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Strategic Planning for Deaprtment of Finance

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					STRATEGIC PLAN
  FY 2007-2012



 October 1, 2006
2
                       CONTENTS

Introduction……………………………………………………………….. ..…..…..…..5

Executive Summary ………………………..…………………………………..…… 11

Mission, Values and Guiding Principles ……..…….…………..………………..… 23

Vision ………………………..……………………………..……………..…………. 24

Populations Served ……………………….……………………………………….. . 25

Goals ……………………………………...……………………………………………25

Agency-wide Action Plans ……….………………..…….…………………..……….26

Action Plan………………….. ……………………………………………………….. 27

Highlights of the Environmental Scan ………….………………………………….. 39

Financial Performance …………………………………………………………….. ..47

Appendix A Technology Plan ………………………………………………………..49

Appendix B Summary of Capital Improvement Requests ………………………..53

Appendix C Key Performance Measures FY07-FY12 …………………………….55

Appendix D Performance on Previous Key Measures FY05-FY10 ……………..63




                                                                  3
4
                             Sequoyah Memorial Office building
                                      P.O. Box 25352
                              Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0352
                              (405) 521-3646 * www.okdhs.org




September 28, 2006


Claudia San Pedro
Office of State Finance
2300 N. Lincoln, Room 122
Oklahoma City, OK 73105-4801

Dear Ms. San Pedro:

Everyone at OKDHS is committed to achieving a goal that is bigger than any one office, larger
than any program and greater than any single division. Though we are separated by policy,
geography and structure, we are united by purpose. And any success achieved by any one of us
contributes to our shared goal of building stronger families.

We can all be proud that:
   • OKDHS collected more child support than anytime in state history.
   • OKDHS established more paternities than anytime in state history.
   • OKDHS certified a record number of persons, mostly children, to receive health care
       during the fiscal year through the Medicaid program.
   • OKDHS certified a record number of Oklahomans as Food Stamp recipients. About half
       of them were children. This benefit contributed to a level of healthy nutrition that, for low
       income Oklahomans, would have otherwise been impossible.
   • Adult Protective Services ensured the safety of more vulnerable adults than ever.
       OKDHS investigated a record number of cases of alleged abuse and neglect.
   • For an unprecedented eighth consecutive year, more than 1,000 foster children were
       authorized for adoption – all of their stories are different, but growing families by choice is
       an inspiring and compassionate event.

We all face challenges bigger than we can overcome alone. So, we reach out. OKDHS is there.
Oklahomans have been turning to OKDHS for 70 years. OKDHS cannot help them alone. We
must also reach out. Through many, many partnerships we successfully serve hundreds of
thousands of Oklahomans every year. Faith-based, corporate, non-profit, government or
individual, our partners are as diverse as the people we serve and the challenges they face.

This five-year plan highlights our collective efforts to serve families; to help more Oklahomans
lead safer, healthier, more independent and productive lives. This great human movement is
inspiring. We hope you catch our enthusiasm and are inspired to find new and creative ways to
join our shared effort to strengthen Oklahoma’s families – there is no better foundation for a
stronger Oklahoma.

Sincerely,


Howard H. Hendrick
Director




                                                                                                     5
6
OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
 KLAHOMA EPARTMENT OF


                AGENCY NUMBER 830

               Sequoyah Office Building
                   P.O. Box 25352
            Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0352

                  AGENCY DIRECTOR

                  Howard H. Hendrick

      OKLAHOMA COMMISSION FOR HUMAN SERVICES

         Richard DeVaughn, D.D.S., Chairman
         Ronald L. Mercer, Vice-Chairman
         Steve W. Beebe, Member
         Wayne Cunningham, Member
         Patrice Dills Douglas, Member
         Michael L. Peck, O.D., Member
         Garoldine (Gerri) Webb, Member
         Aneta F. Wilkinson, Member
         Rev. George E. Young Sr., Member




                                               7
8
                          AGENCY MANAGEMENT
                           AGENCY MANAGEMENT
                             GENCY  ANAGEMENT
                      DIVISION/PROGRAM DIRECTORS
                      DIVISION /PROGRAM DIRECTORS
                        IVISION ROGRAM IRECTORS


      TIITLE
      TITLE
         TLE                                      N AM E
                                                  NAME
                                                    AM E


Chief Administrative Officer                David Shafer
Chief Financial Officer                     Phil Motley
Chief Information Officer                   Marq Youngblood
General Counsel                             Charles Waters
Chief Operating Officer                     Farilyn Ballard
Chief Coordinating Officer                  Raymond Haddock
Advocate General                            Mark Jones
Inspector General                           Mike Fairless & Stuart McCollom
Director of Office Support Services         Paula Hearn
Director of Human Resources Management      Ed Sweeney, Acting
Director of Oklahoma Planning Council for
Developmental Disabilities                  Ann Trudgeon
Director of Family Support Services         Mary Stalnaker
Director of Children and Family Services    Linda Smith
Director of Field Operations                Larry Johnson
Director of Aging Services                  Carey Garland
Director of Child Care Services             Mark Lewis
Director of Child Support Enforcement       Gary Dart
Director of Developmental Disabilities
Services                                    Jim Nicholson
Director of Planning, Research and          Connie Schlittler
Statistics
Director of Legislative Relations and       Sharon Neuwald
Policy
Director of Communications                  George Johnson

STRATEGIC PLAN CONTACT

Connie Schlittler                           Phone: (405) 521-2907




                                                                          9
                          PLANNING PROCESS
                          PLANNING PROCESS

The Commission, Director, and all stakeholders envision active partnerships
among those receiving services, their families, provider organizations, and
community leaders, dedicated to promoting quality of life, safety, and well-being
for the people of Oklahoma.

Strategic planning is a year-long process. The leadership teams regularly review
and analyze information and data received. The Director provides semi-annual
presentations to the Commission on client data, organizational trends and
financial reports. A quarterly key indicators meeting is held to review the status
of organizational performance. The Officers meet weekly and review trends, best
practices, and develop the overall strategy for the organization. Divisional plans
are developed based on the department’s overall plan and identified strategies.
New federal and state mandates are reviewed throughout the year.

OKDHS recognizes that in order to develop a strong strategic plan input from
persons served, providers, employees, and the community is a necessary and
valuable source of information. This information is reviewed throughout the year.




                                                                                10
                             EXECUTIIVE SUMMARY
                             EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
                              XECUT VE UMMARY


Oklahoma’s economy continues to trail the national average.

    •   Among the 50 states, Oklahoma ranks 10th highest in poverty for families. 1
        The number of families in poverty has increased over the past two years in
        spite of a healthy overall economy. 2 , 3

    •   The buying power of the minimum wage is declining significantly.
        Adjusting for inflation, the real value of the minimum wage has declined by
        30 percent over the last 25 years, and by about 10 percent since 1998.

    •   Behind Texas, New Mexico, and Mississippi, Oklahoma has the fourth-
        highest prevalence of families who don’t know where they will get their
        next meal. That ranking rises to first for families who also are experiencing
        hunger, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 4

    •   There are more food stamp recipients, as well as applications.




1
  U.S. Census
2
  IBID
3
  Oklahoma Department of Commerce
4
  Daily Oklahoman, September 9, 2006 “Programs Helping Kids Eat”


                                                                                   11
In Oklahoma, the elderly segment of the population is growing
dramatically. By 2020, one in seven Oklahomans will be at least 65 years of
age, with the fastest growing segment being the 65-74 group followed by
the 85 and older group.

   •   Census 2004 estimates indicated Oklahoma ranked 27th in terms of
       percentage of the total population age 60 and over (625,967).

   •   The very old (85+) population has experienced the most dramatic
       increases from 1980 to 2000. The very old group has risen from 33,981 in
       1980 to 57,175 in 2000—an increase of 68.3 percent.

   •   Oklahoma’s ADvantage Waiver program is experiencing rapid growth
       supporting Oklahomans living in the community rather than nursing home
       care.

   •   Compared to the U.S., Oklahoma spends more Medicaid dollars on home
       and community based services and less on nursing homes and
       Intermediate Care Facilities for the Mentally Retarded (ICF/MR) clients.




                                                                             12
Child safety continues to be an issue in Oklahoma.

   •   Reported incidents of alleged child abuse and neglect continue to increase
       slightly, while confirmations have dropped slightly.

   •   Oklahoma Department of Human Services investigates more than 50,000
       incidents each year that contain allegations of serious or immediate
       threats to a child's safety. On average, OKDHS substantiates that more
       than 13,000 of those incidents are abuse and/or neglect.




       •   In Fiscal Year 2006, 12,974 children were placed in out-of-home care.




                                                                               13
          •   1,066 children were adopted through the Oklahoma Department of
              Human Services in Fiscal Year 2006.

          •   1,336 children were in pending adoption placements in Fiscal Year
              2006.

                    Adoptions of Children in State or Tribal Custody




There is a national trend of unmarried women giving birth.

          •   Thirty-five percent of all births in 2003 were to unmarried women
              compared to 18 percent of births in 1980 5 .

          •   Thirty-seven percent of births in Oklahoma in 2003 were to unmarried
              women between the ages of 15 and 44 compared to 30.9 percent in
              1996. Oklahoma ranked 2nd highest among the 50 states and the
              District of Columbia during fiscal years 2000 through 2002.

          •   Oklahoma has the 7th highest teen birth rate (2003).

Oklahoma continues to experience high rates of divorce compared to other
states.



5
    TANF 6th Annual Report to Congress


                                                                                  14
      •   According to various polls and statistical census data, as recently as 1996
          Oklahoma ranked near the top of the list for having the highest rate of
          divorce.

      •   In addition, according to a 2001 statewide survey about marriage and
          divorce, 39 percent of Oklahoma adults, who have ever been married,
          have been divorced. Thirty-four percent of Oklahoma’s children live in
          single-parent families. 6

      •   Child Support Enforcement Division (CSED) continues to increase
          collections on behalf of children throughout the state. The number of
          families and children benefiting the program also continues to grow.




6
    Oklahoma Kids Count 2006


                                                                                   15
The TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) program has
reduced the number of families and children receiving assistance since
the program’s inception in 1996.

•   Employment among low-income single mothers (earning below 200
    percent of poverty), reported in the U. S. Census Bureau's Current
    Population Survey (CPS), has increased significantly since 1996.

•   Millions of parents have left welfare for work, reducing the TANF rolls
    nationally by nearly 60 percent, from about 4.4 million families in August
    1996 to just 1.9 million families in September 2005.

•   Under the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, states are required to assist even
    more TANF recipients in making the transition to employment. Also, they
    are expected to meet work participation rates and other critical program
    requirements in order to maintain their full Federal funding and avoid
    penalties.




                                                                                 16
      Affordable childcare continues to be needed by Oklahoma families.

      •    Almost 60 percent of Oklahoma children under the age of 13 live in homes
           where both parents or a single head of household works outside the
           home. 7

      •    Three quarters (76.5 percent) of children whose care is paid by subsidy
           receive child care in a Two or Three Star rated facility, up substantially
           from the 45.8 percent as reported in 2003 by Oklahoma Child Care
           Resource and Referral Association.




7
    Oklahoma Child Care & Early Education Portfolio, 2005


                                                                                        17
      Access to health care presents a challenge to Oklahoma.

      •   One in five Oklahoma children have no insurance or were not insured for
          some period during the last year, compared to one in seven nationally.

      •   More than 80,000 (9.6 percent) of Oklahoma’s children have a moderate
          or severe health problem.

      •   One in ten children (9.1 percent) is impaired by a serious mental health
          problem. 8

      •   Applications for Medicaid have increased from the two previous fiscal
          years.




