Docstoc

E RIE C OMMUNITY C OLLEGE - Erie Community College

Document Sample
E RIE C OMMUNITY C OLLEGE - Erie Community College Powered By Docstoc
					      ERIE COMMUNITY COLLEGE




                              Catalog


S t a r t   H e r e .   G o   A n y w h e r e !
                                                  Dear Students,

                                                  Thank you for choosing Erie Community College as the next
                                                  step in your educational career.

                                                  The following pages contain one of the largest varieties of
                                                  academic and support activities offered at any higher education
                                                  institution in Western New York. You may be looking to
                                                  enhance your current employment skills, begin the first two
                                                  years of a baccalaureate degree, attain a degree or certificate
                                                  in one of more than 80 academic areas, or explore a special
                                                  interest. No matter what your goal, you will be able to start
                                                  here and go anywhere.

                                                  Choosing among so many course offerings may seem daunting,
                                                  but remember that each class will give you an opportunity
                                                  to learn and develop new skills and lessons that will help you
                                                  succeed in the future. I, along with the talented faculty and
                                                  staff here at ECC, take your success very seriously; please
                                                  remember we stand ready to help you every step of the way.

                                                  I wish you the best of luck as you continue your academic
                                                  endeavor, and I would like to congratulate you on making
                                                  the important decision to attend ECC.

                                                  Sincerely,




                                                  Jack Quinn
                                                  President




                                                                                                                    1
E C C   2 0 0 8   -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
    ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2008-2009
    Fall Semester 2008
    Registration/Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                        August 25
    Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tuesday             August 26
    Run/Cancel (organization day) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thursday                             August 28
    Faculty Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Friday               August 29
    Labor Day (holiday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                     September 1
    Instruction Begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tuesday                 September 2
    Last Day to Add . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                   September 8
    Columbus Day (holiday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                          October 13
    Mid-Term Grades Due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Friday                       October 24
    Election Day (holiday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tuesday                     November 4
    Veterans’ Day (holiday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tuesday                      November 11
    Last Day to Withdraw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wednesday                           November 19
    Thanksgiving Recess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thursday-Saturday                              November 27-29
    Classes Resume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                  December 1
    Semester Ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                 December 22
    Holiday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thursday             December 25
    Grades Due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                December 29
    Wednesday, November 5, follow Tuesday schedule
    Winter Semester 2008
    Instruction Begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                  December 29
    New Years (holiday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thursday                     January 1
    Classes Resume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Friday                January 2
    Instruction Ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Friday                January 9
    No Saturday classes December 27 and January 3
    Spring Semester 2009
    Registration/Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                        January 12
    Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tuesday             January 13
    Run/Cancel (organization day) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thursday                             January 15
    Faculty Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Friday               January 16
    Martin Luther King (holiday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                            January 19
    Instruction Begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tuesday                 January 20
    Last Day to Add . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                   January 26
    Presidents’ Day Recess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday-Tuesday                              February 16-17
    Classes Resume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wednesday                     February 18
    College Day (no classes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Friday                  March 6
    Midterm Grades Due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Friday                      March 13
    Last Day to Withdraw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tuesday                       April 7
    Spring Recess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wednesday-Saturday                           April 8-18
    Classes Resume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                  April 20
    Semester Ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                 May 18
    Spring Commencement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wednesday                              May 27
    Grades Due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wednesday                   May 27
    Summer Session I 2009
    Memorial Day (holiday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                        May 25
    Instruction Begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tuesday                 May 26
    Instruction Ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thursday                  July 2
    Summer Session II 2009
    Independence Day (holiday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Saturday                          July 4
    Instruction Begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monday                  July 6
    Instruction Ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thursday                  August 13
    Under existing State law (education Law 224-a), campuses are required to excuse, without penalty, students absent from class because of religious beliefs and to provide equivalent opportunity to students to make
    up study or work requirements missed because of such absences.
    Note: The college reserves the right, at any time, to make changes deemed advisable in the calendar, regulations, tuition and fees, and to add, modify, or cancel any course or program as necessary. Information in
    this edition of the Erie Community College Catalog is accurate as of June 01, 2008. The work presented herein is pursuant to the policies of the Board of Trustees of Erie Community College. Erie Community
    College is under sponsorship of Erie County and supervision of the State University of New York. The College Catalog is published by Erie Community College and prepared by the Public Relations Department.




2
                            E C C           2 0 0 8            -     2 0 1 0            •     ( 7 1 6 )            8 5 1 - 1 E C C                    •     w w w . e c c . e d u
TABLE OF                                                         Financial Aid            ........................................                               37
CONTENTS                                                             37
                                                                     37
                                                                               General Financial Aid Information
                                                                               Student Budget
                                                                     38        Federal Aid Programs: Title IV
  1    President’s Message
                                                                     40        Rights and Responsibilities for Borrowers
  2    Academic Calendar 2008-2009

College Information                                        5
                                                                     40        New York State Financial Aid Programs
                       .................................             43        Other Funding Sources
                                                                     43        Miscellaneous

                                                                 Academic Information                    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
  5    City Campus
  5    North Campus
  5    South Campus
                                                                     44        General Education
  6    The Athletic Center
                                                                     47        Academic Advisement
  6    Employment and Training Center
                                                                     47        Academic Freedom
  6    Scott Bieler Alumni/Foundation Office
                                                                     47        Attendance Policies
  6    Vehicle Technology Training Center
                                                                     48        Grading System
  6    History
                                                                     48        Quality Point Average
  6    Accreditations and Affiliations
                                                                     49        Dean’s List
  6    Professional Accreditations
                                                                     49        Academic Standing
  7    Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
                                                                     49        Honors Concentration
  7    The State University of New York (SUNY)
                                                                     49        Academic Probation and Dismissal
  7    SUNY Board of Trustees
                                                                     49        Grade Changes
  8    ECC Board of Trustees
                                                                     50        Grade Reports
  8    ECC’s Belief System

Admissions                                                 9
                                                                     50        Cancellation of Courses
             ...........................................             50        Program Change
                                                                     50        Associate Degree Requirements
  9    General Information on Admission Policies                     50        Second Degrees
  10   Entrance Requirements for Degree Programs                     50        Transfer Credit
  10   On-Line Admissions Applications                               51        Developmental Coursework
  11   Degree Program Chart                                          51        Repeat of a Course
  18   IEP Diplomas                                                  51        Withdrawal from a Course/College

                                                                 Distance Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
  18   Readmission
  19   Students with Disabilities
  20   Acceptance
  20   High School Equivalency G.E.D.                                51        Internet-based Courses
                                                                     52        Life Experience

                                                                 Transitional Programs                                                                           53
  20   Veterans
                                                                                                           .............................
  21   How to Apply
  21   Service Members Opportunity College
  21   International Students                                        53        Pathways to Success
  22   Admission Review Process                                      53        Pre-Collegiate Studies
  22   Honors Concentration                                          54        Middle College at ECC
  22   Transfer Students                                             54        CAST Program
  23   ESF Program                                                   54        Independence Bound

                                                                 Workforce Development                        ...........................                        55
  24   Admissions—Special Programs
  24   Articulation Agreements
  27   Articulations Project Lead the Way                            55        Mission Statement
  28   Joint Admission Agreements                                    55        Community Education
  31   Cooperative Agreements

Registration and Records                                  32
                                                                     56        Corporate Training
                             .........................
                                                                     57        Driver Safety Programs
                                                                     57        Employment Training Center

                                                                 Student Support Services                        .........................                       57
  32   Student Records
  32   Transcripts
  32   Confidentiality of Records                                    58        Athletics
  33   Application for Graduation

Tuition and Fees                                          34
                                                                     59        Auxiliary Services Corp.
                   ....................................
                                                                     59        Bookstores
                                                                     59        Child Care
  34   College Costs                                                 59        Career Resources Centers
  35   Tuition Installment Plan                                      59        Food Service
  35   Summary of Tuition/Fees                                       60        Counseling
                                                                     60        Disabled Student Services
                                                                     60        Security



                                                                                                                                                                          3
             E C C    2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C                •     w w w . e c c . e d u
      61    Evening Services                                                                      Non-Discrimination Policy
      61    Health Services
                                                                                                  ECC is committed to equal opportunity in educational programs,
      61    Immunization Program
                                                                                                  admissions, and employment. It is the policy of Erie Community
      62    International Student Advisement
                                                                                                  College to provide equal opportunity for all qualified applicants,
      62    Library Resources Centers
                                                                                                  students, and employees; and to prohibit discrimination. Title VII
      62    Parking
                                                                                                  of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended: prohibits discrimina-
      62    Student Activities
                                                                                                  tion based on race, religion, national origin, age, sex (including
      62    Student Government Association
      62    Tutoring                                                                              pregnancy), disability, color, or sexual preference; discrimination of
      62    Perkins IV                                                                            this nature is unacceptable and impermissible conduct which will
      64    Student Support Service Centers                                                       NOT be tolerated.
                                                                                                      Erie Community College deplores such conduct as an abuse of

    Student Clubs & Organizations                                                        63
                                                                                                  authority. Allegations leading to conviction can result in suspension
                                                    ...................                           or termination of employment. Related inquiries should be

    Advanced Studies     . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
                                                                                                  addressed to: Title IX, Section 504 and ADA Compliance
                                                                                                  Coordinator Darley Willis, Director of Equity & Diversity, ECC

    Foundation                                                                           65
                                                                                                  City Campus, 121 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203
                 ..........................................                                       (716) 851-1119.
                                                                                                      This material can be made available in alternative media upon
      65 Policies and Procedures                                                                  request for those with disabilities. Accommodations for those with

    College Policies                                                                     66
                                                                                                  disabilities can be arranged upon request.
                       ....................................
      04 Non-Discrimination Policy
      66 Students’ Rights Under Equal Employment/
         Affirmative Action
      66 Student Section 504 Discrimination Procedure
      66 Policy Governing Conduct and Public Order
         on Campus
      67 Student Code of Conduct and Review Board
         Procedures
      69 Student Complaint Procedure
      70 Standards of Eligibility for Participation in
         Student Activities/Athletics
      70 AIDS Policy
      70 Alcohol Policy
      70 Drug-Free Workplace Policy
      71 Immunization Policy
      71 Harassment Policy
      73 Student Right-To-Know Act

    Degree & Certificate Programs                     ..................                 75
    Course Descriptions      ..............................                           164
    Advisory Councils    ................................                             254
    Administration and Faculty               .....................                    260
     260 Administration
     263 Teaching Faculty

    Campus Maps      ....................................                             269
    Index   .............................................                             274




4
                 E C C      2 0 0 8             -      2 0 1 0              •      ( 7 1 6 )        8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
COLLEGE
INFORMATION
                                                                     and in 1964 was named in the Historic American Building
                                                                     Survey as one of the 11 most significant buildings in Buffalo.
                                                                     Bordered by Oak and Ellicott streets, this urban campus is
                                                                     rich in architectural beauty, boasting an expansive skylight,
Erie Community College, New York State’s first multi-campus          an atrium filled with ferns and trees, high-ceilinged class-
public community college outside of New York City, provides          rooms and gourmet cooking facilities. Among the City
affordable educational opportunities for the residents of Erie       Campus programs are: Culinary Arts, Early Childhood
County, New York, other states, as well as foreign countries. At     Education and Industrial Technology.
the three campuses (City, North and South), degree programs,
certificate programs, community education and other special
programs are offered.
     Students interested in pursuing an Associate in Arts (A.A.),
Associate in Science (A.S.), Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S),
or an Associate in Occupational Studies (A.O.S) degree will dis-
cover that Erie Community College is responsive to their needs.
Academic and student services are provided as a means to help
all students attain their educational and personal goals.
     ECC takes pride in the diversity of its students. ECC’s stu-
dent body includes traditional and non-traditional learners,
including recent high school graduates, senior citizens, athletes,
stay-at-home parents, disabled students, business executives, vet-
erans and international students.

                                                                     North Campus
     Why do students from such diverse backgrounds choose
ECC? The variety of the programs available, the affordable
tuition, the high quality teaching faculty, the small classes, the   The North Campus, located in Williamsville, NY, is the oldest of
availability of tutoring and the convenience and accessibility of    the campuses. Spreading over 120 acres, this campus offers its
three campus locations are just some of the reasons that thou-       students several buildings, including the Gleasner
sands of students enroll at ECC each year.                           Administration Building, Dry Memorial Library and Spring
     More than 80 degree and certificate programs are offered to     Student Center. Among the programs offered at the North
students in four divisions, including Health Sciences, Business      Campus are: Criminal Justice, Culinary Arts, Dental Hygiene,
and Public Service, Engineering and Technologies and Liberal         Dietetic Technology, Engineering Science, Hotel Restaurant
Arts. Our academic and training programs are designed to grad-       Management, Nursing, Ophthalmic Dispensing and Respiratory
                                                                     Therapy.

                                                                     South Campus
uate well-prepared, well-rounded students, ready to meet the
demands of the workplace.
     To help students achieve their goals, broad support services
                                                                     The self-contained design of the South Campus offers buildings
are provided. The English and Math Departments offer tutoring
                                                                     connected by bridges surrounding a center courtyard. Located on
in labs to aid students in their academic quests; the Office of
                                                                     Southwestern Boulevard in Orchard Park, NY, this campus has
Disabled Students Services advocates for and supports disabled
                                                                     buildings designated for business and the humanities, math and
students and the Career Resource Centers provide career coun-
                                                                     science, administration and recreation, as well as a two-story
seling and job placement.
                                                                     Learning Resource Center and the Office of Disabled Students
     In short, ECC students discover a college responsive to their
                                                                     Services. Among the programs offered at the South Campus are:
diverse backgrounds, interests, goals and needs while the com-
                                                                     Architectural Technology, Automotive Technology, Business
munity reaps the benefits of an institution preparing tomorrow’s
                                                                     Administration, Computer Information Systems, Computer Repair
workforce – tomorrow’s leaders.

City Campus
                                                                     Technology, Dental Laboratory Technology, Emergency Medical
                                                                     Technology/Paramedic, Emergency Management, Fire Protection
The City Campus moved to its present site in 1982, follow-           Technology, Office Technology, Recreation Leadership and
                                                                     Telecommunications Technology.

                                                                     45 Oak Street
ing the renovation of the Old Post Office, an architectural
landmark, in downtown Buffalo. The site of the present City
Campus is listed in the National Registry of Historic Places
                                                                     Erie Community College opened its newest facility, located at 45
                                                                     Oak Street, across from the college’s City Campus in downtown
                                                                     Buffalo, in January 2008. The 52,000 square foot facility was ren-
                                                                     ovated into a state-of-the-art facility, including more than 20
                                                                     classrooms, as well as faculty and administrative offices.
                                                                         The associate degree programs housed at 45 Oak include
                                                                     Emergency Management, Fire Protection Technology, Nursing,
                                                                     Paralegal and Radiation Therapy Technology. In addition, two
                                                                     new certificate programs, Homeland Security and Crime Scene
                                                                     Technology, are offered at the new facility.




                                                                                                                                          5
               E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                           History
                                                                           In April 2008, Erie Community College celebrated its 62nd
                                                                           anniversary. In the past six decades, the college has grown from a
                                                                           small two-year technical institute to a three-campus college serv-
                                                                           ing more than 13,000 students. Today, ECC is the second largest
                                                                           college in Western New York.
                                                                               On April 4, 1946, the Legislature of the State of New York,
                                                                           recognizing the need for technical-vocational education at the
                                                                           junior college level, established the New York State Institute of
                                                                           Applied Arts and Sciences at Buffalo as one of the five, tuition-
                                                                           free, two-year technical institutes for high school graduates.
                                                                               Two years later, in 1948, when the New York State
                                                                           Legislature founded the State University of New York, the
                                                                           Institute at Buffalo became one of the units of the University. On
                                                                           September 1, 1953, while maintaining ties with the State
                                                                           University of New York, Erie County assumed sponsorship of
                                                                           the college, changing its name to the Erie County Technical
                                                                           Institute.
                                                                               Subsequently, in 1960, the Erie County Technical Institute
                                                                           moved to the present site of the North Campus at 6205 Main

    The Burt Flickinger Athletic Center
                                                                           Street in Williamsville, NY. In 1969, the name of the college was
                                                                           once again changed, this time to its present designation, Erie
    The Burt Flickinger Athletic Center, located at 21 Oak Street in       Community College.
    Buffalo, NY opened as a legacy to the World University Games               In 1971, the City Campus, housed in the former Bishop
    in June 1994. The facility houses an Olympic-size, 50-meter            O’Hare High School in downtown Buffalo, opened, making
    swimming pool with a movable floor, a 25-meter warm-up pool,           ECC the first multicampus college in New York State outside of
    three regulation basketball courts, a large field house that seats     New York City.
    3,000, a 1/9 mile indoor jogging track, a state-of-the-art Wellness        The South Campus opened in the fall of 1974, providing
    Center, Athletic Department offices and a number of classrooms.        accessibility for those in the southern parts of the county. In

    Employment and Training Center
                                                                           January of 1982, the City Campus moved into its refurbished
                                                                           quarters in the heart of Buffalo.
    The Employment and Training Center, located at 3176 Abbott                 Through the years, ECC has undergone significant changes as
    Road in Orchard Park, is the result of a partnership between the       it has moved to serve its constituents with state-of-the-art facili-
    Erie County Workforce Investment Board and Erie Community              ties, professionally accredited programs and an outstanding
    College. This One Stop Service Center provides employment              teaching faculty.

                                                                           Accreditation and Affiliation
    resources to ECC graduates and job seekers in Erie County.
    Services provided by the center include work keys assessments,
    career counseling, education and training opportunities, job           Erie Community College's City, North and South campuses are
    readiness workshops, resume assistance and referrals within a          accredited by the Commission on Higher Education, Middle
    network of federal, state and local agencies.                          States Associates of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street,

    Scott Bieler Alumni/Foundation Office
                                                                           Philadelphia, PA 19104, Telephone: (215) 662-5605. The
                                                                           Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting
    The offices of the Erie Community Foundation and Alumni                agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the
    Relations are located at 4196 Abbott Road in Orchard Park. The         Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation.
    mission of the Foundation is to grant an opportunity for deserv-       The college's curricula are registered with the New York State
    ing students in need to pursue their educational dreams and to         Education Department and have all been approved through the
    preserve the college as a leading educational institution. The         State University of New York.
    Alumni Relations office fosters positive relationships with ECC’s         Many of the professional curricula are accredited by special-
    graduates. The building is named after Scott Bieler ‘74 in recog-      ized agencies. Such accreditations are noted in the program
    nition of his generous support of Erie Community College and           descriptions in this catalog. The college is also a member of the
    his distinguished alumni status.                                       American Association of Community Colleges.

    Vehicle Technology Training Center                                     Professional Accreditation
    The Vehicle Technology Training Center, located at 5885 Big            • Accreditation Board for Engineering & Technology, Inc.
    Tree Road in Orchard Park, serves the Automotive Technology            • Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education
    program, Daimler Chrysler Apprenticeship program and Ford              • American Association of Medical Assistants
    Motor Company ASSET program and allows for the develop-                • American Dental Association
    ment of curriculums designed to prepare graduates to meet the          • American Dietetic Association
    challenges of the automotive industry. College and government          • Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs
    support, a state-of-the-art facility and partnerships with Ford and    • Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics
    General Motors allow the college to successfully meet the needs          and Information Management Education (CAHIIM)
    of the local workforce.                                                • Commission on Accreditation of Hospitality
                                                                             Management Programs
6                                                                          • Commission on Opticianry Accreditation

                   E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
• Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC)               Programs and Educational Opportunity Centers, has become a
• Committee on Health Sciences Education and State of                   model for delivering better learning opportunities to young peo-
  New York Department of Health                                         ple and adults traditionally bypassed by higher education.
• Council of Health Sciences Education and                                  The 30 locally-sponsored two-year community colleges offer
  Accreditation of the American Medical Association                     programs that are directly and immediately job-related as well as
• Joint Review Committee on Education on Radiologic                     degree programs that serve as educational experience or a trans-
  Technology                                                            fer opportunity to a baccalaureate degree at a four-year campus.
• Middle States Association                                                 In 2004, the Governor and the Legislature approved a second
• National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Science           multi-year, $1.8 billion capital construction program for the
• National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence                  University. The first plan, adopted in 1998, provided $2 billion in
• National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission                    capital investments in the University system. This investment in
• New York State Alcohol Certification                                  critical maintenance will protect the University’s infrastructure
• New York State Board of Regents                                       and enable the University to keep pace with modern technology
• New York State Certification for Substance Abuse                      for the benefit of students and faculty.
  Counselors (CSAC)                                                         In 1995, the Board of Trustees developed the document
• New York State Department of Health                                   Rethinking SUNY in response to a call from the Legislature for a
• The Commission on Dental Accreditation accredits the                  “multi-year, comprehensive system-wide plan to increase cost
  Department of Dental Hygiene and the Department                       efficiency.” Underlying Rethinking SUNY is the theme of
  of Dental Laboratory Technology                                       increasing efficiency by empowering campuses to manage direct-

The Commission on Higher Education of the Middle
                                                                        ly more of their academic and financial affairs and by eliminating

States Association of Colleges and Schools
                                                                        disincentives to the prudent use of campus and system resources.
                                                                            The State University system’s involvement in the health sci-
The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is an             ence education is extensive. Hundreds of thousands of New
independent membership organization established in 1919 for             York’s citizens are served each year by faculty and students in
the improvement of educational institutions and the develop-            University hospitals, clinics or affiliated hospitals. The
ment of effective working relations among schools, colleges, and        University’s economic development services programs provide
universities in the Middle States region. It is a non-profit organi-    research, training and technical assistance to the state’s business
zation incorporated in New York, that often works in coopera-           and industrial community. State University libraries, which sup-
tion with other educational agencies. Membership in the                 port teaching and research activities, are an important communi-
Association follows accreditation by the Commission on Higher           ty resource.
Education, along with institutional assumption of the obligations           State University of New York is governed by a Board of
associated with membership. The Association is controlled by its        Trustees, appointed by the Governor, which directly deter-
institutional members whose representatives meet annually in            mines the policies to be followed by the 34 state-supported
convention to transact business and pursue matters of common            campuses. Community colleges have their own local boards of
interest in education.                                                  trustees whose relationship to the State University Board is

The State University of New York (SUNY)
                                                                        defined by law.

The State University of New York’s 64 campuses bring educa-             The University’s motto is: “To Learn — To Search — To Serve.”

                                                                        State University of New York Board of Trustees
tional opportunity within commuting distance of virtually all
New Yorkers and comprise the nation’s largest comprehensive
system of public higher education.                                      Vice Chancellor: John J. O’Connor
    When founded in 1948, the University consolidated 29 state-         Chairman: Carl T. Hayden, Elmira, NY
operated but unaffiliated institutions whose varied histories of
                                                                        Vice Chairman: Randy A. Daniels, New York, NY
service dated as far back as 1816.
    Today, more than 413,000 students are pursuing traditional             Aminy I. Audi, Fayetteville, NY
study in classrooms and laboratories or are working at home, at            Robert J. Bellafiore, Delmar, NY
their own pace, through such innovative institutions as the                Christopher P. Connors, Niskayuna, NY
SUNY Learning Network and Empire State College. The State                  Edward F. Cox, New York, NY
University enrolls 38 percent of all New York State high school            Thomas F. Egan, Rye, NY
graduates.
                                                                           Gordon R. Gross, Amherst, NY
    The distinguished faculty is recruited from the finest graduate
schools and universities throughout the United States and many             Stephen J. Hunt , Katonah, NY
countries around the world. Their efforts are regularly recog-             H. Carl McCall, New York, NY
nized in numerous prestigious awards and honors, including the             Michael E. Russell, East Setquket, NY
Nobel Prize.                                                               Linda Sanford, Chappaqua, NY
    The State University of New York’s research contributions
                                                                           Kay Stafford, Plattsburgh, NY
are helping to solve some of today’s most urgent problems. State
University researchers pioneered nuclear magnetic resonance                Harvey F. Wachsman, Upper Brookville, NY
imaging and the supermarket bar code scanner, introduced time-             Gerri Warren-Merrick, New York, NY
lapse photography of forestry subjects and isolated the bacteria           Carl P. Wiezalis, president, University Faculty Senate
that cause Lyme disease.
    The University’s program for the educationally and economi-
cally disadvantaged, consisting of Educational Opportunity
                                                                                                                                              7
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
    ECC Board of Trustees                                                    tize ECC’s strategy options. They also tell college officials what to
                                                                             bring along on the journey and provide benchmarks for deter-
    The 10-member Board of Trustees of Erie Community College is             mining progress.

                                                                             Mission
    comprised of four members appointed by the Governor, five
    members appointed by the Erie County Executive and approved
    by the Erie County Legislature and a voting student trustee elect-       Erie Community College is a comprehensive provider of quality,
    ed by the student body of the three campuses. The Board                  flexible, affordable and accessible academic and training pro-
    responsibilities include approving the annual budget, setting            grams, along with related services, that meet the needs of a
    policies and requirements, responding to community needs,                diverse student body and promote regional economic growth.

                                                                             Vision
    approving personnel appointments and guiding the college in
    setting and achieving its Mission and goals.

    Erie Community College
                                                                             ECC strives toward a future where education is accessible and
                                                                             convenient to all, and where students can acquire specific com-
    Board of Trustees                         Term Expiration
                                                                             petencies, college credit or a degree along with resources to
                                                                             achieve their goals.

                                                                             Strategic Intent
    Raymond F. Gallagher, Chairman            2008
    Patricia A. Krzesinski, Vice Chair        2011
    Nancy A. Gaglione, Secretary              2009                           ECC will become a national and regional model for the commu-
    James G. Corasanti, M.D., Ph.D.,          2010                           nity college of the 21st century. ECC wants to be known as the
    William A. Delmont                        2011                           most student-friendly and accessible college and the place where
    Ernestine Green                           2014                           success begins. ECC will be an aspirational choice where stu-
    Hormoz Mansouri, Ph.D.                    2012                           dents of all levels of ability attend because it is the best match to
    Patricia Mertz                            2013                           their lifestyle and a respected institution among employers within
    Paul Stasiak                              2010                           higher education and throughout the region.

                                                                             Core Values
    ECC’s Belief System
    Jeffrey Hubbard, Student Trustee/SGA President

                                                                             Student Centeredness: Service to students is the primary reason
                                                                             for ECC’s existence. We put the student at the center of all pro-
    The following statements provid the roadmap and guidebook                grams and services, with responsiveness, accessibility and flexibil-
    the organization uses to develop its strategic thinking. These           ity within all that we do.
    statements indicate where the college is going and helps to priori-




8
                   E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •     ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Accessibility: ECC serves the needs and wants of all students,
including those not having educational opportunity elsewhere.           ADMISSIONS
Access means inclusion by reducing financial, location, physical,
language or other barriers.                                             Erie Community College provides quality and affordable educa-
                                                                        tional opportunities for all eligible applicants who are seeking
Academic Excellence: We expect academic rigor in all curricula          post secondary education on either a part-time or full-time basis.
and from all students. ECC commits to the premise that quality
teaching with comprehensive support will result in positive learn-      Retention, graduation rates and transfer information are all indi-
ing outcomes and student achievement.                                   cators of student success and are available in the college’s
                                                                        Institutional Research Office, North Campus Room G-156.

                                                                        General Information on Admissions Policies
Openness and Respect: We recognize, promote and appreciate a
broad range of cultures, attitudes and viewpoints and create an
environment of respect, caring and trust. Each individual, no           Erie Community College admits applicants based upon two cate-
matter his or her limitations, has intrinsic dignity and unique         gories of Admissions:

                                                                        Matriculated or Non-Matriculated
capabilities.

Principles                                                              Students interested in earning an associate degree or certificate
•   Academic Freedom                                                    must be matriculated in an academic degree program. A matric-
•   Collaboration                                                       ulated student is one who has been formally admitted into a
•   Commitment                                                          degree or certificate program at Erie Community College.
•   Equity and Diversity                                                Applicants will be admitted into a degree program once they
•   Excellence                                                          have completed and submitted an application and official high
•   Integrity and Accountability                                        school and/or college transcripts.
•   Learning Experience
•   Lifelong Learning                                                   A matriculated student must score at an appropriate level on the
•   Student Success                                                     college’s mandatory placement test or have been granted a waiv-

Goals
                                                                        er. Matriculation, once granted, remains in effect as long as the
                                                                        student has continuous sequential enrollment at the college and
Students attaining goals: All students attending ECC academic,          is in good academic standing.
job training, or lifelong learning programs will achieve their self-    Applicants wishing to seek matriculation will need to:
defined goals.                                                          A. Complete the matriculated application online by visiting
Resources in place: Sufficient capital investment support to               www.ecc.edu.
accomplish the college master facilities plan and maintain contin-      B. Submit your official high school and college transcripts to the
uing investment in buildings and equipment will be available.              Admissions office of the campus you wish to matriculate at.
                                                                        C. Bring in General Education Diploma (GED) Certificate and
Perception of quality: There will be broad awareness of the qual-          Scores and submit to the Admissions Office at the campus
ity of instruction and value of the education offered at ECC.              you wish to matriculate. Take the mandatory Placement Test
Build pride internally and community-wide for ECC.                         unless you have been granted a waiver for English and/or
Flexibility around student wants: ECC will have an any time, any           math, based on one of the following reasons:
place learning environment, supported by services, using a vari-           • Have prior college credit in math or English and have pro-
ety of modalities.                                                           vided a official college transcript reflecting a grade of C or
                                                                             better
Educational experience: The educational experience for all ECC             • Scored 85 or higher on the English III or math Course III
students will be challenging and expansive – even life changing –            Regents Exam
with students demonstrating successful learning outcomes and               • Achieved 500 or better on the Verbal and/or math portion
great satisfaction with their ECC experience.                                of your SAT
Diversity: The college will have an inclusive environment that             • Taken the Advanced Placement English or calculus exam
attracts and retains faculty, staff, and students who embrace                and scored a three or higher.
diversity. Every aspect of the college, including student life,         All admission decisions are conditional based upon official proof
teaching, training, hiring and community involvement will               of graduation from an accredited high school or proof of GED,
encompass diversity.                                                    including the certificate and scores. Final placement in a degree
Safety and Security: All students, faculty, staff, and visitors will    or certificate program is dependent upon the results of the man-
                                                                        dated English and Math Placement Test.

                                                                        Admission of Non-Matriculated Students
be safe to pursue their academic and co-curricular activities and
achieve goals.
Campus Development: The campus/academic configuration will              A student may enroll as non-matriculated, taking courses for per-
be developed to serve the needs of our current and potential stu-       sonal fulfillment not leading to completion of a degree or certifi-
dents, taking advantage of opportunities and advancing the              cate program. Non-matriculated students are not required to
development of a one-college concept.                                   take the college’s mandatory Placement Test nor submit official
                                                                        high school or college transcripts.
A Valued Resource: ECC will be the partner with whom every-
one wants to work. Business, government and other organiza-
tions will trust ECC to deliver for them.

                                                                                                                                              9
              E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Placement Testing                                                        Non-matriculated students are required to complete the online
                                                                              application for admission by visiting www.ecc.edu. A non-
     Placement testing is required of all entering matriculated stu-
                                                                              matriculated application will take about two business days to
     dents and those entering a certificate program, both full-time and
                                                                              process before a student may attempt to register for courses.

                                                                              Placement Testing Process
     part-time, unless they have been waived from the placement test.
     The purpose of the test is to provide you with useful information
     about your academic skills in math, reading and writing. The             All students seeking matriculation in a degree or certificate pro-
     results of the assessment in conjunction with your academic              gram are required to take a mandatory placement test.
     background, goals and interests are used by an academic advisor          Completion of the placement test must occur after applying to
     and/or counselor to determine your course selection. You cannot          the college and before the first semester of registration.
     “pass” or “fail” the placement tests, but it is very important that
     you do your very best on these tests so that you will have an accu-      English and Math Requirements for Placement in Credit
     rate measure of your academic skills.                                    Courses

     Placement Test Offices                                                   All incoming students are required to take an English Placement
     Administrative Office: (716) 270-5124                                    Test Battery which consists of two sections: reading and writing.
     City: 851-1022                                                           College Reading and Study Skills I or II (EN 010 or EN 011) or
     North: 851-1943                                                          both are required of all students who place below a minimal level
     South: 851-1914                                                          on the reading section. Improvement of College Writing I or II
                                                                              (EN 020 or EN 021) or both are required of all students who
     The following placement tests are available at ECC:                      place below a minimal level on the writing section. English
                                                                              courses for degree credit (except EN 410, EN 420, EN 430) can-
      ACCUPLACER-Computerized walk in placement test con-
                                                                              not be taken until students demonstrate competence in reading
     sisting of questions in reading comprehension, writing skills,
                                                                              and writing skills.
     arithmetic and elementary algebra skills.
                                                                              Students receiving a score of three or better on the Advanced
      Companion to ACCUPLACER provides a paper-and-pencil
                                                                              Placement Exam are exempt from EN 110 and EN 111 and
     version of the ACCUPLACER test. This is a timed test and avail-
                                                                              should request to be waived from the English Placement Test
     able upon request only. Please contact the placement testing
                                                                              Battery. Students who have taken and passed (C or better) a col-
     office on the campus you wish to take the test to schedule an
                                                                              lege-level English course or New York State Regents English III
     appointment.
                                                                              with an 85 or better on the final exam within the last three years,
      Accommodated Placement Tests can be scheduled for stu-                 should also request the placement test be waived. Students who
     dents with disabilities, individuals with IEPs or IEP Diplomas.          score at least 500 on the math or verbal sections of the SAT will
     Please contact the Disabled Student Services office at the cam-          be waived from the math or English section of the placement
     pus you plan to attend. Disabled Student Services Offices: City:         test, respectively.
     (716) 851-1189; North: (716) 851-1495; South: (716) 851-1933.
                                                                              English 010, 011, 020, 021, 030, 031, 040 and 041, (noncredit
      Ability to Benefit (ATB) is administered when an applicant             courses) may be used to meet the credit requirements of any
     does not hold a high school diploma or a GED certificate at the          scholarship, financial aid, or immigration program. They may
     start of the semester. To meet the federal financial aid eligibility,    also be used as credit hours toward the requirements for partici-
     a student must take an ATB test. Students wishing to take an             pation on athletic teams. However, they may not be used as elec-
     ATB test may attend any scheduled ACCUPLACER test.                       tives toward graduation and may not be substituted for any
                                                                              English requirement of any curriculum. The credit-bearing
      Bilingual Placement Test is for individuals who are dominant
                                                                              English as a Second Language courses EN 132 and EN 142 may
     in a language other than English. A prospective student from this
                                                                              be used as electives toward graduation but may not be substitut-
     group who does not have a high school diploma may also take
                                                                              ed for any English requirement of any curriculum.
     this test which meets the Ability to Benefit (ATB) requirements.
     For test taking tips, practice and placement testing schedule, visit
     www.ecc.edu/admissions/accuplacertips.asp
         Please bring a photo ID
         Please bring two number 2 pencils
         Know your Social Security number
         No calculators are permitted


                                                On-Line Admissions Applications
                                                                  On-Line Admissions
         Attention prospective students! It is quick, easy and free! Erie Community College is now accepting on-line admissions applications.
                                                  Complete your application from our Home Page at:

                                                            Erie Community College
                                                         (716) 851-1ECC • www.ecc.edu
10
                     E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                  Degree
                  PROGRAM CHART




            Start Here. Go Anywhere!

                                                                                              11
E C C   2 0 0 8   -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C   •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                       Recommended                                Career
                                                                       H.S. Courses       Campuses                Opportunities/
                              Hegis   Curr.     Pre-Admission          And/Or             Available               Further
     Degree Program           Code    Code      Recommendations        Experiences        C, N, S       Degree    Education

     Architectural            5317    0538     Math I              3 years Math           S              A.A.S.   Architectural
     Technology —                              Math II                                                            Engineering
     Construction                              (Physics preferred)                                                & Construction or
     Technology                                                                                                   transfer to Bachelor’s
                                                                                                                  Degree Program

     Automotive               5306    0453     Math I                  Geometry           S              A.A.S.   Autobody Repair
     Trades: Autobody                          1 year Science          Chemistry                                  Shops,
     Repair                                    (Chemistry or                                                      Auto Insurance
                                               Physics)                                                           Estimating Centers

     Automotive               5306    0525     Math I                                     S              A.A.S.   Auto
     Technology                                1 year Science                                                     Dealerships,
                                               (Chemistry or                                                      Repair Shops,
                                               Physics)                                                           Garages

     Building                 5317    0576     2 years Math            Drafting/CAD       C              A.O.S.   Facilities Manager,
     Management &                                                      Business                                   Director of Building
     Maintenance                                                       Courses,                                   Services, Building.
                                                                       Shop Courses                               Automation Control
                                                                       Building Trade                             Technician, Sales of
                                                                                                                  Products & Service,
                                                                                                                  Building Inspector,
                                                                                                                  Building Mechanic

     Business —               5004    0632     Math I                  2 years Math       C, N, S        A.A.S.   Accounting &
     Business                                                                                                     Advertising Firms,
     Administration                                                                                               Government,
                                                                                                                  Finance &
                                                                                                                  Insurance Agencies

     Business: Business       5004    0671     Sequential              3 years            C, N, S        A.S.     Transfer to
     Administration                            Math I, II, III         Regents                                    4-year Business
                                                                       Math or                                    Administration
                                                                       4 years Math                               Programs

     Civil Engineering        5309    0517     3 years Math            3 years            N              A.A.S.   Civil Engineering
     Technology                                2 years Science         Science,                                   Firms, Government
                                               (including              Basic                                      Agencies, Testing Labs,
                                               Physics)                Drafting                                   Transfers to Bachelor
                                                                                                                  Degree Programs,
                                                                                                                  Nationally Certified by
                                                                                                                  TAC/ABET.

     Communication            5008    0501     HS or GED                                  S              A.S.     Transfer to
     and Media Arts —                          Diploma                                                            Bachelor’s
     Communication                                                                                                Degree Program
     Arts

     Computer Repair          5105    0495      Math I & II,           3 years Math,      S             A.A.S.    Computer Repair
     Technology                                 2 years Science        Computer                                   & Software
                                                (Physics               Programming                                Companies
                                                included)              (Basic Language)

     Computer Science         5101    0532      3 years Math           4 years Math,      N             A.S.      Transfer to
                                                Math I                 2 years Science                            Bachelor’s
                                                Math II                (Physics)                                  Degree Program,
                                                Math III                                                          Computer
12                                              1 year Science                                                    Companies

                      E C C    2 0 0 8    -   2 0 1 0     •      ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C    •     w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                               Recommended                                 Career
                                                               High School Courses Campuses                Opportunities/
                        Hegis   Curr.     Pre-Admission        And/Or              Available               Further
Degree Program          Code    Code      Recommendations      Experiences         C, N, S       Degree    Education

Construction            5317    1788      Math I, 2 yrs.                          N              A.A.S.    Construction and
Management                                Science, Math II,                                                Building Industry,
Engineering Tech                          Basic Drafting,                                                  Transfers to Bachelor’s
                                          Physics                                                          Degree Program.
                                                                                                           Nationally Certified by
                                                                                                           TAC/ABET

Criminal Justice        5505    0641      4 years English,                        C, N           A.A.      Law Enforcement
                                          2 years Math,                                                    Agencies, Correc-
                                          2 years Natural                                                  tion Facilities; or
                                          Science, 2 years                                                 Transfer to
                                          Social Science                                                   Bachelor’s
                                                                                                           Degree Program

Criminal Justice/       5505    0640      2 years Math,                           N              A.A.S.    Law Enforcement
Law Enforcement                           1 year Science                                                   Agencies, Correc-
Program                                                                                                    tions Facilities

Culinary Arts           5404    0578      Food Prepara-        2 years Math,      C, N           A.O.S.    Restaurant
                                          tion courses,        English                                     Industries, Hotels,
                                          Related Food         Courses                                     Bachelor’s Degree
                                          Service                                                          Programs in
                                          Experience                                                       Hospitality

Dental Hygiene          5203    0545      Biology,             Regents            N              A.A.S.    Dental Offices,
                                          Chemistry,           Science                                     Hospital Clinics,
                                          Math I                                                           Community
                                          85% H.S.                                                         Health Agencies,
                                          average                                                          Dental Products
                                                                                                           Sales, Transfer to
                                                                                                           4-yr. University

Dental                  5204    0547      HS Mathematics,      HS Science         S              A.A.S.    Private Practice,
Laboratory                                Good manual          (Biology and/or                             Commercial
Technology                                dexterity and        Chemistry)                                  Laboratories,
                                          color perception                                                 Hospitals, Public
                                                                                                           Dental Health
                                                                                                           Facilities

Computer                5303    0504      Math I               Calculus,          S              A.A.S.    Engineering &
Aided Drafting                            Math II              Physics                                     Design Firms
& Design                                  Math III

Early Childhood         5503    0606      HS OR GED            English            C              A.A.S.    Day Care
                                          Diploma              Electives,                                  Centers, Nursery
                                                               2 years Math,                               Schools, Early
                                                               Biology, Human                              Childhood
                                                               Relations                                   Centers

Electrical              5310    0699      Math I               Physics,           N              A.A.S.   Electronic,
Engineering                               Math II              Computer                                   Computer,
Technology                                Math III             Skills                                     Communications
                                                                                                          or Power Firms;
                                                                                                          or Transfer to 4-yr.
                                                                                                          college BET
                                                                                                          program



                                                                                                                                     13
                E C C   2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •     w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                     Recommended                                Career
                                                                     High School Courses Campuses               Opportunities/
                              Hegis   Curr.     Pre-Admission        And/Or              Available              Further
     Degree Program           Code    Code      Recommendations      Experiences         C, N, S      Degree    Education

     Engineering              5609    0530      4 years Math,                            N            A.S.      Transfer to a
     Science                                    4 years Science                                                 4-year Engineer-
                                                (Physics and                                                    ing College or
                                                Chemistry)                                                      University

     Emergency                5508    1741      HS Diploma with      HS Regents:        C, S          A.A.S.    Private sector, hospitals,
     Management                                 Regents Math and     Math A                                     Local, state and federal
                                                Chemistry Exams      Math B                                     government, non-profit
                                                GED Diploma on       Chemistry                                  organizations, religious
                                                a case basis                                                    organizations, etc.

     Fire Protection          5507    0639      2 years Math,        Chemistry          S             A.A.S.    Firefighting
     Technology                                 2 years Science                                                 Agencies,
                                                                                                                Insurance Firms

     Food Service             5404    0573      Math I,              Health             N             A.A.S.    Hospitals, Long Term
     Administration —                           Chemistry or         Facility                                   Care, Residential
     Dietetic Technology                        Biology,             Experience                                 and Child Care
     Nutrition Care                             Interview*                                                      Facilities; Public
                                                                                                                Health Nutrition
                                                                                                                Programs, Schools
                                                                                                                Sales, Quick
                                                                                                                Service, Transfer
                                                                                                                to a four-year degree
                                                                                                                program

     Health Information       5213    1117      Biology,             Computer           N             A.A.S.    Hospitals,
     Technology                                 Math I,              Skills,                                    Long Term Care
                                                Typing,              Math II                                    Facilities, Mental
                                                80% H.S.                                                        Health Facilities,
                                                Average                                                         Rehab. Facilities,
                                                                                                                Ambulatory Health
                                                                                                                Care Centers,
                                                                                                                HMO’s, other
                                                                                                                Health Care
                                                                                                                Facilities

     Hotel                    5010    0572      HS Diploma           1 year Math,       N             A.A.S.    Restaurants, Hotels,
     Restaurant                                 or GED               Food                                       Hospitals, Fine
     Management                                                      Preparation/                               Dining, Catering,
                                                                     Restaurant                                 School Lunch,
                                                                     Experience                                 Nursing Homes

     Industrial               5312    0583      HS Diploma           2 years Math       S             A.0.S.    Computer Aided
     Technology                                 or GED, ACT/                                                    Drafting, Electrician,
                                                ASSET place-                                                    General Technology/
                                                ment test, mini-                                                Manufacturing
                                                mum level of
                                                competency in
                                                Math & English
                                                (Math 1)

     Information              5101    0581      3 years Math                            C, N, S        A.A.S.    Industrial and
     Technology                                 Math I,                                                          Business Firms,
                                                Math II,                                                         or transfer to
                                                Math III                                                         Bachelor’s Degree
                                                                                                                 Program


14
                      E C C    2 0 0 8    -   2 0 1 0    •     ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •     w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                Recommended                                 Career
                                                                High School Courses Campuses                Opportunities/
                         Hegis   Curr.     Pre-Admission        And/Or              Available               Further
Degree Program           Code    Code      Recommendations      Experiences         C, N, S       Degree    Education

Liberal Arts &           5649    0250      HS or GED                               C, N, S        A.S.      Transfer to
Science —                                  Diploma                                                          Bachelor’s
General Studies                                                                                             Degree Program

Liberal Arts &        5649       0201      HS or GED                               C, N, S        A.A.      Transfer to
Science —                                  Diploma                                                          Bachelor’s
Humanities &                                                                                                Degree Program
Social Science                                                                                              in Fine Arts,
(Humanities Interest)                                                                                       Philosophy,
                                                                                                            Music, etc.

Liberal Arts &          5649     0212      Math I,              2 years Math,      C, N, S        A.A.      Transfer to
Science —                                  1 year Science       2 years Science                             Bachelor’s
Humanities &                                                                                                Degree Program
Social Science                                                                                              in Economics,
(Social Science Interest)                                                                                   Government,
                                                                                                            Education,
                                                                                                            Sociology

Liberal Arts &           5649    1007      HS or GED                               C              A.A.      Transfer to
Science —                                  Diploma                                                          designated
Humanities &                               Interview                                                        Western New York
Childhood                                  All remedial work                                                Four-Year College
Education                                  completed                                                        to complete Bachelor
1-6                                                                                                         of Education Degree

Liberal Arts &           5649    0221      Math I,              Math 12,           N              A.S.      Transfer to
Science —                                  Math II,             Advanced                                    Bachelor’s
Mathematics &                              Math III             Algebra                                     Degree Programs
Science                                                                                                     in Math, Computer
(Math Interest)

Liberal Arts &           5649    0220      Math I,              Physics,           C, N, S        A.S.      Transfer to
Science —                                  9th-year Science,    Math III                                    Bachelor’s
Mathematics &                              Biology,                                                         Degree Programs
Science                                    Chemistry,                                                       depending on
(Science Interest)                         Math II                                                          Science Major

Medical                  5205    0600      Math I,              Math III,          N              A.A.S.    Medical
Laboratory                                 Math II,             Regents                                     Laboratories,
Technology                                 Chemistry (or        Chemistry,                                  Private Physicians’
                                           equivalent),         Regents                                     Laboratory,
                                           H.S. average         Biology                                     Pharmaceutical
                                           of 80%                                                           Laboratories,
                                                                                                            Environmental
                                                                                                            Laboratories, and
                                                                                                            Research
                                                                                                            Laboratories

Mechanical               5315    0493      Math I               Chemistry          N              A.A.S.    Tool Design
Engineering                                Math II              Physics                                     Companies, Air
Technology                                 Math III                                                         Conditioning and
                                                                                                            Refrigeration Firms

Medical Office           5214    0602      Required             Math I             N              A.A.S.    Physicians’ Office,
Assistant                                  80% Average                                                      Medical Health
                                           (High School),                                                   Care Facilities,
                                           Biology,                                                         Chiropractic Offices,
                                           Keyboarding                                                      Private Industry        15
                 E C C    2 0 0 8    -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •     w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                     Recommended                                 Career
                                                                     High School Courses Campuses                Opportunities/
                              Hegis   Curr.     Pre-Admission        And/Or              Available               Further
     Degree Program           Code    Code      Recommendations      Experiences         C, N, S       Degree    Education

     Mental Health            5216    0541      HS or GED                                C             A.S.      Alcoholism and
     Assistant —                                Diploma                                                          Alcohol Abuse
     Alcohol Counseling                                                                                          Centers,
     Mental Health            5216    0623      HS or GED                                C             A.S.      Substance
     Assistant —                                Diploma                                                          Abuse Centers
     Substance Abuse

     Nursing                  5208.10 0622      H.S. average 86% Health                  C, N          A.A.S.    Hospitals, Public
                                                within last 5 years Care                                         Health Agencies,
                                                or 3.0 GPA             Experience,                               Nursing Homes,
                                                including BI 150       Biology,                                  Physicians’ Offices,
                                                and BI 151 within Algebra                                        Home Health Care,
                                                last 7 years, or for                                             Schools Military,
                                                Evening Track                                                    Nurse Practitioner,
                                                BI 150, BI 151,                                                  Nurse Educator
                                                BI 152, and BI 153
                                                within last 7 yrs. All
                                                applicants are required
                                                to take and pass the
                                                Nurse Entrance Test (NET)
                                                (Educational Resources,
                                                Inc.) with a composite
                                                Math and English score
                                                of 50 or above.
                                                Math and English Pre-test.
                                                Min. Math competency
                                                at the MT 006 level or Math
                                                Dept. waiver and minimal
                                                English competency at the
                                                EN 110 level or English Dept.
                                                waiver. Min. grade of “C” required
                                                in all developmental courses, pre-
                                                requisites, co-requisites and required
                                                nursing courses except MT 111 –
                                                Math Dosage where minimum grade
                                                of 80% or “B-”is required.

     Occupational             5210    0665      83% HS Avg.,         HS Biology,         N             A.A.S.    Hospitals, Long
     Therapy                                    2.75 for College     HS Math                                     Term Care,
     Assistant                                  Students, two-       Level II or                                 Rehabilitation
                                                page handwritten     MT006 Level                                 Centers,School-
                                                letter of intent,    on ECC Math                                 Based Settings,
                                                25-hours             Placement Test                              Day TX Settings,
                                                volunteer exp.                                                   Developmental/
                                                in OT Clinic                                                     Physical Disability

     Office                   5005    0625      Math I or Business                       C             A.A.S.    Public and Private
     Technology                                 Arithmetic (or                                                   Industries & Firms,
                                                General Math),                                                   Educational and
                                                3 years English                                                  Facilities

     Office                   5005    0637      Two units HS                             C, N, S       A.A.S.    Office Managers,
     Management                                 Math, HS Avg.                                                    Admin. Services,
                                                of 80%                                                           Personnel, Admin.
                                                                                                                 Assistants




16
                      E C C    2 0 0 8    -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )     8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •    w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                 Recommended                                     Career
                                                                 High School Courses Campuses                    Opportunities/
                        Hegis    Curr.      Pre-Admission        And/Or              Available                   Further
Degree Program          Code     Code       Recommendations      Experiences         C, N, S         Degree      Education

Ophthalmic              5212     0549       2 years Math         Math II,              N             A.A.S.      Opticians,
Dispensing                                                       Gen. Science                                    Optometrist,
                                                                                                                 Ophthalmologist,
                                                                                                                 Large and Small
                                                                                                                 Independent Offices,
                                                                                                                 Health Maintenance
                                                                                                                 Organizations,
                                                                                                                 Wholesale Sales

Paralegal               5099     0691       1 Math Course,                             C             A.A.S.      Banking, Law,
                                            1 year Science                                                       Credit, Real Estate,
                                                                                                                 Insurance Agencies

Radiologic              5207     0669       2 years Math,        Math III,             C             A.A.S.      Hospitals,
Technology:                                 2 years Science,     2 years                                         Government
Radiation Therapy                           Letters of           Laboratory                                      Agencies, Private
Technology                                  Recommenda-          Science                                         Practice
                                            tion, Interview*

Physical Education      5299.30 1485        Music, Phy Ed.                             C,N,S,        A.S.
Studies

Recreation              5506.10 0609        Commmunica-          Biology, Art,         S             A.A.S.      Community,
Leadership                                  tion Skills,         Psychology,           “C”**                     Recreation and
                                            Computer             Music, Physical                                 Therapeutic
                                            Skills, Extra-       Education,                                      Facilities; Private,
                                            curricular           Health                                          Workplace,
                                            activities                                                           Commercial,
                                                                                                                 Therapeutic Agen-
                                                                                                                 cies; Parks, Bowling
                                                                                                                 Centers, Health,
                                                                                                                 Physical Education,
                                                                                                                 transfer to 4-yr. college

Respiratory             5215     0655       Math I,              Math I & II,          N             A.A.S.      Hospitals,
Care                                        Biology,             Physics,                                        Extended Care
                                            Chemistry,           Microbiology                                    Facilities,
                                            Physical Exam                                                        Physicians’ Offices,
                                                                                                                 Home Care

Tele-                   5310     1022                            3 years Math,        S              A.A.S.      Telecommunications,
communications                                                   2 years Science,                                Local/Wide Area
Technology                                                       2 years,Vocational                              Network Support;
                                                                 Electives (Electronics/                         Computer Support,
                                                                 Communication Specialty)                        Telephone, Cable,
                                                                 Cisco Network Academy                           Television, and
                                                                                                                 Alarm Firms

Visual                  5009     0677       HS or GED            Science,           S                A.A.S.      Printing and
Communication                               Diploma              Math, Keyboarding,                              Graphic Arts
Technology —                                                     Social Science,                                 Firms, Advertising
Graphic Arts &                                                   English                                         and Publishing Firms
Printing

* Informational interviews will be arranged by the individual departments to acquaint prospective students with the program.
**Reactivation pending. See Admissions.


                                                                                                                                             17
               E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C         •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     IEP Diplomas                                                          3. The student must accept all current academic program or col-
                                                                              lege requirements at the time of acceptance into the Fresh
     In May 1986, the New York State Board of Regents amended
                                                                              Start Program.
     the State Education Department regulations to provide for the
     issuance of high school individualized education program (IEP)        4. Students must apply to a new academic department.
     diplomas. Individuals holding IEP diplomas who are seeking
     admission to the college are not currently eligible for matricula-    5 Approved students will receive credit toward the total degree
     tion into academic departments other than the college’s General         requirement for only those courses taken prior to the stu-
     Studies 24-Hour Program. Applicants should contact both the             dent’s five-year absence from ECC in which the student
     Campus Admissions Office and the Disabled Students Services             earned a grade of “C” or better; at least 50 percent of the
     Office for assistance.                                                  degree or certificate requirements must be completed in the
         All students, including those with IEP Diplomas, who have           Fresh Start status.
     neither a high school diploma nor its equivalent, and who are         6. The Fresh Start program is extended only once during the
     admitted to post-secondary education programs on the basis of            student’s enrollment at ECC.
     their ability to benefit, must successfully complete an indepen-
     dently administered Ability to Benefit Test as required by the        7. Fresh Start is intended for students who experienced acade-
     U.S. Department of Education pursuant to Section 484 (d) of the          mic difficulties during their previous enrollment. Applications
                                                                              will not be considered for students not experiencing academ-


     Readmission to ECC
     Higher Education Act of 1965.
                                                                              ic difficulties who wish to improve their GPA for admission
                                                                              into a competitive program.

     Students who do not maintain continuous enrollment from one           8. Changes made to the student’s record under this policy are per-
     sequential semester to another must complete an Admissions               manent and may not be changed in the future for any reason.


                                                                           Readmission of Students Having
     Reactivation Application by visiting www.ecc.edu. Once the


                                                                           Been Academically Dismissed
     form is processed the student will receive a new admissions
     acceptance letter and packet through the mail. Students may
     change their program or campus also during this process also.

     Fresh Start Program                                                   After notification of dismissal, students may register for up to 11.5
     Students who have not registered for courses at the college in the    credit hours at the college as a non-matriculated student.
     past five years may apply for a Fresh Start status. Approved stu-     Academically dismissed students will need to reapply for admis-
     dents may receive credit for only previous courses with a “C”         sion as a non-matriculated student by completing an application
     grade or better which meet degree requirements for a new pro-         online at www.ecc.edu.
     gram of study. A maximum of 50 percent of the required credits        Non-matriculated students are ineligible for financial aid. Tuition
     toward a certificate or degree may be transferred from the stu-       and fees will be the responsibility of the student since they are no
     dent’s previous work at Erie Community College in the Fresh           longer eligible for financial aid. Students may appeal the dismissal
     Start program.                                                        decision for matriculation by completing an Academic Dismissal
     Students interested in seeking information or completing a Fresh      packet. Packets may be obtained by visiting the Student Support
     Start application packet may contact the Admissions Office prior      Centers on their campus. Completed packets may also be
     to the start of the semester or before completion of their first      returned to the Student Support Centers. The Academic
     semester of reactivation. Applicants interested in consideration      Standards Committee will review all completed packets on a
     for a Fresh Start must meet the following conditions.                 monthly basis. All appeal decisions will be mailed to the student
                                                                           after each monthly meeting.
     1. Complete a Fresh Start Application packet and submit to the
        Admissions Office you wish to enroll.                              For more information, or to obtain an Academic Dismissal packet
                                                                           please contact the Student Support Centers.
     2. Attach a personal letter to the Fresh Start packet stating the
        reasons for previous academic difficulties and how you plan        Admissions Review Process for Applicants with Felony
        to resolve future academic problems.                               Convictions and/or Dismissed from Previous Colleges or
                                                                           Universities
     3. Request an unofficial copy of your academic transcript and
        attached to the completed Fresh Start packet.                      Since 1997, all persons requesting admissions to undergraduate
                                                                           SUNY institutions are required to truthfully report felony con-
     4. Submit the completed Fresh Start packet to the Admissions          victions and/or disciplinary dismissals from previous college or
        Office you wish to matriculate.                                    universities.
     5. Contact the Admissions Office to schedule an appointment           Erie Community College has established a special Admissions
        with a counselor to review the completed Fresh Start packet.       Review Committee to assess applicants who fall within the afore-

     Fresh Start Process and Criteria
                                                                           said categories as described by SUNY.
                                                                           The following are admissions procedures for persons who: (1)
     1. All grades earned at ECC will remain on the transcript.            have been previously convicted of one or more criminal offenses,
     2. Any academic status (good standing, probation, dismiss             and/or (2) have been dismissed and/or expelled from a previous
        and/or graduation) will all reflect the cumulative average         college or university for disciplinary reasons.
        beginning with the course work completed after the mini-           These procedures are developed and implemented with considera-
        mum five-year absence.                                             tion given to the requirements set forth in Section 23A of the New
18                                                                         York State Correction Law and undergraduate SUNY institutions.

                    E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
In order to determine eligibility, it is required that the following       (5) Any information produced by the applicant, or produced
items be submitted.                                                            on the applicant’s behalf, in regard to his/her rehabilita-
                                                                               tion and good conduct.
For persons reporting one or more criminal offenses and convic-
tions:                                                                     (6) The legitimate interest of the college in protecting proper-
                                                                               ty, and the safety and welfare of specific individuals or the
• A letter of reasonable assurance or recommendation from a
                                                                               general public.
  parole or probation official on official letterhead and;
                                                                           (7) A certificate of good conduct issued to the applicant,
• A letter of explanation from the applicant stating specifically
                                                                               which shall create a presumption of rehabilitation in
  the nature of the criminal offense.
                                                                               regard to the offense or offenses specified therein.
For persons reporting disciplinary dismissals and/or expulsions
                                                                           (8) Appropriateness of the applicant’s background for the
from previous colleges or universities:
                                                                               academic program requested.
• A letter of explanation stating the violation and disciplinary
                                                                           (9) The relationship between the criminal offense(s) and/or
  dismissal from the previous institution of higher education,
                                                                               dismissal or expulsion and the availability of rehabilitative
  and;
                                                                               and other services at the college.
• A letter of explanation from the applicant stating specifi-
                                                                        A campus Admissions Review Committee consisting of three
  cally the student code of conduct violation or infraction.
                                                                        admissions counselors, the director of admissions or designee
Applications will remain incomplete and admission decision will         and two deans of students will be responsible for reviewing all
not be considered until the requested documents have been               applications of applicants who fall into the categories stated.
received. Although it is required to report such information,
                                                                        If the committee finds that the person’s admission would involve
please know these reasons are not automatic grounds for denial
                                                                        an unreasonable risk to property or the safety or welfare of spe-
of admission. Once all of the information is received, the
                                                                        cific individuals or the general public as outlined in the
Admissions Review Panel will meet and make a decision on
                                                                        Education Law, the applicant will be informed that his or her
admittance.
                                                                        admission has been denied with no reason given. Under Section
The Admissions Review Committee meets once a month. Only                754, should the applicant request it, a written statement of rea-
those applicants whose documentation was received in the                sons for the denial shall be provided within 30 days of the
Admissions Office two weeks prior to the next meeting will be           request.
forwarded to the committee.
                                                                        All admission recommendations will be submitted to the direc-
A. No application for admission to ECC shall be denied by rea-          tor of admissions or his or her designee in order to generate
   son of the applicant having been previously convicted of one         correspondence and document the applicant’s decision. If the
   or more criminal offenses, and/or having been expelled               committee does not find that an unreasonable risk exists, the
   and/or dismissed from college for disciplinary reasons unless:       applicant will be notified by the director of admissions or his or
                                                                        her designee that he or she has passed the special screening
   (1) There is direct relationship between the ECC campus              required by college policy and that the applicant can expect, in
       community and one or more of the previous criminal               the near future, and admissions decision based upon academic
       offenses and/or dismissals or expulsions;                        qualifications.

                                                                        Students with Disabilities
   or
   (2) The granting of admission to ECC would involve an
       unreasonable risk to property or to the safety or welfare        In compliance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Section 504
       of specific individuals or the general public.                   and the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act, Erie Community
                                                                        College does not discriminate against people with disabilities.
B. Applicants convicted of one or more previous criminal                Individuals who are disabled are required to meet the same
   offenses and/or dismissed or expelled from college for disci-        admissions requirements for their academic programs as their
   plinary reasons must meet the same admissions requirements           non-disabled peers. Admission of any student to an individual
   expected of all entering students.                                   program of study is contingent upon successful completion of
                                                                        the college’s Placement Test. Individuals who require assistance
C. Among those factors that will be included in the admission
                                                                        with alternative testing techniques for the Placement Test due to
   decision are:
                                                                        a disability may arrange for such assistance by contacting the
   (1) The bearing, if any, of the criminal offense(s) for which        Office of Disabled Student Services on the campus where they
       the person was previously convicted, and/or the dismissal        plan to take the test. Alternatives include large print copy,
       or expulsion will have on his/her fitness or ability to func-    scribes, readers, extended time, interpreters, etc. Individuals who
       tion successfully in the educational setting of the campus.      have vision problems, learning disabilities, hearing impairments,
                                                                        etc., who did not have any accommodations made for them at
   (2) The time that has elapsed since the occurrence of the
                                                                        the time of the Placement Test, and therefore, performed poorly
       criminal offense(s) and/or dismissal or expulsion.
                                                                        on it or who were notified that they do not appear to be eligible
   (3) The age of the person at the time of occurrence of the           for admission can submit documentation of their disability to the
       criminal offense(s) and/or dismissal or expulsion.               campus Disabled Student Services Office so that their applica-
                                                                        tion can be given a second and more in-depth review.
   (4) The seriousness of the offense(s) and/or dismissal or            Submission of such information is voluntary and will be kept
       expulsion.                                                       confidential. Knowledge of an individual’s disability will not
                                                                                                                                               19
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     adversely affect admission to the college. Individuals who check        1. Applicant must be 19 years of age or older, or;
     the voluntary self-identification of disability box on the SUNY
                                                                             2. Applicant must be at least 17 years of age and either has not
     application form must still contact the Disabled Student Services
                                                                                been regularly enrolled in a full-time high school program of
     Office to arrange for services. Additional information on
                                                                                instruction for at least one year or was a member of a high
     Disabled Student Services may be found in the Student Services
                                                                                school class that has graduated.
     Section of this catalog.

     SUNY Admissions Procedure
                                                                             To apply for the 24-Hour program, students must make an
                                                                             appointment with a counselor in the Admissions Office they
     1. Secure a SUNY Undergraduate Application from a high                  wish to enroll. The counselor will provide an overview of all edu-
        school counselor, ECC Admissions Office or Student                   cational opportunities available. In conjunction with the appli-
        Support Centers                                                      cant the counselor will decide on the best program based on the
     2. Complete the common admissions application                           student’s needs, high school transcript depicting the last period
     3. Send the application and fee to:                                     of attendance and other information.
            State University of New York                                     While students are in this program, they may be matriculated in
            Application Processing Center                                    those academic programs allowing non-high school graduates
            State University Plaza                                           until successful completion of 24 credit hours. Those credit
            Albany, NY 12246                                                 hours that are completed will be in addition to any developmen-
     4. Await word from the ECC Admissions Office regarding the              tal courses needed, which are noncredit.
        status of the application. Notification to fall applicants begins
        in February, and applicants for spring will be notified as early     Upon receipt of the High School Equivalency Diploma, the 24
        as October.*                                                         credit hours will be applied toward the requirements for the
     5. Take the placement test.                                             degree program.
     6. Students who score at an inappropriate level on the place-           Beginning with applications made on or after January 1, 2005 the
        ment test will be contacted by an ECC staff person to discuss        24 credits shall be distributed as follows: six credits in English
        available options.                                                   language arts, including writing, speaking and reading (litera-
     7. Applicants may apply directly to ECC by visiting                     ture); three credits in mathematics; three credits in natural sci-
        www.ecc.edu and complete the application at no cost.                 ence; three credits in social science; three credits in humanities
     *Any questions regarding the status of an application should be         and six credits in electives for college degree program require-
     made directly to the campus you wish to attend:                         ments.
     ECC City Campus                                                         Students dismissed from this program will be required to com-
     Admissions Office                                                       plete their high school equivalency diploma in the traditional
     45 Oak Street                                                           manner before being considered for readmission to ECC.
     Buffalo, NY 14203-2698                                                  (Note: This program does not replace the regularly established pro-
     (716)851-1155                                                           cedures in the granting of local high school diplomas or regents
                                                                             high school diplomas.)

                                                                             Veterans
     ECC North Campus
     Admissions Office
     6205 Main Street                                                        Erie Community College has had thousands of veterans and their
     Williamsville, NY 14221-7095                                            dependents enroll in degree and certificate programs approved
     (716) 851-1455                                                          by the State Education Department Bureau of Veterans
                                                                             Education. Students who will be attending the college using
     ECC South Campus                                                        Veterans’ benefits should keep the following in mind:
     Admissions Office
                                                                             1. Applications and information on Veterans’ Education
     4041 Southwestern Boulevard
                                                                                Assistance, tutorial services, or work study opportunities may
     Orchard Park, NY 14127-2199
                                                                                be obtained at one of the campus Veterans’ Affairs Offices.
     (716) 851-1655

     Certificate Programs
                                                                             2. Veterans should contact the campus Financial Aid Office for
                                                                                information on other grants for which they may be eligible in
     Students who plan to enroll full-time or part-time in a college            addition to Veterans’ benefits.
     certificate program must complete the same application process
     and requirements as students applying to a degree program.              3. College certificate programs are approved on an individual

     24-Hour Program for Non High School Graduates
                                                                                basis under the restrictions of PL93-508. Veterans consider-

     (NHSG) Admissions Procedure
                                                                                ing enrolling in one of the certificate programs should consult
                                                                                the campus Veterans’ Affairs Office before registration.
     The 24-Hour Program allows a student to work toward a New               The Veterans coordinators at each campus evaluate military
     York State High School Equivalency Diploma while pursuing 24            transfer credits using the ACE guide (American Counsel on
     hours of college coursework at Erie Community College. For              Education). This guide is made available by the Federal
     entry into this program, applicants must follow the admissions          Government in cooperation with the Department of Defense
     procedures previously described. In addition, applicants must           and educators from colleges around the country. If you are
     meet one of the following requirements:                                 enrolled in a program at ECC, you may be eligible for transfer
                                                                             credits for your MOS’s or technical schools taken in the service.

20
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Service Members Opportunity College                                      • Tuition and Fees: All tuition, fees and health insurance for
                                                                           the semester must be paid prior to registration. The I-20 will
Erie Community College has been designated as an institutional
                                                                           not be issued until all financial obligations are met.
member of Service Members Opportunity Colleges (SOC), a
group of more than 400 colleges and universities. As a SOC               • International Student Administrative Fee: An administrative
member, ECC recognizes the unique nature of the military                   fee of $150 USD per semester is charged to each international
lifestyle and has committed itself to easing the transfer of relevant      student attending ECC. The fee is included in the tuition bill
course credits, providing flexible academic residency require-             received each semester. The fee assists the college in main-
ments and crediting learning from appropriate military training            taining an International Resource Center. The International
and experiences. SOC has been developed jointly by educational             Student Administrative Fee is subject to change after publica-
representatives of each of the Armed Services, the Office of the           tion of this college catalog
Secretary of Defense and a consortium of 13 leading national
                                                                         Mandatory Health Insurance: Health insurance coverage is
higher education associations. It is sponsored by the American
                                                                         mandatory and must be provided by the ECC approved agency.
Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the
                                                                         There are no exceptions or waivers. Minimum enrollment is for 12
American Association of Community and Junior Colleges
                                                                         months and cost $588 USD for the age group of 22 to 27 years old.
(AACJC).
                                                                         For your rate, please contact the college bursar at (716) 851-1888.
    ECC has also been designated as a participating institution in
                                                                         Rates may change after publication of this catalog.
the Concurrent Admissions Program (ConAP). Individuals
entering the military service can receive a preliminary acceptance       • Deadlines: All application materials including official bank
to the college and be guaranteed a space upon their discharge              statement, official high school diploma, official high school
from active service. Information on both these programs can be             transcript, test scores, medical certificates, official TOEFL
obtained by contacting a Veterans Affairs counselor located at             score and supporting documents sent to ECC, are to be post-
each campus.                                                               marked no later than May 31 for September admission and

International Students
                                                                           October 31 for January admission. The purpose of the dead-
                                                                           line is to allow sufficient time to verify all official documents
To provide a smooth transition for the international student, Erie         received and to report required information to the proper
Community College provides an International Student Advisor,               government agencies. Applications received after the deadline
located at the North Campus. Prior to registration, the advisor            will be processed only if there is sufficient time for verifica-
will assist in the completion of the F-1 status forms. Federal regu-       tion of documents, time for reporting to appropriate agencies
lations pertaining to international student admissions, as outlined        and return mailing time.
in ECC’s Charter I-17, are summarized below:                                Nursing, Dental Hygiene and several other academic pro-
• Language Proficiency: Prior to an international student’s                 grams are very competitive and admission is on a space avail-
  acceptance at the college, the applicant must demonstrate a               able basis and on academic credentials. Deadline application
  certain level of proficiency in the English language. To meet             for these competitive programs are not the same as the
  this requirement, proficiency on the TOEFL (Test of English               International application deadline. Please consult an ECC
  as a Foreign Language), a score of 460 or higher on the paper             admissions counselor for additional admission requirements
  based test (or 140 on the computer based test or 48 on the                and additional deadlines.
  internet based test) is a mandatory requirement. Conditional           • Tuition: Tuition for one semester is approximately $3,500
  Acceptance: For all students with a TOEFL score below 550                USD. This does not include insurance, lab fees, books or
  on the paper based test (213 on the computer based test or 79            equipment. Tuition is subject to change after publication of
  on the Internet based test), mandatory enrollment during the             this college catalog.
  first semester of attendance in EN 132 Reading/Writing III,
  EN 137 Intensive English Grammar for ESL and EN 142                    • Full-Time Matriculation Enrollment: All F1 International
  Oral/Aural is mandatory. Satisfactory completion of the three            students must maintain continuous full-time enrollment of
  courses during the first semester is mandatory. Failure to               12.0 credit hours or more throughout the semester. All F-1
  enroll in these three courses will not allow enrollment for the          International students must maintain continuous enrollment
  following semester at ECC. Some academic programs are                    of a minimum of 9.0 credit hours of “seated” courses (non-
  competitive and enrollment is limited to space available and             internet courses, non-distant learning courses, non-telecours-
  academic credentials. Some examples of limited enrollment                es, or non-hybrid courses) throughout the semester. Student
  are Nursing and Dental Hygiene. Please consult an ECC                    failure to comply with this mandatory requirement will be
  admissions counselor for additional admission requirements.              reported to the Department of Homeland Security as Out of
                                                                           Status Visa. Until the out of status is adjudicated, the student
• Matriculation: Until English proficiency is attained, the stu-           will not be able to matriculate or enroll at ECC or transfer to
  dent will matriculate in the General Studies curriculum.                 another college.
• Financial Responsibility: At the time their visas are issued,          • Dormitory Facilities and Housing: Erie Community College
  international students must prove to the U.S. consul that they           does not have dormitory facilities. For a list of possible avail-
  can adequately finance their stay in the United States. The              able housing, please contact the Dean of Students or visit the
  prospective international student must provide to ECC                    Web site buffalonews.com.
  International Office the “Affidavit of Support”, the
  “International Application Financial Form” and an official             • The Application: The International Application is available
  bank statement. Facsimile, copies and computer print-outs                on the Web site at www.ecc.edu. Also, to receive an interna-
  are not acceptable. Financial aid is not available for interna-          tional application by mail, please write to:
  tional students.
                                                                                                                                               21
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Erie Community College, North Campus                                      OF 101           Basic Keyboarding
     International Student Office; G-128                                       OF 102           College Keyboarding
     6205 Main Street, Williamsville, New York 14221-7095                      SP 210           Spanish Composition I
     U.S.A.                                                                    SP 211           Spanish Composition II
                                                                               DA 106           Microcomputers
     To receive an electronic International Application e-mail:
                                                                               BU 140           Business Organization
     Rosolowski@ecc.edu
                                                                               GS 111           College Success Skills
     • Return the International Application using any postal mail
                                                                            Courses recommended for ESL students to improve English lan-
       (government postal service or private postal service). The
                                                                            guage skills are:
       International Student office does not accept any facsimiles,
       copies, or computer e-mail applications. The completed                  EN 030           Reading/Writing I*
       application should be mailed to:                                        EN 031           Reading/Writing II*
                                                                               EN 132           Reading/Writing III**
     Erie Community College, North Campus
                                                                               EN 137           Intensive Grammar**
     International Student Office, G-128
                                                                               EN 040           Oral/Aural I*
     6205 Main Street, Williamsville, New York 14221-7095
                                                                               EN 041           Oral/Aural II*
     U.S.A.


