Docstoc

Michael Kautzer Portfolio

Document Sample
Michael Kautzer Portfolio Powered By Docstoc
					MICHAELKAUTZERPORTFOLIO

Michael Kautzer Portfolio

The projects that follow show an understanding for the need to closely knit the designed world with the natural world. This is not a necessity but a means for enhancing the experience of both. By placing a relatively fixed element amid those that continually move and change you are able to develop a dynamic yet subtle relationship. This relationship becomes unique to each project and provides you with an interesting character.

SCHOOLOFHUMANECOLOGY
Located along Linden Drive in the center of the University of Wisconsin Madison campus the School of Human Ecology currently comprises a series of separate buildings that not only lack a cohesiveness but are entirely inadequate for the school’s future needs and desires. The needs include adding over 83,000 sq ft to the current 74,000 sq ft of the existing Human Ecology building and providing state of the art facilities for both students and staff. The desires include the creation of a sustainable design that provides the best physical and social environments possible. February 2007

School of Human Ecology

SOHESECTIONALMODEL
The detail model explores the connections, materials, and finishes of the School of Human Ecology addition. It also explores a more important aspect of the design and that is the ways in which vegetation can be integrated into a design. Included is a vine covered trellis, intensive and extensive greenroofs, and indoor plants for purifying the air. September 2007

SoHE Sectional Model

Stormwater Masterplan
University of Wisconsin Milwaukee research project that documented the existing stormwater conditions on campus and outlined ways in which to mitigate the problem. The proposals included a network of rain gardens, greenroofs, and containment systems. May 2006

STORMWATERMASTERPLAN
FINAL REPORT May 5, 2006

UWM as a Zero-Discharge Zone:

A stormwater masterplan for the UWM Campus
An interdisciplinary faculty/ student research project funded by the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District. Additional funding provided by UWM Community Design Solutions.

Associate Professor James Wasley Principle Investigator

mmsd
Preserving The Environment � Improving Water Quality

Stormwater Site Model

S TO R M WAT E R S I T E M O D E L

One of the proposals included in the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee was the redesign of a parking lot/drainage basin. The basin was broken into a series of raingardens that were designed to artfully and scientifically explore the flow of water through the site. March 2007

Humanature ProjectConcept

HUMANATUREPROJECTCONCEPT

As it exists today the world is comprised of two paths of change: one human and intentional and one natural and unintentional. The goal of the human path is to think of the natural path not as being separate and in conflict, but as an interconnected, interdependent, and interrelated interface. In architecture this lack of an interface can’t be anymore striking. Architecture has to be designed according to and in response of natural processes. These natural processes already exhibit strong design concepts and aesthetic qualities that shouldn’t be neglected but embraced. The resulting interface will enrich both the design of a project and the life of the human and natural worlds that could develop into a huma(n)ature. To test the validity of designing with the huma(n)ature concept in mind a site on the National Mall in Washington D.C. was chosen upon which a Biological Center would be built. This center is meant to showcase the world’s biological diversity and how site specific natural biology, along with geology and hydrology, interacts with the built form. May 2007

HUMANATUREPROJECTSITE
The exploration of the site was the first step in understanding what the building/ landscape would be. It also provided the basis for an indepth analysis of the project in more abstract terms such as time, scale, and diversity. Hypothosizing what these concepts mean helps to enrich and offer new insight into its design. For example, projecting how a building will look a hundred years from now allows a certain degree of control over its future.

Humanature Project Site

Humanature Project Plans

HUMANATUREPROJECTPLANS

Plans represent a combination of design principles and personal style that define the project at a given time. They aren’t an end point for the project but a starting point for future development of the ideas involved. There will always be unresolved issues or untested ideas, which is a continuous process just like the natural processes it was meant to explore.

H U M A N AT U R E P R O J E C T S E C T I O N S
Sections through a building provide an anatomical look at its many relationships. Like cutting through the trunk of a tree, a building section offers a glimpse as to how its constructed and operates. Distances, movement patterns, materials, etc. can all be derived from studying it.

Humanature Projects Sections

HUMANATUREPERSPECTIVES
Perspectives provide the most accurate look at a project by showing multiple sides of a building. They also provide a glimpse of what it would be like to be in its presence. Although it is a static representation enough information can be derived to begin a dialogue.

Humanature Perspectives

Nature Frame Concepts

N AT U R E F R A M E C O N C E P T S
Exploring the interface between the intentional design of man and the unintentional design resulting from natural processes increases our understanding of the two. Intentional design in its current state has a great disrespect for its unintentional counterpart due to its isolated development and subsequent disregard for it. Designing something in insolation from the natural order fails to make use of the tremendous variety and depth of design material that exists to help inform and in most cases improve upon a design. Each side has a unique set of qualities that it brings to the table and utilizing both of them helps to produce work with greater character that bridges the divide. In order to understand this concept of the intentional-unintentional interface, one needs to understand each set of design concepts. Intentional design consists of decisions that are made to produce results that are entirely predictable and uniform such as determining the shape, size/scale, and surface of an item. An example of this type of design include: producing dimensional lumber or paint that precisely matches an existing surface. Unintentional design consists of processes, that through interaction, produce results that are unpredictable and unique such as weather patterns, movement of limbs, growth/decay of plants, etc. Examples of this type include the unevenness of tree rings or the patterning of fallen leaves. Although extreme examples of each type of design occur, the reality is that they cannot be separated from each other. The goal is to celebrate this interaction rather than see it as a hindrance. The resulting effect in most cases improves upon the existing situation. Intentionality gives structure and focus and provides a means to showcase natural phenomena. Unintentionality on the other hand provides character and depth to regularity resulting in greater diversity of form. To showcase this interface, a series of frames were constructed and placed in the environment. Each frame attempts to focus the viewer’s attention on various unintentional elements both in space and time (falling leaves, footprints in the snow, ripples in water, etc) as well as improve the visual experience. In addition to literally framing the scene (a border around or next to) they serve as a frame of reference. They provide a reference point upon which to compare and contrast the colors, textures, and other phenomena with the man-made/intentional world. Despite the physical differences, strong visual similarities exist in the way in which the elements interact with each one helping to re-enforce the other. Ultimately, the environment serves as not only a means of inspiration, but as a vital part of the final presentation.

