ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH D PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Document Description and Purpose The information contained in this document will be used to complete the substantive de

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ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH D PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Document Description and Purpose The information contained in this document will be used to complete the substantive de Powered By Docstoc
					       ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
        PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE


Document Description and Purpose
The information contained in this document will be used to complete the substantive
degree program request for the THECB. It will also be used as the foundation for the
development of a catalog description for the UTEP Graduate Catalog if the program
request is approved. Finally, this document is used to capture internal policies that
will be set by the department to guide the administration of the proposed doctoral
program. This document describes the proposed program costs, evaluation, need,
potential, and resources




Effect on Existing Programs

Doctoral study in computer science at UTEP is currently conducted as one of two
tracks in the existing doctoral program in computer engineering. The computer
engineering doctoral program is shared between the Department of Computer
Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. This proposal,
in association with the proposal for the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, would make
the tracks explicit programs, make the programs more attractive to students, and
improve the programs' ease of administration.

Both departments, because they are already administering tracks of the existing
program, already have sufficient graduate faculty. The Department of Computer
Science has, as of the fall of 2002, eleven graduate faculty, of whom six are tenured.

In the last four years, UTEP has graduated four Ph.D.s from the computer-science
track of the existing doctoral program in computer engineering. Our graduates are
now teaching at Texas Tech University, New Mexico State University, Sam Houston
State University, and Tec de Monterrey. The CS track has 12 Ph.D. students as of
the fall of 2002. This track would be converted into an explicit Ph.D. program under
this proposal.

Program Need and Demand

The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) has long been recognized as a national
leader in the education of Hispanic students. UTEP is accredited through the doctoral
level by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools. The University consists of seven colleges (Business Administration,
Education, Engineering, Health Sciences, Liberal Arts, Science, and University
College) and the Graduate School. More than 80 baccalaureate and 72 master's
degrees are currently authorized, as are eight doctoral degrees, in Geological
Sciences, Computer Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Psychology,
Environmental Science and Engineering, Biological Sciences, History, Educational
Leadership and Administration.



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           ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
            PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Because of its location, and the quality of its academic programs, UTEP is in a unique
position to contribute significantly to the production of Hispanic professionals and to
develop the future Hispanic leadership of this country. In Fall 2002, the University
enrolled 17,232 students, an all-time record enrollment and an increase of more
than 6 percent over Fall 2001. UTEP's ethnic composition has come to mirror that of
the community it serves: today over 70 percent of UTEP's students are Hispanic,
compared to less than 30 percent less 20 years ago. Other underrepresented
minorities are enrolled in proportions paralleling their representation in the
community (African Americans, 2.4 percent and Native Americans, 0.2 percent).
Mexican nationals, most commuting from homes across the Rio Grande in Cd.
Juarez, comprise 10 percent of UTEP's student population. UTEP is also a majority-
female institution. In Fall 2002, approximately 55 percent of UTEP’s students are
women.

UTEP receives national visibility for its commitment to combine access to groups
historically under-represented in higher education with excellence in instruction and
the quality and competitiveness of its graduates. In 1993, UTEP received the
Institutional Achievement Award from the National Science Foundation's Directorate
for Education and Human Resources for its efforts to increase under-represented
minority participation in mathematics, science, and engineering; and in 1995 NSF
named UTEP a Model Institution for Excellence (MIE). According to a recent study
(Baker, 2000), UTEP leads the nation in the production of Hispanic baccalaureate
degree recipients who go on to earn doctorates in science and engineering. During
the period studied by Quintana Baker (1994-1997), 44 Hispanic graduates of UTEP
received their doctoral degrees. Twelve of those were women, making UTEP a
national leader in the production of Latina Ph.D.’s.

The proposed doctoral program in Computer Science is designed to address the
following:

1. Need for highly trained workforce

According to the Texas Higher Education Closing the Gaps plan1, Texas needs to
develop a highly trained workforce to meet the challenges of the future. This can be
realized if the number of college graduates increases dramatically, especially in
technical fields. Given the demographic trends in the state, this can only be
achieved if the state substantially increases the proportion of college graduates
among minority populations, and particularly Hispanics. The level of Hispanic
participation is extremely low in the existing six computer science Ph.D. programs in
Texas. According to the CRA 2000-2001 Taulbee Survey2, 1 percent of graduating
Ph.D.s in computer science and engineering in the last year were Hispanic. Data on
the ethnicity of Ph.D. program enrollments indicates that only 1 percent of the
students enrolled in doctoral programs in computer science and engineering are
Hispanics.



1
    http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/AdvisoryCommittees/HEP/0096.htm

2
    http://www.cra.org/statistics/


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           ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
            PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
2. Need for diverse faculty

To meet the goal of increasing the number of graduates in particular computer
science, Texas institutions of higher learning will require the recruitment of
substantial numbers of new faculty. Moreover, if universities are to achieve the goal
of dramatically increasing the numbers of minority graduates, it will be important to
diversify the current faculty. Since 1984, when the Taulbee Survey started to track
Hispanics as an ethnic group, 6,737 doctorates have been granted to White, Non-
Hispanics, while only 229 have been granted to Hispanics.3 By educating Hispanic
Ph.D. students, and students from other underrepresented minority groups, the
UTEP Computer Science Department will be able to increase the current very small
number of Hispanics who have received Ph.D’s in our field.