     ESL Support Center
                                                                               EN 142           Oral/Aural III**
                                                                               EN 147           Accent reduction**


     (English as a Second Language)
                                                                            *College credit is given for these courses, which may be used to
                                                                            meet credit requirements of scholarship, financial aid, or immigra-
                                                                            tion programs. These courses may not, however, be used as elec-
     A broad range of services are offered to students from linguisti-
                                                                            tives toward graduation.
     cally and culturally diverse backgrounds whose dominant lan-
     guage is not English. Students seeking entrance, information, or       **Degree credit is given for EN132, EN137, EN142, and EN147.
     other help are encouraged to visit the ESL Support Center locat-       These courses satisfy Liberal Arts or general elective requirements.
     ed in room 203 at City Campus or call (716) 851-1079.                  In addition, EN132 helps students prepare for the TWE (Test of
         To provide entry assistance, admissions and vocational             Written English). EN132, EN137, EN142, and EN147 also help
     recruitment counselors are available at City Campus. Bilingual,        students prepare for the TOEFL exam.
     Spanish-English support is offered in these offices as well as in
     the Child Development Center. In addition, Spanish speaking            Students who participate in our services become graduates of pro-
     faculty are available for academic help.                               grams and curricula throughout the college upon successful comple-
         Advisement is coordinated through the ESL Support Center.          tion of courses.

                                                                            ESL Scholarships
     Here, the staff works with students in planning programs and
     helping with placement into appropriate classes. Courses provid-
     ed to ESL students target the improvement of English, math and         ESL students at ECC may apply for the Emmanuel & Fallia
     academic skills. Degree credit introductory courses are also avail-    Phufas scholarship. Other scholarships are available through the
     able to all ESL students. These courses are useful in vocabulary       ECC Foundation and the community. In addition, the Hispanic
     and concept building, which may be applied to many college             Women's League offers scholarships to eligible Hispanic stu-
     programs and are credited, in most cases, to the program of the        dents. Information may be obtained by contacting the ESL
     student's choice.                                                      Support Center.

                                                                            Transfer Students
         Additional services are provided by tutors and mentors locat-
     ed in the ESL and Language Labs. The ESL Lab houses
     resource materials and computers for students’ use, and the            A transfer student (anyone who has completed at least one
     Language Lab offers state-of-the-art audio visual equipment to         course at another college) must follow the admissions procedure
     improve language skills.                                               as outlined for new students enrolling in a degree or certificate
         The goal of the ESL Support Center is to prepare students          program and must forward an official transcript of all his/her
                                                                            earlier college work to the Admissions Office.

                                                                            Honors Concentration
     whose dominant language is not English to participate with con-
     fidence and success in college programs and curricula at Erie
     Community College. Through the ESL Support Center, students
     are prepared to have a rewarding experience at ECC.                    Students may apply to the Erie Community College Honors
                                                                            Concentration at the time of their application to the college.
     Courses recommended for ESL students are:                              Students may also apply to the concentration in subsequent
                                                                            semesters. Although the high school record is strongly consid-
        SO 100          Introduction to Sociology
                                                                            ered in admitting students to the concentration, it is not the only
        CH 100          Introduction to Chemistry*
                                                                            consideration. Those with ability and a keen interest in education
        BI 107          Human Biology
                                                                            are also encouraged to apply. Final screening is done through the
        PH 120          Environmental Science
                                                                            college placement test and a personal interview.
        MT 001          Basic Mathematics*
                                                                                The Honors Concentration is open to both full and part-time
        MT 013          Elementary Algebra I & II*
                                                                            day students in any program.
        MT 006          Elementary Algebra I*
                                                                                The concentration provides an enriched academic experience
        MT 007          Elementary Algebra II*
                                                                            through small honors classes and the Honors Colloquium, which
        SP 100          Literature in Translation
                                                                            allows for experiences beyond those of the normal classroom
                                                                            such as lectures, trips, debates and discussions.
22
                    E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
    To graduate as an Honors Concentration Fellow, a student         and natural products, environmental); forest engineering; paper
must complete at least five Honors courses, three semesters of       science and engineering; wood products engineering; forestry
Honors Colloquium and maintain a QPA of 3.25. To graduate as         (resource management, forest resource science, management sci-
an Honors Concentration Associate, a student must complete at        ence, environmental education and communications, urban
least three Honors courses, one semester of honors Colloquium        forestry, world forestry, applied resource management) and envi-
and maintain a QPA of at least 3.25.                                 ronmental studies. In addition, the college offers a dual major
    Each campus has an Honors Coordinator: at City Campus,           program in forestry and biology which requires an additional
Jill Kearns-Bodkin, (716) 270-2968; at South Campus,                 semester in residence. The program in landscape architecture
Christopher Pulinski, (716) 270-2892; at North Campus, Aaron         leads to a B.L.A. degree (Bachelor of Landscape Architecture)
Thomas, (716) 851-1338. Applications may be obtained from the        after three years of study at ESF.


ESF Program
campus coordinator or from the Admissions Office.                        Persons planning to transfer should follow the program
                                                                     requirements in consultation with our Pre-Environmental Science
                                                                     and Forestry campus advisor for selection of electives which vary

Pre-Environmental Science & Forestry
                                                                     according to the curriculum at ESF. Successful graduates of Erie
                                                                     Community College’s Pre-Environmental Science and Forestry
This program is designed for those students who ultimately wish      Program generally gain admission to the SUNY College of
to transfer to the SUNY College of Environmental Science and         Environmental Science and Forestry with full junior class status.
Forestry, an upper division/graduate center.                         Students who are not able to complete all prerequisites may still
    After the first two years of study at Erie Community College,    be considered for admission with deficiencies. Please consult an
transfers to ESF may apply to a variety of programs at Syracuse      Admissions Counselor. ECC also has articulated a 1 + 1 with ESF
which lead to a B.S. degree in the Environmental Sciences and        leading to an A.A.S. degree from ESF in Forest Technology
Forestry. They include the biological sciences (botany and forest    (Forest Ranger). Consult the pre-ESF advisor Dr. Gerald
pathology, entomology, zoology, wildlife biology, pest manage-       Berkowitz at 851-1559 or at berkowg@ecc.edu for details.
ment); chemistry (natural and synthetic polymers, biochemistry



                                                                                                                                         23
               E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Admissions – Special Programs
     Articulation Agreements - earning college credit while still in high school
     Articulation agreements allow students to earn college credit by successfully completing a course in high school. Articulation agreements
     are high school courses that equal entry level college courses. Articulation agreements are made between high school and college faculty
     to ensure a seamless academic transition from high school to college.

     Advantage to Students
     •   Eliminates the duplication of learning
     •   Reduces the required number of credit hours necessary to graduate from ECC
     •   Enroll into a program at ECC with credits already completed in high school
     •   Articulated credit is free and is awarded after the student is accepted at ECC

     How to Apply for Articulated Credit
     1. Maintain an 85 percent average in the high school course, complete the course and graduate from your high school.
     2. Complete the Articulation Credit/Reference form. Forms are available from high school teachers, guidance counselors, or by calling
        ECC’s Academic Career Pathways office at (716) 270-2826.
     3. Complete the ECC application. Send the application, the credit form, and a copy of your high school transcript to the ECC
        Admissions Office at the campus you plan to attend.
     4. You will receive a letter from Admissions confirming your request for Articulation credit.
     5. Inform your advisor at registration about the course(s) you are eligible to receive credit for.

     Academic Career Pathways Office
     Our programs ease the transition from high school to college and support students throughout their course of study at Erie Community
     College:
     • Assistance with articulation credit
     • Summer programs to explore technologies for college credit
     • Information sessions regarding technology programs for students and their families
     • Internship programs and after school courses for high school students
     • Profiles of technology and business programs to assist in making the right decision
     For more information, contact the Academic Career Pathways office at (716) 270-2826.

     Current Articulation Agreements
     High schools are listed in the left column with the ECC program that offers the credit listed on the right.
     Students must be enrolled in a related program in high school to receive the credit.

                                                       High School         ECC Program
                                               Buffalo Public Schools      Architectural Technology
                                                                           Automotive Technology
                                                                           Building Management & Trades
                                                                           Business Administration
                                                                           Computer Aided Drafting/Design Technology
                                                                           Computer Information Systems
                                                                           Computer Repair Technology
                                                                           Computer Science
                                                                           Construction Technology
                                                                           Early Childhood
                                                                           Electrical Engineering Technology
                                                                           Hotel Restaurant Management
                                                                           Industrial Technology
                                                                           Mechanical Engineering Technology
                                                                           Medical Office Assistant
                                                                           Office Management and Administration
                                                                           Telecommunications Technology
                                                                           Visual Communication Technology–
                                                                             Graphic Arts/Printing
                                                    CAO Head Start         Early Childhood
                             Childcare Coalition of Niagara Frontier       Early Childhood
                                     Cattaraugus-Alleghany BOCES           Automotive Technology
                                                                           Automotive Trades/Autobody Repair
                                                                           Criminal Justice
                                                                           Culinary Arts
                                                                           Early Childhood
24
                     E C C    2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C        •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                   Electrical Engineering Technology
                                                   Medical Office Assistant
                                          Eden     Architectural Technology
                                                   Business Administration
                                                   Computer Aided Drafing/Design Technology
                                Erie 1 BOCES       Architectural Technology
                                                   Automotive Technology
                                                   Automotive Trades/Autobody Repair
                                                   Building Management & Trades
                                                   Computer Aided Drafting/Design Technology
                                                   Computer Information Systems
                                                   Computer Repair Technology
                                                   Criminal Justice
                                                   Culinary Arts
                                                   Dental Laboratory Technology
                                                   Early Childhood
                                                   Electrical Engineering Technology
                                                   Hotel Restaurant Management
                                                   Industrial Technology
                                                   Mechanical Engineering Technology
                                                   Medical Office Assistant
                                                   Telecommunications Technology
                                                   Visual Communications Technology-
                                                     Graphic Arts/Printing
                                Erie II BOCES      Architectural Technology
                                                   Automotive Trades/Autobody Repair
                                                   Automotive Technology
                                                   Building Management & Trades
                                                   Computer Aided Drafting/Design Technology
                                                   Computer Repair Technology
                                                   Criminal Justice
                                                   Culinary Arts
                                                   Engineering Science
                                                   Hotel Restaurant Management
                                                   Industrial Technology
                                                   Mechanical Engineering Technology
                                                   Technology and English Department
                                                   Telecommunications Technology
                                                   Visual Communications Technology-
                                                     Graphic Arts/Printing
                      Genesee Valley BOCES         Automotive Technology
                                                   Culinary Arts
                                                   Hotel Restaurant Management
                                                   Visual Communications Technology-
                                                     Graphic Arts/Printing
                                      Hamburg      Business Administration
                                                   Computer Information Systems
                                                   Drafting Technology
                                                   Emergency Medical Technology
                                                   Industrial Technology
                                                   Office Management
                                       Iroquois    Business Administration
                                                   Computer Information Systems
                                                   Office Management & Administration
                                Kenmore East       Mechanical Engineering
                                                   Telecommunications Technology
                                Kenmore West       Mechanical Engineering
                                                   Telecommunications Technology
                                  Lackawanna       Business Administration
                                                   Computer Information Systems
                                                   Office Management & Administration
                                      Lakeshore    Business Administration
                                                   Computer Aided Drafting/Design Technology
                                                   Computer Information Systems                  25
E C C   2 0 0 8   -   2 0 1 0     •    ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C   •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                       Office Management & Administration
                                                       Telecommunications Technology
                                         Lancaster     Biology Department
                                                       Health Information Technology
                                                       Medical Office Assistant
                             Monroe 1 BOCES            Automotive Trades/Autobody Repair
                             Monroe 2 BOCES            Automotive Trades/Autobody Repair
                                  Niagara Falls        Telecommunications Technology
                       Niagara/Orleans BOCES           Automotive Technology
                                                       Automotive Trades/Autobody Repair
                                                       Criminal Justice
                                                       Culinary Arts
                                                       Electrical Engineering Technology
                                                       Industrial Technology
                                                       Mechanical Engineering Technology
                                                       Telecommunications Technology
                                                       Visual Communications Technology-
                                                         Graphic Arts/Printing
                               Oneida BOCES            Automotive Trades/Autobody Repair
                                Orchard Park           Architectural Technology
                                 Sweet Home            Telecommunications Technology
                              West Seneca East         Business Administration
                                                       Computer Information Systems
                                                       Early Childhood
                                                       Hotel Restaurant Management
                                                       Office Management & Administration
                                                       Visual Communication Technology
                              West Seneca West         Business Administration
                                                       Computer Information Systems
                                                       Early Childhood
                                                       Hotel Restaurant Management
                                                       Office Management & Administration




26
     E C C   2 0 0 8   -   2 0 1 0   •     ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C    •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Project Lead the Way Articulations
   Project Lead the Way is a sequence of courses offered at the high school and BOCES centers for pre-engineering students. Erie
Community College has articulation agreements with the following high schools and BOCES centers for Project Lead the Way:
   Alden, BOCES I, Cheektowaga, Clarence, Depew, Frontier, Lakeshore, Lancaster, Maryvale, Springville-Griffith, Sweet Home, West
Seneca East ,West Seneca West, Williamsville East, Williamsville North and Williamsville South.
The following chart lists the high school courses at the top and the ECC departments offering credit on the left side. (For example, if a
student completes Intro to Engineering DDP, they are eligible for credit in Construction Management Engineering Technology for
CO202)

Articulation Agreements for Project Lead the Way
ECC Academic              Secondary School Courses
Department
                       Intro To                Engineering     Digital                  Computer          Principles       Civil Engineering
                       Engineering/            Design          Electronics              Manufacturing     Engineering      Architecture
                       Design (IED)            (EDD)           (DE)                     (CIM)             (POE)            (CEA)
Computer Repair        -                       -               CE 240/CE 241 (4)        -                 -                -
Architectural Tech     AR 342 (3)              -               -                        -                 -                AR 342 (3)
Computer Aided Design DF 106/DF 107 (8)        -               -                        -                 -                DF 490 (2)
Electrical Eng Tech    EL 113 (3)              -               EL 156/EL 157 (4.5)**    -                 -                -
Mechanical Eng Tech    ME 250 (2)              -               -                        ME 208 (2)        -                -
Computer Science       -                       -               CE 240/CE 241 (4)        -                 -                -
Engineering Science    ES 148/ES 149 (2)       -               -                        -                 ES 138 (1)       -
Civil Engineering Tech CI 326 (2)              -               -                        -                 -                -
Industrial Tech        IT 115 (2)              IT 290 (1.5)    Pick One Above           IT 225(4)         ES 138 (1)       -

** EL 156/EL157 students may have to take a proficiency exam in order to receive credit.

Post-Secondary Articulation Agreements
Cassadaga Job Corps Center                                Building Management and Maintenance
Central Police Service                                    Criminal Justice
Clarkson Center                                           Health Sciences
Child Care Coalition of the Niagara Frontier              Early Childhood
Educational Opportunity Center                            Computer Repair Technology
Erie County Dept. of Emergency Services                   Fire Protection Program
Millard Fillmore Hospital                                 Liberal Arts Science
Sisters of Charity Hospital                               Liberal Arts Science
UAW/Ford—ECC—Buffalo State                                Industrial Technology
UAW/GM—ECC—Buffalo State                                  Industrial Technology

Cooperative/Dual Degree Articulation Agreement
Erie Community College maintains Cooperative and/or Dual Degree programs with several baccalaureate institutions. For information
related to these special programs, contact the Admissions Office.

Joint Admissions Agreements
Erie Community College has entered into a number of Joint Admissions Agreements with area colleges.
   Students planning to pursue a bachelor’s degree in selected areas may begin their program at ECC. Transfer of credit and entry to a
parallel major at the four-year school is guaranteed following completion of their first two years at ECC and the attaining of a specific
grade point average or required courses listed in the agreement.
   Interested students must indicate their interest in Joint Admissions by the end of their first semester of attendance. (Transfer students
are not eligible for this option.) The specific four-year unit and intended major must be included in the ECC application. Final accep-
tance will be verified upon receipt of an acceptance letter from the Admission Office of the four-year unit.
   All majors at Buffalo State, Daemen, D’Youville and the University at Buffalo can be selected for Joint Admissions consideration.
There is a transfer counselor at each ECC campus who can further explain the program.
   Additional Joint admissions agreements are being negotiated. For more information, contact the ECC Campus Counseling Center.
   Students not accepted or eligible for the Joint Admissions Program can still transfer under the departmental articulation agreements
listed in the charts below.




                                                                                                                                               27
               E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )     8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Private Colleges                                         Four-Year        ECC                                         Joint
     & Universities                                            Program         Program                                Admissions
     Alfred University                           Business Administration       Business Management A.S., A.A.S.
     Bryant and Stratton                         Business Administration       Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
     Canisius                                                 Accounting       Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
                                                                  Finance      Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
                                                             Management        Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
                                        Management Information Systems         Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
                                                                Marketing      Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
                                                       Physical Education      Physical Education
     Clarkson                                   Aeronautical Engineering       Engineering Science
                                                   Chemical Engineering        Engineering Science
                                                        Civil Engineering      Engineering Science
                                                   Electrical Engineering      Engineering Science
                                              Environmental Engineering        Engineering Science
                                                 Mechanical Engineering        Engineering Science
                                                             Management        Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
     Daemen                                              Biochemistry BS       LAS-Math & Science=Science Interest A.S.              •
                                                               Biology BS      LAS-Math & Science=Science Interest                   •
                                              Business Administration BS       Business Administration A.A.S.                        •
                                         Childhood Education-English BS        LAS-Humanities & Social Sciences A.A.                 •
                    Childhood Education/Including Special Education Eng        LAS-Humanities & Social Science                       •
                    Early Childhood Education/Including Early Childhood        Early Childhood Education                             •
                                  Health Care Studies/Community Health         Health Information Tech A.A.S.                        •
                             Natural Science-Health Science Specialization     LAS-Math & Science - Science Interest                 •
                                                              Nursing BS       Nursing A.A.S.                                        •
                                                          Psychology BA        LAS-Humanities & Social Science
                                                                                Social Science Interest                              •
                                                           Social Work BS      LAS-Humanities & Social Science
                                                                                Social Science Interest A.A.                         •
                                               Visual Arts Education BA        LAS Humanities & Social Science Humanities interest   •
                                               Nursing (1+2+1 Program)         Nursing A.A.S.
     D’Youville                                               Accounting       Business Administration A.S. A.A.S.                   •
                                       Advance Program in Management           Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.                  •
                                     English BA: Literature Concentration      LA - General Studies A.S.                             •
                                                               History BA      LA- General Studies A.S.                              •
                                                    International Business     Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.                  •
                                                             Management        Business Administration A.S. A.A.S.                   •
                                                           Psychology BA       LA-General Studies                                    •
                                                                Sociology      LA-General Studies
     Excelsior College                  Appropriate baccalaureate degree       Associate Degree
     Franklin University                                   Accounting BS       Business Administration
                                                 Applied Management BS         Architectural Technology
                                                 Applied Management BS         Automotive Technology
                                                 Applied Management BS         Civil Engineering Technology
                                                 Applied Management BS         Computer Repair Technology
28
                   E C C     2 0 0 8    -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C   •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                            Applied Management BS          Construction Management Engineering Technology
                                            Applied Management BS          Computer Aided Drafting and Design
                                            Applied Management BS          Engineering Science
                                            Applied Management BS          Industrial Technology
                                            Applied Management BS          Office Management
                                            Applied Management BS          Office Technology
                                          Business Administration BS       Business Administration AS
                                                Computer Science BS        Computer Science
                                        Health Care Management BS          Dental Hygiene
                                        Health Care Management BS          Dental Laboratory Technology
                                        Health Care Management BS          Mental Health Assistant-Alcohol Counseling
                                        Health Care Management BS          Mental Health Assistant-Substance Abuse
                                        Health Care Management BS          Nursing
                                        Health Care Management BS          Ophthalmic Dispensing
                                        Health Care Management BS          Radiologic Technology: Radiation Therapy Technology
                                        Health Care Management BS          Respiratory Care
                                                     Management BS         Business Administration
                                       Public Safety Management BS         Criminal Justice/Police
Hilbert                                   Business Administration BS       Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
                                          Communication Studies BA         Communication & Media Arts A.S.
                                                  Criminal Justice BS      Criminal Justice A.S., A.A.S.
                                                     Human Services        Mental Health Assistant – Alcohol Counseling A.S.
Ithaca (affiliation)                              Physical Education       Physical Education
Kettering University                            Applied Mathematics        Mathematics
                                                      Applied Physics      Physics
                                                   Computer Science        Computer Science
                                                          Engineering      Engineering Science
                                            Environmental Chemistry        Chemistry
                                                         Management        Business Administration
Medaille                                                   Biology BS      LAS – General Studies A.S.
                                          Business Administration BS       Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
                                    Bus. Adm. BBA Accelerated Div.         Business Administration
                                     Computer Information Systems          Computer Information Systems
                                     Computer Information Systems          LAS – General Studies A.S.
                                                  Criminal Justice BS      Criminal Justice A.A.
                                                  Criminal Justice BS      LAS – General Studies A.S
                                                               English     LAS – General Studies A.S.
                                       Health & Human Services BS          LAS – General Studies A.S.
                                          Media Communications BS          Communications & Media Arts A.S.
                                          Media Communications BS          LAS – General Studies A.S.
                                                  Psychology BA, BS        LAS – General Studies A.S.
                                              Sports Management BS         Business Administration A.S.
                                                 Sports Management         LAS – General Studies A.S.
                                           Veterinary Technology BS        LAS – General Studies A.S.
                                               Visual and Digital Arts     LAS – General Studies A.S.
Niagara University                                        Accounting       Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
                                                           Commerce        Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.
                                       Computer & Information Sys.         Computer Science A.S.
                                                      General Biology      LAS-A.S.
                                      Hotel Restaurant Management          Culinary Arts A.O.S.
                                      Hotel Restaurant Management          Hotel Technology A.A.S.
                                      Hotel Restaurant Management          Restaurant Management A.A.S.
                                                         Mathematics       LAS - A.S.
NY Institute of Massage                 NYIM – sequence of courses         ECC –A.S. – General Studies
Paul Smith                                    Hotel, Resort, Tourism
                                                Management BS 2+2          Hotel Restaurant Management A.A.S.
                                              Hotel, Resort, Tourism
                                                     Management BS         Hotel Restaurant Management A.A.S.
                                              Culinary Arts & Service
                                                   Management BPS          Culinary Arts (2+2 option)
RIT                           The Center for Multidisciplinary Studies     All A.A., A.S., A.A.S.

                                                                                                                                 29
              E C C       2 0 0 8   -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C   •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Simmons Institute
     of Funeral Services     Prof. Funeral Directors/Embalmers 1+1 AOS          Course Specific classes
     Villa Maria                                      Interior Design BFA       Architectural Technology

     State University of New York
     Alfred State                               Architectural Technology        Architectural Technology – Construction Technology
                                           Court/Realtime Reporting AAS         Office Management & Administration Court/Realtime:
                                                                                Introduction Certificate
                                                  Mechanical Engineering        Manufacturing Technology BT
                                                  Mechanical Engineering        Mechanical Engineering BS
     Buffalo State                           All College Honors Program         Honors Concentration – specific guidelines        •
                                                        Biology Education       LAS - Science A.S.                                •
                                                 Broadcasting, Journalism       Communication & Media Arts A.S.                   •
                                                  Business Administration       Business Administration                           •
                                                    Childhood Education         LAS Humanities & Social Science                   •
                                                           Communication        LAS - Humanities A.A.                             •
                                          Computer Information Systems          Computer Information Systems                      •
                                          Computer Information Systems          Computer Science A.S.                             •
                                                           Criminal Justice     Criminal Justice A.A.                             •
                                          Department of Business Studies        Business Administration A.A.S.                    •
                                                               Dietetics BS     LAS - General Studies A.S.                        •
                                              Early Childhood Education         Early Childhood
                                       Electrical Engineering Technology        Electrical Engineering Technology A.A.S.          •
                                       Electrical Engineering Technology        Electrical Engineering Technology A.A.            •
                                                         English Education      LAS - Humanities A.A.                             •
                                                              Fine Arts BA      LAS - Humanities A.A.                             •
                                                   Forensic Chemistry BS        LAS - Math & Science A.S.                         •
                                                        Health & Wellness       LAS - General Studies A.S.                        •
                                                 Industrial Technology BS       Civil Engineering Technology A.A.S.               •
                                                 Industrial Technology BS       Industrial Technology                             •
                                                           Mathematics BS       LAS – Math & Science A.S.                         •
                                 Mechanical Engineering Technology BT           Mechanical Engineering Technology                 •
                                                  Social Studies Education      LAS - Social Science                              •
                                                               Social Work      LAS - Social Science A.A.                         •
     Canton                                               Mortuary Science      Funeral Home Management Course                    •
     Fredonia                                       Childhood Education         Early Childhood
                                                         Computer Science       Computer Science
                                                         Computer Science       Computer Information Systems
                                                              Mathematics       LAS - Math
                                                           Math Secondary       LAS – Math
     Hudson Valley                                        Mortuary Science      Funeral Home Management courses
     Jamestown Community        Professional Pilot Degree Program A.A.S.        ECC specific courses
     SUNY Institute of
     Technology at Utica Rome                       Telecommunications          Telecommunications                               •
     University at Buffalo                             Anthropology BA          LAS - Social Science A.A.                        •
                                               Aerospace Engineering BS         Engineering Science A.S.                         •
                                                           Anthropology         LAS - Social Science A.A.                        •
                                                   Anthropology BA ----
                                             (Pre-med, Pre-Dental Track)        LAS - Science A.S.                               •
                                                           Biotechnology        LAS - Science A.S.                               •
                                                 Business Administration        Business Administration A.S., A.A.S.             •
                                                 Business Administration        LAS - Social Science A.A.                        •
                                                Chemical Engineering BS         Engineering Science A.S.                         •
                                                       Chemistry BA, BS         LAS (Mathematics & Science
                                                                                Science (Science Interest) A.S.                  •
                                                     Chemistry BA, BS           LAS - Science A.S.                               •
                                                   Civil Engineering BS         Engineering Science A.S.
                                                  Communications BA             Communications & Media Arts                      •
                                                  Communications BA             LAS - Humanities A.A.                            •
                                               Computer Engineering BS          LAS - Mathematics A.S.                           •
                                               Computer Engineering BS          LAS - Mathematics & Science
                                                                                  (Mathematics Interest) A.S.                    •
30
                     E C C   2 0 0 8   -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )     8 5 1 - 1 E C C   •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                              Computer Science B.A. BS          Computer Science A.S.                  •
                                                           Economics BA         LAS Social Science A.A.                •
                                               Electrical Engineering BS        Engineering Science A.S.               •
                                                          Engineering BS        Engineering Science A.S.
                                                 Engineering Physics BS         Engineering Science A.S.               •
                                                               English BA       LAS – Humanities A.A.
                                                 Environmental Eng. BS          Engineering Science A.S.               •
                                                          Geography BA          LAS - Social Science                   •
                                                                  Geology       LAS – Science A.S.
                                                                   History      LAS - Social Studies A.A.              •
                                               Industrial Engineering BS        Engineering Science A.S.               •
                                                            Legal Studies       Paralegal                              •
                                 Math-BA Computing & Applied Math               LAS Mathematics A.S.                   •
                                                 Mechanical Engineering         Engineering Science A.S.
                                                        Media Study BA          Comm. and Media Arts A.S.              •
                                                 Medical Technology BS          Medical Lab Technology A.A.S.          •
                                                 Nuclear Medicine Tech.         LAS - Science A.S.                     •
                                                               Nursing BS       Nursing A.A.S.                         •
                                                               Nursing BS       Nursing LPN/RN Transfer                •
                                                     Political Science BA       LAS - Social Science A.A.              •
                                                      Psychology BA, BS         LAS - Social Science A.A.              •
                Social Science Interdisciplinary: Environmental Studies         LAS Social Science A.A.                •
             Social Science Interdisciplinary: Health & Human Services          Early Childhood A.A.S.                 •
             Social Science Interdisciplinary: Health & Human Services          LAS Social Science A.A.                •
             Social Science Interdisciplinary: Health & Human Services          Mental Health Assistant Alcohol
                                                                                 Counseling A.S.                       •
             Social Science Interdisciplinary: Health & Human Services          Mental Health Assistant
                                                                                Substance Abuse A.S.                   •
             Social Science Interdisciplinary: Health & Human Services          Occupational Therapy Assistant         •
                                 Social Science Interdisciplinary Studies       LAS – Humanities A.A.
                          Social Science Interdisciplinary: Legal Studies       Criminal Justice A.A.                  •
                          Social Science Interdisciplinary: Legal Studies       LAS Social Science A.A.                •
                          Social Science Interdisciplinary: Legal Studies       Paralegal A.A.S.                       •
                Social Science Interdisciplinary: Urban & Public Policy         LAS Social Science A.A.                •


Cooperative Agreements
                                                            Sociology BA        LAS Social Science A.A.                •



ECC has entered into several international cooperative
agreements leading toward faculty and staff exchanges,
as well as joint educational planning and development.
• Mohawk College of Applied Arts and Technology–
  Hamilton, Ontario
• Niagara College of Applied Arts and Technology–
  Welland, Ontario
Erie Community College admissions decisions and
procedures are in compliance with the SED
Commissioner’s Regulation 52.2D which states
admission of students shall be determined through an
orderly process using published criteria which shall
be uniformly applied. Among other considerations,
the admissions process shall encourage the increased
participation in collegiate programs at all levels of
persons from groups historically under-represented in
such programs.
Admission to the college will not be denied on the
basis of age, sex, disability, ethnic origin, nationality,
political belief or affiliation, race, or religion.



                                                                                                                           31
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •     ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C   •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                            Withdrawal from a Course
                                                                            To withdraw from a course, request a withdrawal form from the
                                                                            Registrar’s Office. This form must be signed by the student and
                                                                            submitted to the Registrar’s Office for processing.
                                                                            Remember: No registration transaction is complete until the
                                                                            Registrar’s Office receives the proper forms.

                                                                            Official Enrollment/Attendance in a Course

     REGISTRATION
                                                                            Attending a class is not a method of official registration, and



     AND RECORDS
                                                                            final grades will not be issued to anyone whose name does not
                                                                            appear on an official roster. Students who have never attended
                                                                            class within the first three weeks of instruction may be noted as
                                                                            “never attended” on the third-week roster and will be deleted

     Student Records
                                                                            from the course section by the registrar. These students will be
                                                                            financially liable according to New York State law.

                                                                            Transfer of Credit
     The Registrar’s Office is responsible for all student records.
     These records are kept confidential and will be released upon
     approval of the campus registrar to appropriate faculty, admin-        The term “transfer” refers to those courses and programs for
     istrators or federal, state or county officials.                       which students expect to receive credit at any other college or
                                                                            university. All credits to be transferred are subject to review by
     Campus Registrars are located at the following:
                                                                            the receiving institution.

                                                                            Transcripts
       City:                       Susan Duke, Room 114
       South:                      Samuel Palumbo, Room 5222
       Director of Registration: Paul A. Lamanna                            Students who are currently enrolled or attended ECC may

     Student Mailings
                                   North Campus, Room G157                  obtain transcripts either by sending a request to the Registrar’s
                                                                            Office or by visiting the office and filling out the available form.
                                                                            There is a $5 fee for an official transcript copy.

                                                                            Confidentiality of Records
     Students are responsible to notify and ensure that their mailing
     address is kept current on the college data files maintained by
     the campus Registrar’s Office. Mail returned to the college as
                                                                            The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
     undeliverable will not be re-mailed. Returned mail will be for-
                                                                            affords students certain rights with respect to their educational
     warded to the office issuing the mail and will be held for 30
                                                                            records. They are:
     days, after which time it will be destroyed.

     Dropping or Adding a Course
                                                                            1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education
                                                                            records within 45 days of the day the college receives a request
     Officially known as Schedule Adjustment, the Drop/Add peri-            for access.
     od allows the student to change his/her semester class schedule.           Students should submit to the registrar, or other appropriate
     The period begins on the first day of classes and runs through         official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to
     the fifth day.                                                         inspect. The college official will make arrangements for access
                                                                            and notify the student of the time and place where the records
     All Classes Day and Evening Procedure                                  may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the col-
     1. Students should consult their academic advisor to determine         lege official to whom the request was submitted, that official
         which classes to change.                                           shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the
     2. Class changes can be made utilizing:                                request should be addressed.
         a. WebAdvisor - log into WebAdvisor and click on the reg-          2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s educa-
             istration area and follow the prompts to make the              tion records that the student believes are inaccurate or mislead-
             change.                                                        ing.
         b. Go to your department or the respective department of               Students may ask the college to amend a record that they
             the course and have them process a change.                     believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the col-
         c. Proceed to the Registrar’s Office and have them process         lege official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part
             the change.                                                    of the record they want changed and specify why it is inaccurate
     3. All course availability will show based on class capacity.          or misleading.
         Classes that are at capacity will not be overloaded.                   If the college decides not to amend the record as requested
     4. Copies of schedule/bills are only available in the Registrar’s      by the student, the college will notify the student of the decision
         Office and it is strongly advised that students obtain a copy      and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding
         of their schedule/bill from the Registrar’s Office once they       the request for amendment. Additional information regarding
         have processed their change.                                       the hearing procedure will be provided to the student when
     Remember: No registration transaction is complete until it is          notified of the right to a hearing.
     processed through the college’s computer system. Simply                3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable
     attending a class is not a method of official registration. Final      information contained in the student’s education records,
     grades will not be issued to anyone whose name does not                except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without
     appear on an official roster. It is ultimately the students’           consent.
     responsibility to make sure that he or she is properly registered
     for a class.
32
                    E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
    One exception which permits disclosure without consent is                 Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any
disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests.     category of information under the Family Educational Rights
A school official is a person employed by the college in an               and Privacy Act of 1974. To withhold disclosure, written notifi-
administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support             cation must be received in the campus Registrar’s Office by
staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and              October 1/February 1. Non-disclosure of information will com-
health staff); a person or company with whom the college has              mence immediately thereafter and be effective until September
contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a         30 of the following year. Written notification to withhold disclo-
person serving on the Board of Trustees; a student serving on an          sure must be made each academic year. ECC assumes that fail-
official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee,        ure on the part of any student to specifically request the with-
or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.      holding of categories of directory information by the deadline
    A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the        date indicates individual approval for disclosure.

                                                                          Application for Graduation
official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his
or her professional responsibility.
    Upon request, the college discloses education records with-           Students are responsible for securing and submitting graduation
out consent to officials of another school in which a student             application forms to the Registrar’s Office at least three months
seeks or intends to enroll.                                               prior to graduation.
4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of              NOTE: Students must ensure that all degree requirements for
Education concerning alleged failures by the college to comply            graduation have been met, and students who fail to apply for
with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of                   graduation will not be certified as a graduate.
FERPA is:
                Family Policy Compliance Office
                U.S. Department of Education
                600 Independence Avenue, SW
                Washington, D.C. 20202-4605
Student information is protected by the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) established by the Department
of Education on November 19, 1974. The regulation provides
explicit directions governing the disclosure of student informa-
tion. College registrars are designated to be the holders of the
cumulative academic record. As such, they are charged with the
responsibility, other federal/state regulations and professional
standards as set by the American Association of Collegiate
Registrars and Admissions Offices (AACRAO).
    Information regarding a student’s personal file should be
disseminated to third parties only by the office responsible for
the collection and maintenance of that information. With the
advent of an integrated file system, student information is more
readily accessible to faculty and staff. Each individual associated
with Erie Community College has a responsibility to be con-
scious of the rights of students and a need to protect the appro-
priate office which collects and maintains the information
before conveying verbally or in writing information about a stu-
dent to a third party.
    Students may elect to have withheld what is termed
Directory Information. The registrars have on file the names of
students who have requested that certain information not be
released. Individuals may, should they convey information
regarding a student to a third party, be in violation of Federal
Regulation and a student’s right to privacy.

Public Notice Designating
Directory Information
Erie Community College hereby designates the following cate-
gories of student information as public or directory information.
Such information may be disclosed by the institution for any
purpose, at its discretion:
1. Name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance,
“from and to” and class.
2. Previous institution(s) attended, major field of study,
awards, honors (includes dean’s list) and degree(s) conferred
including dates.
3. Past and present participation in officially recognized sports
and activities, physical factors (height, weight of athletes).
                                                                                                                                               33
                E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     TUITION AND FEES
     *Tuition and fees are subject to change upon approval of the ECC Board of Trustees and the SUNY Board of Trustees

     College Costs
     Students should carefully examine the following chart on tuition and fees. While analyzing the costs involved, students should:
     1) Keep in mind that many funding sources are available to help finance his/her education (see the section that follows); and
     2) Remember that excessive part-time employment may jeopardize his/her ability to do well in coursework.
     New York State residents who are residents of the sponsorship area, or non-residents of the sponsorship
     area who present a Certificate(s) of Residence:

     Full Time (per academic year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 3,187.00
          Part Time (per credit hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 133.00
     New York State residents who are not residents of the sponsorship area and do not present a Certificate(s) of Residence:
          Full Time (per academic year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 6,374.00
          Part Time (per credit year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 266.00
     Non-New York State Residents:
          Full time (per academic year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 6,374.00
          Part Time (per credit hour) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 266.00
     Off Semester, Off Hour, Off Campus
          Part Time (per credit hour) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$             45.00
     Tuition Deposits:
          Full Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$  0.00
          Part Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$  0.00

     Student Service Fees: Specify each fee and the rate per academic year for full-time students and the rate per semester or quarter,
     credit hour for part-time students.

     Collection Fee (% of amount owed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                 30%
     International Student Admin. Fee (per semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 150.00
     I.D. Card Replacement Fee (per card) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$                    5.00
     International Students Health Insurance* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 600.00
     Lab Fee (per lab) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$  70.00
     Late Payment Fee (not to exceed/semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 30/$30
     Life Experience Assessment Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$                   70.00
     Malpractice insurance (not to exceed/year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$                     75.00
     Tuition Installment Plan Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$           50.00
     Returned Check Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$       20.00
     Student Accident Insurance* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$            12.00
     Telecourse Fee - Distance Learning Fee/ Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$                           60.00
     Transcript Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$  5.00
     Technology Fee (Full-time per Semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 100.00
     Technology Fee (Part-time per Semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$                      50.00
     Re-registration Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$    50.00
     Registration Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 30.00
     *Nursing Test/Evaluation Fee (per semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$                        60.00
     Application Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$  25.00
     First Year Experience Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$          50.00
     Independent Study Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$          30.00
     Excess Credit Hours - $100 for every 3 credits in excess of 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 100/3 cr.
     *Dependent upon premium charged to ECC

     • Residents of New York State outside of Erie County must submit a Certificate of Residence to the ECC Bursar’s Office each year prior to registration.
       The Certificate of Residence is obtained from the Treasurer of the student’s home county. When received, tuition will be lowered to the resident rate,
       if received prior to the start of the semester.
     • Lab fees and distance learning fees are assessed on a course-by-course basis.
     • Due to the fluctuating nature of insurance premiums, specific programs may require additional payment.
     • A $50 re-registration fee is added if your bill is not paid by the due date and you reregister after cancellation. Students who do not have tuition and
       fees paid or deferred by the due date may have their registration cancelled.
     • A $30 registration fee is added to anyone who registers after advance registration.
     • All international students must have International Student Health Insurance or equivalent. Cost may fluctuate depending on age and current
       insurance rates.
34
                            E C C          2 0 0 8           -    2 0 1 0           •     ( 7 1 6 )           8 5 1 - 1 E C C                  •     w w w . e c c . e d u
Student Payments                                                          privileges in cases where students have not paid according to
                                                                          their payment schedule.
For your convenience, student payments can be made 24 hours
                                                                        • The payment plan cannot be used by international students
a day at ECC’s Web page, www.ecc.edu. Click on the drop
                                                                          or to pay a past due balance.
down menu titled Quick Links. Find the option Web Advisor
to pay your bill. Type in your credit card information and the          Tip application form, payment schedule and worksheet are available
payment is instantly made. ECC currently accepts MasterCard,            at www.ecc.edu.
Visa or Discover card. All students can log in to Web Advisor to        For additional assistance, please call Erie Community College at
find their information regarding billing, payments and financial        (716) 851-1888 • Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. – 3 :30 p.m.

                                                                        Summary of Important Factors
aid. If you feel that there are any problems with billing or fees,

                                                                        Related to Tuition and Fees
fill out a billing dispute form, located on the Bursar Web page
at http://www.ecc.edu/studentlift/bursar.asp. Upon receipt of
your letter, the Bursar will review your account.

Monthly Payment Options
                                                                        Certainly, one of the first things that individuals considering the
                                                                        benefits of Erie Community College notice is the reasonable
                                                                        price for a high quality education. Pertinent financial informa-
ECC offers a Tuition Installment Plan which allows students to          tion follows:
pay for college tuition and fees in a convenient monthly pay-
ment. The cost of this plan is $50. There are no other fees or          Registration Cancellation: Students who do not have their
interest charges provided payments are made in accordance               tuition and fees completely paid or deferred by the due date
with this plan. Students who do not meet their scheduled pay-           may have their registration cancelled. Please see other important
ments will have their installment privileges removed and will be        information regarding tuition and fees and TIP.
liable for all tuition and fees immediately. For veterans, ECC          Financial Responsibility: Applicants should be financially pre-
will waive the $50 application fee upon approval from the               pared to pay tuition and meet other expenses incurred during
Veterans Department. Visit the Bursar’s Web page for instruc-           any year of study.
tions and to download the application.

Tuition Installment Plan
                                                                        Collection Costs: Students whose accounts are turned over to a
                                                                        collection agency will be liable for these additional costs. The
                                                                        cost will vary depending on the amount of the debt. The current
TIP is a sensible alternative to meet the cost of tuition and fees      mark-up will be approximately 30 percent. These accounts may
for the academic year. The family budget can be stabilized by           be referred to credit bureaus.
paying the annual college cost over a 10-month period as
                                                                        Due Dates: Students who complete registration must pay all
described below.
                                                                        tuition and fees by the due date on the bill. Failure to pay
The Affordable Alternative                                              tuition on time may result in cancellation.
• Avoid lump sum payments due at the beginning of each
                                                                        First Monies: Erie Community College will deduct unpaid
    school term.
                                                                        tuition from first monies received.
• The convenience of monthly statements.
• Knowledgeable, experienced customer service staff to                  Liability: Registration for a course(s) constitutes full financial
    answer any questions you may have.                                  liability. FAILURE TO ATTEND ANY CLASS(ES) FOR
• This service is provided with no interest charges.                    WHICH A STUDENT HAS REGISTERED DOES NOT
                                                                        ABSOLVE HIM OR HER FROM FINANCIAL LIABILITY.
Interest-Free Payments
                                                                        The formal withdrawal or drop process must be followed.
• TIP is not a loan program - there are no interest or finance
    charges. You make regularly scheduled payments over a               Financial Obligations: Students who have not met prior finan-
    period of five months.                                              cial obligations to the college will not be allowed to register or
• “Pay as you go” on a monthly basis.                                   receive any academic records. This includes transcripts official,
• Reduce your reliance on borrowing.                                    unofficial, or student copy, as well as grade reports.
• Avoid the need to withdraw savings or other assets.                   Consortium Agreements: Tuition for students with Consortium
Procedures for Enrollment                                               Agreements is due in full by the due date indicated on the regis-
• Determine the amount you will need to budget for the full             tration bill.
    school year by using the worksheet provided.                        Accident Insurance: Full-time students are automatically
• Enter the amount which you are budgeting for each term                charged for a mandatory Accident Insurance Plan that covers
    and divide by five. This is your monthly payment.                   unpaid medical/surgical expenses, up to a maximum of $2,500,
• Mail the tuition installment plan application along with the          in the event of most types of accidental injuries that occur either
   $50 processing fee and your first payment by the due date.           on or off-campus.
Once You Have Enrolled                                                  Medical Malpractice Insurance: Medical Malpractice insurance
• We will mail you monthly statements.                                  is mandatory for all students with client contact (full-or part-
• Payment is due on the 1st of each month.                              time) in the following Health Sciences curricula: Alcohol
Terms and Conditions                                                    Counseling, Child Care, Dental Hygiene, Dental Lab, Dietetic
• The $50 application fee is non-refundable.                            Technology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Ophthalmic
• Applications will only be accepted if properly completed              Dispensing, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Therapy,
    and accompanied by the application fee and any required             Emergency Medical Technology, Medical Office Assistant,
    payments. Refunds of monies paid to TIP, except the non-            Medical Lab Technology, Biomedical Equipment Technology
    refundable application fee, will be handled according to the        and Substance Abuse Counseling. This fee will be billed and is
    college’s refund policy.                                            non-refundable.
• There will be an administrative charge of $45 if a check is           Immunization
    returned for insufficient uncollected funds.                        Please note that according to NYS Public Health Law, no insti-
• The college will assess a late payment fee of $10 for each            tution shall permit any student to attend the institution in excess
    payment not made in accordance with the established pay-            of 30 calendar days if not in compliance with the public health
    ment schedule and reserves the right not to offer TIP               laws. Tuition, fees, and book costs incurred by the student will      35
               E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     not be refunded as a result of imposition of New York State                         6. Legal Permanent Resident students: In-county tuition (single
     Public Health Law 2165 and/or 2167 sanctions.                                          tuition) is only afforded to a U.S. citizen or a Permanent
       Tuition fees and book costs incurred by the student will not                         Resident card holder that meet state and county guidelines
     be refunded as a result of the imposition of the Public Health                         (an established permanent and principal residence in New
     Law sanctions.                                                                         York State for one-year, the last six months in Erie County).
     Tuition Refunds: To receive a tuition refund, a student must                           The one year qualification must be one full year previous to
     complete the formal withdrawal process either in the campus                            the beginning of the semester for which single tuition is
     Registrar’s Office or the campus Counseling Center. A chart fol-                       being considered.
     lows which illustrates the time frame for withdrawals and the
     percentages of tuition refund.                                                         Documentation for proof of residency is limited to “official”

     Withdrawal Date                                                     Refund
                                                                                            items such as license and taxes and must be dated in order to
                                                                                            establish the beginning of the student's claim for permanence
     Before the 1st day of instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100%          in the state and county. For a U.S. Visa status Legal
     (Fall or Spring semester)                                                              Permanent Resident card holder, residency date begins
                                                                                            “Resident since mm/dd/yy” on the date indicated on the
     During the 1st week of instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75%
                                                                                            Legal Permanent Resident card.
     (Fall or Spring semester)
                                                                                            All students with a legal non immigrant U.S. Visa status pay
     During the 2nd week of instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50%              double tuition. Exceptions are for refugee or asylum U.S.
     (Fall or Spring semester)                                                              Visa holder in legal status.
     During the 3rd week of instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25%         Out-of-County Residents: All students residing outside of Erie
     (Fall or Spring semester)                                                           County must provide the Bursar’s Office with an out-of-county
     After the 3rd week of instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0%     certificate. Failure to do so will result in double tuition being
                                                                                         charged. Certificates can be obtained from the student’s County
     (Fall or Spring semester)
                                                                                         Treasurer. Certificates must be renewed yearly and filed before
     NOTE: Summer semester courses must be dropped prior to the                          the start of the semester of enrollment.
     first day of instruction to avoid 100 percent financial liability.
                                                                                         Out-of-County Form and Instructions
     NOTE:                                                                               For out-of-county instructions and the application form for an
     1. The first day of classes is the day the semester begins.                         out-of-county certificate, visit the Bursar’s Web page at
     2. All student fees are non-refundable.                                             www.ecc.edu.
     3. Summer school refunds will be granted only if a drop is
                                                                                         International Students: Mandatory health insurance is required
          processed prior to the first day of instruction.
                                                                                         of all students attending ECC. The fee for coverage will be
     4. Refunds will reach students approximately eight weeks after
                                                                                         added to the tuition bill which must be paid prior to the issuing
          the start of classes.
                                                                                         of an I-20. Students covered by comparable health insurance
     5. Legal permanent residents; applicants who are U.S. Visa sta-
                                                                                         from their home country can have the fee waived. Official docu-
         tus of Legal Permanent Residents in the United States must
                                                                                         ments showing insurance coverage should be submitted to the
         meet state and local residency requirements in order to have
                                                                                         Central Bursar’s Office located at the South Campus.
         their tuition reduced to the in-county rate. All students with
         a legal non-immigrant U.S. Visa status pay double tuition.                      Repayment Policy: A student who withdraws, drops out, or is
         Exceptions are for refugee or asylum U.S. Visa holders in                       expelled may be required to repay financial aid that was given
         legal status. These individuals are considered residents of                     directly to the student as a cash disbursement to cover living
         Erie County as long as they have not resided for a time in a                    expenses. Living expenses are a student’s educational costs
         state other than New York and will be charged the in-county                     above and beyond the amount the school charges to the student
         tuition rate. Status questions should be directed to the cam-                   for tuition and fees. A student’s living expenses include items
         pus Registrar. An individual college registrant will be consid-                 such as room and board allowance, books/supplies, transporta-
         ered an Erie County resident and be charged in-county                           tion, child care and miscellaneous expenses. If the student’s liv-
         tuition rates when that individual is determined to be a U.S.                   ing expenses incurred up to the time of total withdrawal/drop
         citizen or legal permanent resident and to have had a New                       exceed the amount of cash disbursed, the student has not been
         York State domicile (i.e., a permanent and principal home in                    underpaid. However, if the cash disbursement was greater than
         New York) for a 12-month (six months of which must be in                        the student’s living expenses up to the withdrawal/drop date,
         Erie County) durational period prior to registration. Persons                   the student must repay the excess amount. This regulation does
         who do not meet this twelve-month and six-month dura-                           not affect students who withdraw/drop from some classes but
         tional requirement will be presumed to be out-of-county resi-                   continue to be enrolled in other classes. Only students who have
         dents and will be charged out-of-county tuition rates unless                    completely withdrawn or dropped and have received cash back
         satisfactory proof is presented to show that domicile in Erie                   for living expenses may owe a repayment. See the Financial Aid
         County has, in fact, been established. Proof of domicile is                     Office for details.
         based upon official Erie County and New York records pro-                       Pro Rata Refund and Title IV: Portion of unearned aid credit-
         vided by the individual and other New York State records.                       ed to student account must be refunded if a student who
     Factors relevant to a determination of domicile include:                            receives the title IV aid withdraws prior to the end of the ninth
     • New York State Income Tax Forms                                                   week of classes. Unearned aid (paid as a refund) to cover cost
     • New York State Vehicle Registration or Driver’s License                           must be repaid by the student and then returned to the sources
     • Federal Income Tax Form                                                           of financial aid.
     • Deed to Real New York State property                                              VISA, MASTERCARD AND DISCOVER ACCEPTED AT
     • Marriage License issued in the State of New York                                  ALL BURSAR LOCATIONS IN PERSON OR BY PHONE
36   • Proof of receiving Social Services Benefits from Erie County

                       E C C       2 0 0 8        -    2 0 1 0       •    ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
FINANCIAL AID                                                            throughout the year as long as the student is still enrolled. If the
                                                                         student totally withdraws from college and then files the
                                                                         FAFSA, no federal grant or loan can be processed. If the stu-
Erie Community College has a comprehensive program of stu-               dent files after the school year has ended, no federal grant or
dent aid including federal and state subsidized programs, loans,         loan can be processed.
part-time employment, and scholarships. Following is general                The last day to file for the New York State TAP grant is May
information regarding Financial Aid as well as specific informa-         1 of the academic year.
tion regarding each of the potential funding sources.
    Contact the Financial Aid Office at any of the three locations:      Transfer Students: A student transferring to ECC mid-year
City Campus: 45 Oak, Room 150, 851-1177; North Campus:                   must notify the New York State TAP program of the change in
Room G-220, 851-1477; South Campus: Room 5206, 851-1677.                 school. This can be accomplished by changing the school code
                                                                         online at www.hesc.org. The TAP school code for all three
NOTE: ALL FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION IS SUBJECT                           campuses is 2065.
TO CHANGE BASED ON FEDERAL AND STATE REGU-
LATIONS.                                                                 Financial Need: Eligibility for campus-based aid (FSEOG and

General Financial Aid Information
                                                                         Work Study) and the subsidized Stafford Student Loan
                                                                         Program are based on need. Need is defined as the difference
                                                                         between the cost of education and the family’s ability to pay. A
Matriculation: To receive aid, including loans, a student must be
                                                                         family’s ability to pay is based on a number of factors: annual
matriculated in a degree or certificate program. If a student is not
                                                                         income, assets, household size, number of family members in
matriculated, no financial aid will be processed, and the student
                                                                         college, etc. A standard formula, established by law, calculates
will be liable for all tuition and fees. (NOTE: For an explanation
                                                                         the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) which is used in the
of matriculation, see "General Information on Admissions
                                                                         needs analysis process.
Policies’’ in the Admissions section of this catalog.)
                                                                         Course or College Withdrawals: Withdrawing from one course
Academic Eligibility: To continue receiving aid, including loans,
                                                                         or all coursework may affect a student's federal and state finan-
a student must be in "good academic standing," meeting the
                                                                         cial aid package for the subsequent semester. A pamphlet on
standards set for a particular aid program. (NOTE: Charts
                                                                         “Academic Requirements for Financial Aid” is available in the
regarding the standards for Title IV Federal Aid Programs and
                                                                         Financial Aid Office. In addition, a student who withdraws
New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) are included
                                                                         from all courses prior to completing 60 percent of the semester
in the sections pertaining to these programs.)
                                                                         may have to return a portion of awarded federal aid. See section
Accuracy and Truthfulness: Students applying for financial assis-        on "Return of Title IV Funds" in the catalog or at www.ecc.edu
tance must present an accurate picture of their financial situation,     under Financial Aid link.

                                                                         Student Budget
including asset and income information.
Application Process: Filing of the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) is required for both federal and state aid           Below is the estimated cost of attendance at ECC for a depen-
including student loans. Students file online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.       dent student living at home: (costs are based on full-time, full-
An e-mail message will be sent to the student within five days           year enrollment).
detailing how to access the FAFSA results (Student Aid Report).          Direct Costs
If an e-mail address was not provided, the Student Aid Report               Tuition*                      $3,187
will be mailed to the student within four weeks of filing. The col-         Fees                             503
lege will also receive the FAFSA results electronically and notify
                                                                         Indirect Costs
                                                                            Books                          1,000
the student if additional information is needed.
ECC Federal Title IV school code for all three campuses is                  Transportation                  1,200
010684. The NYS code is 2065.                                               Personal Expenses                 900

                                                                         Total Allowance                   $9,790
When submitting the FAFSA online, students continue by click-               Room/Board                      3,000
ing on the TAP on the Web link or at www.tapweb.org. The
TAP grant is for NYS residents attending a New York State


                                                                         Independent Student Status
                                                                         *Tuition amount subject to change
school on a full-time basis. Part-time students should complete a


                                                                         Financial Emancipation
New York State Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS) application.
     APTS applications are available in the Financial Aid Office.
There is no application fee to apply for federal or state financial
aid. Students must reapply each year.
                                                                         For Federal Programs
    The Financial Aid Office and/or funding agency will notify
                                                                         In order for a student to exclude parental income from the fed-
students of award(s).
                                                                         eral application for aid, the student must meet the definition of
Deadlines: Apply as soon after January 1 as possible. The                “independent student” as defined in the Higher Education
Student Aid Report (SAR) must be on file in the Financial Aid            Amendments of 1992. A student is automatically independent if
Office by May 1 prior to the upcoming academic year in order to          he/she:
receive first consideration for the Federal SEOG Grant and the           • Is at least 24 years old by December 31 of the award year.
Federal Work-Study Program, which have limited funding.                  • Is an orphan or ward of the court.
Applications received after that date will be processed on a first-      • Is a graduate or professional student.
come basis for these two campus-based programs.                          • Is a veteran of the United States Armed Forces.
   Applications for the Federal Pell Grant and the Federal               • Is a married student or;
Family Education Loan Programs will continue to be processed             • Is a student who has legal dependents other than a spouse.           37
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     If the student does not meet the above criteria but believes he/she      • Males must have registered with Selective Service when
     should be classified as independent, the student must document             required.

                                                                              Verification
     these circumstances to the Financial Aid administrator.
     For New York State Programs                                              If selected for verification, the student must submit additional
     The conditions of financial independence are established in              data to the Financial Aid Office to document information stated
     New York State law and differ from federal aid programs.                 on FAFSA application. Prior year tax returns, verification work-
     To exclude parental income for NYS programs, a student must:             sheet, documentation of social security benefits, child support
     • Be 35 years of age or older, or;                                       and proof of independence (if applicable) are some of the items
     • Have been honorably discharged from the United States                  the student may be asked to provide. Verification must be com-
         Armed Forces (and not claimed as a dependent by either               pleted before any federal funding will be disbursed. Student has
         parent on state or federal income tax returns for the last two       up to 120 days after the last date of enrollment to complete verifi-
                                                                              cation requirements.

                                                                              Special Condition Application
         years).
     If under 35, the student must meet the basic conditions below:
         1. Did not and will not reside in an apartment, house, or
                                                                              When students apply for federal student financial aid, income
         building owned or leased by his/her parents for more than
                                                                              information from the preceding year (referred to as base year
         six weeks during the previous, current, or upcoming calen-
                                                                              income) is used to calculate eligibility. For the 2008-09 award
         dar years.
                                                                              year, 2007 income information is used. However, if the family's
         2. Was not and will not be claimed as a dependent by his/her
                                                                              income changes drastically for the worse after 2007 due to unem-
         parents on federal or state income tax return during any one
                                                                              ployment, a loss of non-taxable income or benefits, separation or
         of the previous, current, or upcoming calendar years.
                                                                              divorce, or death, the student may be eligible to file for a special
         3. Did not and will not receive gifts, loans, or other financial
                                                                              condition calculation. See the Financial Aid Office for details.
         assistance valued in excess of $750 from his/her parents dur-
                                                                              Applies to federal aid programs only.

                                                                              Return of Title IV Funds
         ing the previous, current and upcoming years.
     If the student meets the above basic conditions but is under age
     22, he/she must also meet special conditions. These conditions           (For students who completely withdraw from college)
     must be documented on a Financial Independence Supplement                    Federal Title IV funds (Pell, SEOG, Stafford and PLUS
     Form which will be sent to the student by New York State                 loans) are based on the premise that a student will remain in
     Higher Education Services Corporation (NYSHESC).                         school for the entire semester. If a student completely withdraws
     Waiver of Special Conditions:                                            from college prior to completing at least 60 percent of the semes-
     The student does not have to meet the special conditions if              ter, the college must calculate the portion of federal aid the stu-
     he/she:                                                                  dent has earned (and, therefore, entitled to retain) until the time
     • Was married on or before December 31 of the previous cal-              that the student withdrew. The portion unearned must be
        endar year.                                                           retuned to the federal programs - even if grants/loans have been
     • Is enrolled as a graduate student.                                     credited to the student's account.
     • Received a TAP award as a financially independent student                  For example, if you (the student) complete 30 percent of the
        in the previous academic year.                                        semester, you earn 30 percent of your approved federal aid that

     Federal Aid Programs - Title IV
                                                                              you were scheduled to receive (or the college received on your
                                                                              behalf) for the semester. This means that 70 percent of your
                                                                              scheduled or disbursed aid remains unearned and must be
     • Federal PELL Grant
                                                                              returned to the federal programs or your lender. This may result
     • Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG)
                                                                              in you owing money to the college. However, if Stafford loan
     • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
                                                                              monies are returned to the lender, it will reduce the amount of
       (FSEOG)
                                                                              loan you are obligated to repay to your lender. See the Financial
     • Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)
                                                                              Aid Office for details.

                                                                              Satisfactory Academic Progress
     • Federal Stafford Loans (subsidized and unsubsidized)
     • Federal PLUS Loan (Parent Loan for Undergraduate
       Students

     Eligibility
                                                                              All students receiving financial aid must meet minimum academ-
                                                                              ic requirements within a specified time frame in order to main-
                                                                              tain eligibility. These minimum academic requirements are two-
     In general, a student is eligible for federal aid if he/she meets the
                                                                              fold: Academic Progress and Program Pursuit.
     following requirements:
                                                                                  Academic Progress requires maintenance of a minimum qual-
     • Enrolled at least half-time (6 credits) for any loan or work-
                                                                              ity point average (QPA), while Program Pursuit refers to comple-
         study program; at least one credit for the PELL Grant
                                                                              tion of a certain number of the credit hours attempted.
         Program.
                                                                                  The maximum time frame can be no longer than 150 percent
     • Matriculated, that is, accepted into a program through the
                                                                              of the published length of the degree program. For example, a
         admissions process.
                                                                              two-year degree program consisting of 64 credits will require a
     • Is a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen.
                                                                              student to complete the program within 96 credit hours. No fed-
     • Demonstrates financial need. Filing a FAFSA form is
                                                                              eral aid can be processed for credits taken in excess of the 96
         required to determine need.
                                                                              hours. Exception: Students working on a second degree will be
     • Making satisfactory progress in his/her course of study.
                                                                              placed on a new time frame. Students who fail to meet these min-
     • Not in default on a Perkins Loan (NDSL), Federal Stafford
                                                                              imum requirements will be denied aid the following semester.
         Student Loan, or Federal PLUS/SLS Loan.
                                                                                  The following outlines the minimum requirements as they
     • Does not owe a refund on a Federal PELL Grant or a Federal
38                                                                            relate to ECC students:
         Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG).
                     E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Federal Academic Requirements                                              Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity
ECC Minimum Standards for Receipt of
Federal Title IV Funds                                                     Grant (FSEOG)
Hours Attempted            9-20      21-38       39-54       55-96         FSEOG is a campus-based grant program awarded to students
                                                                           with exceptional financial need; that is, students with the lowest
Minimum % of
                                                                           Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Priority is given to stu-
Completion (Annual)           50%         50%     60%         75%
                                                                           dents who receive maximum Pell. Application Form: Free
Minimum Q.P.A.                                                             Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Limited funds
(Each Semester)               1.00        1.25    1.55        2.00

Academic Appeals Process
                                                                           are available. Apply by May 1 prior to academic year for first
                                                                           consideration.
If the student experienced extraordinary circumstances which               Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)
prohibited academic progress and/or program pursuit, the stu-              The Federal Work-Study (FWS) program offers job opportuni-
dent may appeal through the Academic Standards Committee                   ties to students who demonstrate financial need. Positions as
on campus. Student must submit appropriate written documen-                reading tutors to elementary school students are also available.
tation to support reasons for appeal in order to be considered for         Students in the program are paid $7.15 per hour on campus,
re-instatement of aid.                                                     $7.50 per hour off-campus, and may work up to 20 hours per
   Student will be notified if reinstatement of aid has been               week during the academic year; 35 hours during summer or


Title IV Programs
approved or denied.                                                        break periods depending on need and campus allocation.
                                                                               Application Form: Free Application for Federal Student Aid
                                                                           (FAFSA). Limited funds are available. Apply by May 1 prior to

Federal PELL Grant
                                                                           academic year for first consideration.

The PELL Grant is a federal entitlement program awarded only               Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP)
to undergraduate students. Once a student has a bachelor's                 Consists of the following loan programs:

                                                                           Federal Stafford Loan
degree, he/she is no longer eligible for PELL. The amount of the
award is determined by the federal appropriations available for a
given year and the cost of attendance at the college, the expected         Students who are registered for at least six credit hours and who
family contribution (EFC) and student enrollment status.                   are in good academic standing may be eligible for a Federal
Currently, the maximum award is $4,731 per year.                           Stafford Student Loan. Qualified first-year students may borrow
    The student must be in attendance at the time the completed            up to $3,500; second-year students up to $4,500. All students at
FAFSA is processed by the federal processing center in order to            Erie Community College are classified as either first-year or sec-
receive payment. If selected for verification, student must submit         ond-year; a second-year student must have completed or have
all required documentation no later than 120 days after the stu-           transferred in 30 degree credits. Additional unsubsidized loans
dent's last day of enrollment. Application Form: Free                      are available to independent students.
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).                                   Summer is not part of the regular academic year and is treat-

Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG)
                                                                           ed as a “trailer” term at ECC. Only aid left over from or not
                                                                           used during the previous fall and spring is available toward the
This grant was made available for the first time for the 2006-07           summer term.
school year. Qualifying students who have completed rigorous                   Students must file a FAFSA to receive a Federal Stafford
secondary school programs* and are eligible for federal Pell               Loan. The FAFSA determines family contribution. Amount of
grants can receive an AC Grant for up to $750 for the first year           family contribution figure determines eligibility for either subsi-
of study and up to $1,300 for the second academic year of study.           dized or unsubsidized Stafford Loan. Interest on subsidized
To be eligible for the grant each academic year, a student must:           loan is paid by federal government while student is enrolled at
• Be a U.S. citizen;                                                       least half-time and for six months after student leaves school;
• Be a Federal Pell Grant recipient;                                       interest on unsubsidized loan is paid by student. Repayment of
• Be enrolled full-time in a degree program;                               principal begins six months after the borrower is no longer at
• Be enrolled in the first or second academic year of the stu-             least a half-time student.
    dent’s program at a two-year degree-granting institution;                  Delayed disbursement of funds (30 days after the first day of
• Have completed a rigorous secondary school program of                    instruction) is required for all first-time/first-year borrowers for
    study (after January 1, 2006, if a first-year student, and after       Stafford Loan programs at ECC.
    January 1, 2005 if a second-year student);                                 Funds are transferred electronically from lender to student's
• If a first-year student, not have been previously enrolled in an         ECC account in two installments - usually the first disbursement
    undergraduate program; and                                             is for the fall semester and the second disbursement is for the
• If a second-year student, have at least a cumulative 3.0 grade           spring semester. Most lenders disburse electronically. If the
    point average for the first academic year.                             lender does not participate in electronic funds transfer, student
                                                                           must endorse check when notified by the Bursar.
Application form: Free Application for Federal Student Aid                     A Stafford student loan cannot be certified for a student
(FAFSA)                                                                    who is no longer enrolled at least half-time.
* The U.S. Department of Education has recognized the New                  Application Form: Free Application for Federal Student Aid
York State Regents diploma with honors or a New York State                 (FAFSA) and a Stafford Loan Acceptance Agreement (available
Regents diploma with advanced designation as rigorous high                 online at www.ecc.edu). A loan entrance interview is required
school programs of study for the Academic Competitiveness                  for first-time borrower and may be completed online at
Grant program.                                                             www.mapping-your-future.org.                                           39
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -    2 0 1 0       •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Federal Parent Loan for                                                • You should contact your bank to discuss a repayment sched-

     Undergraduate Students (PLUS)
                                                                              ule with them.
                                                                            • You have a right to repay part or the entire loan ahead of
     Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) are available             schedule without penalty.
     to parents of financially dependent students. Parents who have         • Under certain conditions, you may be able to defer repay-
     no adverse credit history may borrow up to the cost of atten-            ment of your loan. When you apply for a loan, ask the lend-
     dance minus other aid. PLUS loan funds are transferred elec-             ing institution to explain what these conditions are. If you
     tronically from lender to student's account in two installments.         receive a deferment, you must notify the bank when the
     Repayment of principal plus interest begins 60 days after dis-           deferment condition no longer exists.
     bursement. Visit www.ecc.edu for more information.                     • If you are financially unable to make payments, you have a
     Application Form: PLUS application available at participating            right to ask the bank to allow any of the following: a short
     banks.                                                                   period during which you make no payments of principal, an
                                                                              extension of time to make payments, or an opportunity to
     NOTE: Before investigating the PLUS program, students                    make smaller payments than originally scheduled. However,
     should first apply for a Stafford student loan.                          the bank is not required to approve your request.
     Private Alternative Education Loans                                    Failure to Repay Your Loan
     Alternative loan programs are for students who need education-         • If you fail to meet your loan repayment terms, you are delin-
     al loans over and above the amounts they are eligible to borrow          quent. If you continue to be delinquent, you are in default
     through the Federal Stafford Loan Program and/or the Federal             and the entire balance becomes due.
     PLUS Loan program. The terms and conditions of alternative             • The bank will give you written notice of your failure to repay
     loans vary from lender to lender. Most lenders will require              before declaring your loan in default. The notice will be sent
     cosigners. See Financial Aid Office for information.                     to the address which you have provided.


     RIGHTS AND
                                                                            • You should keep in close contact with your bank if you are
                                                                              having financial problems. They will work with you in main-

     RESPONSIBILITIES                                                       New York State
                                                                              taining your credit standing.


     FOR BORROWERS
                                                                            Financial Aid Programs
     Promissory Note                                                        New York State has several programs designed to help eligible
     • You must sign a Master Promissory Note for your initial              state residents secure the funds to finance their post-secondary
       loan before you can receive any guaranteed education loan            education.
       funds. This is your promise to repay the loan.                           Eligibility requirements for individual programs vary.
     • You do not have to sign a promissory note for subsequent             Therefore, it is essential that all students familiarize themselves
       loans with the same lender.                                          with the eligibility criteria for each program.
     • You must comply with the provisions of any promissory                Among the state-funded programs are:
       note or other agreements you sign.                                   • Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)
     • Read and keep the Rights and Responsibilities portion of             • Part-Time TAP
       your loan application and a copy of the completed and                • Supplemental Tuition Assistance Program (STAP)
       signed promissory note.                                              • Aid to Part-Time Students (APTS)
     • The lending institution must return the original promissory          • Veteran Tuition Awards (VTA)
       note to you when you pay the loan in full.

     Changing Conditions
                                                                            • Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)

                                                                            State Academic Requirements
     • Notify the bank or the Higher Education Services                     The following chart outlines the minimum academic require-
       Corporation immediately if you do any of the following: fail         ments for receipt of all New York State Aid programs:

                                                                            Minimum Academic Standards
       to enroll for the period for which the loan was intended,

                                                                            for all New York State Programs
       leave school for any reason, attend less than half-time, trans-
       fer from one school to another, graduate, or change name
       and address.                                                         Before being certified
     • You must notify your school and your bank of any change in           for this payment       1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th* 8th*
       name or address.
     • If the bank sells your loans to another bank, you must be            A student must have
       notified in writing.                                                 accrued at least

     Repayment Terms
                                                                            this many credits       0    3     9    18   30    45    60   75
                                                                            with at least this
     • When you get a loan, the terms of repayment are explained.           grade point average     0    .5 .75 1.3 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0
       It is your responsibility to understand these terms and fol-
                                                                            * Applicable to students in a four-year degree program

                                                                            Pursuit of Program
       low them.
     • You are responsible for repayment of all loans, including
       interest and any fees, even if you do not finish school.             Program pursuit must be determined independently from satis-
     • An exit interview with the school Financial Aid Officer (or          factory academic progress. To satisfy pursuit of program, a stu-
       at www.mapping-your-future.org) is required when you                 dent must earn a passing or failing grade in a percentage of the
40     leave school. The aid officer will explain loan repayment            minimum course load in each term an award is received. The
       terms to you.
                    E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
minimum full-time course load is 12 credits. The percentage               Application Form: Free Application for Federal Student Aid
increases from 50 percent of the minimum full-time course load            (FAFSA) and the NYS TAP Application. The TAP application
(6 credits) in each term of the first year an award is received to 75     must be postmarked by May 1 of academic year.

