years will play the Panjabi music of their choice, produce programmes and
plays. 30 named young people are waiting to go on the project.

Outcomes
– For young people (10-18 years), a specific studio will be designed, fitted and equipped
by April 2003 where young people will access community radio by learning to play their
own Panjabi music, to present, produce, make jingles etc.
– Desi Radio expects to train 40 to 50 young people during this year. It received £4,500
from Community Chest for equipment (i.e.
3 computers and software) in the studio.
– A grant of £4,000 has been agreed by
Local Children‟s Fund to fit out the studio.
– A proposal has been sent to City Trust
for London for part-time staff to coordinate this project.

 4.8.6
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– Co-operation has begun with the Housing Department of the London Borough of
Ealing and other relevant departments, the National Health Service in Ealing, Southall
Day Centre, Milap Day Centre for older people in Southall and Ealing Voluntary
Services Council, to broadcast information about public services.
– Links exist and are being developed with Panjabi theatre groups and cultural and sports
organisations. Also with Southall Football Club, Southall Kabadi Club (sports) and South
Asia Solidarity Group.
– Other social service and voluntary organisations will be involved over time.

Outcomes
– To broadcast information about public services, co-operation has been initiated with
• Housing Department of the London Borough of Ealing and other relevant departments
• National Health Service in Ealing
• Southall Day Centre
• Milap Day Centre (for older people in Southall)
• Ealing Voluntary Services Council.
• Links exist and are being further developed with Panjabi Theatre groups and cultural
and sports organisations. Also with Southall Football Club, Southall Kabadi Club (sports)
and South Asia Solidarity Group.
• Other social service and voluntary organisations will be involved over time.

4.8.7
access to the project by local people

Targets
– The project will offer more than 200 people the opportunity to work as volunteers
(reception, word processing, music archives, database management, marketing,
programming and administration).

Outcomes
– The project has offered more than 200 people the opportunity to work as volunteers
(reception, word processing, music archives, database management, marketing,
programming and administration).

 4.8.8
linguistic impact

Targets
– Desi Radio‟s main language is Panjabi (including its variations in North, South, West
and Central Panjab). Presenters are expected to express the richness and variety of
Panjabi with growing confidence.

Outcomes
– Desi Radio‟s main language is Panjabi (including its variations in North, South, West
and Central Panjab). Presenters are expected to express the richness and variety of
Panjabi with growing confidence.
4.9 FOREST OF DEAN RADIO
TARGETS BY LICENCE END, 19 JULY 2003
OUTCOMES – JANUARY 2003

Aim
  4.9.1 To achieve regeneration for the Forest of Dean through the medium of radio.
 4.9.2
training opportunities

Targets
– 150 training places in foundation radio skills, programme making, presenting, technical
skills, news production and drama production, to be provided through the project.
– 5 skills modules to be prepared.

Outcomes
– 93 training places have been provided.
– Skills modules prepared and Forest of Dean Radio is working on obtaining
accreditation.

4.9.3
work experience opportunities

Targets
– As above.

Outcomes
– See above.

4.9.4
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– Broadcasting opportunities to
be provided for 82 local voluntary
or community organisations.

Outcomes
– Opportunities have been provided for 107 local voluntary or community organisations
and neighbourhood/interest Groups.

4.9.5
contribution to local education

Targets
– Primary Schools: the aim is to enable children to explore many of the skills they are
acquiring in the classroom in the context of real broadcasting to an audience.
– 6 schools to be involved (a pilot with one school has already taken place). In each
school at least 1 member of staff or parent to be trained to act as technical support and
mentor; 10 pupils of different ages to be trained in radio skills; the primary schools to be
enabled to produce on-going programme material for broadcasting
on FODR.
– Secondary Schools: in response to the addition of citizenship to the curriculum and the
addition of Radio to the GCSE Media Syllabus, FODR proposes to support senior schools
to devise a series of 45 minute discussion programmes to be broadcast during school
time. In each school at least 1 member of staff or parent to be trained to act as technical
support and mentor; FODR will work with pupils and staff to agree programme themes;
the involvement of local people, local businesses, politicians and local government
agencies will be encouraged; issues such as balance, equality and research will be
explored; pupils will be trained in radio, interview
and presentation skills.
– All six Forest of Dean senior schools will be involved.

Outcomes
– Primary Schools
• Soudley School Pilot. Forest of Dean Radio (FODR) ran an after-school radio club for
the pupils for a period of five weeks.
Each week the children were taught
various aspects of radio production
• Funding now in place to begin work with two further schools.
• The following Primary schools have
also been involved in broadcasts:
        • Lydney C & E School
        • Lydbrook School
        • Forest View School
        • Westbury School
        • Dean Hall School
– Secondary Schools
        • Whitecross Lydney – the project has been developing regular contact and
programme-making with staff and students to explore views and develop areas of
interest. This has included debates on fox hunting and the local relevance of the
Countryside March,
and opening up the issues of how the increasing amount of time taken up
by testing has been effecting teachers, students and their families.
        • Heywood School in Cinderford is developing a bid to become a specialist sports
school and FODR is negotiating
a course in Sports Journalism linked
to radio output. FODR has worked on
a book review project with the English Department and the Local Library service and the
Head took part with students in a review of the year for the Christmas broadcasting
schedule.
        • Wyedean School, Sedbury. The project has collaborated with the school for a
number of years; the school wishes to host one of FODR‟s studios as part of a new
development to accommodate rising student numbers and community access to the
campus. FODR is working with the school and a number of agencies and local people
further to develop community activity in this isolated rural area. A feature was recorded
during a drugs awareness week when a theatre company commissioned by the Youth
Service visited the school, as was a review of the year produced with staff and students.
        • At Lakers School the project featured its student steel band on tour at a number
of local carnivals and worked with the students as part of a technology project.
        • Newent School has been the base for
a music technology project and several programmes have been broadcast featuring the
young people and their music.
        • Students at Royal Forest of Dean College have just begun a series of IT
problem-solving programmes following training delivered by FODR. The project is also
working with the Student Union to develop a regular magazine programme.

4.9.6
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– See contribution to social inclusion above.
– Coverage by FODR of all relevant community initiatives in the Forest of Dean (civic
matters, health, education, regeneration initiatives, education, regeneration initiatives and
environmental issues).
– Provision of an effective communication service that links core agencies and
the community.
– FODR will build on links with the Dean Heritage Centre; Five Acres College, the
Gloucestershire County Archives, the Forest of Dean Youth Forum, Forest of Dean
District Council and the Forest of Dean Education Business Partnership. Collaboration
will be sought with Information and Advice Groups, including Connexions and the
Learning and Skills Council.

Outcomes
– See contribution to social inclusion above.
– Relevant initiatives have been covered. Programmes have dealt with Health, Housing,
Tourism, Arts Development Strategy, Education, Regeneration and Tourism Strategy.
– Links have been established with
• Dean Heritage Centre
• Five Acres College, Youth Forum
• District Council, Business Partnership
• The Learning & Skills Council is one of
the project‟s major funders.
– Premises are shared with both Connexions and Forest of Dean College.

4.9.7
access to the project by local people
Targets
– The project, building on existing contacts, will provide a series of training sessions to
enable local community groups to promote their activities. They are likely to include
• U3A
• Candi
• New Dean Music Club
• Forest Music Collective
• FoD Local History Society
• Dean Archeological Group
• Dean Forest Voice
• Forest Voluntary Action Forum
• Doorways
• Library Service
• Royal Forest of Dean By Definition
• Forest Blues Club
• FORGE Centre for the Visually Impaired
• Dial-a-Ride
• FoD Family History Society
– 12 people per session will be trained in radio, interview and presentation skills;
programmes for specific slots will be produced during the first phase of broadcasting;
FODR will work with groups to develop new programming strands; two sessions a year
will be run in each of the five Forest of Dean areas.
– Opportunities for 800 people to participate as unpaid volunteers
– Opportunities for local artists to participate in FODR

Outcomes
– 896 participants in Forest of Dean Radio, most of whom are/were involved in
broadcasting, others in administration, technical, publicity and marketing etc.
– Community Groups are targeted and invited to Training sessions.
– Training sessions have included representatives from
• U3A
• New Dean Music Club
• Forest Music Collective
• History Society
• Dean Forest Voice
• Forest Voluntary Action Forum
• Dean By Definition
• Blues Club
– 11 Training Sessions have been held and
ad hoc one-to-one sessions are held as
and when required.
– Artists have been offered training sessions offered and invited in to the studio to talk
about their work.