3. Need for a research presence in the El Paso-Juárez area

UTEP is fast gaining recognition as a model Urban/Regional Research University. In
its 2000 Classification of Institutions of Higher Learning, the Carnegie Foundation
ranked UTEP in the Doctoral/Research University-Intensive category, placing it
among the top seven percent of all colleges and universities in the country. The
development of advanced degree programs will be crucial to UTEP’s goal of
developing and maintaining a major research presence in the El Paso-Juárez and
border regions. UTEP is already fifth in the state among universities in terms of
federal external funding, but the development of additional doctoral programs is
critical if that performance is to be sustained.

4. Need for expanding the higher educational opportunities for the citizens of the El
   Paso area

El Paso is geographically distant from most other major cities. A doctoral degree
program in computer science at UTEP would provide educational opportunities to
those El Pasoans who do not wish to leave the region to pursue expertise in this
field. Moreover, creating local expertise in computer science will encourage regional,
economic and educational development.

Program Potential

The CS Department is currently authorized to have 13 graduate faculty, and we
expect to be at full strength by the fall of 2003. Assuming that each faculty member
can advise a maximum of three doctoral students, the program would have a total
enrollment of 36 students, up from the current enrollment of 12 in the CS track of
the shared doctoral program in computer engineering. If a student takes, on
average, six years to graduate, and if half of the admitted students eventually
graduate, then the program has the potential of producing at least six (and up to
nine, depending on when students leave the program) computer science Ph.D.s per
year.



3
    http://www.cra.org/info/taulbee/ethnicity.html



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       ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
        PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
If even half of the program's graduates are Hispanic (which is reasonable,
considering that about 75 percent of UTEP's B.S. graduates in computer science are
Hispanic), then this program alone would produce an average increase of 20-25
percent in the number of Hispanic Ph.D.s annually in the United States.

In the longer term, UTEP expects to roughly double the size of its undergraduate
program, which should result in increased numbers of graduate faculty in the
Department of Computer Science. To the extent that the number of graduate faculty
increase, we can expect a corresponding increase in the number of students enrolled
in and graduated from the proposed doctoral program. For example, if the number
of graduate faculty were eventually increased to 20, then the program would have a
capacity of 60 students and would likely graduate 10 to 12 students per year.

Resources

The department currently has adequate resources for launching the Ph.D. program in
computer science because it is already running the CS track of the doctoral program
in computer engineering. As the program grows, it will eventually need additional
space for (1) research laboratories and (2) offices for doctoral students. There
should not be significant additional need for student support, as the undergraduate
CS program requires approximately 20 teaching assistants, and the faculty expect to
transition the students from TA-ships to RA-ships as the population of doctoral
students grows and the department's faculty continue to receive research awards.

Costs

There are no new short-term costs associated with this proposal. The proposed
doctoral program in Computer Science corresponds to the existing computer science
track of UTEP's doctoral program in computer engineering. New long-term costs
associated with the program, such as for laboratories, offices and student support,
may exceed the projected costs for the existing program as the increased
attractiveness of a degree explicitly in computer science (rather than as a CS track in
a CS program) may promote a disproportionate increase in enrollments up to the
maximums discussed above with respect to potential.




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       ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
        PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
                                       Part II
Mission of Computer Science Graduate Program

The mission of the Computer Science graduate program is to:

   prepare students to meet the needs of our industrial, academic, and
    governmental constituencies through a balanced approach to education and
    research;
   support research programs of excellence in computer science with special
    attention to the needs of regional institutions;
   attract qualified students from the U.S., Mexico, and abroad who will benefit from
    studying in a diverse community; and
   provide an environment for students that will keep them informed of funding,
    educational and other opportunities that will enhance their graduate experience.

Educational Objectives

Students who graduate from the Computer Science Ph.D. program will:

   have a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles and practices of
    computer science;
   be able to contribute to the state-of-the-art of computer science;
   possess the skills to become researchers and teachers who can excel in both the
    academic and professional spheres of computer science
   have a clear understanding of the professional, ethical, and societal implications
    of computer science research; and
   appreciate the inherent interdisciplinary nature of computer science.

Administration

Administration of the program will be consistent with the guidelines contained in the
University of Texas at El Paso By-Laws for Graduate Education. The Departmental
Committee of Graduate Studies in the Department of Computer Science within the
College of Engineering will administer the program. The Departmental Committee of
Graduate Studies consists of all graduate faculty in the department, including the
department chair.

The computer science Graduate Program Committee, which consists of the Graduate
Advisor and three other graduate faculty of the Computer Science Department, will
review and make recommendations on policies regarding the graduate program and
will maintain on-going review of the program. The members of the Graduate
Program Committee will be elected by the Departmental Committee of Graduate
Studies to serve for a term of 3 years. All recommendations made by the Graduate
Program Committee will be subject to approval by the Departmental Committee of
Graduate Studies.