                                                                          TAP Estimate for ECC Students
percent of the minimum full-time course load (9 credits) in each
term of study in the second year to 100 percent of the minimum
full-time course load (12 credits) in each term thereafter.               The following is a guideline for estimating a TAP award at ECC

Repeating a Course
                                                                          for students who are either financially dependent on their par-
                                                                          ents; or are financially independent and are married or have tax
If a student repeats a course for which previous credit has been          dependents:
                                                                              New York State
                                                                              Net Tax Income                    Tap Award
earned with a D- grade or better, it is not counted as part of a
full-time load for TAP purposes or as part of the required part-
time load for APTS unless a higher grade is required by the stu-                   0 - $7,000                   $3,187
dent’s curriculum.                                                              7,001 - 8,000                    3,117

Loss of State Aid (TAP/APTS)
                                                                               8,001 - 9,000                     3,047
                                                                               9,001 - 10,000                    2,977
Decertification: Students failing to meet the Satisfactory                   10,001 - 11,000                     2,907
Academic Progress or Program Pursuit requirements will not be                11,001 - 12,000                     2,807
eligible for TAP/APTS the following semester. For example, stu-              12,001 - 13,000                     2,707
dents who do not meet the standards in the fall semester will be             13,001 - 14,000                     2,607
decertified for the spring semester.                                         14,001 - 15,000                     2,507
                                                                             15,001 - 16,000                     2,407
Waiver Option (TAP/APTS): When there are extraordinary cir-                  16,001 - 17,000                     2,307
cumstances, students who do not meet state standards may apply               17,001 - 18,000                     2,207
for a one-time waiver during undergraduate study. Granting of a              18,001 - 19,000                     2,087
waiver is not automatic and is subject to review by the TAP certi-           19,001 - 20,000                     1,967
fying officer and/or a committee. Waiver applications and further            20,001 - 21,000                     1,847
information are available in the Registrar’s Office.                         21,001 - 22,000                     1,727
Regaining Eligibility (TAP/APTS): There are four ways in                     22,001 - 23,000                     1,607
which a student may regain eligibility. The student may:                     23,001 - 24,000                     1,487
1. Make up the deficiencies without benefit of state support. For            24,001 - 25,000                     1,367
   example, if a student was at the 75 percent pursuit level and             25,001 - 26,000                     1,247
   received a grade in six semester hours (3 credits short of the            26,001 - 27,000                     1,127
   minimum), the student can take and complete a 3-credit                    27,001 - 28,000                     1,007
   course at his/her own expense.                                            28,001 - 29,000                       887
2. Apply for and be granted a waiver.                                        29,001 - 30,000                       767
                                                                             30,001 - 31,000                       647
3. Be readmitted to the institution after an absence of at least
                                                                             31,001 - 32,000                       520
   one calendar year for TAP, six months for APTS.
                                                                             32,001 - 80,000                       500
4. Transfer to another institution and meet the new institution’s
                                                                              80,000 or more                         0
   admissions requirements.

New York State Aid Program
                                                                          The following are TAP estimates for single, financially indepen-

Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)
                                                                          dent students with no dependents:
                                                                              New York State
The Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) is a New York State                      Net Tax Income                   Tap Award
funded, non-competitive, financial aid grant for state residents                  0 - $3,000                     $3,187
attending an approved post secondary institution in New York as                3,001 - 4,000                      2,877
a full-time, matriculated student and meeting the minimum stan-               4,001 - 5,000                       2,567
dards of Program Pursuit and Satisfactory Academic Progress.                  5,001 - 6,000                       2,257
    Note: Full-time is defined as carrying 12 credit hours or more            6,001 - 7,000                       1,947
of degree-bearing and non-degree (remedial) course work. Of the               7,001 - 8,000                       1,637
12 required hours, three must be degree credits in the first semes-           8,001 - 9,000                       1,327
ter of TAP; at least six degree credits per semester thereafter.              9,001 - 10,000                      1,017
    TAP awards are based on a family’s net taxable New York                  10,001 or more                           0
State income from the previous year and range from $500 to full           *Based on $3,187/yr. tuition.
tuition per year. Students are entitled to TAP payments for up to         NOTE: Annual award is reduced by $100 after 4 payments
three years in an approved associate degree or certificate pro-
gram. A student uses six points for each TAP payments. Once
the maximum of 36 points (six payments) is reached, the student
will receive no further TAP payments at ECC. Exception: EOP
students will continue to receive up to five years of TAP while
pursuing a two-year degree.
    While the three-year limit applies to students enrolled in a
two-year program, a student may be eligible to receive an addi-
tional year of TAP at a four-year institution.
                                                                                                                                             41
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Part-Time TAP                                                            least three credit hours must be toward a degree. The student
                                                                              must meet the income guideline to be eligible for the program.
     Students needs to complete two consecutive, full-time semesters
                                                                                  The good academic standing requirements that apply to stu-
     once to be eligible.
                                                                              dents receiving a TAP full-time award also apply to recipients of
     Must maintain a minimum of a “C” average.                                an APTS award. Both TAP and APTS points count toward a
                                                                              student’s 48 point total undergraduate eligibility.
     Once certification is submitted, NYSHESC will calculate the
                                                                                  Regarding Program Pursuit, APTS requires a 50 percent
     Part-Time TAP award based on the reported credits. The
                                                                              completion of the required minimum half-time course load the
     schedule below reflects the percentage of the full-time award
                                                                              first year, 75 percent completion the second year and 100 per-
     and the undergraduate TAP points accrued based on the PT-
                                                                              cent completion thereafter.
     TAP credits reported on the roster.

     PT TAP Credits and Points Accrued
                                                                              Application Form: APTS application available in the Financial
                                                                              Aid Office or at www.ecc.edu. Funds are limited. Note deadline
       PT TAP                  Percent of                Points               on APTS application.

                                                                              Veterans Tuition Awards (VTA)
     Credit Hours             Full Award                Accrued
           6                       50%                    3.0
           7                    58.34%                    3.5                 New York State's Veteran Tuition Award (VTA) provides up to
           8                    66.67%                    4.0                 $1,000 per semester for full-time study or $500 per semester for
           9                       75%                    4.5                 part-time study to eligible veterans matriculated at an under-
          10                    83.84%                    5.0                 graduate or graduate degree-granting institution in New York.
          11                    91.67%                    5.5                 If the veteran also receives TAP or APTS, the combination of

     Supplemental Tuition Assistance Program (STAP)
                                                                              the two awards cannot exceed tuition.

     STAP is offered to full-time undergraduates who are education-           Eligible Veterans
     ally disadvantaged and require remedial courses.                         New York State residents discharged under other than dishon-
         STAP is available to students who are enrolled in a remedial         orable conditions from the U.S. Armed Forces and are:
     program in the summer term immediately preceding and/or                  • Vietnam Veterans who served in Indochina between
     immediately following the initial year of matriculated study.               12/22/1961 and 5/7/1975
         Students who meet the eligibility criteria for a STAP award          • Persian Gulf Veterans who served in the Persian Gulf on or
     for the summer term are eligible for an award of up to one-                 after 8/2/1990
     quarter of what the student would receive as an annual Tuition           • Afghanistan Veterans who served in Afghanistan during hos-
     Assistance Program (TAP) award. For less than full-time study,              tilities on or after 9/11/2001

                                                                              Application Process
     but at least half-time study, a student would be eligible for one-
     eighth of the Annual TAP award. Students may receive up to
     two such awards: one for a summer term preceding the first               • Students must establish eligibility before September 1 of the
     year of matriculated study, and/or one for a summer term                   award year by completing a NYS Veterans Tuition Award
     immediately following the first year of matriculated study.                Supplement. This form is available at ECC’s Office of
         Students enrolled in the Educational Opportunity Program               Veterans Affairs or from NYS Higher Education Services
     (EOP) are not eligible for the STAP program. However, they                 corporation (1-800-697-4372).
     may receive up to five years of TAP which is an exception to the         • Students must also complete the Free Application for
     three-year limit.                                                          Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year.
                                                                              • Full-time students must complete the Express Tap
     Application Form: Same as TAP applicants.

     Part-Time TAP for Students with Disabilities
                                                                                Application (ETA)

     Students who are disabled, as defined by the 1990 Federal
                                                                              Deadline
                                                                              Eligibility must be established before September 1 of the award
     Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), do not have to be in
                                                                              year. The FAFSA, an ETA and the Tuition Award Supplement
     full-time attendance to be eligible for Tuition Assistance
                                                                              must be completed by May 1 of the academic year for which an
     Program (TAP) payments. Higher Education Services
                                                                              award is sought.

                                                                              Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)
     Corporation (HESC) calculates a full-time TAP award for any
     eligible student who applies. Once the school notifies HESC
     that a student with disabilities is attending less than full-time, a     The Educational Opportunity Program (EOP), funded and
     new partial TAP award certificate is issued to the student.              administered by the New York State Education Department, is
     Whether attending full-time or part-time, a student must carry           a financial aid program designed to help those students who are
     at least three degree credits the first semester and meet mini-          educationally and economically disadvantaged. The amount of
     mum state academic standards as he/she progresses.                       each award is determined on an individual basis depending on
     Application Form: Same as TAP applicants plus ADA certification.         need. Applicants must meet the following criteria:

     Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS)                                           1. Be a New York State resident.
                                                                              2. Have a New York State high school diploma or its equivalent.
     Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS) grants are available to New
                                                                              3. Fall within a defined income bracket or show other evidence
     York State residents (U.S. citizens, permanent aliens, or
                                                                                 of being economically disadvantaged.
     refugees) enrolled in at least 3 credit hours but less than 12. At
                                                                              4. Meet with an EOP counselor to review additional require-
                                                                                 ments for the program.

42
                     E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Income Guidelines for EOP Eligibility                                    Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards: The appli-

   Number of members in
                                                                         cant must be: (1) on an official tribal roll of a New York State

   household (including          Total annual income
                                                                         tribe or the child of an enrolled member of a New York State
   head of household)            preceding calendar year
                                                                         tribe and a resident of New York State; (2) maintaining good
                                                                         academic standing in accordance with Commissioner’s
       1                         $14,100                                 Regulations and (3) enrolled in an approved New York State
       2                          19,600                                 post-secondary program.
       3                          22,350                                 Award Schedule: The award is $2,000 per year for a maximum
       4                          27,800                                 of four years of full-time study (five years where a fifth year is
                                                                         required for completion of degree requirements). Eligible stu-
       5                          32,850                                 dents also may receive student aid for less than four years of
       6                          38,550                                 study and for part-time study. The part-time award is $85 per
       7 or more                  42,900 plus 4,350 for each             credit hour.
                                  family member in excess of 7           Responsibilities of Recipients: Students are responsible for
                                                                         notifying the Native American Education Unit in writing of any
Application Form: Free Application for Federal Student Aid
                                                                         change in student status, program, or institutional enrollment.
(FAFSA) and EOP application. Limited Funds. Apply by
                                                                         Students must also submit semester grades, at the end of each
May 1 prior to academic year for first consideration.

Other NYS Scholarships/Awards
                                                                         semester, showing satisfactory progress toward completion of
                                                                         degree or certification requirements.
• Child of Veterans Awards ($450/yr.)
                                                                         United States Bureau of Indian Affairs
                                                                         (BIA) Aid to Native Americans
• Child of Deceased Police Officers, Firefighters and
  Corrections Officers ($450/yr.)
• Memorial Scholarship for Families of Deceased Police                   Application Procedures: Application forms may be obtained
  Officers and Firefighters Award: (full tuition and non-tuition         from the Bureau of Indian Affairs Office. An application is nec-
  costs).                                                                essary for each year of study. An official needs analysis state-
• Volunteer Recruitment Service Scholarship for volunteer fire-          ment from the college Financial Aid Office is also required each
  fighters and ambulance personnel (up to full tuition).                 year. Each first-time applicant must obtain tribal enrollment
  Applications available at volunteer fire or ambulance compa-           certification from the bureau agency which records enrollment
  nies/organizations.                                                    for a tribe.
• World Trade Center Memorial Scholarship guarantees access              Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards: To be eligi-
  to a college education for the families and financial depen-           ble, the applicant must: (1) be at least one-fourth American
  dents of innocent victims who died or were severely and per-           Indian, Eskimo or Aleut; (2) be an enrolled member of a tribe,
  manently disabled as a result of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist          band, or group recognized by the Bureau of Indian Affairs; (3)
  attacks on the United States of America and rescue and recov-          be enrolled in or accepted for enrollment in an approved col-
  ery efforts: (full tuition and non-tuition costs).                     lege or university pursuing at least a two-year degree and (4)
Application Process: Write to: NYSHESC Student Information,              have financial need.



Other Funding Sources
Albany, New York 12255 or visit www.hesc.org.                            Responsibilities of Recipients: For grants to be awarded in suc-
                                                                         cessive years, the student must make satisfactory progress


                                                                         Miscellaneous
                                                                         toward a degree and show financial need.

NYS Aid to Native Americans
NYS Aid to Native Americans is an entitlement program. There is
                                                                         Students are encouraged to investigate other grants available
neither a qualifying examination nor a limited number of awards.
                                                                         through the New York State Office of Vocational and
Application Procedures: Application forms may be obtained                Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID),
from the Native American Education Unit, New York State                  Veterans Administration, Training Readjustment Act, Social
Education Department, Albany, NY 12230. The completed                    Security Administration, private clubs, charitable organizations
application form should be forwarded by the applicant to the             and foundations. The Financial Aid Office and counselors can
Native American Educational Unit on or before July 15 for the            be of assistance in this area.

                                                                         ECC Foundation
fall semester; December 31 for the spring semester and May 20
for the summer session, of the academic year of proposed enroll-
ment, along with the following materials:                                The ECC Foundation is located at 4196 Abbott Road, Orchard
1. Official transcript of high school record or copy of General          Park 14127. Foundation Scholarship booklets are available in
    Equivalency Diploma                                                  mid October in the Financial Aid and Admission Offices and at
2. Letter(s) of recommendation from one or more leaders in the           www.ecc.edu, Quick Link, ECC Alumni and Foundation.
    community attesting to personality and character                     Scholarship applications are due in early February, and scholar-
3. Personal letter, setting forth clearly and in detail educational      ships are awarded in May for the fall and spring semesters of the
    plans and desires                                                    following academic year. See additional scholarship information
4. Signatures of the parents of minor applicants, approving edu-         in the Foundation section of this catalog.
    cation plans
5. Official tribal certification form
6. Copy of acceptance letter from college attending                                                                                           43
               E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •    ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Emergency Short-Term Loans                                              MT 171
                                                                             MT 175
                                                                                           Elements of Calculus
                                                                                           Survey of Calculus I
     Industrial, professional and student organizations have made
                                                                             MT 180        Pre-Calculus Mathematics
     short-term, interest-free loans for school-related expenses avail-
                                                                             MT 181        Calculus and Analytic Geometry
     able to students at the three campuses. The potential borrowers
     must: 1) prove they have extraordinary circumstances that make
                                                                             Natural Science
     such a loan a necessity; 2) have on file a SEOG or PELL Grant
                                                                             • Understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural
     award and 3) apply for the loan through the Financial Aid Office.
                                                                               phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development,

     ACADEMIC
                                                                               measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation


     INFORMATION
                                                                               of evidence and employment of mathematical analysis
                                                                             • Application of scientific data, concepts and models in one of
                                                                               the natural sciences


     General Education Requirements                                          AS 180/181
                                                                             AS 182
                                                                                           Astronomy & Lab
                                                                                           Stellar Astronomy

     SUNY General Education
                                                                             BI 105        Human Heredity & Environmental

     Student Learning Outcomes
                                                                             BI 107        Human Biology
                                                                             BI 110/115    Biology I & Lab
         The SUNY Board of Trustees has established the mandatory            BI 121/122    Zoology & Lab
     General Education Knowledge and Skill Areas for all SUNY                BI 140        Human Reproduction
     Institutions. Beginning with students admitted in fall 2002, all        BI 149        Survey of Anatomy & Physiology
     graduates of SUNY colleges and universities will be required to         BI 150/151    Anatomy & Physiology I & Lab
     have satisfied the course requirements for competency in each           BI 169        Nutrition for Living
     of the knowledge areas. Erie Community College is committed             BI 230/231    Microbiology & Lab
     to ensuring that its graduates, with Associate in Arts and              CH 110        Survey of Science
     Associate in Sciences degrees, will have met the requirements of        CH 112        Understanding Drugs (formerly CH130)
     seven of these 10 knowledge and skills areas and the two com-           CH 116        Chemistry and the Environment
     petencies. Every effort will be made to guarantee that ECC                            (formerly CH160)
     graduates will be granted Junior status at all SUNY institutions.       CH 118        Forensic Science (formerly CH170)
         Community college students who have not completed the               CH 140/141    College Chemistry I & Lab (formerly CH200/201)
     General Education requirement in two years are eligible to              CH 144/145    General Chemistry w/Intro Organic &
     transfer to a four-year SUNY college or university. However,                          Biochemistry & Lab (formerly CH250/251)
     they are required to fulfill the General Education requirements         CH 180/181    University Chemistry I & Lab
     while at the four-year school. Students are advised to complete                       (formerly CH300/301)
     these requirements at the community college level to make               CH 240/241    Analytical Chemistry & Lab
     room for academic major requirements at the four-year level.                          (formerly CH410/411)
         Following is the listing of knowledge and skills areas and          GL 160/161    Physical Geology & Lab
     related ECC course offerings which have been approved by the            PH 110        Introduction to Integrated Science
     State University of New York. The competencies include                  PH 120        Environmental Science
     Critical Thinking, Reasoning and Information Management.                PH 152        Physics, College
     This list of courses is edited on a semester basis and also appears     PH 170/171    Computer Applications in Optics I & Lab
     in each semester’s publication of the Course Schedule.                  PH 172/173    Computer Applications in Optics II & Lab

     I. Knowledge and Skills Areas
                                                                             PH 180/181    Physics for Architectural Technology & Lab
                                                                             PH 190/191    Basic Physics & Lab
                                                                             PH 210        Radiologic Physics I
     Mathematics                                                             PH 215        Radiologic Physics II PH 220
     • Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models                PH 220        Advanced Radiologic Physics I
       such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics                       PH 225        Advanced Radiologic Physics II
     • Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually,            PH 260/261    Technical Physics I & Lab
       numerically and verbally                                              PH 262/263    Technical Physics II & Lab
     • Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra,              PH 270/271    College Physics I & Lab
       geometry, or statistics to solve problems                             PH 272/273    College Physics II & Lab
     • Estimate and check mathematical results                               PH 280/281    Physics for Science and Engineering I & Lab
     • Recognize the limits of mathematical and statistical methods          PH 282/283    Physics for Science and Engineering II & Lab
                                                                             PH 284/285    Physics for Science and Engineering III & Lab
     MT 112         Survey of Mathematics
     MT116          Modeling with Functions                                  Social Sciences
     MT119          Math for Elementary Teachers II                          • Understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore
     MT 121         Technical Mathematic I                                     social phenomena, including observation, hypothesis develop-
     MT 122         Technical Mathematics II                                   ment, measurement and data collection, experimentation,
     MT 125         College Mathematics I                                      evaluation of evidence and employment of mathematical and
     MT 126         College Mathematics II                                     interpretive analysis
     MT 143         Introductory Statistics I                                • Knowledge of major concepts, models and issues of at least
     MT 167         Discrete mathematics                                       one discipline in the social sciences
44
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
AN 101        Biological Anthropology                                 HI 100         Foundations Western Civilization
AN 102        Cultural Anthropology                                   HI 104         History of Technology
AN 103        Introduction to Archeology                              HI 109         Modern Europe I
EC 100        Introduction to Economics                               HI 110         Modern Europe II
EC 101        Consumer Economics                                      HI 111         British History to 1688
EC 102        Macroeconomics                                          HI 112         British History since 1688
EC 103        Microeconomics                                          HI208          The Enlightenment
EC 201        Money & Banking                                         HI241          History of World War II
GO 100        Introduction to Political Science
GO 101        American Government I                                   Other World Civilizations
GO 102        American Government II                                  • Knowledge of either a broad outline of world history, or the
GO 103        International Relations                                   distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, soci-
GP 101        Introduction to Geography                                 ety, culture, etc. of one non-Western civilization
GP 103        Introduction to Human Geography
GP 105        World Geography                                         AN 102         Cultural Anthropology
GP 150        Introduction to Geographic Information Systems          HI 106         World Civilization I
GP 250        Geographic Information Systems                          HI 107         World Civilization II Humanities
              Skills & Techniques
GP 290        Advanced Topics in Geographic                           Humanities
              Information Systems                                     • Knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of
HU 100        Human Interaction                                         the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other
PS 100        General Psychology                                        knowledge areas required by the General Education program
PS 101        Effective Parenting
PS 201        Developmental Psychology                                AT300          Art Appreciation
PS 202        Abnormal Psychology                                     AT301          Art History I
PS 203        Social Psychology                                       AT302          Art History II
PS 204        Personality                                             CA 120         Introduction to Rhetoric
SO 100        Introduction to Sociology                               CA 121         Communications Theory
SO 101        Social Institutions                                     CA 210         Rhetoric of Vision and Sound
SO 201        Urban Sociology                                         DT101          Introduction to Drama & Theater
SO 202        Sociology of the Family                                 DT102          Contemporary Theatre Workshop
SO 203        (Marx’s) Capital: Origins of the                        DT310          19th Century Russian Theatre
              Modern World System                                     DT320          20th Century Russian Theatre
SS 102        Social Problems                                         DT440          Introduction to Theatre
SS 103        Technology and Society                                  DT445          Fundamentals of Acting
SS 203        Human Sexualities                                       DT450          Introduction to Stagecraft
SS 205        Aging, Death and Dying                                  DT455          Fundamentals of Acting
                                                                      DT460          Theatre Practicum
American History                                                      EN 111         Composition & Interpretation of Literature
• Knowledge of a basic narrative of American history: political,      EN 210         American Literature to 1865
  economic, social and cultural, including knowledge of unity         EN 211         American Literature since 1865
  and diversity in American society                                   EN 215         Afro- American Literature
• Knowledge of common institutions in American society and            EN 220         British Literature to 1800
  how they have affected different groups                             EN 221         British Literature since 1800
• Understanding of America’s evolving relationship with rest of       EN 225         Shakespeare
  world                                                               EN 230         World Literature
                                                                      EN 240         Studies in Short Fiction
HI 101        American History I                                      EN 245         Present Day Short Fiction
HI 102        American History II                                     EN 260         Studies in Poetry
HI 103        African American History                                EN 265         Modern Poetry
HI 108        Work in American: US Labor History                      EN 270         Studies in Drama
HI 115        History of Poverty in America                           EN 280         Literature & Film
HI 231        Civil War and Reconstruction                            EN 285         Introduction to Film
HI 260        History of the Social Image of Women                    EN 286         Contemporary Cinema
              in American Culture                                     EN 292         Children's Literature
                                                                      EN 294         Mythology
Western Civilization                                                  EN 296         The Bible as Literature
• Knowledge of the development of the distinctive features of         EN 430         Oral Interpretation of Literature
  the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc. of       EN 520         Topics in Literature
  Western civilization                                                EN 521         Images of Women
• Relate the development of Western civilization to that of other     MU201          Instrumentation and Arranging
  regions of the world                                                MU210          Enjoyment of Music
                                                                      MU213          Twentieth Century Music
                                                                      MU215          History of Jazz                                        45
               E C C     2 0 0 8    -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     MU217        History of Popular Music                             EN 286        Contemporary Cinema
     MU219        Healing with Music                                   EN 292        Children's Literature
     PY 100       Critical Thinking                                    EN 294        Mythology
     PY 101       Knowledge & Reality                                  EN 296        The Bible as Literature
     PY 102       Logic                                                EN 310        Creative Writing I
     PY 104       Philosophy of Religion                               EN 311        Creative Writing II
     PY 105       Social and Political Philosophy                      EN 520        Topics in Literature
     PY 110       Ethics                                               EN 521        Images of Women
     PY 111       Biomedical Ethics                                    MU 200        Fundamentals of Music
     PY 115       Philosophy of Law                                    MU 201        Instrumentation and Arranging
                                                                       MU 210        Enjoyment of Music
     The Arts                                                          MU 213        Twentieth Century Music
     • Understanding of at least one principal form of artistic        MU 214        Introduction to Folk Guitar
       expression and the creative process inherent therein            MU 215        History of Jazz
                                                                       MU 217        History of Popular Music
     AT 200       Art Drawing I
     AT 201       Art Drawing II                                       Foreign Language
     AT 210       Painting I                                           • Basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign
     AT 211       Painting Workshop                                      language
     AT 220       Photography I                                        • Knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated
     AT 221       Photography II                                         with the language they are studying
     AT 232       Exploratory Casting
     AT 235       Lettering & Design                                   SP110         Elementary Spanish I
     AT 250       Fabric Painting                                      SP 111        Elementary Spanish II
     AT 251       Textiles                                             SP 112        Intermediate Spanish I
     AT 255       Jewelry                                              SP 113        Intermediate Spanish II
     AT 256       Applied Jewelry Techniques                           SP 210        Spanish Composition I
     AT 260       Computer Art & Design                                SP 211        Spanish Composition II
     AT 300       Art Appreciation                                     FR 110        Elementary French I
     AT 301       Art History I                                        FR 111        Elementary French II
     AT 302       Art History II                                       FR 112        Intermediate French I
     DN 101       Introduction to Dance                                FR 113        Intermediate French II
     DN 102       Ballet I                                             FR 114        French Conversation & Composition
     DN 103       Jazz Dance I                                         FR 120        Introduction to French Literature
     DN 107       African Dance I                                      SL 110        American Sign Language I
     DN 108       African Dance II                                     SL 111        American Sign Language II
     DT101        Introduction to Drama & Theater
     DT 102       Contemporary Theatre Workshop                        Basic Communication
     DT 310       19th Century Russian Theatre                         • Produce coherent texts within common college-level written
     DT 320       20th Century Russian Theatre                           forms
     DT 440       Introduction to Theatre                              • Demonstrate the ability to revise and improve such texts
     DT 445       Fundamentals of Acting                               • Research a topic, develop an argument and organize support-
     DT 450       Introduction to Stagecraft                             ing details
     DT 455       Fundamentals of Acting                               • Develop proficiency in oral discourse
     DT 460       Theatre Practicum                                    • Evaluate an oral presentation according to established criteria
     EN 111       Composition & Interpretation of Literature
     EN 210       American Literature to 1865                          EN 110        College Composition
     EN 211       American Literature since 1865                       EN 120        Composition Occupational Communication
     EN 215       Afro-American Literature                             EN 121        Composition & Readings in Science & Literature
     EN 220       British Literature to 1800                           EN 130        Advanced Writing & Readings &
     EN 221       British Literature since 1800                                      Scientific Disciplines

                                                                       II. Competencies
     EN 225       Shakespeare
     EN 230       World Literature
     EN 240       Studies in Short Fiction                             Critical Thinking (Reasoning)
     EN 245       Present Day Short Fiction.                           • Identify, analyze and evaluate arguments as they occur in their
     EN 260       Studies in Poetry                                       own or others’ work
     EN 265       Modern Poetry                                        • Develop well-reasoned arguments.
     EN 270       Studies in Drama                                     Information Management
     EN 280       Literature & Film                                    • Perform the basic operations of personal computer use
     EN 285       Introduction to Film                                 • Understand and use basic research techniques
                                                                       • Locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of
                                                                          sources.

46
                  E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
ECC Graduate Learning Outcomes                                          emic progress. The college will also provide resources for faculty
                                                                        development in teaching diverse student populations.
Upon graduation from ECC, a student will be able to:
                                                                           We see ECC as a college where under-prepared students
1. Communicate effectively.
                                                                        achieve personal growth and academic success within and sup-
2. Read and think critically.
                                                                        ported by a “learning community” dedicated to life-long learning.

                                                                        Developmental Coursework
3. Apply appropriate mathematical procedures and quantitative
    methods.
4. Demonstrate knowledge of the processes of science and tech-          All developmental coursework must be completed by the time a
    nological change and the impact of that change on the indi-         matriculated student has earned 30 credit hours. Students tak-
    vidual, the culture and the environment.                            ing developmental courses will be monitored for progress in sat-
5. Demonstrate a historic perspective and knowledge of artistic         isfying academic standards requirements. Students will be pro-
    and literary traditions.                                            vided academic support services, and those students making
6. Demonstrate civic responsibility including an understanding          insufficient progress will be placed on probation. Students who
    of ethics, diversity, citizenship and community involvement.        fail to meet developmental course of study progress standards
7. Demonstrate personal and interpersonal integrity and maturi-         may be subject to dismissal in accordance with the Academic
    ty through leadership, perseverance, motivation, adapt-ability,     Probation and Dismissal Policy.

                                                                        Academic Advisement
    responsibility and respect for self and others.
8. Exhibit the research skills for lifelong learning.
9. Demonstrate adequate preparation for a career or continuing          Erie Community College believes that academic advisement is a
    education.                                                          major element of student success. An effective advisement pro-
10. Demonstrate competence with computers and technology.               gram provides students a forum in which students, in concert
Developmental Education Vision Statement
                                                                        with a faculty member, can begin to connect their own academ-
                                                                        ic aptitude with their own educational goals.
It is ECC’s vision to be recognized as a college which fosters the          At Erie Community College, academic advising is the cata-
development of under-prepared students and assists them in              lyst for students to achieve their academic potential, objectives
becoming successful life-long learners.                                 and ultimately, to be life-long learners and successful citizens.
Upon completion of ECC’s Developmental Education Program,               Maintaining the highest professional standards, advisers will
students will be able to:                                               ensure all students are given the opportunity to connect the
• Demonstrate proficiency in reading, writing, computation,             advisement process of learning, reflection and academic goal
   speaking and in basic study skills in order to be successful in      setting to their overall college experience.
   credit-bearing course work. Proficiency in these basic skills is         The adviser has the responsibility to possess accurate infor-
   consistent with further development of the general education         mation and to assist students in their efforts to make informed
   competencies in credit-bearing courses.                              academic decisions. To be successful, the individual student in
• Identify personal, educational and career goals.                      pursuit of his or her educational goals must take advantage of
• See themselves as active and successful learners, both within         the opportunities to meet with an adviser and must take respon-
   and beyond this institution and utilize their personal learning      sibility for meeting the specific academic requirements of the
   preferences.                                                         college.
• Solve problems, adapt to change and negotiate the college                 All first-time, full-time, matriculating students must receive
                                                                        academic advisement prior to registering.

                                                                        Academic Freedom
   system.
• Use the college support services effectively.
By achieving these developmental education objectives, students         Erie Community College adheres to the policy that free inquiry
will develop effective approaches to learning and enhance their         and free expression are needed to ensure quality instruction and
self-images.                                                            professional development. The exercise of educational rights
                                                                        and privileges, however, may not infringe on public rights or
The faculty will make every effort to:
                                                                        limit the college in its provision of educational service. The col-
• Provide a positive learning environment that encourages
                                                                        lege shall not permit its facilities to be used as sanctuary for
  human development and enhances students’ self-esteem.
                                                                        those who may violate the civil law or college policy. In addition
• Provide alternative instructional techniques to accommodate
                                                                        to college policies, the staff will be subject to the rules and regu-
  different ways of learning and respect diversity.
                                                                        lations of the County of Erie as stated in the Erie County
• Set personal and professional goals and engage in professional
                                                                        Employee Handbook. Handbooks may be obtained from the
  development consistent with the developmental education
                                                                        ECC Human Resources Department.

                                                                        Attendance Policy
  objectives.
• Know their own learning and teaching styles.
• Reinforce the basic skills competencies in their coursework.          Students are expected to attend class regularly in every course
• Maintain high performance expectations of students.                   for which they have registered. Attendance regulations for spe-
• Participate in out-of-classroom learning, mentoring and advis-        cific courses are established by the course instructor, announced
  ing activities.                                                       and distributed in writing at the beginning of the semester, and
• Actively promote college support services through referral            may have a bearing on the student’s grade. Additional require-
  and direct involvement.                                               ments are found in individual course syllabi. Students are oblig-
• Assess the effectiveness of teaching and learning.                    ated to contact their instructors if they are unable to attend class
Developmental education is a critical component of the college’s        during the first week. Students not attending class during the
mission. The college will provide adequate resources to maximize        first week may be dropped from the class by the instructor.
the potential of under-prepared students in their pursuit of acad-
                                                                                                                                                47
               E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Absences from Class                                                      ment of the degree requirements, if appropriate, but will not con-
     Students who anticipate an absence should contact the appro-             tribute to the quality point average. NOTE: Many four-year insti-
     priate instructor(s) in advance. In the case of an unexpected            tutions will not transfer credit for courses taken on a pass/fail
     absence, students should speak to the instructor(s) as soon as           basis.
     they return to campus or during their absence. Of course, in             I (Incomplete) - Instructors may give an Incomplete grade to a
     either case, the student is responsible for all material covered.        student who has completed at least three quarters of the required
     As required by law, instructors are responsible for keeping              work for a course but because of a personal emergency finds it
     accurate attendance records.

     Absences Due to Religious Observances
                                                                              impossible to finish the coursework within the usual time frame.
                                                                              To receive an “I” grade, the student must sign a contract, pre-
                                                                              pared by the instructor, outlining the coursework to be undertak-
     No student will be penalized for missing classes and/or exami-
                                                                              en and the time frame for completion. A copy of the contract
     nations due to the observance of a religious holiday, as pre-
                                                                              must accompany the instructor’s grade report. Upon satisfactory
     scribed by Section 224 of the State Education Law.

     Grading System
                                                                              completion of the course requirements, the faculty member will
                                                                              submit a change of grade form. In no case may the grade be
     The grading system which is utilized by faculty and computed             changed to a “W.” If the student has not completed the contract
     in a student’s quality grade point average (QPA) is described as         within the one-year time limit, the grade automatically becomes
                                                                              an “F”.
                                                  Quality Pts.
     follows:

     Grade Definition                             Per Cr. Hrs.
                                                                              CR (Credit) - When a student has been awarded credit by virtue
                                                                              of advanced placement courses, transfer courses, departmental
     A Outstanding Achievement                        4.00                    examinations, life experiences or non-collegiate education, the
     A-                                               3.67                    credits will carry a CR notation on the official transcript and will
                                                                              not be computed in a student’s QPA.
     B+                                               3.33
     B Above Average Achievement                      3.00                    Z (Audit) - A student may register to audit a course with the per-
                                                                              mission of the instructor provided there is room in the class. The
     B-                                               2.67
                                                                              audit privilege permits the student to attend class and to do the
     C+                                               2.33                    assignments. However, the student may not take examinations or
     C Average Achievement                            2.00                    have work evaluated.
     C-                                               1.67                    NOTE: 1) Regular tuition is charged for audit privileges; 2)
                                                                              Performance courses are generally not available for audit; 3)
     D+                                               1.33                    During the first month of classes, students must inform the
     D Below Average Achievement                      1.00                    instructor that they are auditing the class; 4) A course that is
     D-                                               0.67                    audited will not be calculated in the total number of hours con-
                                                                              sidered for TAP purposes.
     F    Unsatisfactory Achievement/or               0
          Unsatisfactory Attendance,                                          W (Withdrawal) - Students may officially withdraw from a
          Cheating or Plagiarism *                    —                       course without academic penalty if they do so before the Last
                                                                              Day to Withdraw, as noted in the Academic Calendar of this cat-
     P    Pass                                        —
                                                                              alog. A full-time student who withdraws from all registered
     I    Incomplete**                                —                       courses will be considered withdrawn from the college. A student
                                                                              who withdraws from several courses and fails to satisfactorily
     Z    Audit                                       —
                                                                              complete a minimum of six credit hours in a given semester will
     W Official Withdrawal                            —                       be placed on academic probation. (For further information, see

     Transfer Credit
                                                                              the Dismissal and Probation Policies section).

     CC   External Transfer: 2 year                   —                       Unit of Academic Credit
     CU   External Transfer: 4 year                   —                       In general, one credit (a one-semester hour) represents the equiv-
     HS   High School                                 —                       alent of one hour of lecture or recitation or two hours of labora-
     AP   Advanced Placement                          —                       tory work each week for a fifteen-week semester.

                                                                              Quality Point Average (QPA)
     LP   Life Experience Assessment Program          —
     CL   College Level Examination Program           —
     AS   Armed Services                              —                       Academic standing is based on the cumulative quality point aver-
     IN   Internship Credit                           —                       age (QPA), a mathematical calculation determined by dividing
                                                                              the total quality points earned by the number of semester (credit)
     * A final grade of F will be issued for cheating or plagiarism.
                                                                              hours attempted.
       No other grade will be given.
                                                                                  To arrive at the quality points earned in a particular semester,
     **Must be completed in one year or it will change to F.                  the letter grades earned for each course are translated into
                                                                              numerical equivalents (See Grading System explanation) which
     P (Pass/Fail) - A student may take up to four courses (not in            are then multiplied by the number of credit hours assigned a par-
     the major field of study) on a pass/fail basis through written           ticular course. For example, if a student takes four, three-hour
     agreement with the instructor within the first month of the              courses (12 credit hours for a particular semester) and receives
     semester. If passed, the course will be credited toward fulfill-         one “A”, two “B’s” and a “C,” this translates into 36 quality
                                                                              points to be divided by the 12 credit hours. The resulting QPA
48
                    E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0        •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
would be 3.0, an above average achievement. The cumulative               Academic Probation and Dismissal
QPA is derived by dividing the total number of course semester           If a student falls below a minimum quality point average (QPA)
hours taken while at the college into the total number of quality        for a specific number of credit hours, he/she will receive a letter
points earned for those courses.

Dean’s List
                                                                         of their probationary status or dismissal from a program. The
                                                                         standards for these categories are illustrated in the following
                                                                         chart.

                                                                         Standards for Dismissal/Probation
The Dean’s List recognizes all matriculated students who have
completed a full-time course of study (12 degree credit hours) for
the semester and part-time students upon accumulation of cred-
its in units of 15; for example 15, 30, 45 and 60, and who have          Total                  Dismissal                 Probation
achieved a QPA of at least 3.5. Students who received a grade of         Credits                Cumulative                Cumulative
“F” or “I” in any course are not eligible for the Dean’s List.           Attempted              QPA Below                 QPA Below

Academic Standing and Financial Aid
                                                                         9-20                   1.00                      1.50
                                                                         21-38                  1.25                      1.75
Only students in good academic standing are eligible for financial       39-54                  1.55                      1.90
aid. Students who receive financial aid should carefully review          55 & above             1.85                      2.00
the financial aid section of this catalog for specific academic
progress requirements of state and/or federal aid. NOTE: “F’’            1. Probationary status must be removed by the end of the next
and “W’’ grades are both indicators of questionable academic                regular semester or the student will be subject to the
progress. All students, financial aid students in particular, should        Dismissal Policy.
consult the Counseling Center or the Financial Aid Office before         2. Any student with more than one-half of the courses attempt-
deciding whether to withdraw from a course they are in danger               ed showing a “W” in two sequential semesters will be sub-
of failing.                                                                 ject to the Dismissal Policy.

Good Academic Standing
                                                                         3. Students academically dismissed from a program of study
                                                                            may register in the college as a part-time non-matriculated
The term “in good academic standing’’ means that a student,                 student. The maximum number of credit hours will be less
having met minimum academic standards, is eligible to remain                than 12.
matriculated and to pursue academic coursework toward a
degree.                                                                  During this period of reduced work, the student should seek

Honors Concentration
                                                                         advisement regarding the courses to be scheduled and counsel-
                                                                         ing regarding study skills and financial aid. (Financial aid grants
Erie Community College offers an Honors Concentration to stu-            and loans will not be awarded to individuals enrolled as non-
dents of high academic ability and commitment to enriching their         matriculated students. Therefore, it is important to contact the
education. The Honors Concentration is open to both full-time            Financial Aid Office for advice.)
and part-time students in any degree program.                                When the QPA has been brought up to acceptable stan-
    Admission to the Honors Concentration is based on a stu-             dards, the student may re-apply for admission to matriculated
dent’s final high school average of 90 percent or higher and SAT         status.
or ACT scores. Transfer students need a GPA of 3.50. All stu-                The student may appeal the dismissal by a designated date.
dents are required to have a personal interview with their campus        An Academic Review Committee will review appeals for read-
Honors Coordinator.                                                      mission. The committee will consist of an assistant academic
    Students can take a sampling of Honors designated courses            dean, counselor and a student services representative. The com-
and earn a degree as an Honors Fellow or Honors Associate. As            mittee will determine the status of the student to be one of the
an Honors Fellow, students will take at least five courses desig-        following:
nated as honors and three semesters of Colloquium for a total of
                                                                            A. Readmission without reservation
18 credits. Upon completion of the Honors Fellow requirements,
                                                                            B. Readmission and required registration in GS-111
the student will receive an Honors designation on their official
                                                                            C. Readmission part-time matriculated
college transcript which will indicate completion of the ECC
                                                                            D. Readmission upon successful completion of stipulated
Honors Concentration requirements. As an Honors Associate,
                                                                               academic requirement
students will take at least three courses designated as Honors and
                                                                            E. Remain part-time, non-matriculated
one semester of Colloquium. Upon completion of Honors cours-
                                                                            F. No readmission
es, an Honors designation will be acknowledged for each course
completed on the official college transcript. All Honors students        Students who were dismissed and are eventually reinstated must
must maintain at least a 3.25 GPA.                                       meet any new curricula requirements in effect at the date of
    A variety of Honors courses are offered each semester on all         their reinstatement.
three campuses. Students are invited to apply to the Honors
                                                                         4. Once students have been reinstated, they will receive a letter
Concentration through the Admissions Office or through the
                                                                            of this change of status.

                                                                         Grade Changes
Campus Honors Coordinator.

Graduation with Distinction                                              Once a grade has been reported to the Registrar’s Office, it can
Students with a cumulative QPA of 3.50 or higher at the time of
                                                                         be changed only if an error has been made in computation or in
graduation will be awarded a degree “With High Distinction.”
                                                                         recording. In such cases, the instructor must submit a Change
Students with a cumulative QPA of 3.25 to 3.49 will be awarded
                                                                         of Grade form, signed by the Department Coordinator and for-
a degree “With Distinction.”
                                                                         warded to the Registrar within two years after the original grade
                                                                         had been submitted.
                                                                                                                                               49
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Grade Reports                                                            Associate Degree Requirements Summary
     At the end of each semester, a final grade report will be mailed         A degree candidate must meet the following requirements:
     to the student’s permanent address.

     Satisfactory Progress
                                                                              1. Formal admission to the college as a matriculated student.
                                                                              2. Satisfactory completion of academic courses as indicated in
     To maintain satisfactory progress, full-time students must com-             the degree program of matriculation.
     plete a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester and part-time            3. Successful completion of a minimum of 30 semester hours of
     students must complete all courses for which they have regis-               credit at Erie Community College; acceptance of transfer
     tered. Further, students must have a 2.0 quality point average              credits is the prerogative of the academic department of the
     (QPA), must fulfill department requirements and must not accu-              student’s program.
     mulate excessive course withdrawals or incompletes. Questions            4. Successful completion of any developmental math and
     about satisfactory progress toward a degree may be directed to              English courses by the time a matriculated student has earned
     the student’s academic advisor or financial aid officer.                    30 credit hours.
         If a problem occurs, the burden of proof rests with the stu-         5. Proficiency in algebra at MT 106 level. Individual programs
     dent, not the college. The student must be able to produce a                may require higher levels of math proficiency.
     written document to verify his/her version of the situation.             6. QPA of 2.0 or above.
         Here are some of the items that a student should save in a           7. Meet all financial obligations to the college and return all
     folder for future reference:                                                library materials borrowed.
                                                                              8. File a graduation application form in the Registrar’s Office.

                                                                              Second Degrees
     1.   Letter of acceptance to the college
     2.   Placement test results or waivers
     3.   Student copy of drop/add forms or withdrawal forms                  Consistent with the policy of the State Education Department, a
     4.   Bills and schedules of classes                                      student can earn a double degree if the following qualifications
     5.   Course syllabi                                                      are met:
     6.   Grade reports and unofficial transcripts

     Cancellation of Courses
                                                                              1. All of the requirements for both degrees have been earned.
                                                                                 All general education courses from the previous degree may
     Erie Community College reserves the right to: 1) cancel any                 be applied to the additional degree.
     course section in which the number of students is deemed insuf-          2. Successful completion of requirements for the two degrees
     ficient or for which an instructor is not available; 2) set limits on       requires a minimum of 15 credits of study in addition to the
     the number of students who will be allowed to enroll in any                 number needed for one degree. No more than two degrees
     course or section; 3) cancel courses based on insufficient college          will be awarded at any one time. Two degrees will be awarded
     budget funding. In the case of a course’s cancellation, all tuition         concurrently only if the discipline areas are separate and dis-
     and fees paid for such course will be refunded, or those stu-               tinct as delineated by different HEGIS codes.
     dents who have been affected by course cancellations will be             3. A student interested in earning a second degree should con-
     allowed to register in another course or section without addi-              tact the Admissions Office for an application for admission as
     tional cost.                                                                a second degree candidate. The advantage for obtaining a sec-

     Course Prerequisites
                                                                                 ond degree should be explored with a counselor in the
                                                                                 Admissions Office or with a faculty advisor.

                                                                              Transfer Credit
     A prerequisite course is one that prepares a student for
     advanced courses in a chosen field. When a prerequisite is
     required, that information will be noted in the course listing in        Students transferring to Erie Community College from other
     this catalog or on the schedule of courses. In some cases, a pre-        accredited institutions of higher education may receive whole or
     requisite may be waived by an instructor, so when there is a             partial credit for courses taken at the other institutions. To
     question regarding a requirement, the student should speak to            arrange for the transfer of credits, the student must have an offi-
     the instructor who will be teaching the course.                          cial transcript of his/her work as well as a catalog from the other

     Program Change
                                                                              institution sent to the campus Admissions Office. Once the offi-
                                                                              cial transcript is received, the coordinator in the appropriate aca-
     Students who want to change curriculums should consult their             demic department will evaluate the transcript and supporting
     faculty advisor and the department chair of the curriculum they          documents and decide on the acceptability of the transfer materi-
     wish to enter. The student must then file a program change               al and the amount of credit that will be transferred. No transfer
     form in the campus Admissions Office. Approval of the transfer           credits will be computed in the cumulative quality point average,
     will depend on several factors, including space availability and         and no grade below a “C-” will be transferred.

                                                                              Transferring Courses While Enrolled at ECC
     academic qualifications. Students’ applications for program
     change will be given the same consideration as all other appli-
     cants. Following a change in curriculum, those courses, grades           ECC matriculated students who enroll in courses at other institu-
     and credit hours specific to the former curriculum, and applica-         tions may have these credits transferred providing they obtain
     ble to the new curriculum as unrestricted electives, can be              advance written approval from the department chair and/or head
     included in calculating the new cumulative grade point average.          of their academic department at ECC. An official transcript must
     Please note that all courses for which a student registers will          be sent to that academic department for processing once the
                                                                              course is completed.

                                                                              Falling Below Full-time Status
     appear on the transcript. A student may have this rule applied
     to only one change of curriculum which occurs within the first
     36 credit hours attempted at the college.
                                                                              Most financial aid programs require that students carry a full-
                                                                              time load (12 or more credit hours per semester). Students
50                                                                            receiving financial aid should verify their full-time status.
                     E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Individualized Instruction                                                Distance learning is offered utilizing many forms of technology
                                                                          including:
Under special circumstances, when students can clearly demon-
                                                                          • Internet-based courses
strate a compelling rationale, they may be allowed to receive indi-
                                                                          • Video-based courses
vidualized instruction for a course. The student first contacts
                                                                          • Fiber-optic interactive audio-video based courses

                                                                          Internet-Based Courses
his/her academic advisor who will review and determine the
appropriateness of the request. If the request is warranted, the
advisor will assist the student with the necessary procedures.

Repeat of a Course
                                                                          In an Internet-based course, students access some or all of the
                                                                          course material and participate in course activities over the
                                                                          Internet. Students can work from any Internet connected com-
Students may repeat a course for which credit has been received
                                                                          puter to complete assignments and interact with other students
with a grade of “F” through “B+.” Exceptions to this policy will
                                                                          and the instructor. To participate in an online course, students
be contained in individual departmental policies and procedures.
                                                                          should have regular access to a computer with an Internet con-
   Only the higher of the two grades will be counted in the com-
                                                                          nection. Students should also have some familiarity with
putation of a cumulative quality point average. While a student
                                                                          Internet use, e-mail use and file management (saving files,
may repeat a course at another college, only the course taken at
                                                                          downloading files, attaching files to e-mail). The college uses
ECC can be used in computing the QPA.

Withdrawal From the College
                                                                          two platforms for Internet-based courses: the college server and
                                                                          the SUNY Learning Network.
A student withdrawing from the college must complete the offi-            There are three forms of Internet-based courses:
cial withdrawal forms available in the campus Counseling Center           • Online courses (the majority of the course is completed over
by the last date to withdraw as published in the academic calen-             the Internet, with little or no on-campus time)
dar. This procedure, once completed, terminates current registra-         • Hybrid courses (a combination of online and seated time)
tion in all courses.                                                      • Web-assisted courses (a seated course where the instructor
    Students who fail to complete the withdrawal procedure will              uses online materials and activities to supplement the class-
                                                                             room work)

                                                                          Video-Based Courses
no longer be in good standing. To re-enter the college once the
withdrawal procedure has been followed the student must apply
for readmission through the college Admissions Office.

Residency Requirements
                                                                          In a video-based course, students use a set of videos as a substi-
                                                                          tute for the traditional class lecture. Some of the videos are
Students who intend to receive a degree from Erie Community               available at the campus library; others need to be purchased
College must successfully complete a minimum of 30 semester               from the bookstore. Textbook and other course materials are
                                                                          typically required.

                                                                          Fiber-Optic Based Courses
hours of credit at the college. Acceptance of transfer credits is the


The Center for Alternative
prerogative of the appropriate college academic department.



Course Delivery
                                                                          A fiber-optic based course is a “live” distance learning course.
                                                                          Erie Community College is a partner in Project Connect, a state-
                                                                          of-the-art interactive audio/video network, utilizing fiber optic
                                                                          technology to link several sites together. A host site, with an
Erie Community College provides several alternatives to the typi-         instructor present, is connected to three other sites which use
cal on-campus, seated class. To make it easier for students to            two-way audio/video links to the host (instructor). Some dis-
inquire about these alternatives, the Center for Alternative              tance learning courses use this technology as the “seated” por-
Course Delivery has been created. To inquire about the program,           tion of a Hybrid course, so students may not have to travel to an
call 851-1998.                                                            ECC campus.

                                                                          Degrees at a Distance
DISTANCE
LEARNING
                                                                          Erie Community College has been approved by the New York
                                                                          State Education Department to offer the following degrees at a
                                                                          distance:
                                                                          • Business Administration (A.A.S. and A.S.)
Customize college to your busy schedule with Erie Community
                                                                          • Computer Applications for the Office (Certificate)
College’s Distance Learning Program.

What is Distance Learning?
                                                                          • General Studies (A.S.)
                                                                          • Homeland Security (Certificate)
Distance learning is a formal approach to learning in which the           • Office Management (A.A.S.)
majority of the instruction occurs with the instructor and stu-           • Social Science (A.A.)
                                                                          • Telecommunications Technology (A.A.S.)

                                                                          Could you be a Distance Learner?
dents separated by geographic distance and/or time. Distance
learning courses offer students the flexibility of completing some
or all of their coursework and assignments without having to reg-
                                                                          Distance learners tend to be busy people who take advantage of
ularly attend classes on an ECC campus.
                                                                          flexible course schedules and delivery methods to fit college
    Distance learning students have the ability to take courses at a
                                                                          classes into their hectic lives. Many are employed full-time,
place and time that is convenient for them. The distance learning
                                                                          many are parents and some are homebound due to special
program at ECC serves more than 5,000 students each semester.
                                                                          needs.
Distance learning covers a wide range of General Education
requirements.
                                                                                                                                               51
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     To find out if Distance Learning is right for you, ask yourself         Math: Calculus AB                       MT 181
     the following questions:                                                Math: Calculus BC                       MT 182
     • Am I self-motivated?                                                  Music: Theory                           MU 200
     • Can I work without frequent supervision?                              Physics B                               L. Art - 370/371
     • Do I have the patience to understand if the course does not                                                   & 372/373
        go smoothly?                                                                                                 Technologies - 260/261 &
     • Do I have enough time to take a distance learning course (as                                                  262/263
        some classes require online time)?                                   Psychology                              PS 100
     • Am I computer literate or do I have the proper equipment              Spanish Language                        SP 210 or SP 211
        (i.e. computer and modem)                                            College Level Examination
     • Am I a good time-manager?                                             Program (CLEP)
     If you answered “Yes” to all of these, then you are ready for a         ECC will award college credit to those students who score at the
     Distance Learning course. If you answered “No” to some, then            recommended levels of the College Level Examination Program
     please speak to an Erie Community College academic adviser.             (CLEP). The Commission on Educational Credit of the

     How do I get started?
                                                                             American Council on Education sets the standards and a list may
                                                                             be obtained in the Assistant Academic Dean’s Office at any one
     Register for a distance learning course the same way you would          of the three campuses. The State University of New York College
     any other course. Purchase supplies and educational materials           at Buffalo is the closest test site.

                                                                             Curriculum Linked Internship and Co-op Office
     (text, study guide, etc.) from any ECC bookstore or online at
     efollett.com. Each campus operates a college bookstore where
     books and supplies are available at competitive prices. Visit the       ECC students have the opportunity to gain valuable experience by
     Distance Learning Department Web site: http://dl.ecc.edu.               taking advantage of the internships and co-ops available to all stu-

     Life Experience Assessment Program (LEAP)
                                                                             dents. ECC provides a wide variety of internship and co-op experi-
                                                                             ences which are tailored to fit the needs of students. Internships
     The Life Experience Assessment Program (LEAP) allows stu-               provide hands-on instruction by introducing students to an
     dents to utilize life learning to earn credit toward their degree.      employer's corporate culture, technology and manufacturing tech-
     The student must prepare a portfolio documenting his/her                niques. Another enriching experience is the co-op, which alter-
     knowledge which will be evaluated by two faculty members                nates classroom experiences with hands-on instruction at the work
     selected by the assistant academic dean in the appropriate area.        site. Many internships and co-ops lead to full-time employment.
         After becoming familiar with the requirements for his/her               If you are interested in participating in an internship or co-op,
     degree program, the student should contact the appropriate              please contact your department chair. Please note, participants
     assistant academic dean to obtain the instructions for prepara-         must be currently registered at ECC and must meet the mini-
     tion of the portfolio.                                                  mum qualification standards set by the respective academic
     Weekend College
                                                                             departments.
                                                                                 Available curricula linked to the college's internship and co-op
     Busy during the week? Try a class on the weekend. Explore               programs are:
     Erie Community College’s condensed weekend format. Take a                   Architectural/Drafting Technology
     3-credit course in only five weeks. Classes meet Fridays 6–9:30             Automotive Technology


     Other Sources Of Course Credit
     p.m. and Saturdays 8 a.m.–1 p.m.                                            Baking & Pastry Arts Certificate Program
                                                                                 Building Maintenance
                                                                                 Business Administration

     Advanced Placement
                                                                                 Civil Engineering/Construction Technology
                                                                                 CNC Machining & Programming
     High school students enrolled in advanced placement courses                 Communication & Media Arts
                                                                                 Computer Information Systems

     Advanced Placement Matrix
     will receive credit for a score of three or more.
                                                                                 Computer Repair Technology
                                                                                 Criminal Justice
     AP Exam                                   ECC Equivalent                    Early Childhood
     U.S. History                              HI 102                            Electrical Engineering Technology
     Art History                               Art History I                     Fire Protection Technology
     Biology                                   Score 3 - 110/111                 General Studies (Disney)
                                               Score 4 or 5 - 112/111            Geographic Information Systems
     Chemistry                                 300/301 & 302/303                 Graphic Arts
     Comp. Science A                           CS 121                            Health, Physical Education & Recreation
     Comp. Science AB                          CS 132                            Hotel & Restaurant Management
     Economics: Micro Economics                EC 103                            Human Services Certificate/Soc. Science
     Economics: Macro Economics                EC 102                            Humanities
     English Language & Composition            EN 110                            Manufacturing/Industrial Technology
     English Literature & Composition          EN 111                            Mathematic/Computer Science
     French Language                           FR 114                            Mechanical Engineering Technology
     French Literature                         FR 120                            Office Management & Administration
     Government & Politics: U.S.               GO 101                            Paralegal
     Government & Politics:                                                      Telecommunications
52    Comparative                              GO 103

                    E C C     2 0 0 8      -     2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
For more information contact your academic advisor,
department chair, or Marge Arcadi, Coordinator of Internships
                                                                       United States Armed Forces Institute (USAFI)
                                                                       An academic department can award credit to students who have
and Co-Ops at (716) 270-5312 or arcadim@ecc.edu.

Credit for Military Service
                                                                       taken United States Armed Forces Institute courses which are
                                                                       deemed equivalent to one or more of the students’ required


                                                                       Transitional Programs
Students who have served in any branch of the United States            courses in their curricula.
Armed Forces should speak to the campus Veterans counselor.
Students may be able to gain credit for learning experiences

                                                                       Pathways To Success
while in the military. Military personnel on active duty or dis-
charged from the service who are participants in the Concurrent
Admissions Program must complete a minimum of one-quarter              The mission of Pathways to Success program is to increase the
of his/her program at the college in order to be awarded a             successful movement of students from basic educational pro-
degree. A maximum of three-quarter credits earned while in the         grams to college completions through linkages and shared infor-
military will be applied to a curriculum if previous coursework        mation between Erie Community College, Buffalo Public
meets appropriate degree requirements.                                 Schools, Erie 1 BOCES, Erie 2 BOCES, Ken-Ton and Maryvale
    Three-quarters of the program may be achieved through              school districts, community agencies and local businesses.
coursework acquired in military service through any Service            These partnerships will include a common design of student
Member Opportunity College at levels consistent with the               intake, seamless educational services and timely connections
American Council on Education (ACE) Guide; those tran-                 between the aforementioned institutions.
scripted by the Community College of the Air Force or from                 The Pathways to Success program is for individuals at least
non-traditional testing programs such as CLEP, DSST,                   17 years of age who are not eligible to be enrolled in high school
ACT/PEP or USAFI.                                                      and wish to enroll in Erie Community College.
Reserve Officers’ Training Program (ROTC)                              Services Offered:
ECC has a cross-registration, tuition-free arrangement with            • Assistance with financial aid forms and college application
Canisius College for students enrolling in Military Science cours-       procedures
es and begin earning an Army Officers’ Commission through the          • Individualized academic and career counseling
Reserve Officers’ Training Corps Program. ECC students may             • Streamlined admission into a wide range of degree, certifi-
enroll in the two-year Basic Course for which no military obliga-        cate and vocational training programs

                                                                       Individualized Workshops:
tion is incurred. The Basic Course is designed to provide stu-
dents with fundamental leadership education. For more details,
contact the Army ROTC at Canisius College at 888-3239 or at            •   GED (General Equivalency Diploma)
ECC at 851-1693.                                                       •   ESL (English as a Second Language)

ECC Departmental Proficiency Examinations
                                                                       •   Computer Skills-Introductory Level
                                                                       •   Pre-Collegiate Studies: ELA (English Language Arts) and
Certain academic departments offer exams to certify a student’s            mathematics developmental courses to prepare students for
proficiency in a given area. Students who feel their skills and/or         college level courses.
knowledge preclude the necessity for taking a course should
speak to the department coordinator regarding the possibility of       Call 851-1109 to learn how to take advantage of these opportu-
                                                                       nities.

                                                                       GED Courses
taking such an exam.

Education Programs in Non-Collegiate Organizations
Students may receive credit for learning and/or training earned        These workshops provide intense, short-term academic instruc-
through a non-collegiate organization such as in an industrial or      tion to assist students, who score at least 8.0 on the TABE test
corporate program. Guidelines for the award of such credit can         (form A or D) in preparing for the GED exam. This option is
be found in “A Guide to Educational Programs in Non-                   designed for test preparation and to streamline the transition to
Collegiate Organizations,” prepared by the New York State              ECC. This option is free and located at all three ECC campuses
Education Department or in “A Guide to the Evaluation of               as well as all partnership locations throughout Erie County. Call
                                                                       851-1109 for more information.

                                                                       Pre-Collegiate Studies Program
Service Educational Experiences,” distributed by the American
Council on Education.

Regents College Examinations Introduction                              The Pre-Collegiate Studies courses are non-credit and tuition
Regents College Examinations (RCEs) are proficiency examina-           free. They are designed to provide GED qualifiers and high
tions which measure college-level knowledge in the arts and sci-       school graduates with opportunities to raise their mathematics,
ences, business, nursing and education. They are administered          writing, reading, computer and research skills. The courses are
several times a year throughout New York State.                        interactive and include the use of technology. Completion of
    In states other than New York, they are administered by the        these non-credit courses will provide students with skills to
American College Testing Program and are known as ACT/ PEP             enable them to compete at a college level with students in col-
(Proficiency Examination Program) tests. Regents College               lege who have graduated with a traditional New York State
Examinations are also available worldwide to the military              Regents high school diploma. Course work includes studies in
through the Defense Activity for Non-traditional Education             career exploration, planning, basic technology skills, basic writ-
Support (DANTES) program.                                              ing skills, basic elementary algebra, research and study skills.
    Credit will be awarded for grades of 45 or better in areas
comparable to those listed in the catalog when judged acceptable
by the student’s academic program.                                                                                                          53
               E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Courses Offered:                                                         • Student cannot have a history of behavioral problems,
     Pre-Collegiate Reading/Writing I: This course is the first non-            including, but not limited to, previous formal suspensions
     credit level for individuals who are in need of basic skills in          • Student must be recommended as having the ability to suc-
     reading and writing. Students will learn vocabulary, essay, letter         ceed in a college environment
     and abstract writing techniques. This course provides students           • Student must commit to a five-year program, including sum-
     with general study concepts and patterns to promote future                 mer sessions
     educational experiences.                                                 • Student will be removed from the program if not on track at
                                                                                the completion of each school year
     Pre-Collegiate Basic Mathematics: This course is a non-credit
     course designed for individuals who are in need of basic math            Middle Early College High School at ECC
     skills needed to enter college. This course provides students            290 Main Street, 4th Floor
     with general concepts and patterns to promote future educa-              Buffalo, NY 14202
     tional experiences.                                                      Tel: (716) 851-3763
                                                                              Fax: (716) 851-3766
     For more information about these opportunities, please call
                                                                              E-mail: mchs@buffalo.k12.ny.us

                                                                              CAST Program
     851-1109.

     Middle Early College High School at ECC                                  In 1992, the Career and Success Training (CAST) program
     Middle Early College High Schools are secondary schools locat-
                                                                              began offering programs to the welfare target population.
     ed on college campuses across the country. They educate under-
                                                                              Today, this program is offered in the Ellicott Square Building,
     served students who have the potential to benefit from a rigor-
                                                                              located at 295 Main Street, Suite 733, in downtown Buffalo.
     ous academic curriculum offered within a supportive and nur-
                                                                              Temporary Assistance for Needy Family (TANF) recipients are
     turing environment.
                                                                              referred to the program by the local Erie County Department of
     Shared Characteristics of Middle Early College High Schools              Social Services (ECDSS).
     include:                                                                     CAST offers a work experience program utilizing state-of-
     • Formal collaboration between the high school and the col-              the-art equipment offered to Erie County TANF recipients.
         lege that is demonstrated by:                                        Participants have the opportunity to be placed at a relevant
         a. Inclusion in the organizational structure of the college;         work experience site in order to gain experience and develop
         b. Integration into the college, with faculty and students           important job skills. Some participants also attend G.E.D class-
            sharing educational resources;                                    es through the Department of Labor.
         c. Location on a college campus;                                         Additionally, life skills training is offered for enhanced self-
         d. Coordination of college and high school schedules and             management. Topics include human communication and job
            calendars                                                         readiness preparation. The CAST program is committed to life-
     • Authorization to grant a high school diploma                           long learning through workforce development.
     • Heterogeneous grouping of students
                                                                              Programming has expanded to include:
     • Implementation of collaborative, project-centered, interdis-
                                                                              - Case management
         ciplinary curricula
                                                                              - Work experience placement
     • Expanded teacher role in school governance
                                                                              - Job search assistance
     • Expectation that teachers are teacher/counselors within a
                                                                              - Basic computer skills
         structured system of support for students
                                                                              - Resume and interviewing skills
     • Ongoing embedded professional development
                                                                              - Assistance in G.E.D preparation
     • Student outcomes measured by multiple assessments includ-
         ing performance-based assessments                                    For more information, please call the CAST program at
     • Empowerment of students through formal leadership roles                (716) 851-1230.

                                                                              Independence Bound
         in school governance, in guidance programs such as peer
         counseling, and in academic support services such as peer
         tutoring                                                             The main focus of the Independence Bound Program is to
     • Career education or community service as part of graduation            enhance the educational/vocational options and resources pro-
         requirement                                                          vided to the foster care population. We offer programming that
                                                                              addresses the social, academic, personal and job readiness needs
     At the completion of the fifth year, students will receive an asso-      of foster care youth in Erie County. Independence Bound pro-
     ciate degree in one of the following:                                    vides assistance to 130 foster care youth between the ages of 14
     •   Business                                                             and 21 with an alternative planned permanent living arrange-
     •   Criminal Justice                                                     ment. For more information, contact the Independence Bound
                                                                              Program at 851-1030.

                                                                              Youth Engagement Services (YES)
     •   Building Management and Maintenance
     •   Computer Information Systems
     Admission Criteria:                                                      YES focuses on 30 foster care youth between the ages of 14-18
                                                                              (and pregnant and parenting between the ages of 14-20) identi-
     • Student will be required to submit an application, complete
                                                                              fied as “at risk” of dropping out of school. Youth are eligible to
       with references
                                                                              receive Math and English tutorial and life skills instruction
     • Student must have a grade point average for 7th and 8th
                                                                              through activities and workshops. For more information, con-
       grade between 65-80 percent
                                                                              tact the Independence Bound Program at 851-1030.
     • Student and parent must engage in an interview process
54
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Workforce Development                                                   NON-CREDIT DISTANCE LEARNING PARTNERSHIPS
                                                                        WITH COMMUNITY EDUCATION
Workforce Development provides customized non-credit profes-
sional development training to local businesses, individual com-        Online Certificate Training prepares an individual for employ-
munity residents and local government employees. For more               ment in some of today’s fastest-growing career fields. These
than 20 years, Workforce Development has complemented Erie              affordable, comprehensive online programs teach you every-
Community College’s academic mission and has positioned itself          thing you need to know to start a new career or advance your
as the Workforce Development Leader in Western New York.                current one. Enjoy the convenience of taking professional devel-
    Investment in life-long learning provides the local skilled         opment training at work or at home.
workforce with the necessary skill sets to foster economic devel-       American Home Inspection: Learn how to conduct a thorough
opment.                                                                 home inspection from the moment of pulling into the driveway
    Workforce Development’s four divisions: Community                   to writing up the report. This course offers 100 hours of class-
Education, Corporate Training, Driving Programs and the ECC             room training and 40 hours of field work. Visit
One Stop have created an innovative entrepreneurial workforce           www.ahit.com/affiliates/ecc for complete course information.
team assisting local businesses in remaining globally competitive       Classroom training only in New York State.
in a growing technologically and knowledge driven economy.
    The reason for Workforce Development’s success is largely           The Wedding Planning Institute: Online and classroom train-
attributed to the development of partnerships, strategic alliances      ing designed for those looking to start a career in the wedding
with the community and collaborative relationships working with         industry. Learn everything a wedding planner needs to know
the local, regional and federal government. Courses are cus-            about contracts, etiquette, marketing, business practices and
tomized short term training programs which meet business and            more. Obtain all of the tools necessary to become a professional
industries training needs. These non-credit professional develop-       wedding planner. For more information visit
ment or lifestyle training programs are offered onsite, or are held     www.weddingplanninginstitute.com
at any one of our three conveniently located campuses.                  American Management Association Online Flex study: To
    Through workforce training, ECC plays a critical role in both       meet the needs of the local business community, ECC has part-
the state and region’s economic development efforts. Workforce          nered with the American Management Association (AMA) to
Development provides a life-long learning partnership between           offer professional certification. These AMA/Flex study self-
education and industry offering the following:                          study courses, offering Continuing Education Units (CEUs),
• Providing non-credit upgrade training programs to skilled             will enhance your career and improve your value to any organi-
professionals who have already obtained a two-year, four-year, or       zation. Visit www.flexstudy.com/ecc for a complete list of
advanced degree.                                                        course online offerings.
• Upgrading the technical and soft skills needed for job reten-
tion, advancement and personal, lifestyle enrichment.                   Ed2go Online Courses: One of the primary advantages of our
    It is Workforce Development’s goal to ensure this region’s          Internet workshops is that you can attend class in the comfort
long term vision for economic vitality.                                 and convenience of your own home or office. Log into your

Community Education
                                                                        online classroom when you’re ready. Our Internet courses fit
                                                                        into your schedule: you can take them any time, any place. Visit
The Community Education Department continuously initiates               www.ed2go.com/sunyecc for a complete list of classes and cer-
and develops seminars, workshops and courses that provide stu-          tificate courses.
dents, employees and community members with the opportunity
                                                                        Gatlin Online Courses: Erie Community College, in partnership
to expand their knowledge and update their skills. Community
                                                                        with Gatlin Education Services (GES), offers online open enroll-
Education offers these exciting classroom-based courses:
                                                                        ment non-credit certificate programs designed to provide the
•   Community Emergency Response Training (CERT)                        skills necessary to acquire professional level positions for many
•   Culinary Courses                                                    in-demand occupations. Visit www.gatlineducation.com/ecc for
•   Customer Service Academy                                            a complete list of course offerings.
•   Dental Hygiene Continuing Education Units
                                                                        The eLearning Center proudly offers the most comprehensive
•   New York State Approved Insurance Pre-Licensing
                                                                        collection of online continuing education courses from the
•   New York State Continuing Education Units
                                                                        world's best e-learning companies and authors. We offer self-
•   New York State Mandated Child Abuse Recording and
                                                                        study courses with open enrollment in nearly every subject from
    Reporting
                                                                        business to technology. Visit www.ecc.theelearningcenter.com
•   New York State Mandated Infection Control and Barrier
                                                                        for a complete list of more than 5,000 course offerings.
    Precautions
•   New York State Real Estate Continuing Education Units               360 Training Real Estate and Insurance NY State Licensing
•   NYSERDA Building Analyst Training                                   CEUs: Take a variety of courses required to maintain either a
•   NYSERDA Envelope Professional                                       NY State Real Estate or Insurance license. All courses have
•   NYSERDA Heating and Cooling                                         been approved by the NY State Office of Professions. Visit
•   Respiratory Care Continuing Education Units                         http://eccworkforce.360training.com.
•   SAT Test Prep for High School Students
•   Special Education Workshop                                          Ways to get your company to provide you with professional
•   Wedding Planning Institute                                          development training:
                                                                        1. Ask. A simple verbal request is usually all it takes.
For information about the non-credit professional development           2. Show them this catalog. Ask them to read it. Attach a memo.
training programs that Community Education offers, please call          3. Stress the benefits. Additional skills training will make you a
716-851-1800 or e-mail wfdinfo@ecc.edu.                                    more productive employee, adding value to the company.
                                                                                                                                             55
               E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     4. Emphasize the convenience. Rather than expensing out of             •   Conflict Resolution
        town training, ECC Workforce offers classes at conveniently         •   Customer Service
        located campuses across Western New York. Online courses            •   Decision Making and Creative Problem Solving
        offer the convenience of remaining at your worksite without         •   Ethics and Values
        any travel expenses.                                                •   How to Deal with Difficult Coworkers and/or Supervisors
     5. Affordable career investment. Workforce Development pro-            •   Managing Organizational Change
        vides our community with unsurpassed training at affordable         •   Organization and Time Management
        prices. www.ecc.edu/paths/communityed.asp                           •   Stress Management
                                                                            •   Team Building
     Benefits of Professional Development Training:
     1. Increase job satisfaction and workplace morale.                     Professional Development and Leadership
     2. Increase employee motivation.                                       • Diversity in the Workplace
     3. Increase efficiencies and processes resulting in financial gain.    • Evaluations in the Workplace
     4. Increase capacity to adopt new technologies and methods.            • Executive Leadership Management
     5. Increase innovation in strategies and products.                     • Executive Management Series
     6. Reduce employee turnover.                                           • Foreign Languages for Business Managers
     7. Enhanced company image.                                             • Human Resource Training
     8. Provide new career opportunities.                                   • Leadership in the Workplace
                                                                            • Motivating Your Employees
     To register for classes or for more information call 716-851-1800.