8
    Oklahoma Kids Count 2005


                                                                                     18
Requests for services for persons with developmental disabilities outpace
the state’s ability to provide services.

   •   Approximately 17 percent of children in the United States younger than 18
       years of age have a developmental disability, and approximately 1.4
       million children (2 percent of U.S. school-aged children) have a serious
       developmental disability, which often requires lifelong supportive services.

   •   Developmental disabilities are a diverse group of conditions characterized
       by physical, cognitive, psychological, sensory, and speech impairments
       that begin anytime during the developmental period (from birth through
       age 18 years). Examples of common developmental disabilities are mental
       retardation, cerebral palsy, autism, epilepsy, vision impairment, and
       hearing loss. In most cases (approximately 75 percent) the cause of the
       disability is not known.

   •   Reported incidences of autism are increasing nationally.

   •   Although more people receive specialized waiver services than previously,
       the waiting list for individuals in need of waiver services continues to grow.
       Time on the wait list is currently three years.




                                                                                  19
OKDHS continues to face critical workforce issues.


   •    Thirty percent of the OKDHS workforce is eligible to retire by 2010.

   •    Forty-three percent of OKDHS county directors were eligible to retire in
        October 2005.

   •    By 2010, 28 percent of Adult Protective Services workers will be eligible to
        retire.

   •    Nearly 17 percent of field supervisors are eligible to retire now; more than
        40 percent will be eligible to retire by 2010.

   •    Child welfare and child support enforcement workers continue to turnover
        rapidly.

   •    A recent employee survey was conducted among 3,300 Field Operations
        employees. More than 2,000 employees responded and the findings are
        included below.




       What are the reasons you stay at your present job? (select the top 5)




                                                                                   20
OKDHS continues to seek opportunities to maximize emerging technology.


  •   More business will be conducted in nontraditional settings using
      technology solutions. The trend of moving beyond the requirement to be
      tethered to a fixed office location and hardwire connection towards an
      option of "when and where" technology solutions and services will be
      useful to deliver business services.

  •   Personal Computers (PCs), as well as PC-like devices, and mobile
      communications devices will become more prevalent in the workplace.
      While OKDHS predominantly uses fixed desktop PC workstations and a
      limited number of laptop PCs, by the end of calendar year 2006, more
      than 9,300 PCs will be replaced at OKDHS. More than one-third will be
      mobile PCs, 3,200 tablet PCs. Additionally, over 150 handheld Treo
      mobile devices, used for voice and email communications, are currently in
      use.

  •   Technology is becoming more imbedded into business processes as a
      quantitative component and driven by business processes, not so much
      as an add-on or separate business function. In coming years, technology
      will be less distinguishable as separate from business functions and
      processes and more fused to the business processes. This process is
      termed “immersion.”

  •   Another trend is building safeguards within the technology environment to
      ensure access to facilities, data and solutions, when and where needed,
      for those who are authorized. Efforts will assure prevention of intrusion by
      non-authorized persons or parties that may disrupt services or slow down
      technology infrastructure performance.

  •   As desktop operating systems, third party products and tools become
      available and continue to evolve, collaboration among multiple employees
      becomes much easier. Collaboration through concurrent review of files
      and folders, live meetings, live training, and sharing of information of all
      kinds will become common in the workplace, improving productivity and
      reducing cost.




                                                                                21
22
                            THE MIISSIION OF THE
                            THE MISSION OF THE
                             HE M SS ON OF THE
                  OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVIICES
                  OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
                   KLAHOMA EPARTMENT OF UMAN ERV CES
            S TO HELP NDIVIDUALS AND FAM LIES N NEED HELP THEMSELVES
          IIS TO HELP IINDIVIDUALS AND FAMIILIES IIN NEED HELP THEMSELVES
           IS TO HELP INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES IN NEED HELP THEMSELVES
                  LEAD SAFER HEALTHIER, MORE INDEPENDENT AND
                  LEAD SAFER,, HEALTHIIER, MORE IINDEPENDENT AND
                   LEAD SAFER HEALTH ER MORE NDEPENDENT AND
                                  PRODUCTIVE LIVES.
                                  PRODUCT VE L VES
                                 PRODUCTIIVE LIIVES.




                VALUES AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES

RESPECT

WE BELIEVE IN THE HUMAN DIGNITY OF EVERY PERSON AND THAT EACH PERSON HAS A
PURPOSE FOR LIVING.

WE WILLTREAT ALL PEOPLE WITH DIGNITY, PROMOTE MUTUAL RESPECT AND MAXIMIZE
THE PERSONAL POTENTIAL OF EACH PERSON WE SERVE.


FAMILY

WE BELIEVE THE FAMILY UNIT IS THE BASIC FOUNDATION OF OUR SOCIETY.

WE WILL STRENGTHEN EACH FAMILY WE SERVE.

ACCOUNTABILITY

WE BELIEVE RESPONSIBLE ACTIONS ENHANCE ALL RELATIONSHIPS.

WE WILL BE FISCALLY RESPONSIBLE IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF PUBLIC RESOURCES
AND HOLD OURSELVES TO HIGH MORAL AND ETHICAL STANDARDS.




                        MOTTO
      "STRONGER FAMILIES GROW BRIGHTER FUTURES"




                                                                            23
                                    VISION


The Oklahoma Department of Human Services will have:

An engaged and informed community;

OKDHS will tell the story of improved lives. An informed community will create
more productive partnerships. We will promote community values in order to get
at root causes, bring public awareness to problems, and change the image of
human services. We will change the way the community sees our agency and
the way the agency sees itself.

Creative solutions to complex challenges; and

"The way we’ve always done it" will not suffice in today’s world. We will stretch
ourselves and our agency to find creative solutions for the challenging issues
facing individuals and families. We will demonstrate service, not only to our
external clients, but to our internal clients as well.

A technological advantage.

OKDHS will operate with greater knowledge, efficiency and effectiveness
because we have maximized decision-making and communications technology.
Relationships will be enhanced –– client to agency, agency-to-agency, division-
to-division, and person-to-person. We will narrow the digital divide, expanding
capabilities and providing clients better service.


Approved by: Oklahoma Commission for Human Services, June 13, 2000




                                                                                    24
                              LONG TERM GOALS




 OKDHS WIILL ASSIIST CLIIENTS TO BECOME IINDEPENDENT,, EMPLOYED,, PRODUCTIIVE
 OKDHS WILL ASSIST CLIENTS TO BECOME INDEPENDENT EMPLOYED PRODUCTIVE
 OKDHS W LL ASS ST CL ENTS TO BECOME NDEPENDENT EMPLOYED PRODUCT VE
                                   CITIZENS.
                                   C TIZENS
                                   CIITIZENS.

OKDHS WIILL PROVIIDE SERVICES THAT SUPPORT AND STRENGTHEN THE FAMIILY AND
OKDHS WILL PROVIDE SERVICES THAT SUPPORT AND STRENGTHEN THE FAMILY AND
OKDHS W LL PROV D E SERVICES THAT SUPPORT AND STRENGTHEN THE FAM LY AND
                          PROTECT IITS MEMBERS..
                           PROTECT TS MEMBERS
                           PROTECT ITS MEMBERS

   OKDHS WIILL PROVIIDE SERVICES IIN HOME-- AND COMMUNIITY--BASED SETTIINGS..
   OKDHS WILL PROVIDE SERVICES IN HOME AND COMMUNITY BASED SETTINGS
   OKDHS W L L PROV DE SERVICES N HOME AND COMMUN TY BASED SETT NGS

              OKDHS WIILL PROMOTE HEALTH CARE ACCESSIIBIILIITY..
              OKDHS WILL PROMOTE HEALTH CARE ACCESSIBILITY
              OKDHS W LL PROMOTE HEALTH CARE ACCESS B L TY

   OKDHS WIILL CONTIINUOUSLY IIMPROVE SYSTEMS AND PROCESSES TO SUPPORT
   OKDHS WILL CONTINUOUSLY IMPROVE SYSTEMS AND PROCESSES TO SUPPORT
   OKDHS W LL CONT NUOUSLY MPROVE SYSTEMS AND PROCESSES TO SUPPORT
                      ACHIIEVEMENT OF AGENCY GOALS..
                       ACH EVEMENT OF AGENCY GOALS
                       ACHIEVEMENT OF AGENCY GOALS




                           POPULATIONS SERVED




CHIILDREN AND ADULTS WHO HAVE BEEN ABUSED,, NEGLECTED,, EXPLOIITED OR AT RIISK
CHILDREN AND ADULTS WHO HAVE BEEN ABUSED NEGLECTED EXPLOITED OR AT RISK
 H LDREN AND ADULTS WHO HAVE BEEN ABUSED NEGLECTED EXPLO TED OR AT R SK
            OF ABUSE NEGLECT OR EXPLOITATION AND THEIR FAMILIES.
           OF ABUSE,, NEGLECT,, OR EXPLOIITATION AND THEIIR FAMIILIES.
            OF ABUSE NEGLECT OR EXPLO TATION AND THE R FAM LIES



 CHIILDREN,, ADULTS,, AND FAMIILIIES CHALLENGED BY DEVELOPMENTAL DIISABIILIITIIES..
 CHILDREN ADULTS AND FAMILIES CHALLENGED BY DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
  H LDREN ADULTS AND FAM L ES CHALLENGED BY DEVELOPMENTAL D SAB L T ES



      CHIILDREN,, FAMIILIIES AND SENIIORS WITH FRAGIILE HEALTH OR DIISTRIISSED
      CHILDREN FAMILIES AND SENIORS WITH FRAGILE HEALTH OR DISTRISSED
       H LDREN FAM L ES AND SEN ORS WITH FRAG LE HEALTH OR D STR SSED
                                   CIRCUMSTANCES.
                                   C RCUMSTANCES
                                  CIIRCUMSTANCES.



             CHIILDREN AND FAMIILIIES IIN NEED OF QUALIITY CHIILD CARE..
             CHILDREN AND FAMILIES IN NEED OF QUALITY CHILD CARE
              H LDREN AND FAM L ES N NEED OF QUAL TY CH LD CARE




                                                                                  25
                  AGENCY-WIIDE ACTIION PLANS
                  AGENCY -WIDE ACTION PLANS
                   GENCY W DE CT ON LANS


Prevention, Diversion and Early Intervention
     OKDHS provides early intervention, diversion, and prevention programs
     that support families and children.

Responsibility and Self Sufficiency
     OKDHS provides programs that encourage parents to be financially
     responsible for their children. Programs also provide incentives for
     employment and self-sufficiency for economically distressed families.

Safety and Security
      OKDHS programs protect vulnerable children and adults from abuse and
      neglect.

Permanency and Stability for Children
     OKDHS programs promote stability and seek permanent homes for
     children.

Independence
      OKDHS programs assist seniors and persons with developmental
      disabilities to live successfully in the community.

Resource Stewardship and Integrity
     OKDHS has processes that promote good stewardship of public funds and
     allow the agency to operate at a high level of integrity.




                                                                             26
                Performance Measures and Strategies

      GOAL 1:: OKDHS WIILL ASSIIST CLIIENTS TO BECOME IINDEPENDENT,,
      GOAL 1: OKDHS WILL ASSIST CLIENTS TO BECOME INDEPENDENT
       OAL 1 OKDHS W LL ASS ST CL ENTS TO BECOME NDEPENDENT
                   EMPLOYED , PRODUCTIVE CITIZENS.
                   EMPLOYED, PRODUCTIIVE CIITIZENS.
                   EMPLOYED PRODUCT VE C TIZENS




                                           TRANSITION
            Success Indicators                                       Strategies
Increase work participation rates of the           Assess underlying family problems as part of
individuals who are hardest to serve in            eligibility (access to childcare, literacy,
workforce development systems.                     likelihood of substance abuse, etc.).

