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					Promoting and Protecting Rights in Natural Disasters:

                 Facilitator’s Guide




                     December 2010
                            Promoting and Protecting Rights in Natural Disasters:
                                 Workshop Modules and Facilitator Guide

                                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction

A.        Background and Explanatory Material                                            p. 3

          Introduction                                                                   p. 3
          Purpose and Objectives                                                         p. 3
          Team-Based Workshop Management                                                 p. 4
          Session Evaluations                                                            p. 5
          Equipment and Supplies                                                         p. 5

B.        Two-Day Workshop: Agenda and Session Plans                                     p. 7

          Workshop Agenda                                                                p. 7

Day 1 Agenda
       Session 1 – Opening, Introduction                                                 p. 9
       Session 2 – Human Rights and Protection in Natural Disasters                      p. 11
       Session 3 – Protection Monitoring and Assessment in Natural Disasters             p. 15
       Session 4 – Protection of Special Groups At-risk                                  p. 16
       Session 5 – Tools for Integrating Protection Needs                                p. 19

Day 2 Agenda
       Session 6 – Integrating Protection in Disaster Risk Reduction                     p. 22
       Session 7 – Community-Based Disaster Management; Emergency                        p. 24
                    Response Systems
       Session 8 – Challenges of Early Recovery and Durable Solutions                    p. 25
       Session 9 – Lessons Learned – The Way Forward, Closing                            p. 27




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                      Promoting and Protecting Rights in Natural Disasters:
                           Workshop Modules and Facilitator Guide

Introduction

The Brookings-Bern Project on Internal Displacement has created basic workshop modules and
a facilitator’s guide to support the training of humanitarians and others in addressing the
protection needs of people affected by natural disasters. This resource includes suggested
workshop agendas with detailed session plans and provides guidance for facilitators in
workshop management. The modules and guide are intended to be indicative only; planners
and facilitators should feel free to adapt the material as appropriate for their audience, region
and specific area of focus.

These workshops have been prepared with the expectation that facilitators will seek out local
disaster experts in advance of the workshop, to participate as resource persons or co-
facilitators. This is particularly important in order to prepare regionally/locally relevant case
studies in advance of the workshop.

The resource includes agendas and activities for a two-day workshop. This facilitator’s guide
includes the agenda and session-by-session ‘lesson plans’ that include:
            An outline of the session
            Session objectives
            Key learning points
            A list of documents used or referenced during each session
            Possible variations for the session plan
            Examples of good practice from the field

All documentation listed in the modules will be available in CD-ROM format from the
Brookings-Bern Project on Internal Displacement. The CD-ROM also includes a selection of
other relevant resources as well as tools to support the management and facilitation of the
workshop. Electronic links are provided in written materials to enable quick access to resource
materials where the Internet is available.

A.        Background and Explanatory Material

Purpose and Objectives

The goal of the workshop is to:

Increase the capacity of humanitarian and other actors to incorporate protection in preparing
for, responding to, and/or recovering from natural disasters.
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Specific overall objectives of the workshop include:

         Increasing awareness of the protection challenges that exist in natural disasters
         Introducing activities to promote and protect the rights of disaster-affected people
         Clarifying the role of humanitarian actors in protection in natural disasters

The workshop modules introduce international human rights law and other frameworks (the
Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, for example) that underpin protection work in
natural disasters. These frameworks suggest concepts and tools that will assist in the
integration of protection approaches in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery.

The modules emphasize the protection of persons and groups at special risk due to their
particular needs or circumstances (e.g. unaccompanied/separated children; persons with
disabilities; persons at risk due to gender; ethnic or religious minorities subject to
discrimination; older persons; etc.).

Case studies are included to provide participants with the opportunity to consider the practical
application of the different types of protection activities and modes of action in disaster
settings. Region-specific examples are also included (and may be modified in advance by the
organizers) to ensure relevance. The workshop methodology also provides participants with the
opportunity to share perspectives on protection in natural disasters from their own
experiences.

The workshop is designed to allow the facilitator flexibility in time management. There may be
more information included than can be covered in the time allotted. It is up to the facilitator to
tailor relevant information in the presentations to the needs of the participants.

Team-based Workshop Management

Given the limited timeframe and ambitious agenda of the workshop, careful thought and
planning is necessary to ensure that key tasks are delegated and fulfilled successfully.

Key tasks included in the overall coordination and facilitation of the workshop process:
    Identification of potential partner agencies to co-host the workshop (if desired) and of
       possible presenters for the various sessions
    Review of the agenda with the goal of ensuring relevance to regional or country
       participants
    Collection and electronic filing of all documentation used in the workshop
    Logistics and liaison with participants and resource persons (travel planning; assistance
       with visas; arrangements for venue, accommodations, and food; ensuring
       reimbursement for approved expenses; etc.)


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         Distribution of documentation to participants and collection of feedback from
          participants (including notes of each session, transcription of flip-chart notes, and
          participant comments and questions)

If staff is available to support the facilitator, these functions can be divided amongst a
workshop team. It is advisable for the team to meet the evening after Day 1 to review progress
and plans for the following day, and make adjustments to the agenda and/or materials if
necessary.