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       ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
        PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Admissions

Applicants will apply through the Graduate School at the University of Texas at El
Paso. The student must meet the requirements set forth by the Graduate School. In
addition, the Admissions Committee, consisting of the Graduate Advisor of the
Computer Science Department and three other members of the graduate faculty, will
evaluate all student applications, and make decisions concerning the admittance of
students to the program. The Admissions Committee will assess the following
materials to make admission recommendations to the Graduate School:

   Graduate School Application
   Official transcripts of all previous academic work
   Official scores on the Graduate Record Exam
   Official scores on the TOEFL: international applicants whose first language is not
    English or who have not completed a university degree in the U.S. or other
    English speaking institution will be required to submit scores on the Test of
    English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).
   A Statement of Purpose: applicants must submit a statement of no more than
    800 words addressing the following questions:

       o   What areas of computer science do you wish to study and why?
       o   How has your background prepared you for advanced work in computer
           science?
       o   From what you know about the Computer Science Department at the
           University of Texas at El Paso, how does your research interest(s) match
           with current faculty research interests?
       o   What are your long-term career goals?

   Letters of recommendation: applicants must submit two (2) letters of
    recommendation from individuals qualified to judge the applicant’s potential for
    doctoral work. Each letter should address:

       o   the applicant’s ability to sustain a steady and focused effort over a long
           period of time and over a broad range of tasks and responsibilities;
       o   examples of the applicant’s analytical capabilities and intellectual
           curiosity;
       o   description of a situation in which the applicant has demonstrated
           initiative and the ability to understand his or her own strengths and
           weaknesses;
       o   description of the applicant’s behavior as part of a research or work team
           in a supervised environment;
       o   evidence of research interests that are compatible and consistent with the
           research foci of the department; and
       o   other evidence of relevant personal or professional experience.

   Any other material that supports your application, for example, published papers,
    conference presentations, or patents.

Applicants must have completed a bachelor’s or master’s degree in computer science
or a closely related discipline. Exceptional students with non-computer science

                                                                                         6
         ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
          PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
backgrounds may be conditionally admitted to the program. The Admissions
Committee will review the records of such applicants, determine preparation
deficiencies, and make specific recommendations for leveling courses. Leveling
courses cannot be applied toward the degree requirements. It is the student’s
responsibility to remedy any prerequisite deficiencies for the leveling courses.

[Internal policy-- Students will not be considered for admission to the program if
they have not successfully completed Data Structures. Operating Systems and
Database Management Systems must part of the student’s previous or current
program of study.]

Students admitted conditionally must complete their leveling courses in one year
with a grade-point average (GPA) of 3.5 or better. Only the most recent grade on a
repeated course will be used in GPA calculation. Leveling courses typically include the
courses listed in Table I.

                               Table I: Leveling Courses

    Course                                                      Semester Credit
                                                                Hours (SCH)
    MATH 2300: Discrete Mathematics                             3

    CS 3350: Automata, Computability and Formal Languages       3

    CS 3320: Computer Architecture                              3

    CS 3360: Design and Implementation of Programming           3
    Languages

Advising

The Graduate Advisor

The Departmental Committee of Graduate Studies will elect the Graduate Advisor,
subject to the approval of the Department Chair, the Dean of the Academic College,
and the Head of the Graduate School. The Graduate Advisor will meet with each
incoming student and assist in the development of a program of study and research.
The Graduate Advisor will:

     evaluate transcripts of incoming students to determine what coursework, if any,
      can be applied to the course requirements of the program;
     represent the Graduate School and the Committee on Graduate Studies in all
      matters pertaining to the advising of graduate students taking major work in
      computer science;
     ensure that policies set by the Departmental Committee on Graduate Studies and
      the Graduate School are followed;
     advise each graduate student on registration, adds, drops, section changes, and
      special examinations;
     maintain a record of each student's work for previous degrees along with copies
      of registrations and grades completed at this University; and

                                                                                     7
        ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
         PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
   make recommendations to the Graduate School for exceptions.

The Academic Mentor

The Admissions Committee will assign a member of the graduate faculty to serve as
a student’s Academic Mentor at the time the student is admitted into the program.
The duties of the Academic Mentor are met once the student has a Dissertation
Advisor. The Academic Mentor will:

   ensure that the student is involved in a research group;
   assist students in choosing courses to meet his or her degree requirements;
   monitor the student’s progress on the degree requirements, including the
    programming, oral communication, seminar and written requirements, and
   sign the student’s application to sit for the Qualifying Examination.

[Internal policy—The department encourages the Academic Mentor to discuss
Qualifying Examination preparation with the student.]

The Dissertation Advisor:

A student formally requests that a graduate faculty member serve as his or her
Dissertation Advisor by filing a Declaration of Dissertation Advisor form with the
Graduate Advisor. The Dissertation Advisor assumes the responsibilities of the
Academic Mentor. In addition, the Dissertation Advisor will:

   work with the student to form a Doctoral Advisory Committee subject to approval
    by Graduate School; and
   supervise and guide the student’s dissertation research.