4.9.8
linguistic impact

Targets
– No specific targets set.

Outcomes
– FODR has adopted a policy for broadcasters to reflect the local dialect, where possible.


4.10 GTFM TARGETS BY LICENCE END, 27 APRIL 2003
OUTCOMES – JANUARY 2003

Aim
 4.10.1 GTFM aims to inform and entertain the population of Pontypridd through its
radio programming and
to offer participation and training to community groups and individuals
through the Volunteer Training Programme.
 4.10.2 Depending on the availability
of continued funding, permanent broadcasting would enable the development and
improvement of radio programming
and the expansion of participation and training opportunities.
 4.10.3
training opportunities

Targets
– 200 estimated beneficiaries to gain a range of broadcasting and other skills related to
their abilities and interests.

Outcomes
– The University of Glamorgan has established a training wing of GTFM, run by the
Community Radio Tutor and staff at the
Ilan Centre. The needs of local groups
and individuals have been taken into consideration, but there has also been
pro-active engagement with the community in generating volunteer/trainees.
– One-off training sessions have been held with groups of various sizes; also, formal
courses and a successful Summer School (with assistance from BBC Radio Wales).
– On-going radio clubs at local English and Welsh medium schools have been designed
to give students an insight into broadcasting and many were able to utilise this new
knowledge as part of their studies.
– The project has links with Pontypridd Open Learning centre, Immtech Training and
various community education centres.
– In total, more than 840 volunteers have taken part in GTFM training, inductions and
on-air experience (excluding university students enrolled on accredited radio modules).

4.10.4
work experience opportunities
Targets
– 100 estimated beneficiaries to gain work experience in broadcasting and other skills
related to their abilities and interests.

Outcomes
– The project‟s interpretation of „work experience‟ is to offer opportunities for
participation. It has provided opportunities
in the areas of administration, IT, Radio production and Radio presentation for several
hundred participants.
– GTFM works closely with the local Careers Service and is committed to providing
youngsters with placements whenever possible. However, the opportunities for traditional
„work experience‟ have been fairly limited in practice. 8 people have benefited from
work experience in this sense, the most recent of whom has found a job as Assistant
Producer with the BBC World Service.

4.10.5
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– The project to work with existing community providers and tap into the training they
offer to support each other‟s aims and objectives.

Outcomes
– GTFM is based in the Rhydyfelin area
of Pontypridd, which is one of the 50 Communities First areas in Wales, and
is a member of the Rhydyfelin Regeneration Partnership. The project maintains a special
partnership with the Glyntaff Tenants
& Residents Association, which hosts a
daily community programme (with regular contributions from the local police, consumer
advice centre and dietary/healthy living advice). The Community Development
Co-Coordinator for Rhydyfelin co-hosts
the show once per week.

4.10.6
contribution to local education

Targets
– About 200 pupils at 8 secondary schools, especially those with GCSE and AS Media
pupils, to receive training, facilitating course delivery.
– At Pontypridd College and Merthyr College, 40 GNVQ and HND Media students will
receive training and broadcasting opportunities, facilitating course delivery.

Outcomes
– The project has ongoing links with local schools across the Rhondda Cynon Taf. Each
of the four comprehensive schools in the immediate neighbourhood take part in regular
school shows on GTFM and at two
of them radio clubs are operating
– 91 pupils have so far used their contact with the GTFM as a part of their A level/AS
Level/GCSE course work. 10 students from the Pontypridd Open Learning Centre have
also used the opportunity as a means of working on literacy and communication
skills as part of their course portfolios.
– 10 students from the Pontypridd Open Learning Centre have used the GTFM training
opportunity as a means of working on literacy and communication skills as
part of their course portfolios
– Links with local FE providers are underway, but have yet to result in specific outcomes.
This is partly due to the relocation of the local college Media department to Tonypandy –
outside GTFM‟s broadcast remit.

 4.10.7
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– The project to offer opportunities for participation, training and promotion, dependent
on need, to 100 local
groups including
• Glyn Taff Residents‟ Association
• Valleys Kids
• Age Concern
• Local Authority (various departments)
• Interlink
• Menter Iaith Taf Elai
• Employment Services
• TEDS (Taff-Ely Drug Support)
• Pontypridd College – Open Learning Centre

Outcomes
– Approximately 80 local organisations have been involved in GTFM‟s work to date.
– GTFM provides a free Community Message service locally (on daytime programmes).
To date 43 messages have been broadcast on a regular basis The subjects covered include
local charity appeals, local voluntary services, or essential community information (such
as highlighting the dangers of meningitis which has previously struck Pontypridd badly).
– The local voluntary council, Interlink, presents and produces a weekly show focusing
on volunteering opportunities
in the area. Each week a different group
is highlighted and volunteers are invited on air to talk about their experiences and each is
asked to play their favourite song. Subject to funding and other resource factors it is
hoped this may be expanded in the future
as a community phone-in.
– GTFM produces a weekly show for older listeners – Older & Bolder – in association
with Help the Aged and Age Concern.
– Menter Iaith, a Welsh Language organisation that promotes the use of Welsh, has
presented a weekly Welsh Language programme.
– GTFM wants to extend and expand this kind of programming, and to start a weekly
news round up and topical discussion programmes.

4.10.8
access to the project by local people

Targets
– GTFM‟s membership policy is open to all individuals and groups within the area and is
widely publicised through Interlink. No targets set.
– All members of the community will be
able to become involved, as long as their contributions are in line with Radio Authority
guidelines. 200 estimated participants.

Outcomes
– Membership of GTFM (with the right to
stand for the project‟s management committee) is open to anyone living
or working in the local area.
– Volunteering opportunities are widely promoted through on-air trails and in the weekly
column the project has in the local newspaper,
the Pontypridd Observer. Opportunities are provided for participation in whichever way
the volunteer feels comfortable.

4.10.9
linguistic impact

Targets
– The project will work towards providing
3 hours a week of programming in
the Welsh language. This will reflect
the linguistic diversity and interests
of the target audience.
– On-air and behind-the-scenes work experience will allow contributors to improve their
communications skills
in their language of choice. The target audience will have an increased awareness of the
richness of language used in the locality.

Outcomes
– GTFM‟s commitment to providing 3 hours
a week of Welsh language programming
has proved difficult to fulfil, because of a
lack of suitable Welsh-speaking volunteers. However, thanks to the input of the local
Welsh language school and Menter Iaith,
a local Welsh language organisation, it has been able to meet its targets for approx
75% of the pilot broadcast period.
– Until recently, the project was able to provide a daily Welsh language news bulletin,
from BBC Cymru. The BBC has withdrawn their support for this, awaiting a wider
decision
on its support for Access Radio.

4.11 NEW STYLE RADIO (NSR)
Targets by licence end, 14 August 2003
DELIVERY – JANUARY 2003

Aim
 4.11.1 NSR will give the community generally, and the Caribbean/African community
in particular, a powerful means of social, artistic and cultural expression and provide a
vehicle to support social, cultural and economic initiatives in inner Birmingham.
 4.11.2 In the longer run, the project
will dispel myths and stereotypes about Caribbean/African people and help to create a
more cohesive community, by allowing
a dynamic presence in civic matters, music, arts, culture and education.
4.11.3
training opportunities

Targets
– About 200 people to receive accredited training (radio communication, computer and
life skills).

Outcomes
– Although NSR aims to have in place a formal accredited training programme, this has
not been feasible because of constraints on space (the project is currently in temporary
accommodation, awaiting the construction
of new premises), time and resources. NSR is running an extensive informal community
training programme, where all volunteers receive on-the-job training in technical
operations, digital editing, production methods, news, interview and presentation skills.
All New Style Radio presenters are expected to develop „total radio competence‟.

4.11.4
work experience opportunities

Targets
– 20 people to receive work experience (broadcasting, social and cultural awareness).

Outcomes
– Students from schools, universities and colleges have undertaken placements.