Session Evaluations

At the end of each day, participants will be given a simple evaluation form that will ask them to
rank each session on a scale of 1-5 across a range of criteria, including participants' impressions
of the relevance, interest, format, organization, and content of the workshop. Evaluations will
also include space for comments not captured by the numeric data. This feedback will allow the
facilitators to make adjustments before Day Two and to address any concerns that are raised.

Equipment and Supplies

For each day of the workshop, there should be:
     Grouped seating (chairs arranged around tables throughout the room, rather than
       auditorium or classroom style)
     Flip chart, paper, and pens for the facilitator(s)
     Microphone for facilitator and roving mike for participants
     PowerPoint projector and screen
     Laptop for the facilitator with backup copies of all PowerPoint presentations
     Pens and note paper for the participants
     Any hand-outs required for the sessions. Provide copies of all Power-Point presentations
       for participants at the beginning of each day.
     Evaluation forms
     If possible, a copy of each of the following materials for all participants either in print or
       on a CD:
           o Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement1
           o Protecting Persons Affected by Natural Disasters: IASC Operational Guidelines on
               the Protection of Persons in Situations of Natural Disasters2
           o Checklists for Integrating Human Rights in Natural Disaster Management in the
               Pacific3

1
  The Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement have been translated into over forty languages. See the Brookings-Bern
Project on Internal Displacement for access to translations and commentary on the Guiding Principles.
http://www.brookings.edu/projects/idp/gp_page.aspx
2
  Brookings-Bern Project on Internal Displacement, IASC Operational Guidelines on the Protection of Persons in Situations of
Natural Disasters, 2011, http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2011/0106_operational_guidelines_nd.aspx
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               o Protection: An ALNAP Guide for Humanitarian Agencies4
               o IASC Framework on Durable Solutions for Internally Displaced Persons5

Suggestions:
 If presenters use PowerPoint presentations, provide print-outs of the slides to the
   participants at the beginning of the session.




3
  UNDP Pacific Centre and OHCHR Regional Office for the Pacific. (2007). Checklists for Integrating Human Rights in Natural
Disaster Management in the Pacific. Suva, Fiji: UNDP and OHCHR. Accessed at:
http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/lib.nsf/db900sid/SHIG-
7GLE4T/$file/Checklist_Integrating_HumanRights_in_natural_Disaster_Management.pdf?openelement
4
  Slim, H. and Bonwick, A. (2005) Protection: An ALNAP Guide for Humanitarian Agencies. London: Overseas Development
Agency (ODI). Accessed at: http://www.alnap.org/pool/files/alnap-protection-guide.pdf
5
  Brookings-Bern Project on Internal Displacement, IASC Framework on Durable Solutions for Internally Displaced Persons, 2010,
Washington DC, Brookings Institution. Accessed at:
http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/reports/2010/04_durable_solutions/04_durable_solutions.pdf
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B.        Two-Day Workshop: Agenda and Session Plans

Day 1 Agenda
Time         Session              Topic                                                  Duration
                                                                                         (minutes)
Session 1                         Opening, Introduction
08.30-08.45         1.1           Welcoming, Opening                                     15
08.45-09.30         1.2           Workshop Objectives, Introduction, Ground Rules,       45
                                  Hopes and Fears
Session 2                         Human Rights and Protection in NDs
09.30-10.30         2.1           Introduction to Human Rights and Protection in         60
                                  Natural Disasters
10.30-10.45                       Coffee Break                                           15
10.45-11.15         2.2           Key protection challenges                              30
11.15-11.45         2.3           IASC Operational Guidelines on Protection of           30
                                  Persons in Situations of Natural Disasters
11.45-12.00                       Plenary Discussion, Q & A                              15
Session 3                         Protection Monitoring and Assessment in NDs
12.00-12.45         3.1           Protection Monitoring and Assessment in NDs            45
12.45-13.00                       Plenary Discussion, Q & A                              15
13.00-14.00                       Lunch Break                                            60
Session 4                         Protection of Special Groups At-Risk
                                  Working Groups
14.00-15.00         4.1           1. Gender-Based Violence, Sexual Violence              60
                                  2. Child Protection
                                  3. Special Groups at Risk (People with Disabilities,
                                      Elderly, People with HIV/AIDS)
15.00-15.45                       Debrief, Plenary Discussion                            45
15.45-16.00                       Coffee Break                                           15
Session 5                         Tools for Integrating Protection Needs
16.00-16.45         5.1           Tools for Integrating Protection Needs                 30
                                  Plenary Discussion, Q & A                              15
16.45-18.00         5.2           Exercise                                               75