     Corporate Training
                                                                            • Sales and Marketing
                                                                            • Speaking with Confidence
     Since the mid 1980s the Department of Corporate Training has           • Supervisory Skills
     provided non-credit training programs in support of the acade-         Technical and Manufacturing
     mic mission of Erie Community College. Over the past three             • Auto Cad
     decades, Corporate Training has served the residents and local         • Basic and Advanced Electricity
     business community of Erie County by providing professional            • Blue Print Reading
     development and lifelong learning opportunities. An investment         • Computer Numerical Controls
     by business and industry in continuous learning and training           • Geometric Dimensioning
     strategically positions its workforce for regional economic devel-     • High Voltage Electricity
     opment and future growth. With this in mind, upgrading the             • Industrial Hydraulics and Pneumatics
     current skills and retraining the workforce in Erie County             • ISO Certifications
     remains the primary objective of the Department of Corporate           • Lean Six Sigma
     Training.                                                              • Machine Tool Technology
         The target population the department strives to serve              • Mechanical Maintenance
     includes small, medium and large businesses located in Western         • Programmable Logic Controls and Tolerancing
     New York and Erie County. All training programs are cus-               • Shop Math
     tomized to meet the specific needs of a company. Corporate             • SolidWorks ®
     Training’s professional staff can assist in identifying the educa-     • Statistical Process Controls
     tional and training needs of your business with a free training
     assessment. Training plans can include a custom designed train-        Computers and Information Technology
     ing program or modification of existing course offerings to meet       • A+ and Net+
     an organizations specific needs and goals. Corporate Training          • Cisco
     staff can also be a valuable resource in identifying potential         • Graphic Design
     grant funding opportunities that are available to companies.           • Microsoft Office Suite XP and VISTA
     Such opportunities may assist a company in defraying the cost          • Navigating the Internet
     of training or provide additional benefits.                            • QuickBooks
         Whether it is a single course or an extensive training pro-        • Web Page Design and Development
     gram, small or large company, the Department of Corporate              Environmental Health and Safety
     Training can offer the following services, programs and benefits:      • Asbestos Awareness
     • Free training workplace assessments                                  • Back Injury
     • Customized courses to meet company specific skills for               • Blood Borne Pathogens
         employees                                                          • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
     • Flexible scheduling of courses                                       • Confined Space
     • State-of-the-art on-site training labs                               • Electrical Safety
     • Interactive training from industry experts and our faculty           • Emergency Evacuation
     • Productivity enhancement training                                    • Emergency Preparedness
     • Greater efficiency, cost savings and profitability as a result of    • Ergonomics
         training                                                           • Fall Protection
     • Grant resource information and assistance                            • Forklift Operation
     • High quality non-credit customized training at reasonable            • Hazard Communication
         costs                                                              • Hazardous Waste
     Customer Service Academy                                               • Health and Safety Committee
     • Attitude in the Workplace                                            • Heat/Cold Stress
     • Communication Skills                                                 • Indoor Air Quality
56
                     E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
•   Ladders and Scaffolds                                                 • Driver Improvement Program (DIP): This three-hour course
•   Lockout/Tagout                                                          is available by court referral for traffic violators. One hun-
•   Machine Guarding                                                        dred Western New York courts use our training program to
•   National Electric Code                                                  help the traffic violator improve his/her attitude toward dri-
•   Noise/Vibration                                                         ving.
•   OSHA 10 and 30 Hour Outreach Course (Construction)                    • Risk Intervention Program: The Risk Intervention Program
•   OSHA 10 and 30 Hour Outreach Course (General Industry)                  is a unique four-week traffic safety course for persistent or
•   Personal Protective Equipment                                           severe violators. This court referral program also reduces the
•   Repetitive Motion                                                       fine and/or charge for the driver when the program is com-
•   Safety Management                                                       pleted.
•   Video Terminal Display                                                • New York State Drinking Driver Program (DDP): This 16-
•   Workplace Violence                                                      hour program is available only through a referral from the
                                                                            New York State DMV or as a condition of discharge from a
Corporate Training Business Partners
                                                                            court. The Drinking Driver Program is part of New York’s
• Buffalo Medical Group
                                                                            effort to reduce both the personal and property losses
• Buffalo Niagara Partnership
                                                                            caused by drivers under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
• Catholic Health System
• City of Buffalo                                                         For more information, please visit
• Erie County                                                             http://www.ecc.edu/paths/drivingprog.asp or contact
• Ford Motor Company                                                      drivingprograms@ecc.edu. or call (716) 851- 1820.

                                                                          ECC One Stop Center
• General Motors
• Greatbatch
• Greater Buffalo Savings Bank                                            The Workforce Development One Stop Center is located at
• HSBC                                                                    3176 Abbott Road in Orchard Park, NY, just minutes away
• Kaleida Health                                                          from the South Campus. It is funded by the Buffalo and Erie
• Mittal Steel                                                            County Workforce Development Consortium and has other
• MOD-PAC                                                                 nonprofit partner agencies housed onsite to assist job seekers.
• NanoDynamics                                                                The following complimentary services are provided:
• Surmet Ceramics                                                         Microsoft Office computer classes, career preparation work-
                                                                          shops, resumé assistance, tuition grants for eligible students,
Specialty Training Partners                                               career counseling, job search assistance, high speed Internet
• Accelerated Resource Solutions Ltd                                      access for job searching, labor market information, free postage
• Buffalo Spinal Institute                                                for correspondence to businesses for job searching purposes
• Dantra and Associates                                                   and referrals to other federal, state and local agencies. The One
• Ergo Works                                                              Stop also has an extensive clothes closet of donated business
• Fire Inspection by Ron Endle                                            attire available to individuals who need clothes for work.
• Hagemeyer North America                                                     In order to better serve Erie County residents and ECC
• Hands on Technical Training                                             graduates, the One Stop is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
• Hunt Associates                                                         Monday through Friday. Evening computer classes, resumé
• Invirogenics                                                            workshops and GED classes are offered on Tuesday and
• James A. Mezhir Consulting                                              Thursday evenings until 8 p.m. Registration is required for all
• Quality Inspection Services                                             computer classes and most career development classes.
• RGonzalez Consulting Inc.
• Transformation Partners Company                                         Computer Class Offerings

Driver Safety Programs
                                                                          The One Stop Center offers complimentary noncredit comput-
                                                                          er classes in conjunction with Community Education. Classes
Programs focus on each individual driver’s responsibility to inter-       run in the mornings, afternoons and evenings at three locations:
act lawfully within the traffic system to create and maintain a safe      3176 Abbott Road, ECC North Campus and 45 Oak Street.
environment for all drivers. The curriculum emphasizes personal           Students may register for these classes at www.ecconestop.org
accountability, awareness of laws and how they impact the whole           or by contacting 825-2525.
community and is designed specifically for the different needs
                                                                          Computer Microsoft 2007 and Vista class descriptions:
and types of drivers in the different programs offered.
                                                                          • Intro to Basic Keyboarding: Improve your current speed
    The division is the largest provider of safety training in New
                                                                            and accuracy on the computer through extensive practice
York State with more than 20 years of experience in delivering
                                                                            and error reduction exercises. Recommended for individuals
services to the judicial, substance abuse, safety and general com-
                                                                            who need to increase their keyboarding skills.
munity. The department offers the following training programs
                                                                          • Basic Windows Vista Application/Basic Computers:
driven by market demand:
                                                                            Experience Microsoft Vista’s dramatically different look and
• NYS Point and Insurance Reduction Program: This six-hour
                                                                            learn how it makes your daily tasks quicker and easier. This
    course is voluntary and is open to the public and local busi-
                                                                            course will introduce you to the new intuitive Ribbon tech-
    nesses. Benefits including a 10 percent reduction on liability
                                                                            nology. Learn the taskbar and Start menu; open and close
    and collision insurance/four points off driving record.
                                                                            programs; create, manage, minimize and maximize files and
• NYS Five Hour Pre-licensing Program: This five-hour pre-
                                                                            folders; identify icons, acquire appropriate terminology for
    licensing driver safety course is necessary for any driver apply-
                                                                            computer components and more. Recommended for indi-
    ing for a driver’s license in New York State who has not com-
                                                                            viduals who have little to no experience with computers.
    pleted a driver education course.
                                                                                                                                              57
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                         STUDENT SUPPORT
                                                                         SERVICES
     • Intro to MS Word 2007 Applications: Microsoft Word is
       the most widely used word processor in the world. Learn
       how to use Word 2007’s new Ribbon technology; open, nav-
       igate, proof and print documents, enter, save, edit, move,
       copy, find and replace text. Create, modify and format tables     Student Services provides a wide array of programs and services
       and change page layout. Use mail merge to generate form           to fulfill the needs of Erie Community College’s diverse student
       letters, data sources and mailing labels. Prerequisite: Basic     body. Under the direction of the campus Dean of Students, the
       MS Windows Vista Applications.                                    various Student Services offices focus on realizing the full poten-
     • Intro to MS Word 2007 for Resumés: Having a great look-           tial of each student.
       ing resumé in a format that employers can read is an                   It is part of ECC’s vision to be recognized as a college of
       absolute must for jobseekers. This class will teach you the       excellence that fosters holistic growth for all of its students and as
       basics of Word while developing a professional resumé at          an educational setting where academic achievement and social
       the same time. Learn how to open, navigate, proof and print       development are equally valued. To reach this goal, the college
       documents, enter text, save, edit, move, copy, format, find       will provide students the opportunity to realize self-worth,
       and replace text, check spelling and grammar and more.            enhance ethical consciousness, exhibit interpersonal skills,
       Prerequisite: Basic MS Vista Windows Applications.                respect cultural diversity, demonstrate critical thinking skills,
     • Intro to MS Excel 2007 Applications: Microsoft Excel is the       make informed decisions about their future, demonstrate
       spreadsheet program most commonly used by business own-           employment-related skills, function as responsible/productive cit-
       ers around the world to track and analyze business and per-       izens, enrich others through shared experience and value lifelong
       sonal data. Learn the basics of Excel 2007, including how to      learning.
       create spreadsheets, sort data, use shortcut menus, use func-          ECC has developed a comprehensive network of support ser-
       tions such as SUM, AVERAGE, MIN, MAX and more.                    vices to facilitate the academic experience and enrich students’
       Prerequisite: Basic MS Word 2007 Applications.                    lives. In the following pages, information is included on admis-
     • Intro to MS Access 2007 Applications: Microsoft Access is         sions, financial aid, counseling, career planning and placement,
       used by many businesses to store data and run complex             registration and records, facilities, athletics, governance and pub-
       queries. Learn the basics of Access 2007, including how to        lications. Prior to the registration for classes, all new students will
       plan, explore and create databases and tables; find, edit and     be invited to a Student Orientation where they can become famil-


                                                                         Athletics
       organize records; create, perform operations and modify           iar with ECC.
       queries and reports. Prerequisite: Basic MS Word 2007
       Applications.
     • Intro to MS PowerPoint 2007: Discover why an estimated
                                                                         Erie Community College has one of the most diversified junior
       30 million businesses a day use PowerPoint to share ideas
                                                                         college athletic programs in the United States. Recognized
       and deliver presentations. Learn how to create slide presen-
                                                                         nationally, ECC offers varsity programs for men and women in
       tations using PowerPoint 2007 by designing, formatting, and
                                                                         basketball, bowling, cross-country, golf, soccer, swimming and
       editing your material easily. Prerequisite: Basic MS Word
                                                                         diving, indoor and outdoor track, as well as men’s baseball, foot-
       Applications.
                                                                         ball and ice hockey and women’s softball, lacrosse, volleyball and
     • Intro to MS Publisher: Desktop publishing is a useful tool
                                                                         cheerleading. The students’ athletic fees support all Athletic
       to enhance office productivity. Create, customize, save and
                                                                         Department activities and home athletic events are open to ECC
       edit text in multi-page publications, such as newsletters,
                                                                         students free of charge. Review the Standards of Eligibility in the
       brochures, flyers, catalogs and Web sites. Modify and format
                                                                         General College Policies Section of this catalog for more infor-
       text frames and create text styles. Prerequisite: Basic MS
                                                                         mation on athletic participation. Students interested in participat-
       Word 2007 Applications.
                                                                         ing on an ECC varsity program (baseball, softball, swimming and
     • Six-Week Intro to MS Office: This 6-week course provides
                                                                         diving, basketball, soccer, football, lacrosse, bowling, volleyball,
       students with comprehensive instruction in file management.
                                                                         cross country and track and field, golf, ice hockey and cheerlead-
       Create, edit and print documents, perform mail merges and
                                                                         ing) should contact their athletic office at their campus.

                                                                         City
       tables using MS Word 2007. Also learn how to create
       spreadsheets, formulas, charts and lists using MS Excel
       2007.                                                             The Burt Flickinger Athletic Center, located next to City
     For more information about One Stop services, please                Campus, houses an Olympic-size swimming pool with a movable
     visit http://www.ecc.edu/paths/onestop.asp or contact               floor, a 25-meter warm-up pool, three regulation basketball
     Denise Raymond, project director, at raymond@ecc.edu or             courts, a field house which seats 3,000, an indoor jogging track,
     (716) 825-2525.                                                     wellness center, men’s and women’s locker room and shower
                                                                         facilities and athletic department offices and classrooms.

                                                                         North
     For more information about Workforce Development, contact
     Carrie Kahn, executive dean of Workforce Development at
     (716) 851-1800.                                                     The North Campus Bell Sports Center includes a wellness center,
                                                                         gymnasium, computer lab, classrooms, men’s and women’s lock-
                                                                         er rooms and shower facilities and athletic offices. Outdoor facili-
                                                                         ties include numerous soccer fields, along with a baseball and
                                                                         softball diamond.

                                                                         South
                                                                         Outdoor athletic facilities include Jim Ball Stadium and two varsi-
                                                                         ty soccer fields. Inside the athletic building, there is a gymnasium,
58
                    E C C    2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
pool and weight room. Locker rooms and shower facilities are also          City Campus Child Care Center
available.                                                                 The City Child Development Center accepts children from six


Athletic Activities
   The Athletic Office is located in Building 6, Room 6206F.               weeks through twelve years of age for daytime, evening and
                                                                           summer care, thus enabling parents to study and work while
                                                                           offering the finest quality early childhood experience for chil-

Intercollegiate
                                                                           dren. Hours of service are:
                                                                           7:30 a.m. – 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday
As a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association            7:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. Friday
(NJCAA) Region III Division and the Western New York                       (Evening child care available during the fall and spring semes-
Athletic Conference (WNYAC), ECC teams compete against                     ters)
two-year and four-year institutions throughout the United States.          Summer Session:
    The athletic program at ECC has enjoyed considerable suc-              7:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday
cess. The men’s and women’s programs are considered to be                  7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Friday (office hours only)
among the finest junior college programs in the nation, winning
many Conference, NJCAA Region III and national champi-                     For more information regarding scheduling and fees, please
onships.                                                                   contact the City Campus Child Development Center at
    Participants in all sports will receive a varsity certificate pro-     (716) 851-1152.

                                                                           North Campus Mary Lou Rath
claiming their contribution through participation, while two-year

                                                                           Child Development Center
team members will receive special awards.

Recreational/Leisure Services                                              The North Campus Child Development Center was named
The Athletic Department provides ECC students with the oppor-              after New York State Senator Mary Lou Rath due to her efforts
tunity to pursue recreational and leisure activities such as basket-       in the funding and development of the Center. She worked to
ball, physical fitness, walking, jogging, volleyball, swimming, soft-      obtain a $175,000 grant from the state to fund construction
ball, etc. Individual students and groups may explore a wide vari-         costs and provided an additional $15,000 to ensure that the pro-
ety of activities made possible through the utilization of indoor          ject could be completed.
and outdoor athletic facilities at all three ECC campuses.                     The Center provides quality child care programming
Students are encouraged to participate in any number of recre-             Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. for infants
ational/leisure activities to help them determine the type of activi-      through Pre-K children.
ties they may wish to continue throughout their lives. For more                For more information regarding scheduling and fees, please
information, students should contact the athletic office at their          contact the Mary Lou Rath Child Development Center at North
campus.                                                                    Campus at (716) 851-1437.

                                                                           South Campus Child Care Center
    All athletic facilities, based on availability, are provided for


Auxiliary Services Corporation
ECC students to use with College ID cards.
                                                                           The South Campus Child Development Center provides quality
                                                                           child care programming for infants through Pre-K children and
                                                                           is open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m.– 4:30 p.m.
The Auxiliary Service Corporation is a not-for-profit college ser-             For more information regarding scheduling and fees, contact
vice organization that serves as the fiduciary for the disbursement        the South Child Development Center at (716) 648-5219.

                                                                           Food Service
of student activity fees. Activity fees are used to fund student gov-
ernment, clubs, publications, athletics and a wide variety of stu-
dent events. Auxiliary Services also operates the college food ser-        Cafeterias, kiosks, restaurant facilities and catering services are
vice and child care centers. The Auxiliary Service Board is com-           available at all three campuses. Hours of operation vary at each
prised of faculty, student representatives and administrators.             campus. Contact the Auxiliary Services Office at (716) 851-1260
Regularly scheduled meetings are open to all members of the col-           for specific hours of operation. The E.M. Statler Dining Room,
lege community.

Bookstores
                                                                           available at City Campus, and the Statler Erie Room, available at
                                                                           North Campus, are operated by the students of the Culinary
                                                                           Arts and Hospitality Management programs at Erie Community
Auxiliary Services is the liaison for Follett Higher Education


                                                                           Career Resource Centers
                                                                           College.
Group, the corporation that is contracted to operate a college
bookstore on each campus. The bookstores offer books and sup-
plies for sale at competitive prices and a Web site (efollett.com)
for convenient on-line shopping.                                           The Career Resource Centers, located at each of the campuses

ASC/ECC Child Care
                                                                           of Erie Community College, assist students and prospective stu-
                                                                           dents in exploring majors and career options. Using ACT’s
ECC is aware of the difficulties of those men and women juggling           Discover career assessment system, students can get a clearer
the responsibilities of school, work and parenting, and offers             picture of career options and educational opportunities that are
child care at City, North and South campuses for the children of           available to them.
students, faculty and staff. The Auxiliary Services Corporation               The Career Resource Center also assists students with
serves the child care needs of the college community by providing          resumes and cover letters, interviewing skills and searching for
quality childcare programming at affordable rates. Most students           employment opportunities. The Career Resource Centers are in
are eligible for subsidies to assist them with childcare tuition.          contact with local and national employers on a regular basis.
Registration is done on a first-come, first-served basis.                  The centers host on-campus recruitment opportunities and
                                                                           maintain current employment opportunities for students and
                                                                           alumni.                                                               59
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
         On-campus Career Fairs are held to promote employment                  Section 504 stipulates that a college is not responsible for pro-
     opportunities, give career advice to students, locate part-time,       viding items of a personal nature such as attendant services, wheel-
     seasonal or temporary employment opportunities as well as              chairs, hearing aids, or other personal assistive devices. ECC has no
     facilitate employment with government agencies.                        special classes, programs, or fees exclusively for students with dis-
         Outreach services are provided to local high schools, com-         abilities.
     munity services agencies and businesses/industries that are                All identification of students with disabilities must be voluntary.
     downsizing.                                                            Within a college setting, students with disabilities are personally
         The Career Resource Centers also assist individuals who are        responsible for meeting with the campus counselor to identify
     transitioning to four-year colleges or universities. The centers       needs, provide appropriate disability documentation and arrange
     provide listings and information on colleges and universities          for reasonable accommodations. Accommodations for the college’s


     College Safety
     that match an individual’s goals or expectations.                      placement test may be made by meeting with the campus counselor
                                                                            and providing documentation of disability. Accommodations are
                                                                            made on an as-needed basis. Students must make arrangements for
                                                                            accommodations for courses by contacting the counselor each
     It is the responsibility of each campus College Safety Office to       semester.
     provide for the safety of students and for the security of the             Documentation of disability is the basis for all accommodations.
     buildings, grounds and equipment of the college. The College           Documentation must demonstrate that the individual has a disabili-
     Safety Office also maintains a Lost and Found Department.              ty as defined by Section 504 and state the impact which that disabil-
         Campus safety and security is important to all members of          ity has for the individual in an educational environment. ECC has
     the campus community. Information regarding campus crime               the right to make the final decision as to what accommodations are
     statistics can be accessed by visiting the College Safety Offices      appropriate and reasonable. All information provided pertinent to
     on each campus or by visiting the US Department of Education           the individual’s disability is confidential and is maintained by the
     Web site at http://ope.ed.gov/security/. The crime statistics          Office of Disabled Student Services.
     include offenses reported to Campus Safety Offices for the past            For more information about the services available for students


     Counseling
     three years.                                                           with disabilities at ECC, contact the counselors:
                                                                            City:      Steve Wixson
                                                                                       45 Oak Street, Room 102
     Counseling is located in the Student Support Service Centers                      (716) 851-1189
     (SSSC) at each of the three campuses. The goal of counseling is
     to promote the academic, personal and social growth of both            North:     Heather Hewson
     current and prospective students. Counseling services include                     Spring Student Center, Room 217
     academic, personal, career, transfer and disabled student ser-                    (716) 851-1495
     vices, which may assist with academic success. Students are            South:     Fran Moyer
     encouraged to utilize the services available.

     Transfer Counseling
                                                                                       Building 5, Room 5211


                                                                            ESL Student Support Center
                                                                                       (716) 851-1933
     Students planning to further their education beyond their asso-

                                                                            (English as a Second Language)
     ciate degree can benefit from transfer counseling. Students who
     are interested in transferring should set up an appointment with
     a transfer counselor in the Student Support Service Center to
     learn about various articulations and dual admissions options.             The Center offers a broad range of services to English language
     The transfer counselor will discuss various career options and         learners from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds.
     the colleges or universities that offer these particular majors.       Students seeking information or assistance are encouraged to visit
     Transfer counselors provide information in order to assist stu-        the ESL Student Support Center, located in room 203 at City
                                                                            Campus, or call (716) 851-1079.

     Disabled Student Services
     dents in making an informed decision.
                                                                                Bilingual, Spanish-English services are available in the ESL
                                                                            Student Support Office, Admissions, the Child Development
                                                                            Center, the ESL Lab and the Multilingual Language Lab. In addi-
     Erie Community College has a Disabled Student Services (DSS)           tion, Spanish-English speaking faculty offers academic help.
     office at each campus. The purpose of the DSS Department is                The ESL Student Support Center coordinates academic advise-
     to foster a learning environment which is accessible to all stu-       ment for students with their departments. The Center staff works
     dents. ECC designates a counselor for students with disabilities       with students in planning programs and helping with placement
     at each campus. Each campus also has a technical assistant.            into appropriate classes. Courses provided to ESL students target
     Together, the counselor and technical assistant are available to       the improvement of English, math and academic skills. Degree
     assist students with arranging reasonable accommodations in            credit introductory courses are also available to all ESL students.
     compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973          These courses are useful in vocabulary and concept building, which
     and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Section 504 stipulates        may be applied to many college programs and are credited, in most
     that a person with a disability must be otherwise qualified; i.e.,     cases, to the program of the student's choice.
     able, with or without accommodations, to meet the requisite cri-           Tutors and mentors located in the ESL and Language Labs pro-
     teria for admissions to the college and its programs. Examples         vide additional help. The ESL Lab houses resource materials and
     of frequently used accommodations are alternate test location or       computers for students’ use and the Language Lab offers state-of-
     administration of tests; alternate format for textbooks or note        the-art audio visual equipment to improve language skills.
     takers.                                                                    The goal of the ESL Student Support Center is to prepare stu-
                                                                            dents whose dominant language is not English to participate with
60                                                                          confidence and success in college programs and curricula at Erie
                    E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Community College. Through the ESL Student Support Center,
students are prepared to have a rewarding experience at ECC.           Evening Services
                                                                       The Department of Evening Services was established to main-
Courses recommended for ESL students are:                              tain communication and provide support services for evening
   SO 100          Introduction to Sociology                           and weekend students. Evening and weekend students are those
   CH 100          Introduction to Chemistry*                          students whose classes begin at 5 p.m. or later on weekdays or
   BI 107          Human Biology                                       occur on weekends.
   PH 120          Environmental Science                                   Evening and weekend students may direct any question or
   MT 001          Basic Mathematics*                                  problem normally handled by daytime staff to this department
   MT 013          Elementary Algebra I & II*                          for resolution or referral. In addition, most offices maintain
   MT 006          Elementary Algebra I*                               evening hours during the semester and can be reached during
   MT 007          Elementary Algebra II*                              normal business hours throughout the year. Individual academic
   SP 100          Literature in Translation                           departments may be reached by calling the switchboard at City:
   OF 101          Basic Keyboarding                                   (716) 851-1001, North: (716) 851-1002 and South: (716) 851-
   OF 102          College Keyboarding                                 1003.
   SP 210          Spanish Composition I                                   The Department of Evening Services is currently open from
   SP 211          Spanish Composition II                              noon – 8 p.m. on Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. – 4
   DA 106          Microcomputers                                      p.m. on Fridays during the Fall and Spring semesters. Hours
   BU 140          Business Organization                               may vary between semesters and during summer. The depart-
   GS 111          College Success Skills                              ment may be reached at City Campus: (716) 851-1032, North
                                                                       Campus: (716) 851-1422 and South Campus: (716) 851-1616.
Courses recommended for ESL students to improve English lan-               Students may visit any Evening Services Department to
guage skills are:                                                      obtain a Student Help Sheet, which provides department
   EN 030          Reading/Writing I*                                  descriptions, their functions, locations, general hours of opera-


                                                                       Health Services
   EN 031          Reading/Writing II*                                 tion and direct dial phone numbers.
   EN 132          Reading/Writing III**
   EN 137          Intensive Grammar**
   EN 040          Oral/Aural I*                                       The Health Office at each campus has a Registered Nurse on
   EN 041          Oral/Aural II*                                      staff. Students may seek first aid for on-campus sickness/injury,
   EN 142          Oral/Aural III**                                    consultation and/or referrals. Information on accident and
   EN 147          Accent reduction**                                  health insurance policies is also available. For evening hours,
*College credit is given for these courses, which may be used to       students should check with their campus Health Office.
meet credit requirements of scholarship, financial aid, or immi-       Health Offices:
gration programs. These courses may not, however, be used as           City Campus:        Maryetta DuBois, RN, College Nurse
electives toward graduation.                                                               Room 228, (716) 851-1199
**Degree credit is given for EN132, EN137, EN142 and EN147.            North Campus:       Rita A. Belzer, RN, College Nurse
These courses satisfy Liberal Arts or general elective require-                            Room S152, (716) 851-1499
ments. In addition, EN132 helps students prepare for the TWE           South Campus:       Sally Stephenson, RN, BSN, College Nurse
                                                                                           Room 5109, (716) 851- 1699

                                                                       Immunization Requirements
(Test of Written English). EN132, EN137, EN142 and EN147
also help students prepare for the TOEFL exam.

English as a Second Language Certificate                               Immunization Statement
The ESL Certificate of Completion verifies that an ESL student         All students must complete the Confidential Student Health
has the English, math and computer skills necessary to function        Form, including immunization information as required.
successfully in most introductory college-level courses and entry-     Students will not be able to register for classes until this is sub-
level job training programs. After completing the required             mitted it directly to their campus health office.
degree-credit courses with at least a 2.0 QPA, ESL students must          Those students who submit a partial record of immunization
also take and pass certain standardized tests before being award-      before registration, who have a confirmed appointment within
ed the certificate. For further information about course and test-     one month to complete the New York State Public Health Law
ing requirements, contact the ESL Student Support Center at            requirements, shall be granted a 30-day grace period in order to
                                                                       comply.

                                                                       Mandatory Immunization Information
(716) 851-1079 or 851-1117, or stop by City Campus Room 203.
    Students who participate in ESL services become graduates
of programs and curricula throughout the college upon success-
ful completion of courses.                                             New York State Public Health Law 2167 requires that each stu-

ESL Scholarships
                                                                       dent taking six or more credit hours (regardless of birth date)
                                                                       read information about meningococcal meningitis and provide
ESL students at ECC may apply for the Emmanuel & Fallia                the college with a signed and dated response on the appropriate
Phufas scholarship. Other scholarships are available through the       section of the Confidential Student Health Form. The meningo-
ECC Foundation and the community. In addition, the Hispanic            coccal meningitis immunization is highly recommended but
Women's League offers scholarships to eligible Hispanic stu-           optional. A student may respond by either providing proof of
dents. Information may be obtained by contacting the ESL               the date the vaccination was received within the past 10 years,
Student Support Center.                                                or by signing a refusal/waiver of vaccination.
                                                                                                                                              61
               E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
         New York State Public Health Law 2165 requires that each
     student born after 1956 and taking six or more credit hours pro-        Parking
     vide proof of immunity to measles, mumps and rubella. Proof             Free parking for students is available at North and South
     consists of two live doses of measles vaccine or MMR, one live          Campuses and limited free parking is available for students at
     dose of mumps vaccine or MMR and one live dose of rubella               City Campus. Students must have a valid parking permit, which
     vaccine or MMR. A vaccination date is not acceptable if given           is available through the College Safety Office. Limited parking is
     before one year of age. Alternatively, students may provide             available for students with disabilities who have special parking
     proof of immunity by submitting laboratory results of blood             permits. Please note that all designated parking will be enforced


                                                                             Perkins IV
     testing showing that they have antibodies to measles, mumps             and violators will be ticketed.
     and rubella.
         Specific questions about college procedures regarding stu-
     dents who are deemed as non-compliant can be directed to the
                                                                             The Perkins IV program provides support services to targeted
     Dean of Students or please see the college Policies Section of
                                                                             student populations, including the economically and academical-


     International Student Advisement
     this catalog for NYS Law on immunizations.
                                                                             ly disadvantaged, bilingual learners and students with disabilities
                                                                             enrolled in a vocational curriculum. From pre-admissions proce-
                                                                             dures through graduation and career placement, students in this
     The International Student Advisor, located at the North Campus,         program are provided with the services of professional coun-
     assists international students so they comply with Department of        selors, tutors and job developers who help to ensure the students’
     Homeland Security regulations. For additional admission require-        academic success and personal fulfillment. Contact the campus
     ments and deadlines, consult with an ECC admissions officer.            Perkins IV Office for further information.

                                                                             Coordinated Studies Program
     Please note: Admission to certain competitive academic programs
     of limited availability (such as nursing, dental hygiene, etc.)
     include additional requirements and deadlines. Please carefully         Coordinated Studies Programs are courses that are linked during
     consult the college catalog. (NOTE: For more information,               an academic term, around an interdisciplinary theme, and enroll
                                                                             a common cohort of students. Erie Community College offers


     Library Resource Centers
     review the Admissions section of this catalog.)
                                                                             Coordinated Studies Programs to students unsure of a specific
                                                                             academic degree and interested in learning about the various
                                                                             vocational career options ECC offers. The program provides stu-
     The Library Resource Center on each campus is an information            dents with opportunities to learn about, experience and assess
     center providing students with access to a broad range of mater-        career options within the three college workforce divisions:
     ial and services to improve learning. The goal of the Library           Health Sciences, Business and Public Service, or Engineering and
     Resource Centers and their professional staff is to assist students     Technologies. Students in similar programs enjoy enhanced aca-
     in attaining their educational goals and in developing research         demic and social opportunities, satisfactory GPAs, improved
     skills. Across the three campuses, the libraries offer a large num-     connections to faculty and increased understanding of their abili-
     ber of resources in a variety of formats tailored to meet student       ties and interests in their targeted careers. The program is spon-


                                                                             Student Activities
     needs. An online catalog contains the holdings of the three cam-        sored by the Perkins IV grant.
     pus libraries, including books, periodicals, course reserves and
     non-print materials. The library home page provides access to a
     wide variety of databases and the Internet. The library is an
     active participant of the SUNYConnect initiative. The ECC               Education is not limited to the classroom and employers know
     library home page can be found at http://elinks.ecc.edu/library.        this. Student activities give students first-hand experience in
         Other offerings include services for individuals with disabili-     planning and publicizing an event, managing a budget, recruiting
     ties, photocopying, personal computers, study guides, group             volunteers and being a leader. Many students have found their
     study rooms and laptops.                                                first job after college through contacts made during their club’s
         The College Archives are housed in the North Campus                 activities.
     Library Resource Center.                                                    Through the use of a percentage of student activity fees, the
         In addition to the campus facilities, local and state library       SGA also supports student clubs and organizations and funds a
     resources are available to students through the interlibrary loan       variety of campus events and services that enhance the quality of
     network and the Library Resource Center’s membership in the             student life. Officers are elected in the spring semester.
     Western New York Library Resources Council.                                 To find out whom the current advisor is for a particular club,
         ECC students with a current ID card may borrow materials            call the campus Student Activity Office or the Student
     from Buffalo State College, SUNY at Buffalo and other SUNY              Government Association. If students participate in an activity,
                                                                             they take advantage of precious opportunities to meet new


     Mentoring
     libraries.
                                                                             friends and to make college a more memorable experience. Most
                                                                             graduates agree that their fondest memories of college are in
                                                                             some way connected to their affiliation with a student club or
     Mentoring is a support service provided to give the student per-        organization.

                                                                             Student Government Association
     sonal contact with the campus. The mentor provides a link to
     the institution’s services and assists the student in bridging
     problems which may be interfering with learning. Mentors are            The Student Government Association of Erie Community
     provided to the students through a referral process in the              College is comprised of elected student representatives who pro-
     Student Support Service Centers.                                        vide a forum for student input, assists in the coordination of stu-
                                                                             dent activities and works closely with the college administration
62
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
in developing policies which affect students. All students are            Latino Student Association
encouraged to participate in either the Student Government                LSA encourages Latino students to participate in extracurricu-
Association or in one or more of the co-curricular clubs on each          lar activities for the purpose of leadership development, gener-
of the campuses. A list of specific clubs is outlined in this publi-      ates an awareness of the Latino presence at Erie Community
cation. Any questions should be directed to the campus activities         College through club events and activities and supports Latino
coordinators.                                                             students in academic and social activities.

                                                                          Multilingual Club
STUDENT CLUBS                                                             The purpose of the Multilingual Club is to create an awareness
                                                                          of the diverse languages and cultures at Erie Community
Membership in student clubs is open to all currently enrolled             College.

                                                                          Nursing Club
ECC students regardless of sex, disability, race, or creed. It is not
based on any action or situation which recklessly or intentionally
endangers mental or physical health or involves the forced con-           The object of the Nursing Club is to broaden the knowledge of
sumption of liquor or drugs. The officers of a student club must          the student nurse to promote an interest in student activities. It
meet the eligibility guidelines outlined by the college, and meet         is open to all students.

                                                                          Radiation Therapy Club
other criteria as established by the constitution of the club.
There is a Club Day at the beginning of each semester. For fur-
ther information on student clubs, contact your campus SGA                The Radiation Therapy Club is being organized to provide to
                                                                          extracurricular activities for participating student to help studies


City Campus Clubs
office or the Student Activities Office.
                                                                          in the cancer field. The student activity funds will be used to
                                                                          promote cancer awareness in the community. It will also be


                                                                          North Campus Clubs
                                                                          used to raise funds for different cancer charities.
Clubs may be reached via the SGA Office (Room 274), Advisor
mailbox, or Student Activities Office (Room 276).

Black Student Union
The Black Student Union, as a college student based club, does            American Public Works Association
herby dedicate itself to the development of beneficial programs           The purpose of this club shall be the advancement of the theory
for increasing black and other ethnic minority participation on           and practice of the design, construction, maintenance, adminis-
the campuses of ECC. These programs will be initiated both                tration and operation of public works facilities and services; the
within and outside the college community. Members of this club            dissemination of information and experience upon, and the pro-
are encouraged to join and participate in their individual soci-          motion of improved practices in, public works administration;
eties. This club will provide general counseling for all members.         the encouragement of the adherence by public works officials to

Campus Ministry Club
                                                                          a high professional standard and the professional and social
                                                                          improvement of its members, as set forth in the Constitution of
The mission of this club is to strive to provide opportunities for        the American Public Works Association.
life-promoting experiences, rooted in religious values, on cam-               The branch is not organized for profit and no part of the
pus. Members offer presence, witness, response and involvement            earnings shall inure to the benefit of any member or officer
on a peer level. Membership encourages the expression of indi-            except as compensation for services rendered or for necessary
vidual traditions and requires a willingness to participate on an         expenses actually incurred.

                                                                          Dental Hygiene
ecumenical basis.

ECC Dance/Step Team                                                       The goal of the Dental Hygiene Club is to inform and educate
This club has been organized to start a dance team at the college         the public in preventive dentistry and proper oral hygiene tech-
so that the students can interact with other students.                    niques by sharing information, e.g. visiting schools, nursing

Gay Straight Alliance
                                                                          homes, or shopping malls. The club also gives students an
                                                                          opportunity to attend local and national ADHA functions.

                                                                          Future Teachers (FTC) Club
This group is organized to provide a secure environment in
which members can openly express their sexuality and deal with
relevant issues and to foster a sense of acceptance within the cam-       The Future Teachers Club provides academic and social sup-
pus community.                                                            port for students with a career goal in education. Fundraising

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Club
                                                                          drives are held periodically to benefit the student body in the

(HPER)
                                                                          name of the organization. The club reaches out to further the
                                                                          image of Erie Community College as a positive force in the com-
                                                                          munity.

                                                                          The Life House Club
The purpose of the HPER club is to not only help Health,
Physical Education and Recreation majors prepare themselves
for their chosen profession, but to inform the students of the fun
                                                                          The Life House is beneficial to the school not only by providing
physical activities that one could do to have a healthy lifestyle.

The Improv Hour
                                                                          a place for students to meet and fellowship with other students
                                                                          but also allows students to talk about things going on in their
This club has been organized for the sole purpose of giving those         life. This club will enhance a student’s experience at ECC by
who are seriously considering acting a chance at understanding            connecting them with fellow students.
and molding their skills through various improvisation.
                                                                                                                                                 63
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Sign Language Club                                                     Phi Theta Kappa
     The Sign Language Club is an opportunity for students on cam-          Phi Theta Kappa's mission is two-fold: To recognize and encour-
     pus to meet new people and engage in school sponsored activi-          age the academic achievement of two-year college students and
     ties. The objectives are to increase awareness of the deaf com-        to provide opportunities for individual growth and development
     munity and respect for the deaf culture.                               through participation in honors, leadership, service and fellow-

     Student Nursing Society
                                                                            ship programming.
                                                                               Annually, approximately 100,000 students are inducted into
     The Student Nurse’s Society consists of Erie Community                 Phi Theta Kappa. To be eligible for membership a student must
     College students who are studying to become Registered                 complete a minimum of 12 hours of associate degree course work
     Nurses. The club consists of likeminded individuals who partic-        and generally earn a grade point average of 3.5 or higher.
     ipate in community, charity and fund-raising events. Goals             Students must maintain a high academic standing throughout
     include enhancing education, enriching the community and

                                                                            Student Support Service Centers
                                                                            their enrollment in the two-year college, generally a 3.25 GPA.


     South Campus Clubs
     supporting worthwhile causes.




     Architecture Club
                                                                            The Student Support Service Centers (SSSC) presently consist of
                                                                            Counseling, Advisement and Disabled Student Services. SSSCs
                                                                            respond to the individual needs of all students through a variety
     This club was formed by the Department of Architectural                of student supportive services, including counseling, academic
     Technology. Members of the National Association of Student             advisement, mentoring and tutoring sessions. A combination of
     Chapters of the American Institute of Architects actively partici-     ongoing multiple services are also provided through academic
     pate in such events as field trips, conferences and lectures.

     DJ Club
                                                                            assistance and a variety of student supportive services. Our goal
                                                                            in the SSSC is:
                                                                            • To provide a center where students can receive academic and
     If you are interested in being a disc jockey, the DJ Club is a
                                                                                student support services in a comfortable, welcoming envi-
     great place to start. Members learn how to entertain with music
                                                                                ronment
     by receiving training in the operation of the Campus DJ booth.
                                                                            • To assist students in becoming self-confident, critical thinkers
     Each person may have their own weekly show which enables
                                                                                and responsible learners
     them to improve their performance and develop their own style.

     Dental Lab Club
                                                                            • To provide a place where students can meet, collaborate on
                                                                                academic initiatives, work or volunteer their time to assist fel-
     This club provides vast learning experiences in the field of den-          low students in meeting academic and personal goals
     tal lab, including lectures, conferences, seminars and visits to       • To provide a place where faculty can refer students who need
     dental manufacturers’ facilities and labs. The Dental Club pro-            personal and academic support
     vides numerous opportunities for guidance toward a career in           • To refer students to resources they need as they work toward
     this rapidly growing field.                                                graduation

     Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER)
                                                                            • To evaluate activities and improve services as needed for our
                                                                                students
     Education, experience and career guidance in the area of recre-        Our mission is based upon respect, confidentiality, collaboration,
     ational studies are the main objectives of the HPER Club.              support, accountability and utilizing best practices in learning


                                                                            Tutoring
     Members are also affiliated with the Niagara Frontier Parks and        assistance to meet the ever changing needs of our students.
     Recreation Society. Conferences and group meetings, coupled
     with sponsoring various activities, enhance the student’s knowl-
     edge and views regarding the recreation field.

     Veterans Club
                                                                            Tutoring services are available to all students. Students in need of
                                                                            assistance in one or more courses should contact their instructor
     The Veterans Club was primarily organized to share cama-               or the divisional assistant academic dean for information regard-
     raderie among veterans and also to pursue data beneficial to the       ing the services available.


                                                                            ADVANCED
     veterans such as job placement, job benefits and health-related


                                                                            STUDIES
     benefits. It also organizes needs and information if needed. It is
     also a social club and serves as a community service organiza-


     Student Organizations
     tion.


                                                                            What is the Advanced Studies Program?
     College-wide Student Publications
                                                                            Erie Community College’s Advanced Studies program is
                                                                            designed for selected high school students interested in begin-
     Students publish a college-wide newspaper, the ECC Student             ning their college studies while still in high school.

                                                                            What is an Advanced Studies Course?
     Voice, throughout the academic year, as well as a literary maga-
     zine, Images. Collectively, student publications provide students
     with learning opportunities through the exploration and expres-        An Advanced Studies course is taken during the high school day
     sion of issues and ideas. These publications provide the college       and is identical to the ECC course described in the college cata-
     community with a student’s perspective of events, issues and           log. Textbooks, course materials and assessments of student
     activities at the three campuses. In addition, these publications      work are the same as those used by ECC faculty in the course
     provide students with unique opportunities for personal and            sections taught at one of the three ECC campuses.
64   professional growth and development.

                    E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Who Teaches Advanced Studies Courses?                                        The ECC Foundation Office works in conjunction with the
Courses in the Advanced Studies program are taught in the                 Financial Aid Office and welcomes scholarship inquiries
high school by high school teachers who are adjunct faculty               throughout the year. For further information on scholarships,
members of ECC.                                                           visit the ECC Foundation at the Scott Bieler Alumni/

What Does An Advanced Studies Course Cost?
                                                                          Foundation Office, 4196 Abbott Road, Orchard Park or call
                                                                          (716) 851-1990.
For the academic year, the student will pay a discounted                  Officers
tuition rate of one-third the cost of tuition. This tuition rate is       Cynthia Schwartz, Chair
provided under the guidelines of the State University of New              Office of Corporate Projects & Initiatives,
York tuition discount. The student will be billed after they              Roswell Park Cancer Institute
register for the course and payment in full will be due.
Advanced Studies students are not eligible for financial aid.             Mark L. Martin, Vice Chairman

What Advantages Are There in the Advanced
                                                                          Vice President, M & T Bank

Studies Program?
                                                                          William R. Basile, Treasurer
                                                                          Vice President, Actuarial and Underwriting,
In addition to being able to take a college course at a dis-              Independent Health
counted tuition rate, a student completing and earning a
                                                                          Maureen Rasp-Glose, Secretary
grade in the course may transfer the course credit to SUNY                Director, Community Affairs, Verizon
colleges and most two- and four-year colleges and universities.
An ECC transcript request form must be completed in order                 Members
to forward grades to other colleges.                                      Leona N. Backus
What Benefits Do Advanced Studies
                                                                          Human Resources Manager, Howden Buffalo, Inc.

Students Receive?                                                         James DiMino
                                                                          Director of National Sales, Western New York
Students have access to the same facilities and services as               Public Broadcasting
other ECC students. Students are also eligible for transfer
advisement and academic counseling services from ECC.                     Patricia H. Mertz, Owner/CEO

Samples of Advanced Studies Courses
                                                                          West Metal Works, Inc. & Metal Locking Service
                                                                          Dennis P. Murphy
Courses Offered:                                                          President, InnVest Lodging
• Biology                   • Mathematics                                 Anthony J. Picone, Sr.
• French                    • Chemistry                                   President, Picone Construction Corp.
• Spanish                   • College Success skills
• Telecommunications        • Survey of Anatomy                           Diane Pudlewski, D.D.S.
                              and Physiology                              Dentist/Owner, Western New York Dental Group

For more information, contact:                                            Jack Quinn
   Advanced Studies Coordinator                                           President, Erie Community College
   Deborah Schmitt (716) 851-1270                                         Michael C. Schafer, Chairman
   schmitt@ecc.edu                                                        Vice President-Commercial Lending, Evans National Bank


ECC FOUNDATION
                                                                          Vilasini M. Shanbhag, M.D.
                                                                          Director, Radiation Oncologist, Co-Founder
                                                                          Donald P. Spasiano
The Erie Community College Foundation, Inc. is a non-profit               Professor, Hospitality Management, Erie Community College
organization established to support Erie Community College.
The Foundation’s purpose is to raise, receive and administer              William D. Tate, Sr., President
                                                                          Palma Tool & Die Co., Inc.
all private gifts and program services intended for the college,
its programs and its students.                                            Emeritus
    The Erie Community College Foundation Board of                        Louis Billittier, Sr.               Rocco A. Celeste
Directors is comprised of community and business leaders                  Anthony M. D’Auria                  Janet E. Woelfling

                                                                          Scholarship Program
who volunteer their time and resources to assist the college in
achieving this goal. The ECC Foundation believes that assist-
ing today’s students will ensure the success of tomorrow’s                Erie Community College Foundation offers scholarship awards to
leaders.                                                                  students who attend ECC. Scholarship packets are available mid-
    The ECC Foundation sponsors various fundraisers                       October at the Financial Aid and Admissions Offices, and on the
throughout the year such as the Distinguished Alumni                      Web site www.ecc.edu. The deadline to submit an application for
Awards Dinner, Chairman’s Ball, Scholarship Awards                        the 2008-2009 academic year is Friday, February 5, 2009.
Luncheon and the Annual Golf Classic. Funds raised from
these events allow the Foundation to offer scholarships for
those students who otherwise could not afford to attend col-
lege and to reward the academic achievements of others.

                                                                                                                                            65
                E C C      2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •    w w w . e c c . e d u
     COLLEGE POLICIES                                                            Disabled Student Services Staff: Will contact the faculty member
                                                                                 and arrange a meeting with him/her with or without the student,

     Student’s Rights Under Equal
                                                                                 as is appropriate for the situation, as soon as possible. If the situa-

     Employment/Affirmative Action
                                                                                 tion cannot be resolved between the Disabled Student Services
                                                                                 staff member and the faculty member, the staff member will
     Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended prohibits             immediately refer the matter, in written form, to the appropriate
     discrimination based on race, religion, national origin, sex                Assistant Academic Dean for action.
     (including pregnancy), disability, color or sexual preference.              Assistant Academic Dean: Will meet with faculty member and
     Discrimination of this nature will NOT be tolerated.                        staff member to resolve the problem. If no resolution is possible,
         Erie Community College deplores such conduct as an abuse                the Assistant Academic Dean will refer the matter to the
     of authority. Allegations leading to conviction can result in sus-          Associate Vice President in writing within five days of the meet-
     pension or termination of employment.                                       ing; the Disabled Student Services staff member and the
         Students at Erie Community College have the right to equal              Coordinator of Special Services will receive a copy of this memo.
     opportunity in campus employment and to no discrimination in                Associate Vice President: Will arrange a meeting with the faculty
     hiring on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin,    member, Disabled Student Services staff member and others
     physical or mental disability, marital status or sexual preference.         such as the Assistant Academic Dean, Coordinator of Special
         Students have the right to a non-racist, non-sexist, educa-             Services, student, as needed to resolve the problem. If the stu-
     tional program in course offerings and all campus activities. In            dent or the Disabled Student Services staff member is still dissat-
     1964, the passage of the Civil Rights Act rendered illegal dis-             isfied with the solution arranged by the Associate Vice President,
     crimination on the basis of race in schools and other institu-              the staff member will refer the student to the Dean of Students.
     tions. In 1972, Title IX of the Education Amendments was
     enacted to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex in educa-            Affirmative Action/504 Coordinator: Will investigate the validity
     tional institutions and programs.                                           of the complaint; if the grounds are valid, will refer the matter to
                                                                                 the college President or the Affirmative Action Office.


                                                                                 Policy Governing Conduct
         The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504, protects the
     rights of disabled students, which means that particular efforts


                                                                                 and Public Order on Campus
     must be made to ensure accessibility to campus facilities and pro-
     grams to disabled persons be they matriculated/non-matriculated,
     undergraduate/graduate students, faculty, or other employees. It
     means permitting access and full participation by persons with a            (Extracted in part from the New York State Education Law,
     wide range of disabilities through the elimination of architectural,        Section 6450 and New York State Code of Rules and
     public relations, program and attitudinal barriers.                         Regulations, Part 535.)

                                                                                 General Statement
         Student rights include equal opportunity in admissions,
     financial aid and counseling. Different treatment on the basis of
     gender or race in the classroom which affects the performance               The property of Erie Community College is under the jurisdic-
     of the student and which constitutes harassment is prohibited.              tion of the County of Erie, its local sponsor and the Erie
     (Textbooks and other instructional materials are not included               Community College Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees of
     under Title IX.)                                                            Erie Community College is charged with the care, custody, con-
         If a student feels he or she has been discriminated against for         trol and management of the lands, grounds, buildings and facili-
     the above reasons, the individual should contact the Director of            ties used for college purposes.
     Equity and Diversity or the Dean of Students.                                   Nothing herein is intended, nor shall it be construed, to limit

     Student Section 504
                                                                                 or restrict the freedom of speech or peaceful assembly. Free

     Discrimination Procedure
                                                                                 inquiry and free expression are indispensable to the objectives of
                                                                                 a higher educational institution. Similarly, experience has demon-
     The following process outlines the formal steps to be taken                 strated that the traditional autonomy of the educational institu-
     within the college in situations where a student with a disability          tion, and the accompanying institutional responsibility for the
     feels there has been discrimination due to that disability in viola-        maintenance of order, is best suited to achieve these objectives.
     tion of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Section 504. The student             These rules shall not be construed to prevent or limit communi-
     also has the option of reporting a problem directly to the 504              cation between and among faculty, students and administration,
     Compliance Coordinator, Darley Willis, Director of Equity and               or to relieve the institution of its special responsibility for self-reg-
     Diversity, ECC City Campus, 121 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY                ulation in the preservation of public order. Their purpose is not
     14203, (716) 851-1118/1119.                                                 to prevent or restrain controversy and dissent, but to prevent
     Disabled Student Services Staff: Will meet with self-identifying            abuse of the rights of others and to maintain public order appro-
     disabled student. Discussion of difficulties and available docu-            priate to the college, without which there can be no intellectual
                                                                                 freedom. They shall be interpreted and applied to that end.

                                                                                 Prohibited Conduct
     mentation will be used to determine recommended classroom
     accommodations. Staff will fill in accommodations form, retain-
     ing a copy for their files.
                                                                                 No person, either individually or in concert with others, shall:
     Disabled Student: Will present accommodations form to faculty
     member. Student and faculty may discuss accommodations;                     A. Willfully cause physical injury to any other person, nor
     however, any changes in the accommodations must be                             threaten to do so for the purpose of compelling or inducing
     approved by the Disabled Student Services staff member                         such person to refrain from any act which he has a lawful
     responsible for the campus office. The student is responsible for              right to do or to do any act which he has a lawful right not to
     immediately reporting any problems to the campus Office for                    do;
     Disabled Students.                                                          B. Physically restrain or detain any other person, nor remove
66                                                                                  such person from any place where he is authorized to remain;
                      E C C      2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0       •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C        •   w w w . e c c . e d u
C. Willfully damage or destroy property of the institution or              F. In the case of a faculty or staff member, charges of miscon-
   property under its jurisdiction, or remove or use such prop-               duct in violation of these rules shall be dealt with through
   erty without authorization;                                                the appropriate collective bargaining agreements.
D. Without permission, expressed or implied, enter into any pri-           G. Bonafide student organizations which operate on campus for
   vate office of an administrative officer, faculty, or staff mem-           educational purposes shall be barred from engaging in the
   ber;                                                                       prohibited conduct herein defined. In addition, organiza-
E. Enter upon and remain in the building or facility for any pur-             tions are prohibited from engaging in activities which reck-
   pose other than its authorized uses or in such manner as to                lessly or intentionally endanger health or involve forced con-
   obstruct its authorized use by others;                                     sumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into
F. Without authorization, remain in any building or facility after            or affiliation with said organizations. All organizations must
   it is normally closed;                                                     include in their by-laws a statement of this prohibition.
G. Refuse to leave any building or facility after being required to           1. An organization charged with a violation of the rules set
   do so by an authorized administrative officer;                             forth herein shall be dealt with as provided in Section 535.10
H. Obstruct the free movement of persons and vehicles in any                  of the New York State Code of Rules and Regulations.
   place to which these rules apply;                                          2. Any organization which authorizes prohibited conduct as
I. Deliberately disrupt or prevent the peaceful and orderly con-              described herein will be subject to the rescission of permis-
   duct of classes, lectures, and meetings or deliberately inter-             sion to operate on campus through the Student Government
   fere with the freedom of any person to express his views,                  Association, Auxiliary Services Corporation, and the college.
   including invited speakers;                                             H. Any penalties for violations imposed under the rules and
J. Knowingly have in his possession upon any premises to                      procedures set forth herein shall be in addition to any penal-
   which these rules apply, any rifle, shotgun, pistol, revolver, or          ty pursuant to the Penal Law or any other chapter to which a


                                                                           Student Code of Conduct
   other firearm or weapon without the written authorization of               violator or organization may be subject.
   the Chief Administrative Officer, whether or not a license to


                                                                           and Review Board Procedures
   possess the same has been issued to such person;
K. Willfully incite others to commit any of the acts do so;
L. Take any action, create or participate in the creation of any

                                                                           Statement of Philosophy
   situation which recklessly or intentionally endangers mental
   or physical health, or which involves the forced consumption
   of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or affilia-       Erie Community College, sponsored by the County of Erie and
   tion with any organization; or                                          under the supervision of the State University of New York, real-
M. Activate cellular telephones, pagers, or other communication            izes that the rights and privileges exercised by any person are
   devices in classrooms, libraries, or inappropriately use com-           always a function of his/her relationship with others. Taken in
   munication devices in violation of rights of others (e.g.               the context of the college, this makes students responsible for
   improper computer usage). It is library policy that cellular            their actions while members of the college community. The col-
   phones not be used in the libraries.                                    lege has a responsibility in establishing a Student Code of
Procedures
                                                                           Conduct to protect as a whole the unique properties of this col-
                                                                           lege organization and to provide an atmosphere for sound acad-
A. All requests from outside groups to utilize the campus must             emic and co-curricular learning.
   be in writing to the Dean of Students at each campus.                       Therefore, Erie Community College expects its students to
B. The Dean of Students or his/her designee shall inform the               assume a professional attitude in their conduct. This simply
   invitee who violates any provision of these rules that his cam-         implies that the student has a seriousness of purpose and is here
   pus security will be contacted to escort them off campus.               to grow both personally and academically. By enrolling at Erie
C. In the case of any other violator, who is neither a student or          Community College, the student agrees to abide by all college
   faculty or other staff member, the Dean of Students or his/her          regulations and it is understood that he/she is aware of the
   designee shall inform him/her that he/she is not authorized to          Student Code of Conduct and its procedures.
   remain on campus. In the event of their refusal or failure to               Any type of dishonest, abusive, or destructive behavior is
   do so, campus security will be contacted to escort them off             subject to inquiry and may result in a disciplinary hearing. Loss
   campus. Nothing in this statement shall be construed to                 of privileges, specified discipline requirements, or separation
   authorize the presence of any such person at anytime prior to           from the college may be imposed on any student whose conduct
   such violation nor to affect his liability of prosecution for tres-     on or off campus adversely affects his/her status as a member of
   pass or loitering as prescribed in the Penal Law.                       the academic community. The Deans of Students reserve the
D. Under New York State Penal Law, Section 240.35(5), a per-               right to deny students the privilege of participating in student
   son is guilty of loitering when he/she loiters or remains in or         activities for disciplinary reasons, based upon the college Code
   about school grounds, a college or university building or               of Conduct.
   grounds, not having any reason or relationship involving cus-               Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended: pro-
   tody of or responsibility for a pupil or student, or any other          hibits discrimination based on race, religion, national origin,
   specific, legitimate reason for being there, and not having             sex, pregnancy, disability, color, or sexual preference.
   written permission from anyone authorized to grant the same.            Discrimination of this nature is unacceptable and impermissible
E. A student charged with a violation of the rules set forth here          conduct which will NOT be tolerated.
   in shall be dealt with as provided in the current Code of                   Erie Community College deplores such conduct as an abuse
   Student Conduct and the notice, hearing and determination               of authority. Allegations leading to conviction can result in sus-
   of charges against said student shall comply with Section               pension, termination of employment, or status as a student. The
   535.9 of the New York State Code of Rules and Regulations.              following is a list of infractions of the Code of Conduct which
                                                                           might lead to suspension or dismissal:                               67
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     A. Physical or verbal abuse, including disorderly, loud, inde-         es speak not in the presence of any other witnesses for either side
        cent, obscene conduct or expression toward fellow students          or may allow everyone to be present who will be offering testimo-
        or any and all members of the college staff.                        ny. The make up of the Judicial Board will be the same as that of
     B. Tampering with safety alarms or equipment, violation of spe-        the student grievance procedure. During the hearing the Judicial
        cific safety regulations, possession or use on campus of            Board will appoint one of its members to chair the hearing. This
        firearms, knives, other weapons, explosives, or fireworks.          will be done in order to maintain order and adhere to procedures
     C. Forcible disruption or obstruction of regular college activi-       for questioning.
        ties including administration, classes, campus services, orga-          The written decision of that body will be forwarded to the
        nized events; interference with free speech and movement of         Dean of Students. The Dean of Students will review the Judicial
        academic community members; refusal to provide an identi-           Board’s recommendations and make the final decision regarding
        fication card when requested or to obey any other legitimate        any penalties imposed upon the student charged. The student
        instruction from a college official, faculty member, or securi-     may request an appeal of the decision of the Dean of Students to
        ty guard.                                                           the Executive Vice President for Student Affairs for alleged pro-
     D. Dishonesty, such as cheating or plagiarism.                         cedural error.
        *Plagiarism is passing off someone else’s ideas or words as             Quite often a student conduct hearing will be held along with
        your own without giving credit or without giving credit             a student grievance hearing relating to the same set of facts. If a
        properly. Plagiarism may take the form of directly copying          member of the college community charges a student with violat-
        another’s work (in whole or in part), improperly citing             ing the code of conduct, the student can counter charge the indi-
        sources, presenting another’s view or concept without               vidual bringing the code of conduct action with a violation under
        acknowledging the originator, or receiving help with an             the student grievance procedure. When this occurs, it is the
        assignment beyond what one might receive from a tutor in            responsibility of the campus Dean of Students to preside over a
        the ECC skills centers. Academic dishonesty also refers to          judicial hearing. The same questioning procedures will exist as
        cheating on quizzes or exams.                                       those stated in the student grievance section. The recommenda-
     E. Falsifying information to the college, such as forgery, alter-      tion of the Judicial Board will be made to the Dean of Students
        ation, or intentional misuse of college documents, records or       where upon the Dean will review and check whether it is appro-
        identification.                                                     priate and make a determination upon the issues. Appeals of the
     F. Misuse of the name, seal, or logo of Erie Community College         resolutions may only be made regarding procedural concerns to
        or claiming to speak or act in the name of the college with-        the appropriate Executive Vice President.
        out due authorization of the President or an approved repre-            Campus Judicial Board procedures are available at the respec-
        sentative.                                                          tive Dean of Students offices.

                                                                            Status of Student Pending Final Action
     G. Unauthorized gambling in any form on the campus or in any
        of the college buildings.
     H. Open or public possession, sale, use or exchange of illegal         Pending action of the charges, civil or college, the status of the
        substances or intoxicants on campus.                                student shall not be altered or his/her right to be present on the
     I. Theft, abuse, or unauthorized use, of public or private prop-       campus and attend classes denied, except for reasons relating to
        erty, including unauthorized entrance into college facilities       the safety and well-being of students, faculty, college personnel,
        and/or possession of stolen property.                               or college property as determined by the campus Dean of
     J. Smoking is prohibited on all campuses.                              Students. Appeals must be in writing and any appeals are
                                                                            requested by the Executive Vice President for Student Affairs in
     For further information, contact the campus Dean of Students           consultation with the Dean of Students.

                                                                            Appendix
     Office.

     Procedure for Dealing with
     Code of Conduct Infractions
                                                                            “Range of Educational Sanctions” (May be assigned alone or in
                                                                            combination if student is found to be in violation).
     All charges of code infractions made by any member of the col-
                                                                            A. Official Warning - An official warning is an oral notification
     lege community shall be submitted to the Dean of Students in
                                                                               to the student that his/her behavior is unacceptable in the col-
     writing in complete detail. Within 10 working days following
                                                                               lege community and that repetition of that behavior will result
     the submission of the charges, the student will be notified in
                                                                               in further disciplinary action. This may be assigned by the
     writing of the charges including the time and date of a consulta-
                                                                               Dean of Students without a formal hearing.
     tion with the Dean of Students. The Dean will render a decision
                                                                            B. Disciplinary Reprimand - A disciplinary reprimand is a writ-
     on the case within 10 working days following the consultation.
                                                                               ten notification to the student that his/her behavior is unac-
     In cases where further investigation is deemed necessary by the
                                                                               ceptable in the college community and that repetition of that
     Dean, a hearing may be convened. This hearing will take place
                                                                               behavior will result in further disciplinary action.
     no later than two weeks (10 working days) after the meeting
                                                                            C. Restitution - Restitution requires the student to pay for all
     with the Dean. The hearing will be presided over by the campus
                                                                               direct and indirect costs of damages caused to property or
     Judicial Board in conjunction with the Dean of Students. The
                                                                               person. No amount beyond that, for example as a fine, may
     hearing will permit that witnesses be brought in by the college
                                                                               be assigned. Restitution may be required by the Dean of
     under the auspices of the Dean of Students and by the student
                                                                               Students with a formal hearing, if the student accepts respon-
     charged with the code infraction. The members of the Judicial
                                                                               sibility.
     Board will be permitted to question the Dean of Students and
                                                                            D. Loss of Privileges - Privileges within the college community
     any witnesses as well as being able to question the student
                                                                               may be revoked for a specified period of time, as long as they
     charged with the code infraction and any witnesses brought in
                                                                               are consistent with the nature of the offense and the educa-
     by that student. The Judicial Board may choose to have witness-
                                                                               tion of the student.
68
                    E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
E. Alternative Educational Sanctions - Alternative educational          Admission or Re-admission of a Student with a History of
   sanctions are intended to contribute to the education of the         Violent Behavior.
   student, the education of the college community, and/or to           As a component of its responsibility to protect all members of
   be a form of social restitution. Alternative sanctions are           the college community, the college reserves the right to refuse
   specifically designed to fit the individual student and the          admission or readmission to any individual who has a history of


                                                                        Student Complaint Procedure
   nature of the specific offense. They may include a require-          violent behavior such as murder, rape, assault, molestation, etc.
   ment to present an education program for fellow students,
   to write an informative research article for the student news-
   paper, to perform a specified number of hours in communi-
   ty service, etc. In assigned educational sanctions, care must        It is the intent of Erie Community College to encourage a
   be taken not to violate the individual student’s constitutional      prompt and informal resolution of problems. The following
   rights.                                                              resolution mechanism is an orderly procedure for processing
                                                                        complaints.

                                                                        Definitions
F. Disciplinary Probation - A disciplinary probation is a defi-
   nite period of time during which the student is required to
   fulfill specified conditions or obligations, with the under-
                                                                        1. A complaint involves the application, interpretation, or vio-
   standing that failure to meet the requirements of the proba-
   tion or further infraction of college policy may result in more         lation of:
   severe sanctions, including suspension or dismissal.                    A. A college policy
G. Suspension - A suspension is a separation from the college,             B. An administrative procedure
   for a specified period of time, ranging from a portion or all           C. An administrative regulation
   of a given semester to a full academic year. Conditions for             D. Academic matters, excluding individual grades
   return to the college, if any, must be outlined at the time of          E. Academic matters, including grades will be forwarded to
   suspension. In addition, restrictions on the suspended stu-                 the appropriate department chair or head.
   dents’ access to the campus during the period of suspension          2. “Working days” shall be defined to mean any day, Monday
   may be                                                                  through Friday, that the college is open.
   assigned, including the assignment of a formal persona non
                                                                        3. A student is defined as someone who is enrolled at Erie
   grata status.
                                                                           Community College at the time of the act or event in question.

                                                                        Resolution of Complaints
H. Dismissal/Expulsion - Dismissal/expulsion may be the per-
   manent separation of the student from the college. It is
   reserved for the most serious of offenses against the college        The student must go to the college employee with whom the
   and/or the members of the college community.                         alleged problem originated. An attempt should be made to
Student’s Involuntary Removal from Campus(es) Due to                    resolve the matter equitably and informally at this level. If an
Behavior:                                                               acceptable solution is not reached with the person or persons
When a student speaks or exhibits behavior that is perceived as         directly involved with the complaint, the student has the option
deteriorating to the point of posing a direct threat to other           of contacting the Department Head or immediate supervisor. If
members of the campus community, the Dean of Students has               you do not know whom to contact, call the Dean of Students’
the right to prevent a student from being on campus. Before             office for assistance. This process should be initiated within 30
such action is taken, the Dean is to consult with appropriate           working days of the original complaint.
campus personnel from such departments as Security, Health                  Complaints will be forwarded to the campus Judicial Board
                                                                        as deemed necessary by the Dean.

                                                                        Steps To Resolve A Complaint
Services, Counseling, or Disabled Student Services. This is a
preventative action. Prior to the start of the next semester, or
thereafter, the student must present documentation to the
chairperson of the Readmission Committee that the source of             Informal Process
the problem has been addressed/resolved in order to re-register         1. Student has a complaint.
for classes. The committee will then make a recommendation to           2. Student talks to the college employee against whom the
the Dean regarding readmission. The Dean of Students will                   complaint is rendered.
make the final determination. Should the behavior reoccur, the          3. If unresolved, the student takes the complaint to the head of
Dean has the right to expel the student permanently.                        the department in which the college employee works.
Documentation Presented for Re-admission After a Voluntary              4. If the complaint is still unresolved, the student may speak
or Involuntary Removal from Campus:                                         with the appropriate Dean or Department/Supervisor. The
A student who is presenting documentation of extenuating cir-               appropriate Dean or Department/Supervisor is the supervi-
cumstances for a return to campus should present that docu-                 sor of the department of the person against whom the com-
mentation to the chairperson of the Re-admission Committee.                 plaint has been filed.
In the case of documentation related to a disability, that infor-       5. If the complaint is still unresolved, the student may write a
mation should be submitted to the campus counselor for                      formal complaint.
Students with Disabilities who will share pertinent information         The above includes an explanation of steps to resolve a student
with the Readmission Committee on a need to know basis. All             concern to the point when a student writes a formal complaint.
documentation submitted is confidential and should be main-             If the appropriate Dean deems it necessary, the complaint may
tained in confidential files at the Dean of Student’s office. The       be turned over to a campus Judicial Board for a hearing. The
Committee reserves the right to request additional documenta-           campus Judicial Board is made up of the following individuals:
tion if they determine that what was submitted was adequate. If         two faculty members, one counselor, two administrative staff
a student refuses to provide additional documentation, the              and two students. Training for Judicial Board members will be
committee can recommend to the Dean of Students continued               arranged through the Dean of Students.
                                                                                                                                            69
suspension or permanent expulsion.
               E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
         This hearing will permit witnesses to be presented by the                Students in leadership positions and student athletes will sign
     student grieving as well as witnesses to be presented by the             a release allowing their grades to be used to determine eligibility
     party against whom the grievance has been filed. Each side will          and for advisement purposes by college Counselors and Mentors.
     be permitted to present testimony with the appropriate Dean                  The Dean of Students monitors publications officers while
     presiding.                                                               the Activity Coordinators monitor Student Government
         Those who may remain present while the hearing is in ses-            Association officers and club-elected officers. Club advisers must
     sion will include both the student grieving and the person               present a list of student officers to the Student Activity
     against whom the grievance has been filed. Witnesses, however,           Coordinators no later than October 1 for the fall semester and
     may not be permitted to remain at the hearing through the testi-         February 15 for the spring semester to verify grades.
     mony of other witnesses. This will be at the discretion of the               During the first month of each semester, club advisors should
     hearing board. The rationale for this is that, at times, hearing         inform all members that a 2.0 cumulative average is necessary in
     testimony from other witnesses may have some impact upon the             order to participate in club activities.
     testimony of witnesses to come thereafter. This is a student                 The Activity Coordinator ensures that student voting mem-
     grievance hearing and is not subject to the same rules and regu-         bers at SGA meetings meet the minimum grade point average of
     lations regarding evidence procedure, etc. as would exist in a           2.0.
     formal court of law. Due process, however, will be adhered to.               The Dean of Students reserves the right to deny students the
         The procedure will involve questioning of witnesses by the           privilege of participating in student activities for disciplinary rea-
     judicial hearing board members, the Dean, and both the griev-            sons, based upon the college Code of Conduct.

                                                                              AIDS Policy
     ant and the griever (the person against whom the grievance has
     been filed) in the case. That is, if the grievant presents a witness,
     all may ask the witness questions. The person against whom the           The following guidelines, which is derived from the best currently
     grievance is filed may ask questions and members of the hearing          available medical facts about HIV/AIDS, apply to all students or
     board may ask questions. Procedural order will be maintained             employees.
     by the Dean. In addition, the person or persons against whom                 Since current knowledge indicates that students or employees
     the grievance has been filed will also be permitted to present           with HIV/AIDS do not pose a health risk to other employ-
     witnesses, question those witnesses and allow the grievant to            ees/students in an academic setting, the Erie Community College
     question those witnesses. Also, the grievance hearing board              Board of Trustees has adopted this policy to protect those with
     members, as well as the Dean, may question the witnesses. After          HIV/AIDS.
     witnesses have been questioned, the grievance hearing board                  Those with HIV or AIDS shall not be denied admission to
     members will be permitted to ask any final questions of the              the college on the basis of this disability. Those with HIV or
     grievant or the person being grieved. After this, all parties pre-       AIDS shall be considered as having a disabling condition and will
     sent will be excused; the grievance hearing board will then meet         be given the special services provided to others with disabilities.
     privately with only its members present and discuss the case and         Those with HIV or AIDS are allowed regular classroom atten-
     determine a procedure and a timeline for finalizing its recom-           dance in an unrestricted manner as long as they are physically
     mendations. The maximum period of time from the end of the               and mentally able to attend classes. There is no justification, med-
     hearing to finalization of the hearing board’s recommendations           ical or otherwise, for restricting access to those with HIV or
     will be 10 working days. The hearing board will present its rec-         AIDS to snack bars, cafeterias, gymnasiums, swimming pools,
     ommendations for solution to the Dean. The Dean will then                showers, recreational facilities, or other common areas.
     review in order to determine whether the recommendations are                 These guidelines are designed to protect the legal and consti-
     appropriate and fall within the policies of Erie Community               tutional rights of those with HIV or AIDS. All stu-
     College.                                                                 dents/employees are entitled to confidentiality of records and
         After the complaint process is completed, the appropriate            information as stated in previously set Board policy.