Performance Measures:                              Identify opportunities with the family to move
Percent of TANF cases closed for reason of         into self-sufficiency.
employment which have remained closed for
three months.                                      Provide resources to support employment
                                                   activities (subsidized and unsubsidized
Percent of TANF recipients meeting                 employment, work experience, on-the-job
participation rate (in work activity 30 hours or   training, job search, vocational training, job
more per week)                                     skills training, education directly related to
                                                   employment).

                                                   Analyze, develop, implement and monitor
                                                   strategies that enhance work participation
                                                   rates.




                                       SELF-SUFFICIENCY
            Success Indicators                                       Strategies
Increase self-sufficiency for families and         Independent living services include life skills
individuals with distressed/fragile health         assessments, life skills development and
circumstances.                                     training, specialized community homes and
                                                   services that focus on education, employment
Performance Measures:                              and career planning for youth transitioning from
Percent of youth eligible for Independent Living   state or tribal custody.
services and has received life skills
assessment.

Number of aging services volunteers.




                                                                                                    27
28
GOAL 2:: OKDHS WIILL PROVIIDE SERVIICES THAT SUPPORT AND STRENGTHEN
GOAL 2: OKDHS WILL PROVIDE SERVICES THAT SUPPORT AND STRENGTHEN
 OAL 2 OKDHS W LL PROV DE SERV CES THAT SUPPORT AND STRENGTHEN
              THE FAMIILY AND PROTECT IITS MEMBERS.
              THE FAMILY AND PROTECT ITS MEMBERS .
              THE FAM LY AND PROTECT TS MEMBERS


                     PREVENTION AND EARLY INTERVENTION
            Success Indicators                    Strategies
Increase number of children or adults                Provide expanded and more appropriate
remaining safely in their home and are not           alternatives to removing children and adults
subjected to abuse, neglect, or exploitation.        from their homes that focus on prevention and
                                                     early intervention.
Performance Measures:

Percentage of families receiving prevention
services with no additional confirmed
investigations or assessments within 12
months of case closures.
                                                     Accept application and approve applications for
Assure quality care for children.                    licensure of childcare providers and facilities.

Performance Measures:                                Monitor facilities for compliance and investigate
                                                     complaints.
Percent of slots among Child Care Centers,
Two Star or above                                    Maintain involvement in community child care
                                                     issues and promote public awareness.
Percent of slots among Child Care Homes,
Two Star or above                                    Create incentives for improvements in child
                                                     care providers through Reaching for the Stars
Percent of children using the subsidy at Child
Care Centers, Two Star or above.                     Provide training to early childhood educators
                                                     through the Center for Early Childhood
Percent of children utilizing the subsidy at Child   Professional Development.
Care Homes, Two Star or above.


                                            DIVERSION
            Success Indicators                                        Strategies
Provide a reliable source of support for all         Identify funding for extraordinary remedies,
children.                                            elevating child support warrants, debt
                                                     leveraging, and predictive dialing system.
Performance Measures:
                                                     Develop New Hire Employer penalty and car
Percent of paternities established                   tag revocation legislation.

Percent of child support orders established          Review and expand on the tasks of existing
                                                     process improvement teams.
Percent of current support collected.
                                                     Develop comprehensive locate tools.

                                                     Problem solve with the courts.




                                                                                                     29
                                             SAFETY
           Success Indicators                                       Strategies
Improved child and adult safety by                 Monitor and refine protocols relating to
enhanced quality and timeliness of                 acceptance of reports of maltreatment.
response to reports of abuse, neglect, or
exploitation.                                      Revise, train, implement and monitor policy
                                                   and protocols as established by the CPS Task
Performance Measures:                              Force prioritization of reports of maltreatment
                                                   and response time frames.
Percent of Priority 1 Child Abuse and Neglect
reports initiated within 24 hours.                 Analyze, develop, implement and monitor
                                                   strategies that address risk factors for
Percent of Priority 1 Child Abuse investigations   maltreatment in out-of-home placements.
completed within 60 days.
                                                   Revise, train, and implement and monitor the
Percent of adult abuse investigations initiated    Risk/Safety Assessment and Safety Planning
within established time frame.                     instruments and procedures per task force
                                                   recommendations.
Percent of adult long term care investigations
initiated within 30 days.                          Increase efforts to educate the public, including
                                                   policy-makers on the importance of protecting
Number of Nursing Home Ombudsman                   the rights of older Oklahomans and preventing
volunteer hours.                                   elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

Percent of nursing home allegations addressed
without referral to enforcement agencies.




                                           NORMALCY
           Success Indicators                                       Strategies

Children with stable living environment.           Develop and maintain an adequate number of
                                                   high quality placement settings with qualified
Performance Measures:                              personnel for out-of-home care that are
                                                   properly resourced and appropriately matched
Of children in out-of-home care six months or      to clients’ needs.
longer, the percentage who has remained in
the same placement for six months or more.




                                                                                                 30
                                         PERMANENCE
           Success Indicators                                      Strategies
More children remain in or return to their      Refine, train, implement, and continually
home.                                           assess, through family and stakeholder
                                                involvement, a reunification protocol which
Performance Measures:                           includes risk and safety assessment, provision
Percent of permanency planning cases with no    of services, and monitoring of the family.
additional confirmed investigations or
assessment within 12 months of case closure.    Pilot, assess, refine, train, replicate as
                                                appropriate and monitor the ecobehavioral
                                                model for OCS.

                                                Evaluate, implement and replicate practices
                                                promoting family (particularly father and sibling)
                                                connections.


More children who are unable to remain in       Secure safe, permanent homes for children in
or return to their home will achieve timely     the custody of the Department who cannot be
and lasting permanence.                         returned to their birth parents.

Performance Measures:                           One Church One Child: a nationally recognized
Percentage of children with goal of adoption    recruitment program is designed to find parents for
that are in trial adoption.                     African-American children who need permanent
                                                homes. One Church One Child provides pre and
                                                post adoptive services; adoptive home
Percent of children who achieve a finalized     assessments, mentoring, recruitment, and adoption
adoption.                                       support groups.

Number of custody children who are authorized   Offer resource parents the opportunity to learn
for adoptive placement.                         more about the children available for
                                                placement through OKDHS, and provides an
                                                opportunity for the family and OKDHS to
                                                assess whether placement is best for the
                                                family.




                                                                                                 31
32
          GOAL 3:: OKDHS WIILL PROVIIDE SERVIICES IIN HOME AND IIN
          GOAL 3: OKDHS WILL PROVIDE SERVICES IN HOME AND IN
           OAL 3 OKDHS W LL PROV DE SERV CES N HOME AND N
                      COMMUNITY-BASED SETTINGS.
                      COMMUNIITY-BASED SETTIINGS.
                      COMMUN TY BASED SETT NGS


                                   SELF SUFFICIENCY
           Success Indicators                                   Strategies

Seniors able to maintain independence.
                                               Collaborate with partners to provide
Performance Measures:                          transportation services for older Oklahomans to
                                               increase their access to services.
Number of caregiver respite vouchers issued.
                                               Promote policies, programs and activities that
Number of caregiver respite vouchers paid.     support family caregivers.

Number of home-delivered meals served          Increase information and education provided to
through Aging Services Division.               the public, including employers, community
                                               agencies, organizations, and public officials on
Number of congregate meals served.             family caregiving and the importance of
                                               supporting family caregivers.
Number of persons served in adult day
services.                                      Work with personal computer (PC) user special
                                               interest groups and other appropriate entities
Number of riderships (persons served)          such as universities, technical centers, and
provided by Section 5310 Transportation        libraries throughout the state to provide
Program.                                       computer training to older Oklahomans to
                                               increase their access to information.
Number of ADvantage Program Home-
Delivered Meals.

Increased self-sufficiency for individuals     Provide older Oklahomans information needed
and families with distressed or fragile        to increase their access to health, mental
health circumstances.                          health, and social supports.

Performance Measures:                          Provide information needed to make informed
                                               decisions about care options, to plan ahead for
Number of persons served through State Plan    long-term care needs, and to streamline
Personal Care and ADvantage Waiver rather      access to publicly supported long-term care
than living in nursing homes.                  programs.

                                               Assist moderate-to-low income individuals
Number of new persons served through State
                                               avoid or delay institutional care.
Plan Personal Care and ADvantage Waiver.

Number of persons served by ADvantage Adult
Day Health Program.




                                                                                            33
                                        INDEPENDENCE
           Success Indicators                                    Strategies
Individuals with developmental disabilities     Assist families providing care for family
will be adequately prepared to achieve and      members through provision of essential
maintain independence.                          services, training, mentorship, and financial
                                                subsidies.
Performance Measures:
Number of persons satisfied with case           Implement models of service delivery that
management services.                            maximize funding for direct service provision.

Number of persons receiving community-based     Review all plans of care to assure expenditures
waiver services.                                meet service necessity criteria.

Number of persons on the waiting list for       Assist individuals with developmental
waiver services.                                disabilities to function independently and have
                                                meaningful work activities.
Number of children being served.
                                                Develop and implement a pilot project to offer
Number of families with children being served   an effective, affordable service package for
through subsidy.                                families caring for members with autism.




                                                                                                34
       Goall 4:: OKDHS wiillll promote heallth care accessiibiilliity..
       Goal 4: OKDHS will promote health care accessibility.
       Goa 4 OKDHS w promote hea th care access b ty


                                             ACCESS
           Success Indicators                                    Strategies

Children and adults able to access benefits.    Accurately and efficiently administer federal
                                                and state programs.
Performance Measures:
Number of intermediate health benefits (20      Perform and promote continuous quality
days or more).                                  improvement.

Number of long-term health benefits (i.e.       Establish and maintain rules and benefit
nursing home, Advantage waiver).                delivery systems in the most effective
                                                (efficacious) manner.
Number of persons receiving short-term health
benefits (20 days or less).

Number of Medicaid applications processed.




                                                                                                35
36
       Goall 5:: OKDHS wiillll contiinuouslly iimprove systems and
       Goal 5: OKDHS will continuously improve systems and
       Goa 5 OKDHS w cont nuous y mprove systems and
        processes to support achiievement of agency goalls..
        processes to support achievement of agency goals.
        processes to support ach evement            agency goa s


                        STEWARDSHIP AND INTEGRITY
           Success Indicators                    Strategies

Use of resources complies with federal and      Comply with prompt payment requirements.
state requirements.
                                                Meet federal standards for assistance payment
Performance Measures:                           accuracy and fraud recovery.
Percent of Food Stamp program applications
processed within time standards.                Continue program monitoring to ensure
                                                compliance with federal and state standards.
Percent of food stamp benefits determined
accurately.                                     Decrease number of adverse audit findings and
                                                improve timeliness and accuracy of corrective
Percent of cash benefits determined             action to remedy audit findings.
accurately.

Percent of child-care program certifications
processed within required time frame.

Percent of Medicaid benefits processed within
time standards.

Percent of compliance to standard for prompt
payment of invoices.
   • travel claims
   • administrative claims
   • foster care


All scheduled preventive maintenance is         Maintain all facilities in proper working order.
completed.
                                                Continue to provide state of the art county
Performance Measures:                           office buildings and equipment through the
                                                establishing protocols for enhanced office
                                                planning.
Number of building inspections completed.




                                                                                                   37
                        EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTIVITY
           Success Indicators                     Strategies

Increased employee satisfaction.                Distribute employee satisfaction baseline
                                                survey.
Performance Measure:

Percent of ADA and Civil Rights requests by
employees.


Increased employee retention.                   Assure all Human Services Centers training
                                                academies meet the needs of the field.
Performance Measure:
                                                Assure continuous learning, coaching and
Percent of employee turnover/retention in       training occurs to give the staff opportunities to
mission-critical areas.                         develop competence and confidence.