4.11.5
contribution to social inclusion
Targets
– NSR to work with the following projects
• CSV Media
• Castle Vale Community Radio Project
• The DRUM
• Kajan
• Youth Empowerment for Success
• Lozells Music Workshop

Outcomes
– In 2001 via Fusion FM the project worked with Birmingham City Council Leisure and
Cultural Services Department to deliver a Black History Month programme and was
appointed the official Black History Month radio station for 2002. As a result of New
Style Radio, venues attracted large audiences.
– From 27th January 2003 the project will
be broadcasting a series of programmes
in association with Relate. This will
include advertising Relate‟s services
to the black community and running
promotion competitions.
– Speech programmes are very diverse with issues covered ranging from employment,
transportation, regeneration, policing and community safety, health, education,
business development, arts and culture
to relationships. Some of NSR‟s specialist
speech programmes are:
a) Mid Morning Mission: a programme concerned with general current affairs
and community issues.
b) Mid Week Melt Down: a women‟s magazine programme.
c) Vibrant Mindz: a one-hour programme presented by Birmingham Arts Marketing,
focusing on arts in the region.
d) Heart 2 Heart: part of this arts and
culture programme is delivered by
a local police sergeant.
– Working with Birmingham Capital of Culture team, West Midlands Arts and the Write
Thing, a London agency, the project will be promoting and staging Celebrating Sisters
at the Birmingham Hippodrome and the Drum. The event will take place on 22 February
and 30 March 2003. Celebrating Sisters is the largest black women‟s performing arts
show in the UK.

4.11.6
contribution to local education

Targets
– The project has links with the following institutions
• University of Central England (UCE)
• University of Birmingham
• City College
• Bournville College
• South Birmingham College
– It will work with the universities on research, courses and student placements.

Outcomes
– Links have been established with local schools, colleges and universities. The project
has produced programmes with
a number of secondary schools and one local primary school.
– NSR is in discussion with colleges and universities about joint courses, particularly
when the new Afro-Caribbean Resource Centre opens in December 2003.

 4.11.7
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– As above. In addition, NSR believes that
a critical outcome will be the number of listeners from the British Caribbean community;
it expects that the vast majority of that community to listen to NSR.

Outcomes
– NSR has links with all the major black organisations in Birmingham (for example, the
Birmingham Race Action Partnership).
It works closely with the police and is a member of a police liaison committee. It
NSR is collaborating with Connexions, a new outreach and social organisation funded by
the Learning and Skills Council, in relation
to 16-19 year-olds at risk.
– For small community organisations and churches, NSR usually offers free advertising.

 4.11.8
access to the project by local people

Targets
– 13 volunteers will be involved in project management.
– More than 200 volunteers will take part
in broadcasting.

Outcomes
– Volunteers number approximately 100.
Each week at least 5 enquiries are received from people wishing to be involved.
– The station receives approximately 100 phone calls per day.

 4.11.9
linguistic impact
Targets
– Caribbean dialect in the context of the United Kingdom has to a large extent been
Jamaicanised, but the dialects are as numerous and diverse as the many islands that make
up the region. New Style Radio will seek to expose this richness and diversity of
patois/Creole.
– As standard English is our basic language, an important mission is to ensure that
presenters develop fluency in the use of standard English, while having the freedom to be
expressive in the various Caribbean dialects.

Outcomes
– The project celebrates the richness of patios, or British Caribbean Creole. However,
presenters are required to recognise the differences between British and Caribbean
contexts and be able also to communicate in standard English, when appropriate.
Programmes are critiqued at a weekly meeting for volunteer presenters.

4.12 NORTHERN VISIONS RADIO (NVR)
TARGETS BY LICENCE END, 9 MARCH 2003 DELIVERY – JANUARY 2003
Aim
 4.12.1 To provide alternative and innovative local radio programming in addition to that
already on offer, based
upon community access, which will reflect and enrich the diversity of the Belfast
community through the presentation of programmes which contribute towards
the expansion of the variety of viewpoints broadcast in Northern Ireland, thereby
enhancing the range of choice available
to the listening public.
4.12.2 In the longer term, to develop standards of practice and support on an inclusive
basis for groups and individuals seeking to access local radio production, thereby
stimulating job creation in the cultural and media industries, facilitating the transfer of
skills and confidence for trained or professional workers to these groups
and individuals, and especially young people, through the provision of workshops and
courses.

4.12.3
training opportunities

Targets
– The project will provide workshops in radio techniques and continual one-on-one
support in order to create enough adequately trained volunteers to run the station.

Outcomes
– 76 people were given 4 hours introductory training on: studio desk operation, using
portable recording equipment and basic computer editing. All participants received
induction into the history, policies and legal requirements of community radio.
– 52 went on to become permanent presenters – providing at least one hour of
programming per week. They were given additional training on desk operation, portable
recording equipment and editing and interviewing techniques, how to research and
dealing with interviewees.
– All volunteers are regularly offered feedback on performance, programme content,
written or verbal.
– 6 volunteers were given additional support (e.g. further technical training on particular
issues).
– 8 volunteers mentored on extensive basis. Mentoring takes the form of volunteers
sitting in with experienced presenters to gain confidence and know-how; discussion on
the type of programme proposed and how best to realise this, analysis of making a pilot
programme, in-depth analysis of programme content and presentation.
– 2 outreach workshops for 16 people with learning difficulties were conducted.

4.12.4
work experience opportunities

Targets
– NVR will provide opportunities for volunteers to perform all tasks associated with a
radio station, including production, recording, editing, presenting, maintenance of
equipment and administrative duties.
There will also be opportunities for personal development and confidence building.

Outcomes
– 4 volunteers from media training organisations used working at NVR as
work experience for part of their training.
– Two volunteers went on to gain employment in the media.

4.12.5
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– The project will provide a platform which
is wholly inclusive of the diversity of communities of interest in the greater Belfast area,
especially members of ethnic communities; gay, elderly, young and disabled people;
homeless, unemployed and poor people; and prisoners and
ex-prisoners.

Outcomes
– Northern Visions advocates, supports and provides access to media resources for a
diverse, changing and often embattled community, and promotes public discourse, which
especially includes the voices of the less dominant, and less powerful, members of
society. Northern Visions is committed to an equal opportunities policy in terms of
hiring, distribution, production and representation, and particularly encourages women,
people living in disadvantaged areas, and the disabled, to use its facilities.
– Regular presenters include ex-prisoners
(c. 8), people with disabilities (4 physically disabled, 2 learning disability and 2 with
mental health difficulties); several members of foreign cultures (African, Asian,
Ashkenazy, Australian, French, German, Iranian, Palestinian, Spanish). Regular gay
presenters: 8 alternating 4 per week.
Lesbian presenters: 4 per month. Young people (under 12) 1. Youth (under 25) 10. Over
50‟s 9. Unemployed 4.
– Programming hours 9th March 02- 5th
Jan 03
• Ethnic Communities 20 hours
• Gay, Lesbian 40 hours
• Women‟s issues 40 hours
• People with Disabilities 20 hours
• Young people 90 hours
 4.12.6

4.12.6
contribution to local education

Targets
– As Northern Visions already targets schools and colleges, providing vocational training
and a structured schools programme, the radio station will offer
an extension of existing work, enabling young people to talk about their work in film
with Northern Visions and other matters of importance to them, and to have their
broadcast in sound. There will be at least one hour of broadcasting by young people every
week.

Outcomes
– Insufficient staff are in place to negotiate partnerships with schools.

4.12.7
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– Northern Visions advocates, supports and provides access to media resources for a
diverse, changing and often embattled community, and promotes public discourse, which
especially includes the voices of the less dominant, and less powerful, members of
society. Northern Visions is committed to an equal opportunities policy in terms of
hiring, distribution, production and representation, and particularly encourages women,
people living in disadvantaged areas, and the disabled, to use its facilities.
• Northern Vision‟s partners include
• An Culturlann & An Droichead (Irish language)
• Multi Cultural Resource Centre
• Community Arts Forum
• Medi-Able (disability group)
• Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action (community development umbrella
body) Childrens Express (young people learning through journalism)

Outcomes
– Service to neighbourhood or interest groups have included
• Multi Cultural Resource Centre (ethnic minorities)
• Community Arts Forum (community arts and Irish language programming)
• Medi-Able (disability group)
• Children‟s Express (young people learning through journalism)
• Queer Space

4.12.8
access to the project by local people

Targets
– Northern Visions Media Trust is a charity and involves all personnel, whether salaried,
freelance or volunteer, in decision making. All persons involved in the running of the
station have a say in programming structures and content, with presenters and
programmers being given free rein in their compilations and style, subject to current
guidelines and evolving station policy. There is a continual open invitation to anyone
who wants to be in or on the radio to come along and try their hand at it. The response
has been huge, with many people and groups staying
with the station after their initial testing
of the water.