                                                                              Alcohol Policy
     Dean or supervisor of the griever will render a resolution. This
     resolution will be final unless an appeal is filed within 10 work-
     ing days of the resolution. The appeal will be to the appropriate        It is recognized that consumption of alcohol at any activity may
     Associate Vice President or administrator, if procedural errors          be a pleasurable aspect of the program. It should not, however,
     have been charged. The Associate Vice President or administra-           be considered the primary purpose for which the event is spon-
     tor may review the case, if he/she deems it appropriate.                 sored nor should it be the central activity around which the pro-

     Standards of Eligibility for Student Leadership
                                                                              gram evolves. Normally, events at which alcohol is served may

     Positions and Athletics
                                                                              not be held on campus. Further, student activity fee money may
                                                                              not be used to purchase alcohol for any off-campus events.
     Students who are members of executive boards of SGAs, stu-
     dent members of the ASC, editors of student publications, pres-
                                                                              Drug-Free Workplace Policy
                                                                              Erie Community College is committed to the development and
     idents of student clubs and the SGA President/Student Trustee
                                                                              maintenance of a drug-free environment, and, in accordance with
     are required to meet the standards of eligibility as outlined in
                                                                              the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988, prohibits the unlawful
     the Student Government Association Policies and Procedures
                                                                              possession, use, manufacture, distribution and dispensation of
     Manual.
                                                                              controlled substances (drugs and alcohol) in and on Erie
        Student athletes participating on the intercollegiate level in
                                                                              Community College owned or controlled property.
     any of the National Junior College Athletic Association
                                                                                  Students charged with the possession, sale, or use of alcohol
     (NJCAA) certified sports must be eligible to compete based on
                                                                              or a controlled substance will be subject to the full penalty of the
     the requirements set forth by Erie Community College and the
                                                                              law which is stated in all applicable Federal, State and Local
     NJCAA. Student athletes are required to follow the Erie
                                                                              laws. Reference: Title M, Article 220 and 221 of the New York
     Community College Code of Conduct as well as Rules of
                                                                              State Law.
70   Conduct established by the NJCAA.

                     E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
    Students found to be at risk of drug or alcohol abuse will be        the Meningitis response section of the Confidential Student
referred to local, public and private agencies that have a history       Health Form. The meningococcal meningitis vaccine is recom-
of providing rehabilitation services.                                    mended but is optional. A student may respond either by pro-
    Students who are charged with unlawful use of alcohol or             viding documentation of the date the vaccination was received
substance possession and/or sale may be subject to the following         within the past 10 years, or by signing a refusal/waiver of vacci-
sanctions:                                                               nation.
A. Students whose presence on the campus poses a clear danger                Please note that according to New York State Public Health
    to other students, staff, or faculty may be prevented from con-      Law, Erie Community College shall not permit any student with
    tinuing in their studies until such time as the charge has been      incomplete records to continue to attend the institution in
    heard.                                                               excess of 30 calendar days, without completely satisfying the
B. Given the nature and severity of the offense, students maybe          Public Health Law requirements. Tuition, fees and book costs
    permitted to continue in class while undergoing voluntary            incurred by the student during the semester will not be refund-
    rehabilitation services.                                             ed should it be necessary for the college to impose NYS PHL
C. Students involved in rehabilitation programming will remain           2165 and/or NYS PHL 2167 sanctions.
    on probation until such time as the program has been success-            Erie Community College reserves the right to withdraw stu-
    fully completed, as attested to by the agency providing the          dents that do not meet New York State Department of Health
    service.                                                             Regulations as outlined. Withdrawn students will not be able to
                                                                         return to the college that semester. Withdrawn students will be
Erie County is committed to a drug-free workplace and will work          allowed to attend college the following semester, once comple-
diligently to promote and enforce the following county policies:         tion of the New York State immunization requirements has
1. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, disposition, posses-          been satisfied.

                                                                         Harassment Policy Statement
    sion, or use of a controlled substance during working hours at
    any county workplace is prohibited, and an employee
    engaging in such conduct shall be discharged in accordance           Erie Community College, its Board of Trustees and the County
    with applicable employee bargaining unit contracts.                  of Erie prohibit harassment by supervisors, co-workers, stu-
2. The Erie County Employee Assistance Program shall offer sub-          dents and non-employees on the basis of sex, race, national ori-
    stance abuse counseling and referral to rehabilitation programs.     gin, disability, or any other protected status. These forms of
3. Each employee shall abide by the Federal Drug-Free                    harassment are also prohibited through compliance with Title
    Workplace Policy. It is the responsibility of each employee to       VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
    notify his/her supervisor of any conviction or violation of any          Sexual harassment, as defined by the Equal Employment
    criminal drug statute arising out of actions at the employee’s       Opportunity Commission (EEOC), is as follows: “Harassment
    workplace, no later than five days after such conviction. The        on the basis of sex is a violation of Section 703 of Title VII.
    employee’s supervisor shall, upon receipt of such notice:            Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and
    A. Notify any Federal contract officer within 10 days of such        other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitutes
    conviction; and,                                                     sexual harassment when (1) submission to such conduct is made
    B. Impose the following sanctions and/or remedial measures           explicitly or implicitly as a term or condition of an individual’s
    within 30 days upon any employee who is convicted of drug            employment; (2) submissions to or rejection of such conduct by
    violations in the workplace;                                         an individual is used as the basis for employment decisions
    C. Take appropriate disciplinary action against the employee,        affecting such individuals; or (3) such conduct has the purpose
    up to and including discharge; and/or,                               or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work
    D. Require such employee to satisfactorily participate in a          performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive
    drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program approved for         work environment.”**
    such purposes by a Federal, State, or local health law enforce-          Sex discrimination is defined and prohibited by Title IX as
    ment or other appropriate agency.                                    follows: “No person in the United States shall, on the grounds
4. In connection with this policy, employees are directed to note        of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation
    Rule #2 and Rule #15 of the Employee Handbook, which are             in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination
    Class A dischargeable violations.                                    under any program or activity receiving federal financial assis-
The County of Erie will make continuing efforts to maintain a            tance, or be treated on the basis of sex under most education
drug-free workplace by strict enforcement of this policy and its         programs or activities receiving federal assistance.”**

                                                                         Policy
requirements.

Immunization Requirements for Registration                               Erie Community College, through its commitment, will affirma-
New York State Public Health Laws 2165 and 2167 pertain to               tively attempt to provide an environment free of harassment for
post-secondary students attending colleges and universities.             all employees and students in accordance with the laws of the
    PHL 2165 requires college students born on or after January          United States of America and the State of New York.
1, 1957 who are taking six or more credit hours to provide proof             Harassment of students and employees of Erie Community
of immunity to Measles, Mumps and Rubella. Proof consists of             College based on sex, race, national origin, disability, or any
documentation of two live Measles vaccines, one live Mumps               other protected status includes ethnic or racial slurs and other
vaccine and one live Rubella vaccine (or two doses of combined           verbal or physical conduct relating to a person’s sex, race,
MMR vaccine). Alternatively, students may provide proof of               national origin, disabling condition, or any other protected sta-
immunity by submitting laboratory results of blood testing that          tus is unacceptable and impermissible conduct which will not
shows they have antibodies to Measles, Mumps and Rubella.                be tolerated. Erie Community College deplores such conduct as
    PHL 2167 requires that all college students enrolled for six or      an abuse of authority. Whenever knowledge is received that a
more credit hours, regardless of birth date, be informed about           harassing condition is being imposed, prompt and remedial
Meningococcal Meningitis, and further, complete, sign and date           action will be taken.                                                71
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
         Any person who believes harassment has taken place in viola-           2. The aggrieved individual will be informed of options to file
     tion of the policy may file a written complaint with the Director             a formal complaint with the Affirmative Action/ Equal
     of Equity and Diversity.                                                      Employment Opportunity Office, as well as the com-
     The Director of Equity & Diversity is:                                        plainant’s right to file a complaint with the New York State
             Darley Willis, ECC/City Campus                                        Division for Human Rights and/or the United States Equal
             121 Ellicott Street                                                   Employment Opportunity Commission.
             Buffalo, New York 14203
                                                                             C. If the aggrieved wishes to file a formal complaint, the
             716-851-1118/1119
                                                                                Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Office
     ** Source: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended by         will:
     the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Section
                                                                                1. Write up the formal complaint, naming the alleged discrim-


     Discrimination/Harassment
     1604.11; Title IX of the Education Amendments, 1975.
                                                                                   inating respondent, the alleged discriminating practices and
                                                                                   the restitution desired. The complaint must be signed and
                                                                                   dated by the complainant.
     Alleged acts of discrimination or harassment which are in viola-           2. Investigate the alleged discriminatory practices.
     tion of Equal Employment, Educational Opportunity or                       3. Make a determination as to whether the investigation
     Harassment policies under which Erie Community College and                    revealed discriminatory practices against the complainant.
     the County of Erie operate, shall be filed in writing directly with        4. Issue a written notice to the complainant regarding the
     Erie Community College’s Director of Equity and Diversity.                    findings and determination of the Affirmative
     These procedures shall apply to all complaints relating to affir-             Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Office.
     mative action policies of Erie Community College as stated in             5. Schedule a conciliation meeting with the name of the
     the Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Policy                   respondent and the department head when probable cause
     Statement and the Harassment Policy Statement. Such reports                  has been determined to rectify the discriminatory practices
     of alleged acts (complaints or charges) will be handled under                against the complainant.
     the following procedures:

     Definition
                                                                             D. If the complainant is dissatisfied with the issued determina-
                                                                                tion, the complainant may request a hearing by an Ad Hoc
     A complaint is defined to mean a formal allegation involving the           Committee designed by the Director of Equity and Diversity.
     interpretation of Erie Community College’s Affirmative Action           E. The Ad Hoc Committee will conduct a hearing based upon
     Policy and/or Harassment Policy Statement, the regulations of              the investigation file and testimony of any witness(es) they
     Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Title VI            deem necessary to call. The Committee will then submit its
     and Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972; Section                findings to the Director of Equity and Diversity for a final
     503, 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; and the            decision.
     Americans with Disability Act of 1990, as amended.

     Complaint Procedure
                                                                             If the complainant is still not satisfied with the findings, the com-
                                                                             plainant may pursue the matter through the New York State
     Procedures have been developed to insure fairness and consis-           Division for Human Rights and/or the United States Equal
     tency in Erie Community College’s employment program,                   Employment Opportunity Commission.
     admissions policies and program activities with its employees               Every person involved has a right to legal representation
     and students. Any college employee or applicant for employ-             throughout the entire process.

                                                                             Complaint Procedure
     ment or admissions, who believes he/she has been wrongly
     denied equal benefits or privileges because of race, color, reli-
     gion, sex, pregnancy, national origin, age, sexual orientation,         Once initial discrimination of the incident occurs:
     disability, marital or veteran status in any employment-related         Stage I: Informal Solution
     matter or admission to the college, caused by a college official or     Stage II: Complaint filed with Equity and Diversity/EEO Office
     employee, may seek admissions or employment opportunity                 • Immediately official investigation begins - To complete the
     counseling or file a complaint.                                            investigation in a timely manner, the investigator submits
        No person seeking information, equal opportunity counsel-               completed file to the Director of Equity and Diversity. The
     ing or who files a formal complaint will be adversely affected in          Director of Equity and Diversity attempts resolution of com-
     any manner because the complainant utilizes these procedures.              plaint.
     A. Any college employee or student who believes to have been            • 30 days to complete investigation
        aggrieved may seek counseling from the Director of Equity            • Investigator submits completed file to Director of Equity and
        and Diversity the alleged discriminatory incident. The                  Diversity
        Director of Equity and Diversity will investigate the com-           • 20 days to finalize solution— Director of Affirmative Action
        plaint and seek to informally resolve the matter:                       attempts resolution of complaint
                                                                             Stage III: Hearing conducted by Ad Hoc Committee (to be
     B. The aggrieved may seek initial equal employment opportuni-              designated by the Director of Affirmative Action)
        ty counseling at the Affirmative Action/Equal Employment
        Opportunity Office.                                                  Stage IV: Complainant may file with New York State Division
                                                                                of Human Rights and/or United States Equal Employment
        1. The Office of Equity and Diversity will seek to resolve the          Opportunity Commission.
           complaint informally.
                                                                             Complaint may be resolved at any of the four stages outlined if
                                                                             agreeable with complainant. Days are based on college’s work
                                                                             week.
72
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Students’ Rights Under Affirmative Action/
Equal Employment Opportunity
                                                                                        undue hardship. The law covers applicants and employees of
                                                                                        most private employers, state and local governments, educational
                                                                                        institutions, employment agencies and labor organizations.
Students of Erie Community College have the right to equal
                                                                                            Student rights include equal opportunity in admission, finan-
opportunity in campus employment and to no discrimination in
                                                                                        cial aid and counseling. Different treatment on the basis of gen-
hiring on the basis of race, color, religion, pregnancy, sex, age,
                                                                                        der or race in the classroom which affects the performance of the
national origin, disability, sexual orientation, marital or veteran
                                                                                        student and which constitutes harassment is prohibited.

                                                                                        Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial
status.

                                                                                        Assistance Race, Color, National Origin, Sex
    Students have the right to a non-racist, non-sexist education-
al program in course offerings and all campus activities. In 1964,
the passage of the Civil Rights Act rendered illegal discrimina-
                                                                                        In addition to the protection of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act
tion on the basis of race in schools and other institutions and
                                                                                        of 1964, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination
prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational insti-
                                                                                        on the basis of race, color, or national origin in programs or activ-

Individuals with Handicaps
tutions and programs.
                                                                                        ities receiving federal financial assistance. Employment discrimi-
                                                                                        nation is covered by Title VI if the primary objective of the finan-
Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, pro-                         cial assistance is provision of employment, or where employment
hibits job discrimination because of handicap, and requires                             discrimination causes or may cause discrimination in providing
affirmative action to employ and advance in employment quali-                           services under such programs. Title IX of the Education
fied individuals with handicaps who, with reasonable accommo-                           Amendments of 1972 prohibits employment discrimination on
dations, can perform the essential functions of a job.                                  the basis of sex in educational programs or activities which
    Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended,                          receive Federal assistance.
prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of handicap                                If you feel that you have been discriminated against under any
in any program or activity which receives Federal financial assis-                      of the above laws, you immediately should contact the Office of
tance. Discrimination is prohibited in all aspects of employment                        Equity and Diversity/Equal Employment Opportunity Office at
against handicapped persons who, with reasonable accommo-                               the City Campus, 121 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203,


                                                                                        Student Right-To-Know Act
dations, can perform the essential functions of the job.                                in Room 174, or by calling (716) 851-1118 or 851-1119.
    The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504, protects the
rights of disabled students which means that particular efforts

                                                                                        Graduation Rate Disclosure Information
must be made to ensure accessibility to campus facilities and pro-
grams to disabled person be they matriculated/non-matriculated,
undergraduate/graduate students, faculty and other employees. It                            On July 1, 1992, the Student Right-To-Know and Campus
means permitting access and full participation by persons with a                        Security Act went into effect. Among its provisions is the require-
wide range of disabilities through the elimination of architectural,                    ment for institutions receiving federal student aid funds to make
public relations, program and attitudinal barriers.                                     available to prospective students the college’s graduation, reten-

Disability
                                                                                        tion, and attrition rates.
                                                                                            This report, the Student Right-To-Know/Graduation Rate
The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, pro-                           Disclosure, is available at all Admissions Offices college wide
hibits discrimination on the basis of disability and protects quali-                    through the Call Center or directly from the college’s
fied applicants and disabled employees from discrimination in                           Institutional Research Office at North Campus.
hiring, promotion, discharge, pay, job training, fringe benefits                            Individuals with questions or seeking clarification related to
and other aspects of employment. The law also requires that cov-                        any aspect of this report should contact Marlene Arno, Director
ered entities provide qualified applicants and employees with                           of Institutional Research, North Campus, Gleasner Hall, Room
disabilities with reasonable accommodations that do not impose                          156, (716) 851-1431, arno@ecc.edu.




                                                    ERIE COMMUNITY COLLEGE
                                                        Start Here. Go Anywhere!
                                                                 (716) 851-1ECC
                                                                           www.ecc.edu

Erie Community College is committed to equal opportunity in educational programs, admissions, and employment. It is the policy of ECC to provide equal
opportunity for all qualified applicants, students and employees, and to prohibit discrimination. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, prohibits
discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, pregnancy, disability, sexual orientation, marital status or veteran status. Discrimination of
this nature is unacceptable and impermissible conduct which will NOT be tolerated.

Erie Community College deplores such conduct as an abuse of authority. Allegations leading to conviction can result in suspension or termination of employ-
ment. Related inquiries should be addressed to: Title IX, ADA and Section 504 Compliance Coordinator, Darley Willis, Director of Equity and Diversity,
851-1119.                                                                                                                                                                  73
                   E C C       2 0 0 8        -   2 0 1 0        •    ( 7 1 6 )        8 5 1 - 1 E C C            •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      ACADEMIC DEGREE
      & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS




74
     E C C   2 0 0 8   -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C   •   w w w . e c c . e d u
 ACADEMIC DEGREE PROGRAMS
Enrollment in programs other than those registered or otherwise approved may jeopardize a student’s eligibility for certain awards.

Curr.                                                                                   City         North      South       Hegis
Code #     Program Name                                                     Degree      Campus       Campus     Campus      Code


HEALTH SCIENCES DIVISION
0545       Dental Hygiene                                                   A.A.S.                   •                      5203
0547       Dental Laboratory Technology                                     A.A.S.                              •           5204
0573       Food Service Admin. - Dietetic Tech. - Nutrition Care            A.A.S.                   •                      5404
1117       Health Information Technology                                    A.A.S.                   •                      5213
0600       Medical Laboratory Technology                                    A.A.S.                   •                      5205
0602       Medical Office Assistant                                         A.A.S.                   •                      5214
0541       Mental Health Assistant—Alcohol Counseling                       A.S.        •                                   5216
0623       Mental Health Assistant—Substance Abuse                          A.S.        •                                   5216
0622       Nursing                                                          A.A.S.      S            P                      5208.10
0665       Occupational Therapy Assistant                                   A.A.S.                   •                      5210
0549       Ophthalmic Dispensing                                            A.A.S.                   •                      5212
0669       Radiologic Technology: Radiation Therapy Technology              A.A.S.      P                                   5207
0655       Respiratory Care                                                 A.A.S.                   •                      5215

P September Admittance Only
S January Admittance

BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE DIVISION
0632       Business Administration                                          A.A.S.      •            •          •           5004
0671       Business: Business Administration (Transfer Option)              A.S.        •            •          •           5004
0640       Criminal Justice/Police                                          A.A.S.                   •                      5505
0641       Criminal Justice                                                 A.A.        •            •                      5505
0578       Culinary Arts                                                    A.O.S.      •            •                      5404
0606       Early Childhood                                                  A.A.S.      •                                   5503
1741       Emergency Management                                             A.A.S       •                       •           5508
0639       Fire Protection Technology                                       A.A.S.                              •           5507
0572       Hotel Restaurant Management                                      A.A.S.                   •                      5010
0581       Information Technology                                           A.A.S.      •            •          •           5101
0637       Office Management                                                A.A.S.      •            •          •           5005
0625       Office Technology                                                A.A.S.      •                                   5005
0691       Paralegal                                                        A.A.S.      •                                   5099
1485       Physical Education Studies                                       A.S.        •            •          •           5299.30
0609       Recreation Leadership                                            A.A.S.                              •           5506.10




                                                                                                                                      75
               E C C       2 0 0 8    -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Curr.                                                                            City          North     South    Hegis
     Code #   Program Name                                                 Degree     Campus        Campus    Campus   Code


     ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGIES DIVISION
     0538     Architectural Technology—Construction Technology             A.A.S.                             •        5317
     0525     Automotive Technology                                        A.A.S.                             •        5306
     0453     Automotive Trades: Autobody Repair                           A.A.S.                             •        5306
     0576     Building Management & Maintenance                            A.O.S.         •                            5317
     0517     Civil Engineering Technology                                 A.A.S.                   •                  5309
     0504     Computer Aided Drafting and Design Technology                A.A.S.                             •        5303
     0495     Computer Repair Technology                                   A.A.S.                             •        5105
     1788     Construction Management Engineering Technology               A.A.S.                   •                  5317
     0699     Electrical Engineering Technology                            A.A.S.                   •                  5310
     0583     Industrial Technology                                        A.O.S                    •                  5312
     0493     Mechanical Engineering Technology                            A.A.S.     •                                5315
     1022     Telecommunications Technology                                A.A.S.                             •        5310
     0677     Visual Communication Tech.—Graphic Arts & Printing           A.A.S.                             •        5009


     LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
     0501     Communication and Media Arts—Communication Arts              A.S.                               •        5008
     0532     Computer Science                                             A.S.                     •                  5101
     0530     Engineering Science                                          A.S.                     •                  5609
     0250     Liberal Arts & Science—General Studies                       A.S.       •             •         •        5649
     0201     Liberal Arts & Science—Humanities & Social Science/
              Humanities                                                   A.A.       •             •         •        5649
     0212     Liberal Arts & Science—Humanities & Social Science/
              Social Science                                               A.A.       •             •         •        5649
     1007     Liberal Arts & Science—Humanities & Social Science/
              Childhood Education 1-6                                      A.A.       •                                5649
     0220     Liberal Arts & Science—Mathematics & Science/
              Science                                                      A.S.       •             •         •        5649
     0221     Liberal Arts & Science—Mathematics & Science/
              Math                                                         A.S.                     •                  5649




76
              E C C     2 0 0 3       -   2 0 0 5   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C   •       w w w . e c c . e d u
                  CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Curr.                                                                                    City        North      South      Hegis
Code #       Program Name                                                                            Campus     Campus     Campus
1415         Baking & Pastry Arts                                                        •                                 5404
1827         Basic Police Training                                                                   •                     5505
0977         Building Trades/Residential Light Commercial                                •                                 5317
1867         Casino Gaming Machine Repair Technology                                                            •          5105
1787         Computer Applications for the Office                                                    •                     5005
1783         Court/Realtime Reporting                                                    •                                 5005
1933.CST Crime Scene Technology                                                          •           •                     5503
1353         Dental Assisting                                                                        •                     5202
0983*        Emergency Medical Technology/Paramedic*                                                            •          5299
1192         Entrepreneurship                                                            •           •          •          5004
0907         Financial Services                                                          •           •          •          5003
1470**       Geographic Information Systems Software Application Specialist                          •                     5399
0961*        Heating & Air Conditioning                                                              •                     5317
1932.HLS Homeland Security                                                               •           •                     5005
0949         Human Services                                                              •           •          •          5501
1931.ISS     Information Systems Security                                                            •                     5199
0980         Medical Office Practice                                                                 •                     5214
0935         Office Assistant                                                            •                                 5005
1330.TEA Teaching Assistant                                                              •                                 5503
1670         Web Network Technology                                                                  •                     5104
1418         Web Page Design                                                                                    •          5104

* Basic Emergency Medical Technology Certification (prerequisite for EMT/Paramedic) is offered at all three campuses
** GIS is currently offered only at North



                     SELECTION OF REQUIRED ELECTIVES
        As part of completing program requirements, students may be required to choose electives in Liberal Arts or General
           Education. The following list should be used in consultation with an academic advisor when selecting courses to meet
                     liberal arts or general education requirements.

                  ENGLISH — Any three-credit English course except EN 110, EN 111, EN 120 and EN 121

              HUMANITIES — Any three-credit course in art, dance, drama, French, music, philosophy, sign language, Spanish

          SOCIAL SCIENCE — Any three credit course in anthropology, economics, geography, government, history,
                           human services, psychology, sociology
           MATHEMATICS — Read catalog and check with your advisor for interpretation of mathematics courses that you are
                           qualified to select
       NATURAL SCIENCE — Any three-or four-credit course in astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physics

                                    Check for prerequisites or other restrictions with your advisor.
                                Some courses cannot be taken as electives by Liberal Arts science majors.




                                                                                                                                    77
               E C C     2 0 0 8       -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C        •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     ARCHITECTURAL
     TECHNOLOGY–
                                                                            Degree: Associate in Applied Science


     CONSTRUCTION
                                                                            Hegis: 5317
                                                                            Curriculum Code: 0538


     TECHNOLOGY
                                                                            Total Degree Credits: 67.0
                                                                            Campus Location: South
                                                                            Engineering & Technologies Division
     Program Description                                                    CURRICULUM
     The Architectural Technology-Construction Technology pro-
     gram provides the skills necessary to produce construction doc-                           First Year, Fall Semester
     uments for both residential and commercial projects. Emphasis          EN120              Composition and Occupational
     is placed on the graphic communications necessary for the fab-                            Communication (3 cr) or
     rication of structures.                                                EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
         The fundamental objective of the program is to prepare             EC 104             Industrial Relations (3 cr) or
     graduates for entry-level positions in architecture or in related      ______             Social Science Elective (3 cr)
     construction fields.                                                   AR 108             Arch. Graphics Lab (3 cr)
         Students are provided with a comprehensive architecture            AR 125             Codes & Standards/Lab (3 cr)
     program, which addresses code application and compliance,              AR 228             Architectural Methods &
     material selection and construction methods, structural design                            Materials/Lab (3 cr)
     and analysis, as well as architectural design, planning and
                                                                                               First Year, Spring Semester
     detailing. Coursework involves training on a variety of the latest
                                                                            MT 121             Technical Math I (4 cr) or
     computer aided design software programs, including 3D mod-
                                                                            MT 125             College Math I (4 cr)
     eling.
                                                                            PH 180             Physics (3 cr)
         Graduates of the program are prepared to assume entry-
                                                                            PH 181             Lab for PH 230 (1 cr)
     level architectural positions. However, many of the program's
                                                                            AR 211             Architecture I/Lab (3 cr)
     graduates transfer to four-year institutions for advanced
                                                                            AR 282             Applied Mechanics (3 cr)
     degrees.
                                                                            AR 342             CAD Applications in Arch/Lab (3 cr)
         To successfully complete the program, a candidate must
     maintain a 2.0 grade point average in all departmental courses.                           Second Year, Fall Semester

     Department Notes
                                                                            EN 121             Readings in Science & Literature (3 cr) or
                                                                            EN 111             Comp. & Interpretation of Literature (3 cr)
     Students are encouraged to become active in the Campus                 MT 122             Technical Math II (4 cr) or
     Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and other              MT 126             College Math II (4 cr)
     appropriate professional organizations. There is also an intern-       AR 111             Arch. Presentation/Lab (3 cr)
     ship program available in the forth semester for students who          AR 311             Architecture II /Lab (5 cr)
     wish to gain office experience. Students must meet the require-        AR 384             Applied Structural Design /Lab (3 cr)
     ments as set forth by the Architecture Technology Program.
     Night class course options are based upon student demand.                                 Second Year, Spring Semester

     Program Competencies
                                                                            AR 351             Engineering Contracts (3 cr)
                                                                            AR 411             Architectural Design/Lab (5 cr)
     Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree            AR 416             Mechanics for Buildings/Lab (3 cr)
     in Architectural Technology—Construction Technology, the               AR 418             Architectural Detailing/Lab (3 cr)
     graduate will be able to:                                              AR 432             Photography & Models /Lab (3 cr)
                                                                                               Options:
     • Use a computer with basic competency                                 AR 221             History of Arch. (3 cr)
     • Create necessary drawings required for the construction of
       both residential and commercial structures                           NOTE: This is a recommended sequence for possible employment.
     • Interpret and apply building codes; state, federal and indus-        Student should consult your academic advisor prior to registering.


                                                                            AUTOMOTIVE
       trial codes; standards and regulations



                                                                            TECHNOLOGY
     • Research products and materials in resources such as
       Sweets Catalog and manufacturer’s literature
     • Select appropriate materials for building applications

                                                                            Program Description
     • Understand construction specifications based upon the CSI
       format
     • Interpret, modify and select the appropriate contract docu-          In this age of computer-enhanced, fuel-injected automobiles, the
       ments necessary for the construction of both residential and         modern automotive technician must be knowledgeable in many
       commercial structures                                                areas to be successful. These changes in auto technology have
     • Apply the basics of a computer graphics system to specific           expanded the need for automotive technicians.
       architectural applications                                               The objective of the automotive technology curriculum is to
     • Apply principles of structural mechanics, mechanical                 prepare graduates for the challenges of the auto industry. Either
       building systems and plumbing systems                                on a full-time or part-time basis during the day or evening, stu-
                                                                            dents in this program develop the automotive expertise to work
                                                                            within this changing industry.

78
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
    The Automotive Technology curriculum provides both theo-            EN 120/EN110        Composition and Occupational
retical and practical knowledge. In automotive courses, students                            Communications (3 cr) OR College
learn about electrical systems, transmissions, transaxles, engine                           Composition (3 cr)
performance, fuel and emissions, alignment and suspension, air          MT 121              Technical Mathematics (4 cr)
conditioning and heating as well as mastering computer-assisted
                                                                                      First Year, Spring Semester
mechanisms and New York State inspection. Coursework is
                                                                        AU 320        Automotive Brakes (2 cr)
complemented with laboratory experiences in a fully-equipped,
                                                                        AU 321        Lab for AU 320 (2 cr)
up-to-date facility.
                                                                        AU 324        Manual Transmissions and Transaxles (2 cr)
    Graduates of the Automotive program are eligible for posi-
                                                                        AU 325        Lab for AU 324 (2 cr)
tions as technicians, lead technicians, assistant foremen, shop
                                                                        EN 121/EN111  Comp. and Readings in Science and
foremen, parts managers, service managers, or salespersons.

Department Notes
                                                                                      Literature (3cr) OR Comp & Interpretation
                                                                                      of Literature (3 cr)
• Registration and admission to the Automotive Technology               ––––––        Liberal Arts Elective (3 cr)
  program is processed through the South Campus Admissions              PH 190/PH 191 Basic Physics (4 cr) and Physics Lab (0 cr )
  Office.                                                                                   Second Year, Fall Semester
• All automotive students registered in labs will be required to        AU 412*             Fuel and Emissions (2 cr)
  display essential hand tools the first week of lab. The neces-        AU 413*             Lab for AU 412 (2 cr)
  sary tools will cost the student approximately $1,500-$2,500,         AU 416              Service & Parts Management (3 cr)
  depending upon the source of purchase and quality of the              AU 418*             Engine Performance (2 cr)
  tools. A list of the essential tools will be made available upon      AU 419*             Lab for AU 418 (2 cr)
  request.                                                              AU 420              Alignment and Suspension (2 cr)
• Graduates can be New York State certified vehicle safety              AU 421              Lab for AU 420 (2 cr)
  inspectors.
• The Automotive Technology Department administers the                                      Second Year, Spring Semester
  Ford Motor Company ASSET program and Chrysler CAP                     AU 414***           New York State Inspection (1 cr)
  Program. These training programs have special admissions              AU 415***           Lab for AU 414 (1 cr)
  requirements. For more information, contact the Automotive            AU 422              Air Conditioning and Heating (2 cr)
  Technology Department.                                                AU 423              Lab for AU 422 (2 cr)

Program Competencies
                                                                        AU 424**            Computer Assisted Mechanisms (2 cr)
                                                                        AU 425**            Lab for AU 424 (2 cr)
Upon graduating with an Associate in Applied Science degree in          AU 322              Automatic Transmissions and
Automotive Technology, the graduate will be able to:                                        Transaxles (2 cr)
                                                                        AU 323              Lab for AU 322 (2 cr)
• Demonstrate appropriate methods of estimating and develop-
                                                                        ––––––              Liberal Arts Elective (3 cr)
  ing repair order/invoices
• Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills
                                                                        * Prerequisites: AU 312, AU 313, AU 310 and AU 311
• Utilize current technical communication systems in diagnos-
                                                                        ** Prerequisites: AU 412, AU 413, AU 418 and AU 419
  ing and servicing vehicles
                                                                        *** New York State inspection license requires one year of related
• Demonstrate proper use of tools
                                                                        experience or one year toward completion of the A.A.S. in
• Demonstrate proper use of test equipment
                                                                        Automotive Technology. Consult your adviser before registering
• Interpret manufacturer’s specifications and perform pre-
                                                                        for AU-414.
  scribed procedures from manuals for diagnosis and repair of
  charging, starting, electrical and accessory systems; drivelines,     NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult
  differentials, clutches, manual and automatic transmissions           his/her academic adviser prior to registering.


                                                                        AUTOMOTIVE
  and transaxles; struts, torsion bars, leaf and coil suspension
  systems; fuel and emissions systems, computerized engine con-

                                                                        TECHNOLOGY
  trol systems, air conditioning and heating systems and fuel
  metering systems (including throttle body injection, port fuel
  injection and turbo charging).
                                                                        FORD ASSET OPTION

                                                                        Program Description
Degree: Associate in Applied Science
Hegis: 5306
Curriculum Code: 0525                                                   Sponsored by Ford Motor Company, the ASSET program com-
Total Degree Credits: 67.0                                              bines classroom instruction with hands-on experience in a local
Campus Location: South — Vehicle Technology Training Center             Ford or Lincoln-Mercury dealership. Students in the ASSET
Engineering & Technologies Division                                     program gain valuable real-life experience by working as actual

CURRICULUM
                                                                        employees of a modern automotive dealership service depart-
                                                                        ment. Students are paid during the dealership work experience
                   First Year, Fall Semester                            to help offset the cost of attending college. Graduates receive
AU 300             Intro to Automotive Tech. (2 cr)                     not only an Associate in Applied Science degree from Erie
AU 310             Automotive Electrical (2 cr)                         Community College but also certifications from Ford Motor
AU 311             Lab for AU 310 (2 cr)                                Company. These certifications are recognized by Ford and
AU 312             Automotive Engines (2 cr)                            Lincoln-Mercury dealerships across the country.
AU 313             Lab for AU 312 (2 cr)                                                                                                     79
               E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Department Notes                                                                          Comp. and Interpretation of Literature (3 cr)
     • Students of the ASSET program must be sponsored by a                  ______            Liberal Arts/General Education
       Ford or Lincoln/Mercury dealership. Sponsorships are coor-                              Elective (3 cr)
       dinated with the ASSET instructors at the college.                    AU 129            Ford ASSET Cooperative
     • Registration and admission to the ASSET program is                                      Work Experience (1.5 cr)
       processed through the South Campus Admissions Office.                                   First Year, Summer Semester
     • Students must have a valid drivers license to enroll in the           AU 222            Air Conditioning and Heating (2 cr)
       ASSET program.                                                        AU 223            Air Conditioning and Heating Lab (2 cr)
     • All automotive students registered in labs will be required to        AU 220            Alignment and Suspension (2 cr)
       have essential hand tools the first week of lab. The necessary        AU 221            Alignment and Suspension Lab (2 cr)
       tools will cost the student approximately $1,500-$2,500,              AU 215            New York State Inspection Lab (1 cr)
       depending upon the source of purchase and quality of the              PH 190/191        Basic Physics (4 cr) and Physics Lab (0 cr)
       tools. A list of the essential tools will be made available upon      ______            Liberal Arts/General Education
       request.                                                                                Elective (3 cr)
     • Semesters run for 10 weeks, year round.

     Program Competencies
                                                                             AU 239            Ford ASSET Cooperative
                                                                                               Work Experience (1.5 cr)
     Upon graduating with an Associate in Applied Science degree                               Second Year, Fall Semester
     in Automotive Technology, the graduate will be able to:                 AU 218            Engine Performance (2 cr)
                                                                             AU 219            Engine Performance Lab (2 cr)
     • Demonstrate appropriate methods of estimating and devel-
                                                                             AU 224            Computer Assisted Mechanisms (2 cr)
       oping repair order/invoices
                                                                             AU 225            Computer Assisted Mechanisms Lab (2 cr)
     • Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills
                                                                             AU 212            Fuel and Emissions (2 cr)
     • Utilize current technical communication systems in diagnos-
                                                                             AU 213            Fuel and Emissions Lab (2 cr)
       ing and servicing vehicles
                                                                             AU 249            Ford ASSET Cooperative
     • Demonstrate proper use of tools
                                                                                               Work Experience (1.5 cr)
     • Demonstrate proper use of test equipment
     • Interpret manufacturer’s specifications and perform pre-                                Second Year, Spring Semester
       scribed procedures from manuals for diagnosis and repair of           AU 122            Automatic Transmission/Transaxle (2 cr)
       charging, starting, electrical and accessory systems; drive-          AU 123            Automatic Transmission/Transaxle Lab (2 cr)
       lines, differentials, clutches, manual and automatic transmis-        AU 124            Manual Transmission/Transaxle (2 cr)
       sions and transaxles; struts, torsion bars, leaf and coil sus-        AU 125            Manual Transmission/Transaxle Lab (2 cr)
       pension systems; fuel and emissions systems, computerized             AU 259            Ford ASSET Cooperative
       engine control systems, air conditioning and heating systems                            Work Experience (1.5 cr)
       and fuel metering systems (including throttle body injection,
                                                                             NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should
       port fuel injection and turbo charging).
                                                                             consult his/her academic adviser prior to registering.


                                                                             AUTOMOTIVE
     Degree: Associate in Applied Science
     Hegis: 5306

                                                                             TECHNOLOGY
     Curriculum Code: 0525
     Total Degree Credits: 74.5
     Campus Location: South — Vehicle Technology Training Center
     Engineering & Technologies Division                                     CHRYSLER CAP OPTION

     CURRICULUM                                                              Program Description
                                                                             Sponsored by Chrysler Corporation, the CAP program com-
                        First Year, Fall Semester                            bines classroom instruction with hands-on experience in a local
     AU 100             Intro to Automotive Tech. (2 cr)                     Chrysler dealership. Students in the CAP program gain valuable
     AU 110             Automotive Electrical (2 cr)                         real life experience by working as actual employees of a modern
     AU 111             Automotive Electrical Lab (2 cr)                     automotive dealership service department. Students are paid
     AU 120             Automotive Brakes (2 cr)                             during the dealership work experience to help offset the cost of
     AU 121             Automotive Brakes Lab (2 cr)                         attending college. Graduates receive not only an Associate in
     EN 120/EN110       Composition and Occupational                         Applied Science degree from Erie Community College but also
                        Communications (3 cr) OR College                     certifications from Chrysler Corporation. These certifications
                        Composition (3 cr)                                   are recognized by Chrysler dealerships across the country.

                                                                             Department Notes
     MT 121             Technical Mathematics (4 cr)
     AU 119             Ford ASSET Cooperative
                        Work Experience (1.5 cr)                             • Students of the CAP program must be sponsored by a
                                                                               Chrysler dealership. Sponsorships are coordinated with the
                        First Year, Spring Semester                            CAP instructors at the college.
     AU 112             Automotive Engines (2 cr)                            • Registration and admission to the CAP program is processed
     AU 113             Automotive Engines Lab (2 cr)                          through the South Campus Admissions Office.
     AU 227             Automotive Electronics (2 cr)                        • Students must have a valid driver’s license to enroll in the
     AU 228             Automotive Electronics Lab (2 cr)                      CAP program.
     EN 121/EN111       Comp. and Readings in Science and
80                      Literature (3cr) OR

                    E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
• All automotive students registered in labs will be required to        AU 220             Alignment and Suspension (2 cr)
  have essential hand tools the first week of lab. The necessary        AU 221             Alignment and Suspension Lab (2 cr)
  tools will cost the student approximately $1,500-$2,500,              AU 215             New York State Inspection Lab (1 cr)
  depending upon the source of purchase and quality of the              PH190/PH191        Basic Physics (4 cr) and Physics Lab (0 cr)
  tools. A list of the essential tools will be made available upon      ______             Liberal Arts/General Education
  request.                                                                                 Elective (3 cr)
• Semesters run for 10 weeks, year round.                               AU 238             Chrysler CAP Cooperative Work

Program Competencies
                                                                                           Experience (1.5 cr)

Upon graduating with an Associate in Applied Science degree in                             Second Year, Fall Semester
Automotive Technology, the graduate will be able to:                    AU 218             Engine Performance (2 cr)
                                                                        AU 219             Engine Performance Lab (2 cr)
• Demonstrate appropriate methods of estimating and develop-            AU 224             Computer Assisted Mechanisms (2 cr)
  ing repair order/invoices                                             AU 225             Computer Assisted Mechanisms Lab (2 cr)
• Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills           AU 212             Fuel and Emissions (2 cr)
• Utilize current technical communication systems in diagnos-           AU 213             Fuel and Emissions Lab (2 cr)
  ing and servicing vehicles                                            AU 248             Chrysler CAP Cooperative Work
• Demonstrate proper use of tools                                                          Experience (1.5 cr)
• Demonstrate proper use of test equipment
• Interpret manufacturer’s specifications and perform pre-                                 Second Year, Spring Semester
  scribed procedures from manuals for diagnosis and repair of           AU 122             Automatic Transmission/Transaxle (2 cr)
  charging, starting, electrical and accessory systems; drivelines,     AU 123             Automatic Transmission/Transaxle
  differentials, clutches, manual and automatic transmissions                              Lab (2 cr)
  and transaxles; struts, torsion bars, leaf and coil suspension        AU 124             Manual Transmission/Transaxle (2 cr)
  systems; fuel and emissions systems, computerized engine              AU 125             Manual Transmission/Transaxle Lab (2 cr)
  control systems, air conditioning and heating systems and fuel        AU 258             Chrysler CAP Cooperative Work
  metering systems (including throttle body injection, port fuel                           Experience (1.5 cr)
  injection and turbo charging).                                        NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Students should
Degree: Associate in Applied Science                                    consult their academic adviser prior to registering.


                                                                        AUTOMOTIVE
Hegis: 5306.0


                                                                        TRADES:
Curriculum Code: 0525
Total Degree Credits: 74.5


                                                                        AUTOBODY REPAIR
Campus Location: South
Engineering & Technologies Division

CURRICULUM                                                              Program Description
                   First Year, Fall Semester                            The Automotive Trades/Autobody Repair curriculum prepares
AU 100             Intro to Automotive Tech. (2 cr)                     students for employment in the automotive industry. Students
AU 110             Automotive Electrical (2 cr)                         may study full- or part-time for an Associate Degree in Applied
AU 111             Automotive Electrical Lab (2 cr)                     Science (A.A.S.) day or part-time evening.
AU 120             Automotive Brakes (2 cr)                                 The curriculum includes the study of theory as well as practi-
AU 121             Automotive Brakes Lab (2 cr)                         cal applications of theory. Students enrolling full-or part-time in
EN 120/EN110       Composition and Occupational                         the A.A.S. program take their laboratory work in a fully
                   Communications (3 cr) OR College                     equipped, up-to-date facility at the South Campus.
                   Composition (3 cr)                                       To be admitted to the program, a student needs to follow
MT 121             Technical Mathematics (4 cr)                         the application procedures described in this catalog. Each stu-
AU 118             Chrysler CAP Cooperative Work                        dent must have his/her own basic tool kit and will be admitted
                   Experience (1.5 cr)                                  to laboratory classes only upon satisfying minimum tool require-
                                                                        ments. The approximate cost of the tools is $1,000-$1,200. A list
                   First Year, Spring Semester                          of the necessary tools will be available to the students during the
AU 112             Automotive Engines (2 cr)                            first week of classes.
AU 113             Automotive Engines Lab (2 cr)                            Graduates of the Autobody Repair program will be eligible
AU 227             Automotive Electronics (2 cr)                        for advanced degree training and positions as body technicians,
AU 228             Automotive Electronics Lab (2 cr)                    painting technicians, body shop managers, collision estimators
EN 121/EN111       Comp. and Readings in Science and                    and auto appraisers. Graduates will also be eligible for I-CAR
                   Literature (3cr) OR Comp. and                        Gold Points.

                                                                        Program Competencies
                   Interpretation of Literature (3 cr)
______             Liberal Arts/General Education
                   Elective (3 cr)                                      Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree
AU 128             Chrysler CAP Cooperative Work                        in Automotive Trades/Autobody Repair, the student will be
                   Experience (1.5 cr)                                  able to:
                   First Year, Summer Semester                          • Demonstrate appropriate methods of estimating and devel-
AU 222             Air Conditioning and Heating (2 cr)                    oping repair orders/invoices
AU 223             Air Conditioning and Heating Lab (2 cr)                                                                                    81
               E C C     2 0 0 8       -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                           BAKING &
                                                                           PASTRY ARTS
     • Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills
     • Demonstrate universal measuring devices, as well as dedicat-
       ed fixtures

                                                                           Program Description
     • Demonstrate proper use of tools
     • Properly use various welding technique
     • Demonstrate different methods of frame straightening                Special Admissions Requirements/Prerequisites:
     • Demonstrate the application of multiple painting proce-             Prospective Baking and Pastry Arts students are encouraged to
       dures                                                               take the Math Placement Test during the spring semester prior to
     • Interpret manufacturer's specifications and perform pre-            enrollment. It is strongly recommended that students testing into
       scribed procedures from manuals for diagnosis and repair of         MT001 register for and complete that class with a grade of “C”
       charging, starting, electrical, and accessory systems; struts,      or better prior to fall registration in the certificate program.
       torsion bars, leaf and coil spring suspension systems; air con-         Food preparation and service uniforms are required for all
       ditioning and heating systems; brake systems and hydraulics,        laboratories. Students may not be allowed in our inspected
       including automatic braking systems                                 kitchens without proper uniforms.
                                                                               Retail and in-store baking is a growing part of the food ser-
     Degree: Associate in Applied Science                                  vice-hospitality industry. The Retailer’s Bakery Association
     Hegis: 5306.0                                                         recently reported annual sales of more than $18 billion, which
     Curriculum Code: 0453                                                 does not include the baking done in hotels, restaurants and pri-
     Total Degree Credits: 65.0                                            vate clubs, where the clientele expects more “scratch” or “fin-
     Campus Location: South                                                ished” baked goods produced on the premises.
     Engineering & Technologies Division                                       The Baking and Pastry Arts certificate program is designed to

     CURRICULUM
                                                                           equip the student with the necessary skills to be hired in a super-
                                                                           market or retail bakery, as well as assist a Pastry Chef in a hotel,
                        First Year, Fall Semester                          restaurant, or club. Also, many students have found baking to be
     AB 130             Introduction to Autobody (2 cr)                    an ideal way to start a career or small business on a part-time
     AB 140             Detailing (2 cr)                                   basis, sometimes out of their own homes.
     AB 150             Autobody Skills I (2 cr)                               For the 120 hours of required field experience, the depart-
     AB 151             Autobody Skills I Lab (2 cr)                       ment makes every effort to place the student in the type of com-
     EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)                         mercial baking environment most closely resembling the stu-
     MT 112             Survey of Mathematics (3 cr)                       dent’s desired career path; whether it is a sophisticated club,
                                                                           small retail bake shop, larger commercial operation, or white
                        First Year, Spring Semester                        tablecloth restaurant.

                                                                           Program Competencies
     AB 210             AutoBody Skills II (2 cr)
     AB 211             Lab for AB 210 (3cr)
     AB 232             Body Welding (2 cr)                                • Successfully produce various baked goods including but not
     AB 233             Lab for AB 232 (2 cr)                                limited to: cakes, cookies, pastries, bread and rolls
     AU 330             Suspension, Alignment, and Brakes (2 cr)           • Successfully produce specialty items such as breakfast Danish,
     AU 331             Lab for AU 330 (2 cr)                                coffee cakes, brioche, traditional and contemporary plated
                        Science Elective (3-4 cr)                            desserts, ethnic cookies and wedding cakes
                                                                           • With time and practice, produce more advanced baked goods
                        Second Year, Fall Semester                           and pastries, including breads, classical cakes, tortes, tarts,
     AB 240             Refinishing (2 cr)                                   individual pastries and rustic desserts
     AB 241             Lab for AB 240 (3 cr)                              • Confidently work with chocolate, sugar, marzipan and the
     AB 242             Estimating & Shop Management (3 cr)                  like, as both ingredients and presentation media
     AU 310             Electrical (2 cr)                                  • Demonstrate a reasonable level of comfort and confidence
     AU 311             Lab for AU 310 (2 cr)                                participating in the operation of a wholesale or retail bakery
     EN 111             Composition & Interpretation of                    • Demonstrate an aesthetic sense of garnishing and food pre-
                        Literature (3 cr)                                    sentation with regard to the color, flavor and texture of baked
     ––––––             Liberal Arts Elective (3 cr)                         goods, as well as the presentation and merchandising of fin-
                        Second Year, Spring Semester                         ished products for the retail display case and buffet service
     AB 230             Frame and Unibody (2 cr)                           • Maintain a safe and sanitary environment for food prepara-
     AB 231             Lab for AB 230 (3 cr)                                tion and service
     AB 234             Accessory Service & Repair (1 cr)                  • Successfully complete the Sanitation Manager’s certification
     AB 235             Lab for AB 234 (2 cr)                                exam administered by the Educational Foundation of the
     AU 422             Heating & Air Conditioning (2 cr)                    National Restaurant Association
     AU 423             Lab for AU 422 (2 cr)                              • Accurately calculate: adjustments in recipe yields, ingredient
     ––––––             Liberal Arts Elective (3 cr)                         and recipe costs, food cost percentage, menu cost using at
                                                                             least two different pricing methods, fixed and labor costs
     NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Students should consult         • Make business decisions in the areas of restaurant marketing
     their academic adviser prior to registering.                            and finance
                                                                           • Identify and explain the use and maintenance of all major
                                                                             pieces of kitchen equipment
                                                                           • Effectively communicate verbally and in writing with superi-
                                                                             ors, peers, subordinates and customers in both work and
82                                                                           social settings
                    E C C     2 0 0 8       -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Scholarships                                                            toward a B.P.S. (Baccalaureate of Professional Studies) in
• The Statler Foundation Scholarship                                    Facilities Management, Sports Facilities Management, or
• New York State Restaurant Association Scholarship                     Business Administration. Some graduates have also transferred
• American Culinary Federation of Greater Buffalo                       to the State University of New York College at Buffalo’s
                                                                        Vocational Education Department to pursue teaching profes-
Certificate: Baking & Pastry Arts                                       sions in the trades.

                                                                        Program Competencies
Hegis: 5404
Curriculum Code: 1415
Total Certificate Credits: 32.0                                         Upon graduation with an Associate in Occupational Studies
Campus Location: City                                                   degree in Building Management and Maintenance, the graduate
Business & Public Service Division                                      will be able to:

CURRICULUM
                                                                        • Operate, maintain and troubleshoot building mechanical sys-
                                                                          tems (HVAC, electrical, power distribution, plumbing, etc)
                   First Semester                                       • Operate, maintain, and troubleshoot structural systems
HC 100             Hospitality Math (3 cr)                              • Develop operational forms for a facility
HC 208             Introduction to Baking (4 cr)                        • Develop and implement Standard Operating Procedure
HC 210             Intermediate Baking (4 cr)                             (S.O.P.) Manual
HC 212             Advanced Pastries & Cakes (4 cr)                     • Develop and implement preventive maintenance program(s)
HR 136             Sanitation (2 cr)                                    • Estimate labor, material and equipment for the maintenance
                                                                          function
                   Second Semester                                      • Manage a project, renovation, or remodeling for a facility
HC 300             Food & Labor Cost Control (3 cr)                     • Perform an energy audit and make recommendations for
HC 308             Classical Bake Shop (4 cr)                             cost effective retrofits
HC 310             Retail Bake Shop (4 cr)                              • Supervise the maintenance function—personnel, work, load
HC 312             Bake Shop Field Experience (4 cr)                      balancing, problem solving and scheduling


BUILDING
                                                                        • Develop a training program in various media formats or sub-


MANAGEMENT
                                                                          ordinates
                                                                        • Interpret and use financial and legal documents


AND MAINTENANCE
                                                                        • Demonstrate communication skills through an extensive,
                                                                          multi-format presentation—video, oral, written

Program Description
                                                                        • Interpret residential and commercial blueprints
                                                                        • Understand dynamics of management—human resources
                                                                          productivity, corrective action, cognitive/psychomotive
The Building Management and Maintenance curriculum pre-
                                                                        • Be aware of day-to-day operational considerations
pares students to assume key positions in fields of facility opera-
tions and property management. There is a great need for highly-        Degree: Associate in Occupational Studies
trained individuals to operate, manage and maintain various             Hegis: 5317
kinds of facilities both locally and nationally. The curriculum is      Curriculum Code: 0576
unique among New York State colleges in providing this techni-          Total Degree Credits: 66.5
cal and managerial training.                                            Campus Location: City
    The student will gain knowledge in the following areas: opera-      Engineering & Technologies Division

                                                                        CURRICULUM
tion of a building’s mechanical system, overview of the building
trades, managerial/supervisory skills and business practices. Our

                                                                        Full-Time Students
program aims to develop skills which are needed for planning,
scheduling and controlling the efficient operation and repair of
state-of-the-art equipment and buildings.
                                                                                           First Year, Fall Semester
    The facilities operations and property management fields will
                                                                        BM 130             Building Systems 1 (3 cr)
require a thorough understanding of the construction and main-
                                                                        BM 140             Electrical Systems 1 (3 cr)
tenance process. This is accomplished by utilizing trade specific
                                                                        BM 180             Applied Mathematics, Estimating (3 cr)
software for estimating, project management, preventative main-
                                                                        CO 101             Architectural Blueprint Reading and
tenance and computer aided drawing (CAD). The training will
                                                                                           Sketching (3 cr)
also include computer simulations which provide students both
                                                                        EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
problem-solving and troubleshooting skills. The curriculum pro-
vides hands-on activities to augment and complete the education                            First Year, Spring Semester
of the student.                                                         BM 231             Building Systems II (3 cr)
    Positions our graduates may acquire include: facilities man-        BM 237             Building and Grounds Operations (3 cr)
agers, director of building services, building inspectors, building     BM 240             Plumbing Systems (3 cr)
automation controls technicians, building engineers, property           BM 241             Electrical Systems II (3 cr)
managers, building mechanics and sales representatives for build-       BM 281             Facilities Maintenance &
ing services and products.                                                                 Environmental Topics (3 cr)
    Although this degree is designed for students entering the          BM 451             Maintenance Management
work force, there are also transfer agreements with the local col-                         Supervision (3 cr)
leges. Graduates may transfer credits to Empire State College
                                                                                                                                        83
               E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                       Second Year, Fall Semester                                             Fourth Year, Fall Semester
     BM 200            Techniques of Renovation and                       BM 231              Building Systems II (3 cr)
                       Restoration (3 cr)                                 BM 281              Facilities Maintenance and
     BM 350            Maintenance Organization (2 cr)                                        Environmental Topics (3 cr)
     BM 341            Heating Systems I (3 cr)                           EN 110              College Composition (3 cr)
     BM 342            Air Conditioning and Ventilation (3 cr)
                                                                                              Fourth Year, Spring Semester
     BU 261            Business Law I (3 cr)
                                                                          CO 102              Architectural Blueprint Reading for Building
     ______            Business Elective (Approved by BMM
                                                                                              Trades Certificate II (3 cr)
                       Dept.) OR Technical Elective (Approved
                                                                          BU 261              Business Law (3 cr)
                       by BMM Dept.) (3 cr)
                                                                                              Fifth Year, Fall Semester
                       Second Year, Spring Semester
                                                                          BM 237              Buildings & Grounds Operations (3 cr)
     BM 240            Plumbing System
                                                                          BM 429              Maintenance Programs (4 cr)
     BM 443            Heating Systems II (3 cr)
     BM 429            Maintenance Programs (4 cr)                                            Fifth Year, Spring Semester
     BM 452            Property Management ( ( 3 cr)                      BR 100              **Building Trades Practicum I (4 cr)
     BM 445            Energy Management (3 cr)                           BR 102              **Building Trades Practicum II (4 cr)
     BU 121            Accounting Principles I (4 cr) (or)
     BM 181            Budget Control and Estimating (4 cr)               **Offered on Saturdays in the fall and spring
     ______            Optional Internships (4 cr)                        Offered T/Th fall and spring
                                                                          Offered T/W/Th summer sessions 1 and 2
     NOTE: Internships are offered based on good academic standing
     and faculty recommendations.                                         NOTE: Student should follow each sequence. Student may
                                                                          enter into advanced course based on experience and education
     NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult         with department chair's permission.


                                                                          BUILDING TRADES/
     his/her academic adviser prior to registering.



                                                                          RESIDENTIAL LIGHT
     In order to be granted an associate degree, a student must
     demonstrate proficiency in Algebra at the level of MT 006.

     Part-time and Evening Students
                                                                          COMMERCIAL
                                                                          Program Description
     (Suggested sequence)
                       First Year, Fall Semester
     BM 350            Maintenance Organization (2 cr)                    As many of the nation’s buildings age, an appreciation of their
     BM 341            Heating Systems 1 (3 cr)                           worth grows. With this renewed appreciation in the value of
     BM 140            Electrical Systems 1 (3 cr)                        these treasures, there has grown a need for technicians knowl-
                                                                          edgeable in the rehabilitation and renovation field.
                       First Year, Spring Semester
                                                                             The Building Trades curriculum is a unique, hands-on and
     BM 451            Maintenance Management (3 cr)
                                                                          technical one-year certificate program. The objective is to pro-
     BM 342            Air Conditioning and Ventilation (3 cr)
                                                                          duce graduates capable of renovating and updating structures.
     BM 241            Electrical Systems II (3 cr)
                                                                             This curriculum features both classroom learning and on-site
                       Second Year, Fall Semester                         lab experiences. Specifically, in the classroom, students study
     CO 101            Architectural Blueprint Reading (3 cr)             techniques of renovation (contracting and project management),
     BM 180            Applied Mathematics and Estimating (3 cr)          blueprint reading, electrical systems, carpentry and estimating.
     _____             Business Elective (BU 315, BU 406, BU 500)         While at an on-site location, students participate in a residential
                       or approved Technical Elective (3 cr)              or multi-use renovation project.
                                                                             Graduates of the program may assume positions with build-
                       Second Year, Spring Semester                       ing restoration companies, general contractors, home inspectors,
     BM 130            Building Systems 1 (3 cr)                          or trade apprentices. In addition, many graduates transfer their
     BM 181            *Budget Control and Estimating (4 cr)              credit hours in the pursuit of an associate degree in the Building
                       *Offered SS # 1 only. Suitable for students        Management and Maintenance curriculum.
                       with math and computer experience
                                                                          Degree: Certificate
                       Third Year, Fall Semester                          Hegis: 5317
     BM 452            Property Management (3 cr)                         Curriculum Code: 0977
     BM 443            Heating Systems II (3 cr)                          Total Degree Credits: 33.0
     BU 121            Accounting Principles I (4 cr)                     Campus Location: City

                                                                          CURRICULUM
                       Third Year, Spring Semester
     BM 200            Techniques of Renovation (3 cr)
                       (Project Management)
                                                                                              First Year, Fall Semester
     BM 445            Energy Management (3 cr)
                                                                          BM 130              Building Systems I (3 cr)
                                                                          BM 140              Electrical Systems I (3 cr)
                                                                          BM 180              Applied Mathematics, Estimating I (3 cr)
                                                                          CO 101              Architectural Blueprint Reading I (3 cr)
                                                                          BR 100              Building Trades Restoration Practicum I (4 cr)
84
                    E C C    2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                   First Year, Spring Semester                          • Have a sufficient foundation in mathematics to be prepared
BM 240             Plumbing Systems (3 cr)                                to take additional courses in mathematics, accounting and
BM 181             Budget Control and Estimating (4 cr)                   business
CO 102             Architectural Blueprint Reading II (3 cr)            • Use a computer in academic and business settings
BM ___             Approved Technical Elective (3 cr)                   • Demonstrate a firm foundation in business theory
                   Choose One: BM 241, BM 341, or BM 281)               • Work effectively in a group setting
BR 102             Building Trades Restoration Practicum II (4 cr)
                                                                        Although this program primarily prepares the student for trans-
NOTE: BR 100 and BR 102 are hands-on courses offered at build-          fer to another college, the rigorous preparation will enable the
ing renovation sites throughout the local area.                         student to work in a business environment while pursuing a


BUSINESS:
                                                                        four-year degree.



BUSINESS
                                                                        Degree: Associate in Science


ADMINISTRATION
                                                                        Hegis: 5004
                                                                        Curriculum Code: 0671
                                                                        Total Degree Credits: 65.0 to 67.0
                                                                        Campus Location(s): City, North, South
(TRANSFER OPTION)

Program Description
                                                                        Business & Public Service Division

The Associate in Science degree in Business: Business                   CURRICULUM
Administration is a program which includes core business cours-                            First Year, Fall Semester
es and a significant number of general education courses. This          EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
program integrates the unique requirements of both two-year             MT 175             Calculus I (4 cr)
and four-year institutions.                                             EC 102             Macroeconomics (3 cr)
    The program’s primary objective is to attract from local high       BU 121             Accounting Principles I (4 cr)
schools those students who are primarily interested in a career in                         (Formerly BU 200)
business and who realize that they must ultimately transfer to a        BU 131             Computer Applications in Business (3 cr)
four-year institution to complete their course of study. It enables                        (Formerly BU 315)
the recently graduated high school student who has expressed an
interest in business to remain near home and experience small                              First Year, Spring Semester
classes in a very personalized academic environment for the first       EN 111             Comp. & Interpretation of Literature (3 cr)
two years of his or her post-high school education, following           MT 176             Calculus II (4 cr)
which the student will proceed to a four-year institution as a          BU 122             Accounting Principles II (4 cr)
junior.                                                                                    (Formerly BU 201)
    Students who enroll in this program will be fully prepared to       BU 151             Principles of Marketing (3 cr)
transfer to a four-year college upon graduation. They will have                            (Formerly BU 500)
taken all of the prerequisites necessary to make the transfer           BU 231             Business Systems (3 cr)
process an easy one.                                                                       (Formerly BU 316)
    This degree is not intended to provide vocational preparation                          Second Year, Fall Semester
for entry into the labor force upon graduation. Therefore, all stu-     ––––––             Science Elective, (Per adviser) (3 or 4 cr)
dents in this program should begin planning, upon enrollment at         PS 100             General Psychology (3 cr)
ECC, where they intend to transfer for the last two years.

Transfer Agreements
                                                                        EC 103             Microeconomics (3 cr)
                                                                        BU 240             Principles of Management (3 cr)
                                                                                           (Formerly BU 405)
Erie Community College’s Business Administration Department
                                                                        BU 261             Business Law I (3 cr)
has transfer agreements with most area colleges. The agreements
                                                                                           (Formerly BU 600)
facilitate the transfer of ECC business graduates into the four-
year schools. They include Alfred University, Buffalo State                                Second Year, Spring Semester
College, SUNY at Buffalo, D’Youville College, SUNY College at           MT 143             Intro. to Statistics (4 cr)
Fredonia, Canisius College, Daemen College, Hilbert College,            ______             Humanities Elective (Per adviser)
Houghton College, Medaille College and Niagara University, as                              * (3 or 4 cr)
well as Thames Valley University in London, England and                 BU 262             Business Law II (3 cr)
European University in Antwerp, Belgium.                                                   (Formerly BU 601)

Program Competencies
                                                                        ––––––             Marketing Elective (Per adviser) *(3 cr)
                                                                        BU ___             Business Elective (Per adviser) *(3 cr)
Upon graduating with an Associate in Science degree in Business:
Business Administration, the student will be able to:                   * As transfer agreements vary you must consult with your
• Be prepared to enter employment upon graduation in the                Business Administration faculty adviser prior to registering for
  business field                                                        these courses.
• Transfer to a business or accounting program at a four-year
  college/university                                                    NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should con-
• Speak and write clearly and correctly                                 sult his/her academic adviser prior to registering.
• Read critically and think logically
• Understand the basic concepts of business
                                                                                                                                           85
               E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     BUSINESS:
     BUSINESS
                                                                             • Understand the social responsibility of business


     ADMINISTRATION
                                                                             • Understand the basic concepts of business
                                                                             • Work effectively in a group setting
                                                                             Degree: Associate in Applied Science
     Program Description
                                                                             Hegis: 5004
                                                                             Curriculum Code: 0632
     Erie Community College recognizes the need to prepare its stu-          Total Degree Credits: 62.0 to 65.0
     dents for a job market in a constant state of change. An                Campus Location(s): City, North, South
     Associate in Applied Science degree is a significant first step in      Business & Public Service Division

                                                                             CURRICULUM
     securing the knowledge and skills necessary for employment or
     continued education in such a dynamic environment. We
     endeavor to offer contemporary subject matter, including state-
     of-the-art computer training and to encourage the student to                                First Year, Fall Semester
     view education as a lifelong process.                                   EN 110              College Composition (3 cr)
         The objectives of the Business Administration Department            ––––––              Math Elective (3-4 cr)
     are threefold: to prepare students for responsible entry-level          BU 121              Accounting Principles I (4 cr)
     employment in the business arena immediately following gradu-                               (Formerly BU 200)
     ation; to provide a quality education for students interested in        BU 130              Quantitative Business Methods (3 cr)
     transferring to a four-year institution for bachelor of arts or                             (Formerly BU 300)
     bachelor of science degrees and to provide continuing educa-            BU 140              Introduction to Business (3 cr)
     tion opportunities for those already working in business and                                (Formerly BU 400)
     industry.
                                                                                                 First Year, Spring Semester
         The comprehensive nature of this program prepares stu-
                                                                             BU 131              Computer Applications in Business (3 cr)
     dents for a variety of employment opportunities. Business
                                                                                                 (Formerly BU 315)
     administration students take a core of business subjects and
                                                                             BU 122              Accounting Principles II (4 cr)
     then choose four business electives. These electives allow stu-
                                                                                                 (Formerly BU 201)
     dents flexibility in exploring particular areas of interest. In addi-
                                                                             BU 151              Principles of Marketing (3 cr)
     tion, students take a variety of liberal arts, math and science
                                                                                                 (Formerly BU 500)
     courses. The degree can be completed on a full-time or part-
                                                                             EN 111              Composition & Interpretation of
     time basis, during the day or evening.
                                                                                                 Literature (3cr)
         Graduates of the program are qualified for entry-level man-
                                                                             ––––––              Math/Science Elective (3-4 cr)
     agerial positions, such as accounting clerk, auditor’s assistant,
     sales and office manager and administrative assistant.                                      Second Year, Fall Semester

     Transfer Agreements
                                                                             BU 240              Principles of Management (3 cr)
                                                                                                 (Formerly BU 405)
     Erie Community College’s Business Administration Department             BU 261              Business Law I (3 cr)
     has transfer agreements with most area colleges. The agreements                             (Formerly BU 600)
     facilitate the transfer of ECC business graduates into the four-        ––––––              Business Elective (3 cr)
     year schools. They include Alfred University, Buffalo State             ––––––              Business Elective (3 cr)
     College, SUNY at Buffalo, D’Youville College, SUNY College at           EC 102              Macroeconomics (3 cr)
     Fredonia, Canisius College, Daemen College, Hilbert College,
     Houghton College, Medaille College and Niagara University, as                               Second Year, Spring Semester
     well as Thames Valley University in London, England and                 BU 232              Business Finance (3 cr)
     European University in Antwerp, Belgium.                                                    (Formerly BU 355)

     Special Admissions Requirements/Prerequisites
                                                                             ––––––              Business Elective (3 cr)
                                                                             ––––––              Business Elective (3 cr)
     Two years of high school mathematics are recommended.                   EC 103              Microeconomics (3 cr)

     Program Competencies
                                                                             ––––––              Liberal Arts Elective (3-4 cr)

     Upon graduating with an Associate in Applied Science degree in          NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult
     Business—Business Administration, the graduate will be able to:         his/her academic adviser prior to registering.

     • Transfer to a four-year college/university                            The following are recommended courses for students who wish to
     • Be employed in entry-level managerial positions                       emphasize the accounting, marketing, or manage-
     • Develop a career in sales and marketing                               ment/supervisory skills aspect of the Business Administration
     • Interpret various accounting/financial statements                     program. Students are advised to contact academic advisers for
     • Be able to use a computer in a variety of organizational              further information.
       settings                                                                                       Management/
     • Demonstrate good reasoning and analytical skills                      Accounting               Marketing           Supervisory Skills
     • Be able to express oneself intelligently in print and orally
                                                                             BU 221                   BU 251              BU 231
     • Understand the ethical and legal foundations of business
                                                                             (Formerly BU 204)        (Formerly BU 501)   (Formerly BU 316)
                                                                             BU 222                   BU 252              BU 234
                                                                             (Formerly BU 210)        (Formerly BU 502)   (Formerly BU 360)
86
                     E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                          CASINO GAMING
                                                                          MACHINE REPAIR
BU 223                  BU 253                 BU 235


                                                                          TECHNICIAN
(Formerly BU 211)       (Formerly BU 550)      (Formerly BU 390)
BU 224                  BU 254                 BU 242
(Formerly BU 220)       (Formerly BU 551)      (Formerly BU 410)

                                                                          Program Description
BU 225                  BU 255                 BU 243
(Formerly BU 230)       (Formerly BU 552)      (Formerly BU 415)
BU 226                  BU 256                 BU 248                     With the sudden dramatic expansion of casino gaming
(Formerly BU 245)       (Formerly BU 589)      (Formerly BU 480)          machines locally and simultaneous technological change in the
                                               BU 247                     industry, a serious void exists in educational opportunities to
                                               (Formerly BU 490)          prepare for work involving repair of the equipment on which
                                               BU 241                     revenue depends. With this certificate program, Erie
                                               (Formerly BU 620)          Community College intends to assist the industry locally by cre-
                                               BU 262                     ating a recognized course of study as well as assist job seekers in
                                               (Formerly BU 601)          qualifying for positions.
                                                                              This program is designed to provide education and training
*NOTE: A student may use an interdisciplinary approach by select-         in the repair and maintenance of casino gaming machines. Its
ing courses from any business course not required, to fulfill the         purpose is to prepare individuals for jobs as technicians who
business elective requirements.                                           will service this sophisticated electronic equipment in the gam-
Recommended Part-Time Sequence
                                                                          ing industry. Students may include persons new to the industry,

in Business Administration
                                                                          as well as employees already in the industry who may wish to
                                                                          upgrade their skills. Individuals already working as electronic
Semester One                                                              technicians may wish to add a new skill set. Moreover, it will
  English*                                                                make possible another career alternative for students in the
  Introduction to Business                                                Computer Repair Technology program.
Semester Two                                                                  The design of the program recognizes that the CGM Repair
  English                                                                 Technician is essentially a computer repair technician and
  Quantitative Business Methods                                           builds upon the courses comprising the first year of Computer
Semester Three                                                            Repair Technology. Then it adds the missing elements in an
  Accounting Principles I                                                 additional CGM System Maintenance course. It is a 25-credit
  Macroeconomics                                                          hour program, designed for full-or part-time study – two
Semester Four                                                             semesters full-time or three semesters part-time. The first half
  Accounting Principles II                                                of the curriculum includes mathematics, recognition of compo-
  Computer Applications in Business                                       nents, circuit testing and safety issues. The second half deals
Semester Five                                                             with advanced electronic skills, computer logic and micro-
  Microeconomics                                                          processors. Electronic troubleshooting is featured in the new
  Principles of Marketing                                                 course.

                                                                          Department Notes
Semester Six
  Business Law I
  Liberal Arts Elective*                                                  The Casino Gaming Machine Repair Technician program is
Semester Seven                                                            built from the content of the Computer Repair Technology
  Business Elective*                                                      program, but does not replace it. However, it does meet the
  Math Elective*                                                          required courses for a portion of the first year requirements.

                                                                          Prerequisite
Semester Eight
  Business Finance
  Business Elective*                                                      Pre-testing of students will be used to determine entry
Semester Nine                                                             requirements. Students who do not test at MT 007 or higher
  Principles of Management                                                will be given an opportunity to take developmental math
  Business Elective*                                                      before entry into the program in order to insure every oppor-
                                                                          tunity for success.