                                                Ensure direct reports receive praise,
                                                recognition and rewards.



Increase employee productivity and              To deliver innovative technology solutions that
efficiency through use of technology and        enable Oklahoma government entities and
information systems.                            service providers to effectively serve the
                                                citizens of Oklahoma
Performance Measures:
                                                Monitor operational/production hardware and
Number of customer service calls received by    software to ensure stability, peak performance,
Data Services Division.                         and optimal utilization.

Percent of customer service calls answered by
Data Services Division.                         Establish a CPI methodology within the IT
                                                processes to incrementally improve business
Number of offices with no outages (network      solutions and processes to achieve a high level
availability).                                  of customer satisfaction and technological
                                                excellence.
Average network transaction response time
(seconds).                                      Develop maintenance and replacement plan for
                                                equipment by working with Data Services
                                                Division and Support Services Division.

                                                Develop feedback loop from the field to State
                                                Office on the effectiveness of data
                                                systems.




                                                                                                38
                     SUMMARY OF ENVIIRONMENTAL SCAN
                     SUMMARY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN
                      UMMARY OF NV RONMENTAL CAN

Economy

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) released the 2005 Gross State Product (GSP) estimates
in June 2006. Between 2004 and 2005, Oklahoma’s GSP in current dollars (unadjusted for
inflation) grew 7.8 percent from $111.8 billion in 2004 to $120.5 billion in 2005. The 7.8 percent
growth rate between 2004 and 2005 represents the largest annual increase since 1999-2000
when the state’s GSP grew 7.9 percent. Oklahoma’s most recent GSP growth rate ranked the
state as 13th nationally among the fifty states and surpassed both the U.S. Gross Domestic
Product (GDP) growth rate (6.4 percent) and the seven-state regional Gross Regional Product
(GRP) growth rate (7.7 percent) over the same time period. 9

In spite of this high economic growth rate, about 600,000 Oklahomans are living at or below the
poverty level. 10 The state’s poverty rate rose in 2005 to 13.2 percent of families, up from 11.8
percent in 2004. Ten percent of families nationally are at or below the poverty rate. Oklahoma
(with a rate of 16.5 percent) is ranked 10th among states in the percentage of persons living in
poverty. 11 The child poverty rate in Oklahoma (22.7 percent in 2005) is one of the highest rates
in America. Although Oklahoma’s economy is improving, many families and children are not
benefiting from the current positive environment. The 2005 Census report also showed that the
median household income of Oklahomans declined, yet another indication of a very uneven
growth, where the average household and those at the bottom of the economic ladder have been
left out of the state’s overall economic growth.

Economic inequality and poverty The U.S. has experienced an economic boom during the late
90s, a short recession in 2001 (from March to November), and a period of recovery followed by a
strong economic growth since then. The Congressional Budget Office predicts that the U.S.
economy will continue to grow at a healthy pace—in terms of gross domestic product—over the
next five years. 12

But this widely used economic indicator masks the differential effects of the economic “growth” on
various demographic and income groups. The following data shows that not everyone reaped the
benefits of the economic growth and that the benefits of this growth have been skewed in favor of
the wealthiest members of the society. Over the past 60 years, the Census Bureau has used a
commonly used measure, the Gini coefficient (also known as the index of income concentration),
to calculate family income inequality in the U.S. The value of this index may vary from 0.0,
indicating all families have equal share of income, to 1.0 perfect inequality when one family has
all the income and the rest has none. From 1947 to 1968 the value of the Gini coefficient had a
downward trend indicating a decrease in income inequality among U.S. families. Since 1968,
however, this trend has been upward, indicating a widening gap between the rich and the poor
and from 1980 the slope has increased. 13



9
  Oklahoma Economic Briefing, Oklahoma Department of Commerce, July 10, 2006
10
   2005 American Community Survey, August 2006
11
   American Community Survey, Selected Economic Characteristics 2005, U.S. Census Bureau
12
   http://65.246.118.254/ftpdocs/70xx/doc7027/01-26-
BudgetOutlook.pdf#search=%22congressional%20budget%20office%2C%20economic%20outlo
ok%22
13
 U.S. Census Bureau, Historical Income Inequality Tables, Table IE-1: Selected Measures of
Household Income Dispersion


                                                                                               39
Another indicator that Census Bureau uses to measure the income inequality is the aggregate
shares of household income received by each fifth of the income distribution. According to the
data (depicted in Figure 1), the aggregate share of income received by the households in the
highest fifth grew by 3.1 percent during the 1993 - 2005 period, while households in all other
quintiles actually lost ground. The households in the lowest income group have lost the most
(i.e., their share on aggregate income has declined by 5.6 percent over this period). 14

     Figure 1. Percent Change in Share of Aggregate Income for Households: 1993-2005




With the events of the Middle East and the globalization of the economy, it is expected that this
trend will continue in the future, pushing more families into poverty, which translates into a higher
demand for DHS services.

Social / Demographic

Education Although the U.S. economy has performed well over the past few years, as was
mentioned in the previous section, most of the benefits of growth have gone to the top portion of
the income ladder. As Melissa Kearney’s study 15 indicates, the gap is largely because of
differences in educational attainments. James Heckman, Nobel-Prize-winning economist argues
that the rate of return for educational investments are highest for the youngest children. Skill,
according to Heckman, brings about skill, and each stage of education builds on skills acquired at
an earlier stage. Therefore, in order to narrow the gap between rich and poor, “the highest
priority in education should be preparing very young children from poor families for school.” 16
Research on brain development also emphasizes the importance of high-quality early education
programs on a child’s long-term academic achievement.

Given the critical importance of early education on a child’s future success, the crucial role that
OKDHS plays in providing quality childcare for vulnerable children becomes evident. Over the
past few years, OKDHS has set up the “Reaching for the Stars” rating system to encourage
childcare providers to improve the quality of their services by increasing the competence of


14
   U.S. Census Bureau, “Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States:
2005”, Aug. 2006
15
   Kearney, M. ”Intergenerational Mobility for Women an d Minorities in the United States,”
www.futureofchildren.org
16
   Sawhill, I. “Opportunity in America: the Role o Education,” Policy Brief, Fall 2006


                                                                                                  40
 teachers and raising the subsidy reimbursement rate to increase the number of slots for low-
income families. 17 In addition, in order to promote high quality care for low-income families’
children, OKDHS requires that newly authorized children do not use the subsidy in One-Star
childcare centers unless an exception is granted. As the result of this policy, more than three-
quarters of Oklahoma low-income families’ children receiving subsidies have attended Two-Star
or Three-Star facilities.

Births to Unmarried Women National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) at the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention in HHS is responsible for collecting and analyzing vital statistics
data. The NCHS data shows that in 2004, a record number of babies—1.5 million— were born to
unwed mothers. This represents 35.7 percent of all American births, 18 also a new record. Teen
birth as a percent of total unwed births is declining, though the rate is still considerably high. The
out of wedlock birth rate in Oklahoma, in 2004, was 38.5 percent and the teen (15 to 19 years)
birth rate remained higher (33.3 percent higher—fourth highest rate in the U.S.) 19 than the
national rate.

The percentage of births to unmarried women has followed an upward trend both at national and
Oklahoma levels over the past 50 years. The trend took pace during the 1960s and continued to
accelerate until 1994. The rate of out-of-wedlock births slowed considerably in the nation from
1994 until 2004, while Oklahoma continued to climb on the same accelerated trend line (Figure
3). According to Robert Rector,”Out-of-wedlock childbearing and single parenthood are the
principal causes of child poverty and welfare dependence in the U.S.” 20 A study by Oklahoma
Health Department’s Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAM), using 2000-2003
data, indicates, “Nearly 80 percent of unmarried adolescent mothers end up in poverty.” 21 The
PRAM study also revealed that more than 44 percent of the teens reported being below 100
percent of federal poverty level. Given the unwed birth’s trend in Oklahoma and the consequent
effects on these families, it is anticipated that, unless serious preventive measures take place, the
demands for various OKDHS services will grow substantially over the next five years.

                      Figure 3. Birth to Unmarried mothers, OK and U.S.




17
   2005 Oklahoma Child Care & Early Education Portfolio
18
   http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/unmarry.htm
19
   Based on the 2003 data. See http://www.aecf.org/kidscount/sld/10
20
   Rector, Robert E. The Effects of Welfare Reform, the Heritage Foundation, March 2001.
21
   http://www.health.ok.gov/program/hpromo/news/news05/prams.html




                                                                                                   41
Health Care Each year 17,000 Oklahoma children fail to receive all the health care they need.
Three out of every five Oklahoma children do not have a "medical home," a place with a primary
care provider where the child consistently receives all needed care and at least one preventive
care visit during the most recent year. Among children needing prescription medications, almost
10,000 do not receive them. Among children needing mental health care, 30,000 do not receive it.

Numerous studies have analyzed the relationship between income and health. According to the
National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a nationally representative annual survey of U.S.
families, a person’s overall health measure is highly correlated with family income. Figure 4
portrays this correlation: as income increases, the percent of people reporting “excellent” or
“good” health increases.




Other Health Facts:

   •   For every 1,000 Oklahomans, there are fewer than two physicians, just over twelve
       nurses and less than one dentist.
   •   One in five Oklahoma children have no insurance or were not insured for some period
       during the last year, compared to on in seven nationally.
   •   Under combined Oklahoma Medicaid and SCHIP eligibility, just under half of Oklahoma's
       children are eligible for public insurance.
   •   Over 80,000 (9.6 percent) Oklahoma children have a moderate or severe health problem.
   •   One in ten children (9.1 percent) are impaired by a serious mental health problem.
   •   One in four Oklahoma children between the ages of 1 and 5 is at moderate or high risk
       for developmental delay. More than 35,000 Oklahoma children from the ages of 5
       through 15 have a disability. Ranking 38th with 6.4 percent of 5 through 15-year-old
       children having at least one disability, Oklahoma is in the worse half of all states.
   •   Every year an average of 144 Oklahoma children and youth ages 1 through 19 die from
       disease.




                                                                                             42
     •   While most Oklahoma children are very healthy (86.3 percent), significant and disturbing
         differences occur by race and ethnicity. Rates of excellent or very good health plummet
         for Hispanic (63.3 percent) and African American (78.5 percent) children in Oklahoma.

These facts reveal the pain felt and the challenges faced by large numbers of Oklahomans each
year and the pressing needs of this population that requires our serious attention.

Child Well-Being The number of children in Oklahoma in 2005 was 848,413 (24.7 percent of the
state population). The Oklahoma Kids Count reports on twelve indicators of child, family and
community well being. On a positive note, this report indicates that Oklahoma has made progress
in eight of the twelve indicators. Teen birth rates, juvenile violent crime rates, infant mortality and
child and teen death rates are all down. 22 Currently, youth in every age group die at rates lower
than they did in the mid-1990s. However, this can be misleading. Even though death rates for
children and teens have improved in recent years, Oklahoma still ranks in the worst half of all
states (34th in child death; 37th in teen death) 23 for the most recent year. These rates, along
with other poor indicators, show that there is still a lot of work to be done to improve child well-
being.

     •   More than 400 youth die each year. Half are children; half are teens.
     •   About 195,000 Oklahoma children (22.7 percent) live in poverty. 24
     •   Thirteen thousand (12,904) children are abused or neglected. Resulting child abuse and
         neglect deaths are at an all time high.
     •   On average, OKDHS substantiates over 13,000 cases of abuse and/or neglect.
         Fortunately, the record high rate of child abuse and/or neglect posted in Oklahoma during
         the late 1990s has declined substantially. Oklahoma ranks in the bottom half of all states
         (39th) in the rate of child abuse and neglect the state substantiates per 1,000 children in
         the state.