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Day 2 Agenda
Time         Session              Topic                                                 Duration
                                                                                        (minutes)
08.30-09.00                       Overview of 1st days discussions                      30
Session 6                         Integrating Protection in Disaster Risk Reduction
                                  (DRR) Working Groups
09.00-10.00         6.1               Possible Topics:                                  60
                                  1. The Role of Children and Youth in Disaster
                                      Preparedness
                                  2. Climate Change, Disaster and Preparedness
                                  3. Community-Based DRR Projects
10.00-10.30                       Debrief, Plenary Discussion                           30
10.30-10.45                       Coffee Break                                          15
Session 7                         Disaster Management; Emergency Response
                                  Systems
10.45-11.45         7.1           Panel Presentations: Possible Topics                  60
                                  1. Supporting Local Capacity in Disaster
                                      Management
                                  2. Community-Based Emergency Response Systems
                                      and Protection
                                  3. Restoring Family Links, Management of Human
                                      Remains, Psychosocial Support
11.45-12.15                       Plenary Discussion, Q & A                             30
12.15-13.30                       Lunch Break                                           75
Session 8                         Challenges of Early Recovery and Durable Solutions
13.30-14.00         8.1           Challenges of Early Recovery                          30
14.00-14.20                       Plenary Discussion, Q & A                             20
14.20-15.00         8.2           Durable Solutions                                     40
15.00-15.30                       Q&A                                                   30
15.30-15.45                       Coffee Break                                          15
Session 9                         Lessons Learned – The Way Forward, Closing
15.45-16.45         9.1           Working Groups: Lessons Learned – The Way             60
                                  Forward
16.45-17.30                       Debrief, Plenary Discussion                           30
17.30-18.00         9.2           Evaluation and Closing                                30

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                                               DAY 1: SESSION PLANS

Session 1: Opening, Introduction

Session 1.1: Welcoming, Opening

Session objectives:
 Welcoming the participants and introducing the organizers
 Officially opening the workshop

Time: 15 minutes


Session 1.2: Workshop Objectives, Introduction, Ground Rules, Hopes and Fears

Session objectives:
 To introduce participants to one another and create an atmosphere of mutual respect
 To briefly review the workshop agenda and methodology
 To set up ground rules for the workshop and receive feedback about participants’
   expectations

Time: 45 minutes

Topics:
1. Introductions
2. Review of workshop agenda, objectives, outputs (as determined jointly by the facilitator
   and participants) and norms/ground-rules.
3. Give participants the chance to voice their expectations, hopes, and fears regarding the
   workshop.
4. Review of “housekeeping” (location of restrooms, internet facilities/business facilities,
   telephones, etc.) and logistical issues.

Methods:
 Facilitation

Outline:
1. Opening (5 minutes)
      State objectives of the session

2. Introductions: (15 minutes)
        Options for introduction of participants:
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            If there is a large group, ask each provide their name/name of their organization.
            If there is a smaller group, also ask each participant to say in ONE sentence either:
                o What they hope to gain by attending the workshop, or
                o What they bring to the workshop in terms of experience (relating it to
                   protection if possible), e.g. “I have worked for 10 years as an advocate for
                   persons with disabilities,” or
                o What aspect of protection most interests them, e.g. “I am interested in what my
                   organization can do address the inequity of assistance provided to the religious
                   minority in my community.”

3. Review of agenda and workshop methodology: (10 minutes)
      The facilitator will briefly review the workshop objectives and agenda, ask for input
         from workshop participants on the objectives and agenda and ask the participants to
         agree upon basic ground rules for the workshop.

4. OPTIONAL: Expectations (Hopes and Fears): (5 minutes)
      Ask participants to write one of their hopes and fears regarding the workshop on a
        small piece of paper (pin it on flip-chart paper and exhibit in the seminar room). This
        can then be reviewed at the end of the workshop, allowing participants and
        organizers to evaluate the workshop process and output.

5. Closing: (10 minutes)
       Provide any final housekeeping information – meal times, etc.
       Give participants time to voice questions related to workshop agenda, ground rules
         and housekeeping agenda.

Materials and Equipment:
 Workshop materials in binder
 Flip chart or projector to display objectives and agenda
 Workshop CD-ROM
 Additional flip charts/stands as needed to record ground rules and other discussions

Suggestions for possible facilitation techniques:
 List 'burning questions' that people would like addressed before the end of the day;
 An agreement for how to manage discussion, such as "one finger" raised if one wishes to
  make a point; "two fingers raised" if one wishes to make a point directly relevant to a point
  just made by someone else, or a rebuttal to an argument made by someone else;
 Having place-cards with names and moving them around at lunch or before Day Two of the
  workshop to change the dynamics a bit in cases where some people are actively
  participating while others are not participating at all;
 Suggestions for quick icebreakers: briefings on local customs and etiquette if many of those
  attending are from other countries, ethnic groups or religions.
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Session 2: Human Rights and Protection in Natural Disasters
Session 2.1: Introduction to Human Rights and Protection in Natural Disasters

Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Familiarity with human rights instruments developed globally, regionally and locally
 Ability to identify human rights concerns in disaster contexts
 Understanding of the challenges in the practical application of these instruments
 Awareness of what is protection and why it is important
 Familiarity with protection challenges in the context of natural disasters
 Exposure to a human rights-based approach to disaster response

Time: 60 minutes

Topics:
 Human rights in disasters
 Human rights instruments and their practical application
 Protection in natural disasters

Methods:
 Presentation and Facilitation

Outline:
1. Opening (5 minutes):
    State objectives of the session, and outline what will be reviewed in the PowerPoint
       presentation.

