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									                                The Water We Drink
                    ASCENSION PARISH WATER WORKS DISTRICT #2
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005001

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our drinking water is
supplied from another water system through a Consecutive Connection (CC). To find out
more about our drinking water sources and additional chemical sampling results, please
contact our office at the number provided below. Our water source(s) are listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
BUYS FROM LA1093004 ST.                                     Surfacewater          CC001
JAMES DIST. 1


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'low'. If you
would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our office
at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Guy Hymel at 225-545-3989.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
  Violation Number Violation Date                      Violation Name
                           Category                           Anaylte Name                                      Anaylte Code
       2007 21031          10/31/2006                  MONITORING (TCR), ROUTINE MAJOR
                       Monitoring                            COLIFORM, TOTAL (TCR)                                      3100
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Received

       2007 21032          12/31/2006                  MCL (TCR), MONTHLY
                         MCL                                 COLIFORM, TOTAL (TCR)                                      3100
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Received



       Our water system tested a minimum of 2 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                      Title                                                 Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria        Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples             Dec        2           0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, December 12, 2006. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required
on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year
of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                     Date               Level            MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
    Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                              9/6/2006          0.3016      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Lead
    Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                              9/6/2006          0.492       AL =     15                   0             ppb
Haloacetic Acids (HAA)
    Major Sources:     By-product of drinking water disinfection
                                            Annual Average          1.56              60                                ppb
TTHMs [Total trihalomethanes]
   Major Sources:    By-product of drinking water chlorination
                                          Annual Average           43.80              80                                ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++
       Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an
indicator that other, potentially-harmful, bacteria may be present. Coliforms were found in
more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.
       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

       Please call our office if you have questions.
         We at the ASCENSION PARISH WATER WORKS DISTRICT #2 work around the
 clock to provide top quality drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us
 protect and conserve our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of
 life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                      BON TERRE CORP.
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005004

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
BON TERRE CORP. WELL 001         Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005004-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact W.j. Cointment at 225-644-5454.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Wednesday, July 13, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            8/7/2006          0.1137      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             12/2/2003            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            8/7/2006          3.4465      AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the BON TERRE CORP. work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
 water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
 sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                       BAYOU ESTATE
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005005

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
BAYOU ESTATES WELL 002                                      Groundwater        1005005-002


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Patricia Valega at 225-673-8560.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
  Violation Number Violation Date                     Violation Name
                           Category                          Anaylte Name                                       Anaylte Code
       2006 20124           1/31/2006                 MONITORING (TCR), ROUTINE MAJOR
                       Monitoring                           COLIFORM, TOTAL (TCR)                                        3100
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Received

       2006 20126           4/30/2006                 MCL (TCR), MONTHLY
                         MCL                                COLIFORM, TOTAL (TCR)                                        3100
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Received

       2006 20128           5/31/2006                 MCL (TCR), MONTHLY
                         MCL                                COLIFORM, TOTAL (TCR)                                        3100
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Received



       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                      Title                                                  Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria        Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples            Aprl         2          0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, July 06, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                    Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:      Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                              8/16/2006         0.0005      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               1/14/2003            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
    Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                             11/20/2006         0.103       AL =     15                    0            ppb
    There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
    January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++
       Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an
indicator that other, potentially-harmful, bacteria may be present. Coliforms were found in
more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.
       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

       Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the BAYOU ESTATE work around the clock to provide top quality drinking water
 to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water sources,
 which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                           BELLE RINA
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005006

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
BELLE RINA WELL 001              Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005006-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Monday, August 30, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            8/22/2006          0.09       AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             2/3/2004             0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            8/22/2006         0.8525      AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the BELLE RINA work around the clock to provide top quality drinking water to
 every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water sources,
 which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                             KENNEDY HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005017

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
KENNEDY HEIGHTS WELL             Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005017-001
PHILLIPPE WELL                   Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005017-002


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Monday, August 30, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            6/10/2004          0.20       AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             1/21/2004            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            6/10/2004          6.00       AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the KENNEDY HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION work around the clock to provide top
quality drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and
conserve our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our
children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                     GONZALES, CITY OF
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005030

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
BAYOU BLACK WELL                 Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005030-001
BOURQUE WELL                     Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005030-004
DOUBLE L HYDROTEST WELL          Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005030-003
RODDY RD. WELL                   Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005030-002