Fall leaves Cage subpr. Green harvest, October 2007 Culvert Bridge subpr. Sandy snow, March 2008

Nature Frame Concepts

N AT U R E F R A M E C O N C E P T S
The resulting images can be broken down into three components that are represented in the title. Like the classification of plants and animals, each image is based on a hiearchial ordering of ideas. The first is the unintentional component that represents an environment, concept, or specific plant that gives rise to a need for interpretation or exploration. Image Fall leaves Cage subpr. Foreground tree includes in its title the concept of “falling leaves” that is explored through the conveyance of the second part of the title. The second part is the intentional component or built project that represents an abstract architectural or design typology. This typology references the shape or physical qualities of the project. For example, a frame that stands vertically might be a tower or one that has an elevated horizontal surface might be a platform. Image Fallen bark Grid subpr. Fallen tree includes in its title “grid” due to the use of a grid system to arrange and showcase the irregularities of the bark. The third one is the subproject that is a specific composition of the intentional frame showcasing the unintentional elements and the resulting photographed image. Images Oak tree Tower subpr. Three trees and Oak tree Tower subpr. Bark comparison consist of the same elements “a tower and an oak tree,” but the relationship manifests itself in different ways. Although each image divides into the three component parts listed above, each image is thought of as one intentional design adventure. Exploring the unintentional world itself is an attempt to better understand and make sense of it. These observations translate into design ideas that provide the basis for one’s own addition. For example, a piece of bark riddled with holes translates to a rigid ordering of holes on a pegboard. These ideas are combined with formal design concepts/principles (asymmetry, contrast, hierarchy, etc) to produce something that when placed back into the setting, not only references it, but helps to improve one’s understanding. The placement of a frame in concert with the original observations that inspired it also results in a multitude of new and previously unknown interactions. For example, one might be aware of a falling leaf, but placing a white-painted box, which you designed and built, behind it reveals the shadow of the tree it fell from as well as additional leaves left on the tree. The goals of each project are finding these unknown or hidden interactions as well as gaining a better understanding of the unintentional or natural world as a whole. The works presented span the course of one year and are grouped into the seasons they represent. More at www.natureframe.com

Empty forest Tower subpr. Last opening, April 2008 P. peltatum Boardwalk subpr. Covering, May 2008

Autumn Nature Frames
Bark Tower subpr. Afternoon shadows, October 2007 Oak tree Tower subpr. Three trees, November 2007 Fall leaves Cage subpr. Foreground Tree, October 2007

A U T U M N N AT U R E F R A M E S

W I N T E R N AT U R E F R A M E S
Winter N atur e F r a m e s
Snow pile Podium subpr. Sunny ridge, March 2008 Icicle Ladder subpr. Daggers, February 2008 Frozen river Bridge subpr. Disturbance, February 2008

S P R I N G N AT U R E F R A M E S
Spr ing N atur e F r a m e s
Flooded Platform subpr. Furthest out, April 2008 S. foetidus Cage subpr. Gathering, April 2008 Forest litter Levels subpr. Saplings, April 2008

Summer Nature Frames

S U M M E R N AT U R E F R A M E S

Sesquicentennial stump Cathedral subpr. New growth, July 2008 Bleachers Viaduct subpr. Best seat, August 2008 Forest edge Gallery subpr. Overlapping leaves, June 2008

THEEPITECTURESTUDIO
Founded in 2009 by Michael Kautzer, The Epitecture Studio explores and presents the epitecture concept. Derived from the words epi- meaning “upon, in addition” and tecture (texture) meaning “network, structure” it refers to a structure/sculpture/architecture that relies upon another self-defined structures/sculptures/architecture for its existence. Similar to epiphytes, which derive support from other plants, epitecture utilizes its host for support as well as provide it with design inspiration. Milwaukee Art Museum Manhole Gallery, 2008 Bollard Lighthouse at Wharf Milwaukee. 2009

The Epitecture Studio

Chip & Jute Builders: Quality Since 2009

CHIP&JUTEBUILDERS

Picnic Table Tower: Veterans Park 2009 Abandoned Lofts: Juneau & 4th, 2009 Collapsed Lofts: Juneau & 4th, 2009

Po c ke t P a r k S y s t e m
Milwaukee Pocket Park System, 2009-present Brushed Alley Park, 2009 Rail Ties Ballast Park, 2009

P O C K E T PA R K S Y S T E M

Michael Kautzer Portfolio

www.epitecture.com kautzerm@gmail.com (262) 893-3469

Michael Kautzer Portfolio

HUMANECOLOGYFLOORPLANS

The projects that follow show an understanding for the need to closely knit the designed world with the natural world. This is not a necessity but a means for enhancing the experience of both. By placing a relatively fixed element amid those that continually move and change you are able to develop a dynamic yet subtle relationship. This relationship becomes unique to each project and provides you with an interesting character.


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Tags:
Stats:
views:83
posted:7/29/2009
language:English
pages:22