2. Main Topic (50 minutes):
    Discuss human rights concerns in disaster contexts.
    Review human rights instruments.
    Discuss challenges in applying human rights instruments in practice.
    Introduce the concept of protection.
    Review the challenges associated with protection in natural disasters.
    Introduce a human rights-based approach to disaster response.

3. Closing (5 minutes):
    Wrap up summary of main points raised

Materials and Equipment:
 PPT presentation
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    Projector, Laptop, screen
    Flip charts and markers

Possible variations:
 If time is limited, the facilitator may choose to present only a few of the human rights
   instruments.
 If the facilitator has access to photographs/examples of the standards/articles relevant to
   local or regional natural disasters, these may be substituted for the ones included.

Documents used in this session:
 Excerpts from the UN Charter,6 Universal Declaration of Human Rights,7 International
   Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights8
 Regionally relevant examples of disasters and regional/national human rights instruments
   (if these are available).

Session 2.2: Key Protection Challenges

Session objectives:
 Identification of key protection challenges
 Sharing of challenges faced in the field
 Linking the concepts of human rights and protection to the reality in the field

Time: 30 minutes

Topics:
 Protection Challenges

Methods:
 Small group exercise
 Facilitation

Outline:
1. Opening (5 minutes):
    The facilitator states session objectives and asks participants to form small groups (2-3
       persons).
    Distribute exercise questions to the participants (can also be done before the session
       starts).



6
  http://www.un.org/en/documents/charter/
7
  http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/
8
  http://www2.ohchr.org/english/law/cescr.htm
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2. Small Group Exercise: Key Protection Challenges (15 minutes):
    Participants in small group identify key protection challenges they see in their particular
      context.
    Each group determines a note-taker and speaker who reports the results of the
      discussion at the end of the exercise.

3. Debriefing (10 minutes):
    Facilitator notes key protection challenges on flip-chart (results should be visible to
      participants throughout the rest of the workshop.).

Materials and Equipment:
 Flip charts and markers
 Questions for small group exercise

Suggested questions for small group exercise:
This morning you have heard about protection issues which arise in many situations of natural
disasters.

     1. What protection issues have you seen in your own context in situations of natural
        disasters?
     2. What actions were taken to address these issues? What more could have been done to
        either respond to the protection challenge or to prevent its occurrence in the first
        place?
     3. What are the key lessons learned?
     4. What have been the major challenges and how were they overcome?
     5. (If time permits) What do you think can be done at the regional and global levels? In
        terms of research; action; policy?


Session 2.3: IASC Operational Guidelines on the Protection of Persons in Situations of Natural
Disasters

Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Understanding of the structure and content of the IASC Operational Guidelines
 Understanding of the four main categories of rights contained in the Guidelines
 Understanding of protection activities to mitigate/address violations

Time: 45 minutes

Topics:
 IASC Operational Guidelines on the Protection of Persons in Situations of Natural Disasters
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Methods:
 Presentation with plenary questions integrated into the discussion
 Plenary discussion, Q & A

Outline:
1. Presentation: Introducing IASC Guidelines: (30 minutes):
    Introduce the IASC Operational Guidelines in terms of the underlying ideas and the
       structure.
    Review the four main categories of rights, inviting participants to contribute their
       experiences and understanding of each category of rights where possible and relevant.
    Discuss examples of violations and good practice for each category.

2. Plenary discussion, Q & A (15 minutes):
    Give participants time to discuss, and panellists/facilitators the time to answer
       questions about topics from sessions 2.1 and 2.2.

Possible variations:
If time is tight, limit examples of violations and good practices for each category of rights.

Materials and Equipment:
 PPT presentation
 Projector, laptop, screen
 Flip charts and markers

Documents used in this session
 Protecting Persons affected by Natural Disasters: IASC Operational Guidelines on the
   Protection of Persons in Situations of Natural Disasters9




9
 Brookings-Bern Project on Internal Displacement, IASC Operational Guidelines on the Protection of Persons in Situations of
Natural Disasters, 2011, http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2011/0106_operational_guidelines_nd.aspx
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Session 3: Protection Monitoring and Assessment in Natural Disasters

Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Understanding of different types of monitoring and why monitoring is important
 Understanding of why protection needs assessments and common protection standards are
    key components of an effective disaster response (and the importance of advance
    development of assessment tools and common standards)
 An understanding of how monitoring is used to improve understanding of the risks
    particular people face and the need to ensure monitoring is linked to protection activities

Time: 60 minutes

Topics:
 Introduction to protection monitoring and assessment and why it is important in disaster
   contexts

Methods:
 Presentation with plenary questions integrated into the discussion
 Plenary discussion, Q & A

Outline:
1. Opening (5 minutes):
    State objectives of the session, and outline what will be reviewed in the PPT.