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Donna Duplessis at 225-647-2841.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 15 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Wednesday, September 27, 2006. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be
required on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the
latest year of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                   Date               Level              MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                             8/18/2004          0.30       AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:    Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                      aluminum factories
                                              12/2/2003            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead                                                                      Number of Sampling Sites Exceeding AL : 3
    Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                             8/18/2004         24.00       AL =     15                  0              ppb
Haloacetic Acids (HAA)
    Major Sources:   By-product of drinking water disinfection
                                          Annual Average          2.00                60                               ppb
TTHMs [Total trihalomethanes]
   Major Sources:    By-product of drinking water chlorination
                                          Annual Average         0.6375               80                               ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++
      Infants and children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the
general population. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other
homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home`s plumbing. If you are
concerned about elevated lead levels in your home`s water, you may wish to have your water
tested and flush your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using tap water. Additional
information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4761).
       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
      Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

      Please call our office if you have questions.
      We at the GONZALES, CITY OF work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                 MONTERRAY SUBDIVISION
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005034

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
MONTERREY SUBDIVISION            Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005034-001
WELL


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
     There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
     December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 0 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Monday, August 30, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                Date              Level              MCL             MCLG             Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:   Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                           6/25/2003          0.10       AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:   Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                           6/25/2003          1.50       AL =     15               0              ppb




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

        Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the MONTERRAY SUBDIVISION work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                 PEOPLES WTR CO.-DVILLE
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005035

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
INTAKE 001                        Mississippi River         Surfacewater       1005035-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'high'. If you
would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our office
at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Norbert Redmond at 225-473-7603.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
  Violation Number Violation Date                      Violation Name
                           Category                          Anaylte Name                                       Anaylte Code
     2006 20106                3/31/2006               INADEQUATE DBP PRECURSOR REMOVAL
                          TT                                 CARBON, TOTAL ORGANIC (TOC)                                 2920
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Received

     2006 20108                5/31/2006               MCL, AVERAGE, WITH NO. EXCEEDANCE
                         MCL                                 CHLORITE                                                    1009
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Received

     2006 20110                7/31/2006               MCL (TCR), MONTHLY
                         MCL                                 COLIFORM, TOTAL (TCR)                                       3100
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions                State Public Notification Received



       Our water system tested a minimum of 15 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                       Title                                                 Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria          Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples            July       3          0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Sunday, December 31, 2006. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required
on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year
of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                     Date             Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:      Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                              1/17/2006         0.913       AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               8/3/2005             0.40               4                4                 ppm
Gross Beta Particle Activity
    Major Sources:     Decay of natural and man-made deposits
                                              5/3/2005             3.00                50                  0            pCi/l
Lead
   Major Sources:      Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
Contaminant                                   Date               Level            MCL   MCLG   Unit
                                             1/17/2006            3.00     AL =   15      0     ppb
Haloacetic Acids (HAA)
   Major Sources:    By-product of drinking water disinfection
                                          Annual Average         16.8363          60            ppb
TTHMs [Total trihalomethanes]
   Major Sources:    By-product of drinking water chlorination
                                          Annual Average         34.875           80            ppb




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++
       Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an
indicator that other, potentially-harmful, bacteria may be present. Coliforms were found in
more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.
       Total organic carbon (TOC) has no health effects. However, TOC provides a medium
for the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). These byproducts include
trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Drinking water containing these
byproducts in excess ofthe MCL may lead to adverse health effects, liver or kidney problems,
or nervous system effects, and may lead to an increase risk of getting cancer.
       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

        Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the PEOPLES WTR CO.-DVILLE work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                SUMMERFIELD SUBDIVISION
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005036

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
SUMMERFIELD S/D WELL             Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005036-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Monday, August 30, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            6/8/2004           0.45       AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             12/2/2003            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            6/8/2004           1.00       AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the SUMMERFIELD SUBDIVISION work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                      ASCENSION CONSOLIDATED UTILITY DIST #1
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005045

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our drinking water is
supplied from another water system through a Consecutive Connection (CC). To find out
more about our drinking water sources and additional chemical sampling results, please
contact our office at the number provided below. Our water source(s) are listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
PURCHASE FROM LA1005035                                     Surfacewater          CC001
PEOPLES WATER


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'low'. If you
would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our office
at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Guy Hymel at 225-545-3989.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
  Violation Number Violation Date                    Violation Name
                         Category                           Anaylte Name                                    Anaylte Code
       2006 21043         6/30/2006                  MCL, AVERAGE, WITHOUT NO. EXCEEDANCE
                         MCL                               TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANES (TTHM)                             2950
           Associated Enforcement Actions              State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions              State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions              State Public Notification Received