                                                                          Program Competencies
Semester Ten
  Business Elective*
  Math or Science Elective*
                                                                          • Use the resistor color code and component recognition
*Consult with academic advisers.                                          • Demonstrate electronic soldering and terminating wire con-
                                                                            nections using solderless type connectors
NOTE: Students should be aware that special electives may not be          • Demonstrate using electronic test instrumentation dual
offered each semester. The above sequence, assuming two courses             trace scopes, frequency counters and function generators
per semester, enables students to finish in 10 semesters. Students        • Demonstrate troubleshooting half-wave, full-wave and
are free to accelerate with the understanding that they may not per-        bridge power supplies.
form satisfactorily if they do not allow adequate time for out-of-        • Student will be able to troubleshoot and repair voltage
class study. Inquiries should be directed to the chairperson of the         doublers
business administration department.                                       • Prototype multistage analog and digital circuits, check these
                                                                            circuits for normal operation and design and construct cir-
                                                                            cuit boards for these circuits
                                                                                                                                                87
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     • Design, construct and test digital logic circuits to meet the        the solutions to the problems facing the construction team,
       demands of any four input logic circuits                             including the owner, surveyor, architect, engineer, building
     • Demonstrate basic theory and architecture of computer                product supplier and contractor.
       systems                                                                  The program encourages professional office practice stan-
     • Interact with a computer system to assess its performance            dards in both the lecture and lab experiences. Through lecture
     • Disassemble and reassemble mechanical components of                  courses, students probe surveying, manual and Computer Aided
       computer systems and adjust for proper operation                     Design (CAD) drafting, structural steel design, reinforced con-
     • Isolate system malfunction by relating program execution to          crete design, highway design and computer applications. These
       specific groups of circuits                                          classes are supplemented by laboratory experiences. Students,
     • Use system software to generate, operate and maintain pro-           having regular access to state-of-the-art equipment, including
       gram logos to identify failed system components                      micro-computers, survey programs, printers, plotters, micro-
     • Demonstrate power system operation                                   based CAD equipment, electronic planimeters, COGO survey
     • Isolate data communications system faults to specific subsys-        programs, electronic distance measuring equipment, automatic
       tems                                                                 levels and theodolites, are expected to produce calculations and
                                                                            reports that meet professional standards.
     Degree: Certificate
                                                                                A minimum grade point average of 2.0 is required for gradua-
     Proposed HEGIS Code: 5105
                                                                            tion with an A.A.S. degree in civil engineering technology.
     Curriculum Code: 1867
                                                                            Graduates of the program may continue on toward a B.S. degree
     Total Degree Credits: 25 credits
                                                                            at various universities or find employment with material testing
     Campus Location: South
                                                                            and inspection firms; private and governmental engineering,
     CURRICULUM
                                                                            design and surveying agencies; architectural firms; contracting
                                                                            firms and construction material and equipment suppliers.

                                                                            Accreditation
                        First Semester
     MT 112             Survey of Mathematics (3 cr)
     CE 140             Technology Methods (2 cr)                           Nationally accredited through the Technology Accreditation
     CE 141             Lab for CE 140 (1 cr)                               Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and
                                                                            Technology (TAC/ABET).

                                                                            Special Admissions Requirements/Prerequisites
     CE 142             Electrical Circuits (4 cr)
     CE 143             Lab for CE 142 (1 cr)
     CP 165             Computer Applications for
                                                                            It is recommended that students have at least three years of high
                        Computer Technicians (2 cr)
                                                                            school mathematics and science, as well as basic drafting.
                        Second Semester                                         Students who are required to take remedial math and/or
     CE 240             Computer Logic (3 cr)                               English courses will be scheduled for the pre-civil engineering
     CE 241             Logic Lab (1 cr)                                    technology sequence. Additional term(s) of coursework may be
     CE 242             Computer Electronics (3 cr)                         required in order to make up deficiencies.

                                                                            Scholarship Opportunity
     CE 243             Electronics Lab (1 cr)
     CE 280             CGM System Maintenance (4 cr)


     CIVIL
                                                                            APWA - American Public Works Association
                                                                            NYSETA – New York State Engineering Technology Association

                                                                            Program Competencies
     ENGINEERING
     TECHNOLOGY
                                                                            Upon graduating with an Associate in Applied Science degree in
                                                                            Civil Engineering Technology, the graduate will be able to:

     Program Description
                                                                            • Use micro-computers for problem solving utilizing commer-
                                                                              cial software
     While civil engineers plan, design and construct various struc-        • Analyze and design structural members of steel and concrete
     tures including all civic facilities, commercial buildings and           for buildings
     highways, the civil engineering technician assists the profession-     • Take and record accurate measurements with surveying
     al engineer in the accomplishments of these tasks. There is an           equipment and complete various engineering layouts
     urgent and continuing local need for civil engineering technolo-       • Construct multi-view engineering drawings (convention-
     gy graduates to support the enormous investment in moderniz-             al/CAD)
     ing the infrastructure of the local community. There is a current      • Design and layout curves, drainage and geometry for basic
     shortage and demand for trained personnel by governmental                highway projects
     and private sector design agencies as well as construction con-        • Perform and record results of various ASTM standard tests
     tractors. The demand for civil engineering technicians exceeds           for construction materials, with special emphasis on concrete
     the annual number of graduates. ECC is the only institution in         • Identify soil materials, perform various ASTM and AASHTO
     Western New York offering this program.                                  standard soil tests and write reports on test findings
         The objective of the Civil Engineering Technology pro-             • Understand and interpret the requirements of construction
     gram is to provide basic training in the concepts fundamental            contracts and specifications as they relate to the construction
     to the development, design and construction of commercial,               process
     industrial and public structures, utilities and highways.              • Prepare plans for water and wastewater facilities from designs
     Students develop a clear understanding of the problems and               prepared by the engineers
                                                                            • Inspect various phases of a building construction project for
                                                                              conformance with plans and specifications
88
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
• Analyze population trends, compute population projections
  and analyze/prepare reports on the processes and operations
                                                                       Part-Time Students
  of water treatment plants and sewage treatment plants                                  Fall Semester (first year)
• Analyze hydrostatic forces and pipe flow                             CI 120            Application for Digital Computer ( 2 cr)
                                                                       CI 121            Lab for CI 120 (1 cr)
Degree: Associate in Applied Science
                                                                       MT 122            Technical Mathematics II (4 cr) or
Hegis: 5309
                                                                       MT 126            College Mathematics II (4 cr)
Curriculum Code: 0517
Total Degree Credits: 71                                                                 Spring Semester (first year)
Campus Location: North                                                 CI 172            Surveying I (1 cr)
Engineering & Technologies Division                                    CI 173            Lab for CI 172 (2 cr)

CURRICULUM
                                                                       CI 190            Engineering Mechanics (3 cr)


Full-Time Students
                                                                                         Fall Semester (second year)
                                                                       PH 260            Technical Physics I (4 cr)
                                                                       PH 261            Lab for PH 260 (0 cr)
                  First Year, Fall Semester                            CI 216            Engineering Drafting (2 cr)
MT 122            Technical Mathematics II (4 cr) or                   CI 217            Lab for CI 216 (1 cr)
MT 126            College Mathematics II (4 cr)
PH 260            Technical Physics I (4 cr)                                             Spring Semester (second year)
PH 261            Lab for PH 260 (0 cr)                                GL or PH          Tech Physics II or
CI 120            Application of Digital Computer (2cr)                                  Physical Geology (4 cr) *
CI 121            Lab for CI 120 (1 cr)                                MT 171            Elements of Calc/Tech. Applica. (4 cr)
CI 172            Surveying I (1 cr)                                                     Fall Semester (third year)
CI 173            Lab for CI 172 (2 cr)                                CI 274            Surveying II (1 cr)
CI 190            Engineering Mechanics (3 cr)                         CI 275            Lab for CI 274 (2 cr)
                  First Year, Spring Semester                          CI 291            Strength of Materials (3 cr)
MT 171            Elements of Calculus/Technical Applic. (4 cr)                          Spring Semester (third year)
–––––             Technical Physics II or                              EN 110            College Composition (3 cr) or
                  Physical Geology* (4 cr)                             EN 120            Comp. & Occupational
–––––             Lab for PH 262 or GL 160* (0 cr)                                       Communication (3 cr)
CI 216            Engineering Drafting (2 cr)                          CI 326            Computer Aided Drafting I (3 cr)
CI 217            Lab for CI 216 (1 cr)                                CI 260            Estimating for Engineers (3 cr)
CI 274            Surveying II (1 cr)
CI 275            Lab for CI 274 (2 cr)                                                  Fall Semester (fourth year)
CI 291            Strength of Materials (3 cr)                         CI 392            Structural Steel Design (3 cr)
                                                                       CI 332            Materials Testing (2 cr)
                  Second Year, Fall Semester                           CI 333            Lab for CI 332 (1 cr)
EN 110            College Composition (3 cr) or
EN 120            Comp. & Occupational                                                   Spring Semester (fourth year)
                  Communication (3 cr)                                 EN 111            Comp. & Interpretation of Lit. (3 cr) or
CI 326            Computer Aided Drafting I (3 cr)                     EN 121            Comp. & Reading in Science & Lit. (3 cr)
CI 332            Materials Testing ( 2 cr)                            CI 388            Soils and Foundations (2 cr)
CI 333            Lab for CI 332 ( 1 cr)                               CI 389            Lab for CI 388 (1 cr)
CI 260            Estimating for Engineers (3 cr)                                        Fall Semester (fifth year)
CI 388            Soils and Foundations (2 cr)                         CI 412            Highway Design (2 cr)
CI 389            Lab for CI 388 ( 1 cr)                               CI 413            Lab for CI412 (1 cr)
CI 392            Structural Steel Design (3 cr)                       CI 461            Contracts/Specifications/ Management (3 cr)
                  Second Year, Spring Semester                                           Spring Semester (fifth year)
EN 111            Composition and Interpretation (3 cr) or             CI 493            Reinforced Concrete Design (3 cr)
EN 121            Composition and Reading in Science                   CI 496            Hydraulics & Hydrology (4 cr)
                  & Literature (3 cr)                                  –––––             Social Science Elective (3 cr)
CI 412            Highway Design (2 cr)
CI 413            Lab for CI 412 (1 cr)                                NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult
CI 461            Contracts/Specifications/ Management (3 cr)          his/her academic adviser prior to registering.

                                                                       Evening Students
CI 493            Reinforced Concrete Design (3 cr)
CI 496            Hydraulics & Hydrology (4 cr)
–––––             Social Science Elective (3 cr)                       Evening students should follow the part-time student sequence.
*Student has option to enroll in physics or geology
PH 262            Technical Physics II (4 cr)
PH 263            Lab for PH 262 (0 cr)
GL 160            Physical Geology (4 cr)
GL 161            Lab for GL 160 (0 cr)
                                                                                                                                        89
               E C C    2 0 0 8        -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     COMMUNICATION
     AND MEDIA ARTS—
                                                                                                  Second Year, Fall Semester


     COMMUNICATION
                                                                             CA 210               The Language of Vision & Sound (3 cr)
                                                                             ______               Film Analysis Elective* (3 cr)


     ARTS
                                                                             EN 426               Interpersonal Communication (3 cr)
                                                                             TE 222               Television Production (4 cr)
                                                                             ______               LA/General Education/4 (3)
     Program Description                                                                          Second Year, Spring Semester
     The Communication and Media Arts—Communication Arts                     CA 221               Writing for Media (3 cr)
     curriculum is designed to prepare students for employment               EN 410               Public Speaking (3 cr)
     and/or transfer opportunities in the fields of broadcasting (tele-      ––––––               Image Making Elective ** (3 cr)
     vision and radio), business, education, the arts and other mass         ––––––               LA/General Education/4 (3-6 cr)
     media related activities such as journalism, advertising, public        ––––––               LA/General Education/4 (3 cr)
     relations and film/video production.                                    * Students must select at least one of the following courses to fulfill
         The program consists of a selection of core communication           the Film Analysis Elective:
     and media courses that introduce students to the expansive
     range of disciplines within the communication field. Advance            EN 285               Introduction to Film (3 cr)
     media courses allow for a more professional focus. The core             EN 280               Literature and Film (3 cr)
     communication courses are complimented by a wide array of               EN 286               Contemporary Cinema (3 cr)
     electives that allow students to emphasize a particular area of         CA 998               Topics in Film (3 cr)
     their academic pursuits. The curriculum sequence is intended
                                                                             ** Students must select at least one of the following courses to ful-
     to educate students in the fundamentals of communication
                                                                             fill the Image Making Elective:
     while remaining flexible enough for students to personalize
     their studies.                                                          AT 200               Art Drawing
         Communication and Media Arts–Communication Arts con-                AT 210               Painting
     sists of 64.5 - 65.5 credit hours distributed over a four-semester      AT 220               Photography
     sequence, beginning with introductory courses followed by pro-          AT 260               Computer Art Design
     fessional courses and advanced electives. Subsequent studies            CA 295               Video Postproduction
     would follow at either public or private four-year institutions         CA 299               Internship (permission of Department
     and, in particular, those with whom ECC has initiated articula-                              Chairperson required)
     tion agreements.

     Program Competencies
                                                                             1. Student placement in an appropriate English course depends
                                                                             upon academic advisement and the results of a reading and
     Upon graduation with an Associate in Science degree in                  writing placement test.
     Communication and Media Arts—Communication Arts, the                    2. MT 112, MT 116, MT 125 or higher will fulfill the math
     graduate will obtain competencies as outlined by the college’s          requirement. Student placement in an appropriate mathematics
     Liberal Arts Division.                                                  course depends upon academic advisement and the results of a
     Degree: Associate in Science                                            mathematics pretest. Remedial mathematics courses cannot be
     Hegis: 5008                                                             used for degree credit.
     Curriculum Code: 0501                                                   3. Social Science: Anthropology (AN), Social Science (SS),
     Total Degree Credits: 64.5                                              Sociology (SO), Economics (EC), Geography (GP), Government
     Campus Location: South                                                  (GO), History (HI), Psychology (PS), Human Service (HU).
     Liberal Arts Division

     CURRICULUM
                                                                             4. Humanities and Arts: (EN 210-999), Music (MU), Dance
                                                                             (DA), Drama-Theatre (DT), Art (AT), Philosophy (PY), French
                                                                             (FR), Spanish (SP). Natural Sciences: Astronomy (AS), Biology
                        First Year, Fall Semester                            (BI), Chemistry (CH), Physics (PH), American History/Western
     EN 110             College Composition/1 (3 cr)                         Civilization (HI).


                                                                             COMPUTER AIDED
     MT ––              Mathematics/2 (3-4 cr)
     EN 290             Introduction to Mass Media (3 cr)


                                                                             DRAFTING/DESIGN
     CA 120             Introduction to Rhetoric (3 cr)


                                                                             TECHNOLOGY
     ––––––             LA/General Education Elective (3 cr)
                        First Year, Spring Semester

                                                                             Program Description
     EN 111             Composition and Interpretation
                        of Literature (3 cr)
     CA 121             Communication Theory (3 cr)
                                                                             Every high school graduate has an opportunity for a rewarding
     CA 220             Introduction to Broadcasting (3 cr)
                                                                             and progressive Computer Aided Drafting/Design (CAD)
     CS 101             Computer Literacy (3 cr)
                                                                             career. The curriculum has been designed to accommodate
     ––––––             LA/General Ed. Elective (3 cr)
                                                                             individuals who are high school graduates or equivalent and
     ––––––             LA/General Ed. Elective/3 (3 cr)
                                                                             who have a desire to become part of the CAD profession in the
                                                                             challenging field of technology.


90
                    E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C        •   w w w . e c c . e d u
    The first two semesters are designed to provide entry-level        DF 107             Tech Graphics II w/AutoDesk Inventor (4 cr)
courses in keeping with the New York State Education                   DF 230             Intro to Solid Works (2 cr)
Department requirements towards an Associate in Applied
                                                                                          Second Year, Fall Semester
Science degree in Computer Aided Drafting and Design
                                                                       ME 114             Analytical Mechanics (3 cr)
Technology. In the last two semesters, students are guided into a
                                                                       DF 213             Electronic Drafting (1.5 cr)
concentrated field of Computer Aided Design including a variety
                                                                       DF 150             Matls & Proc In Mfg (4 cr)
of different 3D software packages. The overall program provides
                                                                       DF 222             3D Autocad (2 cr)
the student with a broad assortment of different drawing experi-
                                                                       DF 479             Systems Piping (2 cr)
ences in diverse areas of study. Upon completion of this broad
                                                                       DF 480             Descript Graphics I (2 cr)
and comprehensive training in CAD, the student will be qualified
                                                                       DF 481             Lab for DF 480 (1 cr)
to accept job opportunities in support of engineers and designers.
                                                                       DF 235             Intro to Pro Engineer (2 cr)
    Graduates will be able to assume positions as designers or
CAD operators working with and supporting engineers and engi-                             Second Year, Spring Semester
neering departments.                                                   DF 200             Intro to Finite Element Anal. (3cr)
Program Competencies
                                                                       DF 315             Mechanical Drafting Strength of
                                                                                          Materials (3 cr)
Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree            DF 482             Descript Graphics II (2 cr)
in Computer Aided Drafting and Design, the graduate will be            DF 483             Lab for DF 482 (1 cr)
able to:                                                               DF 490             Architectural Drafting (2 cr)
• Draw, dimension and interpret basic mechanical working               DF 496             Structural Drafting (2.5 cr)
  drawings                                                             ME 484             Geometric Dimensioning &
• Prepare accurate and concise technical reports                                          Tolerancing (1 cr)
• Demonstrate with explanation the metallurgical properties of         ME 485             Lab for ME 484 (1 cr)
  materials, including plastics, be familiar with manufacturing        MG 437             Industrial Analysis (2 cr)
  processes and machine tools and have an awareness of prod-           NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult
  uct safety and reliability                                           his/her academic adviser prior to registering.
• Develop technical illustrations
• Develop working drawings from engineering flow sheets and            Internships are unique opportunities for students to gain valu-
  utilize standard piping symbols                                      able experience while in school. Potential employment opportu-
• Perform basic engineering calculation                                nities exist upon successful completion of internship/co-op pro-
• Apply geometric tolerancing and true positioning to a draw-          gram and graduation. Other internship/co-ops are available at
  ing using the current ANSI Code Y-14.5                               Fisher-Price, MOOG, along with several local engineering
• Demonstrate skills to design, draw and interpret basic wood          firms.
  frame construction                                                       For more information contact the department chair/adviser
• Draw, dimension and interpret structural detailing                   or call the ECC Internship Office at (716) 851-1800.


                                                                       COMPUTER
• Describe and construct an electrical/electronic drawing using


                                                                       APPLICATIONS
  standard symbols
• Be able to research, interpret and present technical information


                                                                       FOR THE OFFICE
• Demonstrate with explanation the basic operation of CAD
  (Computer Aided Design) and using commands, create two


                                                                       Program Description
  dimensional working drawings
• Analyze with explanation the industrial working environment
  as it relates to management structure, work ethics and safety
                                                                       The Computer Applications for the Office certificate program
Degree: Associate in Applied Science                                   provides students with office and computer skills to meet the
Hegis: 5303                                                            workplace needs in Western New York. Students develop
Curriculum Code: 0504                                                  entry-level office and computer skills or upgrade their current
Total Degree Credits: 63.0                                             skills for employment or advancement. Students who complete
Campus Location: South                                                 the required computer courses may qualify to take the
Engineering & Technologies Division                                    Microsoft Office Specialist certification exams.

CURRICULUM
                                                                           The certificate also provides opportunities for lifelong learn-
                                                                       ing, transfer preparation, career enhancement and job place-
                                                                       ment by offering coursework that is continuously assessed,
                   First Year, Fall Semester
                                                                       serves the needs of a diverse student population and facilitates
MT 121/125         Math (4 cr)
                                                                       the acquisition of general education competencies necessary for
EN 120/110         English (3 cr)
                                                                       competing in a changing economic climate. Courses completed
______             Social Science Elective (3 cr)
                                                                       in the Computer Applications for the Office program can be
DF 106             Tech. Graphics I w/ AutoCAD (4 cr)
                                                                       applied to a degree in Office Management or Liberal Arts and
CE 890             Basic Electricity (3 cr)
                                                                       Science—General Studies. The certificate allows students to
                   First Year, Spring Semester                         complete the required courses through distance learning or in a
MT 122             Math (4 cr)                                         traditional seated classroom.
EN 121/111         English (3 cr)
PH 190             Physics (4 cr)
PH 191             Lab for PH 190                                                                                                            91
               E C C     2 0 0 8       -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Program Competencies                                                        The Computer Repair Technology curriculum is designed to
     Upon graduation with a certificate in Computer Applications             provide the knowledge and skills required in the maintenance
     for the Office, the graduate will be able to:                           and repair of computer equipment and systems. In this curricu-
     • Utilize current software programs for word processing,                lum, students learn basic electronics, semiconductor applications,
         spreadsheets, databases, presentations, communications,             integrated circuits, digital logic, computer programming and
         graphics and operating system applications                          computer repair. Troubleshooting of individual logic devices and
     • Be skilled in new and emerging technology including use of            computer systems completes the students’ study. Graduates of
         the Internet, intranets, e-mail and Web site design                 this curriculum are qualified to maintain all types of computer
     • Apply appropriate mathematical procedures and quantita-               hardware, write computer programs, isolate and diagnose com-
         tive methods                                                        puter system breakdowns, etc.
     • Write correctly and effectively                                           Computer Repair Technology graduates may pursue careers
     • Listen and speak effectively                                          in field service, manufacturing, engineering, software develop-
                                                                             ment, sales, or technical writing.

                                                                             Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
     • Demonstrate the ability to read critically
     • Demonstrate critical thinking and analytical reasoning skills
     Degree: SUNY Certificate                                                Applicants should have three units of high school mathematics
     Hegis: 5005                                                             (including trigonometry and intermediate algebra) and two units
     Curriculum Code: 1787                                                   of high school science (physics is preferred).

                                                                             Scholarships
     Total Degree Credits: 30-31
     Campus Location: North

     CURRICULUM
                                                                             The Albert Adams Memorial Scholarship: Monetary amounts to
                                                                             be presented annually to students on the basis of need and acade-
                                                                             mic achievement.

                                                                             Program Competencies
                        First Year, Fall Semester
     OF 102             College Keyboarding (3 cr)
     OF 121             MS Vista (1 cr) OR                                   • Use the resistor color code and component recognition
     OF 122             MS Outlook (1 cr)                                    • Demonstrate electronic soldering and terminating wire con-
     OF 124             MS PowerPoint (1 cr)                                   nections using solderless type connectors
     OF 125             MS Word Level 1 (1 cr)                               • Demonstrate using electronic test instrumentation dual trace
     OF 135             MS Word Level 2 (1 cr)                                 scopes, frequency counters and function generators
     OF 126             MS Excel Level 1 (1 cr)                              • Demonstrate troubleshooting half-wave, full-wave and bridge
     OF 136             MS Excel Level 2 (1 cr)                                power supplies
     OF 140             Business English (3 cr)                              • Student will be able to troubleshoot and repair voltage dou-
     OF 162             Internet Access & Research (3 cr)                      blers
                                                                             • Prototype multistage analog and digital circuits, check these
                        First Year, Spring Semester
                                                                               circuits for normal operation and design and construct circuit
     OF 127             MS Access Level 1 (1 cr)
                                                                               boards for these circuits
     OF 137             MS Access Level 2 (1 cr)
                                                                             • Design, construct and test digital logic circuits to meet the
     OF 139             Integrated MS Office (2 cr)
                                                                               demands of any four input logic circuits
     EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
                                                                             • Demonstrate basic theory and architecture of computer sys-
     ______             General Education Elective (3 cr)
                                                                               tems
     ______             Math Elective (3 cr)
                                                                             • Interact with a computer system to assess its performance
     ______             Office Management & Admin. Elective (3 cr)
                                                                             • Disassemble and reassemble mechanical components of com-
     OF164 can be substituted for OF124, OF125, OF126, and                     puter systems and adjust for proper operation
     OF127.                                                                  • Isolate system malfunction by relating program execution to


     COMPUTER
                                                                               specific groups of circuits
                                                                             • Use system software to generate, operate and maintain pro-

     INFORMATION
                                                                               gram logos to identify failed system components


     SYSTEMS
                                                                             • Demonstrate power system operation
                                                                             • Isolate data communications system faults to specific sub-
                                                                               systems
     (December 2007 – Renamed Information Technology)                        Degree: Associate in Applied Science


     COMPUTER REPAIR
                                                                             Hegis: 5105
                                                                             Curriculum Code: 0495

     TECHNOLOGY
                                                                             Total Degree Credits: 70.5
                                                                             Campus Location: South

     Program Description
                                                                             Engineering & Technologies Division

     Computers have revolutionized every facet of American life.             CURRICULUM
     From computerized billing systems to automatic tellers, the                                First Year, Fall Semester
     advancement of computerized devices has created the need for            EN 110             College Composition (3 cr) or
     competent technicians to service this modern technology.                EN 120             Comp. & Occupational Communication (3 cr)
                                                                             MT 121             Technical Math I (4 cr) or
92
                    E C C     2 0 0 8    -   2 0 1 0        •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
MT 125             College Mathematics I (4 cr)                            The Computer Science degree program at Erie Community
CE 140             Technology Methods (2 cr)                           College is a Liberal Arts program which provides the course-
CE 141             Lab for CE 140 (1 cr)                               work necessary for the first two years of a four-year degree in
CE 142             Electrical Circuits (4 cr)                          Computer Science. The primary goal of the computer science
CE 143             Lab for CE 142 (1 cr)                               curriculum is to prepare students to transfer to four-year institu-
CP 165             Computer Applications for Computer                  tions as third-year students in a computer science program.
                   Technicians (2 cr)                                      Computer science courses require a firm understanding of
                                                                       critical issues and concepts of computer science: problem analy-
                   First Year, Spring Semester
                                                                       sis, data abstraction, algorithm development, program imple-
EN 111             Comp. and Interpretation
                                                                       mentation, testing and validation, computer organization and
                   of Literature (3 cr) or
                                                                       basic system control. Other courses in the curriculum focus on
EN 121             Comp. & Reading in Science & Lit. (3 cr)
                                                                       skills needed for essential activities such as communicating,
MT 122             Technical Math II (4 cr) or
                                                                       designing logical programs, working as a member of a project
MT 126             College Mathematics II (4 cr)
                                                                       team and understanding potential areas of application. All com-
______             Science Elective (3 cr) *
                                                                       puter science courses have both lecture and lab components. In
CE 240             Digital Logic I (3 cr)
                                                                       computer labs, students analyze problems and then proceed to
CE 241             Lab for CE 240 (1 cr)
                                                                       design, write and debug computer programs. The computer
CE 242             Electronics I (3 cr)
                                                                       languages and methodology taught are those currently
CE 243             Lab for CE 242 (1 cr)
                                                                       employed by practicing professionals. Studying computer sci-
SO 100             Introduction to Sociology (3 cr) *
                                                                       ence demands a substantial time commitment; therefore, stu-
                   Second Year, Fall Semester                          dents should be prepared to spend a considerable amount of
CE 202             Micro Controllers Lab (1 cr)                        time in the lab.

                                                                       Admission Requirements
CE 340             Digital Logic II (3 cr)
CE 341             Lab for CE 340 (1 cr)
CP 210             Computer Processors (3 cr)                          The Computer Science curriculum requires a strong math back-
CP 215             Lab for CP 210 (1 cr)                               ground. Three years of high school math (to include intermedi-
CP 220             Peripherals I (3 cr)                                ate algebra and trigonometry) and one year of science are
CP 223             Lab for CP 220 (1 cr)                               required for admission. A fourth year of math and a year of
CP 230             Microprocessor Applications (3 cr)                  physics are strongly recommended. Students should be profi-
                                                                       cient in English language usage.

                                                                       Program Competencies
CP 233             Lab for CP 230 (1 cr)
                   Second Year, Spring Semester
CE 342             Electronics II (2 cr)                               Upon graduation with an Associate in Science degree in
CE 343             Lab for CE 342 (1 cr)                               Computer Science, the graduate will be able to:
CP 250             Data Communications & Interfacing (3 cr)            • Identify all the steps of the software system life cycle and
CP 251             Lab for CP 250 (1.5 cr)                               perform problem analysis, the top-down step-wise refine-
CP 260             System Maintenance (3 cr)                             ment design process, coding and testing
CP 265             Lab for CP 260 (1 cr)                               • Write, execute and debug programs in high-level languages,
CP 270             Peripherals II (3 cr)                                 an assembly language and hybrid programs
CP 273             Lab for CP 270 (1 cr)                               • Explain the concept of an abstract data type and design such
                                                                         data types for use in programs
* Student should consult with his/her adviser
                                                                       • Apply efficiency measures to algorithms and abstract data
NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult             types and to interpret the results
his/her academic adviser prior to registering.                         • Describe and explain the main components of a computer,


COMPUTER
                                                                         their organization and functionality, as well as system control
                                                                         concepts, computer memory organization and management,


SCIENCE
                                                                         addressing modes, internal representation of programs and
                                                                         data, assemblers and compilers

Program Description
                                                                       • Write technical documents with an emphasis on good com-
                                                                         position and communication skills. This includes documenta-
                                                                         tion that is internal to computer programs and external docu-
Computer science is the study of the computing process and the
                                                                         mentation such as user manuals and programmer manuals
fundamental algorithms, structures and languages that underlie
that process. There is an increasing need for experimental work,       Degree: Associate in Science
and the application of computing science to other fields is unlim-     Hegis: 5101
ited. It is this blend of theory and practice that makes computer      Curriculum Code: 0532
science so exciting.                                                   Total Degree Credits: 60.0
    Programming is an indispensable tool in engineering, technol-      Campus Location: North
ogy and many other scientific and technical fields. However,           Liberal Arts Division
programming is a means to explore the processes of reasoning
that is found between and among several different programming
languages. Computer science also concentrates on areas such as
artificial intelligence, graphics, distributed systems, robotics,
machine vision, numerical analysis and applications of computing
in other fields.                                                                                                                             93
               E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     CURRICULUM                                                         The student should check with the appropriate department concern-
                                                                        ing the semester in which the above courses may be offered.


                                                                        CONSTRUCTION
                       First Year, Fall Semester
     MT 181            Calculus & Analytic Geometry I* (4 cr)


                                                                        MANAGEMENT
     CS 121            Computer Science I (4 cr)


                                                                        ENGINEERING
     EN 110            College Composition (3 cr)
     ––––––            Elective (3-4 cr)

                                                                        TECHNOLOGY
                       First Year, Spring Semester
     MT 182            Calculus & Analytic Geometry II* (4 cr)

                                                                        Program Description
     CS 132            Computer Science II (4 cr)
     EN 111            Comp. and Interpretation of Literature (3 cr)
     ––––––            Elective (3-4 cr)                                No other country matches the United States in new construction pro-
                                                                        jects. American companies are also involved in projects worldwide.
                       Second Year, Fall Semester                       With these expenditures has come the growing demand for construc-
     CS 221            Machine Organization and Assembly                tion workers and technicians prepared to spearhead this monumental
                       Language Programming (4 cr)                      rebuilding effort. Homes, highways, buildings, plants, airports and
     ––––––            Humanities Elective (3 cr)                       bridges will require the handiwork of master builders and the
     ––––––            Social Science Elective (3 cr)                   Construction Management Engineering Technology curriculum will
     ––––––            Science Elective** (3-4 cr)                      provide some of these technicians.
     ––––––            Approved Elective*** (3-4 cr)                        The fundamental objective of the Construction Management
                       Second Year, Spring Semester                     Engineering Technology curriculum is to provide a sound education
     CS 220            Advanced Programming in Java (4 cr) or           in both the theory and the application of quality construction princi-
     CS 232            Advanced Data Structures (4 cr)                  ples for a variety of construction projects. To attain this objective, stu-
     ––––––            Humanities Elective (3 cr)                       dents learn the basic methods, materials, techniques and develop-
     ––––––            Social Science Elective (3 cr)                   ments involved in the construction industry.
     ––––––            Science Elective** (3-4 cr)                        This program offers the students a unique combination of manage-
     ––––––            Approved Elective*** (3-4 cr)                    ment, design and hands-on experience. Through a series of construc-
                                                                        tion management courses, students learn about the construction
     NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult       industry as a whole and analyze the interrelationships of the various
     his/her academic adviser prior to registering.                     organizations within the industry. In the laboratory, students master
     *MT 175, 176 can be substituted for MT 181, 182 upon               blueprint reading, quantity take-offs and the estimating of residential
     advisement.                                                        and commercial projects. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 is
                                                                        required for graduation with an A.A.S. degree in Construction
     **PH 280, 282 is the recommended science. PH 270, 272 can be       Management Engineering Technology.
     substituted for PH 280, PH 282 upon advisement.                        Graduates qualify for positions such as construction managers,
                                                                        supervisors, building inspectors, contractors, field clerks, purchasing
                                                   Campus
                                                                        agents, surveyors, expediters, estimators and construction materials
     Approved Electives:                           Where Offered:
                                                                        salespersons. Other graduates often transfer credits toward a bache-
     CS 209    Programming in Java                 North                lor’s degree.

                                                                        Accreditation
     CS 211    Computer Networks
               and Internetworks                   North
     CS 215    Web Development                                          Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board
                                                                        for Engineering and Technology (TAC/ABET).

                                                                        Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
               and Programming I                   North
     CS 216    Advanced Web Development
               and Programming II                  North
     CS 220    Advanced Programming                                     It is recommended that applicants have completed two years each of
               in Java                             North                high school mathematics and science. Those students deficient in
     CS 290    Computer Science Internship         North                these or other areas may have to take an additional term of course
                                                                        work.

                                                                        Scholarships
     MT 167    Discrete Math                       North
     MT 283    Calculus III                        North, South
     MT 284    Introduction to
                                                                        Scholarships are available specific to this program.

                                                                        Program Competencies
               Differential Equations              North
     MT 292    Introduction to Linear Algebra      North
     DA 310    Introduction to Networking          City, North,         Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree in
                                                   South                Construction Management Engineering Technology, the graduate
     ES 031    Electrical Networks                 North                will be able to:
     EL 156    Computer Logic and El 157 Lab       North
               (or CE 240 Digital Logic and                             • Utilize modern instruments, methods and techniques to imple-
     CE 241    Digital Logic Lab South)                                   ment construction contracts documents and codes
     EL 200    Microcontrollers and EL 201 Lab     North or             • Evaluate materials and methods for construction projects
                                                   South                • Utilize modern surveying methods for construction layout
     CP 230    Microprocessor Applications and                          • Determine forces and stresses in elementary structural systems
     CP 231                                                             • Estimate material quantities and costs
94                                                                      • Employ productivity software to solve technical problems

                    E C C    2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
• Draw and interpret basic construction working drawings                  ______              Social Science Elective (3 cr)
• Supervise, inspect and evaluate the erection of wood, steel,            ______              Option* (4 cr) (see below)
  masonry and concrete systems in relation to residential, com-           *Student has option to enroll in physics, geology or engineering
  mercial and industrial structures                                       applications:
• Manage, document and coordinate a basic building construc-
  tion project                                                            PH 262              Technical Physics II (4 cr)
• Identify, locate and use a wide range of information resources          PH 263              Lab for PH 262 (0 cr) or
  including subject experts, library references, electronic data          GL 160              Physical Geology (4 cr)
  bases, on-line services and Internet sites to solve or explain          GL 161              Lab for GL 160 (0 cr) or
  construction related issues                                             CO 462              Engineering Problem Applications (4 cr)
• Ability to generate construction, civil drawings either manually        NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should
  or by CAD                                                               consult his/her academic adviser prior to registering.

                                                                          Part-Time Students
• Analyze and prepare reports
Degree: Associate in Applied Science
Hegis: 5317                                                                                   Fall Semester (first year)
Curriculum Code: 1788                                                     CO 101              Architectural Blueprint Reading (3 cr)
Total Degree Credits: 73                                                  CO 130              Construction I (1 cr)
Campus Location: North                                                    CO 131              Lab for CO 130 (2 cr)
Engineering &Technologies Division

CURRICULUM
                                                                                              Spring Semester (first year)
                                                                          CO 150              Principles of Contracting (3 cr)

Full-Time Students
                                                                          CI 120              Application of Digital Computer (2 cr)
                                                                          CI 121              Lab for CI120 (1 cr)

                   First Year, Fall Semester                                                  Fall Semester (second year)
MT 121             Technical Math I (4 cr) or                             MT 121              Technical Math I (4 cr) or
MT125              College Math I (4 cr)                                  MT 125              College Math I (4 cr)
EN 120             Composition and Occupational                           CO 202              Drafting for Construction (3 cr)
                   Communication (3 cr) or                                                    Spring Semester (second year)
EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)                             MT 122              Technical Math II (4 cr) or
CO 101             Architectural Blueprint Reading (3 cr)                 MT 126              College Math II (4 cr)
CO 130             Construction I (1 cr)                                  CO 232              Construction II (1 cr)
CO 131             Lab for CO 130 (2 cr)                                  CO 233              Lab for CO232 (2 cr)
CO 150             Principles of Contracting (3 cr)
CI 120             Application of Digital Computer ( 2 cr)                                    Fall Semester (third year)
CI 121             Lab for CI 120 (1 cr)                                  CO 280              Principles of Mechanics (3 cr)
                                                                          CI 172              Surveying I (1 cr)
                   First Year, Spring Semester                            CI 173              Lab for CI172 (2 cr)
MT 122             Technical Math II (4 cr) or
MT126              College Math II (4 cr)                                                     Spring Semester (third year)
EN 121             Composition and Reading in Science and                 CO 372              Construction Surveying (1 cr)
                   Literature (3 cr) or                                   CO 373              Lab for CO 372 (2 cr)
EN 111             Composition and Interpretation (3 cr)                  CO 381              Principles of Structural Design (3 cr)
CO 202             Drafting for Construction ( 3 cr)                                          Fall Semester (fourth year)
CO 232             Construction II (1 cr)                                 PH 260              Technical Physics I (4 cr)
CO 233             Lab for CO 232 (2 cr)                                  PH 261              Lab for PH260 (0 cr)
CO 280             Principles of Mechanics (3 cr)                         CI 326              Computer Aided Drafting I (3 cr)
CI 172             Surveying I (1 cr)
CI 173             Lab for CI 172 (2 cr)                                                      Spring Semester (fourth year)
                                                                          CO 334              Construction III (1 cr)
                   Second Year, Fall Semester                             CO 335              Lab for CO334 (2 cr)
PH 260             Technical Physics I (4 cr)                             EN 120              Composition & Occupational
PH 261             Lab for PH 260 (0 cr)                                                      Communication (3 cr) or
CI 326             Computer Aided Drafting I ( 3 cr)                      EN 110              College Composition (3 cr)
CO 334             Construction III (1 cr)
CO 335             Lab for CO 334 (2 cr)                                                      Fall Semester (fifth year)
CO 355             Estimating for Construction (3 cr)                     CO 355              Estimating for Construction (3 cr)
CO 372             Construction Surveying (1 cr)                          ______              Social Science Elective (3 cr)
CO 373             Lab for CO 372 (2 cr)                                  EN 121              Composition and Reading in Science &
CO 381             Principles of Structural Design (3 cr)                                     Literature (3 cr) or
                                                                          EN 111              Composition & Interpreation (3 cr)
                   Second Year, Spring Semester
CO 451             Construction Management (3 cr)                                             Spring Semester (fifth year)
CO 456             Estimating for Construction II (3 cr)                  CO 451              Construction Management (3 cr)
CO 457             Contracts and Specifications (3 cr)                    CO 456              Estimating for Construction II (3 cr)
                                                                                                                                             95
               E C C     2 0 0 8       -   2 0 1 0   •      ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                        Fall Semester (sixth year)                              BU 261               Business Law (3 cr)
     CO 457             Contracts & Specifications (3 cr)                       MA 555               Medical Terminology I (3 cr)
     _____              Option* (4 cr) (See Below)                              EN 111               Composition & Inter. of Literature (3 cr)
     *Student has option to enroll in Physics, Geology or Engineering           EN 410               Public Speaking (3 cr)
     Applications:                                                              *Students with previous instruction may take a proficiency exam
     PH 262              Technical Physics II (4 cr)                            to determine placement
     PH 263              Lab for PH262 (0 cr)
                         or                                                     Degree: Certificate
     GL 160              Physical Geology (4 cr)                                Hegis: 5005
     GL 161              Lab for GL160 (0 cr)                                   Curriculum Code: 1783
                         or                                                     Total Certificate Credits: 32
     CO 462              Engineering Problem Applications (4 cr)                Campus Location(s): City
     NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult
     his/her academic adviser prior to registering.
                                                                                Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
                                                                                • Applicants should have at least an 80 percent high school


     COURT/REALTIME
                                                                                  average


     REPORTING
                                                                                • Applicants should have strong English skills
                                                                                • Students will be required to purchase stenowriter
                                                                                  machine and software totaling approximately $1,800 at the

     Program Description
                                                                                  start of the first semester
                                                                                • Suggested daily practice time is 2-3 hours


                                                                                CRIME SCENE
     The Court/Realtime Reporting program at Erie Community
     College is a certificate program for students who wish to pursue


                                                                                TECHNOLOGY
     a career as court, freelance or realtime reporters. Students will
     learn the machine shorthand theory using state-of-the-art equip-

                                                                                Program Description
     ment and software.
         The program is intended to prepare students for transfer to
     SUNY Alfred State (online) or a similar educational institution
                                                                                With the sudden dramatic expansion of the field of crime scene
     to complete an A.A.S. degree in Court/Realtime Reporting.
                                                                                investigation and simultaneous technological changes in crimi-
         Specific courses will be offered in language arts and commu-
                                                                                nal investigation, a serious void exists in educational opportuni-
     nication skills, computer word processing software, medical ter-
                                                                                ties for students who want to prepare for a career as an evidence
     minology and business law.

     Program Competencies
                                                                                collection specialist.
                                                                                    Erie Community College intends to assist in providing police
     Upon graduation with a certificate in Court/Realtime Reporting,            agencies and other criminal justice or investigative organizations
     the graduate will be able to:                                              that need crime scene technical assistance with qualified investi-
                                                                                gators.
     • Demonstrate knowledge of the computer and keyboarding                        This program is designed to provide education and training
       equipment to produce and format documents for mailable                   in crime scene technology: collection of evidence, crime scene
       copy                                                                     photography, location and processing fingerprints. The student
     • Transcribe documents using machine shorthand at 90 words                 will learn to compare fingerprints properly and to prepare and
       per minute                                                               present evidence in the courtroom.
     • Keyboard at 30 net words per minute                                          The program may include criminal justice students, police
     • Develop grammar, punctuation and spelling skills essential               officers, security officers, emergency responders or individuals
       for completing documents related to court reporting                      interested in the field of crime scene technology, science or
     • Transcribe letters, reports and other documents from various             forensics.
       methods of input to produce mailable copy with appropriate                   The design of the crime scene technology program recog-
       grammar, punctuation and layout                                          nizes that students interested in criminal justice may not be
     • Demonstrate an understanding of the communication                        interested in becoming a police officer, but are interested in the
       process and its role in verbal and nonverbal interpersonal               field of solving crime with the use of physical evidence. This
       communications                                                           program has been designed to fulfill this desire by introducing

     CURRICULUM
                                                                                the student to criminal justice with specialized study in the field
                                                                                of crime scene technology.
                                                                                    This is a 31-credit program designed for full-or part-time
                        First Year, Fall Semester
                                                                                study. The first half of the curriculum includes composition and
     OF 150             Realtime Writing I (4 cr)
                                                                                occupational communication, introduction to criminal justice
     OF 111             Keyboarding I (3 cr)*
                                                                                and related fields in public safety.

                                                                                Department Notes
     OF 140             Business English (3 cr)
     EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
     PS 100             General Psychology (3 cr)                               Students entering this program must be physically able to fulfill
                        First Year, Second Semester                             all requirements. Students are encouraged to consult an adviser
     OF 151             Realtime Writing II (4 cr)                              in the department regarding program requirements. They must
     OF 133             Business Law & Insurance                                be physically able to perform duties as a crime scene investigator.

96
                    E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Program Competencies                                                          The Criminal Justice curriculum is designed to provide a
Upon graduation with this certificate the graduate will be able to:       foundation in the theory and execution of the law and to pre-
                                                                          pare students to assume responsible positions in any of a variety
• Display an understanding of criminal justice vocabulary and             of criminal justice agencies. Sixty percent of the courses in the
  meaning of terms used frequently                                        curriculum focus on criminal justice while the other 40 percent
• Demonstrate an understanding of the historical background in            are in social sciences, humanities and liberal arts.
  the three parts of criminal justice: law enforcement, courts and            Graduates of the program can serve as police officers at the
  corrections                                                             state, county, or local level. Criminal justice graduates qualify to
• Exhibit an understanding of composition and occupational                work in private or industrial security or as a conservation offi-
  communication in classroom discussion                                   cer, correctional officer, or campus security officer. Students
• Explain how science can be used to examine evidence and                 anticipating doing any type of investigative work will benefit
  search for answers to the unknown                                       from this curriculum (rather than the Criminal Justice/A.S.
• Illustrate the proper methods for locating, photographing and           option).
  collecting evidence at a crime scene                                        The program prepares students to transfer to four-year insti-
• Exhibit the process for examination of crime scenes for finger-         tutions offering bachelor's degrees in criminal justice and relat-
  prints, photography and identification of patterns, classification      ed fields.
  and connectivity to a suspect                                               When students graduate from this program, they will be able
• Illustrate the proper method of crime scene measuring and               to step into almost any facet of criminal justice work and not
  developing a crime scene matrix                                         only feel comfortable, but have a thorough understanding of the
• Demonstrate the proper method of presentation of evidence,              functions of the particular area they have entered. They should
  photographs and charts in the courtroom                                 have the knowledge and the background to make them excel-
• Explain the proper use of a digital camera, flash and close up          lent practitioners in the field and be an asset to the agency that
  photography                                                             hires them.

                                                                          Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
• Display knowledge of use of the Photoshop software program
  to print, enlarge and photograph crime scenes and evidence
                                                                          Students entering this program must be physically able to fulfill
Award: Certificate
                                                                          all requirements. Students are encouraged to consult an adviser
Hegis: 5503
                                                                          in the department regarding scheduling.

                                                                          Program Competencies
Total Degree Credits: 30-31
Campus location: North and City
Business and Public Service Division                                      Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree in

CURRICULUM
                                                                          Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement, the graduate will be able to:

EN 120              Composition and Occupational                          • Demonstrate an understanding of the criminal justice
                    Communication (3 cr)                                    vocabulary
CR 150              Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 cr)               • Demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical and his-
CH 170              Forensic Science (3 cr)                                 torical background in the three parts of criminal justice: law
IN 100              Introduction to Crime Scene                             enforcement, courts and corrections
                    Investigation (3 cr)                                  • Demonstrate an understanding of the theories on causes of
IN 110              Fingerprint I.D. and classification (4 cr)              crime: economic, sociological and psychological
CR 260              Criminal Courts and Procedures (4 cr)                 • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the New York State
IN 200              Crime Scene Photography (4 cr)                          penal laws and the criminal procedure laws
IN 210              Courtroom Presentation of Evidence (3 cr)             • Demonstrate an understanding of and work in industrial and
CR/CH               Open Elective (3 or 4 cr)                               retail security


CRIMINAL
                                                                          • Recognize people with mental disorders: psychotics, psy-
                                                                            chopaths, personality disorders; people intoxicated by drugs:


JUSTICE/LAW
                                                                            LSD, heroin, PCP, etc; sexual aberrations; suicide potentials


ENFORCEMENT
                                                                            and be aware of methods of handling such individuals
                                                                          • Demonstrate an understanding of police ethics and how to
                                                                            resolve practical problems of an ethical nature

Career Opportunities
                                                                          • Demonstrate an understanding of basic qualities of a crimi-
                                                                            nal investigation: fingerprinting, photographing a crime
Career opportunities include law enforcement agencies, correc-              scene, plaster casting, handling and recording of physical
tion facilities, private or industrial security, conservation officer       evidence
or campus security.                                                       • Demonstrate an understanding of our correctional system;

Program Description
                                                                            the use of penitentiaries and prisons in American society;
                                                                            probation and parole concepts and usages; the nature of
In a maze of modern law enforcement and legal proceedings, the              punishment and present trends in corrections
demand for highly qualified criminal justice professionals is heard       • Demonstrate an understanding of the internal workings of
in police stations, correctional facilities and campus security             police departments; organizational and leadership prob-
headquarters. Accordingly, the criminal justice curriculum pre-             lems; planning and research; inspection procedures; per-
pares students for employment in the various areas of criminal              sonnel problems and contemporary problems of police
justice and for further education if desired.                               departments

                                                                                                                                                 97
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
     Degree: Associate in Applied Science                                   arts/humanities and social sciences and affords students tremen-
     Hegis: 5505                                                            dous flexibility in terms of future career choices or further study.
     Curriculum Code: 064                                                       Graduates of this program may enter such fields as correc-
     Total Degree Credits: 66.0                                             tions, probation, crime prevention, criminal justice planning and
     Campus Location: North                                                 court work; or they may transfer and pursue a Bachelor of
     Business & Public Service Division                                     Science degree at a four-year college or university.

     CURRICULUM                                                             Department Notes
                                                                            Students entering this program must be physically able to fulfill
                        First Year, Fall Semester                           all requirements. Students are encouraged to consult an adviser
     CR 150             Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 cr)             in the department regarding scheduling. See Articulation
     CR 160             Crime & Society (3 cr)                              Agreement section.

                                                                            Program Competencies
     CR 170             Introduction to Criminal Law (4 cr)
     EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
     PE 202             Physical Fitness I (1 cr)                           Upon graduation with an Associate in Science degree in Criminal
     ––––––             Elective (open)(3 cr)                               Justice, the graduate will be able to:
                        First Year, Spring Semester                         • Demonstrate an understanding of the criminal justice
     CR 200             Industrial & Retail Security (3 cr)                   vocabulary
     CR 260             Criminal Courts & Procedures (4 cr)                 • Demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical and his-
     CR 300             Deviant Behavior (3 cr)                               torical background in the three parts of criminal justice: law
     EN 111             Comp. & Interpretation of Literature (3 cr)           enforcement, courts and corrections.
     CS101              Computer Literacy (3 cr)                            • Demonstrate an understanding of the theories and causes of
                                                                              crime: economic, sociological and psychological
                        Second Year, Fall Semester
                                                                            • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the New York State
     CR 350             Law Enforcement Ethics (3 cr)
                                                                              Penal Code and the Criminal Procedure Law
     CR 380             Criminal Investigations I (4 cr)
                                                                            • Student will have obtained those competencies as outlined by
     CR 381             Lab for CR 380 (0 cr)
                                                                              the college’s Social Science Department
     PS 100             General Psychology (3 cr)
     ______             Math Elective (3cr)                                 Degree: Associate in Science
     ______             Liberal Arts Elective (3cr)                         Hegis: 5505
                                                                            Curriculum Code: 0641
                        Second Year, Spring Semester
                                                                            Total Degree Credits: 63.0
     CR 390             Criminal Investigations II (3 cr)
                                                                            Campus Location(s): City, North
     CR 400             Introduction to Corrections (3 cr)
                                                                            Business & Public Service Division
     CR 410             Police Administration (4 cr)
     SO 100
     PE 203
                        Introduction to Sociology (3 cr)
                        Physical Fitness II (1 cr)
                                                                            CURRICULUM
     ––––––             Natural Science Elective (3cr)                                         First Year, Fall Semester
                                                                            CR 150             Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 cr)
     NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult
                                                                            CR 160             Crime & Society (3 cr)
     his/her academic adviser prior to registering.
                                                                            CR 170             Introduction to Criminal Law (4 cr)

     CRIMINAL JUSTICE
                                                                            EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
                                                                            PE ___             –––––– Elective (Open) (3 cr)

     Career Opportunities
                                                                                               First Year, Spring Semester
                                                                            CR 260             Criminal Courts & Procedures (4 cr)
     Law enforcement agencies, correction facilities, crime preven-         ––––––             Criminal Justice Elective (3 cr)
     tion, criminal justice planning or court work.

     Program Description
                                                                            EN 111             Comp. & Interpretation of Literature (3 cr)
                                                                            PS100              General Psychology (3 cr)
                                                                            ––––––             Liberal Arts Elective(3 cr)
     Programs to meet society’s criminal justice needs have grown
     within the past decade. Simultaneously, the demand for profes-                            Second Year, Fall Semester
     sionals to work in corrections, probation, crime prevention and        GO 101             American Government I (3 cr)
     court work has skyrocketed.                                            ______             Mathematics Elective (3 cr)
         The Criminal Justice/A.S. option has been designed to pro-         ––––––             Math/Natural Science Elective (3 cr)
     vide a broad education with emphasis in criminal law, the              CR 350             Criminal Justice Ethics(3 cr)
     dynamics of crime and society, government, the social sciences         ––––––             Social Science Elective (3 cr)
     and liberal arts/humanities. The program is structured so that
                                                                                               Second Year, Spring Semester
     students may opt to take a reduced academic course load, to
                                                                            GO 102             American Government II (3 cr)
     transfer into the Law Enforcement/A.A.S. degree program, or
                                                                            SO 100             Introduction to Sociology (3 cr)
     to transfer to a four-year college/university.
                                                                            ––––––             Math/Natural Science Elective (3 cr)
         Criminal justice courses comprise approximately 34 percent
                                                                            ––––––             Humanities Elective (3 cr)
     of the curriculum’s required courses, whereas the remaining 66
                                                                            CR 400             Introduction to Correction (3 cr))
     percent of coursework is taken in the liberal arts/humanities
     and the social sciences. The concentration is in the liberal           NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult
98                                                                          his/her academic adviser prior to registering.
                    E C C     2 0 0 8       -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
CULINARY ARTS                                                               • Maintain a safe and sanitary environment for food prepara-

Program Description
                                                                              tion and service
                                                                            • Successfully complete the Sanitation Manager’s certification
The hospitality/culinary industry is one of the largest in the United         exam administered by the Educational Foundation of the
States, accounting for 8.1 percent of all employment nationally. It           National Restaurant Association
has been estimated that the industry will need more than 160,000            • Accurately calculate: adjustments in recipe yields, ingredient
newly-trained employees every year until at least 2012.                       and recipe costs, food cost percentage, menu cost using at
    The objective of the Culinary Arts curriculum is to provide a             least two different pricing methods, fixed and labor costs
variety of culinary skills enabling graduates to enter positions in the     • Make business decisions in the areas of restaurant market-
hospitality industry which meet their career aspirations matched              ing and finance
with the job opportunities available. The A.O.S. degree is usually          • Identify and correctly use wines, beers and spirits in cook-
achieved through full-time day study, although several classes are            ing and as accompaniments to food
available in the evening, or in a full or partial online format.            • Develop menus appropriate for a given clientele, consider-
    Throughout the Culinary Arts program, food preparation and                ing other menu development parameters such as kitchen,
management skills are developed. Besides foundations-based                    staff competency, budget and food presentation
coursework and skills development in hot food preparation, spe-             • Analyze the nutritional composition of a recipe and be able
cific areas of study include wine appreciation, baking, methods               to successfully modify and prepare dishes meeting recog-
and ingredients of international cuisines, America’s regional                 nized nutritional guidelines
cuisines, banquet management and buffet presentation and the                • Demonstrate an aesthetic sense of garnishing and food pre-
skills of the cold kitchen. Practical experience is another high-             sentation with regard to color, flavor and texture
light of the curriculum as students gain practical experience in            • Successfully produce various baked goods, including but
the Statler Erie Room at North Campus and the E.M. Statler                    not limited to cakes, cookies, pastries, bread and rolls
Dining Room at the City Campus, as well as the campus cafete-               • Recognize ingredients from, and perform cooking tech-
rias and the City Campus Atrium Café.                                         niques associated with, different regional, ethnic and inter-
    Graduates of the program can be employed throughout the                   national cuisines
hospitality industry as chefs, bakers, cooks and apprentices in             • Design a kitchen to efficiently produce and serve a prede-
hotels, restaurants, clubs and hospitals. They are also better pre-           termined menu
pared to attend nationally recognized culinary programs, as well            • Identify and explain the use and maintenance of all major
as to transfer into bachelor’s degree programs in many areas of               pieces of kitchen equipment
hospitality management.                                                     • Effectively communicate verbally and in writing with supe-

Special Admissions Requirements/Prerequisites
                                                                              riors, peers, subordinates and customers in both work and
                                                                              social settings
Food preparation and service uniforms are required for all labo-            Degree: Associate in Occupational Studies
ratories. Students may not be allowed in our inspected kitchens             Hegis: 5404
without proper uniforms.                                                    Curriculum Code: 0578
Math/Algebra Proficiency - the student passes ECC Math Pretest              Total Degree Credits: 72.0
and is placed at the MT 006 level or above, or has received a               Campus Location: City and North
waiver from the Math Department. Math Developmental courses                 Business & Public Service Division

                                                                            CURRICULUM
must be passed with a grade of “C.”
English Proficiency - the student passes ECC English Pretest at
the EN 110 level or above, or has received permission from the                                    First Year, Fall Semester
Hospitality Management Department or a waiver from the                      HC 100                Hospitality Mathematics (3 cr)
English Department. English developmental courses must be                   HC 104                Culinary Arts Basic Skills (4 cr)
successfully completed with a grade of “C.”                                 HC 106                Pantry & Garde Manger (4 cr)
                                                                            HC 108                Culinary Nutrition (2 cr)
Culinary Arts students must be using their own cutlery set in all           HR 136                Sanitation (2 cr)
food preparation classes by the beginning of their second semester.

Scholarships
                                                                            EN 110                College Composition (3 cr)
                                                                                                  First Year, Spring Semester
• The Statler Foundation Scholarship                                        HR 123                Supervisory Development in Hotel
• New York Restaurant Association Scholarships                                                    Restaurant Management (3 cr)
• New York State Hotel Association Scholarship                              HC 202                Menu Design (3 cr)
• The Innkeepers Association of Western New York, Bertrand                  HC 204                Introductory Hot Food I (4 cr)
  H. Hoak Memorial Scholarship Award                                        HC 206                Intermediate Hot Food II (4 cr)
• American Academy of Chefs & Chaine Des Rotisseurs                         HC 208                Introduction to Baking (4 cr)
Program Competencies                                                                              Second Year, Fall Semester
Upon graduation with an Associate in Occupational Studies                   HC 300                Food & Labor Cost Control (3 cr)
degree in Culinary Arts, the graduate will be qualified to:                 HC 302                Wine, Beers & Spirits (3 cr)
                                                                            HC 304                Advanced Food Preparation &
• Demonstrate food preparation methods appropriate for the                                        Service I (4 cr)
  specific production situation and food item                               HC 306                Advanced Food Prep. & Service II (4 cr)
• Demonstrate a reasonable level of comfort and confidence                  HC 308                Classical Bake Shop (4 cr)
  participating in the operation of a commercial kitchen                                                                                       99
                E C C      2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •     w w w . e c c . e d u
                         Second Year, Spring Semester                        Dental assisting graduates may continue with further education
      HC 400             Kitchen Design & Layout (3 cr)                      in related fields such as dental hygiene, dental laboratory technol-
      HC 408             Culinary Purchasing (3 cr)                          ogy, dental school and allied health education leading to careers
      HC 402             Banquet & Buffet Management (4 cr)                  in advanced clinical practice, teaching, research or the dental
      HC 404             Classical & International Cuisine (4 cr)            sales industry.

                                                                             Scholarships
      HC 406             American Regional Cuisine (4 cr)
      NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult           American Dental Assistants Association
      his/her academic adviser prior to registering.                         Eighth District Dental Society
      In order to be granted an associate degree, a student must demon-      ECC Foundation Scholarship
      strate proficiency in algebra at the level of MT 006.                  Western New York Dental Group
      Culinary Arts graduates may take these additional baking cours-
      es and be eligible for the Baking & Pastry Arts Certificate (City
                                                                             Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
                                                                             Eligibility for the Dental Assisting program is based upon the fol-
      Campus only)
                                                                             lowing criteria:
      HC 210             Intermediate Baking (4 cr)
                                                                             • High school graduates with a minimum cumulative average of
      HC 212             Advanced Pastries & Cakes (4 cr)
                                                                               80 percent
      HC 310             Retail Bake Shop (4 cr)
                                                                             • College students/transfer students with a cumulative GPA of
      HC 312             Bake Shop Field Experience (4 cr)
                                                                               2.50 or above

      DENTAL ASSISTING
                                                                             • Transfer credits or general education credits required for the
                                                                               dental assisting curriculum must have a grade of “C” or above

      Program Description
                                                                             • English and math placement tests must be at the EN 110 or
                                                                               MT 007 levels
      The New York State licensed certified dental assistant is a vital      • Developmental courses indicated by placement tests must be
                                                                               completed prior to admission to DS courses

                                                                             Department Notes
      member of the dental healthcare team. Primarily trained to
      assist the dentist during chair side procedures, a licensed dental
      assistant may also perform a variety of supportive services
                                                                             • Entrance into the dental assisting program occurs only in the
      under direct supervision of the dentist. In addition to clinical
                                                                               Fall semester and courses must be taken in the prescribed
      duties, assistants are also trained in laboratory and administra-
                                                                               sequence.
      tive procedures.
                                                                             • Preference is given to applicants who have already completed
          The dental assisting curriculum satisfies state and national
                                                                               EN 110 and BI 149.
      requirements through coursework in biomedical sciences, den-
                                                                             • A current physical exam and immunization report is required
      tal sciences, clinical and laboratory procedures and practice
                                                                               prior to the start of clinical externship.
      administration. Dental assisting students learn head and neck
                                                                             • Hepatitis B immunization is strongly recommended for the
      anatomy, dental instruments, equipment and procedures,
                                                                               dental assisting profession.
      manipulation of dental materials, x-ray techniques, disinfection
                                                                             • Students must participate in clinical practice activities as a
      and sterilization procedures, management of medical and den-
                                                                               clinician and as a patient.
      tal emergencies and laboratory fabrication of dental products.
                                                                             • Students are responsible for providing transportation to off-
      Administrative coursework includes business office skills and
                                                                               campus assignments.
      basic computer operations, ethical and legal aspects of dentistry
                                                                             • Membership in the American Dental Assistants Association
      and communication skills. Clinical externships are provided
                                                                               and malpractice insurance is required.
      through local dental healthcare facilities to gain hands-on expe-
                                                                             • Students must purchase a lab coat, clinical uniforms and
      rience under the direct supervision of licensed professionals.
                                                                               shoes, protective eyewear, books and any necessary school
          Licensure and/or registration requirements vary per state
                                                                               supplies.
      and each graduate must verify the requirements for the state or
                                                                             • “C-” is the minimum passing grade in all required courses in
      province in which they will be practicing. Graduates who wish
                                                                               the Dental Assisting curriculum.
      to apply for New York State licensure must successfully com-
                                                                             • Students must successfully complete all first semester courses
      plete the Dental Assisting National Board (DANB) Radiation
                                                                               prior to admission to the second semester.

                                                                             Program Competencies
      Health and Safety Exam, the DANB Infection Control Exam,
      the New York Professional Dental Assisting Exam and current
      certification for BLS Healthcare Provider. Graduates are               Upon graduation with a certificate in Dental Assisting, the gradu-
      encouraged to seek national board certification, join their local,     ate will be able to:
      state and national dental assisting organizations and volunteer
      in community dental health projects.                                   • Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills

      Career Opportunities
                                                                             • Exhibit sensitivity to cultural diversity and patients with spe-
                                                                               cial needs
      Licensed dental assistants are in demand due to recent legisla-        • Demonstrate a basic understanding of body structures and
      tive changes enabling dental assistants to participate more fully        functions
      in direct patient care through expanded functions.                     • Identify normal and pathological conditions of the oral cavity
      Employment opportunities are available in settings such as pri-        • Discuss the effects of diet and nutrition on oral health
      vate practice in general or specialized dentistry, dental clinics,     • Describe the characteristics of microorganisms and relation-
      dental schools, hospital clinics and the military.                       ship to the disease process
                                                                             • Prevent disease transmission through proper asepsis, disinfec-
100                                                                            tion and sterilization

                     E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
• Follow standards and guidelines of occupational safety for           or higher degree programs to expand their career options to
  dental office personnel                                              teaching, research, management, professional consulting and
• Prepare and maintain dental equipment, instruments and               the dental products industry.

                                                                       Program Description
  treatment rooms
• Assist with the collection and recording of diagnostic data
• Expose, process and evaluate intraoral and extraoral radi-           The Registered Dental Hygienist is a licensed healthcare profes-
  ographs                                                              sional dedicated to the maintenance of optimal oral health and
• Prepare for and assist with general dentistry and specialty          the prevention of oral disease. These professional goals are
  procedures                                                           accomplished through individual and community education;
• Implement four-handed dentistry concepts during all treat-           through delivery of preventive dental health services and
  ment phases                                                          through highly skilled patient treatment. Professional responsi-
• Select, prepare and manipulate restorative dental materials          bilities vary by state or province but generally include the fol-
• Respond to and assist with chair side dental and medical             lowing clinical skills: perform thorough patient assessment,
  emergencies                                                          including review of health history; recording vital signs; head
• Demonstrate basic knowledge of pharmacology as it relates            and neck inspection; oral cancer screening and dental charting;
  to dentistry                                                         develop individualized oral self-care strategies; educate patients
• Perform general laboratory procedures and prosthetic fabri-          on the value of good oral health and its relationship to systemic
  cations                                                              health; perform various types of dental radiographic films;
• Perform basic administrative duties of a dental business             administer local anesthesia and nitrous oxide sedation; remove
  office assistant                                                     deposits and stains from the teeth; apply chemotherapeutic
• Identify and apply concepts of risk management in profes-            agents to treat or prevent dental diseases; manage special needs
  sional practice                                                      and medically compromised patients.
• Maintain the professional and ethical standards of the                   Dental hygienists are licensed by the state or province in
  ADAA Code of Ethics                                                  which they plan to practice. Generally, candidates for licensure
                                                                       must be graduates of an accredited dental hygiene program,
Degree: Certificate                                                    must pass the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination
Hegis: 5202                                                            taken near graduation and must pass a state or regional clinical
Curriculum Code: 1353                                                  examination. New York State uses the clinical examination
Total Degree Credits: 31.5                                             administered by the Northeast Regional Board of Dental
Campus Location: North                                                 Examiners. This examination is accepted by 15 states and the
Health Sciences Division                                               District of Columbia. Applicants for licensure in New York

CURRICULUM
                                                                       must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, must be of good
                                                                       moral character and will be subject to special review if criminal
                   First Semester (Fall)                               charges are pending or there has been a previous felony or mis-
BI 149             Survey of Anatomy and Physiology (3 cr)             demeanor conviction.
DH 120             Dental Radiography I (1 cr)                             Dental hygienists are valuable members of the dental health-
DH 121             Lab for DH 120 (1 cr)                               care team who work with dentists to provide oral health services
DS 100             Dental Assisting I (4 cr)                           to patients. They enjoy helping people, welcome challenging
DS 110             Dental Biomedical Sciences (2 cr)                   opportunities like performing detailed work and have an inter-
DS 120             Dental Sciences (2 cr)                              est in life sciences. As a respected member of the dental team,
DS 130             Dental Laboratory Procedures (1.5 cr)               dental hygienists can have a positive influence on the health of
DS 160             Dental Practice Management (2 cr)                   others, play a key role in the prevention of oral diseases and
                                                                       enjoy a flexible, rewarding career.

                                                                       Program Accreditation
                   Second Semester (Spring)
DH 180             Dental Radiography II (1 cr)
DH 181             Lab for DH 180 (1 cr)                               The program in dental hygiene is accredited by the Commission
DH 220             Dental Materials (2 cr)                             on Dental Accreditation. The Commission is a specialized
DS 150             Dental Assisting II (4 cr)                          accrediting body recognized by the United States Department
DS 170             Dental Assisting Externship (3 cr)                  of Education. The Commission on Dental Accreditation can be
EG 022             Medical Emergencies in the                          contacted at (312) 440-4653 or at 211 East Chicago Avenue,
                   Dental Office (1 cr)                                Chicago, IL 60611.

                                                                       Program Mission and Goals
EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)


DENTAL HYGIENE
                                                                       The mission of the Dental Hygiene program is to provide a high
                                                                       quality, affordable curriculum which meets the requirements of

Career Opportunities
                                                                       the state dental practice act and national accreditation standards
                                                                       and enables graduates to attain licensure to practice as a
Dental Hygiene offers exceptional career opportunities for men         Registered Dental Hygienist. The goals of the program are to:
and women of all ages and backgrounds. Most graduates are              • Comprehensively prepare competent, entry-level oral
employed in general or specialty dental practices or clinics.            healthcare professionals with current scientific knowledge,
Alternate practice settings include hospitals, nursing homes,            clinical training, interpersonal skills and ethical behaviors to
extended care facilities, public health agencies, public and pri-        provide oral health services to a diverse community
vate institutions, health maintenance organizations and the mili-
tary. Graduates may continue their educations in baccalaureate
                                                                                                                                            101
               E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      • Maintain an educational environment which facilitates                • Determine priorities and establish oral health goals with the
        open inquiry, critical thinking, problem solving and evi-              patient and family/guardian as active participants
        dence-based decision making                                          • Communicate the plan for dental hygiene services to the den-
      • Support the personal responsibility of students to learn by            tist and appropriate interdisciplinary health team members
        providing an integrated, sequenced variety of didactic, lab-         • Obtain the patient’s informed consent based on a thorough
        oratory and clinical experiences                                       case presentation
      • Encourage student appreciation of the value of community
                                                                             Self-Care Instruction – graduates must provide planned educa-
        service, life-long learning and participation in professional
                                                                             tional services using appropriate interpersonal communication
        associations
                                                                             skills and educational strategies to achieve oral health goals.
      • Implement a broad-based outcomes assessment plan to
                                                                             Specifically, the dental hygiene graduate must:
        evaluate and improve curriculum effectiveness
      • Perform ongoing curriculum planning to assure that the               • Identify the health needs of patients and assist them in the
        program responds to scientific and technological advances,             development of individualized self-care regimens
        to the changing needs of students and the community and              • Encourage patients to assume responsibility for their health
        supports student attainment of program competencies                    and promote adherence to self-care regimens
      Program Competencies                                                   Implementation – graduates must provide treatment that
      The Dental Hygiene curriculum provides content in general              includes preventive and therapeutic procedures to promote and
      education, biomedical sciences, dental sciences and clinical           maintain oral health. Specifically, the dental hygiene graduate
      skills. Graduation from the program requires attainment of the         must:
      following competencies:                                                • Adhere to state and local policies and procedures for main-
      Professional Integrity – graduates must apply the American               taining safety in the dental facility
      Dental Hygienists’ Association Code of Ethics and practice             • Provide an oral environment for patients which is conducive
      with personal and professional integrity in accordance with the          to health by applying principles of dental hygiene instrumen-
      state dental practice act. Specifically, the dental hygiene grad-        tation without causing trauma to tissues
      uate must:                                                             • Control pain and anxiety during treatment through the use of
                                                                               appropriate clinical techniques and behavioral management
      • Uphold ethical and legal behaviors with all patients, col-             strategies
        leagues and other professionals                                      • Select and administer appropriate chemotherapeutic agents
      • Exhibit cultural awareness and sensitivity to patients’ goals,         for the treatment or prevention of dental diseases and provide
        values, beliefs and preferences in healthcare choices while            pre-and post-treatment instructions
        promoting optimal oral care and general health during
        patient treatment                                                    Evaluation – graduates must evaluate the effectiveness of
                                                                             planned clinical and educational services and modify them as
      Assessment – graduates must apply medico-legal principles to           necessary. Specifically, the dental hygiene graduate must:
      the systematic collection, analysis and accurate recording of
      general, personal and oral health status of patients.                  • Evaluate the clinical outcomes of dental hygiene treatment
      Specifically, the dental hygiene graduate must:                          interventions using dental health indices, instruments and
                                                                               examination techniques and determine appropriate re-care
      • Recognize medical conditions that necessitate special con-             schedules for patient
        siderations prior to or during treatment                             • Determine a patient’s satisfaction level with the dental
      • Identify the patient at risk for a medical emergency and be            hygiene care received and the oral health status achieved
        prepared to manage the event should it occur during treat-
        ment                                                                 Community Involvement – graduates must be able to initiate and
      • Perform an extra-oral and intra-oral examination of hard             assume responsibility for health promotion and disease preven-
        and soft tissues, distinguish abnormal from normal findings          tion for diverse populations. Specifically, the dental hygiene grad-
        and accurately record the clinical observations                      uate must:
      • Identify the need for dental radiographs, perform and                • Promote oral health and wellness strategies within the com-
        process radiographs of diagnostic quality and interpret the            munity
        films or digital images                                              • Assess, plan, implement and evaluate community-based oral
      • Evaluate oral tissues, health history and personal and cul-            health programs
        tural behaviors to identify risk factors that require interven-      • Provide community educational services and refer clients to
        tion to prevent disease                                                appropriate resources in the health care system
      • Determine the need for referral to the appropriate health-
        care provider                                                        Information Management and Critical Thinking – graduates
                                                                             must acquire and synthesize information in a critical, scientific
      Planning – graduates must establish a planned sequence of              and effective manner. Specifically, the dental hygiene graduate
      patient care based on the dental hygiene diagnosis by identify-        must:
      ing oral conditions, potential problems, etiologic and risk fac-
      tors and available treatment modalities. Specifically, the dental      • Evaluate the scientific literature and dental product or thera-
      hygiene graduate must:                                                    peutic claims and use information technology to assist in
                                                                                developing evidence-based decisions regarding patient care
      • Analyze and interpret assessment data to formulate a dental          • Be informed of current issues that impact the profession and
        hygiene diagnosis                                                       clinical practice

102
                     E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Characteristics of Successful
Dental Hygiene Students
                                                                         Most dental hygiene students elect to complete required general
                                                                         education courses in the curriculum prior to entering clinical
                                                                         courses as part of an extended curriculum option. This path is
Applicants to the dental hygiene program should have a well-
                                                                         helpful to students who have other personal responsibilities or
rounded academic background with strong preparation in the
                                                                         who have no college experience. Applicants who do not meet
sciences. The two-year program is a rigorous schedule of academ-
                                                                         admission requirements may also be accepted to an extended
ic and clinical courses which requires a full-time commitment. In
                                                                         curriculum option. This option provides an individually devel-
addition to spending time in lectures, labs and clinics each week,
                                                                         oped schedule of courses based on the applicant’s academic
students must devote considerable out-of-class time to study and
                                                                         background and College Placement Test results. This path pro-
the preparation of assignments. The physical demands of dental
                                                                         vides an opportunity to meet program admission requirements
hygiene practice require good vision, depth perception and hand-
                                                                         for clinical courses. Students may begin either option in fall,
eye coordination to perform finely detailed clinical procedures.
                                                                         spring, or summer semesters.