2. Presentation: Protection Monitoring and Assessment (40 minutes):
    Introduce the concept of monitoring and the key principles underlying it.
    Discuss why monitoring is important and identify the issues/groups to be monitored in
      each disaster phase.
    Present the rationale for a protection needs assessment and for implementation of
      SPHERE standards to guide disaster response.

3. Plenary Discussion, Q & A (15 minutes):
    Give participants time to discuss, and presenter/facilitator the time to answer questions
      about protection monitoring and assessment.

Materials and Equipment:
 PPT presentation
 Projector, laptop, screen
 Flip charts and markers



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Possible variations:
If time is limited, the slides concerning common protection standards can be omitted from the
presentation.

Documents used in this session:
 Sphere Project Minimum Standards (under revision)10
 Humanitarian Accountability Partnership 2007 Standard in Humanitarian Accountability and
   Quality Management11
 Interagency Network for Education in Emergency Standards12
 Red Cross Code of Conduct13
 Good Enough Guide14
 Standards and Indicators in UNHCR Operations15

Session 4: Protection of Special Groups At-Risk
Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Understanding of the different risks faced by certain groups within the affected population
 Understanding of selected programmatic tools available to address special risks in disaster
    response

Time: 105 minutes

Topics:
 Gender-based violence, sexual violence
 Child Protection
 Special groups at risk (people with disabilities, seniors, people with HIV/AIDS)

Methods:
 Working Groups
 Plenary discussion

Outline:
1. Working Groups: (60 minutes):




10
   http://www.sphereproject.org/
11
   http://www.hapinternational.org/pool/files/hap-2007-standard(1).pdf
12
   http://www.ineesite.org/uploads/documents/store/Minimum_Standards_2010_eng.pdf
13
   http://www.ifrc.org/publicat/conduct/
14
   http://www.ecbproject.org/pool/good-enough-guide.pdf
15
   http://www.unhcr.org/40eaa9804.pdf
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         Form working groups (ideally not more than 10 persons), provide break-out rooms or
          divide up conference room to allow groups to work undisturbed.
         Each working group works on one topic. Depending on the number and intent of
          participants, the topics can be modified or additional working groups can be added.
         Each working group should have one facilitator who leads the discussion and one
          rapporteur who will report the working group’s results to the panel.
         Facilitator or designated resource person (can be one of the participants) gives a short
          introduction to the topic (max. 10 minutes).
         The group then discusses the questions that have been posed to the working groups.
         After 60 minutes working groups return to the main plenary room (5 minutes).

2. Plenary Discussion (45 minutes):
    Each working group briefly reports back its findings (5 minutes per group).
    Close the session, leaving room for questions or plenary discussion about the findings.



Suggestions:
 Allow participants to sign up for the working groups during registration so they can attend
   the working group that is closest to their interest. This also allows for better preparation of
   the working group sessions.
 Let participants rank the working groups according to their preferences when they sign up.
   This way you can divide them up into evenly-sized groups while still respecting their
   preferences.
 Distribute the working group questions at the end of session 3 giving participants time to
   prepare for the working group during the break.
 Announce working group composition and locations at the end of session 3 and ask
   participants to form the working groups directly at the start of the session. This will save
   valuable time.
 Time-management is of utmost importance. Each working group’s facilitator needs to
   perform strict time-management.
 If you have a resource person who gives an introduction to the topic, that resource person
   can take the role of the facilitator for the working group.
 If a resource person wants to work with a PowerPoint presentation for the introduction,
   make sure that the presentation is an introduction to the topic and not an introduction to
   the organization the person works for. Also make sure that it is within the time limit.
 The return from the working groups to the plenary will take some time. Plan accordingly.
 60 minutes is a minimum time for the working groups. Also plan sufficient time (minimum
   of 30 minutes but ideally 45 minutes) for the working groups to report back their findings
   and for questions about and discussion of the working groups’ findings.


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Possible working group questions:
 The working group is asked to come up with examples of good practices used in responding
   to these particular protection challenges. (For example, “We set up a system to identify and
   register unaccompanied and separated children,” or, “We deployed women health workers
   in affected communities.”)
 If time permits, the working group is also asked to make recommendations to addressing
   the protection challenge, being careful to identify to whom the recommendation is
   addressed. (For example, “We recommend that UN agencies identify someone on their
   staff to monitor the situation of persons with disabilities.”)

Possible variations:
This training module also includes a PowerPoint presentation on the topic which takes
approximately 45 minutes to be used when time is limited or for other programmatic reasons.