Doctoral Advisory Committee

After completion of the Qualifying Examination, a doctoral candidate will work with
his or her Dissertation Advisor to form a Doctoral Advisory Committee. This
committee will consist of the dissertation advisor, at least two additional members
from the departmental graduate faculty, and at least one member from a
department other than Computer Science. The members of the committee should
have expertise in areas related to the student’s research. The Graduate Program
Committee and the Graduate School must approve the selections. The Doctoral
Advisory Committee will:

       provide guidance and advice on the student’s research, and
       approve or disapprove the final dissertation defense.

Course Requirements

The Ph.D. program requires a minimum of 54 semester-credit hours of coursework,
unless the student enters the program with a Master’s degree in computer science.
In this case, the student will be required to take a minimum of 27 semester-credit


                                                                                      8
       ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
        PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
hours of coursework. In addition, students must complete 24 semester-credit hours
of research and dissertation.

Students meet the course requirements by successfully completing the core courses,
fulfilling the breadth requirement, and by completing five approved technical
electives. No more than six hours of approved senior-level undergraduate course
work may be used to satisfy course requirements.

Core Courses

All students must take the five core courses listed in Table II. See Appendix D for
course descriptions.

                               Table II: Core Courses

 Course                                                                     SCH
 CS 5392:   Graduate Research Methods                                       3
 CS 5303:   Logical Foundations of Computer Science                         3
 CS 5315:   Theory of Computation                                           3
 CS 5341:   Advanced Computer Architecture                                  3
 CS 5350:   Advanced Algorithms                                             3

Breadth Requirement

Students must complete a minimum of two courses from each of the four focus areas
in the curriculum (see Table A in Appendix A). Courses from one focus area may be
applied to another area, in cases when the topics are highly related, with written
approval from the student’s Academic Mentor or Dissertation Advisor.

The breadth requirement ensures that the student understands the fundamental
concepts of the field of computer science, and the ways in which they relate to one
another.

Technical Electives

Students complete their program of study by taking five courses exclusive of those
used to fulfill the core and breadth requirements. The student’s Academic Mentor or
Dissertation Advisor must approve the selected courses. At least three of these
courses must be chosen from the computer science curriculum.

Students are allowed to apply up to two senior-level or graduate-level courses from a
subject area outside of the field of computer science to their degree program. The
student’s Academic Mentor or Dissertation Advisor must approve any interdisciplinary
courses chosen by the student. The intention of the interdisciplinary allowance is to
allow students to acquire a more detailed understanding of a field related to their
research.

[Internal policy- Students will be encouraged to take electives that develop depth in
their research area. In particular, students will be encouraged to take

                                                                                        9
       ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED PH.D.
        PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
interdisciplinary courses that allow them to acquire a more detailed understanding of
a field related to their research.]




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                                                                          DRAFT
                                                               A. SAMPLE DEGREE PLAN4


                                Qualifying                                          Comprehensive
                               Examination                                           Examination




               Year 1                 Year 2                    Year 3                    Year 4                           Year 5
               Fall       Spring      Fall         Spring       Fall         Spring       Fall           Spring            Fall
               Core       Core        Core         Breadth      Breadth      Technical    Technical      Dissertation      Dissertation 5

               Core       Core        Breadth      Breadth      Technical    Technical    Technical      Dissertation      Dissertation

               Breadth    Breadth     Breadth      Breadth      Research     Research     Research       Dissertation



Total SCH      9          9           9            9            9            9            9              9                 6                  78

              Core Courses: Student must enroll in 5 courses for a total of 15 SCH
              Breadth Courses: Student must enroll in 8 courses for a total of 24 SCH
              Technical Electives: Student must enroll in 5 courses for a total of 15 SCH
              Research: Student must enroll in 3 courses for a total of 9 SCH
              Dissertation: Student must enroll in 5 courses for a total of 15 SCH




      4
       This degree plan is designed only to show the required number of semester credit hours for students entering the program with a Bachelor’s degree.
      Courses do not necessarily have to be taken in the order shown here.

      5
       Students may enroll in Dissertation after they have passed the Comprehensive Examination. Only fifteen semester credit hours of Dissertation are
      explicitly required. However, students must continue to enroll in Dissertation until their research in complete.




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Other Degree Requirements

In addition to the course requirements described in the previous section, each
student is required to:

       meet programming, written communication, seminar, and teaching
        requirements;
       pass Qualifying and Comprehensive Examinations; and
       write and orally defend his or her dissertation.

The graduate faculty at the Computer Science Department believe that community
involvement is an important part of the doctoral student experience. Accordingly,
each doctoral student is encouraged to be actively involved in departmental activities
such as outreach programs, mentoring, and other activities.

[Internal Policy—The department’s faculty will define criteria and review formats for
each of the requirements described below.]