Outcomes
– Northern Visions Media Trust is a charity
and involves all personnel, whether salaried, freelance or volunteer, in decision making.
All persons involved in the running of the station have a say in programming structures
and content, with presenters and programmers being given free rein in their compilations
and style, subject to current guidelines and evolving station policy. There is an open
invitation to anyone who wants to be in or
on the radio to „come along and try their hand at it‟. There has been a large response, with
many people and groups staying with the station after their initial testing of the water.
– 98 individuals have filled in volunteer forms.
– All presenters are free to decide their own content in programming.
– There have been 970 hours of original programming - 60% speech and 40% music.
– Original programming is repeated twice in one week.
– Volunteer information is posted on the web site.
– Posters calling for volunteers are placed in shops and art centres.
– Volunteer involvement is sought in Visions (cir. 5,000 copies, bi-annually).
– Art.ie, a monthly with circulation of 30,000 contains permanent information on
volunteering for NVR100.6fm
– 90% of the volunteers have attended a meeting to review the work of the station.

4.12.9
linguistic impact

Targets
– Microphone technique, interviewing skills and the art of conversation are essential
elements of the training offered to volunteers. These skills are developed through hands-
on experience of interviewing, participating in panel discussion and presenting, as desired
by each volunteer. While some presenters tend to speak „correctly‟,
NVR actively encourages good regional pronunciation and inflection and is active in
promoting the use of other languages than English, especially Cantonese
and Irish. It also offers broadcasting
in Ulster-Scots.

Outcomes
– Microphone technique, interviewing skills and the art of conversation are essential
elements of the training offered to volunteers. These skills are developed through hands-
on experience of interviewing, participating in panel discussion and presenting, as desired
by each volunteer. While some presenters tend to speak „correctly‟, NVR actively
encourages good regional pronunciation
and inflection and is active in promoting
the use of other languages than English.
– Programming hours 9th March 02 - 5th Jan 03
• Irish language 27 hours
• Spanish language 1 hour
• French language 3 hours
• Chinese language 1 hour
– There have been 3 hours on Ulster
Scots issues, primarily language and
cultural questions, but the language
utilised was English.


4.13 RADIO FAZA ASIAN WOMEN‟S FOUNDATION
TARGETS BY LICENCE END, 25 MARCH 2003
OUTCOMES – JANUARY 2003
Aim
 4.13.1 To provide a multicultural service that is reflective of multicultural Nottingham,
but also one that particularly and distinctively reflects the cultural needs, values and
aspirations of the Asian Community.

 4.13.2
training opportunities

Targets
– 2 radio broadcasting courses, in broadcasting skills and use of radio equipment.
– 15 people trained with qualifications,
with a view to increasing the take-up by unemployed young people, disadvantaged
people and labour market returnees in
pre-vocational and vocational training, counselling and employment programmes leading
to job opportunities.
Outcomes
– To date, 12 people have been trained and achieved OCN qualifications in Cool Pro Edit
Programme. 15 more volunteers have just enrolled on the radio equipment course.

4.13.3
work experience opportunities

Targets
– 6 people undertaking work experience,
in the provision of administrative support.

Outcomes
– 4 young people have completed work placements. Another 2 will start placements at
the end of January to be completed by
the end of March 2003.

4.13.4
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– Coverage of all relevant social and community issues.
– 3 hours a week of local news.

Outcomes
– Educational programmes for children covering the whole range of the National
Curriculum in school for 5-13 year olds.
– Programmes on the British education system, transfers, attendance, truancy, welfare,
governors‟ roles and responsibility, parental involvement.
– Programmes on crime, gun shootings, burglary, youth crime culture, drugs, alcohol,
mobile phone thefts, drink driving offenses, Racism etc.
– Programmes on British and Asian
sub-continent judicial system. Immigration/
asylum law.
– Programmes on post September 11th impact and its effects on the Asian community.
– Programmes on the Pakistan/Indian
and British political systems – including
live coverage of Pakistan Elections, live interviews with politicians including,
local councillors, MP‟s and MEP, Sheriff
of Nottingham. Also interviews with leaders
of the political parties in Pakistan.
– Programmes on health – including on cancer delivered in partnership with Cancer UK;
diabetes, coronary heart disease, Aids/HIV, sexual health, infertility, childhood diseases,
arthritis and immunisations.
– Programmes on social issues, which addressed stereotypes, norms and practices,
domestic violence, divorces, mixed marriages etc
– Live coverage of art and cultural events, Eid, Diwali, Christmas, Independent Days,
Poetry, book reviews. Live in the studio interviews with music artists and bands.
– Sport programmes, live interviews with sport personalities, England Cricket Captain
Nasser Hussain, welter weight boxing champion Usman Afzal and many more. Coverage
of Commonwealth Games.
– Programmes around sports and leisure facilities.

4.13.5
contribution to local education

Targets
– Broadcasting opportunities for
30 schoolchildren, with a view to
rising achievements among primary
and secondary school pupils.
– Collaboration with the Local Education Authority to produce programmes on
such issues as bullying, governance
of schools etc.

Outcomes
– 35 children between the ages of 5-13 year old were involved in planning, researching
and presenting programmes. The children covered issues of concern to them, such as
bullying, drugs, racism, gang culture within schools – thus providing them with a voice
and platform to express and debate issues.
– The children‟s regular slot included National Curriculum topics, the environment,
sciences (plants, human body, planets), story reading, spellings, maths and many more
topics.
– Local Colleges and CONNEXIONS were involved in planning and presenting
programmes for adults and young 16-19
year old people about learning and training opportunities available and career advice.
– Local colleges have delivered Radio courses in house for Radio Faza at AWP.
– AWP has secured funding to work closely with the local schools to raise educational
achievement for school children, which will involve SATTS revision, on radio homework
clubs etc.
– Colleges and schools with which the project has worked include
• People‟s College
• South Notts. College
• New College, Nottingham
• Manning School
• Blue Coats School
• Forest Primary School
• Margaret Glen Bott School
• Greenwood Dale School

4.13.6
service to neighbourhood or interest groups
Targets
– Collaboration with local community
groups – for example,
• Take One
• Indian Community Centre
• Bulwell Adventist Church

Outcomes
– AWP-Radio Faza empowers Asian communities by breaking down language barriers
and making information available in several community languages thus widening access
for hard to reach group. AWP provides improved access to media and other course by
provision of childcare and language support and by making sure the courses are tailored
to the need of the community in respect of content, delivery, appropriate resources, mode
of delivery (pace and time of course).
– Its partners include:
• Take 1 – African Caribbean Group
• Bulwell Advent Group – Advent
Christian Group
• Madrassa Aloom – Supplementary School
• Pakeeza – Art and Culture Women‟s group
• Local Colleges
• Local authority education department
• Apna Arts – Asian Art project
• Gujerat samaj
• City Central PCT
• BBC Radio Nottingham
• CONNEXIONS
• Cancer Research UK
• University of Nottingham
– AWP has recently formed a partnership with the BBC, which will provide training for
the project‟s producer and release one day a week of a BBC worker‟s time to work with
AWP programme teams as part of the development. They will be involved in the
producer‟s recruitment. The producer will spend 20 days in a year at the BBC.

4.13.7
access to the project by local people

Targets
– Broadcasting and other opportunities
for 20 young people
– Broadcasting and other opportunities
for 20 older people
– 60 people involved in voluntary work
– Broadcasting and other opportunities
for 4 artists
Outcomes
– 273 volunteers have participated in the project, drawn from all age groups.
– In addition, 51 older people have been involved with reminiscence/memoir
programming.
– More than one artist, craftsperson or designer has been featured every week (including,
musicians, poets and fashion designers).
– The station has an open access policy, which allows volunteers to participate in
researching, presenting, planning, producing, and participating in programmes over the
phone, decision-making and policy formation.
– Regular fortnightly meetings are held with volunteers and partner organisations to
evaluate the progress of their contributions. Each person is valued and their contribution
recognised, with certificates, awards or „even just a pat on the back‟.
– AWP Radio Faza has on-site childcare
and disabled access; it is on the route
of Nottingham‟s new Tram Network.