       2007 21044         9/30/2006                  MCL, AVERAGE, WITHOUT NO. EXCEEDANCE
                         MCL                               TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANES (TTHM)                             2950
           Associated Enforcement Actions              State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions              State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions              State Public Notification Received

       2007 21046        12/31/2006                  MCL, AVERAGE, WITHOUT NO. EXCEEDANCE
                         MCL                               TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANES (TTHM)                             2950
           Associated Enforcement Actions              State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions              State Public Notification Requested
           Associated Enforcement Actions              State Public Notification Received



       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, December 12, 2006. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required
on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year
of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                   Date               Level           MCL             MCLG             Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            8/30/2006         0.9251      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            8/30/2006         3.065       AL =     15               0              ppb
Haloacetic Acids (HAA)
   Major Sources:    By-product of drinking water disinfection
                                          Annual Average         42.55             60                              ppb
TTHMs [Total trihalomethanes]
   Major Sources:    By-product of drinking water chlorination
                                          Annual Average         91.375            80                              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++
     Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over
many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous system, and
may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

       Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the ASCENSION CONSOLIDATED UTILITY DIST #1 work around the clock to
 provide top quality drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect
 and conserve our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and
 our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                JIMMY BABIN APARTMENTS
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005046

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
JIMMY BABIN APTS WELL #2         Chicot Equiv Aquifer       Groundwater        1005046-002


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Jimmy Babin at 225-644-6617.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Thursday, June 16, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL              MCLG             Unit
Beryllium
    Major Sources:   Discharge from metal refineries and coal-burning factories; Discharge from electrical, aerospace, and
                     defense industries
                                            8/27/2002            1.00                 4                 4               ppb
Copper
    Major Sources:   Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            9/13/2006         0.0857      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             8/27/2002            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
    Major Sources:   Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            9/13/2006         0.3615      AL =     15                  0               ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

           Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the JIMMY BABIN APARTMENTS work around the clock to provide top quality
drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                MANORWAY TRAILER PARK
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005061

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
MANORWAY TRAILER PARK                                       Groundwater        1005061-002
WELL


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Patrick Campesi at 225-698-9195.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Saturday, July 16, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            8/4/2003           0.05       AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             6/9/2004             0.20               4                4                 ppm
Lead                                                                     Number of Sampling Sites Exceeding AL : 1
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            8/4/2003          29.00       AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++
      Infants and children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the
general population. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other
homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home`s plumbing. If you are
concerned about elevated lead levels in your home`s water, you may wish to have your water
tested and flush your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using tap water. Additional
information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4761).
       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

      Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the MANORWAY TRAILER PARK work around the clock to provide top quality
drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                    RIVERSIDE ESTATES
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005074

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
RIVERSIDE ESTAES WELL 002       Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005074-002


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Monday, August 30, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            8/14/2006         0.0828      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                            10/14/2003            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            8/8/2006          0.6235      AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the RIVERSIDE ESTATES work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
 water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
 sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                   MCGAHA APARTMENTS
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005085

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
MCGAHA APTS. WELL               Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005085-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Troy Canter at 225-445-3706.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                      Title                                                  Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria        Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples            Nov          1          0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, July 26, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                    Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
    Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                              9/15/2006         0.0291      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               4/20/2004            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
    Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                              9/15/2006         0.033       AL =     15                    0            ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

           Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the MCGAHA APARTMENTS work around the clock to provide top quality
drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                    BOBS TRAILERLAND
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005112

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
BOB'S TRAILERLAND WELL          Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005112-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Barbara Goff at 225-647-2528.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Wednesday, October 05, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be
required on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the
latest year of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            11/5/2006         0.0044      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             6/9/2004             0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            11/5/2006         0.2135      AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the BOBS TRAILERLAND work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
 water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
 sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                      SHADY OAKS MHP
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005114

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
SHADY OAKS MHP WELL             Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005114-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Troy Canter at 225-445-3706.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, July 26, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                           10/31/2006         0.0126      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             4/20/2004            0.20               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                           10/31/2006         0.0555      AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the SHADY OAKS MHP work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
 water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
 sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                               COLONIAL PROPERTIES MHP
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005118

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
Z-LAND MOBILE HOME PARK         Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005118-001
WELL