Programming Requirement

The student’s Dissertation Advisor and at least one graduate faculty member must
attest to whether the student has demonstrated proficiency in programming. This
may be demonstrated through course projects or research projects. The criteria for
judging proficiency will be set by the Department, and includes appropriate use of
data structures, development of well-structured code, and basic documentation.

This requirement is designed to ensure that graduates of our program are able to
apply the principles and techniques of computer science to the design, development,
and testing of computer programs.

Written Communication Requirement

The student must write at least one scholarly document in which he or she is primary
author. A scholarly document includes any publishable conference or journal paper.
This requirement can be met in one of two ways:

   1. The student submits the paper to at least three graduate program faculty
      members who evaluate its merits based on the criteria set by the department.
      The reviewers must complete a standard review form and provide
      constructive feedback to the student. Recommendations will include
      ―approved,‖ or ―not approved.‖ Two of the three reviewers must approve
      credit for this requirement.
   2. The document has been accepted to a peer-reviewed scientific conference or
      journal, and the student is primary author on the paper.

This requirement is designed to ensure that graduates of our program are able to
communicate technical ideas clearly in writing. Practice and constructive feedback
are essential for developing students’ abilities in written communication.


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                                     DRAFT
Seminar Requirement

Each full-time student is required to attend eight seminars per year. Additionally, the
student is expected to present at least two seminars during his or her doctoral study.
Seminars must be appropriately advertised in advance. As with the written
communication requirement, reviewers must complete a review form that provides
constructive feedback to the student, based on criteria set by the department.

This requirement is designed to ensure that graduates of our program are able to
communicate technical ideas and answer questions in a public forum. Practice and
constructive feedback are essential for developing students’ abilities in oral
communication.

Teaching Requirement

Students will be required to teach (or assist in teaching) a minimum of six (6)
contact hours in a course taught in the Computer Science Department. A member of
the Departmental Committee of Graduate Studies, using criteria set by the
department, will evaluate the student’s teaching ability. This requirement may be
waived for students entering the program with documented teaching experience.

This requirement is designed to allow our graduates to develop their ability to
synthesize, organize and communicate technical material to an audience in such a
way that the audience understands and can apply the concepts taught.

Qualifying Examination

Students entering the program with a Bachelor’s degree in computer science must
pass the Qualifying Examination within three calendar years from the semester of
acceptance into the program. Those entering with a Master’s degree in computer
science must pass the Qualifying Examination within two calendar years from the
semester of acceptance into the program. The Qualifying Examination is offered once
a year and is given prior to the start of the semester. Students will be given two
opportunities to pass the examination.

The Departmental Committee on Graduate Studies will annually publish the topics,
content, objectives, and reading list for the Qualifying Examination. The Qualifying
Examination will consist of four two-hour exams given over two days that cover
content from Computer Architecture and Operating Systems, Data Structures and
Algorithms, Design and Implementation of Programming Languages and Theory of
Computation.

[Internal policy- The Departmental Committee of Graduate Studies must approve
any change to Qualifying Examination topics. The Graduate Program Committee will
coordinate with faculty to ensure that published topics, content, objectives, and
reading list for the exam are current.]

Each exam will have questions that test the student’s knowledge on basic concepts
and questions that require students to integrate and synthesize knowledge. Students

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                                      DRAFT
must pass each exam. In addition, the committee will review each student’s
performance on the examination as a whole. A minimal pass on each topic does not
constitute passing the Qualifying Examination. If the student fails only one exam,
the student may retake that topic; otherwise, the student must retake all exams.

The purpose of the qualifying exam is to ensure that the student is adequately
prepared to begin advanced work in computer science and to determine the
student’s potential for success in the program.

Comprehensive Examination

Upon completion of all course work and after passing the Qualifying Examination, a
Ph.D. candidate will take an oral Comprehensive Examination administered by the
Doctoral Advisory Committee. Typically, this will occur within two years of passing
the Qualifying Examination. Prior to the oral examination, the student will prepare a
written research proposal describing the research problem, the significance and
broader impact of its solution, a review of current related literature, and a research
plan. See Appendix B for an outline and description of the proposal contents.

The purpose of the Comprehensive Examination is to ensure that the student has
identified a research topic and has acquired a sufficient depth of knowledge in the
topic area to perform new and significant research and that this research is feasible
(refer to Appendix C for evaluation guidelines). Upon successful completion of the
Comprehensive Examination, the chair of the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee
will inform the Graduate School that the student is ready to begin work on his/her
final dissertation.

The Dissertation

The dissertation must demonstrate both the ability to do independent research and
competence in scholarly exposition. It should present original investigations at an
advanced level of a significant problem in computer science and should provide the
basis for a publishable contribution to the research literature in the field. Draft copies
of the dissertation must be submitted to the Doctoral Advisory Committee at least
three weeks before the defense and any suggested corrections must be made. Two
copies of the final bound dissertation, and the unbound original, must be submitted
to the Graduate School Office by the posted deadlines. Two bound copies must also
be submitted to the Graduate Advisor.