 4.13.8
linguistic impact

Targets
– Programmes will be broadcast mainly
in English and Urdu. Other languages, such as Mirpuri, Pashtu, Gujarati and Panjabi
languages, will be allocated
one hour a week

Outcomes
– AWP – Radio FAZA broadcasts in 9 community languages, main languages being
Urdu, Punjabi, English; other languages include Hindi, Mirpuri, Pashto, Bengali,
Gujerati, Arabic, which have
regular two-hour slots a week.
– Broadcasting programmes in various languages widens access for all groups.
– The project‟s linguistic impact has been significant, particularly for young presenters as
they are reviving their mother tongue in order to reach out to their audiences. This helps
to build their positive identity, pride
in their own culture, language, culture,
and history



KARIMIA FOUNDATION
TARGETS BY LICENCE END, 25 MARCH 2003
OUTCOMES – JANUARY 2003
Aim
 4.13.9 to entertain, inspire and educate listeners, by giving the Muslim community
(Pakistani and Kashmiri) a means of artistic and cultural expression that will lead to a
more informed community leading to the regeneration of the community and by
involving the community in running the radio station at all levels of organisation

 4.13.10
training opportunities

Targets
– At least 15 people to be trained and study OCN Level 1 and 2 in broadcasting.
– 15 additional volunteers to be trained in radio presentation and administrative skills

Outcomes
– 11 people have been trained on the Community Broadcasting course (OCNB Level 1)
run in partnership with New College Nottingham which started in September and finished
in December.
– 25 additional volunteers have been trained
in radio presenting and administrative skills.

4.13.11
work experience opportunities

Targets
– No specific targets set.

Outcomes
– 10 people have come to the project for work experience.

 4.13.12
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– Programmes on the British education system, the National Health Service, criminal and
justice system, social services and welfare, the British political system.
– Phone-in programmes with officials from the local council and statutory bodies.

Outcomes
– Programmes on the British education system, The National Health Service,
criminal and justice system, social services and welfare, The British Political system.
– Business and voluntary community organisations take part as well.
– Phone-in programmes with the officials
from the local council and statutory bodies.

4.13.14
contribution to local education

Targets
– Programmes on raising educational standards.
– Advertorials for local FE colleges, universities and selected primary and secondary
schools (with Pakistani pupils) and Karimia Tutorial Classes.

Outcomes
– Programmes on raising educational standards.
– Advertorials for local FE Colleges, Universities, and selected primary and secondary
schools (with Pakistani pupils) and Karimia tutorial classes.

4.13.15
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– 50% of programmes in Urdu/Panjabi.
– News and views from Pakistan.
– Folk songs and devotional music.
– 1 programme a week on local businesses, emphasising successes and achievements.
– Giving a sense of community and putting down roots in England, creating a sense of
belonging to Nottingham, by making local history programmes, patterns of migration and
immigrants‟ life stories.

Outcomes
– 50% of programmes are in Urdu/Panjabi.
– News and Views from Pakistan.
– Folk songs and devotional music.
– 1 programme a week on local businesses, emphasising success and achievements.
– The project aims to give a sense of community and of putting down roots in England, to
create a sense of belonging
to Nottingham, by making local history programmes about patterns of migration
and immigrants‟ life stories.

4.13.16
access to the project by local people

Targets
– Anyone who wants to play a part in the station as DJ, presenter, researcher,
etc is welcome. Karimia asks listeners to participate in helping to run the station and
operates an open policy. Nearly 30 volunteers are taking part running the project. The
management committee
is made up from these volunteers.

Outcomes
– 74 volunteers are taking part in the project.
– Anyone who wants to play a part in the station as DJ, presenter, researcher, etc is
welcome. Karimia regularly requests listeners to participate in helping to run the project.
Nearly the entire management committee
is recruited from these volunteers.
4.13.17
linguistic impact

Targets
– Karimia broadcasts mainly in Urdu and English; there are regular weekly (1hr)
programmes in Gujrati, Bangla and Mirpuri. Arabic is also used throughout most
programmes, the lingua franca of Muslims.
– The project believes that the use of Urdu has a positive impact on young third
generation Pakistani and helps to bridge the intergenerational gap. The use of English, on
the other hand, will help many women working at home to improve their English.

Outcomes
– The project believes the use of Urdu has
a positive impact on young third generation Pakistani and helps to bridge the
intergenerational gap. The use of English,
on the other hand, will help many women working at home to improve their English.
– The building of confidence in new presenters. New presenters are encouraged,
mentored, coached, and fully supported to develop
into confident speakers. Many are now very assertive, and use colloquial language
whether it is English or Urdu.
– Radio Faza has been very successful in attracting volunteers not only training but
retaining them as well. So far 3 volunteers have succeeded in getting jobs with BBC. One
works as a senior journalist in BBC Asian Network, another as a trainee journalist with
BBC York and the third has been sponsored by BBC to do an MA in journalism.


4.14 RADIO REGEN (INCORPORATING
ALL FM AND WYTHENSHAWE FM)
Targets by licence end, 6 May 2003
OUTCOMES – JANUARY 2003

Aim
 4.14.1 To create a mass audience platform for the views, hopes, fears and abilities of
Wythenshawe and the A6 Corridor that will promote community
pride and participation as well as lowering barriers to unemployment.

 4.14.2
training opportunities

Targets
– The stations will provide 24 training weeks (30 hours each week), giving an
introduction to radio skills and transferable workplace skills (e.g. teamwork, problem
solving, ICT, professional work practice, communication skills and self-esteem) and the
chance to progress to other training opportunities with Radio Regen and other providers.
Outcomes
– Radio/transferable skills delivered as a mandatory induction for all volunteers: 12
30-hour training weeks for ALL FM. and 14 for Wythenshawe FM. Five volunteers have
enrolled at Radio Regen for an Introduction to Radio Course.
– The existing induction is soon to be accredited with the Open College Network, giving
a qualification to volunteers and resources for trainers to the stations. Radio Regen‟s
Training From Volunteering project [LSC funded] will also develop accreditation from
programme making.

4.14.3
work experience opportunities

Targets
– 40 Radio Regen trainees will receive substantial work experience (including „real time‟
broadcasting) at the stations.

Outcomes
– 11 BTEC and 9 others at ALL FM and 5 BTEC and 14 others at Wythenshawe FM.
– The BTEC trainee take-up was not as successful as had been hoped because the stations
arrived part way through an existing course. Other work placements came from
employment schemes and colleges.
– New Radio Regen trainees will now „graduate‟ during their course to take up
increasingly significant roles in the stations. They will also produce feature material for
the stations from Radio Regen‟s city centre base.

4.14.4
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– No specific targets set.

Outcomes
– The stations have become major centres for volunteering in each area, with 76
volunteers making programmes every week on ALL FM and 86 doing so in
Wythenshawe. These people are not „community activists‟ but they are now helping
sustain one of the biggest community projects in their areas. This level of demand has
stretched resources on the stations and Radio Regen is working with them to ensure that
support for these volunteers is resourced and sustainable.

– If „social inclusion‟ also includes overcoming barriers over issues, one major example
is WFM‟s domestic violence campaign. Much of the material will also make its way to
ALL FM where additional material will be added to address specific issues there.
– In terms of multiculturalism, WFM has two Irish shows, and ALL FM has one. ALL
FM has a wide range of non-English broadcasting (see Linguistic Impact below).

4.14.5
contribution to local education

Targets
– Youth groups and school classes will
be invited to train and then create programmes.

Outcomes
– Schools recruited with the aid of the LEA,
7 by ALL FM and 8 by Wythenshawe FM. The schools take up a weekly 15‟ slot to
broadcast heir news and talent.
– 2 youth groups involved in ALL FM. and 5
in Wythenshawe FM. Many other individual young people are also involved, with most
of Saturdays on ALL FM being dominated
by young people.