Materials and Equipment:
 Break-out rooms or space (for every working group)
 Working-group questions
 Flip charts and markers (for every working group)
 Projector, screen and laptop (if needed by facilitator or resource persons)

Documents used in this session:
The below materials could be briefly introduced and should be included on the workshop CD-
ROM. Given time constraints materials could also be on display during breaks which should be
pointed out by the facilitator.
 IASC Gender Handbook in Humanitarian Action: Women, Girls, Boys and Men – Different
   Needs, Equal Opportunities16
 IASC Guidelines for HIV/AIDS Interventions in Emergency Settings17
 IASC Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings18
 Older People in Disasters and Humanitarian Crises: Guidelines for Best Practice19
 Inter-Agency Guiding Principles of Unaccompanied and Separated Children20
 Moving Beyond Rhetoric: Consultation and Participation with IDPs21




16
   http://ochaonline.un.org/AboutOCHA/GenderEquality/KeyDocuments/IASCGenderHandbook/tabid/1384/Default.aspx
17
   http://data.unaids.org/Publications/External-Documents/IASC_Guidelines-Emergency-Settings_en.pdf
18
   http://www.unicef.org/protection/files/Guidelines_IASC_Mental_Health_Psychosocial.pdf
19
    http://www.globalaging.org/armedconflict/countryreports/haigiudelines.pdf
20
   http://www.unhcr.ch/include/fckeditor/custom/File/IAPUnaccompaniedChildren_e.pdf
21
   http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/reports/2008/10_internal_displacement/10_internal_displacement.pdf
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Session 5: Tools for Integrating Protection Needs
Session 5.1: Tools for Integrating Protection Needs

Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Familiarity with monitoring as a means to identify and respond to protection problems
 Understanding of the utility of checklists as a simple field-based tool
 Understanding of the importance of linking monitoring to an action plan (monitoring not an
    end in itself)

Time: 45 minutes

Topics:
 Monitoring and assessment; checklists as a simple monitoring/assessment tool

Methods:
 Presentation with plenary questions integrated into the discussion
 Plenary discussion, Q & A

Outline:
1. Opening (5 minutes):
    State objectives of the session and main outline of what will be reviewed in the
       PowerPoint presentation.

2. Presentation: Protection Monitoring and Assessment (25 minutes):
    Introduce monitoring tools and discuss the rationale for the use of checklists.
    Present the checklist for emergency response and the checklist for disaster response
      and recovery.

3. Plenary Discussion, Q & A (15 minutes):
    Give participants time to discuss, and presenter/facilitator the time to answer questions
      about protection monitoring and assessment.

Materials and Equipment:
 PowerPoint presentation
 Projector, laptop, screen
 Flip charts and markers

Possible variations:
If time is limited, the slides concerning common protection standards can be omitted from the
presentation.

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Documents used in this session:
 Protecting Persons affected by Natural Disasters: IASC Operational Guidelines on the
   Protection of Persons in Situations of Natural Disasters22
 Checklists for Integrating Human Rights in Natural Disaster Management in the Pacific23

Session 5.2: Exercise

Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Understanding of how the tools and concepts discussed can be applied to specific natural
    disaster scenarios

Time: 75 minutes

Topics:
 Case Study Exercise

Methods:
 Small group exercise
 Plenary discussion, Q & A

Outline:
1. Opening (10 minutes):
    State objectives of the session
    Divide participants into small groups (3-5 persons)
    Distribute different case studies and case study questions to each group.

2. Small Group Discussion (40 minutes):
    Small groups discuss the case studies
    Facilitator(s) standing by to clarify questions and give assistance

3. Exercise Debrief and Practical Announcements (25 minutes):
    Discuss experience of applying the tool provided
    As this is the last session of the day, provide some time for practical announcements
      (short overview over the program of the second day, when to reconvene, dinner…)

Case Study Questions:

     1. Identify the human rights issues from the case study.
22
   Brookings-Bern Project on Internal Displacement, IASC Operational Guidelines on the Protection of Persons in Situations of
Natural Disasters, 2011, http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2011/0106_operational_guidelines_nd.aspx
23
   http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/lib.nsf/db900sid/SHIG-
7GLE4T/$file/Checklist_Integrating_HumanRights_in_natural_Disaster_Management.pdf?openelement
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     2. What recommendations can you make to address the human rights issues identified in
        the response and recovery phases?
     3. How can human rights be effectively used to mitigate damages and losses following a
        natural disaster in the case study?
     4. How helpful were the tools in identifying human rights issues?
     5. How could some of the human rights issues identified be addressed in your area of
        work?

Suggestions:
 Set up the plenary room in a way that transition to small groups does not take too much
   time.
 Allow groups to work outside the main plenary room (lobby, garden, break-out rooms) but
   make sure locations of all teams are known, so it is possible for the facilitators to interact
   with the groups.

Materials and Equipment:
• Sufficient copies of the case studies (assign different case studies to specific tables) and
   case study questions (same for all).
  If possible, provide a copy of the documents listed below for each participant for use as
   reference tools during case study exercise.

Possible variations:
The attached case studies were developed by UNDP-Pacific and OHCHR-Pacific, and as such,
they are focused on the Pacific region. The facilitator may choose to adjust the details of these
to make them more relevant to the participants’ region(s).