Elderly 25 Oklahoma’s older population continues to increase in size. According to the 2000
census, 17.4 percent of Oklahomans (599,080 people) were age 60 or over. In 2004, 17.8
percent of the Oklahoma population was 60 or over. By 2025, there are projected to be more
than one million people age 60+ in Oklahoma. Other characteristics of elderly in Oklahoma
include:

     •   Disability: About 47 percent of the older adults age 65+ in Oklahoma have a disability,
         which is higher than the national average (41.9 percent).
     •   Poverty: In 2004, approximately 9.1 percent of people 65+ had income below the
         poverty level.
     •   Long-Term Care: In 2003, Oklahoma was one of the only eight states where Medicaid
         participants receiving aged/disabled waiver services outnumbered Medicaid participants
         living in nursing homes.

Government and Regulatory

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 (Pub. L. 104-193)
created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant that fundamentally transformed
welfare from a cash benefits program to a program focused on work and temporary assistance. Under
TANF, adults receiving assistance are expected to engage in work activities and develop the capability to
support themselves before their time-limited assistance runs out. States are required to assist recipients in


22
   2005 Oklahoma Kids Count
23
   2005 Oklahoma Kids Count
24
   U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2005
25
   This section is taken from OKDHS – Aging Services Division’s Strategic Plan.


                                                                                                         43
making the transition to employment. Also, they are expected to meet work participation rates and other
critical program requirements in order to maintain their full Federal funding and avoid penalties.

Work Since the enactment of TANF in 1996, millions of families have avoided dependence on
welfare in favor of greater independence through work. Employment among low-income single
mothers (earning below 200 percent of poverty), reported in the U. S. Census Bureau's Current
Population Survey (CPS) has increased significantly since 1996. Although it declined slightly in
2001 and 2002, it is still eight percentage points higher than in 1996 – a remarkable achievement,
particularly since it remained high through the brief recession in 2001. Among single mothers
with children under age six – a group particularly vulnerable to welfare dependency –
employment rates are 13 percentage points higher than in 1996 (Figure 5).



Figure 5. Employment Among Single Mothers Under 200 percent of Poverty




The PRWORA legislation also dramatically changed intergovernmental relationships, giving
States and Tribes broad flexibility to set eligibility rules and decide what types of benefits and
services to provide clients. States and Tribes have used this flexibility to try new, far-reaching
initiatives that effectively addressed the needs of families. PRWORA limited Federal regulatory
authority, but added new responsibility for tracking State performance and imposing penalties
when States fail to comply with program requirements.

TANF has been a truly remarkable example of a successful Federal-State partnership. Millions of
parents have left welfare for work, reducing the TANF rolls by nearly 60 percent, from about 4.4
million families in August 1996 to just 1.9 million families in September 2005. But the decline in
the caseload is just part of the story. During this period there were also great improvements in a
range of outcomes for low-income families and children: The percentage of never-married
mothers who work outside the home for wages increased nearly 30 percent, from 49.3 percent in
1996 to 63.1 percent in 2004. The child poverty rate fell from 20.5 percent in 1996 to 17.8
percent in 2004, reflecting 1.4 million fewer children living in poverty.

Although the poverty rate has increased some since 2000 as a result of the most recent
recession, the surge in job creation over the past two years portends favorably for renewed
improvement in poverty rates.



                                                                                                    44
But, if we are to succeed in achieving the full purposes of TANF, there is still much to be done.
Even with the dramatic results States have achieved, there are still far too many clients that are
denied the opportunities of work and preparation for work. In FY 2005, only 30 percent of those
required to work were participating in work activities for sufficient hours to count toward the work
participation rate. States have been less effective in placing clients with multiple barriers in work,
including those with mental health issues, addiction, developmental or learning disabilities, limited
English proficiency, and those subject to domestic violence. While the average wages of clients
entering the workforce are above the minimum wage, they are still too low to ensure family well
being. More effective models of post-employment supports that lead to career development and
wage progression are needed. Our clients also need programs that sustain and keep families
together and programs that enable low-income, non-custodial fathers to help their families
financially.

Marriage and Divorce One of the central purposes of TANF is to encourage the formation and
maintenance of married two-parent families. Child well-being is generally enhanced by being
raised with the love and committed guidance of both parents. On average, children raised by
parents in healthy marriages are less likely than those of other family forms to fail at school, suffer
an emotional or behavioral problem requiring psychiatric treatment, be victims of child abuse and
neglect, become pregnant as teenagers, get into trouble with the law, use illicit drugs, smoke
cigarettes, abuse alcohol, engage in early sexual activity, grow up in poverty, or attempt suicide.
Children raised by parents in healthy marriages are also, on average, more likely to have a higher
sense of self-esteem, form healthy marriages when they marry, attend college, and to be
physically healthier. 26

Families with two committed parents also greatly improve their prospects for income security. In
2004, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that the poverty rate for people in married couple families
with related children was just 7 percent (8 percent in Oklahoma), compared to 33 percent in
single parent families with related children (37 percent in Oklahoma).

Not every person can or should marry, and not all who are married can or should remain so.
However, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is encouraging States to
explore ways to help interested individuals and couples gain access to the skills and knowledge
that will increase the likelihood they will form and sustain healthy marriages. Such strategies
need not involve TANF cash recipients specifically, and can be part of a larger human service
delivery strategy to improve the well being of children. Numerous studies and supporting data
point to the many benefits of children reared in nuclear (biological) two-parents families including
the following:

      •   Pooled data from 1996 and 2001 show that 97 percent of adolescents ages 15–17 who
          lived with their married, biological parents were enrolled in school, compared with 94
          percent of adolescents who lived with a single parent, and 80 percent of adolescents who
          lived with neither parent.
      •   According to pooled data from 1996 and 2001, 86 percent of adolescents ages 15–17
          who lived with their married, biological parents, were reported to be in excellent or very
          good health, compared with 80 percent of adolescents who lived with a married
          stepparent, 76 percent of those who lived with a single parent, and 67 percent of those
          who lived with neither parent.
      •   Pooled data from 1996 and 2001 show that 2 percent of all females ages 15–17 who
          lived with their married biological parents became unmarried mothers by age 17–19,




26
     Waite & Gallagher, 2000


                                                                                                    45
         compared with 9 percent of those who lived with a single parent, and 27 percent of those
         who did not live with either parent. 27

Oklahoma DHS has explored various strategies for helping couples form and sustain healthy
marriages as part of an effort to help families achieve self-sufficiency and improve child well being
but a lot still needs to be done...

     o   Divorce rate is down, but the ratio of divorce to marriage remains high. From 1990 to
         2000, the divorce rate in Oklahoma reduced by half (from 24.9 percent to 12.4 percent),
         but the rate of marriages ended up in divorce increased from 75.1 percent to 79.5 percent
         over the same period. 28
     o   The percent of married-couple families in all families in Oklahoma has had a downward
         trend since 1960, which continued up until 2004; the last year for which the data is
         available. 29
     o   Meanwhile the percent of female householders is increasing.

It is the responsibility of the government to help citizens to reach self-sufficiency and to prosper
and also provide a safety net for those who may fall on the way.




27
   America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well Being 2005
28
   http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/tables/06s0117.xlw
29
   U.S. Census Bureau, 2004 American Community Survey, issued in 2005


                                                                                                       46
                             F nanc a Performance
                             Fiinanciiall Performance
                             Financial Performance




Safety and Security
OKDHS’ priority is protecting vulnerable children and adults from abuse and neglect. Additional
resources will be requested in this area as needs are identified. Child Welfare services are paid
through a combination of federal and state funds. Adult Protective Services are funded through
state appropriations and the federal Social Services Block Grant. Based on growth in the state
population including the aging population, additional support for these programs will be required
to assure the safety of children and vulnerable adults.

Responsibility and Self Sufficiency
Over the next five years, OKDHS will continue to expand programs that encourage parents to be
financially responsible for their children. The Child Support Enforcement Division (CSED) is
funded through a combination of state and federal funds and fees. This program reduces the
economic burden on the state and is a good future investment for the State of Oklahoma.

Programs through Family Support Services Division provide incentives for employment and self-
sufficiency for economically distressed families. These are funded primarily through federal
funds. Changes in the TANF block grant may result in dramatic reductions in funding to the state
in the next two to three years. Programs that support job and work may be jeopardized if this
funding is not replaced at the state level.

Permanency and Stability for Children
In order to continue to promote permanency and stability for children, OKDHS will seek increases
in funding for adoption and supporting quality foster care or group home environments. The
support of these programs through fair and equitable rates enhances the safety and quality
homes for children.

Independence
As previously stated, the number of people eligible for DDSD (Developmental Disabilities Service
Division) outpaces the agencies able to provide care. Many of these services are funded through
Medicaid, a combination of federal funds with state match requirements. In order to better serve
this population, additional funding will be required over the next five years. DDSD is developing
methods to better configure services so additional persons with disabilities can be served with
existing funding.

As the population of the state ages, the Aging Services Division will have increased demands for
community-based services. Although nutrition services received a long overdue increase,
additional rate increases funded by state dollars are needed to support these community-based
providers. The ADvantage Waiver, also a Medicaid program funded through federal funds with
state match, has seen dramatic demands for services over the past three years. As an
alternative to nursing home and other institutional care, the services of the Aging Services
Division and Developmental Disabilities Services Division are less expensive and promote a
better quality of life.

Resource Stewardship and Integrity
Major initiatives are underway in many areas of the agency to use technology to increase
efficiency, productivity, and access to services. These projects should result in more efficient use
of personnel, maximization of federal funds and an eventual cost benefit to the State of
Oklahoma. Nevertheless, the agency will continue to face inflationary maintenance costs and the
projected actual cost of increased operations.



                                                                                                 47
48
                                   APPENDIX A
                                   APPENDIX A
                                   APPENDIX
                             DATA SERVICES DIVISION
                             DATA SERVICES DIVISION
                             DATA SERVICES DIVISION
                          INFORMATIION TECHNOLOGY PLAN
                           NFORMAT O N TECHNOLOGY PLAN
                         IINFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PLAN
                                Executive Summary
                                     2006-2010

                                  REVISED JULY 1, 2006


Data Services Division is making significant strides in providing services to and partnering with
the divisions of OKDHS. Many accomplishments are evident and a few of these accomplishments
and contributions are:

    •   APS System Implementation
        Adult Protective Services (APS) system implementation provides a comprehensive web-
        based system, which increases program efficiency and effectiveness and ensures
        program policies are enforced on a consistent basis. The APS system also provides the
        ability to track processes and share alleged victim and perpetrator information across the
        state.

    •   HIFA System Design, Development and Implementation
        Health Insurance Flexibility Accountability (HIFA) is, at its core, a federal government
        approved premium assistance waiver initiative for Medicaid. This is a jointly administered
        program between two agencies, the Oklahoma Department of Humans Services
        (OKDHS) and the Oklahoma Healthcare Authority (OHCA), and a Third Party Agent
        (TPA) which is currently Electronic Data Systems (EDS). Currently, a web-based online
        application developed and maintained by the TPA collects the necessary data elements
        for determining premium assistance eligibility. The web-based online application is front-
        loaded with as much eligibility logic as possible so that it can transmit eligible applicant
        data to OKDHS. OKDHS verifies the eligibility and when processing is complete or errors
        have been identified, sends an acknowledgment to the TPA. Successfully verified
        eligibility transactions are sent to the OHCA Medicaid Management Information System
        (MMIS) for each person found eligible. A noteworthy goal of this project was to establish
        the framework to allow client access to Medicaid eligibility services outside of the Human
        Service Center process. This new process will increase the number of insured citizens
        while simplifying the eligibility process.