4.14.6
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– The stations will support 24 voluntary and community groups

Outcomes
– Many groups make occasional use of the two projects.
– Groups with regular slots on ALL FM include
• Longsight Police Mothers Against Violence
• Youth Service
• Sure Start
• Connexions
• A6 Routes
• Community Safety team
• Drake Music Project
• Assati (Asian Women)
• Mehfil (Asian literary circle)
• Yip Ying Chinese Assoc.
• M13 Youth
– Groups with regular slots on Wythenshawe FM include
• Longsight Police Mothers Against Violence
• Youth Service
• Sure Start
• Connexions
• A6 Routes
• Community Safety team
• Drake Music Project
• Assati (Asian Women)
– Community Participation Workers have
been recruited to increase the uptake by community groups. One particular area
of work will be to increase the profile of
the local Community Networks and their
role in the Local Strategic Partnership.

4.14.7
access to the project by local people

Targets
– Each station will have a steering group
of between 6 and 12 people, a majority
of whom will be residents of the
respective areas.
– It is estimated that about 200 people
will volunteer to work for the stations. Each station will include the work of
21 young people

Outcomes
– 76 volunteers, of whom 19 are young people, are making programmes at ALL FM and
89, of whom 29 are young people, at Wythenshawe FM.
 4.14.8

4.14.9 linguistic impact

Targets
– No specific targets set.

Outcomes
– From 6 pm to 8 pm every day ALL FM broadcasts non English shows in e.g. Urdu,
Benin, Portuguese, Hindi, Kashmiri, Punjabi, Farsi. The phone response to the non-
English shows is good and spreads well beyond the target area. ALLFM also plays
a fair proportion of non-western music in
the daytime. It is understood that the Benin programme is the only one in the country.
– Wythenshawe FM broadcasts only in English, with an emphasis on the local
vernacular.

4.15 RESONANCE FM
Targets by licence end, 1 May 2003
outcomes – january 2003

Aim
 4.15.1 Resonance 104.4 FM offers to
the community of London‟s artists access
to an expressive communication medium and seeks to broaden as widely as possible
hands-on use of radio.
 4.15.2 It seeks long term to redefine the perception and understanding of the expressive
uses of radio.
4.15.3
training opportunities

Targets
– 500 people in total or 30 people a month to be provided with basic broadcasting skills,
in addition to 60 regular broadcasters who have received training. 15 engineers have been
trained, offering further training to new volunteers. The target is a pool of 30 trained
engineers.
– 15 people to be trained in administrative skills.

Outcomes
– On course to meet target of providing 30 people a month with basic broadcasting skills.
– 85 – 100 regular broadcasters have received training and make shows.
– 40 engineers have been trained, offering further training to new volunteers. The
project‟s revised target, reached pragmatically, is for a stable pool of 25 trained
engineers, who oversee the bulk of broadcasts.
– On course to meet revised target of training
9 people in administrative skills.

4.15.4
work experience opportunities

Targets
– Up to 3 unemployed New Deal placements.

Outcomes
– One placement so far has been secured,
as well as 2 from educational institutes.

 4.15.5
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– 80% of participants are on low incomes.
– The project works with
• London Prisoners‟ Magazine
• Pensioners‟ Action Group

Outcomes
– 80% of participants are on low incomes.
– In addition to the two organisations listed,
the project also works with Deptford Action Group for the Elderly.

4.15.6
contribution to local education
Targets
– The project provides an outlet for the projects of students from
• Lewisham College
• Morley College
• Middlesex University
• London College of Printing
• St Martins College
• South Bank University
• Southwark Council Media Education
– It supplements the course work of some 50 students at Middlesex University (sound
engineering and audio courses) and Lewisham College (broadcasting course).
– About 12 students are engaged with the project.

Outcomes
– The project provides an outlet for the projects of students from
• Lewisham College
• Middlesex University
• London College of Printing
• South Bank University
• Westminster University
• SAE Technology College, Holloway
– Local schools: The project‟s „Go! for
children of all ages‟ weekly show features contributions deploying 28 languages
from schoolchildren attending
• Colvestone Primary School, Hackney;
• Highbury Quadrant School, Islington;
• Stoke Newington Secondary School,
Stoke Newington;
• William Patten School, Hackney.

4.15.7
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– The programming provides content relevant to different sections of the
artistic community and the wider society, providing radio access to artists, writers and
musicians. The project works closely with Seven Dials Community Festival, Coin Street
Festival and Sonic Arts Network.

Outcomes
– In addition to presenting work by the
local artistic community, the project has established constructive relations with
the following organisations:
– Seven Dials Festival, in Covent Garden,
with whom Resonance FM worked closely in autumn 2002, providing a new sound
scape work for the radio by Tom Wallace, broadcast in the Thomas Neal Centre; street
musicians for the festival; and interview features with Eileen Woods, the Director of the
Festival, and three of the visual artists involved in
the Festival.
– South London Gallery: the project broadcast an audio work by the radical South
American artist Santiago Sierra, an integral part of his show at SLG.
– Resonance was also a featured element
of the London Fashion Week show by the haute couturier Robert Cary-Williams.
– Deptford Action Group for the Elderly:
the project now broadcasts three shows a week by this pensioners‟ lobbying group.
– Other cultural organisations: Sonic Arts Network, the British Music Information Centre
and Cultural Co-Operation are all involved
in the project as programme makers.

4.15.8
access to the project by
local people

Targets
– 4 workers maintain the web-site and
web broadcasting.
– 12 to 20 people have artistic work featured.
– 2 to 3 visual artists contribute monthly
in publicity material.
– The project encourages the artistic community to participate actively in the running of
Resonance FM, which is organised and facilitated by volunteers.
– London Musicians‟ Collective, Resonance FM‟s sponsoring body, is governed by 12
directors elected by about 200 subscribers.

Outcomes
– 4 workers maintain the web-site and web broadcasting.
– 3 photographers and 3 designers have contributed to publicity material (including the
website).
– The project encourages the artistic community to participate actively in the running of
Resonance FM, which is organised and facilitated by a central team
of ten volunteers, who meet weekly. London Musicians‟ Collective, Resonance‟s
governing body, is run by a board of 12 directors elected by the 200-odd members.
– Local venues: the project has broadcast live shows from the ICA, the Foundry in Old
Street and The 12 Bar Club in Denmark Street.

4.15.9
linguistic impact

Targets
– The project actively encourages many
bi-lingual participants to use their mother tongue as well as English and has featured
programmes in Russian, Hungarian, German, Japanese and French. It aims for 7% of its
output to be in non-English languages.
– Four regular shows (Dosensos, ClingRadio, Onkyodo, Xentursian Nights) are
conducted in more than one language.

Outcomes
– The project actively encourages bi-lingual participants to use their mother tongue as
well as (sometimes instead of) English and has featured programmes in Russian, Spanish,
Hungarian, German, Japanese, French and Serbian. It aims for 5% of its output to be in
non-English languages. Seven regular shows (Borderline, Dosensos, ClingRadio,
Onkyodo, Xantursian Nights, Tamizdat, Zerbian Radio Slot) are conducted in more than
one language. The “Clear Spot” week-daily show has featured 2% foreign language
works.



4.16 SHINE FM
Targets by licence end, 21 September 2003
outcomes – january 2003
Aim
 4.16.1 To build community identity and combat isolation, to provide a non-sectarian
Christian perspective, to equip individuals with broadcasting skills, while providing
awareness of Banbridge as being within the context of globalization.
 4.16.2 In the longer term, to develop Shine FM with certificated training courses
alongside a multimedia centre.

 4.16.3
training opportunities

Targets
– Basic radio broadcast training will be offered in presentation, production, interview
skills and making advertisements. It is hoped that 10 newcomers will receive training and
20 of the existing team of volunteers will receive additional training.

Outcomes
– Training Workshops prior to broadcast were run, covering basic presentation &
production skills, legal issues & Radio Authority guidelines, interview skills and
advertisement production. Attendance: 14 newcomers and 11 previous team members.
– Many people joined after the project went
on air and, consequently, much training was „on the job‟. From the feedback forms this
seemed to be well received. In the Team Survey, when asked to respond to statement „I
have had opportunities at Shine FM
to learn and grow‟ on a scale of 1 to 5,
„1‟ = strongly disagree „5‟ = strongly agree. Average of all 19 responses was 4.2
indicating that people felt that they had learned a significant amount. Response
to statement „I have the training and support I need to do my work right?‟ as mentioned
above under Priority 3 was 4.3.
– Feedback is offered informally to all presenters on a regular basis. More formal
evaluation meetings have been offered to all team members, which will commence
shortly.