Dissertation Defense

Candidates for this doctoral degree must write a dissertation under the direction of
the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee. The student's dissertation must exhibit
originality in research, scholarly ability, independent thinking, technical mastery of a
field of study and competence in scholarly exposition. The Doctoral Advisory
Committee together with an additional faculty member from outside the College of
Engineering, approved by and representing the Dean of Graduate School, will
conduct the Final Dissertation Examination.



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Time Limits and Graduate Catalog Changes
All requirements for the degree must be completed within one eight-year period
preceding the awarding of the doctoral degree. Work more than eight years old is
lost and can be reinstated only by special permission of the Graduate School upon
recommendation of the Departmental Committee on Graduate Studies. Further, all
requirements for the doctorate must be completed within five years after passing the
Comprehensive Examination. General and specific requirements for degrees in the
Graduate School may be altered in successive Graduate Catalogs. Provided the
requisite course continues to be offered, the student is bound only by the course
requirements of the catalog in force at the time of admission or readmission within
an eight-year limit, unless, with the approval of the Associate Vice President for
Research and Graduate Studies, the student elects to be bound by the course
requirements of a subsequent catalog. This regulation applies to course requirements
only.


Transfers
Ordinarily most work done for a graduate degree must be done at the University. All
course work transferred from other institutions requires both the approval of the
Committee on Graduate Studies and the Director of Graduate Student Services.
Courses for which a grade of "C" or lower was earned may not be transferred to
UTEP. Correspondence courses are not accepted for graduate credit. All documents
submitted to the University for transfer work purposes become part of the official
files of the University and cannot be released or returned to the student or another
institution.




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                                    DRAFT
Appendix A

                           Classification of Courses

Courses are divided into four focus areas: Systems/High-Performance Computing,
Human-Computer Interaction, Theory, and Software Engineering. Core courses are
not included Table II.

                     Table A: Courses Grouped by Focus Area

  Systems/High-       Human-Computer              Theory            Software
   Performance          Interaction                                Engineering
    Computing
CS 5310:             CS 5314: Artificial   CS 5322: Topics in   CS 5383:Topics in
Computer Graphics    Intelligence I        Advanced Database    Software Assurance
                                           Systems
CS 5334: Parallel    CS 5317: Human                             CS 5381:Topics in
and Concurrent       Computer              CS 5351:Interval     Software Design
Programming          Interaction           Computations
                                                                CS 5382:Topics in
CS 5352:Computer     CS 5319:Topics in     CS 5353: Topics in   Software
Security             Language              Emerging             Development
                     Processing            Computing
CS 5337:Topics in                          Paradigms            CS 538X:
Advanced             CS 5318:Topics in                          Advanced Software
Interconnection      Interactive           CS 5354: Topics in   Engineering
Networks             Systems               Intelligent
                                           Computing
CS 5340: Advanced    CS 5336:Scientific
Operating Systems    and Program
                     Visualization


Note: Core courses are not included in Table A.




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Appendix B
                      Research Proposal Outline

Title Page

Abstract

Include a brief description of the proposed work. The abstract should be
approximately 200-400 words.

Introduction

This section should briefly and directly state the problem to be addressed and the
objectives to be achieved or hypothesis to be studied. The problem or challenge to
be addresed must be succinctly and clearly articulated in language approchable by
non-experts in the problem area. You should assume that the readers are literate,
competent computer scientists, but not necessiarily well versed in this specific area.
The objective or hypothesis should succinctly state what you plan to prove or
achieve.

Background

This section should present a motivation for the work by detailing the problem and
the conditions under which it is manifested. This section must provide sufficient
background that a knowledgeable computer scientist can appreciate the problem and
understand the historical context in which the proposed work is to be conducted.
Prior works directly related to the problem should be described, along with a
discussion of the need for new work in this area. The scope of the research and the
peripheral areas that are excluded from the investigation should be outlined.

Other Related Work

Work that is indirectly related to the problem statement should be described. This
may include approaches or solutions to other problems which may be applied to the
given problem. The combination of Sections 2 and 3 should describe and reference
the state-of-the-art in this area. This section should describe the steps taken to
ensure that the proposed research is unique.

Significance

Describe the significance and contribution of the work.




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Methodology

This section presents the proposed plan of work. Briefly, describe techniques,
approaches, and/or methods that will be used to complete the work. Include the
metrics that will be used to measure the progress and success of the research. Note
milestones and include a timeline. This section should convince the reader that the
approaches are feasible under the time constraints given in the timeline.

References

Use IEEE citation format or another acceptable format from your area of study. See
IEEE Transactions, Journals and Letters: Information for Authors. Available at
http://www.ieee.org/organizations/pubs/transactions/auinfo97.pdf. Another
source is: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (Fifth
Edition), 2001.




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Appendix C
                       Proposal Evaluation Guidelines

Significance of Proposed Work Broader Impact

      Does the proposal convincingly state that the proposed work will produce
       significant results with broader impact?
      Does the proposal provide substantial evidence that the work is unique?