    •   Mainframe Upgrade to IBM Z-Server (Z9)
        The OKDHS mainframe computer was replaced and upgraded to keep the mainframe
        response time as efficient as possible to meet OKDHS daily business requirements. The
        following goals were set and met;
             o Increase mainframe performance by upgrading the hardware.
             o Increase functionality of the mainframe operator consoles.
             o Remove unsupported communication equipment.
             o Achieve the upgrade with as much transparency as possible for OKDHS
                customers.
             o Identify opportunities for future mainframe enhancements and support functions
                for future technology initiatives.




                                                                                                 49
   •   Mobile Email (Treo) Implementation
       The Mobile E-Mail Project began as a research request from the CIO on behalf of the
       OKDHS Director for information on and the feasibility of deploying Blackberry type
       devices at OKDHS, as a tool to allow selected staff to send and receive e-mail remotely.
       After considerable research into the feasibility of using Blackberry devices in the OKDHS
       environment, the scope was broadened to mobile e-mail, rather than limit it to a specific
       device. The ability to provide a solution that interfaced with OKDHS’ Exchange 2000 (e-
       mail) Servers was critical to the success of the project. OKDHS implemented a pilot
       project using the Treo, which is similar to a Blackberry in that it functions as a cell phone,
       a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), and as a remote e-mail device and it also has a built-
       in camera. Though the path was somewhat challenging due to the relative newness of
       the service and the devices, the pilot included 20 users, consisting of OKDHS executive
       staff and DSD technical staff. The project produced documentation for the processes
       and procedures for requesting, procuring, receiving, and installing the devices, as well as
       instructions to set up the interface to OKDHS e-mail servers. Today, there are more than
       100 OKDHS employees use the Treo to expedite the communications and decision-
       making processes and improve their personal productivity.

   •   Quality of Service (QOS), Packet Prioritization
       The Quality of Service (QOS), Packet Prioritization initiative allows data, which is moved
       from one point to another throughout OKDHS network, to be prioritized by chunks of
       data, called “packets”, and therefore increase the usability and availability of data within
       the network. QOS runs behind the scenes to help ensure each person, who hits the
       enter key on their PC, receives the data they expect without it getting clogged up in the
       network.

   •   MFP Printer Statewide Deployment
       The Multi Function Printer (MFP) project improved the availability, quality of network
       printing, document copying, faxing, and scanning capabilities of output devices provided
       to internal OKDHS personnel at all office locations throughout the state.
       The project developed a repeatable rollout deployment process for these devices. The
       business objectives met in this project were to;
            o Improve the availability of all MFP equipment, network printers, and color MFP
                 equipment
            o Improve the quality of printing available on all MFP equipment, network printers,
                 and color MFP equipment
            o Reduce the overall cost of document copying on all MFP equipment and color
                 MFP equipment.
   •   Overpayments System – TOP Module
       The Treasury Offset Program (TOP) module was developed and implemented by the
       OKDHS to assist in recovering overpayments made to agency clients for the Food
       Stamps program, a federal program administered by the USDA. This program allows
       OKDHS, through the federal Treasury Department, to recoup overpayments from clients’
       federal benefits, including;
            o Tax returns
            o Social security
            o Federal retirement
            o Food stamps or TANF benefits in another state
            o Any other federal benefit plan.
       Collections of nearly $1 million have been recovered from November 2005 through end of
       the fiscal year, June 30, 2006. This is more than the last four years combined and
       justifies continued development of the expanded Overpayments System, planned for
       implementation later in fiscal year 2007.


DSD contributes to the ongoing success of OKDHS through diligently avoiding negative impacts


                                                                                                  50
to our customers. DSD often works behind the scenes keeping the wheels turning on all systems
and maintaining services to our customers. The DSD staff is focused on providing and
maintaining a quality technology experience for all OKDHS employees and customers through
avoidance of:

    •   Viruses, this requires constant detection and elimination
    •   Downtime on computing components and the network
    •   Spam (Voluminous unwanted e-mail), requires constant monitoring and detection
    •   Inappropriate websites, requires detection and blocking
    •   Abnormal Job Endings (Abends), reduction requires system monitoring on a 24 hour a
        day, 7 days a week basis


DSD partners with other OKDHS divisions on several large strategic projects to deliver upon our
strategic goals. Some of these are multi-year projects and some are taking an Enterprise
approach (systems which provide similar services to multiple divisions within the agency).
Examples of these initiatives are:

    •   Business Resumption/Disaster Recovery Planning, Testing, and Preparedness
    •   OCEAN, Oklahoma Child-support Enforcement Automated Network, a major multi-year
        project for the enhancement and modernization of Child Support applications technology
        and processes
    •   PC Replacement
    •   Imaging Project – Electronic Case File
    •   Border Infrastructure – Firewall Upgrades for enhanced Internet throughput
    •   Enterprise Framework, a common foundational architecture upon which applications may
        be layered and shared by various divisions within OKDHS




                                                                                              51
52
                                              APPENDIX B
                                              APPENDIX B
                                              APPENDIX
                                   SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION
                                    SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION
                                      PPORT SERVICES DIVISION
                                   CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT REQUEST
                                   CAPIITAL IIMPROVEMENT REQUEST
                                   CAP TAL MPROVEMENT REQUEST
                                         REVISED JULY 1, 2006


                                                                                                    Recom-           Agency
 DHS                                                                                   STATE        mended          Last Year
PROJ #      PROJECT NAME                                                              APPROP        Priority         Priority

830-0164   Fire Alarm / PA System Replacement (SORC)                                   $1,567,450               1            1
830-0277   Campus wide Central Fire Alarm System (LDC)                                   $133,350               2            2
830-0321   Lagoons repair banks and new rip rap (NORCE)                                  $160,500               3           26
830-0074   Sewer Lines Replacement (SORC)                                              $2,541,000               4            4
830-0325   Sewer Lines Replacement (NORCE)                                             $2,541,000               5            5
830-0160   Replace Campus Water Lines (SORC)                                           $1.267.325               6            6
830-0280   Replace Campus Water Lines & Add Valves (NORCE)                             $1,267,325               7            7
830-0363   Repair Tunnels and Sidewalks (NORCE)                                          $100,000               8
830-0342   Sprinkle Buildings where Clients Sleep - Canna & Rose Cottages               $172,200                9            9
830-0323   Refurbish Exterior Administration Bldg (NORCE)                                $127,050              10           10
830-0151   Heating/Cooling Hospital (NORCE)                                            $2,728,700              11           11
830-0284   Replace windows on S. side of Hospital (NORCE)                                $280,150              12           12
830-0313   New Tulsa Children's Shelter (LDC)                                         $11,475,393              13           13
830-0315   Repair Roof Flashing & Mansard Swimming Pool (SORC)                            $69,300              14           14
830-0285   Replace Client Plumbing Fixtures (Greer)                                      $100,000              15
830-0080   Calvert-Kerr Cottages Renovation ADA Restrooms(SORC)                          $533,610              16           16
830-0283   Emergency Generators (NORCE)                                                  $633,675              17           17
830-0221   Shower Renovations/Cottages (SORC)                                            $557,865              18           18
830-0256   Gary Cottage Floor Repairs (SORC)                                             $231,000              19           19
830-0090   Cold Storage Renovation Calvert/Kerr & Condensing Units(SORC)                  $42,685              20           20
830-0364   New Group Homes (8) (NORCE)                                                 $6,810,000              21
830-0326   Upgrade Campus Electrical Distribution Service (LDC)                          $467,775              22           22
830-0330   New Admin, Staff Training, Client Training, & Multi Purpose Bldg (GREER)    $2,300,000              23           23
830-0163   Doors / Hardware Replacement- Campus-wide (SORC)                              $525,525              24           24
830-0292   Repair & Paint Water Tower (SORC)                                             $100,000              25           25
830-0365   New Group Homes (2) (SORC)                                                  $1,702,500              26
830-0154   Window Replacement 6 Bldgs(NORCE)                                             $485,100              27           27
830-0242   Window Replacement (SORC)                                                     $386,875              28           28
830-0093   Admin Bldg Modifications (SORC)                                              $126,735               29           29
830-0007   Replace Streets & Sidewalks (NORCE)                                         $1,787,600              30           30
830-0098   Resurface Streets & Parking Lots (SORC)                                     $2,467,950              31           31
830-0264   Parking Lot Repairs- Co Offices (FMU)                                         $130,000              32           32
830-0136   Roof Replacement/Repairs (FMU)                                                $145,000              33           33
830-0261   HVAC Replacement/Repairs- Co Offices (FMU)                                    $345,000              34           34
830-0279   Remodel 3 Buildings (GREER)                                                    $30,000              35           35
830-0282   Parking Lots Surfacing (NORCE)                                                $667,050              36           36
830-0252   HVAC Replacements (LDC)                                                     $1,905,750              37           37
830-0135   Roof Replacement/Repairs (SORC)                                               $200,100              38           38
830-0139   Roof Replacement/Repairs (NORCE)                                              $346,500              39           39
830-0138   Roof Replacement/Repairs (LDC)                                                $103,100              40           40
830-0265   Renovate Bldg 5 (LDC)                                                         $388,100              41           41
830-0206   Installation of Elevator- Admin Bldg (NORCE)                                  $317,625              42           42
830-0250   Refurbish Bldg Exteriors (LDC)                                                $242,550              43           43
830-0320   Add power assisted doors to bldgs for client use (NORCE)                      $165,165              44           44
830-0247   Installation of Automatic Doors (SORC)                                        $343,645              45           45
830-0173   Replace Asbestos Core Fire Rated Doors/Jambs (NORCE)                          $311,275              46           46
830-0331   Upgrade HVAC Systems w/ Computer Controls for Client Bldgs (SORC)             $369,600              47           47
830-0156   Renovate Old Laundry Building (NORCE)                                         $500,325              48           49
830-0281   Capital Equipment for Maintenance (NORCE)                                     $165,000              49           50
830-0278   Add Elevator to Building #4 & #2 (LDC)                                        $934,500              50           51
830-0287   New 20,000 sqft Building for Staff (LDC)                                    $2,541,000              51           52
830-0036   Auditorium Seating & Barrier Wall Removal (SORC)                              $100,000              52           53




                                                                                                                     53
                                                                                             Recom-        Agency
  DHS                                                                            STATE       mended       Last Year
 PROJ #    PROJECT NAME                                                         APPROP       Priority      Priority
830-0260   HVAC Replacement Linden Hall (GREER)                                 $1,461,075           53            54
830-0210   Window Replacement- Linden Hall (GREER)                                $508,200           54            55
830-0327   Cover Basketball Court (LDC)                                            $52,000           55            57
830-0340   Tuck Pointing and Caulking Linden Hall (GREER)                         $210,000           56            58
830-0332   New Creek County Office Building w/ CSED (PMU)                       $4,137,908           57            59
830-0333   New McClain County Office Building (PMU)                             $1,266,738           58            60
830-0334   New Pawnee County Office Building (PMU)                              $1,266,738           59            61
830-0335   New Mayes County Office Building (PMU)                               $2,558,606           60            62
830-0336   New Atoka County Office Building (PMU)                               $1,762,635           61            63
830-0337   New Craig County Office Building (PMU)                               $2,016,600           62            64
830-0338   New Haskell County Office Building (PMU)                             $1,556,000           63            65
830-0343   New Pontotoc County Office Building (PMU)                            $4,622,622           64            66
830-0344   New Harper County Office Building (PMU)                                $436,879           65            67
830-0345   New Cleveland County Office Building (PMU)                           $5,502,629           66            68
830-0346   New Tulsa County 72H Office Buuilding (PMU)                          $3,063,355           67            69
830-0348   New Osage County Office Buuilding (PMU)                              $2,788,146           68            71
830-0349   New Dewey County Office Building (PMU)                                 $464,379           69            72
830-0350   New Stephens County Office Building (PMU)                            $3,120,961           70            73
830-0351   New Rogers County Office Building (PMU)                              $3,931,929           71            74
830-0352   New McCurtain County Office Building (PMU)                           $3,985,950           72            75
830-0353   New Nowata County Office Building (PMU)                                $964,285           73            76
830-0354   New Kiowa County Office Building (PMU)                               $1,144,262           74            77
830-0355   New Pottawatomie County Office Building (PMU)                        $4,955,062           75            78
830-0356   New Carter County Office Building (PMU)                              $4,240,841           76            79
830-0357   New Hughes County Office Building (PMU)                              $1,684,593           77            80
830-0358   New Okfuskee County Office Building (PMU)                            $1,144,262           78            81
830-0359   New McIntosh County Office Building (PMU)                            $2,031,524           79            82
830-0360   New Pushmataha County Office Building (PMU)                          $1,684,593           80            83
830-0361   New Oklahoma County Office Building - Airport Area (PMU)             $3,242,881           81            85
830-0362   New Oklahoma County Office Building - Village (PMU)                  $4,554,630           82            85
                                                                      TOTAL   $124,301,206