4.16.4
work experience opportunities

Targets
– Two places will be offered local students. They will have exposure to the general
running of a radio station, the opportunity
to record and edit interviews, make programmes and write and record advertisements.

Outcomes
– 1 Secondary School student and 6 Youth With A Mission students, as part of their
practical work for course.

4.16.5
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– No specific targets set.

Outcomes
– With a view to opening local people to opportunities, needs and cultures of
other nations, at least 12 local people who have worked or lived abroad have been
interviewed about their experience. Countries involved include: Zimbabwe, Tasmania,
Ukraine, Lithuania, Kirgiztan, Uganda, Thailand, the Philippines, Sierra Leone
and New Zealand.
– At least 6 groups with international connections were interviewed, with an emphasis in
each of the interviews on how local people can get involved and help those in other
countries. People from other countries Uganda, America, Canada, Zimbabwe.

4.16.8
contribution to local education

Targets
– Opportunities to participate will be given to 1 to 4 young people working for the Duke
of Edinburgh Award Scheme.
– Shine FM will broadcast programmes featuring primary school pupils. Numbers to be
confirmed.

Outcomes
– In total 88 Primary School children were interviewed. This included interviews with
individual pupils who wrote or read poetry
in a local drama competition, interviews with children about Christmas and local school
choirs singing Christmas carols. All local primary schools were invited to participate.

4.16.9
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– Regular interviews will be broadcast with Banbridge District Council (including the
Health and Social Services department) and the local police.
– Community groups and organisations involved in the community will be invited to
participate in Shine FM programmes (mainly live broadcasts). Numbers involved will
depend on the interest shown.

Outcomes
– Community Noticeboard was broadcast 3 times a day on weekdays and also at
weekends.
– Average of 10 interviews per week with locally based organisations/individuals (there
are 170 groups and organisations, excluding sport and recreation, in Banbridge District.)
Regular interviews with District Council, Police, Health and Social Services, Job Centre,
Citizens‟ Advice Bureau, local entrepreneurs in conjunction with Banbridge Enterprise
Centre.
– Other groups interviewed include various neighbourhood and local interest groups:
Accept (Mental Health Support Group), Banbridge Library, Speech & Drama Festival,
Power to Change (local events as part of nationwide Christian initiative), Taurus (for
people with addictions), Banbridge Writer‟s Circle, Footsteps Coffee Bar (local event),
Banbridge Carers Support Group, Rotary Club, Blue Dove Support Group (for local
Hospice), Girls‟ Brigade, Royal British Legion and St. Vincent De Paul.
– Weekly sports reports were broadcast covering results from the following local
clubs/groups: Bowling, Archery, Horse riding, Hockey, Football, Rugby, Angling,
Cycling, Badminton, Boxing, Snooker, Mountain Biking, Motocross, Cross-country
running, Gymnastics, Netball, Squash, Camogie, Gaelic Football, Darts, Swimming,
Cricket, Tennis. Sports Education Courses and Training nights were also promoted.
– Denominations involved in running of the station include: Presbyterian, Church of
Ireland, Baptist, Catholic, Pentecostal, Free Presbyterian. Team members are expected to
be Christian and are asked to complete application forms stating their religion for
monitoring purposes. These show the team consists of 30% „Catholic‟, 45% „Protestant‟
and 25% „Christian‟. The denominational breakdown of Banbridge is estimated at 40%
Catholics and 60% Protestants.

4.16.10
access to the project by local people

Targets
– The number of those taking part in managerial decision-making will depend on suitable
candidates have the time available. Between 5 and 15 people could be involved.
– More than 50 people are expected to have some involvement in broadcasting to varying
degrees, from presenting a few programmes to presenting regular weekly programmes.

Outcomes
– 54 people have had some active engagement in broadcasting on Shine to varying
degrees. 27 new local people involved. Also, 15 others were involved who before Shine
FM had had no broadcasting experience. Including those given work experience (see
above), a total of 49 people involved in the running of the station received their first
experience of broadcasting through Shine FM.
– 168 individuals have been interviewed live and 107 were pre-recorded at external
locations, totalling 275 individuals interviewed during the 13 weeks of Shine FM‟s
licence. Asked if they had had previous media experience, 77% of 111 guests said that
they had not.
– All presenters produce their own shows, picking music and planning speech. When
presenters were asked to respond to statement „I have freedom to plan and produce my
own programme‟ on a scale of
1 to 5 “1”=strongly disagree “5”=strongly agree. Average of 21 responses was 4.7, which
indicates substantial agreement.
– In the Team Survey, when asked to respond to statement „At Shine FM, my opinions
seem to count‟ on a scale of 1 to 5. Average of 22 responses was 4.2 indicating that
people felt involved in decision-making processes. When asked in feedback forms if they
would like to be more involved in the running of the station, most respondents said „No‟,
but were keen to continue their present involvement.

4.16.11
linguistic impact

Targets
– The number and emphasis of any programmes concerned with or using other languages
is to be confirmed.

Outcomes
– In the Team Survey, when asked to respond
to statement „Because of my involvement in Shine FM, I feel I have more confidence to
express myself linguistically‟ on a scale of
1 to 5 „1‟ = strongly disagree „5‟ = strongly agree. Average of 22 responses was 4.1,
indicating that people believe they benefited linguistically from their involvement in
Shine FM.

4.17 SOUND RADIO
Targets by licence end, 26 July 2003
outcomes – january 2003
Aim
 4.17.1 To establish the principle recognised in other countries that there should be a
recognised, effective and non-marginalised media platform for those at the margins
of society by virtue of their race, culture, religion, social class, geographic location, and
those suffering from socio-economic disadvantage not contained in the foregoing. To
establish the diverse and sophisticated range of positive outcomes that can be facilitated
through a commitment to an adventurous and responsive community broadcasting
strategy.
 4.17.2 To establish the diversity and substance of contribution which those
in the target groups above have made,
and can and will make, to broader society on a substantial permanent basis. Notably,
to promote harmonious relations between those groups and individuals historically,
currently and with the potential for
future conflict.

4.17.3
training opportunities

Targets
– Up to 30 volunteers, notably from language-based groups, trained in broadcasting skills
in the start-up period.
– The project expects to attract about 360 users to take up learning opportunities over the
period of the project (including people who need help with basic skills, lone parents,
people from ethnic minorities, unemployed people, people with disabilities, people who
are over 60 and not involved in learning activities).
– As members of the London Open College Network, SVT will deliver Level 1 Units in
Basic ICT, Community Radio and Communication Skills.

Outcomes
– About 100 volunteers are all receiving various levels of training from basic to advanced
in station/studio/portable/internet skills.
– The project is reviewing the best way of applying accreditation.

4.17.4
work experience opportunities

Targets
– See training opportunities above.

Outcomes
– 1 at BBC London
– 1 at BBC World Service (Spanish section) – employment
– 2 Voice over work – employment
– 1 employed formally at SVT, with 2 to follow shortly – employment
– 2 work placements at SVT
– 5 DJ‟s increasing work at clubs
– 1 attachment at SVT from BBC World
Service (Assistant Senior Studio Manager (Asia & Pacific))
4.17.5
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– Sound Radio will target as broad a range of the local community as possible,
multi-cultural, young and old. See training opportunities above.
– Key client groups will be drawn from the residents of Eastdown Ward in Hackney,
including people who need help with basic skills, lone parents, people from ethnic
minorities, unemployed people, people with disabilities and people who are over 60 and
not involved in learning activities.

Outcomes
– First ever local reporting of the Mayoral elections in Hackney
– First ever local reporting of Council by–elections in Hackney
– Series in Development
• Drugs and Crime (in partnership with the local estate and the Hackney Drugs Action
Team)
• ICT advice and guidance
• Health
• Education
• Sources of Funding

4.17.6
contribution to local education

Targets
– No specific targets set.