                                                                         Department Notes
Individuals should be free of serious hand, wrist or back prob-
lems and should not have allergies or skin conditions which pre-
vent use of required infection control items such as surgical            • Dental hygiene courses are integrated and sequenced in a
masks, gloves, soaps or disinfectants. Successful dental hygiene           specific manner to enable students to attain program compe-
students also demonstrate the following personal characteristics:          tencies. Candidates admitted to dental hygiene courses must
good study habits and test-taking skills; excellent communication          enroll in all courses required during each semester of the
ability; good written, verbal, and interpersonal skills; an interest       program. All required courses must be passed each semester
in sciences and working with people; good manual dexterity;                in order to advance to the following semester. Dental
highly motivated with good stress coping skills and the ability to         hygiene courses must be taken in the prescribed sequence.
accept constructive criticism; the financial and personal support          General education courses may be taken in advance but not
to carry a full-time academic schedule; mature behavior that               later than the prescribed schedule.
takes responsibility for actions and an understanding that effort is     • Withdrawal from or failure of a required course results in
essential and expected but that it is performance that counts.             dismissal from the curriculum. Academically dismissed stu-
Arrangements for financial assistance and personal needs such as           dents must re-apply for program admission on a space avail-
child care should be completed three months prior to the antici-           able basis and must meet admission requirements. Students
pated start of classes.

Special Admissions Requirements/Prerequisites
                                                                           who experience a second course failure or excessive with-
                                                                           drawals demonstrate unsatisfactory academic progress and
                                                                           will be dismissed from the curriculum.
The clinical dental hygiene course sequence begins in the fall
                                                                         • A physical examination and current immunization report are
semester. Admission is competitive and limited to 60 students.
                                                                           required prior to the start of clinical courses to ensure candi-
Completed applications and supporting transcripts must be
                                                                           dates are in good physical and mental health and capable of
received in the North Campus Admissions Office by March 31
                                                                           completing the requirements of the program.
for fall admission. Applications received after that date are con-
                                                                         • Students entering dental hygiene are strongly recommended
sidered on a space available basis. Acceptances are contingent on
                                                                           to receive immunization against Hepatitis B.
satisfactory College Placement Test results and successful com-
                                                                         • Malpractice insurance, accident insurance and membership
pletion of current academic courses.
                                                                           in the Student American Dental Hygienists’ Association are
    The Admissions Office has responsibility for selecting quali-
                                                                           required of students in each year of clinical courses. Student
fied applicants who have the potential for successfully complet-
                                                                           health insurance is strongly recommended for those who are
ing the dental hygiene program. To be considered for admission
                                                                           not insured.
to the dental hygiene program, applicants must demonstrate evi-
                                                                         • Students are required to purchase textbooks, uniforms, sup-
dence of the following requirements:
                                                                           plies, instruments and safety equipment as prescribed by the
• Current high school graduates – a cumulative average of 88               faculty. Contact the department for a current list of estimat-
  percent or higher and courses in general biology and chem-               ed costs.
  istry at 88 percent or higher. Reading and writing competen-           • Students must participate in clinical practice activities as
  cies at the EN 110 level and mathematics competency at the               clinicians and as patients.
  MT 007 level as determined by the College Placement Tests              • Students must provide their own transportation to off-cam-
  or other admissions criteria.                                            pus assignments.
• Current college students – internal and external college trans-        • Students are required to recruit patients for treatment at
  fer applicants must have a cumulative grade point average of             scheduled clinical practice sessions.
  at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale and grades of "C" or higher in gen-        • Special attention should be given to course pre-requisites
  eral education courses required in the dental hygiene curricu-           and co-requisites during schedule planning. Students must
  lum. Reading and writing competencies must be at the EN                  meet with their dental hygiene academic advisers each
  110 level and mathematics competencies at the MT 007 level.              semester.
  Applicants who do not meet the chemistry requirement for               • “C-” is the minimum passing grade in all required courses in
  current high school graduates must take CH 100 and CH 101                the Dental Hygiene curriculum. The grading system for den-
  or CH 200 and CH 201 (General Chemistry with lab).                       tal hygiene courses is: A = 94-100; B = 87-93; C = 80-86.
  Applicants who have not had a biology course must take BI              • Dental hygiene students are expected to manifest exemplary
  149 (Survey of Anatomy & Physiology) or BI 107 (Human                    ethical and professional behaviors and must adhere to the
  Biology) prior to BI 150/151 (Anatomy and Physiology with                Professional Code of Ethics developed by each class.
  lab). Science courses taken more than 10 years ago may not be            Academic dishonesty or other unprofessional conduct is
  applicable. Preference is given to qualified applicants who              subject to peer review by elected members of the dental
  have completed EN 110, BI 150, BI 151, BI 230 and BI 231.                hygiene student Professional Honor Council and faculty and
                                                                           may result in disciplinary action.
                                                                                                                                              103
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      • If continuous registration in the program cannot be main-           Developmental courses as indicated by placement testing are also
        tained, the department reserves the right to have returning stu-    required and include all developmental English courses and
        dents demonstrate skills and knowledge through written, oral,       mathematics courses up to, and including, algebra (MT 006).
        laboratory, and/or clinical evaluation in order to determine the    Students requiring developmental courses must enroll in the
        appropriate courses for program re-entry.                           extended curriculum option.


                                                                            DENTAL
      • Students may be excluded from clinical courses when, in the
        judgment of the college, they are unable to provide safe patient

                                                                            LABORATORY
        care or have demonstrated unprofessional behavior.


                                                                            TECHNOLOGY
        Appropriate professional conduct is outlined in clinical manu-
        als provided to students.
      • To assure current and adequate preparation for licensure

                                                                            Program Description
        examinations at graduation, transfer credit for biomedical sci-
        ences taken more than five years ago may not be accepted.
        Transfer credit for DH courses may be granted only for cours-       Dental Laboratory Technicians possess the skills, competencies
        es taken at a CODA accredited dental hygiene program within         and knowledge that is invaluable to the practice of modern den-
        the past three years.                                               tistry. Through the unique Dental Laboratory Technology pro-

      CURRICULUM
                                                                            gram situated at the well equipped laboratories at the ECC South
                                                                            Campus, students are instructed in all aspects of prosthodontic
      The dental hygiene faculty conducts ongoing curriculum reviews        dentistry. Opportunities are available for second year students to
      and planning to maintain currency and effectiveness. Please con-      work with dentists in private practice, at hospitals and at commer-
      tact the department to receive the most current curriculum format.    cial dental laboratories as they prepare to join the profession and
                                                                            the dental health team.
                         First Year, Fall Semester                              The goal of the Dental Laboratory Technology program is to
      DH 100             Oral Health Services I (5 cr)                      train students to be capable of the design, fabrication and pro-
      DH 110             Head, Neck & Oral Anatomy (3 cr)                   duction of dental prostheses, including full and partial dentures,
      DH 120             Dental Radiography I (1 cr)                        crowns, bridges and orthodontic appliances. New state-of-the-art
      DH 121             Lab for DH 120 (1 cr)                              techniques, equipment and materials are emphasized, i.e. implan-
      BI 150             Anatomy & Physiology I (3 cr)                      tology and cosmetic and aesthetic dentistry.
      BI 151             Lab for BI 150 (1.5 cr)                                The curriculum, offered on a full-time basis during the day,
      BI 230             Microbiology (3 cr)                                highlights coursework in anatomy, physiology, occlusion, bio-
      BI 231             Lab for BI 230 (1 cr)                              medical materials, dental metallurgy, dental prostheses and
                         First Year, Spring Semester                        ceramics technology. Classroom learning is supplemented with
      DH 150             Oral Health Services II (4 cr)                     laboratory experiences in our well equipped laboratories at the
      DH 170             Dental Nutrition (2 cr)                            college, as well as at local hospitals and commercial laboratories.
      DH 180             Dental Radiography II (1 cr)                           The dental laboratory technology laboratories at South
      DH 181             Lab for DH 180 (1 cr)                              Campus have been designed to accommodate students confined
      DH 190             Periodontology (2 cr)                              to wheelchairs.
      EG 022             Medical Emergencies (1 cr)*                            Employment opportunities are available in commercial dental
      BI 152             Anatomy & Physiology II (3 cr)                     laboratories, private dental practices, hospitals, public dental
      BI 153             Lab for BI 152 (1.5 cr)                            health facilities, manufacturers of dental supplies, materials and
      SS 102             Social Problems (3 cr)**                           equipment and in research facilities and educational institutions.
                                                                            Our graduates are employed in various types of positions:
      *EG 009 (3 cr) may be substituted.                                    research and development for large manufacturing companies;
      **AN, GO, HI, SO or SS courses may be substituted.                    quality control; technicians working at the bench and lecturers
                                                                            and demonstrators. Several are on the faculty of dental and/or
                         Summer Session I                                   dental laboratory schools; some are denturists in Canada and in
      DH 175             Oral Health Services III (3 cr)                    the several states in the U.S. that license denturism; open their
                                                                            own laboratories, etc. Each year, several graduates attend dental
                         Second Year, Fall Semester
                                                                            school in order to continue their education.
      DH 200             Oral Health Services IV (6 cr)
                                                                                The RG/Certification examination (National Board for
      DH 220             Dental Materials (2 cr)
                                                                            Certification in Dental Laboratory Technology) is offered to stu-
      DH 221             Lab for DH 220 (1 cr)
                                                                            dents at the conclusion of the second year of study. ECC has had
      DH 230             Pathology (3 cr)
                                                                            100 percent passage rate for this examination and ECC students
      EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
                                                                            traditionally exhibit one of the highest overall averages in the
                         Second Year, Spring Semester                       nation.
      DH 160             Pain & Anxiety Control (2 cr)                          ECC South Campus is the site for the National Board for
      DH 250             Oral Health Services V (5 cr)                      Certification C.D.T. Specialty Examinations.

                                                                            Accreditation
      DH 260             Community Dental Health (2 cr)
      DH 270             Pharmacology (2 cr)
      EN 111             Comp. & Interp. of Literature (3 cr)               The program in Dental Laboratory Technology is accredited by
      HU 100             Human Interaction (3 cr)*                          the Commission on Dental Accreditation. The Commission is a
      *PS 100            (3 cr) may be substituted.                         specialized accrediting body recognized by the United States
                                                                            Department of Education. The Commission on Dental
                                                                            Accreditation can be contacted at (312) 440-4653.
104
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •    ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites                             CURRICULUM
Applicants should have a high school diploma or GED. Good
                                                                                               First Year, Fall Semester
manual dexterity, color perception and an aptitude for detail are
                                                                         DL 110                Introduction to Technical Dentistry (1 cr)
essential. Students are required to purchase a dental tool kit at
                                                                         DL 111                Dental Anatomy, Physiology &
the approximate cost $250.

Program Flexibility
                                                                                               Occlusion (2 cr)
                                                                         DL 112                Lab for DL 111 (3 cr)
Required liberal arts and science courses are available at all three     DL 113                Biomedical Materials & Dental
campuses, evenings and summers. Dental Laboratory                                              Metallurgy (1 cr)
Technology courses are offered at South Campus. Although most            DL 114                Lab for DL 113 (1 cr)
students begin in September, a limited number are accepted in            DL 115                Complete Denture Technique I (1 cr)
January as part of the extended curriculum option.                       DL 116                Lab for DL 115 (3 cr)

Scholarships Available
                                                                                               First Year, Spring Semester
                                                                         DL 221                Removable Partial Denture
•   American Dental Association                                                                Technique I (1 cr)
•   Dental Laboratory Association, NY                                    DL 222                Lab for DL 221 (3 cr)
•   ECC Health Sciences                                                  DL 223                Restorative Technique I (2 cr)
•   Ivoclar North America, Inc.

Program Competencies
                                                                         DL 224                Lab for DL 223 (3 cr)
                                                                         DL 225                Complete Denture Technique II (1 cr)
                                                                         DL 226                Lab for DL 225 (3 cr)
Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree
in Dental Laboratory Technology, the graduate will be able to:                                 Second Year, Fall Semester
                                                                         DL 330                Dental Laboratory Practice (3 cr)
• Draw to scale and carve each permanent tooth
                                                                         DL 331                Removable Partial Denture
• Identify uses of and list the properties of the various dental
                                                                                               Technique II (1 cr)
  materials
                                                                         DL 332                Lab for DL 331 (2 cr)
• Construct a denture which is functional and aesthetic
                                                                         DL 333                Restorative Technique II (1 cr)
• Demonstrate knowledge of surveying and designing by con-
                                                                         DL 334                Lab for DL 333 (3 cr)
  structing a removable partial denture
                                                                         DL 335                Ceramics Technique I (1 cr)
• Perform minor repairs on dental lab equipment
                                                                         DL 336                Lab for DL 335 (1 cr)
• Mount and articulate maxillary and mandibular casts on a
                                                                         DL 337                Orthodontic Technique I (1 cr)
  semi-adjustable articulator
                                                                         DL 338                Lab for DL 337 (1.5 cr)
• Repair all types of oral prostheses
• Construct custom trays and fabricate models and dies                                         Second Year, Spring Semester
• Develop and construct any type of fixed bridge (single unit,           DL 440                Dental Laboratory Practice II (4 cr)
  multiple unit, Maryland bridge)                                        DL 441                Senior Seminar (1 cr)*
• Identify malocclusions                                                 DL 443                Restorative Technique III (1 cr)
• Design and construct an orthodontic appliance capable of               DL 444                Lab for DL 443 (3 cr)
  correcting a specific malocclusion                                     DL 445                Ceramics Technique II (1 cr)
• Construct various types of crowns (one-piece posted crown              DL 446                Lab for DL 445 (1 cr)
  and two-piece post, core and crown)                                    DL 450                Dental Lab Specialties (4 cr)
• Construct a bridge using semi-precision attachments and a
  milled lock attachment; also using attachments in conjunction          *NOTE: DL 441 determines eligibility for taking RG/CDT (cer-
  with removable partial dentures                                        tifying) examination.
• Construct metal substructure and build, fire and complete                                    Specialty Course Options
  porcelain on single and multiple units                                                       (three courses required)
• Construct a complete set of implant dentures                           DL 447                Orthodontic Technique II (1 cr)
• Construct a bridge and removable appliance using implants              DL 448                Lab for DL 447 (1 cr)
  attachment                                                             DL 451                Partial Dentures Seminar (2 cr)
• Treat patients of different cultural, racial, ethnic and class         DL 453                Complete Dentures Seminar (2 cr)
  backgrounds                                                            DL 455                Ceramics/Restorative Seminar (2 cr)
• Be cognizant of the healthcare system                                  DL 457                Maxillofacial Prosthesis (1 cr)
• Prevent contamination by blood borne infectious diseases               DL 458                Lab for DL 457 (1 cr)
Degree: Associate in Applied Science                                     DL 470                Dental Implantology (2 cr)
Hegis: 5204                                                              DL 480                Dental Laboratory Internship (2 cr)
Curriculum Code: 0547                                                    DL 663                Advanced Ceramics (1 cr)
Total Degree Credits: 72.0                                               DL 664                Lab for DL 663 (1 cr)
Campus Location: South                                                   DL 666                Lab for Denture Set Ups (1 cr)
Health Sciences Division                                                 DH 618                Oral Histology (2 cr)
                                                                         DH 642                Pathology (2cr)
                                                                         Twenty credits of Liberal Arts are required. The following four
                                                                         courses are required plus eight additional credits of Liberal
                                                                         Arts/General Studies of the students’ choice.
                                                                                                                                            105
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •     w w w . e c c . e d u
      CH 250             General Chemistry with Introductory                  Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
                         Organic and Biochemistry (3 cr)                      Early Childhood students must be exempt from, or have satisfac-
      MT 112             Survey of Mathematics (3 cr)                         torily completed developmental reading and writing courses
      EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)                           before enrolling in the program. Students must maintain a grade
      EN 111             Comp. & Interp. of Literature (3 cr)                 of "C" in all early childhood courses. (A "C–" or a "D" in an
      NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should                    Early Childhood course indicates that the course must be repeat-
      consult his/her academic adviser prior to registering.                  ed to remain in the Early Childhood curriculum.) As a prerequi-


      EARLY CHILDHOOD
                                                                              site of the lab experiences, students must be able to satisfy health
                                                                              and other requirements of New York State Day Care Licensing
                                                                              regulations as stated in the licensing document and New York

      Program Description
                                                                              State Division of Family Services. The college reserves the right
                                                                              to deny acceptance into the Early Childhood program when stu-
      Child care has become a national priority. Along with the               dents have incomplete or unacceptable physical report or do not
      sweeping changes in the American family have come demands               meet the requirements requested by the licensed day care centers,
      for quality early childhood education and care, resulting in the        family day care homes and public schools used for lab place-
      need for competent early childhood professionals. The Early             ments by the Early Childhood Department.
      Childhood program prepares students to assume responsible               All students must also make an appointment with an adviser
      early childhood positions. Both degree and non-degree stu-              from the Early Childhood Department before starting any lab
      dents, full or part-time, are welcome in this curriculum. Those         practicum requirements (Lab I, Lab II, Lab III).

                                                                              Program Competencies
      interested may take 12 credit hours in the Early Childhood
      department to meet New York State daycare regulations.
          The Early Childhood program consists of early childhood             Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree in
      education courses, liberal arts courses and practical field experi-     Early Childhood, the graduate will be able to:
      ence with infants and young children. Students use their class-
      room learning in a series of laboratory experiences in a variety        • Demonstrate clear knowledge of child growth and develop-
      of early childhood education centers. The first two early child-          ment
      hood lab experiences are generally offered day and evening,             • Assist the classroom teacher in establishing and maintaining a
      depending on enrollment. The third lab and student teaching               safe and healthy learning environment
      are offered only during the day; but the seminar portion for stu-       • Plan goals and objectives for early childhood programs
      dent teaching is now offered in the evenings, depending on the          • Prepare, select and use materials appropriate for the age level
      semester and need. Students working in the field may apply for            and maturity of young children
      a waiver/or LEAP credit for Labs I, II or III, depending on             • Plan and implement daily activities on the level of the children
      experience. All of the other required Early Childhood                   • Supervise the activities of young children
      Education courses are offered during both the day and evening.          • Observe, record and communicate children’s behaviors
          Graduates and students are employed in responsible early              effectively
      childhood positions in the community. These include, but are            • Provide opportunities for parental involvement in a child’s
      not limited to, positions in day care classrooms, preschool pro-          education
      grams, nursery schools, Head Start, before and after-school pro-        • Understand the history of early childhood education, the the-
      grams, family day care programs, residential setting programs,            ory and research concerning the development, behavior and
      special education programs, agencies specializing in the care of          learning of young children
      infants and young children and positions as nannies.                    • Provide opportunities for building self-confidence and

      Articulation Agreements
                                                                                strengths in young children
                                                                              • Demonstrate an awareness and sensitivity to cultural diversity
      Articulation agreements with the Child Care Coalition of                  with children, adults and the community
      Niagara Frontier Inc. CDA, CAO Head Start CDA, Erie I                   • Exhibit a healthy self-esteem and demonstrate professionalism
      BOCES, Ellicottville BOCES, West Seneca Academy of                      • Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills
      Education and Alden High School facilitate transfer of credit           • Become active members in early childhood professional orga-
      into the Erie Community College Early Childhood Department.               nizations

      Advanced Studies Agreements                                             Degree: Associate in Applied Science
                                                                              Hegis: 5503
      The Early Childhood Department has an Advanced Studies
                                                                              Curriculum Code: 0606
      agreement with Erie I BOCES which enables students at Erie I
                                                                              Total Degree Credits: 61.5
      BOCES to earn transcripted college credit for their studies in
                                                                              Campus Location: City
      the Erie I BOCES Early Childhood classes.

      Transfer Agreements
                                                                              Business & Public Service Division

      The Erie Community College Early Childhood Department has               CURRICULUM
      transfer agreements with several area colleges. The agreements                             First Year, Fall Semester
      facilitate the transfer of Erie Community College Early                 CC 200             Early Childhood Education I (3 cr)
      Childhood graduates into designated four-year programs. They            CC 201             Lab for CC 200 (1.5 cr)
      include Medaille College, Daemen College, SUNY at Buffalo,              MT 112             Survey of Math (or higher no.) (3 cr)
      SUC at Buffalo and SUC at Fredonia.                                     PS 100             General Psychology (3 cr)
                                                                              SO 100             Intro. to Sociology I (3 cr)
106                                                                           EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)

                      E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                    First Year, Spring Semester                            Accreditation
CC 202              Early Childhood Education II (3 cr)                    The Electrical Engineering Technology curriculum is fully
CC 203              Lab for CC 202 (1.5 cr)                                accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and
CC 300              Curriculum Planning (3 cr)                             Technology (TAC/ABET).

                                                                           Certifications
––––––              Social Science Elective (3 cr)
BI 107              Human Biology (3 cr)
PS 201              Developmental Psychology (3 cr)                        Graduates of the Electrical Engineering Technology program
                                                                           are ready for the following certifications:
                    Second Year, Fall Semester
CC 204              Early Childhood Education III (3 cr)                   CET: "Certified Electronics Technician" issued by the
CC 205              Lab for CC 204 (1.5 cr)                                Electronics Technicians Association International.
––––––              English Elective (3 cr)
––––––              Psychology Elective (3 cr)                             Graduates that have completed the computer/electronics
––––––              Social Science (3 cr)                                  sequence are ready for the A+ Certification issued by the
                                                                           Computer Technology Industry Association (CompTIA).

                                                                           Scholarships
EG 009              Basic Emergency Health (3 cr) or
HT 201              Advanced First Aid (3 cr)
                    Second Year, Spring Semester                           Departmental scholarships are awarded depending on the cor-
CC 206              Student Teaching/Seminar (6 cr)                        porate and professional society grants that are received.

                                                                           Program Competencies
––––––              Elective (3 cr)
––––––              Humanities/Social Science Elective (3 cr)
                                                                           Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree in
NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult               Electrical Engineering Technology, the graduate will be able to:
his/her academic adviser prior to registering. Students planning on
transferring to a four-year college or university should see an advis-     • Interpret electrical/electronics or logic schematics using
er in the Early Childhood Department in order to choose the cours-           ASA standard symbols
es which will transfer best.                                               • Recognize electronic devices, their coded values and their


ELECTRICAL
                                                                             function within a circuit
                                                                           • Construct an analog or digital circuit given its electronic


ENGINEERING
                                                                             schematic


TECHNOLOGY
                                                                           • Solder, desolder and rework electronic circuit boards
                                                                           • Use a computer as an analytical tool and to generate reports
                                                                           • Communicate the results of lab tests through well organized

Program Description
                                                                             and written technical reports
                                                                           • Understand electronic and logic principles, concepts, laws
The Electrical Engineering Technology program has enjoyed                    and rules and apply these to analysis of circuit performance
more than 50 years of service to the local community. It is the            • Determine a circuit’s proper response and identify compo-
only electronics training program in Western New York that                   nent or circuit failures
offers both TAC/ABET accreditation and full transfer credit to             • Properly select and use a variety of electronic instruments to
four year colleges.                                                          measure and record data
    This program prepares students for entry-level skills as techni-       • Perform tests on electronic systems for determination of
cians in the fields of electronics, computers, communications,               proper performance, calibration, or troubleshooting
instrumentation, automation and power. It also provides the first          • Install, operate, troubleshoot and program microcontrollers
two years of a four-year engineering technology program.                     and programmable logic controllers (PLCs)
    The faculty meet the highest standard of academic excellence           • Install, operate and troubleshoot communications equip-
for technician training. Their credentials include graduate                  ment, instrumentation, control systems and electrical
degrees in engineering along with professional engineering expe-             machines and controls
riences that enrich the classroom presentation. A close liaison
                                                                           Degree: Associate in Applied Science
between the faculty and their industrial advisory council ensures
                                                                           Hegis: 5310
that the curriculum content prepares the graduate for entry into
                                                                           Curriculum Code: 0699
the local job market.
                                                                           Total Degree Credits: 72.0
    The students are presented a solid foundation in electrical
                                                                           Campus Location: North
and electronics theory along with hands-on laboratory experi-
                                                                           Engineering & Technologies Division
ence. Computer simulation and applications are an integral part
                                                                           CURRICULUM
of the curriculum.
    Although the program adheres to rigorous academic stan-
dards, students whose high school experience is deficient are              Full-Time Students, Two-year Sequence
offered remedial courses. Faculty consultation, both faculty and
senior-student tutoring and schedule adjustments are also avail-                              First Year, Fall Semester
able for students.                                                         EL110              Electricity I (4 cr)
    Graduates find employment in electronics industries and                EL 111             Lab for EL 110 (1 cr)
other fields requiring electronics technicians. Our graduates may          EL 121             Computer Applications In Elect. (1.5 cr)
select from a variety of job types including electronic repair, pro-       EL 113             Computer Aided Design (1.5 cr)
totyping, testing, field service, industrial sales, maintenance, cus-      MT 122             Technical Mathematics II** (4 cr) or
tomer support and technical writing. Many students also contin-            MT 126             College Mathematics II** (4 cr)
ue their education at a four-year college directly after graduation.                                                                          107
                E C C      2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      PH 260/PH 261 Technical Physics I/Physics Lab (4 cr)                    EN 110           College Composition (w/permission) (3 cr)
      EN 120        Comp. & Occupational                                      MT 122           Technical Mathematics II** (4 cr) or
                    Communications(3 Cr)                                      MT 126           College Mathematics II (4 cr)
                           First Year, Spring Semester                                      First Year, Spring Semester
      EL 150               Electricity II (4 cr)                              EN 121        Comp. & Readings in Science & Lit. (3 cr) or
      EL 161               Lab for EL 150 (1 cr)                              EN 111        Compositions and Interpretation of
      EL 153               Electronic Fabrication (1.5 cr)                                  Literature (with permission) (3 cr)
      EL 154               Electronics I (3 cr)                               PH 260/PH 261 Technical Physics I /Physics Lab (4 cr)
      EL 155               Lab for EL 154 (1 cr)
                                                                                               Second Year, Fall Semester
      EL 156               Digital Logic (3 cr)
                                                                              EL 110           Electricity I (4 cr)
      EL 157               Lab for EL 156 (1.5 cr)
                                                                              EL 111           Lab for EL 110 (1 cr)
      EN 121               Composition and Readings in
                                                                              EL 113           Computer Aided Design (1.5 cr)
                           Science and Literature (3 cr)
                                                                                               Second Year, Spring Semester
                           Second Year, Fall Semester
                                                                              EL 150           Electricity II (4 cr)
      EL 200               Microcontrollers (3 cr)
                                                                              EL 161           Lab for EL 150 (1 cr)
      EL 201               Lab for EL 200 (1 cr)
                                                                              EL 153           Electronic Fabrication (1.5 cr)
      EL 204               Electronics II (3 cr)
      EL 205               Lab for EL 204 (1.5 cr)                                             Third Year, Fall Semester
      EL ___               Technical Sequence (3 cr)                          MT 171           Elements of Calculus
      EL –––               Lab for Technical Sequence (1.5cr)                                  with Technical Applications** (4 cr)
      MT 171               Elements of Calculus with                          EL121            Computer Applications in Electronics (1.5 cr)
                           Technical Applications** (4 cr)
                                                                                               Third Year, Spring Semester
                           Second Year, Spring Semester                       EL 154           Electronics I (3 cr)
      EL                   Technical Elective (3.5 cr)                        EL 155           Lab for EL 154 (1.5 cr)
      EL 260               Programmable Logic Controllers (3 cr)              EL 156           Digital Logic (3 cr)
      EL ____              Technical Sequence (3 cr)                          EL 157           Lab for EL 156 (1.5 cr)
      EL ____              Lab for Technical Sequence (1.5 cr)
      PH 262/              Technical Physics II/Physics Lab (4 cr)                             Fourth Year, Fall Semester
      PH 263               Social Science Elective (3 cr)                     EL 200           Microcontrollers (3 cr)
                                                                              EL 201           Lab for EL 200 (1 cr)
                           Industrial Electronics                             EL 204           Electronics II (3 cr)
                           Technical Sequence                                 EL 205           Lab for EL 204 (1.5 cr)
      EL 206               Machines and Controls (3 cr)
      EL 207               Lab for EL 206 (1.5 cr)                                          Fourth Year, Spring Semester
      EL 256               Control Systems (3 cr)                             PH 262/PH 263 Technical Physics II/Physics Lab (4 cr)
      EL 257               Lab for EL 256 (1.5 cr)                            EL            Technical Elective (3.5 cr)
                                                                                               Fifth Year, Fall Semester
                           Computer Electronics – Technical Sequence          EL ___           Technical Sequence (3 cr)
      EL 208               Microcomputers (3 cr)                              EL ___           Lab for Technical Sequence (1.5 cr)
      EL 209               Lab for EL 208 (1.5 cr)                            EL 260           Programmable Logic Controllers (3 cr)
      EL 258               Data Communications (3 cr)                                          Fifth Year, Spring Semester
      EL 259               Lab for EL 258 (1.5 cr)                            EL ___           Technical Sequence (3 cr)
                           Technical Electives                                EL ___           Lab for Technical Sequence (1.5 cr)
      EL270                Electronic Communications (3.5 cr)                 ––––––           Social Science Elective (3 cr)
      EL272                Embedded C Applications (3.5 cr)                                    Industrial Electronics – Technical Sequence
      EL 274               Internship (3 cr)                                  EL 206           Machines and Controls (3 cr)
                           Two industrial work days of 4 hours each           EL 207           Lab for EL 206 (1.5 cr)
                                                                              EL 256           Control Systems (3cr)
      NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult            EL 257           Lab for EL 256 (1.5 cr)
      his/her academic adviser prior to registering. Students should be
      aware that all technical sequence electives may not be offered each                      Computer Electronics – Technical Sequence
      semester.                                                               EL 208           Microcomputers (3 cr)

      CURRICULUM
                                                                              EL 209           Lab for EL 208(1.5 cr)
                                                                              EL 258           Data Communications (3cr)

      Part-Time Students
                                                                              EL 259           Lab for EL 258 (1.5 cr)
                                                                                               Technical Electives
                           First Year, Fall Semester                          EL 270           Electronic Communications (3.5 cr)
      EN 120               Composition and Occupational                       EL 272           Embedded C Applications (3.5 cr)
                           Communications (3 cr) or
                                                                              NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult
                                                                              his/her academic adviser prior to registering.
108
                      E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C    •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                            EMERGENCY
                                                                            MANAGEMENT
**Higher level mathematics sequence will be allowed with approval
of department head.


                                                                            Program Description
Any three credit social science course will be allowed.
Any student who withdraws or receives a failing grade from a
course that is a prerequisite for another course must seek depart-          The mission of the Associate in Applied Science program in
ment approval to register for the course requiring the prerequisite.        Emergency Management is to prepare students with the knowl-
The application for approval should be submitted for a department           edge and experience to respond to and be effective before, dur-
meeting prior to the registration period.                                   ing and after any local, statewide, or national emergency. The

Extended Program Sequence (if required by adviser)
                                                                            need for effective emergency management has become a signifi-
                                                                            cant national priority, brought about by the recent concerns
                    Fall Semester                                           with response and recovery operations for Hurricane Katrina.
MT–––               Mathematics** (4 cr)                                        Additionally, the constant threat of terrorism and events sur-
PH –––              Physics** (4 cr)                                        rounding situations like the attack on the World Trade Center,
EN –––              English** (3 cr)                                        the documented rise in the number of weather related disasters
EL 010              Introduction to Technology I (2 cr)                     and increasingly complex world events with regards to other
                                                                            natural and human-induced disasters provides strong evidence
                    Spring Semester                                         for the immediate and long-term need for well-trained highly
MT–––               Mathematics** (4 cr)                                    qualified emergency managers. Individuals completing this cur-
EN –––              English** (3 cr)                                        riculum will have gained the necessary skills to contribute to the
––––––              Social Science Elective (3 cr)                          four phases of emergency management: mitigation, prepared-
* Satisfactory completion of pre-electrical sequence will allow stu-        ness, response and recovery. Trained with the knowledge and
dents to enter first year of regular program.                               understanding of how individuals and organizations at all levels
                                                                            of government should respond during disasters, students com-
** Course numbers as required by pre-test.                                  pleting the program will be able to face the specific challenges

Overhead Electric Line Worker Program
                                                                            encountered by emergency responders and managers.
                                                                                Individuals, firefighters, police officers, emergency medical
The following sequence of courses will prepare students for                 personnel and safety officers in both the public and the private
employment as Line Mechanics for the power utility companies.               sectors will enhance career opportunities and be better prepared
Qualification includes a physical strength test, an aptitude test           to offer practical strategies and methodologies for effective
and the ability to obtain a commercial driver's license. Courses            response. Learning activities will include fundamentals in emer-
may be applied to a planned future Associate in Applied Science             gency planning, leadership and influence, decision making and
degree option for Energy Workers. This training is provided                 problem solving, incident command, exercise programs and the
through the Electrical Engineering Technology Department.                   emergency operations center.
                    Prerequisite                                                Graduates will be able to engage, facilitate and encourage
MT 125              College Math I (4) or                                   community and organizational disaster preparedness to newly
                                                                            recognized national standards.

                                                                            Program Competencies
MT 121
                    First Year, Fall Semester
EL 110              Electricity I (4 cr) & EL 111 Lab (1 cr)  5             • Demonstrate an understanding of emergency management
MT 126              College Math II (4 cr) or MT122 (4 cr)    4               functions, organizations and activities
PH 260              Tech Physics I (4 cr) & PH 261 Lab (0 cr) 4             • Ability to explain the local, state and federal roles in emer-
                                                             13               gency management
                                                                            • Recognize and understand the role of organizations and indi-
                    First Year, Spring Semester
                                                                              viduals, as well as their relationships with one another, in
EL 150              Electricity II (4 cr) & EL 161 Lab (1 cr)    5
                                                                              emergency management systems
EL 153              Electronic Fabrication (1.5 cr)            1.5
                                                                            • Respond to disasters involving hazardous material
EL 170              Electric Power System (2 cr) - & Lab (2 cr) 3
                                                                            • Illustrate methods used to maintain or increase the skill and
EN 110              English (3 cr)                               3
                                                                              motivation level of volunteers involved in emergency man-
                                                              12.5
                                                                              agement
                    Summer                                                  • Ability to integrate knowledge about the different styles of
EL 173              Electric Power Overhead Const (Note 1) 4                  leadership and influence and understand their impact on
Total Hours                                              29.5                 behavior in an emergency management context

Certificate-Level Courses
                                                                            • Recognize circumstances and on-scene key indicators that an
                                                                              incident may be an intentionally caused terrorist event
The following courses are available from the Electrical                     • Understand and describe defensive considerations associated
Engineering Technology Department:                                            with biological, nuclear, incendiary, chemical and explosive
                                                                              incidents
EL 060              Residential Wiring (3 cr)

Evening Students
                                                                            • Ability to identify and monitor hazard risks, and identify
                                                                              opportunities to mitigate hazardous conditions
Evening students follow the part-time student sequence.                     • Understand the operation of Unified Command functions on
                                                                              a multi-jurisdiction or multi-agency incident


                                                                                                                                                 109
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -     2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      Degree: Associate in Applied Science                                  Paramedics staff pre-hospital mobile advanced life support units,
      Hegis: 5508                                                           as well as emergency industrial health and safety units. Also,
      Curriculum Code: 1741                                                 many paramedics assume other roles in clinical settings.
      Total Degree Credits: 66 - 67                                             This program's primary objective is to prepare students to
      Campus Location: City & South                                         become certified as paramedics and effective components in the
      Business & Public Service Division                                    delivery of pre-hospital advanced life support.

      CURRICULUM
                                                                                Full-Time (day and evening programs) - The two-semester,
                                                                            52-week EMT-P program begins in August and concludes the
      Full-Time Sequence
                                                                            following August. During the first 32 weeks (first semester), there
                                                                            is a mixture of lecture and laboratory work. In addition to class
                           First Year, Fall Semester                        work, the student will also perform clinical rotations through var-
      EN 120               Composition & Occupational                       ious emergency departments, morgue, labor and delivery rooms,
                           Communications (3 Cr)                            operating rooms of affiliated hospitals and the gross anatomy lab
      ______               Open Elective (3 cr)                             at Daemen College.
      ER 150               Principles of Emergency Management (2 cr)            The last 20 weeks (second semester) is primarily spent in the
      ER 152               Public Safety Critical Incident                  hospital clinical setting and field internship clinical rotations.
                           Management (1 cr)                                There will be some time spent in a lab setting performing assess-
      ER 160               Development of Volunteer Resources (1 cr)        ment-based management and the mandated New York State
      ER 162               Resource & Donations Management (2 cr)           final practical examination. The majority of graduates staff pre-
      ER 170               Public Information Officer                       hospital advanced life support paramedic units or work in indus-
                           Basic Course (3 cr)                              trial health settings. Approximately 25 percent of previous gradu-
                                                                            ates continue their education, many eventually becoming physi-
                           First Year, Spring Semester                      cians, physician's assistants, registered nurses, emergency medical
      EN 121               Composition & Readings in Science and            service supervisors and hospital administrators.

                                                                            Accreditation
                           Literature (3 cr)
      DA 106               Introduction to Microcomputer
                           Applications (3 cr)                              • American Heart Association Basic CPR credential
      ______               Science (3-4 cr)                                 • American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support
      ER 178               Emergency Response Planning (3 cr)                 Provider credential.
      ER 180               Emergency Management Leadership (2 cr)           • American Heart Association Pediatric Advanced Life
      ER 182               Basic Incident Command System (1 cr)               Support credential.
      ER 184               Emergency Response to Terrorism (1 cr)           • American Academy of Emergency Physicians'- International
                           Second Year, Fall Semester                         Trauma Life Support - Advanced Provider credential.
      CR 150               Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 cr)          • State University of New York Certificate - EMT Paramedic
                                                                            • NYS Health Department Certification - EMT Paramedic

                                                                            Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
      ______               Math (3 cr)
      ER 252               Disaster Response and Recovery
                           Operations (2 cr)
                                                                            • Student must contact the Emergency Medical Technology
      ER 256               Mitigation for Emergency Managers (1.5 cr)
                                                                              Department at South Campus for preliminary advisement.
      ER 262               Intermediate Incident Command
                                                                            • Student must seek an interview and advisement with the
                           System (1.5 cr)
                                                                              EMT Department faculty prior to registration.
      ER 270               Multi-Hazard Response Planning for
                                                                            • Student must meet all of the following prerequisites:
                           Schools (1 cr)
                                                                            • Current Basic EMT certification
      ______               CJ/HPER/FPT/EMT Elective (6 cr)
                                                                            • High school diploma or its equivalent
                           Second Year, Spring Semester                     • Be physically fit to provide advanced pre-hospital emergency
      ______               Social Science (3 cr)                              medical care. A physical examination by a physician is
      ER 278               Emergency Operations Center (1.5 cr)               required, with appropriate immunizations.
      ER 280               Emergency Program Management. (3 cr)             • A student who has previously attended ECC must be in good
      ER 282               Advanced Incident Command System (1.5 cr)          academic standing.
      ER 284               Terrorism Response Planning (2 cr)               • Applicants must not have any convictions for any crime or
      ______               CJ/FPT/EMT Elective (6 cr)                         crimes related to murder, manslaughter, assault, sexual abuse,


      EMERGENCY
                                                                              theft, robbery, drug abuse or the sale of drugs, or current
                                                                              charges for any such crime.


      MEDICAL
                                                                            • It is strongly encouraged that candidates have as much EMT


      TECHNOLOGY/
                                                                              patient care field experience as possible prior to entering the
                                                                              program. (Non-driving role). EMT faculty have observed stu-

      PARAMEDIC
                                                                              dents and believe candidates entering the paramedic program
                                                                              with minimal EMT patient contact experience have a much

      Program Description
                                                                              more difficult time meeting program requirements.
                                                                            • Being an active member of a volunteer, municipal, or com-
      The Emergency Medical Technology/Paramedic (EMT-P) cer-                 mercial EMT unit prior to applying is strongly recommended
      tificate program at the South Campus is designed to meet the
      1998 national standard for emergency medical training.
110
                     E C C      2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Math Competencies Required                                           • Perform umbilical vein catheterization (P)
Complete the ECC math placement test with a code of MTLV2            • Apply MAST trousers (B, A, P)
or higher. If you do not score at the MTLV2 level or higher on       • Perform intramuscular, subcutaneous, IV push injections,
the placement test you may:                                            IV infusions, aerosolized, oral and topical medication admin-
a. Enroll in and successfully complete the ECC non-credit math         istration (P)
course MT 001 prior to the start of the Paramedic program            • Calculate drug dosages (P)
b. Study on your own material similar to the content of the          • Perform basic and/or advanced airway techniques to
pretest and retake the pretest to score at the MTLV2 level.            include, but not limited to, esophageal obturator airway,
                                                                       combitube, endotracheal intubation and LMA (B, A, P)
The Math pretest may be waived if you meet one of the following:
                                                                     • Initiate oxygen therapy utilizing the appropriate equipment
a. Scored 500 points or higher on the math section
                                                                       (B, A, P)
 *or*
                                                                     • Perform CPR (B, A, P)
b. Previously successfully completed a college level math course
                                                                     • Perform defibrillation and cardiac monitoring (B, A, P)
*or*
                                                                     • Perform cardioversion and transcutaneous pacing, 12 lead
c. Passed the New York State Math Regents examination with a
                                                                       EKG (P)
score of 85 percent (B) or higher within the last three years.
                                                                     • Interpret patient electrocardiograms and initiate proper
English Competencies Required                                          treatment (B, A, P)
Complete the ECC English placement test with a code of               • Properly manage central nervous system injuries to include
WRLV3 and RELV3 or higher. If you do not score at the                  immobilizing devices (B, A, P)
WRLV3 and RELV3 level or higher, you may:                            • Properly manage soft tissue injuries (B, A, P)
a. Enroll in and successfully complete the English non-credit        • Properly manage orthopedic emergencies to include splint-
courses as indicated by pre-testing, prior to the start of the         ing techniques (B, A, P)
Paramedic program.                                                   • Assist in normal and abnormal obstetrical deliveries (B, A, P)
*or*                                                                 • Manage psychiatric emergencies (B, A, P)
b. Retake the pretest.                                               • Manage violence containment (B, A, P)
                                                                     • Perform chest decompression (A, P)
The English placement test may be waived if you meet one of          • Operate radio communications equipment (B, A, P)
the following:                                                       • Perform as a team member (B, A, P)
a. Scored 500 points or greater on the English section of the        • Explain role of medical direction (A, P)
SAT                                                                  • Demonstrate written communication procedure (B, A, P)
 *or*                                                                • Demonstrate the ability to provide an accurate written
b. Previously successfully completed a college level English           Patient Care Report (PCR) (B, A, P)
course
*or*                                                                 NOTES:
c. Passed the New York State English Regents exam with a             B = Basic EMT/D
score of 85 percent (B) or higher within the last 3 years.           A = EMT/Intermediate

Department Notes
                                                                     P = EMT Paramedic

Satisfactory completion of the Basic EMT certification and field     CURRICULUM
experience does not guarantee admission into the Intermediate
or Paramedic certification programs.                                                    First Semester (August to March)
                                                                     EG 099             Introduction, Pathophysiology & Lifespan
• The Basic EMT certificate course is offered at North and                              Development (3 cr)
  South campuses as are other EMT program electives.                 EG 101             Advanced Airway Mgmt. Lab (1 cr)
• Application for ECC graduate status for paramedic students         EG 103             Patient Assessment (2 cr)
  is required prior to NYS Certification exam.                       EG 104             Patient Assessment Lab (1 cr)
• Clinical sites require verification of physical exam and immu-     EG 105             Pharmacology (2 cr)
  nizations.                                                         EG 106             Pharmacology Lab (1 cr)
Degree: Certificate                                                  EG 107             Respiratory & Cardiology (2 cr)
Hegis: 5299                                                          EG 108             Respiratory & Cardiac Lab (1 cr)
Curriculum Code: 0983                                                EG 109             Paramedic Clinical I (1 cr)
Total Degree Credits: 39.5                                           EG 110             Paramedic Clinical II (1 cr)
Campus Location: South - Day and Evening Programs                    EG 200             EMS Operations (3 cr)
Prerequisite: Basic EMT offered at: North, South                     EG 204             Medical Emergencies II (2 cr)
                                                                     EG 205             Medical Emergencies II Lab (1 cr)
Upon completion of EMT course or courses, the graduate will
prove competency in those skills pertinent to his/her level of                          Second Semester (March to August)
training as indicated below: (See Notes for explanation.)            EG 201             Trauma (2 cr)
                                                                     EG 202             Trauma Lab (1 cr)
• Properly conduct a patient history, physical examination and       EG 203             Medical Emergencies I (4 cr)
  properly manage medical and trauma patients (B, A, P)              EG 206             Paramedic Clinical III (2 cr)
• Perform proper Body Substance Isolation (B, A, P)                  EG 302             Paramedic Clinical IV (2.5 cr)
• Perform peripheral venipuncture using an angiocatheter, but-       EG 303             Paramedic Ambulance Field
  terfly, saline trap and vacutainer (A, P)                                             Internship (7 cr)
                                                                                                                                        111
               E C C    2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      ENGINEERING
      SCIENCE
                                                                                                 First Year, Fall Semester
                                                                             ES 138              Engineering Concepts (1 cr);
                                                                             ES 139              Computer Skills for Engineers (1 cr)

      Program Description
                                                                             ES 148              Engineering Graphics (1 cr)
                                                                             ES 149              CAD Lab for ES 148 (1 cr)
      The Engineering Science program at Erie Community College is           MT 181              Calculus & Analytical Geometry I (4 cr)
      an alternative to the first two years of the baccalaureate program     CH 180              General Chemistry (3 cr) (formerly CH 300)
      in engineering at a large four-year university. Classes at the         CH 181              Lab for CH 180 (1.5 cr) (formerly CH 301)
      North Campus are small and in this intimate setting, learning is       EN 120              Composition and Occupational
      greatly enhanced. The personal attention, small classes and con-                           Communications (3 cr) or
      tinued guidance are important factors in students’ success at          EN 110              College Composition (3 cr.)
      ECC. This two-year engineering science program is designed to          ––––––              Social Science Elective* (3 cr)
      qualify students for transfer to a four-year engineering program.
          The Engineering Science curriculum includes courses in                                 First Year, Spring Semester
      English, social science, advanced mathematics, physics and             ES 181              Engineering Materials (3 cr)
      chemistry. Within this program, students will also take certain        MT182               Calculus & Analytic Geometry II (4 cr)
      prescribed engineering courses and elect others, depending on          PH 280              Physics (4.5 cr);
      the requirements of the four-year engineering school of their          PH 281              Physics Lab for PH 280;
      choice. These required courses have been designed to facilitate        CH 182**            General Chemistry (3 cr) and
      transfer to baccalaureate engineering programs. Graduates of                               formerly CH 302
      this program continue their engineering education at four-year         CH 183**            Lab for CH 182 (1.5 cr)
      colleges and universities. Many attend other State University of                           formerly CH 303
      New York institutions such as SUNY at Buffalo and SUNY at              EN 121              Composition & Readings in Science and
      Binghamton, while others attend private universities, including                            Literature (3 cr) or
      Rochester Institute of Technology, Clarkson University,                EN 111              Composition & Interpretation
      University of Detroit, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,                                   of Literature (3 cr.)
      Kettering University and Syracuse University. Students opt for         ES 204**            Thermodynamics (4 cr)
      degrees in many types of engineering, including aeronautical                               Second Year, Fall Semester
      engineering, ceramic engineering, chemical engineering, civil          ES 207              Statics (3 cr)
      engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering,             MT 284              Introduction to Differential Equations (4 cr)
      industrial engineering, manufacturing engineering, materials           MT 191              Applications of Digital Computer (4 cr)
      engineering, mechanical engineering and metallurgical engineer-        PH 282              Physics II (4.5cr)
      ing. If students have the appropriate grade average, they can          PH 283              Lab for PH 282
      transfer into these previously mentioned programs as juniors.

      Program Competencies
                                                                             _______             Social Science Elective* (3 cr)
                                                                                                 Second Year, Spring Semester
      Upon graduation with an Associate in Science degree in                 ES 208              Dynamics (3 cr)
      Engineering Science, the graduate will be able to:                     PH 284 **           Physics III (4.5 cr)
                                                                             PH 285**            Lab for PH 284
      • Enter, with junior standing, one of many engineering col-            MT 283              Calculus & Analytic Geometry III (4 cr)
        leges, provided grades are acceptable                                ES 200              Electrical Networks I (4 cr.) or
      • Attack problems; solve them in the traditional engineering           ES 209              Mechanics of Materials (3 cr)
        fashion of: Given, Find, Solution                                    ES 210              Lab for ES 209 (1 cr);
      • Utilize developed math skills and physical concepts to prob-
        lem solving                                                          * Social Science electives should be selected on the basis of the
      • Use the computer, as a tool, to help in problem solving              requirements of the engineering school of the student’s choice.
      • Conduct and write laboratory tests/experiments in a thor-
                                                                             ** Contact academic adviser regarding these courses.
        ough fashion using proper communications skills
      • Develop an appreciation of the non-technical, human                  To promote smooth transfer of ECC engineering science students
        aspects of engineering                                               to four year engineering institutions and also to accommodate
      • Recognize the difference between a technician, technologist          specific changes in the curriculum at these institutions, the engi-
        and an engineer                                                      neering science department may make adjustments to its curricu-
      • Appreciate and have an interest in literature                        lum by introducing new courses that might be specific to certain
                                                                             engineering disciplines. Consult with the academic adviser regard-
      Degree: Associate in Science
                                                                             ing the curriculum.
      Hegis: 5609


                                                                             ENTREPRENEURSHIP
      Curriculum Code: 0530
      Total Degree Credits: 71.5
      Campus Location: North

                                                                             Program Description
      Engineering & Technologies Division

      CURRICULUM                                                             The Entrepreneurship certificate is designed to assist the student
      Students should consult with his/her academic adviser prior to         in the establishment and operation of a small business. While
      registering.                                                           most of the courses satisfy partial requirements for an Associate in
                                                                             Applied Science degree in Business Administration, many
112
                     E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
students take this program solely to acquire the knowledge                   At this writing, Buffalo is home to two huge banks and a
needed to meet entrepreneurial goals. In addition to honing             regional center for three others, with a number of smaller insti-
computer and writing skills, the program focuses on developing          tutions having area presence. Erie County serves as a regional
the skills needed to write a business plan, keep books and create       base for GEICO Insurance, Merchants Mutual and a handful
a marketing plan.                                                       of smaller operators. Our real estate market, compared with
                                                                        much of the nation, is strong and growing.
Degree: Certificate
                                                                             Human Resources officers at many of these financial entities
Hegis: 5004
                                                                        report aggressive recruitment efforts in place. They encounter
Curriculum Code: 1192
                                                                        bright, well-intentioned employment candidates; however,
Campus Locations: City

Program Competencies
                                                                        many of these job-seekers appear to lack basic job skills, includ-
                                                                        ing familiarity with the industry. Coupled with developmental
Upon successful completion of this program, the student will be         work in math and English skills, a new certificate in Financial
able to:                                                                Services will do much to rectify this lack of job preparation.
                                                                             This SUNY certificate is grounded in this belief: Major local
• Use a computer with basic competency                                  employers have developed strong in-house training programs
• Write clearly and concisely                                           focusing on the business at hand; however, ancillary knowledge
• Understand the history of American business and capitalism            and skills make the student a more attractive candidate for
• Prepare a business plan worthy of acceptance and processing           employment and promotion. For example, HSBC and M&T
  by the banking community                                              Bank are equipped to thoroughly acquaint new hires with the
• Demonstrate the skills acquired in a business elective                details of banking operations; however, employees need collater-
• Keep a set of books and analyze financial statements                  al knowledge of business law, accounting, insurance, etc. to be

CURRICULUM
                                                                        truly effective bank assets. Ten of the 12 courses mandated in
                                                                        this program would also count toward the Associate of Applied
The majority of these courses may be taken in any sequence;             Science in Business Administration degree. This program thus
however, Business Plan Construction and the internship should           fills an immediate need and applies credit toward the A.A.S. in
not be attempted until the student has acquired foundation tools.       Business, a degree many employers are willing to subsidize.
                         First Semester                                 Program Competencies
BU 120                   Introduction to Accounting (3 cr) or           •   Interpret various accounting/financial statements
                         (Formerly BU 100)                              •   Demonstrate good reasoning and analytical skills
BU 121                   Accounting Principles I (4 cr)                 •   Understand the ethical and legal foundations of business
                         (Formerly BU 200)                              •   Understand the basic concepts of business
BU 131                   Computer Application in Business (3 cr)        •   Be prepared to enter employment upon graduation in the
                         (Formerly BU 315)                                  financial field
BU 140                   Introduction to Business (3 cr)
                         (Formerly BU 400)                              Degree: Certificate
BU 151                   Marketing I (3 cr)                             Hegis: 5003
                         (Formerly BU 500)                              Curriculum Code: 0907
EN 110                   College Composition (3 cr)                     Total Degree Credits: 37
                                                                        Campus Location: City
                         Second Semester                                Business & Public Service Division

                                                                        CURRICULUM
BU 240                   Principles of Management (3 cr)
                         (Formerly BU 405)
BU 243                   Entrepreneurship (3 cr)                        While technically a two semester certificate, some students may
                         (Formerly BU 415)                              need remediation in Math and/or English early in the program,
BU 247                   Business Plan Completion (3 cr)                delaying progress. The mandated credit hours are rather high
                         (Formerly BU 420)                              for a certificate; hence, the sequence shown below may be
BU 271                   Internship (3 cr)                              appropriate only for those with substantial available time. Most
                         (Formerly BU 590)                              students will likely need one and one-half years for program
BU____                   Business Elective (3 cr)                       completion.


FINANCIAL
                                                                                           First Semester


SERVICES
                                                                        BU 121             Accounting Principles I (4 cr)


CERTIFICATE
                                                                        BU 130             Quantitative Business Methods (3 cr)
                                                                        BU 131             Computer Applications in Business (3 cr)
                                                                        BU 233             Consumer Finance (3 cr)

Program Description
                                                                        EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
                                                                        BA 173             Principles of Bank Operations (3 cr)
Given the demise of the basic steel industry and the substantial
decline in automobile affiliated manufacturing in Western New                              Second Semester
York, private sector employment opportunities appear to exist           BU 225             Income Taxation (3 cr)
primarily in a segment normally referred to as the Financial            BU 234             Investments (3 cr)
Services industry. This field historically embraces banking, insur-     BU 261             Business Law I (3 cr)
ance and real estate, with the later two requiring state licensing      OF 140             Business English (3 cr)
for many of the positions offered.                                      BA 237             Real Estate and Insurance (3 cr)
                                                                        BA 638             Insurance I (3 cr)                                113
               E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      FIRE PROTECTION
      TECHNOLOGY
                                                                               • Demonstrate a working knowledge of New York State laws
                                                                                 and the criminal procedure regarding the fire service
                                                                               • Identify the various families of hazardous materials

      Program Description
                                                                               • Demonstrate an understanding of the operational principles
                                                                                 behind the various methods available to extinguishing fires of
      In an increasingly complex world of changing technologies, syn-            widely varied origin
      thetic materials and budget crises, the fire chief and line officers     • Respond to disasters involving hazardous materials
      must not only be an authority on fire suppression and preven-            • Demonstrate an understanding of firefighter safety issues
      tion, but must also be skilled in the fields of management, man-         • Understand risk analysis
      power utilization and personnel development. The Fire                    • Recognize and understand the dangers of radioactive sub-
      Protection Technology curriculum combines all the elements                 stances and the procedures to follow when encountered
      necessary to prepare the paid and volunteer firefighting profes-         • Understand the principles of securing evidence at a fire scene,
      sional.                                                                    and of record keeping and documentation
          The objectives of this program are to promote effective fire         • Determine when an experienced fire investigator is needed at
      fighting strategies; to develop qualities of leadership necessary in       a fire scene
      fire administration and supervision and to provide firefighters,         • Understand the principles of leadership, supervision, human
      officers and chiefs with a comprehensive background and                    resources and fiscal management
      updated information in the fire protection area, with an empha-          • Demonstrate an understanding of the internal workings of fire
      sis on the management and administration of fire departments               departments and contemporary problems of fire departments
      large and small.
          This curriculum introduces students to the latest techniques         Degree: Associate in Applied Science
      of firefighting and fire prevention and employs faculty members          Hegis: 5507
      from among the ranks of the firefighting community. Lectures,            Curriculum Code: 0639
      demonstrations, field trips and discussions will lead the student        Total Degree Credits: 66.0
      from the basics of fire protection equipment and building con-           Campus Location: South
      struction to the fields of radiological theory, fire investigations,     Business & Public Service Division

                                                                               CURRICULUM
      the handling of hazardous materials, resource typing and grant
      writing to dealing with terrorist situations. Fire operations strat-
      egy gives the students an opportunity to utilize all the acquired        Full Time Sequence
      skills and to improve them through the information acquired in
      the management and leadership courses. The fire protection                                    First Year, Fall Semester
      courses and the general studies courses combine to prepare the           FP 101               Fire Prevention & Protection (3 cr)
      firefighter, fire officer and fire investigator for the challenges of    FP 102               Fire Protection Equipment &
      modern day fire fighting.                                                                     Alarm Systems (3 cr)
          Graduates of this curriculum are well qualified to accept            FF 107               Chemistry of Hazardous Materials (3 cr)
      leadership positions as fire officers, chiefs, marshals, arson inves-    FP 114               Fire Personnel Management/
      tigators and safety officers in both the public and private sec-                              Administration/Administration (3 cr)
      tors.                                                                    ––––––               Math Elective (3 cr)

      Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites                             FP 105
                                                                                                    First Year, Spring Semester
                                                                                                    Fire Operations Strategy (3 cr)
      Students who have taken fire service training with appropriate
                                                                               FP 109               Radiological Theory and
      state or county certificates may be able to apply these courses to
                                                                                                    Instrumentation (3 cr)
      fulfill their degree requirements. Apply for transfer credit as early
                                                                               CH 200               Introduction to College Chemistry I (3 cr)
      as possible.

      Program Competencies
                                                                               FP 113               Fire Codes & Standards (3 cr)
                                                                               EN 120               Comp. & Occupational
      Upon graduation with the Associate in Applied Science degree                                  Communication (3 cr)
      in Fire Protection Technology, the graduate will be able to:             ______               Social Studies Elective (3 cr)
                                                                               ______               Physics/Science Elective (3 cr)
      • Demonstrate an understanding of fire prevention and fire
        suppression                                                                                 Second Year, Fall Semester
      • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the responsibilities of             FP 103               Building Construction & Fire Hazards (3 cr)
        the Fire Service in fire origin cause and of the principles of         FP 106               Legal Aspects of Fire Protection (3 cr)
        fire investigation                                                     FP 112               Historical Developments of Fire
      • Differentiate various types of fire suppression systems and                                 Science (3 cr)
        their component parts                                                  EN 121               Composition & Readings in Science & (3 cr)
      • Handle citizen complaints/inquiries concerning fire safety             CH 202               Introduction to College Chemistry II (3 cr)
        systems or concerns                                                    _______              First Aid/Emergency Medical Tech. (3 cr)
      • Understand the general and specific construction features of                                Second Year, Spring Semester
        buildings with emphasis on fire service associated problems            FP 108               Safety in Industry & Fire Service (3 cr)
      • Have an improved ability to safely evaluate the effects of fire        FP 110               Fire Investigation (3 cr)
        on various types of buildings                                          FP 107               Chemistry of Hazardous Materials (3 cr)
      • Apply the tactical and technical skills necessary to direct fire       FP 116               Fire Arson Internship
        personnel in the performance of fire suppression and pre-              ______               Social Science Elective (3 cr)
114     vention activities                                                     ______               Humanities Elective (3 cr)

                      E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C        •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Note: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult                 The primary objective of this curriculum is to prepare tech-
his/her academic adviser prior to registering. CH 200, CH 202            nicians to be capable of interviewing patients regarding food
and FP 107 must be taken in sequence.                                    patterns, counseling patients in dietary practices, reporting
Part Time Sequence
                                                                         nutritional status and progress to other health care profession-
                                                                         als, monitoring food consumption of clients, calculating nutrient
                     First Year, Fall Semester                           components and planning and supervising food service.
FP 101               Fire Prevention & Protection (3 cr)                     Courses in the curriculum provide an orientation to the
FP 102               Fire Protection Equipment (3 cr)                    health field and dietary services. Nutrition care is emphasized
––––––               Math Elective (3 cr)                                with courses in nutrition and modified diets, and clinical experi-
                                                                         ences in each of the last three semesters are provided. In the
                     First Year, Spring Semester                         fourth semester field experience, students learn the principles of
FP 105               Fire Operations Strategy (3 cr)                     food service and dietary management.
EN 120               Composition & Occupational                              Graduates qualify for employment as dietetic technicians in
                     Communication (3 Cr)                                hospitals, nursing homes, adult residences, children’s residential
                     Second Year, Fall Semester                          homes and community agencies. Those who successfully com-
FP 103               Building Construction & Fire Hazards (3 cr)         plete the program also meet minimum New York State require-
                                                                         ments for food service managers in health care facilities.

                                                                         Accreditation
FP 106               Legal Aspects of Fire Protection (3 cr)
CH 200               Introduction to College Chemistry I (3 cr)
                     Second Year, Spring Semester                        • The Dietetic Technician program is currently accredited by
FP 108               Safety in Industry & Fire Service (3 cr)              the Commission on Accreditation/Approval for Dietetic
FP 110               Fire Investigation (3 cr)                             Education of the American Dietetic Association, a special-
CH 202               Introduction to College Chemistry II (3 cr)           ized accrediting body recognized by the Commission on
                                                                           Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation and the United
                     Third Year, Fall Semester
                                                                           States Department of Education.
FP 107               Chemistry of Hazardous Materials (3 cr)
                                                                         • Graduates of the Dietetic Technology Program are eligible
FP 114               Fire Personnel Management/
                                                                           to write the registration examination for dietetic technicians.
                     Administration (3 cr)
                                                                           This examination is administered by the Commission on
______               Social Science Elective (3 cr)
                                                                           Dietetic Registration. Successful completion of the examina-
                     Third Year, Spring Semester                           tion credentials the individual as a Dietetic Technician
FP 113               Fire Codes & Standards (3 cr)                         Registered (DTR).

                                                                         Department Notes
––––––               Social Science Elective (3 cr)
––––––               Physics/Science Elective (3 cr)
                                                                         • Continuation in the program is contingent on satisfactory
                     Fourth Year, Fall Semester                            completion of required courses and attainment of a mini-
FP 112               Historical Developments of Fire                       mum grade of “C” in all dietetic technology courses. Co-req-
                     Science (3 cr)                                        uisite courses must be completed concurrently to receive
EN 121               Composition & Readings in Science &                   credit.
                     Technology (3 cr)                                   • Students are responsible for lab coat, transportation, liability
––––––               First Aid/Emergency Medical Tech. (3 cr)              and malpractice insurance costs as well as other miscella-
––––––               Humanities Elective (3 cr)                            neous expenses related to clinical and field experience.
NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult             • Student membership in the American Dietetic Association
his/her academic adviser prior to registering. CH 200, CH 202,             and the WNY Dietetic Association is recommended.
and FP 107 must be taken in sequence.                                    • The Dietetic Technology Program Student handbook


FOOD SERVICE
                                                                           describes additional program policies.

                                                                         Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
ADMINISTRATION–
DIETETIC
                                                                         •   Applicants must have a high school diploma or GED.
                                                                         •   Students are admitted to the program in the fall semester.


TECHNOLOGY–
                                                                         •   A personal interview for advisement is required.


NUTRITION CARE
                                                                         •   Prospective students must complete the college Immunization
                                                                             form and the Health Sciences Report form in order to partici-
                                                                             pate in clinical facilities.

Program Description
                                                                         •   Applicants are required to have taken algebra and chemistry
                                                                             or biology.
The current emphasis on nutrition care as a fundamental part of          •   Work experience in a health care setting is desirable.
present day health care has increased the demand for dietetic            •   Applicants who do not meet these requirements may be pro-
technicians in the nutrition field. This is a career for those who           visionally accepted for an extended program to include alge-
enjoy working with people to achieve nutritional well-being.                 bra and basic chemistry.
Dietetic technicians work in association with the food service           •   Admission to clinical courses will be on a space available
manager and under the supervision of a registered dietitian to               basis.
provide nutritional care to individuals in health care facilities.


                                                                                                                                              115
               E C C       2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      Scholarships Available                                                  NT 384             Dietetics Seminar (2 cr)
      Scholarships are available from several sources, including the          NT 385             Nutrition Care IV (3 cr)
      American Dietetic Association and the Gertrude Chrymko                  NT 386             Clinic for NT 385 (3.5 cr)
      Scholarship.

      Program Competencies
                                                                              NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Each student should con-
                                                                              sult his/her academic adviser prior to registering.
      Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree             *Developmental courses (as recommended on the basis of testing)
      in Dietetic Technology, the graduate will be able to:                   are also required.
      • Utilize the nutrition care process to maintain or restore well-       In order to be granted an associate degree in Food Service
        ness among a diverse population with various cultures and             Administration – Dietetic Technology – Nutrition Care, a student
        faiths                                                                must demonstrate proficiency in algebra at the level of MT 006.
      • Utilize the nutrition care process to promote wellness among


                                                                              GEOGRAPHIC
        a diverse population in various community settings


                                                                              INFORMATION
      • Demonstrate competence in basic technical knowledge and
        skills in the field of food service management


                                                                              SYSTEMS
      • Demonstrate a sound knowledge base regarding food


                                                                              SPECIALIST
      • Incorporate professionalism in dietetics practice
      • Communicate effectively in written and verbal forms
      • Apply critical thinking at an entry level in a variety of profes-

                                                                              Program Description
        sional situations
      • Work independently and cooperatively
      • Use current information technologies for information and              The Geographic Information Systems Specialist certificate pro-
        communication activities                                              gram is designed to prepare students to directly enter the work-
                                                                              force in GIS Technician positions in a variety of applications and
      Degree: Associate in Applied Science                                    fields. The program also prepares students to continue in more
      Hegis: 5404                                                             advanced GIS programs. GIS is a tool for storing, organizing,
      Curriculum Code: 0573                                                   managing and analyzing information in a spatial context. It is
      Total Degree Credits: 66.0                                              more than just a computer mapping tool. The maps generated in
      Campus Location: North                                                  GIS are interactive, allowing users to control the data displayed
      Health Sciences Division                                                on the map, how it is displayed and linking additional informa-

      CURRICULUM
                                                                              tion in a database to the objects on the map. Maps can also be
                                                                              linked to the database so the map is automatically updated every
                         First Year, Fall Semester                            time the information in the database is changed. GIS is currently
      NT 228             Food Selection & Preparation (3 cr)                  being used in a broad spectrum of career fields outside the tradi-
      NT 232             Nutrition Care I (3 cr)                              tional bounds of geography - police departments, businesses,
      NT 234             Health Field Orientation (2 cr)                      health care planning, transportation management and local gov-
      CH 250             General Chemistry with Introductory                  ernment service. GIS technology is a relatively new addition to
                         Organic & Biochemistry (3 cr)                        information systems technology with strong projected job growth
      CH 251             Lab for CH 250 (1.5 cr)                              both locally and nationally.
      EN 110             College Composition* (3 cr)                              GIS technicians are trained to work with GIS software and
      SO 100             Introduction to Sociology (3 cr)                     databases to perform some of the following functions: manage
                                                                              and update the databases; organize and present the data, usually
                         First Year, Spring Semester                          in the form of a map, for use by decision makers; create specific
      NT 236             Nutrition Care II (3 cr)                             applications for non-GIS-trained users of the database; perform
      NT 237             Clinic for NT 236 (3 cr)                             spatial analysis on the data and make recommendations to deci-
      NT 238             Education for Dietetic Majors (3 cr)                 sion makers based on the results of the analysis.
      BI 178             Basic Human Physiology (3 cr)                            The GIS Certificate program consists of a core of required
      EN 121             Composition and Readings in Science and              GIS courses that allow students to develop GIS skills in a hands-
                         Literature (3 cr)                                    on learning environment. As students progress through the core
      ––––––             Liberal Arts Elective (3 cr)                         courses, they work more and more in the classroom on real pro-
                         Second Year, Fall Semester                           jects to gain experience in how GIS systems operate and how
      NT 382             Nutrition Care III (3 cr)                            they are applied to solve problems in real situations. Finally stu-
      NT 383             Clinic for NT 382 (4 cr)                             dents may opt to participate in an internship program, in which
      NT 387             Health Care Delivery Systems (2 cr)                  they go out into a real GIS working environment to perform GIS
      NT 275             Introduction to Food                                 tasks similar to what they will be expected to do in a GIS techni-
                         Systems Management (3 cr)                            cian job. Additional coursework requirements in the GIS pro-
      PS 100             General Psychology (3 cr)                            gram are quite flexible to allow students to create a background
                                                                              in areas that will complement their work in GIS. Students may
                         Second Year, Spring Semester                         also combine the GIS certificate program with a variety of associ-
      NT 376             Food Systems Management (3 cr)                       ate degree programs at the college. For example, students may
      NT 377             Field Experience for Food Systems                    want to add the GIS certificate to their regular program in
                         Management (3 cr)                                    Business, Criminal Justice, Environmental Studies, or Social
                                                                              Science.
116
                      E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Program Competencies                                                     Recommended area electives: Students may wish to augment
The purpose of this curriculum is to provide students with the           their GIS studies with concentrations in other disciplines, such
concept knowledge and skills necessary to transfer successfully          as Criminal Justice, Environmental Science, Marketing, Civil
into a Baccalaureate GIS program or to enter the workforce as a          Engineering, Social Science, or Computer Science. Students will
GIS technician or analyst. The coursework in this program will           choose from the following list of area electives (or other areas of
focus on the development of four areas of GIS-related concepts           interest to the student) in consultation with their adviser accord-
and skills, as identified below.                                         ing to their particular interests and career goals. This list is sug-
                                                                         gestive and is not meant to be exclusive of other options.
Area #1: The student will acquire a basic understanding of the
geographic terms and concepts that are necessary for the appro-          CS 121              Computer Science I (4 cr)
priate use of GIS. These will include concepts of spatial variables,     CS 209              Programming in Java (4 cr)
scale, map projection and map coordinate systems. The student            CS 215              Web Development and Programming (4 cr)
will also be aware of the history of GIS, how it fits into overall       DA 261              Database Concepts (3 cr)
information management, a variety of applications in which GIS           DF 251              Introduction to AutoCAD (2 cr)
can contribute to analysis and decision-making and have a sense          GP 101              Physical Geography (3 cr)
of where the technology will be headed in the future.                    GP 103              Introduction to Human Geography (3 cr)
                                                                         SO 100              Introduction to Sociology (3 cr)
Area #2: The student will acquire skills in the use of GIS soft-         PH 120              Environmental Science (3 cr)
ware, with experience in at least two major GIS software prod-                               Criminal Justice courses
ucts such as ESRI ArcGIS and Autodesk Map. The student will                                  Computer Science courses
be able to load the software, import and use data in the soft-                               Business (Marketing) courses
ware, conduct analysis of the data in the software and produce                               Social Science courses


                                                                         HEALTH
output from the software. The student will also be able to pro-
gram in the software in order to change the user interface or


                                                                         INFORMATION
simplify tasks for other users of the GIS.