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                                        Appendix C
                              Fiscal Years 2007 through 2012
                                  Performance Measures

Goal 1: OKDHS will assist client to become independent, employed productive citizens.
     1.1 Key performance Measure Title: TANF Cases closed and employed
          Description: Percent of TANF cases closed for reason of employment which have remained closed for three
          months.
                        FY 2005      FY 2006   FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009    FY 2010    FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated                             70%         70%        70%         70%       70%          70%
            Actual         48%         68%

     1.2   Key performance Measure Title: TANF Work Participation Rate
           Description: Percent of TANF recipients meeting participation rate (in work 30 hours or
           more per week)
                         FY 2005     FY 2006     FY 2007    FY 2008       FY 2009      FY 2010     FY 2011       FY 2012
           Estimated                  50%          50%         50%          50%          50%        50%           50%
             Actual       41%         41%

     1.3   Key performance Measure Title: Independent Living Services
           Description: Percent of youth eligible for Independent Living services and have received
           life skills assessment.
                            FY 2005  FY 2006       FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009     FY 2010     FY 2011       FY 2012
             Estimated       80%       80%            70%       70%           70%        70%        70%           70%
               Actual        68%       68%


     1.4   Key performance Measure Title: Aging Service Volunteers
           Description: Number of aging service volunteers
                         FY 2005    FY 2006      FY 2007   FY 2008          FY 2009     FY 2010      FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated      11,500     11,500       12,000    12,000           12,000      12,000       12,000      12,000
             Actual       12,106     11,959


Goal 2: OKDHS will provide services that support and strengthen the family and protect
its members.
      2.1 Key performance Measure Title: Prevention Services
          Description: Percent of families receiving prevention services with no additional confirmed
          Investigations or assessments within 12 months of case closure.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006       FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010     FY 2011       FY 2012
           Estimated        90%       90%           90%         90%         90%          90%         90%          90%
             Actual         85%       80%


     2.2   Key performance Measure Title: Child Care Centers Subsidy Utilization
           Description: Percent of children utilizing subsidy at centers with licenses at level two or higher.
                         FY 2005     FY 2006        FY 2007     FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY 2011   FY 2012
           Estimated      91%           93%           96%         100%         100%         100%         100%     100%
             Actual       90%           90%




                                                                                                                     55
Goal 2: OKDHS will provide services that support and strengthen the family and protect
its members.
      2.3 Key performance Measure Title: Child Care Homes Subsidy Utilization
          Description: Percent of children utilizing subsidy at homes licensed at level two or higher.
                        FY 2005     FY 2006        FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010     FY 2011      FY 2012
           Estimated                   57%           65%         73%         82%          90%          95%        100%
             Actual       53%          51%


     2.4    Key performance Measure Title: Total Capacity Child Care Centers
            Description: Percent of child care slots among centers at level two or higher.
                          FY 2005     FY 2006       FY 2007    FY 2008       FY 2009     FY 2010     FY 2011     FY 2012
            Estimated                    68%          75%        80%          85%          90%        95%         100%
              Actual       66%           68%


     2.5    Key performance Measure Title: Total Capacity Child Care Homes
            Description: Percent of slots among homes with licenses at level two or higher.
                          FY 2005      FY 2006    FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010       FY 2011     FY 2012
            Estimated                    35%       45%          55%          65%         78%          90%         100%
              Actual       32%           35%


     2.6    Key performance Measure Title: Paternities Established
            Description: Percent of paternities established
                          FY 2005     FY 2006       FY 2007 FY 2008         FY 2009      FY 2010     FY 2011     FY 2012
            Estimated       90%         90%          90%       90%           90%          90%         90%         90%
              Actual       107%         96%


     2.7    Key performance Measure Title: Child Support Orders
            Description: Percent of child support cases with child support ordered.
                          FY 2005     FY 2006      FY 2007     FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010     FY 2011     FY 2012
            Estimated      72%           72%         72%          72%         72%         72%         72%         72%
              Actual       69%           70%


     2.8    Key performance Measure Title: Child Support Collected
            Description: Percent of current child support collectibles collected.
                          FY 2005     FY 2006       FY 2007     FY 2008       FY 2009    FY 2010     FY 2011     FY 2012
            Estimated                   50%          51%           51%          51%       51%         51%         51%
              Actual       50%          52%


     2.9    Key performance Measure Title: Priority 1 investigations Initiation
            Description: Percent of Priority 1 child abuse and neglect reports initiated within 24 hours.
                          FY 2005     FY 2006        FY 2007    FY 2008     FY 2009       FY 2010      FY 2011   FY 2012
            Estimated                    98%           98%        98%          98%           98%          98%     98%
              Actual       90%           95%


    2.10    Key performance Measure Title: Priority 1 Investigations Completed
            Description: Percent of Priority 1 child abuse and neglect reports investigations completed within
            60 days.
                          FY 2005     FY 2006        FY 2007    FY 2008     FY 2009       FY 2010    FY 2011     FY 2012
             Estimated                   90%           90%        90%          90%          90%        90%        90%
              Actual       69%           74%




                                                                                                                     56
Goal 2: OKDHS will provide services that support and strengthen the family and protect
its members.
     2.11 Key performance Measure Title: Adult Abuse Investigations
          Description: Percent of adult abuse investigations initiated within established time frame.
                        FY 2005     FY 2006      FY 2007      FY 2008       FY 2009     FY 2010     FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated                  95%         96%           96%           96%         96%         96%       96%
             Actual       97%         96%


    2.12    Key performance Measure Title: Long Term Care Investigations
            Description: Percent of adult long term care investigations initiated within 30 days.
                          FY 2005     FY 2006      FY 2007      FY 2008       FY 2009      FY 2010   FY 2011   FY 2012
            Estimated                   95%          85%          85%           85%          85%      85%       85%
              Actual       29%          59%


    2.13    Key performance Measure Title: Ombudsman Volunteer hours
            Description: Number of nursing home ombudsman volunteer hours
                          FY 2005    FY 2006    FY 2007  FY 2008     FY 2009             FY 2010     FY 2011   FY 2012
            Estimated      16,000     16,000     15,000   15,000      15,000              15,000      15,000    15,000
              Actual       16,162     14,474


    2.14    Key performance Measure Title: Nursing Home Allegations
            Description: Percent of nursing home allegations addressed without referral to law enforcement.
                          FY 2005     FY 2006    FY 2007      FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010      FY 2011    FY 2012
            Estimated       90%         90%         90%         90%        90%           90%         90%        90%
              Actual       100%        100%


    2.15    Key performance Measure Title: Children Stable Living Environment
            Description: Of children in out of home care six months or longer, the percent who have remained
            in the same placement for six months or more.
                           FY 2005     FY 2006     FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010    FY 2011     FY 2012
             Estimated      65%          65%         70%         70%          70%         70%         70%       70%
               Actual       68%          70%


    2.16    Key performance Measure Title: Permanency Planning
            Description: Percent of permanency planning cases with no additional confirmed investigations
            Or assessment within 12 months of case closure.
                          FY 2005     FY 2006    FY 2007    FY 2008     FY 2009       FY 2010     FY 2011      FY 2012
            Estimated      90%          90%        93%        93%          93%          93%         93%         93%
              Actual       94%          93%


    2.17    Key performance Measure Title: Trial Adoption
            Description: Percent of children with goal of adoption who are in trial adoption.
                          FY 2005     FY 2006      FY 2007      FY 2008     FY 2009       FY 2010    FY 2011   FY 2012
            Estimated      50%           50%         50%          50%          50%          50%       50%       50%
              Actual       49%           41%


    2.18    Key performance Measure Title: Adoption
            Description: Number of custody children who are authorized for adoptive placement.
                          FY 2005    FY 2006      FY 2007    FY 2008      FY 2009     FY 2010        FY 2011   FY 2012
            Estimated                              1,400      1,400        1,400        1,400         1,400     1,400
              Actual       1,151      1,336




                                                                                                                   57
Goal 3: OKDHS will provide services in home and community-based settings.
     3.1 Key performance Measure Title: Caregiver Vouchers Issued
          Description: Number of caregiver vouchers issued.
                        FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007      FY 2008 FY 2009        FY 2010    FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated                             180          180     180            180        180         180
            Actual        166         177


     3.2   Key performance Measure Title: Caregiver Vouchers Paid.
           Description: Number of caregiver vouchers that are paid.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007      FY 2008   FY 2009     FY 2010    FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated                              120          120       120         120        120         120
             Actual        131        116


     3.3   Key performance Measure Title: Home Delivered Meals
           Description: Number of home delivered meals served through Aging Services Division
                         FY 2005    FY 2006    FY 2007     FY 2008    FY 2009     FY 2010     FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated     1,850,000 1,920,000 1,920,000 1,920,000 1,920,000 1,920,000 1,920,000            1,920,000
             Actual      1,915,687 1,918,850


     3.4   Key performance Measure Title: Congregate Meals Served
           Description: Number of congregate meals through senior nutrition programs.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006    FY 2007     FY 2008       FY 2009    FY 2010   FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated     2,400,000 2,350,000 2,350,000 2,350,000 2,350,000 2,350,000          2,350,000   2,350,000
             Actual      2,511,437  2,345894


     3.5   Key performance Measure Title: Adult Day Services
           Description: Number of persons in adult day services.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007      FY 2008   FY 2009     FY 2010    FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated       700        900          700         700       700         700        700         700
             Actual        669        630


     3.6   Key performance Measure Title: Senior transportation
           Description: Number of riderships (persons served) provided by 5310 Transportation program
                         FY 2005     FY 2006     FY 2007    FY 2008      FY 2009    FY 2010     FY 2011   FY 2012
           Estimated     1,500,000 1,700,000 1,700,000 1,742,500 1,742,500 1,742,500 1,742,500            1,742,500
             Actual      1,582,179 1,888,359


     3.7   Key performance Measure Title: Advantage Waiver
           Description: Number of persons served through the Advantage Waiver and Personal Care Plan
           Rather than living in nursing homes.
                           FY 2005     FY 2006  FY 2007     FY 2008   FY 2009     FY 2010    FY 2011      FY 2012
           Estimated        18,000      25,000   20,000      22,000    24,000      26,000     28,000       30,000
             Actual         13,988      16,998


     3.8   Key performance Measure Title: New Enrollees Advantage Waiver
           Description: Number of new persons served through the Advantage Waiver and Personal Care Plan
           Rather than living in nursing homes.
                           FY 2005     FY 2006  FY 2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated        6,000        8,000   8,000      8,000       8,000      8,000      8,000      8,000
             Actual         4,344        7,767