Depth of Knowledge and Soundness of Methodology

      Does the proposal present sufficient background at an appropriate depth to
       provide the basis for the proposed research?
      Is there evidence of sufficient understanding of the topic area to select a
       research method?
      Is a research method described in the proposal?
      Will the research method described address the premise of the work?

Clarity of Presentation

      Are the research problem, objectives, and premise of the work clearly and
       succinctly articulated?
      Is the research method clearly articulated?
      Does the overall quality of writing indicate that the student will be able to
       produce publication quality articles?

Feasibility of Work

      Is a timeline presented?
      Does the proposal convince the reader that the work can be completed within
       the time constraints listed in the timeline?




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Appendix D
                    Computer Science Graduate Courses

      CS 5303 Logical Foundations of Computer Science -- A presentation of
       fundamental tools required in advanced computer science, including topics
       such as propositional and first-order logic, topological properties of networks,
       managing tasks in parallel systems using graphs as well as modeling,
       simulation and queuing processes.

      CS 5310 Computer Graphics -- Computer representation and display of
       graphical information including line, character and curve generation, two and
       three dimensional graphical techniques, interactive methods, and advanced
       topics. Prerequisite: CS 3370 or equivalent.

      CS 5314 Artificial Intelligence I -- A study of first-order logic, including an
       introduction to Prolog, knowledge representation including semantic networks
       and logical representations, query answering, and reasoning
       methods. Prerequisite: CS 4320 or equivalent.

      CS 5315 Theory of Computation -- A review of formal languages and
       models of computation such as Turing machines, followed by an in-depth
       study of undecidability, computational complexity theory, and intractablility.
       Prerequisite: CS 3350 or equivalent

      CS 5317 Human-Computer Interaction -- Presentation of human-
       computer-interaction theory, ethical and societal issues, development
       methods such as user-centered design, prototyping, participatory design,
       evaluation and testing, and user-interface programming.

      CS 5318 Topics in Interactive Systems -- Advanced study of human-
       computer interaction. In-depth treatment of topics such as theoretical
       models of interaction, evaluation of interfaces, dialogue modeling, next-
       generation interfaces, user interface management systems, participatory
       design, groupware, and design of procedures and documentation. May be
       repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite: CS 5317.

      CS 5319 Topics in Language Processing --The study of concepts and
       techniques of computational processing of human language. Topics may
       include natural language processing, spoken language understanding, natural
       language generation, and machine translation and dialogue systems. May be
       repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite: CS 3350.

      CS 5322 Topics in Advanced Database Systems -- A review of relational
       algebra followed by a study of DATALOG and its extensions (negation as
       failure, aggregates), query optimization, dependencies, and object-oriented


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       databases. Prerequisites: CS 5303 and CS 4320.

      CS 5334 Parallel And Concurrent Programming --The study of software
       and hardware architectures for parallel and concurrent systems, including
       multiple processes executing in parallel and the programming of distributed
       systems.

      CS 5336 Scientific and Program Visualization -- In-depth treatment of
       scientific and program visualization techniques, including a survey of
       visualization, fundamentals of visualization and visualization systems,
       applications of color to visualization, and applications of data and program
       visualization techniques.

      CS 5337 Topics in Advanced Interconnection Networks -- Description
       (600 characters): An in-depth treatment of both electrical and optical
       interconnection networks that may be used for parallel processing algorithms
       and systems. Topics covered include interconnection architectures, switching
       and routing techniques and algorithms, and metrics.

      CS 5340 Advanced Operating Systems -- A review of process
       synchronization, deadlocks and memory allocation paradigm, followed by in
       depth coverage of distributed systems, computer security and queuing
       theory. Prerequisites: CS 4375 and instructor approval.

      CS 5341 Advanced Computer Architecture –- A review of the
       fundamentals of computer design and instruction set principles, followed by
       the study of the basic principles underlying the design of today’s computers,
       including advanced pipelining, instruction-level parallelism, memory-hierarchy
       design, storage systems, interconnection networks, and multiprocessors. Real
       examples, measurements on real machines, cost/performance tradeoffs, and
       good engineering design are emphasized.

      CS 5350 Advanced Algorithms – A review of mathematical techniques for
       analysis of computer algorithms, techniques for design of efficient algorithms,
       description and analysis of both well-established and recently developed
       algorithms. Prerequisites: CS 2302 or permission of instructor.

      CS 5351 Interval Computations -- An overview of interval computations
       that take into account how input uncertainties influence the computation
       result. A review of the main ideas behind interval computations, main interval
       techniques, and applications to practical problems such as robotics, computer
       graphics, control, and bioinformatics.

      CS 5352 Computer Security -- General concepts and applied methods of
       computer security, especially as they relate to confidentiality, integrity, and
       availability of information assets. Topics include system security analysis,
       access control and various security models, identification and authentication,


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       protection against external and internal threats, communication protocols and
       Internet security.

      CS 5353 Topics in Emerging Computing Paradigms -- Introduction to
       emerging, revolutionary computing paradigms. Topics may include quantum,
       chemical, and biological computing. May be repeated for credit when topic
       varies.