Documents used in this session:
 Case studies and case study questions
 Protecting Persons affected by Natural Disasters: IASC Operational Guidelines on the
   Protection of Persons in Situations of Natural Disasters24
 Checklists for Integrating Human Rights in Natural Disaster Management in the Pacific25




24
   Brookings-Bern Project on Internal Displacement, IASC Operational Guidelines on the Protection of Persons in Situations of
Natural Disasters, 2011, http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2011/0106_operational_guidelines_nd.aspx
25
   See at: http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/lib.nsf/db900sid/SHIG-
7GLE4T/$file/Checklist_Integrating_HumanRights_in_natural_Disaster_Management.pdf?openelement
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                                               DAY 2: SESSION PLANS

Session 6: Integrating Protection in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR)

Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Familiarity with basic concepts of disaster preparedness
 Understanding of the role of protection in disaster preparedness

Time: 90 minutes

Topics:
 Community based DRR projects
 The role of children and youth in disaster preparedness
 Climate change, disaster and preparedness

Methods:
 Working groups
 Plenary discussion

Outline:
1. Working Groups: (60 minutes):
    Form working groups (ideally not more than 10 persons), provide break-out rooms or
       divide up conference room to allow groups to work undisturbed.
    Each working group works on one topic. Depending on the number and intent of
       participants, the topics can be modified or additional working groups can be added.
    Each working group should have one facilitator who leads the discussion and one
       rapporteur who will report the working group’s results to the panel.
    Facilitator or designated resource person (can be one of the participants) gives a short
       introduction to the topic (max. 10 minutes).
    The group then discusses the questions that have been posed to the working groups.
    After 60 minutes working groups return to the main plenary room (5 minutes).

2. Plenary Discussion (30 minutes):
    Each working group briefly reports back their findings (5 minutes per group)
    Close the session, giving room for question or plenary discussion about the findings.

Suggestions:
 Allow participants to sign up for the working groups during registration so they can attend
   the working group that is closest to their interest. This also allows for better preparation of
   the working group sessions.

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    Let participants rank the working groups according to their preferences when they sign up.
     This way you can divide them up into evenly-sized groups while still respecting their
     preferences.
    Announce working group composition and locations during the opening session of the day
     (Overview of 1st days discussion), and ask participants to form the working groups directly at
     the start of the session. This will save valuable time.
    Time-management is of utmost importance. Each working group’s facilitator needs to
     perform strict time-management.
    If you have a resource person to introduce the topic, that resource person can take the role
     of the facilitator for the working group.
    If a resource person wants to work with a PowerPoint presentation for the introduction,
     make sure that the presentation is an introduction to the topic and not an introduction to
     the organization the person works for. Also make sure that it is within the time limit.
    The return from the working groups to the plenary will take some time. Plan accordingly.
    60 minutes is a minimum time for the working groups. Also plan sufficient time (minimum
     of 30 minutes but ideally 45 minutes) for the working groups to report back their findings
     and for questions about and discussion of the working groups’ findings.

Possible working group questions:
    The working group is asked to come up with examples of good practices used in responding to this
     aspect of disaster preparedness. (For example, “We organized awareness raising sessions in schools
     so that children would know what to do in case of a disaster.”)

    If time permits, the working group is also asked to make recommendations for incorporating specific
     groups or issues into disaster risk reduction initiatives. (For example, “local governments are
     encouraged to meet with civil society groups in developing their disaster preparedness plans.”)

Materials and Equipment:
 Break-out rooms or space (for every working group)
 Working-group questions
 Flip charts and markers (for every working group)
 Projector, screen and laptop (if needed by facilitator or resource persons)

Possible variations:
This training module also includes a PowerPoint presentation on the topic which takes
approximately 45 minutes to be used when time is limited or for other programmatic reasons.
If the PowerPoint is used, the facilitator should prepare examples of national laws and policies
relevant to disaster preparedness and disaster risk reduction.




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Session 7: Disaster Management; Emergency Response Systems; Restoring
Family Links

Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Knowledge of ways communities should be engaged in disaster management
 Understanding of challenges and good practices in restoring family links, management of
    human remains and psychosocial support
 Familiarity with entry points to engage the community in disaster management and specific
    examples of good practices in community participation.
 Understanding about the use of emergency response systems for protection

Time: 90 minutes

Suggested Topics:
 Supporting local capacity in disaster management
 Community-based emergency response systems and protection
 Restoring family links, management of human remains, psychosocial support

Facilitator note: The presentations for this session can be thematically flexible, depending on
available resource persons or local and regional needs. This training module also includes a
PowerPoint presentation for the topic of “Supporting Local Capacity in Disaster Management”,
which takes approximately 30 minutes, to be used when time is limited or for other
programmatic reasons.

Methods:
 Panel Presentations
 Q&A

Outline:
4. Opening (5 minutes):
    Moderator introduces the panellists and gives short overview over the session

5. Presentations: (55 minutes):
    Three panel presentations (15-20 minutes per presentation)

6. Plenary Discussion, Q & A (30 minutes):
    Giving participants room to discuss and raise questions related to the panel
      presentations


Materials and Equipment:
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    PPT presentations
    Projector, laptop, screen
    Print-outs of presentation slides

Possible variations:
 Depending on the available resource persons, the topics for this session can be modified
   and other topics added to the session.
 Should there be no resource persons available for the three topics they can also be
   integrated in one of the working group sessions.
 Q & A could also be done for 10 minutes after each panel presentation.