                                                                                                               58
Goal 3: OKDHS will provide services in home and community-based settings.
     3.9 Key performance Measure Title: Case Management Satisfaction
          Description: Number of persons with developmental disabilities satisfied with case management.
                        FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007    FY 2008       FY 2009       FY 2010   FY 2011        FY 2012
           Estimated                  93%        95%        95%           95%           95%       95%           95%
            Actual        93%         96%


    3.10   Key performance Measure Title: Community Based Services
           Description: Number of persons with developmental disabilities receiving community-based services
           Through the waiver.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007    FY 2008       FY 2009      FY 2010   FY 2011     FY 2012
            Estimated                            5,100       5,200         5,300       5,400     5,500       5,600
             Actual       4,448      4,944


    3.11   Key performance Measure Title: Waiting List
           Description: Number of persons with developmental disabilities on the waiting list for waiver services.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007    FY 2008       FY 2009      FY 2010       FY 2011      FY 2012
           Estimated                 3,853       3,000       3,000         3,000       3,000          3,000        3,000
             Actual       3,853      2,860


    3.12   Key performance Measure Title: Children with Developmental Disabilities
           Description: Number of children with developmental disabilities being served through family subsidy.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006      FY 2007    FY 2008       FY 2009     FY 2010     FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated                  1,735       1,735       1,735         1,735       1,735      1,735        1,735
             Actual       1,735       1,698


    3.13   Key performance Measure Title: Families Receiving Services
           Description: Number of families with developmentally disabled children being served with Family
           Support Subsidy.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006      FY 2007    FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010     FY 2011      FY 2012
            Estimated                              1,700      1,700       1,700        1,700       1,700        1,700
             Actual                  1,686


Goal 4: OKDHS will promote health care accessibility.
     4.1 Key performance Measure Title: Short Term Health Benefits (20 days or more)
          Description: Number intermediate health benefits (20 days or more)
                        FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007      FY 2008     FY 2009 FY 2010            FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated                           127,702      127,702     127,702 127,702            127,702     127,702
            Actual       74,382    127,702


     4.2   Key performance Measure Title: Long Term Health Benefits
           Description: Number of long term health benefits (20 days or more)
                         FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007       FY 2008    FY 2009       FY 2010     FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated                             15,581        15,581     15,581        15,581      15,581      15,581
             Actual       15,416     15,581


     4.3   Key performance Measure Title: Short Term Health Benefits
           Description: Number short term health benefits (20 days or less)
                         FY 2005   FY 2006      FY 2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010     FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated                             95,823       95,823       95,823       95,823      95,823      95,823
             Actual                  95,823


     4.4   Key performance Measure Title: Processing Medicaid Applications
           Description: Number of Medicaid applications processed.
                         FY 2005   FY 2006      FY 2007     FY 2008  FY 2009           FY 2010     FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated                            239,106     239,106   239,106          239,106     239,106     239,106
             Actual                239,106




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Goal 5: OKDHS will continuously improve systems and processes to support
achievement of agency goals.
     5.1 Key performance Measure Title: Food Stamp Applications
          Description: percent of Food Stamp applications processed within time standards.
                        FY 2005     FY 2006    FY 2007      FY 2008    FY 2009      FY 2010        FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated      95%         95%        97%          97%        97%         97%            97%        97%
            Actual        97%         97%


     5.2   Key performance Measure Title: Food Stamp Accuracy
           Description: Percent of Food Stamp benefits determined accurately.
                         FY 2005     FY 2006   FY 2007      FY 2008    FY 2009        FY 2010      FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated      94%         94%        94%          94%        94%           94%          94%        94%
             Actual       94%         94%


     5.3   Key performance Measure Title: Child Care Certifications
           Description: Percent of child care program certifications processed within required time frame.
                         FY 2005     FY 2006      FY 2007      FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010     FY 2011   FY 2012
           Estimated      95%           95%         95%           95%        95%         95%           95%     95%
             Actual       94%           92%


     5.4   Key performance Measure Title: Medicaid Processing
           Description: Percent of Medicaid benefits processed within required time frame.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007      FY 2008     FY 2009       FY 2010     FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated      95%         95%          95%         95%          95%         95%         95%        95%
             Actual       94%         92%


     5.5   Key performance Measure Title: Travel Claims
           Description: percent of compliance to standard for prompt payment of travel invoices.
                         FY 2005     FY 2006     FY 2007      FY 2008    FY 2009     FY 2010       FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated       96%        96%           96%         96%       96%           96%         96%        96%
             Actual        96%        97%


     5.6   Key performance Measure Title: Administrative Claims
           Description: Percent of compliance to standard for prompt payment of administrative claims.
                         FY 2005     FY 2006     FY 2007      FY 2008   FY 2009     FY 2010       FY 2011     FY 2012
           Estimated      95%         95%          95%          95%       95%         95%           95%        95%
             Actual       79%         94%


     5.7   Key performance Measure Title: Foster Care Claims
           Description: Percent of foster care claims processed in targeted time frame.
                         FY 2005     FY 2006       FY 2007    FY 2008     FY 2009     FY 2010      FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated      95%           95%         95%         95%          95%        95%         95%        95%
             Actual       99%           99%


     5.8   Key performance Measure Title: Facility Inspections
           Description: Number of building inspections completed
                         FY 2005    FY 2006      FY 2007    FY 2008       FY 2009     FY 2010      FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated       110         110          200        200          200         200          200        200
             Actual        240         214




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Goal 5: OKDHS will continuously improve systems and processes to support
achievement of agency goals.
     5.9 Key performance Measure Title: ADA and Civil rights
          Description: Number of ADA and Civil rights requests by employees
                        FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010     FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated                              100         100        100          100         100        100
            Actual        153        126


    5.10   Key performance Measure Title: Turnover/Retention
           Description: Percent of employee turnover/retention (does not include part time temporary employees).
                         FY 2005     FY 2006    FY 2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010    FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated                              10%           10%         10%          10%        10%        10%
             Actual       14%         14%


    5.11   Key performance Measure Title: Service Calls
           Description: Number of customer service calls received by Data Services Division.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007      FY 2008    FY 2009     FY 2010     FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated                 2,600       2,600         2,600      2,600       2,600      2,600      2,600
             Actual       2,418      2,687


    5.12   Key performance Measure Title: Calls Answered
           Description: Percent of customer service calls answered by Data Services Division.
                         FY 2005     FY 2006     FY 2007     FY 2008    FY 2009     FY 2010     FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated                   90%         90%         90%        90%         90%        90%        90%
             Actual                    90%


    5.13   Key performance Measure Title: Network Availability
           Description: Number of offices with no outages (network availability).
                         FY 2005    FY 2006      FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009    FY 2010     FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated                   92%         92%         92%          92%      92%         92%        92%
             Actual       85%          93%


    5.14   Key performance Measure Title: Network Transaction Time
           Description: Average network transaction response time in seconds.
                         FY 2005    FY 2006     FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009     FY 2010     FY 2011    FY 2012
           Estimated                 0.20         0.20         0.20       0.20       0.20        0.20       0.20
             Actual       0.19       0.16




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62
                                  Appendix D
                     Performance on Previous Key Measures

                            Fiscal Years 2005 through 2010


Goal 1: OKDHS will assist clients to become independent, employed
Productive citizens.
     1   Key performance Measure Title: TANF Cases closed and employed
         Description: Percent of TANF cases closed for reason of employment which have
         Remained closed for more than 12 months.
                       FY 2003     FY 2004    FY 2005     FY 2006       FY 2007  FY 2008           FY 2009   FY 2010
         Estimated                              50%          50%         50%       50%              50%       50%
           Actual       56%         48%         48%       not available


     2   Key performance Measure Title: Child Support Collections
         Description: Percent of current child support collections collected.
                       FY 2003     FY 2004       FY 2005     FY 2006       FY 2007     FY 2008     FY 2009   FY 2010
         Estimated                                50%           55%         60%         65%         70%       80%
           Actual       48%          49%          50%           52%


     3   Key performance Measure Title: Adoptions Finalized
         Description: Percent of children in trial adoption who achieved a finalized adoption.
                       FY 2003     FY 2004        FY 2005     FY 2006    FY 2007       FY 2008     FY 2009   FY 2010
         Estimated                                  70%         71%         72%         73%         74%       75%
           Actual       41%           68%           66%         66%


Goal 2: OKDHS will provide services that support and strengthen the family
And protect its members.
     1   Key performance Measure Title: Prevention
         Description: Percent of families receiving prevention services with no additional
         Confirmed investigations or assessments within 12 months of case closure.
                       FY 2003      FY 2004      FY 2005     FY 2006     FY 2007      FY 2008      FY 2009   FY 2010
         Estimated                                 90%         90%         90%          90%         90%       90%
           Actual        88%          84%          85%         80%


     2   Key performance Measure Title: Child Support orders
         Description: Percent of child support cases with child support ordered.
                       FY 2003     FY 2004      FY 2005     FY 2006      FY 2007       FY 2008     FY 2009   FY 2010
         Estimated                                72%          74%         76%          78%         80%       80%
           Actual       71%           70%         69%          70%


     2   Key performance Measure Title: Child Care Quality
         Description: Percent of child care facilities with licenses at level two or higher.
                       FY 2003     FY 2004        FY 2005       FY 2006      FY 2007     FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010
         Estimated                                   35%          45%          60%          75%     90%       100%
           Actual       21%           29%            35%          40%




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Goal 3: OKDHS will provide services in home and community-based settings.
     1   Key performance Measure Title: Permanence
         Description: Percent of children in out-of-home care during the month who achieved
         Permanence within 12 months.
                       FY 2003     FY 2004       FY 2005    FY 2006      FY 2007   FY 2008      FY 2009     FY 2010
          Estimated                                26%        26%         30%        32%         34%         35%
           Actual       42%           24%          24%        26%


     2   Key performance Measure Title: Home Care for Elderly
         Description: Percent of persons 65+ who are nursing facility residents will be at or
         Below the national average.
         (this is no longer tracked by Oklahoma State Department of Health).
                         FY 2003      FY 2004     FY 2005      FY 2006   FY 2007      FY 2008   FY 2009     FY 2010
          Estimated                                4.80%        4.60%                  4.20%                 4.20%
            Actual        5.20%             *** Not available ***


     3   Key performance Measure Title: Waiting list
         Description: The number of persons with developmental disabilities on the waiting list for
         services.
                       FY 2003   FY 2004     FY 2005     FY 2006      FY 2007      FY 2008        FY 2009   FY 2010
          Estimated                            4,325      4,500          4,700      4,900           5,100    5,300
           Actual       3,419      4,081       3,853      2,860


Goal 4: OKDHS will promote health care accessibility.
     1   Key performance Measure Title: Timeliness
         Description: Percent of Medicaid cases processed in targeted time frame.
                       FY 2003    FY 2004     FY 2005     FY 2006      FY 2007    FY 2008       FY 2009     FY 2010
         Estimated                               95%        95%          95%       95%           95%         95%
           Actual       86%         91%          94%        87%


     2   Key performance Measure Title: Eligibles Served
         Description: Percent of eligible children enrolled in Medicaid
         (this can no longer be tracked by the agency)
                         FY 2003     FY 2004      FY 2005      FY 2006    FY 2007   FY 2008     FY 2009     FY 2010
          Estimated
            Actual       75.25%             *** Not available ***


Goal 5: OKDHS will continuously improve systems and processes to
support achievement of agency goals.
     1   Key performance Measure Title: Key Indicators Met
         Description: Percent of performance measures attained.
                       FY 2003     FY 2004    FY 2005     FY 2006         FY 2007   FY 2008     FY 2009     FY 2010
         Estimated                             50%          50%            50%       50%         50%         50%
           Actual       41%          43%       33%          13%




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