      CS 5354 Topics in Intelligent Computing --Introduction to advanced
       concepts and techniques of intelligent and soft computing and their
       applications. Topics may include neural computations, fuzzy computations,
       evolutionary computations, intelligent control and intelligent web design. May
       be repeated for credit when topic varies.

      CS 5381 Topics in Software Design -- The study of methods and
       approaches to software design. Topics may include advanced object-oriented
       design, meta-object protocols, software architectures, and design patterns.
       May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisites: CS 4311 or
       instructor approval.

      CS 5382 Topics in Software Development -- The study of the production
       of high-quality software systems. Topics may include process improvement
       models, deductive and inductive program synthesis, clean-room
       programming, and software project management. May be repeated for credit
       when topic varies.

      CS 5383 Topics in Software Assurance -- The study of methods and
       approaches to software quality assurance particularly as it applies to high-
       assurance, high-consequence, and safety-critical systems. Topics may include
       software specification methods, formal methods of software development,
       formal methods in software verification, and high-assurance software
       engineering and system safety. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
       Prerequisites: CS 5303 and CS 4311.

      CS 538X Advanced Software Engineering –(New course to be added;
       description not yet complete.)

      CS 5390 Special Topics -- Advanced topics of contemporary interest in
       Computer Science. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
       Prerequisite: Department approval.

      CS 5391 Individual Studies -- Individual variable-credit research, design or
       analysis on advanced phases of computer science problems conducted under
       the direct supervision of a faculty member. A maximum of 3 credit hours may
       be applied towards the M.S. degree. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

      CS 5392 Graduate Research Methods -- Introduction to research

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       methods, including research paradigms and methodologies across computer
       science, research question formulation, design of research approach,
       literature search and presentation of related work, analysis of results, verbal
       and written presentation skills, and research ethics. Students prepare and
       defend a thesis proposal or project proposal in an area of their choice.

      CS 5394 Graduate Research -- Individual variable-credit research of
       contemporary topics in Computer Science. Prerequisite: Permission of
       Graduate Advisor.

      CS 5694 Graduate Research -- Individual variable-credit research of
       contemporary topics in Computer Science. Prerequisite: Permission of
       Graduate Advisor.

   ·   CS 5396 Graduate Projects -- Individual research, design, or analysis on
       advanced phases of Computer Science conducted under the direct supervision
       of a faculty member. The courses, including a written report, are required of
       all students in the non-thesis option. Prerequisite: instructor approval.
       Prerequisite: Instructor approval.
      CS 5397 Graduate Projects -- Individual research, design, or analysis on
       advanced phases of Computer Science conducted under the direct supervision
       of a faculty member. The courses, including a written report, are required of
       all students in the non-thesis option. Prerequisites: CS 5396 and instructor
       approval

      CS 5398 Thesis –- Initial work on the thesis.

      CS 5399 Thesis –- Continuous enrollment required while work on thesis
       continues. Prerequisite: CS 5398.

      CS 6398 Dissertation – Initial work on dissertation.

      CS 6399 Dissertation – Continuous enrollment required while work on
       dissertation continues. Prerequisite: CS 6398.




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Appendix E

                             Definition of Terms
   1. Academic Mentor

   A member of the graduate faculty of the department who serves as a mentor to
   the doctoral student and who works to guide and advise the student. The
   agreement of the academic mentor and doctoral student to work together must
   be one of mutual consent. The Academic Mentor makes recommendations to the
   Graduate Advisor concerning the courses the student chooses to meet his or her
   breadth, depth, and interdisciplinary requirements, monitors the student’s
   progress on the degree requirements, and signs the student’s application to sit
   for the Qualifying Examination.

   2. Admission to candidacy

   A formal step that occurs after the student has:

           completed formal course work,
           filed a research proposal approved by the Doctoral Advisory, and
           passed the oral Comprehensive Examination.

   3. Contact Hours

   Actual hours spent in classroom lecture.

   4. Departmental Committee of Graduate Studies

   A committee comprised of all graduate faculty in the department, including the
   department’s chair. The Departmental Committee of Graduate Studies is directly
   responsible for administration of the Computer Science Doctoral Program.

   5. Dissertation Advisor

   Once the student had taken and passed the Qualifying Examination, his/her
   Academic Mentor will serve as his/her Dissertation Advisor, and in that capacity
   will work with the student to form a Doctoral Advisory Committee subject to
   approval by Graduate School, and supervise and guide the student’s dissertation
   research.

   6. Doctoral Advisory Committee

   A committee comprised of the student’s academic mentor and at least three
   additional graduate faculty advisors. Of these three, one must be from a
   department other than Computer Science Department.


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   7. Graduate Program Committee

   A committee comprised of the Graduate Advisor and three other qualified
   members of the Computer Science Department. These members will be elected
   by the Departmental Committee of Graduate Studies to serve on the committee
   for a term of 3 years. The Graduate Program Committee is responsible for
   maintaining on-going review of the program, and developing and proposing
   policies regarding the program.




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