Outcomes
– Coverage of all major breaking stories, interviews “on air” as regular feature of
Community News, notably with the Learning Trust – now in charge of all local
educational services in Hackney. Primary source of information on educational matters in
Hackney and East London.
– Adult literacy classes for EASOL (12 students) as part of a larger community opera
project.
 4.17.7
service to neighbourhood or interest groups
Targets
– Up to 60 volunteers from community groups to take part in Sound Radio.
– Sound Radio has working relationships with Renaisi, a regeneration agency for
Hackney; H10, the Hackney Training Employment Network; Comprehensive Estates
Initiatives; Nightingale CEI; Arts Reach; Betar Bangla in Tower Hamletts and others.

Outcomes
– Sound Radio has worked with
• 3 Youth music projects
• Environmental and Recycling project
• Local Community Development Trust
• Neighbourhood Renewal Fund
• Local Drug Action Team
• Local Police
• Luncheon Club
Also
• Home Office (Active Communities Unit)
• Virgin Radio
• BBC World Service (Spanish and Russian Sections)
• East London Business Alliance
• Renaisi (regeneration agency)
• Hackney Borough Council Mayor
• Hackney Borough Council CEO
• London Development Agency
• The Learning Trust
• Corporation of London
• International Links
– 173 community stations in Latin America as part of Voices of the Kidnapped
programming.
– AMARC and Community Media Association – Global broadcast Anti Racism Day
facilitated by SVT

 4.17.8
access to the project by local people

Targets
– More than 100 volunteers, whether individuals or from groups, to express
an interest in taking part in Sound
Radio‟s work during the first six months
of the project.

Outcomes
– About 100 volunteers (drawn, as expected, from the borough, not the ward).
– Programme contributors – 350
(approx 15 new per week minimum).
– Organisation contributors – 78
(approx 3 new per week minimum).
– Youth – 14 (from partnership projects leading directly to programme transmission).
– Website – 60,000 plus hits since launch.
– Phone Calls (incoming) – 5,000 plus.
– Ethnicity – Kurdish/Turkish, Bengali, Latin American, Jewish, Farsi, Mauritian,
Somali, French (African).
– Religions represented
•      Christian (Gospel Explosion and breakfast and drive time once per week each).
•      Jewish (With Mazal – weekly programme, with possible plans for Orthodox
women‟s programme).
•       Muslim (as general part of Bangla broadcasts, but specifically at times
of religious festivals).
•       Other religions (covered in general content).

4.17.9
linguistic impact

Targets
– Throughout the broadcast schedule, the station will try to include as many languages
from the locality as possible, while maintaining an English-language backbone.
Programming will change throughout the year, but will start with English, Spanish,
Kurdish, Bangladeshi and Yiddish/Jewish.
– Sound Radio aims to build broadcasting capacity within three language-based groups.

Outcomes
– As projected, there has been a substantial response to Sound Radio‟s language-based
programming, notably from those with little or no current representation on radio.
– The Kurdish group obtained 700 letters of support asking for more programmes. Many
telephone calls in response to Bangla and Latino programmes.
– Much of the English language programming reflects the „colloquial lexicon‟ peculiar to
the target audience.
– (Programme makers have sought to avoid language that may be perceived as
inappropriate. The project has received no formal or informal complaints with regard to
linguistic content. Indeed a programme, originally intended to deal with potential
complaints of any nature regarding station output has, for the time being at least, been
shelved.)


4.18 TAKEOVER RADIO
Targets by licence end, 23 March 2003
outcomes january 2003

Aim
 4.18.1 To empower children currently between 8 and 14 years to have a voice in their
community, which is not available in any other way, bringing children‟s issues and
concerns to the forefront and proving that children‟s radio is a viable concept in the
United Kingdom.
 4.18.2 On an on-going basis, more and more children to have the opportunity to
experience media learning activities and grow in confidence, learn new life skills
and work as a team. The concept of children‟s radio to be more firmly validated on the
route to a larger station.

4.18.3
training opportunities
Targets
– 200 children to be trained with the project period.
– Existing Takeover participants to undergo follow-up training.

Outcomes
– 109 children have joined Takeover Radio,
in addition to the 52 already actively involved in the project. Of the newcomers 76
attended the training course; eleven now have their own shows and a further seven will
be starting soon. The total membership is 356.

4.18.4
work experience opportunities

Targets
– 10 places to be made available for young people of approximately 16 to 17 years,
during the twelve months, for periods of between 1 and 2 weeks.

Outcomes
– 8 students have undertaken work experience.
– Work experience opportunities have come to end with the withdrawal of Phil Solo from
Takeover Radio.

4.18.5
contribution to social inclusion

Targets
– Takeover will work with various partners including
• Soft Touch Community Arts
• Crimebeat
• NSPCC
• The Children‟s Fund
• Conflict Resolution in Schools (CRISP) Mediation Service

Outcomes
– Worked with Crimebeat (interviewing groups Crimebeat supports and creating and
managing their web-site).
– Produced promotional features for the NSPCC and The Birmingham Childrens Fund.
12 Birmingham children given
radio training.
– Promoted locally Scout Jamboree in Thailand.

4.18.6
contribution to local education

Targets
– Takeover will work with about 350 children and 10 teachers from 10 schools in the
twelve months. They prepare and produce their own material, which is aired on Takeover
Radio. The material is integrated with English Stage 2 project work.

Outcomes
– Worked with 275 children and nine teachers from the following schools
• Dovelands Primary
• Coldicote Infants
• Riverside Primary
• Rushymead Secondary
• Beauchamp College
• Loughborough Grammar

4.18.7
service to neighbourhood or interest groups

Targets
– Activities and events of interest to and
for children will be publicised during
the broadcasts. All manner of activities. Unmeasurable. On demand. Results
will be tracked through central diary
and on-air promo production and news features in takeover‟s What‟s On sections.

Outcomes
– Organisations with which Takeover has worked include
• Phoenix Arts
• De Montfort Hall
• Haymarket Theatre
• The Charlotte (music venue)
• Half Time Orange (music venue)
• Nottingham City Council (festival)
• Leicester City Council
• Leicester Promotions
• Melton Mowbray District Council
• North West Leicestershire District Council
• The Y Theatre
• The Little Theatre
• Leicester Mercury/Leicester Link
• The Leicester Comedy Festival
– Takeover Radio, as the only full-time children‟s radio station broadcasting on
FM, has received queries from students, academics and others. Pock FM, a local school
station in York, paid Takeover a fact-finding visit. Last November Takeover was invited
to hold master-classes at SkillCity 2002 in Manchester.

 4.18.8
access to the project by local people
Targets
– Children to have direct creative and hands-on input in the management and running of
Takeover Radio. Through daily involvement, informal meetings, open expression policy
and team working, they are regularly consulted on their views and requirements. There is
also a formal Kidz Board and Panel.
– Most of the broadcasting to be done
by children (except for young adult presenters during weekdays). The 200 trainees (see
training opportunities above) will take part in Takeover activities.

Outcomes
– Participating children play an active role in the running of Takeover Radio. They are
consulted when any major decision is made and form part of the Kidz Board and Panel
which discusses and agrees new policies. One fifteen-year-old has gained the experience
to run Takeover‟s extensive local sports coverage as a semi-independent operation.
– The number of Asian children involved in Takeover Radio broadly equates with the
percentage of the Asian people in Leicester.
– All the adult helpers are from the local community.

4.18.9
linguistic impact

Targets
– The children all have local voices with their own regional dialects and distinct
language. They also have their own popular vernacular and „cool culture‟ speech forms,
enhanced by the shortening phenomenon of text messaging. Sometimes only the children
know what they are referring to! Leicester has a large Asian population, most of which
speak English as a first language; Takeover will, however, provide Asian music and
speech during the Monday music show, presented by an Asian girl.

Outcomes
– In distinction to the voices usually heard
on BBC and commercial local radio, it is noticeable that a number of the children who
present have very strong Leicester accents, and this gives the station a local feel.
– The experience of training the children has shown that they have a tendency to speak
rather quickly, and do not show the care over pronunciation and articulation that comes to
most people a little later in life. During the training the youngsters have been strongly
encouraged to think about what it is they are intending to say, and to ensure the clearness
of their delivery.

				
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