                                                                         TECHNOLOGY
Area #3: The student will be able to deal with a variety of GIS
database issues, including, but not limited to: database creation

                                                                         Program Description
through digitizing and on-screen drawing, editing, design, man-
agement and data conversion for use in GIS software. The stu-
dent will also be aware of the importance of metadata, privacy
                                                                         The purpose of this program is to prepare individuals for
concerns and issues of data sources, modification, and accuracy.
                                                                         employment as health information technicians. Graduates of
Area #4: The student will be able to perform a GIS project               this program will be prepared for positions in the medical
(analysis for decision-making or creation of a GIS product, such         record departments of health care institutions such as hospitals,
as a map or database). This will include the initial problem             nursing homes, health maintenance organizations, physician
statement, identification of data needs, acquisition or creation of      offices, insurance companies and a variety of health care institu-
data, determination of the type of analysis to be conducted or           tions. Graduates will be prepared in organizing, analyzing and
type of product most appropriate to deal with the problem                technically evaluating medical records according to established
statement, performance of the analysis and the creation and pre-         standards. Compilation of statistics, medical coding of informa-
sentation of the results.                                                tion, abstracting medical records and legal aspects of health
                                                                         information will be taught.
Degree: Certificate                                                          The academic content will include a core of liberal arts cho-
Hegis: 5399                                                              sen from the areas of anatomy and physiology, social sciences,
Curriculum Code: 1470                                                    mathematics and English. The remainder of the curriculum is
Total Degree Credits: 28.0                                               designed to build technical, computer and supervisory skills
Campus Location: North                                                   necessary for the health information technician. Computer labo-

CURRICULUM
                                                                         ratories will also be used for medical coding, statistical analysis,
                                                                         clinical data base management and maintenance and retrieval of
                    Fall Semester                                        patient data. During the course of study, students will partici-
EN 110              College Composition (3 cr)                           pate in two professional practice experiences which will provide
                                                                         training and experience in actual health care settings.

                                                                         Accreditation
GP 150              Introduction to GIS (4 cr)
                    Area Elective (3-4 cr)
                    Area Elective (3-4 cr)
                                                                         The Health Information Technology program is accredited by
                    Area Elective (3-4 cr)
                                                                         the Commission on Accreditation of Health Informatics and
                    Spring Semester                                      Information Education (CAHIIM) in cooperation with the
EN111               Composition and Interpretation of                    American Health Information Management Association
                    Literature                                           (AHIMA).
                    Math Elective MT 125 or above (3 -4 cr)                 Graduates of the Health Information Technology program
GP 250              GIS Skills and Techniques (4 cr)                     are eligible to write the National Qualifying Examination for
GP 290              Advanced Topics in GIS (4 cr)                        certification as Registered Health Information Technician
                    Area Elective (3-4 cr)                               (RHIT).
                    Area Elective (3-4 cr) optional
                    Summer Session Course (Optional)
GP 295*             GIS Internship (4 cr)                                                                                                        117
                E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      Department Notes                                                      • Sequence diagnoses and procedures to ethically and accurate-
      Cost of books, supplies, identification badges, transportation to       ly optimize reimbursement
      clinical sites, other costs related to Professional Practice          • Organize and display data for research projects, special stud-
      Experience (PPE) and the physical examination prior to these            ies and educational programs
      clinicals are the responsibility of the HIT student.                  • Follow procedures to maintain security of computerized

      Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
                                                                              information
                                                                            • Assess institutional and patient-related information needs and
      • Applicants must have at least a high school diploma or GED.           departmental informational, service and operational needs
      • Applicants should have high school biology and two units of         • Design and select departmental service and operational sys-
        mathematics. Computer and keyboarding skills are highly               tems and information systems for patient-related data
        recommended.                                                        • Implement departmental service and operational systems and
      • Applicants should have at least 80 percent high school                information systems for patient-related data
        average.                                                            • Evaluate departmental, operational and service systems and
      • Individuals who have not had biology in high school must              information systems for patient-related data
        take BI 149 prior to taking the anatomy and physiology              • Conduct oneself in a professional and ethical manner by
        courses. The Erie Community College math and English                  adhering to the AHIMA Code of Ethics and standard profes-
        pretests must be passed or developmental courses success-             sional practice
        fully completed before matriculation into the health infor-
                                                                            Degree: Associate in Applied Science
        mation technology program.
                                                                            Hegis: 5213
      • Each student is responsible for providing transportation to
                                                                            Curriculum Code: 1117
        off-campus community agencies utilized for the PPE activi-
                                                                            Total Degree Credits: 70.5
        ties. Students must maintain a “C” or better in all required
                                                                            Campus Location: North
        Health Information Technology courses, Anatomy &
                                                                            Health Sciences Division
        Physiology I and II lecture and lab and Medical
        Terminology.
      • Students must meet departmental and all college require-
                                                                            CURRICULUM
        ments for graduation.                                                                  First Year, Fall Semester
      • A physical examination and current immunization report is           EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
        required prior to the start of clinical classes.                    BI 150             Anatomy & Physiology (3 cr)
      • Individuals must complete MT 006 and 007 or 013 or                  BI 151             Lab for BI 150 (1.5 cr)
        receive a placement test code of MTLV4 or higher prior to           CS 101             Computer Literacy (3 cr)
        matriculation into the Health Information Technology cur-           MA 555             Medical Terminology (3 cr)
        riculum.                                                            MR 101             Introduction to Health Information
      • Individuals must complete keyboarding (OF 111 or OF101)                                Technology (3 cr)
        or pass a proficiency examination for OF 111 prior to gradu-        MR 102             Lab for MR 101 (1 cr)
        ation from the Health Information Technology program.

      Program Competencies
                                                                                               First Year, Spring Semester
                                                                            EN 111             Composition & Interpretation of
      Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree                              Literature (3 cr)
      in Health Information Technology, the graduate will be able to:       BI 152             Anatomy & Physiology II (3 cr)
                                                                            BI 153             Lab for BI 152 (1.5 cr)
      • Apply existing policies for organizing, planning, collecting,       MR 103             Health Record Law (2 cr)
        processing, controlling and evaluating health information           MR 105             Intro to Coding, Classification &
        services                                                                               Reimbursement Systems (3 cr)
      • Evaluate health records to determine if they meet institution       MR 106             Lab for MR 105 (1 cr)
        needs                                                               MR 250             Health Concepts (3 cr)
      • Maintain manual or automated incomplete record control
        systems and systems for retrieval of all other health infor-                           Summer Session
        mation                                                              ––––––             Humanities Elective (3 cr)
      • Apply and follow existing policies for retrieval and retention      MR 252             Professional Practice Experience I (3 cr)
        of health information                                                                  Second Year, Fall Semester
      • Develop, apply and evaluate policies and procedures for             MT 143             Introductory Statistics I (4 cr)
        health information, services and functions                          BU 140             Introduction to Business (3 cr)
      • Direct and monitor classifying, indexing, coding and related        MR 107             Health Information Assessment
        activities to assure quality                                                           and Reporting (3 cr)
      • Apply and follow existing policies for the control, use and         MR 203             Advanced Coding, Classification &
        release of health information                                                          Reimbursement Systems (3 cr)
      • Follow procedures to maintain confidentiality and security          MR 204             Lab for MR 203 (1 cr)
        of health information including computerized information            MR 209             Computerized Systems in Health Care (2 cr)
      • Follow existing procedures for abstracting and reporting            MR 210             Lab for Computerized Systems in
        health information as required by legal, accrediting, licensing                        Health Care (1 cr)
        and certifying regulations
      • Apply coding rules to diagnoses and procedures                                         Second Year, Spring Semester
                                                                            ––––––             Social Science Elective (3 cr)
118
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                       HOMELAND
                                                                       SECURITY
MR 205             Alternative Health Care Delivery
                   Systems (3 cr)
MR 206             Lab for MR 205 (1 cr)

                                                                       Program Description
MR 211             Topics in Health Information
                   Management (2 cr)
MR 212             Coding Seminar (3 cr)                               The Homeland Security certificate program is designed to equip
MR 253             Professional Practice Experience II (1.5 cr)        students with the knowledge and skill sets needed to effectively
                                                                       deal with the challenges facing America in the arena of homeland
NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Students should consult          security.
the Health Information Technology Department Head prior to reg-            Homeland security took on a new meaning as of Sept. 11,
istering for courses.                                                  2001. It is such a complex and critical term that it has a variety of


HEATING & AIR
                                                                       meanings, depending on the perspective and context of its use.


CONDITIONING
                                                                       To some, it refers to the new federal agency, that merged such
                                                                       diverse entities as FEMA, the Transportation Security
                                                                       Administration, Immigration and Customs, the Coast Guard and

Program Description
                                                                       U.S. Secret Service under one umbrella to provide protection to
                                                                       our domestic frontier. Others may opt to view the term as being
Air conditioning is the control of all or many of the conditions       able to personally survive man-made disasters such as the terror-
which affect the physical and chemical characteristics of the          ist attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C on Sept. 11
atmosphere within a structure. The conditions subject to control       or the devastation caused by a natural disaster like Hurricane
are temperature, humidity, motion, distribution, pressure, dust,       Katrina.
bacteria and odors.                                                        This certificate delves into the above topics in the introducto-
   The Heating and Air Conditioning program meets the                  ry course and then expands on specific areas in the more
requirements of the rapidly expanding field of air conditioning.       advanced courses stressing detection, protection and recovery
Present day interpretation of that term includes design for year-      issues for government, non-profit organizations, businesses, fami-
round living comfort.                                                  lies and citizen first responders. While some may seek this educa-
   Actual problems are used as a basis for class discussions. Ideas    tion as a foundation for employment or voluntary service, many
are exchanged in order to enrich the experience of those already       students will use the knowledge acquired to enhance their skills
employed, and to give a broader background to those interested         for use in their current work and personal lives.

                                                                       Program Competencies
in entering this field. Graduates qualify for upgrading in their
jobs or for employment in the air conditioning field.
   Students may follow a certificate program, or they may select       • Demonstrate an understanding of the terminology of home-
individual courses provided that they have completed the course          land security
prerequisites.                                                         • Discuss the historical roots leading to the evolution of home-
                                                                         land security
Degree: Certificate                                                    • Explain the U.S. Government’s justification for the creation
Hegis: 5317                                                              of a Department of Homeland Security
Curriculum Code: 0961                                                  • Justification and discussion for the passage of the Patriot Act
Total Degree Credits: 34.0                                               and other homeland security-related legislation
Campus Location: North                                                 • Be able to construct an outline of the components of the

CURRICULUM
                                                                         Department of Homeland Security
                                                                       • Explain the changing role of police, firefighters, EMTs and
ME 101             Introduction to Technical Concepts (3 cr)             other first responders
ME 102             Introduction to Technical Concepts II (3 cr)        • Discuss the conflict between greater security versus personal
ME 111             Principles of Engineering Technology (4 cr)           freedom
ME 112             Principles of Engineering Technology II (4 cr)      • Display knowledge of weapons of mass destruction and the
ME 389             Fabrication Shop (2 cr)                               threat posed to homeland security
ME 391             Heating and Cooling Load Calculations (3 cr)        • Distinguish hate crimes from terrorism and discuss the obsta-
ME 392             Principles of Heating & Air Conditioning (3 cr)       cles encountered in defining them correctly
ME 407             Burner Principles (2 cr)                            • Demonstrate a working knowledge of counterterrorism and
ME 408             Lab for ME 407 (1 cr)                                 the approaches being used or considered in an effort to com-
ME 409             Heating and Cooling Systems (2 cr)                    bat terrorism
ME 410             Lab for ME 409 (1 cr)                               • Explain the incident command system and its role in
ME ___             Elective (3 cr)                                       responding to terrorist and other emergency situations
ME ___             Elective (3 cr)                                     • Discuss the role of unified command in responding to both
                                                                         terrorist attacks and natural disasters
Electives                                                              • Be able to understand and apply the basic components of
ME 120             Ammonia Refrigeration I (3 cr)                        security and risk management
ME 121             Ammonia Refrigeration II (3 cr)                     • Distinguish between “hard” and “soft” targets and how to
ME 122             Ammonia Refrigeration III (3 cr)                      harden soft targets
ME 386             Basic Electricity for Mechanical                    • Demonstrate the ability to utilize the skill sets developed in
                   Equipment (3 cr)                                      the program by applying them to real-life situations either
ME 393             Machine Trades Blueprint Reading (3 cr)               through an internship or via a monitored situation in an exist-
ME 403             Refrigeration I (2 cr)                                ing homeland security work environment
ME 404             Lab for ME 403 (1 cr)                                                                                                       119
               E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      Degree: Certificate                                                    •   New York State Hospitality & Tourism Association
      Hegis: 5005                                                            •   American Academy of Chefs & Chaine Des Rotisseurs
      Total Degree Credits: 32-33                                            •   International Food Service Executive Association
      Campus Location: North and City Campus (45 Oak Street)                 •   Kevin Malchoff NRA Educational Foundation Scholarship

                                                                             Program Competencies
      Business & Public Service Division

      CURRICULUM                                                             Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree in
      CR150               Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 cr)            Hotel Restaurant Management, the graduate will be able to:
      CR170               Criminal Law (4 cr)                                • Demonstrate the technical skills necessary to manage a hospi-
      GO101               American Government (3 cr)                           tality operation at the entry-level of management
      SO100               Introduction to Sociology (3 cr)                   • Apply the understanding and ability to provide a level of ser-
      HS100               Introduction to Homeland Security (3 cr)             vice necessary in the hospitality industry
      HS105               Terrorism & Hate Crimes (3 cr)                     • Develop human relation skills relating to the hospitality
      HS110               Basic Incident Command (1 cr)                        industry; i.e., communicating, training, motivating, evaluating,
      HS200               Homeland Security & Assessment (3 cr)                delegating, diversity, planning and organizing
      HS210               Advanced Incident Command (3 cr)                   • Demonstrate basic food preparation techniques
      HS220               Homeland Security Internship (3 cr)                • Understand the marketing function as it applies to the hospi-
      CR/ER/CIS elective (3 or 4 cr)                                           tality industry
      Total (32-33 credit hours)                                             • Develop an understanding of the basic functions related to


      HOTEL
                                                                               the operation of the front desk and the coordination of the


      RESTAURANT
                                                                               guest cycle
                                                                             • Demonstrate an understanding of the preparation and service


      MANAGEMENT
                                                                               of wines, beers and spirits in hospitality beverage operation
                                                                             • Demonstrate an understanding of sanitation as it applies to

      Program Description
                                                                               the hospitality industry
                                                                             • Apply fundamental cost control techniques and purchasing
                                                                               procedures
      The hospitality industry, one of the nation’s leading employers, is
                                                                             • Demonstrate computer literacy as it applies to the hospitality
      continually looking for well-qualified managers. Students entering
                                                                               industry
      the curriculum are provided with the skills and knowledge neces-
                                                                             • Develop an understanding of budgets and financial reports
      sary for management positions in hotels, restaurants, country
                                                                             • Apply an understanding of laws and regulation impacting the
      clubs, catering, sales, fine dining and quick service.
                                                                               hospitality industry
         The program is designed to emphasize strategies in supervision,
      marketing, sanitation, food, beverage, labor cost controls and man-    Degree: Associate in Applied Science
      agement. Laboratory courses (on-campus fine dining restaurant)         Hegis: 5010
      are scheduled for students to actively participate in actual opera-    Curriculum Code: 0572
      tion. An eight-week internship in the hospitality industry con-        Total Degree Credits: 66
      cludes the program providing students with a management-orient-        Campus Location: North
      ed experience.                                                         Business & Public Service Division

                                                                             CURRICULUM
         Upon graduation, students are prepared to enter the job mar-
      ket or transfer to a four-year program. Transfer agreements are in
      place with many colleges. These include Niagara University,
      Rochester Institute of Technology, University of Nevada at Las                            First Year, Fall Semester
      Vegas, Florida International University, Paul Smith’s College and      HR 111             Hospitality Service Seminar (3 cr)
      Buffalo State College, just to mention a few.                          HR 123             Supervisory Development in

      Special Admissions Requirements/Prerequisites
                                                                                                Hotel Restaurant Management (3 cr)
                                                                             HR 135             Food Preparation Techniques (4 cr)
      Students must purchase an appropriate uniform for laboratory           EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
      classes as prescribed by the faculty. Order forms are provided by      ______             Liberal Arts Elective*** (3 cr)
      curriculum.

      Scholarships
                                                                                                First Year, Spring Semester
                                                                             HR 112             Hospitality Costing & Purchasing
                                                                                                Control (3 cr)
      Scholarships are available from several industry organizations,
                                                                             HR 124             Bar & Beverage Management (3 cr)
      including:
                                                                             HR 136             Sanitation (2 cr)
      • Statler Foundation Scholarship                                       EN 111             Composition & Interpretation of
      • New York State Restaurant Association                                                   Literature (3 cr)
      • Jack Geiger Memorial Scholarship                                     ______             Liberal Arts Elective*** (3 cr)
      • Marjorie E. White Scholarship                                        ______             Liberal Arts Elective*** (3 cr)
      • Family Member Scholarship (family member must be a mem-
                                                                                                Second Year, Fall Semester
        ber of the NYSRA)
                                                                             HR 261             Hospitality Operations* I (7 cr)
      • Employee Scholarship (employer must be a member of the
                                                                             HR 273             Hospitality Financial Information
        NYSRA)
                                                                                                Systems (3 cr)
                                                                             HR 285             Promotional Strategies in Hospitality (3 cr)
120                                                                          ______             Liberal Arts Elective*** (3 cr)
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0    •   ( 7 1 6 )     8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                            INDUSTRIAL
                                                                            TECHNOLOGY
                    Second Year, Spring Semester
HR 262              Hospitality Internship* (4 cr)
HR 274              Front Desk Operations (3 cr)

                                                                            Program Description
HR 286              Hospitality Operations II* (7 cr)
______              Liberal Arts Elective*** (3 cr)
                                                                            The Industrial Technology program can provide:
NOTE: This is the recommended sequence. Student should consult              •   Custom technology degrees
his/her academic adviser prior to registering.                              •   Computerized machine tools training
                                                                            •   Machine tools trades training
*These courses will be scheduled for one-half semester.                     •   Plastics technology training
***In addition to EN 110, EN 111 and CS 101, the student must               •   Industrial electricity

                                                                            Quality/Manufacturing Courses
complete 12 credit hours with electives from the following:
(A) Social Sciences, (B) Humanities, (C) Sciences.


HUMAN SERVICES
                                                                            This curriculum can open career paths for recent high school
                                                                            graduates, dislocated workers and career changers in addition to
                                                                            giving industrial workers the opportunity to upgrade their skills

Program Description
                                                                            and earn an Associate in Occupational Studies (AOS) degree*
                                                                            while employed. With a core that is generic in design, the
The Human Services Certificate program is designed to prepare               opportunity exists to take many technical electives and cus-
students for employment in entry level staff positions at human             tomize a degree program to fit the required skills for many
service agencies serving children, adolescents, the elderly and             employee classifications, student needs and desires.
families.                                                                       The program accounts for the trend for local industries to
    The certificate program is further designed to expose students          design and request from us course sequences that bring employ-
to a variety of theoretical, as well as practical, human service skills     ee skills up to a specific level for given positions, including, but
and concepts in order to meet the demands of the workplace. It              not limited to, apprenticeships. Employer identified courses
is expected that students completing the certificate program will           may become designated electives for current and future employ-
be familiar with, and able to apply, an understanding of human              ees while still encouraging and supporting attainment of an
behavior, a variety of communication skills and a diversity of              AOS degree. Students may select courses from any technical
therapeutic approaches to their chosen clientele.                           area of interest to them to develop – with adviser approval – a
    Students who successfully complete the Human Services                   custom degree. Non-degree training is offered in high demand
Certificate program may apply to transfer their credits into the            machine trades vocations.
Associate in Arts degree program in Social Science.                             A unique program attribute is the capability of granting
Hegis: 5501                                                                 credit (pending evaluation) for non-credit courses and work-
Curriculum Code: 0949                                                       place training programs that may not be recognized by other
Total Degree Credits: 27.0                                                  degree programs. The ECC life experience credit program may
Campus Location: City, North South                                          also be used to obtain credits.

CURRICULUM
                                                                                Students interested in transferring to the State University of
                                                                            New York College at Buffalo should see their adviser on com-
                                                                            pleting 0 – 10 credits of liberal arts electives.
                    Fall Semester
EN 110              College Composition (3 cr)                              * Precision Machine Tool and Plastic Injection Molding ECC
HU 100              Human Interaction (3 cr)                                pathways with Letters of Completion (approximately 30 credit
                                                                            hours) are available.

                                                                            Goals of the program include:
HU 101              Introduction to Human Service
                    Delivery Systems (3 cr)
PS 100              General Psychology (3 cr)
                                                                            • To offer the Industrial Technology program to employees in
                    Spring Semester                                           local industry to fulfill their need for training bearing degree
HU 102              Introduction to the Helping                               credit in the pursuit of career objectives
                    Relationship (3 cr)                                     • To offer an entry mode and career path for secondary school
HU 103              Human Services Field Placement                            students who cannot go directly into apprenticeships or sim-
                    and Seminar (3 cr)                                        ilar skilled positions in industry
SO 100              Introduction to Sociology (3 cr)                        • To offer opportunities for dislocated workers and persons
                                                                              changing careers to enter new positions that would other-
Select one from the following:                                                wise be inaccessible
CS 101             Computer Literacy (3 cr)                                 • To offer a program option that is suitable for diverse indus-
DA 106             Introduction to Microcomputer                              tries of the region
                   Application (3 cr)                                       • To provide a means by which local industry can meet grow-
Select one from the following:                                                ing needs to replace skilled tradesmen, many of whom are
PS 201             Developmental Psychology (3 cr)                            now or soon will be of retirement age
PS 202             Abnormal Psychology (3 cr)
PS 101             Skills for Effective Parenting (3 cr)
SO 202             Sociology of the Family (3 cr)
NOTE: It is expected that students enrolled in this certificate
program will attend two semesters, plus summer school.                                                                                             121
                E C C      2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites                          Technical Core Courses
      All new students must meet all the criteria for admission,            (May be modified with department approval)
      including but not limited to, holding a high school diploma or        16 credit hours required
      General Education Diploma (GED) and taking the                        IT 210             Industrial Inspection/Metrology (2 cr)
      ACT/ASSET placement test and achieving certain levels of                                 or equivalent – see adviser
      competency. If minimal levels of competency are not demon-            IT 115             Technical Communications/Graphics (2 cr)
      strated in math and English, remedial courses may be needed to        IT 125             Materials and Materials Processing (3 cr)
      improve the students' chances for success.

      Program Competencies
                                                                            IT 250             Work Design (3cr)
                                                                            IT 260             Manufacturing Management (4 cr)
                                                                            DF 230             Introduction to Solid Works (2 cr)
      Upon completion of an Associate in Occupational Studies
      degree in Industrial Technology, graduates will be able to:
                                                                            Total General Education Technical Core Courses
      • Utilize industrial technology concepts and practices in cur-        Credit Hours = 18 cr + 16 cr = 34 cr
        rent drawing standards
                                                                            General Technology (Custom Degrees)
      • Write correctly and effectively
                                                                            • General Education courses (18 cr, listed above )
      • Read critically and think logically
                                                                            • Industrial Technology core courses (16 cr listed above )
      • Apply basic workplace computational procedures and quan-
                                                                            • Technical and Liberal Arts electives selected by advisement:
        titative analysis
                                                                              Technical electives (select 17 to 27 cr)
      • Produce technical sketches and drawings
                                                                              Liberal Arts electives (select 0 to 10 cr)
      • Illustrate knowledge of technical concepts and standards
      • Apply processes and materials used by industry                      A student may fulfill the technology elective requirement with any
      • Demonstrate an understanding of fundamental manufactur-             technology degree level course offered through the Technologies
        ing methods, industrial processes and safe use of equipment         Division, subject to adviser approval. Also, students may be grant-
      • Apply technical concepts, industrial processes and principles       ed credit for non-credit courses, workplace training programs and
        as required                                                         on-the-job experience (ECC LEAP Program) per evaluation and
      • Apply general technical drafting and design principles              approval of the Industrial Technology Department.
      Degree: Associate in Occupational Studies                             Liberal Arts Electives (select 0 to 10 cr)
      Hegis: 5312
                                                                            Social Science/Humanities electives may be selected from any of
      Curriculum Code: 0583
                                                                            the following courses:
      Total Degree Credits: 60.0 – 62.0
      Campus Location: (N), (S)                                             AN (Anthropology), EC (Economics), GO (Government), HU

      CURRICULUM
                                                                            (Human Services), GP (Geography), HI (History), PS
                                                                            (Psychology), and SO (Sociology), AT (Art), DN (Dance), DT
      Students may select from the following pathways:                      (Drama/Theatre), FL (Foreign Language), MU (Music), PY
      General Technology custom degrees includes Quality Control,           (Philosophy).
      Management and Skilled Trades options
                                                                            Total Credits
      • Computerized Machine tools
                                                                            General Technology (Custom Degrees)
      • Machine tools trades
                                                                            34 cr + 27 cr = 61 cr

                                                                            Pathway – Machine Tools
      • Plastics
      • Industrial electricity
      All degrees require:                                                  •   General Education Courses (18 cr listed above )
      1. General Education courses                                          •   Industrial Technology Core Courses (16 cr listed above )
      2. Technical Core courses                                             •   Machine Tools Technical Core (16 cr)
      3. Electives                                                          •   *15 Week Program (option) (12 cr total)
      Total for all three credit areas: 60 – 61 cr.                         •   One Year Precision CNC Machining (option)
                                                                                (24 cr total)
      General Education Courses
      (May be modified with department approval)                            IT 121             Machine Tool Practice I (4 cr)
      18 credit hours required)                                             IT 131             Machine Tool Practice II (4 cr)
      CS 101              Computer Literacy (3 cr) – see adviser            IT 141             Machine Tool Practice III (4 cr)
                                                                            IT 102             CNC Mill Programming (2 cr)
      EN 120              Composition and Occupational                      IT 103             CNC Lathe Programming (2 cr)
                          Communication (3 cr) or
      EN 110              College Composition (3 cr)                        Machine Tool Technical Electives (11 cr)
      MT 121              Technical Math I (4 cr)                           Select below:
      MT 122              Technical Math II (4 cr)                          IT 120          Introduction to Manufacturing Trades (3 cr)
      or                                                                    IT 122          CNC Mill Operation (2 cr)
      MT 125              College Math I (4 cr)                             IT 123          CNC Lathe Operation (2 cr)
      MT 126              College Math II (4 cr)                            IT 220          Mastercam, Computer Aided Design (2 cr)
      PH 190              Basic Physics (4 cr) and                          IT 250          Coordinate Measuring Machine (2 cr)
      PH 191              Lab for PH 190 (0 cr)                             IT 210          Industrial Inspection/Metrology (2 cr)
                                                                            IT 265          Jig and Fixture Design (3 cr)
122                                                                         IT 299          Manufacturing Technology Internship (3 cr)

                      E C C      2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
IT 998             Manufacturing Technology Topics (6 cr)                Related Course Objectives
ME 484             Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (1 cr)         a. Application packages for steganography
ME 485             Lab for ME 484 (1 cr)                                 b. Firewall packages
DF 222             3D Auto Cad or                                        c. Anti-virus packages
                                                                            • Assess hacker challenges, malicious break-ins and insider
Any technical course per advisement.                                          threats.
                  Total Credits                                             • Analyze the security issues that are specific to database
                  Machine Tools Pathway                                       systems.
                  34 cr + 27 cr = 61 cr

Pathway – Plastics Injection Molding
                                                                            • Identify and secure web exposures.
                                                                            • Observe TCP/IP packet streams to understand zone
                                                                              basedsecurity.
• General Education Courses (18 cr listed above)
• Industrial Technology Core Courses (16 cr listed above)                Degree: Certificate
• Plastics Technical Core (22 cr)                                        Hegis: 5199
                                                                         Curriculum Code: 1931.ISS
IT 110             Plastics Mold Design I (3 cr)                         Location: North (expand to City and South)

                                                                         CURRICULUM
IT 112             Plastics Materials (4 cr)
IT 114             Plastics Processes I (3 cr)
IT 214             Plastics Processes II (3 cr)
EN 130             Advanced Writing and Readings                                            First Semester
                   in Plastics (3cr)                                     DA 150             Programming Visual Basic
IT 126             Statistical Process Control (3 cr)                    DA 215             Windows 200 Server
TE 350             Computer Applications in Plastics (3 cr)              DA 107             Introduction to Information
                                                                                            Systems Security
Plastics Electives (4 cr)                                                DA 202             Legal, Ethical Regulatory Framework
IT 120              Introduction to Manufacturing Trades (3 cr)                             of Security
IT 250              Coordinate Measuring Machine (2 cr)                                     Second Semester
ME 484              Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (1 cr)        DA 200             Computer and Network Security
ME 485              Lab for ME 484 (1 cr)                                DA 201             Operations and Database Security
DF 222              3D Auto Cad                                          DA Elective        TBD
DF 105              Technical Graphics II (2 cr)                         DA 203             Internship (optional)
IT 210              Industrial Inspection/Metrology (2 cr) or            DA 150             Intro to Computer
                    Any technical course per advisement.                                    Programming Visual Basic
                                                                         DA 200             Computer and Network Security
                   Total Credits                                         DA 215             Windows 2000 Server
                   Plastics Injection Molding Pathway                    DA 201             Operations and Database Security
                   34 cr + 26 cr = 60 cr                                 DA 107             Introduction to Information


INFORMATION
                                                                                            Systems Security


SYSTEMS
                                                                         DA elective        TBD
                                                                         DA 202             Framework Legal, Ethical, Regulatory


SECURITY
                                                                         DA 203             ISS internship (optional)



Program Description                                                      INFORMATION
The ISS Certificate program provides students with the core              TECHNOLOGY
skills required to take a lead role in information security within       (Formerly Computer Information Systems)

                                                                         Program Description
their organization. Students will be able to identify risks, threats
and vulnerabilities to a computer system. They will acquire the
skills to isolate these threats and fortify or harden computer sys-      Computers are an integral part of everyday life at home, busi-
tems, software, networks and the physical sites. Students will also      ness and school. Our information society is in constant demand
develop working knowledge of the various laws governing the              of individuals who can meet the needs of users within an organi-
computer security area and how compliance can be effected.               zation through the selection, creation, application, integration
    The certificate is designed with a two fold approach; to accept      and administration of computing technologies. The Information
students who already have a degree and want to upgrade their             Technology Associate in Applied Science degree provides stu-
skills or to accept entry level students who are brand new to the        dents with the skills needed to succeed in today’s digital world.
knowledge set and do not have a degree. These students will be               During the first year of study, Information Technology stu-
able to intern at a company and apply the skills and abilities,          dents will acquire a broad business and real world perspective
before venturing into an employment setting.                             of information technology, strong analytical and critical thinking

Program Competencies
                                                                         skills, knowledge of data design and data management princi-
                                                                         ples and knowledge of basic programming and computer logic
1. Achieve entry-level working knowledge of popular microcom-            principles. These skills will provide students with the founda-
puter application packages.                                              tion needed to advance to their second year of study. In the sec-
                                                                         ond year of the program, students will choose one from the fol-
                                                                         lowing seven areas to specialize*:                                   123
               E C C      2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      1. Geographic Information Systems [GIS]                                 • Demonstrate the ability to present and discuss how computer
      2. Information Systems Security [ISS]                                     systems impact the operation and management of business
      3. Management Information Systems [MIS]                                   and society
      4. Networking                                                           • Demonstrate the ability to discuss the impact of information
      5. Programming                                                            technology on society and the workplace
      6. Web Development                                                      • Demonstrate the ability to define and use the basic terminology
      7. Web Page Design                                                        of relational databases
      * Not all courses available at all campuses. Check with your advis-     • Demonstrate the ability to use the tools and skills needed to
      er to ensure course availability.                                         create and utilize databases
          Graduates of the Information Technology AAS degree pro-             Programming Concentration Competencies
      gram can gain employment in technical support, programming,             • Demonstrate expertise in multiple programming languages
      networking, systems analysis and design, information security,          • Demonstrate expertise in the use of the IBM AS/400
      geographic information systems, business analysis and other               midrange computer for programming

                                                                              Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
      computer related fields. Those graduates seeking additional

                                                                              Concentration Competencies
      education may continue their computer education at four-year
      institutions in programs such as computer science, management
      information systems, computer information systems, business             • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the geographic terms
      administration and telecommunications technology.

      Program Competencies
                                                                                and concepts that are necessary for the appropriate use of GIS
                                                                              • Demonstrate expertise in the use of GIS software, with expe-
                                                                                rience in at least two major GIS software products such as
      Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree
                                                                                ArcView and Autodesk Map
      in Information Technology, the graduate will be able to:
                                                                              • Demonstrate knowledge of GIS database issues, including,
      • Demonstrate knowledge of a broad business and real world                but not necessarily limited to, database creation (through digi-
        perspective of information technology                                   tizing and on-screen drawing), editing, design, management
      • Demonstrate analytical and critical thinking skills                     and data conversion for use in GIS software

                                                                              Information Systems Security (ISS)
      • Demonstrate knowledge of data design and data management

                                                                              Concentration Competencies
        principles
      • Demonstrate knowledge of basic programming principles
      • Demonstrate knowledge of systems development and how it               • Demonstrate an understanding of key terms and critical con-
        relates to industry                                                     cepts of information security, and the duties and responsibili-
      • Demonstrate the ability to apply analytical and logical                 ties within an information technology department
        thinking to gathering and analyzing information, designing            • Demonstrate expertise in the use of various information secu-
        and testing solutions to problems and formulating plans                 rity software

                                                                              Management Information Systems (MIS)
      • Demonstrate the ability to visualize and articulate complex

                                                                              Concentration Competencies
        problems and concepts
      • Demonstrate the ability to gather, analyze and organize data
        using a logical and systematic process                                • Demonstrate knowledge of analytical and practical frame-
      • Demonstrate the ability to select, implement and evaluate               works and methodologies necessary to analyze, design, imple-
        appropriate problem solving techniques and tools                        ment and manage complex information systems in contempo-
      • Demonstrate the ability to effectively adapt problem solving            rary organizational structures

                                                                              Networking Concentration Competencies
        techniques to specific situations
      • Demonstrate the ability to apply statistical methods to
        analyze and resolve business and technical problems                   • Demonstrate proficiency in the installation of telecommunica-
      • Use and apply current technical concepts and practices in               tion end-user equipment; switching and transmission equip-
        the core information technologies                                       ment
      • Analyze, identify and define the requirements that must be            • Demonstrate expertise in the use of various topologies, trans-
        satisfied to address problems or opportunities faced by orga-           mission media, network interfaces and shared resources to
        nizations or individuals                                                interconnect LANs

                                                                              Web Development Concentration Competencies
      • Design effective and usable IT-based solutions and integrate
        those components into the user environment
      • Identify and evaluate current and emerging technologies and           • Write, execute and debug programs in high-level languages,
                                                                                specifically designed for the Web

                                                                              Web Page Design Concentration Competencies
        assess their applicability to address the users’ needs
      • Analyze the impact of technology on individuals, organiza-
        tions and society, including ethical, legal and policy issues
      • Demonstrate an understanding of best practices, standards             • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of multimedia
        and their application                                                   authoring and development to incorporate sound, still and
      • Demonstrate independent critical thinking and problem                   moving images for use with Web pages, multimedia CD
        solving skills                                                          ROMs, etc.
      • Communicate effectively and efficiently with clients, users           • Demonstrate knowledge of the basics of Web design and the
        and peers both verbally and in writing, using appropriate               Internet competencies including the rules and regulations of
        terminology                                                             the World Wide Web
                                                                              • Create an interactive Web site utilizing current Web editing
                                                                                software
124
                       E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
Degree: Associate in Applied Science                                 CS 209              Programming in Java (3.5 cr)
Hegis: 5101                                                          CS 210              Programming in C++ (3 cr)
Curriculum Code: 0581                                                CS 215              Web Development and Programming I (4 cr)
Total Degree Credits: 60.0 – 67.0                                    CS 216              Advanced Web Development and
Campus Location(s): City, North, South                                                   Programming I (4 cr)
Business & Public Service Division                                   CS 220              Advanced Programming in Java (4 cr)

CURRICULUM                                                           Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Concentration
                                                                     Courses
                  First Year, Fall Semester                          GP 150           Introduction to GIS (4 cr)
DA 103            Introduction to Computer Information               GP 250           GIS Skills and Techniques (4 cr)
                  Systems (4 cr)                                     GP 290           Advanced Topics in GIS (4 cr)
DA 150            Programming Visual Basic (4 cr)
                                                                     In addition, select one to two from the following:
EN 110            College Composition (3 cr)
                                                                     DF 251               Introduction to AutoCAD (2 cr)
MT 125            College Math I (4 cr) or an IT approved
                                                                     GP 101               Physical Geography (3 cr)
                  Math elective
                                                                     GP 103               Introduction to Human Geography (3 cr)
                  First Year, Spring Semester                        GP 295               GIS Internship (4 cr)
DA 240            Systems Analysis with Respect to Business          PH 120               Environmental Science (3 cr)
                  Applications (4 cr)                                NOTE: A GIS Certificate is also available.
DA 261            Database Concepts (4 cr)
EN 111            Composition and Interpretation                     Information Systems Security (ISS) Concentration Courses
                  of Literature (3 cr)                               DA 107           Introduction to ISS (4 cr)
––––––            Concentration Course(s) (3-4 cr)                   DA 200           Computer and Network Security (4 cr)
                                                                     DA 201           Operations and Database Security (4 cr)
                  Second Year, Fall Semester                         DA 202           Legal, Ethical and Regulatory
––––––            Concentration Course(s) (3-4 cr)                                    Framework (3 cr)
––––––            Concentration Course(s) (3-4 cr)
––––––            Information Technology Elective (3-4 cr)           In addition, select one from the following:
MT 143            Introduction to Statistics (4 cr)                  DA 203               ISS Internship (2 cr)
––––––            Social Science Elective (3 cr)                     DA 204               Digital Forensics (4 cr)
                                                                     CR 150               Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 cr)
                  Second Year, Spring Semester                       CR 160               Crime and Society (3 cr)
––––––            Concentration Course(s) (3-4 cr)                   CR 170               Criminal Law (4 cr)
––––––            Concentration Course(s) (3-4 cr)
––––––            Information Technology Elective (3-4 cr)           NOTE: An ISS Certificate is also available.
––––––            Liberal Arts Elective (3 cr)                       Management Information Systems (MIS)
––––––            Social Science Elective (3 cr)                     Concentration Courses
NOTE: This is a recommended sequence. Student should consult         BU 121           Accounting Principles I (4 cr)
his/her academic adviser prior to registering.                       BU 151           Principles of Marketing (3 cr)
                                                                     DA 290           Management for Systems Analysts (4 cr)
Information Technology Electives:
DA 105           Introduction to Programming (3 cr)                  In addition, select two from the following:
DA 106           Introduction to Microcomputer                       BU 122               Accounting Principles II (4 cr)
                 Applications (3 cr)                                 BU 221               Computerized Accounting (4 cr)
DA 180           E-commerce (4 cr)                                   BU 231               Business Systems (3 cr)
DA 215           Networking with Windows Server (4 cr)               BU 243               Entrepreneurship (3 cr)
DA 270           Computer Information Systems Project (4 cr)         BU 261               Business Law I (3 cr)
DA 290           Management for Systems Analysts (4 cr)              BU 262               Business Law II (3 cr)
DA410            Data Communications                                 EN 410               Public Speaking (4 cr)

Information Technology Approved Math Electives:                      Networking Concentration Courses
MT 126           College Mathematics II (4 cr)                       DA 215          Networking with Windows Server (4 cr)
MT 167           Discrete Mathematics (4 cr)                         TE 295          CISCO I - Networking Basics (3 cr)
MT 180           Pre-Calculus Mathematics (4 cr) or any              TE 296          CISCO II - Routers and Routing
                 Calculus Course                                                     Basics (3 cr)
                                                                     TE 361          Digital Logic I (4 cr)
Programming Concentration Courses
DA 130         Programming COBOL (4 cr)                              In addition, select one from the following:
DA 140         Programming COBOL, Advanced (4 cr)                    DA 200               Computer and Network Security (4 cr)
DA 170         Control Language Programming (3 cr)                   TE 297               CISCO III/IV Switching/Routing/
DA 210         Programming RPG (4 cr)                                                     WAN (4 cr)
                                                                     TE 363               Digital Logic II (4 cr)
In addition, select one from the following:
DA 180               E-commerce (4 cr)                               Web Development Concentration Courses
DA 255               Advanced Visual Basic (4 cr)                    CS 209         Programming in Java (3.5 cr)
CS 103               Web Development and Programming                 CS 210         Programming in C++ (3 cr)
                     Fundamentals (3 cr)
                                                                                                                                    125
               E C C    2 0 0 8     -    2 0 1 0   •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
                                                                              LIBERAL ARTS
                                                                              AND SCIENCE—
      CS 215              Web Development and Programming I (4 cr)


                                                                              GENERAL STUDIES
      CS 216              Advanced Web Development and
                          Programming I (4 cr)
      In addition, select one from the following:
                                                                              Program Description
      DA 180               E-commerce (4 cr)
      DA 255               Advanced Visual Basic (4 cr)
      CS 220               Advanced Programming in Java (4 cr)                The General Studies curriculum is designed to provide the stu-
                                                                              dent with a variety of options—a flexible exploratory course of
      Web Page Design Concentration Courses                                   study and the option of self-structured curricula without a prior
      GA 101          Orientation to Graphics (2 cr)                          commitment to either specific academic or vocational goals. It is
      GA 131          Photoshop I (2 cr)                                      offered day and evening on all campuses.
      GA 140          Publishing IV Web Basics (3 cr)                             This program serves the needs of students interested in trans-
      GA 144          Multimedia (2 cr)                                       ferring to four-year institutions as well as students interested in
      GA 145          Web Design/Editing with                                 fulfilling their General Education requirements. The program is
                      DreamWeaver (3 cr)                                      also ideal for the student who has an inquisitive mind and wishes
      In addition, select two to four from the following:                     to explore a variety of academic options. Graduates may find
      CS 209               Programming in Java (3.5 cr)                       numerous entry-level positions available in banking, sales, real
      EN 201               Writing for Graphic Publications (3 cr)            estate and health and human services.
      GA 102               Publishing I Basics (2 cr)                             An applicant for General Studies should contact a college
      GA 106               Create with FreeHand (2.5 cr)                      admissions counselor. After notification of acceptance and receipt
      GA 125               Create with Illustrator (2.5 cr)                   of placement test scores, the applicant is required to contact the
      GA 130               Publish with QuarkXPress (3 cr)                    General Studies departments for course advisement.
      GA 141               Photoshop II (2 cr)                                    Students matriculated in the General Studies program must
                                                                              complete a minimum of 33 credit hours in required core course
      NOTE: A Web Page Design Certificate is available. Students              requirements. A minimum of 27 degree credit hours may be taken
      should consult his/her academic adviser for designated sequencing       in any college degree course for which the general studies student
      of required courses. Students may elect to transfer credits from the    qualifies for registration under guidelines established by college
      degree program to the one-year Web Page Design Certificate pro-         academic units or departments. The student may attend part-time
      gram to supplement their degree with a certificate through addi-        or full-time. Students enrolled in this program will be required to
      tional study.                                                           take GS 111 - College Success Skills.


      LIBERAL ARTS
                                                                              Degree: Associate in Science
                                                                              Hegis: 5649
                                                                              Curriculum Code: 0250
      The Liberal Arts curriculum has a dual purpose. The courses
                                                                              Total Degree Credits: 60.0
      provide students subject matter enabling them to transfer to a
                                                                              Campus Location(s): City, North, South
      four-year college or university. However, the curriculum is also
                                                                              Liberal Arts Division
      designed to provide general education for those who desire it.
                                                                              REQUIRED COURSES
         Requirements are listed on the following pages for programs
      granting Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degrees. The
      Associate in Arts requirements are designed to give students a          EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
      balanced distribution of courses in English, humanities and             EN 111             Composition & Interpretation of
      social sciences. The Associate in Science requirements are                                 Literature (3 cr)
      designed to give a student a balance between mathematics and            GS 111             College Success Skills (3 cr)
      laboratory sciences. These programs have been formulated to             ––––––             Math Elective (3-4 cr)
      ensure a maximum level of acceptance for the transfer student           ––––––             3 Social Science Electives (9 cr)
      regardless of the program for which he/she applies at a four-           ––––––             2 Humanities Electives (6 cr)
      year institution.                                                       ––––––             2 Science Electives (6-8 cr)
         Students interested in a flexible exploratory course of study        ––––––             9 Open College Electives (27-36 cr)
      and the option of a self-structured curriculum may pursue                                  (minimum 9 courses)
      Liberal Arts—General Studies. This program offers the student           1. Student placement in an appropriate English course depends
      a course of study leading to an Associate in Science degree and            upon the results of a reading and writing placement test.
      an opportunity to experience courses in other curricula.                2. Student placement in an appropriate mathematics course

      SUNY General Education
                                                                                 depends upon the results of a mathematics pretest.

      Student Learning Outcomes
                                                                                 Developmental mathematics courses cannot be used for
                                                                                 degree credit.*
                                                                              3 Social Science: anthropology (AN), economics (EC), govern-
      The SUNY General Education knowledge and skills areas and
                                                                                 ment (GO), history (HI), human services (HU), psychology
      the two competencies now function as the basis for the Liberal
                                                                                 (PS), sociology (SO), geography (GP)
      Arts degree program outcomes. These General Education
                                                                              4. Humanities: EN 210 or above, EN 520, art (AT), dance (DN),
      requirements are detailed in the Academic Information section
                                                                                 drama-theatre (DT), French (FR), music (MU), philosophy
      of this catalog.
                                                                                 (PY), Spanish (SP)
                                                                              5. A student may fulfill the open college elective requirement
                                                                                 with any degree level course on campus. However, registration
126
                      E C C     2 0 0 8      -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
   for open college electives will be determined by the availabili-      All degree candidates must complete a minimum of 60 credit
   ty of space and academic advisement.                                  hours for graduation and seek approval for courses prior to reg-
6. Science: astronomy (AS), biology (BI), chemistry (CH), geol-          istration from an English/Humanities adviser.
   ogy (GL), physics (PH)
                                                                         1. Humanities electives: EN 210 or above, art (AT), dance
* See reference to developmental studies elsewhere in catalog               (DN), drama-theatre (DT), French (FR), music (MU), philos-
                                                                            ophy (PY), sign language (SL), Spanish (SP), foreign lan-
Advisement considers placement test scores.
                                                                            guage (FL).
NOTE: Student should consult his/her academic adviser prior to           2. A student may fulfill these elective requirements with any
registering.                                                                degree credit hours.
                                                                         3. Liberal arts electives: English/Humanities: EN 210 or above,


LIBERAL ARTS
                                                                            music (MU), dance (DA), drama-theatre (DT), art (AT), phi-


AND SCIENCE—
                                                                            losophy (PY), French (FR), Spanish (SP), foreign language
                                                                            (FL) and sign language (SL).


HUMANITIES AND
                                                                         Mathematics: MT 112 through MT 998

SOCIAL SCIENCE
                                                                         Natural Science: biology (BI), chemistry (CH), physics (PH)


HUMANITIES INTEREST
                                                                         Social Science: anthropology (AN), social science (SS), sociolo-
                                                                         gy (SO), economics (EC), government (GO), geography (GP),

Program Description
                                                                         history (HI), human services (HU), psychology (PS)
                                                                         NOTE: Student should consult his/her academic adviser prior to
The Humanities degree program is a liberal arts degree with
                                                                         registering.
concentrations in Fine Arts or English. Students selecting the
Humanities degree should be interested in transferring to a bac-         NOTE: Secondary Teacher Education degrees - Erie Community
calaureate degree program after completion of their associate            College has completed or is in the process of completing Dual
degree at Erie Community College. The Humanities degree is               Admissions/Cooperative Degree programs with Western New
broad enough to transfer as the core foundation for a variety of         York colleges for students wishing to pursue Secondary English,
baccalaureate degrees in liberal arts, education and pre-profes-         Foreign Language and several other Humanities related Teacher
sional programs. However, most students selecting the                    Education degrees. Because requirements vary somewhat with
Humanities degree have one or more of the following interests:           each four-year school, it is strongly recommended that prospective
pursuing a four-year degree in teacher certification at the ele-         students contact the Department Head for Teacher Preparation
mentary school level or in secondary English; pursuing a                 programs at (716) 270-5211 to discuss appropriate courses within
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in art, drama, music, philosophy,           this associate degree program to insure a seamless transfer to the
English, or combination of these areas; pursuing other profes-           four year college of choice.


                                                                         LIBERAL ARTS
sional careers related to art, drama, music, English or foreign lan-
guages (including Spanish, French, music and sign language), or


                                                                         AND SCIENCE—
pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Humanities.


                                                                         HUMANITIES AND
    The Humanities Department has joint articulation agreements
with Buffalo State College, Brockport State and the University at

                                                                         SOCIAL SCIENCE
Buffalo. The Humanities program has excellent transferability to
all SUNY institutions, as well as private colleges in the Western

                                                                         SOCIAL SCIENCE INTEREST
New York area. Completion of the Humanities Associate in Arts
degree allows the student to transfer to a four-year institution as

                                                                         Program Description
full first semester juniors in most cases.
Degree: Associate in Arts                                                The objectives of the Social Science curriculum are twofold: to
Hegis: 5649                                                              provide a transfer program for students in the Social Science
Curriculum Code: 0201                                                    disciplines as well as in areas such as the arts, sciences and busi-
Total Degree Credits: 60.0                                               ness/management and to provide general education courses for
Campus Location(s): City, North, South                                   students enrolled in other curricula.
Liberal Arts Division                                                        For those students who transfer to four-year institutions, par-

REQUIRED COURSES
                                                                         ticularly state colleges and university centers within New York
                                                                         State, the program provides completion of lower-division
EN 110              College Composition (3 cr)                           requirements in any of the social science departments. The
EN 111              Composition & Interpretation of                      attainment of the Associate in Arts degree can confer full first-
                    Literature (3 cr)                                    term junior status.
––––––              1 Mathematics Elective (3-4 cr)                          Erie Community College has agreements with the State
––––––              7 Humanities Electives (21 cr)                       University of New York at Buffalo, Hilbert College and various
––––––              2 Social Science Electives (6 cr)                    other four-year institutions making it possible for students to
––––––              1 Liberal Arts Elective (3 cr)                       achieve guaranteed course or program transferability and/or
––––––              1 Science Elective (3-4 cr)                          acceptance from ECC into the four-year social science major of
––––––              1 Science or Math Elective (3-4 cr)                  their choice. Program requirements for both joint admissions
––––––              5 Open College Electives (15-20 cr)                  and articulation agreements are specified in the Admissions sec-
                                                                         tion of this catalog.                                                  127
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C      •   w w w . e c c . e d u
          The Liberal Arts—Social Science program presents a broad              English/Humanities: EN 210 or above, music (MU), dance
      spectrum of study in both the social and behavioral sciences, com-        (DN), drama-theatre (DT), art (AT), philosophy (PY), French
      prising the disciplines of anthropology, economics, geography,            (FR), Sign Language (SL), Spanish (SP)
      government, history, human service, psychology, sociology and             Mathematics: mathematics (MT) 112-998
      interdisciplinary social science. The variety of topics available
                                                                                Science: biology (BI), chemistry (CH), physics (PH)
      within these areas enables students to design a course of study
      specifically related to their individual academic and career goals.           It is recommended that a student wishing to transfer to a
      In a world of such rapid technological and social change, the social      four-year institution take a laboratory course sequence in natural
      science major is uniquely qualified to adapt to new courses of            science.
      study and job market fluctuations.                                        Social Science: anthropology (AN), economics (EC), government
          All degree candidates must complete a minimum of 60 credit            (GO), geography (GP), history (HI), human service (HU), psy-
      hours to graduate. Students must seek approval for all courses            chology (PS), sociology (SO), social science (SS).
      from their adviser prior to registration. Courses not approved
      by a social science adviser may not be accepted as credit                 *** A student may fulfill these elective requirements with any
      towards a degree. Social science majors must select the required          degree level courses on campus. However, outside the liberal arts
      21 credit hours from among the social science disciplines which           division, registration will be determined by the availability of
      include anthropology (AN), economics (EC), geography (GP),                space. Students should be aware that electives may not be offered
      government (GO), history (HI), human service (HU), psycholo-              each semester.
      gy (PS), sociology (SO) and social science (SS). In addition,
                                                                                **** Social Science majors must receive a grade of “C” or better
      social science majors must receive a grade of “C” or better in all
                                                                                in all social science courses to fulfill the 21 hours of Social
      social science courses used to fulfill the 21 hours of social sci-
                                                                                Science elective credit in their degree program. Social Science
      ence elective credit in their degree program. Students must
                                                                                majors must select the required 21 credit hours from among the
      study from at least three disciplines and may not exceed 12
                                                                                various Social Science disciplines: anthropology (AN), economics
      credit hours in any one discipline.
                                                                                (EC), government (GO), geography (GP), history (HI), human
      Degree: Associate in Arts                                                 service (HU), psychology (PS), sociology (SO), social science
      Hegis: 5649                                                               (SS). To insure depth and breadth, the distribution will allow a
      Curriculum Code: 0212                                                     maximum of 12 credit hours in any one discipline and must
      Total Degree Credits: 60.0                                                include some study in at least three disciplines.


                                                                                LIBERAL ARTS
      Campus Location(s): City, North, South


                                                                                AND SCIENCE/
      Liberal Arts Division

      REQUIRED COURSES
                                                                                HUMANITIES AND
                                                                                SOCIAL SCIENCE
      EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)
      EN 111             Composition & Interpretation of
                         Literature (3 cr)
                                                                                CHILDHOOD EDUCATION- 1-6
      ––––––             Math Elective (3-4 cr)

                                                                                Program Description
      ––––––             Natural Science Elective (3-4 cr)
      ––––––             Math or Natural Science Elective (3-4 cr)
      ––––––             2 English/Humanities Electives* (3-4 cr)
                                                                                   The Childhood Education 1-6 program is a special program
      ––––––             Liberal Arts Elective** (3-4 cr)
                                                                                presently being redesigned through a cooperative effort with The
      ––––––             5 Open Electives*** (3-4 cr)
                                                                                State University of New York College at Buffalo. When the
      ––––––             7 Social Science Electives**** (3 cr)
                                                                                redesign is completed, the program will allow ECC students to
      NOTE: For the recommended sequence, students should consult               achieve an associate degree in Childhood Education 1-6 at ECC
      their academic adviser prior to registering.                              and complete the first two years of a program that will ultimately
                                                                                result in a teaching degree from The State University of New
      NOTE: Secondary Teacher Education degrees – Erie Community
                                                                                York College at Buffalo.
      College has completed or is in the process of completing Dual
                                                                                   Acceptance into the program is contingent upon several
      Admissions/Cooperative Degree programs with Western New York
                                                                                requirements including the possession of a high school diploma
      colleges for students wishing to pursue a Secondary Social Studies
                                                                                or GED and an academic record of general education courses at
      Teacher Education degree. Because course requirements vary some-
                                                                                the high school level indicating that the student shows the ability
      what with each four-year school, it is strongly recommended that
                                                                                to complete courses toward the associate degree within a three-
      prospective students contact the department head for Teacher
                                                                                year period. An interview with the Department Head for Teacher
      Preparation Programs at (716) 270-5211 to discuss appropriate
                                                                                Preparation Programs is also required.
      courses within this associate degree program to insure a seamless
                                                                                   Students matriculated in the Childhood Education 1-6 program
      transfer to the four-year college of choice.
                                                                                complete a minimum of 60 credit hours in the required courses.
      * All degree candidates must complete a minimum of 60 credit                 Transfer to the four-year college will be contingent upon sev-
      hours for graduation and seek approval for courses prior to regis-        eral criteria including a minimum QPA.
      tration from a Social Science faculty adviser. Courses not
                                                                                NOTE: Childhood Education 1-6 Teacher Education degree - Erie
      approved by a Social Science adviser may not be accepted for
                                                                                Community College has completed or is in the process of complet-
      credit toward the degree.
                                                                                ing Dual Admissions/Cooperative Degree programs with Western
      ** Liberal Arts Electives:                                                New York colleges in addition to the State University of New York
                                                                                College at Buffalo for students wishing to pursue a Childhood
128                                                                             Education 1-6 Teacher Education degree. Because course require-
                     E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )     8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
ments vary somewhat with each four- year school, it is strongly rec-     Special Admission Requirements
ommended that prospective students contact the Department Head           Applicants should have previously taken pre-calculus and
for Teacher Preparation Programs at (716) 270-5211 to discuss            have at least an 85 percent (B) average in math. Those who do
appropriate courses within the appropriate associate degree program      not meet these requirements may be provisionally accepted
to insure a seamless transfer to the four-year college of choice.

Scholarships
                                                                         for an extended program to include math courses prerequisite
                                                                         to calculus.
Scholarships are available. Contact the ECC Foundation for               Degree: Associate in Science
additional information.                                                  Hegis: 5649

Program Competencies
                                                                         Curriculum Code: 0221
                                                                         Total Degree Credits: 62.0-69.0
Upon graduation with an Associate in Arts degree in Liberal Arts         Campus Location: North
and Sciences—Humanities and Social Science—Childhood                     Liberal Arts Division

                                                                         CURRICULUM
Education 1-6, the graduate will obtain competencies as outlined
by the Liberal Arts Department.
Hegis: 5649                                                              EN 110              College Composition (3 cr)
Curriculum Code: 1007                                                    EN 111              or
Total Degree Credits: 60.0                                               EN 121              Composition & Interpretation of
Campus Location: C, N, S                                                                     Literature (3 cr)
Liberal Arts Division                                                    MT 181              Calculus & Analytic Geometry I (4 cr)

Required Courses
                                                                         MT 182              Calculus & Analytic Geometry II (4 cr)
                                                                         MT 283              Calculus & Analytic Geometry III (4 cr)
The listing of required courses for Childhood Education 1-6              MT 284              Introduction to Differential Equations (4 cr)
varies depending on the choice of concentration. Also, New               ––––––              2 Mathematics Electives (8 cr)
York State Department of Education regulations are revised peri-         ______              2 Sequential Laboratory Sciences (8-9 cr)
odically and may affect the courses to be taken. Explanation and         ______              2 Social Science Electives (6 cr)
options are available in the Teacher Preparation Programs’               ______              2 English/Humanities Electives (6 cr)
Office at City Campus (716) 270-5211.                                    ______              2 Liberal Arts Electives (6-9 cr)


LIBERAL ARTS
                                                                         ______              2 Open Electives (6-9 cr)



AND SCIENCE/
                                                                         All degree candidates must complete a minimum of 62 credit
                                                                         hours for graduation. An intended mathematics major who has

MATHEMATICS AND
                                                                         a need for preparatory work before taking MT 181 should con-


SCIENCE–
                                                                         sider taking courses in the summer preceding the first semester.
                                                                         NOTE: Student should become aware of the course requirements

MATH INTEREST
                                                                         of the college to which they are transferring. The final selection of


Program Description
                                                                         courses is to be made after advisement by a faculty adviser of the
                                                                         mathematics department.
Mathematics is the foundation of many fields. Jobs for individu-         NOTE: Secondary Mathematics Teacher Education degree – Erie
als with mathematical training are available in industry, education      Community College has completed or is in the process of complet-
and scientific research. The Mathematics degree program is a lib-        ing Dual Admissions/Cooperative Degree programs with Western
eral arts concentration, which provides the coursework necessary         New York colleges for students wishing to pursue a Secondary
for the first two years of a four-year degree in mathematics or          Mathematics Teacher Education degree. Because course require-
related areas such as statistics, mathematics-education, actuarial       ments vary somewhat with each four-year school, it is strongly rec-
science, applied technology, natural science, or applied math.           ommended that prospective students contact the Department
    The primary goal of the Liberal Arts—Mathematics curricu-            Head for Teacher Preparation Programs at (716) 270-5211 to dis-
lum is to prepare students to transfer to a four-year institution as     cuss appropriate courses within this associate degree program to
third-year students in a mathematics or math-related program. In         insure a seamless transfer to the four year college of choice.
addition to the required mathematics courses, the program
                                                                         Mathematics Electives: choose from MT 167, MT 180, MT 191,
includes courses in English, science, humanities and social sci-
                                                                         or MT 292.
ence, thereby giving the student a background in the different
areas of liberal arts.                                                   Sequential Laboratory Sciences: Lecture-laboratory combina-
    All Liberal Arts—Mathematics students are required to study          tion courses count as single courses; i.e., CH 300 and CH 301
calculus and differential equations. Students interested in math         count as one unit. A two-semester sequence from Physics,
education can apply to be tutors in the math lab. Articulation           Chemistry, or Biology is recommended.
meetings are held with neighboring colleges and universities to
                                                                         Liberal Arts Electives: MT 143 and CS 111 are recommended.
ensure optimal transferability.
    The two-year curriculum in Liberal Arts—Mathematics is a
liberal arts concentration, meaning that the successful student
can transfer to a four-year school to complete the requirements of
a bachelor’s degree in mathematics or a related field. For those
students who are unable to continue their education, careful
selection of electives under faculty advisement can make job mar-
ket entry more viable.                                                                                                                           129
                E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0     •   ( 7 1 6 )    8 5 1 - 1 E C C       •   w w w . e c c . e d u
      LIBERAL ARTS
      AND SCIENCE/
                                                                                Physics: PH 270/PH 271 and PH 272/PH 273 are recommend-


      MATHEMATICS
                                                                                ed for most liberal arts Associate in Science students. PH
                                                                                280/PH 281 and PH 282/PH 283 are recommended for chem-


      AND SCIENCE–
                                                                                istry and physics majors. PH 284/PH 285 may be required for
                                                                                some engineering and medical schools. One physics sequence

      SCIENCE INTEREST
                                                                                (maximum) may be used to satisfy the laboratory science require-
                                                                                ment.

      Program Description                                                       Geology: GL 160/GL 161 count as one lecture laboratory sci-
                                                                                ence unit.
      The Liberal Arts and Science – Science curriculum is a liberal
      arts concentration designed to provide the first two years of a           **Mathematics: MT 125, MT 126, MT 143, as well as higher
      bachelor’s degree program. Biology, chemistry and physics lec-            numbered courses, are acceptable (except as indicated in course
      tures and laboratories are conducted in small classes under the           descriptions). Chemistry and physics require MT 181 and MT
      direction of faculty who have indicated and demonstrated that             182 for transfer with junior status, while biology and health sci-
      teaching is their primary concern.                                        ences require MT 175 and MT 176.
          Graduates generally continue their studies in the sciences,
                                                                                For transfer to baccalaureate programs in the sciences, the fol-
      physical therapy, pharmacy and other health specialties requir-
                                                                                lowing science and mathematics courses are suggested:
      ing a baccalaureate degree. Some will become physicians, den-
      tists, veterinarians, chiropractors and other health professionals.       Chemistry: CH 180-CH 183, CH 220-CH 223, CH 240-243, PH
          Because requirements vary greatly for different baccalaure-           280-PH 283, MT 181-MT 182***
      ate degree programs at different institutions, it is extremely
      important for students to be aware of the course requirements             Physics: PH 270-PH 273 or PH 280-PH 285, MT 181 and MT
      of the college of intended transfer. Close contact with faculty           182***
      advisers at their future college will ensure individually tailored        Biology: CH 180-CH 183, CH 220-CH 223, BI 110 and BI 115
      programs designed to enhance flexibility and transferability.             or BI 121 and BI 122, BI 112 and BI 117 or BI 225 and BI 226,
      Degree: Associate in Science                                              BI 150 and BI 151, BI 152 and BI 153, BI 230 and BI 231, PH
      Hegis: 5649                                                               270-PH 273, MT 125 and MT 126**.
      Curriculum Code: 0220                                                     **Social Science Elective: choose 6 degree credit hours from the
      Total Degree Credits: 63.0-71.0                                           following disciplines: anthropology (AN), economics (EC), geog-
      Campus Location(s): City, North, South                                    raphy (GP), government (GO), history (HI), human services
      Liberal Arts Division                                                     (HU), psychology (PS), sociology (SO), or social science (SS).

      REQUIREMENTS:                                                             **Humanities Electives: choose degree credit hours from the
      EN 110             College Composition (3 cr)                             following disciplines: art (AT), dance (DN), drama-theatre (DT),
      EN 111             Composition & Interpretation of Lit. (3 cr)            music (MU), English (EN 210 or above), French (FR), Spanish
      ––––––             2 Mathematics Electives (8 cr)**                       (SP), Sign Language (SL) or Foreign Language (FL).
      ––––––             6 Lecture Laboratory Science Electives                 **Two Liberal Arts Electives: choose degree credit hours from
                         (25-27 cr)***                                          the following disciplines: art (AT), dance (DN), drama-theatre
      ––––––             2 Social Science Electives (6 cr)**                    (DT), music (MU), English (EN), French (FR), Spanish (SP),
      ––––––             2 Humanities Electives (6 cr)**                        Sign Language (SL), Foreign Language (FL), philosophy (PH),
      ––––––             2 Liberal Arts Electives (6 cr)**                      astronomy (AS), biology (BI), chemistry (CH), physics (PH),
      ––––––             2 Open Electives (6-9 cr)**                            geology (GL), anthropology (AN), economics (EC), geography
                                                                                (GP), government (GO), history (HI), human services (HU),
      NOTE: Student should consult his/her academic adviser prior to            psychology (PS), sociology (SO), social science (SS) or computer
      registering.                                                              science (CS)
      *** Lecture Laboratory Science Electives: Lecture laboratory              **Open electives: choose any degree credit hours from courses
      courses count as one unit. Units should be selected from at least         listed in the college catalog.
      two science areas. They are the following:
                                                                                *See adviser
      Astronomy: AS 180 and AS 181 Lab                                          **Recommended
      Biology: BI 110/BI 115 and BI 112/BI 117 are recommended                  ***Minimum
      for the first year. Suggested electives for the second year include
      BI 150/BI 151, BI 152/BI 153, BI 230/BI 231, BI 212/BI 213                NOTE: Secondary Science Teacher Education degree - Erie
      and BI 220/BI 221.                                                        Community College has completed or is in the process of complet-
                                                                                ing Dual Admission/Cooperative Degree programs with Western
      Chemistry: A chemistry sequence of CH 180/CH 181, CH                      New York colleges for students wishing to pursue a Secondary
      182/CH 183, CH 220/CH 221, CH 222/CH 223 at all campus-                   Science Teacher Education Degree. Because course requirements
      es; CH 240/CH 241 at North Campus are all recommended for                 vary somewhat with each four-year school, it is strongly recom-
      students intending to transfer as chemistry majors.                       mended that prospective students contact the Department Head for
                                                                                Teacher Preparation Programs at (716) 270-5211 to discuss appro-
                                                                                priate courses within this associate degree program to insure a
                                                                                seamless transfer to the four-year college of choice.
130
                      E C C     2 0 0 8     -   2 0 1 0      •   ( 7 1 6 )   8 5 1 - 1 E C C     •   w w w . e c c . e d u
MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING
                                                                         English Sequence Options: (EN 110 and 111) or (EN 120 and


TECHNOLOGY
                                                                         EN 121)
                                                                         Social Science Electives: EC100, EC104, GO101, HI 101-105,


Program Description
                                                                         PS 100, SO 100.

                                                                         Internships/Co-ops
The demand for trained Mechanical Engineering Technicians,               Internships/Co-ops are often available from local companies.
knowledgeable in both the theory and application of engineering          These are unique opportunities for students to gain valuable
principles, continues to grow. These professionals serve as the          experience while in school and offer potential employment
link between engineers and craftsmen, and the Mechanical                 opportunities with the company upon successful completion of
Engineering Technology Program provides their foundation.                an internship/co-op program and graduation. For more infor-
    The objective of the Mechanical Engineering Technology               mation, contact the department chair/adviser or call the ECC
program is to train professionals capable of assuming responsible        Internship office at 270-5160.

                                                                         Scholarships
positions in machine and tool design, heat power and refrigera-
tion, instrumentation, CNC and CAM programming, fluid
power, material testing, CAD, solid modeling, stress analysis,           Various scholarships are available. Contact the department
manufacturing processes, automation and drafting.                        coordinator for more information.

                                                                         Accreditation
    Comprehensive in nature, the Mechanical Engineering
Technology program offers an in-depth study of mechanical
engineering technology courses as well as liberal arts and social        Technology Accreditation Commission/Accreditation Board
science courses. Machine tools, analytical mechanics, tool design,       for Engineering and Technology (T.A.C./A.B.E.T.)

                                                                         Program Competencies
fluid mechanics, applied thermodynamics, instrumentation and
mechanical equipment are among the subjects analyzed in cur-
riculum courses. The mechanical engineering technology courses           Upon graduation with an Associate in Applied Science degree
are enriched with laboratory experiences. The program is com-            in Mechanical Engineering Technology, the graduate will be
pleted with composition, literature and social science courses,          able to:
which help students to better communicate and to participate in          • Construct multi-view mechanical drawings
meaningful interpersonal relationships.                                  • Apply geometric tolerancing and true positioning
    Graduates of the program either assume positions as a                • Take measurements with instrumentation
Mechanical Technician in machine and tool design, heat power,            • Operate basic machine tools
refrigeration, instrumentation, CNC programming, fluid power             • Program C.N.C. machine tools
and drafting or continue their education toward a bachelor’s or          • Use engineering materials and manufacturing processes
advanced degree in engineering or technology programs.                   • Solve for analytical forces

Special Admission Requirements/Prerequisites
                                                                         • Test materials using standard testing machines
                                                                         • Write technical reports
MET first year students must have been placed at                         • Use personal computers for problem solving
MT126/MT122 or higher math courses. Students with low math               • Solve problems in fluid and heat flow
scores are required to start a MET pre-engineering program.              • Relate electricity to the operation of mechanical equipment
This program will provide them with additional courses and will          • Understand basic jigs, fixtures and dies
prepare them for the regular MET program. The pre-engineering            • Design basic machine elements
students will be placed immediately in the regular MET program           • Understand basic thermal machines and equipment includ-
once they register in MT126 or MT122.                                       ing refrigeration systems

Course Sequence Options and Electives
                                                                         • Understand basic hydraulic and pneumatic systems in
                                                                            power or control applications
Mechanical Electives: MET students have the option of selecting
                                                                         Degree: Associate in Applied Science
at least three of the five courses listed below to graduate from the
                                                                         Hegis: 5315
program. Students are encouraged to take all five courses.
                                                                         Curriculum Code: 0493
1. ME 317 Machine Design (2 cr)                                          Total Degree Credits: 71.0
   ME 318 Lab for ME 317 (1 cr)                                          Campus Location: North
2. ME 346 Heat Power & Refrigeration (2 cr)                              Engineering & Technologies Division

                                                                         CURRICULUM
   ME 347 Lab for ME 346 (1 cr)

                                                                         Full-Time Students
3. ME 321 Tool Design (2 cr)
   ME 322 Lab for ME 321 (1 cr)
4. ME 354 Fluid Power (2 cr)
   ME 355 Lab for ME 354 (1 cr)                                                                First Year, Fall Semester
5. ME 600 M.E.T. Cooperative/Internship (3 cr)                           MT 122                Technical Mathematics II (4 cr) or
                                                                         MT 126                College Mathematics II (4 cr)
Math Sequence Options: Any of the (MT180 or 181,182), (MT                PH 260                Technical Physics I (4 cr)
125,126, 171) or (MT 121, 122, 171) sequences are allowed with           PH 261                Lab for PH 260 (0 cr)
approval of the unit coordinator.                                        DF 104                Technical Graphics I (2 cr)
Science Sequence Options: (PH 260/261 and PH 262/263) or                 ME 11