Session 8: Challenges of Early Recovery and Durable Solutions

Session 8.1: Challenges of Early Recovery

Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Awareness of protection challenges during early recovery

Time: 50 minutes

Topic:
 Protection during early recovery

Methods:
 Small group exercise
 Plenary discussion

Outline:
1. Opening (10 minutes):
    The facilitator states session objectives and asks participants to form small groups (2-3
       persons). Depending on the knowledge base of participants the facilitator can give a
       brief overview about the concept of “early recovery”.
    Distribute exercise questions to the participants (can also be done before the session
       starts).

2. Small Group Exercise: Challenges of Early Recovery (20 minutes):
    Participants in small group identify key protection challenges they see during early
      recovery in their particular context.
    Each group determines a note-taker and speaker who reports the results of the
      discussion at the end of the exercise.
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3. Debriefing (20 minutes):
    Facilitator notes key protection challenges on flip-chart (results should be visible to
      participants throughout the rest of the workshop).

Suggested questions for small group exercise:
1. What protection issues arise during early recovery?
2. What actions were taken to address these issues? What more could have been done to
   either respond to the protection challenge, or to prevent its occurrence in the first place?
3. What are the key lessons learned?
4. What have been the major challenges and how were they overcome?
5. (If time permits) What do you think can be done at the regional and global levels? In terms
   of research; action; policy?

Materials and Equipment:
 Flip charts and markers
 Questions for small group exercise

Suggestion:
 If more time is needed for the plenary debate or there are unaddressed questions, they can
   be raised in the Q & A session during the following session.

Session 8.2: Durable Solutions Framework

Session objectives:
At the end of the session, participants will have advanced their:
 Awareness of why durable solutions are important
 Familiarity with the Framework for Durable Solutions

Time: 70 minutes

Methods:
 Presentation
 Q&A

Outline:
1. Opening (5 minutes):
    The facilitator states session objectives.

2. Presentation: Durable Solutions Framework (35 minutes):



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           Discuss why durable solutions are important.
           Introduce the Framework for Durable Solutions.
           Discuss the process and conditions for durable solutions.

3. Q & A (30 minutes):
    Give participants time to discuss, and presenter/facilitator the time to answer questions
      about protection in early recovery, and about durable solutions.

Materials and Equipment:
 PPT presentations
 Projector, laptop, screen
 Print-outs of presentation slides

Documents used in this session
 When Displacement Ends: A Framework for Durable Solutions26

Session 9: Lessons Learned – The Way Forward, Closing

Session 9.1: Lessons learned – the way forward

Session objectives:
 Participants sum up some of the most important lessons learned regarding protection in
   natural disasters
 Participants formulate recommendations for different actors (governments, UN, NGOs, civil
   society) based on the findings during the workshop

Time: 90 minutes

Topic:
 Lessons learned
 Recommendations
 Action plan

Methods:
 Small working groups
 Plenary discussion




26
     http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/reports/2010/0305_internal_displacement/0305_internal_displacement.pdf
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Outline:
1. Opening Presentation (5 minutes):
    The facilitator states the session’s objectives and asks participants to form small working
       groups (3-6 persons).

2. Working Groups: Lessons learned – The Way Forward (55 minutes):
    Each group designates a rapporteur who will take notes and report the results.
    Participants in small group identify key lessons learned.
    Participants formulate recommendations for different actors.

3. Plenary Discussion (30 minutes):
    Groups report back some of their findings and facilitator compiles group findings.

Suggested questions for small working groups:
1. What are the key lessons learned regarding protection in the different stages from disaster
   preparedness to disaster response?
2. Which actions would you recommend for different actors to improve protection?
3. Which actions can you or your organization take to promote and improve the protection of
   rights in natural disaster situations?

Materials and Equipment:
 Flip charts and markers
 Questions for working groups

Suggestions:
 Set up the plenary room in a way that transition to small working groups does not take too
   much time.
 Allow groups to work outside the main plenary room (lobby, garden, break-out rooms) but
   make sure locations of all teams are known, so it is possible for the facilitators to interact
   with the groups.
 Different kinds of groupings are possible: cross-selection of participants, or groups that are
   from a particular group, organization or entity (NGOs, UN agencies, government ministries),
   or work in a specific thematic area (DRR, child protection, first responders).
 If time allows, working groups can design action plans.

Session 9.2: Evaluation and Closing

Session objectives:
 Give participants time to fill out workshop evaluation
 Thank organizers, participants, summarize main themes
 Close the workshop


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Time: 30 minutes

Materials and Equipment:
 Evaluation form

Suggestions:
 If the hopes and fears exercise was completed at the beginning of the workshop, ask
   participants to review what they wrote down and to discuss how the workshop performed
   regarding their hopes and fears.
 Don’t rush participants while they are filling out the evaluation forms.




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