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'high'. If you
would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our office
at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Eddie Denham at 225-223-7978.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
  Violation Number Violation Date                   Violation Name
                        Category                           Anaylte Name                                       Anaylte Code
    2007 5               11/30/2006                 FOLLOW-UP OR ROUTINE TAP M/R (PB/CU)
                      Monitoring                          LEAD & COPPER RULE                                           5000
          Associated Enforcement Actions              State Violation/reminder Notice
          Associated Enforcement Actions              State Public Notification Requested



       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, May 31, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             5/31/2005            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            4/26/2004          0.50       AL =     15                  0              ppb




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

        Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the COLONIAL PROPERTIES MHP work around the clock to provide top quality
drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                            COUNTRY SIDE MOBILE HOME COURT
                             Public Water Supply ID: LA1005119

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
DONNA'S TRAILER PARK WELL       Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005119-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Darrell Landry at 225-647-7368.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
     There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
     December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Wednesday, August 17, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required
on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year
of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             8/10/2005            0.10               4                4                 ppm




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

        Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the COUNTRY SIDE MOBILE HOME COURT work around the clock to provide
 top quality drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and
 conserve our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our
 children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                               J & S MOBILEHOME PARK LLC
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005120

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
MORAN T/P WELL                  Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005120-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact John Soileau at 225-647-3602.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
     There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
     December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 0 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Wednesday, September 08, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be
required on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the
latest year of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                Date              Level              MCL        MCLG   Unit
Lead
   Major Sources:   Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                           9/30/2004          1.00       AL =     15         0     ppb




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

        Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the J & S MOBILEHOME PARK LLC work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                 OAKWOOD ESTATES MHP
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005140

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
OAKWOOD ESTATES WELL            Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005140-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Rodney Daigle at 225-673-9091.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
  Violation Number Violation Date                     Violation Name
                           Category                          Anaylte Name                                       Anaylte Code
     2006 20145             7/31/2006                 MCL (TCR), MONTHLY
                         MCL                                COLIFORM, TOTAL (TCR)                                        3100
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Requested

     2006 20146             9/30/2006                 MCL (TCR), MONTHLY
                         MCL                                COLIFORM, TOTAL (TCR)                                        3100
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Requested

     2006 20147             8/31/2006                 MCL (TCR), MONTHLY
                         MCL                                COLIFORM, TOTAL (TCR)                                        3100
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Requested

     2007 20150            11/30/2006                 FOLLOW-UP OR ROUTINE TAP M/R (PB/CU)
                       Monitoring                           LEAD & COPPER RULE                                           5000
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Violation/reminder Notice
           Associated Enforcement Actions               State Public Notification Requested

     2007 2                12/31/2006                 MONITORING, ROUTINE (DBP), MAJOR
                           Monitoring                        TOTAL HALOACETIC ACIDS (HAA5)                               2456


     2007 1                12/31/2006                 MONITORING, ROUTINE (DBP), MAJOR
                           Monitoring                        TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANES (TTHM)                                2950




       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                      Title                                                  Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria        Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples            Sep          3          0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Wednesday, June 09, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required
on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year
of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                    Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               6/9/2004             0.20               4                4                 ppm
Contaminant                        Date          Level          MCL         MCLG         Unit



    There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
    January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++
       Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an
indicator that other, potentially-harmful, bacteria may be present. Coliforms were found in
more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.
       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

       Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the OAKWOOD ESTATES MHP work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                  HIGHLAND APARTMENTS
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005142

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
HIGHLAND APTS. WELL             Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005142-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Monday, August 30, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            8/22/2006         0.1711      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                            10/14/2003            0.20               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            8/22/2006         0.837       AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the HIGHLAND APARTMENTS work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                 SORRENTO TRAILER PARK
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005143

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
SORRENTO T/P WELL               Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005143-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Larry Jumonville at 225-675-6675.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                      Title                                                  Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria        Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples            Aug          1          0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Thursday, August 19, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                    Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
    Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                              9/13/2006         0.0027      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               4/20/2004            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
    Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                              9/13/2006         0.1855      AL =     15                    0            ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

           Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the SORRENTO TRAILER PARK work around the clock to provide top quality
drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                     AUDREY F. EDDY TP
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005144

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
AUDREY F.EDDY BACK UP           Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005144-002
WELL
AUDREY F.EDDY MAIN WELL-        Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005144-001
SHOP


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Audrey Eddy at 225-675-8294.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                      Title                                                  Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria        Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples            Aug          1          0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Wednesday, July 20, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                    Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
    Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                             11/15/2006         0.0351      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               5/31/2005            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
    Major Sources:     Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                             11/15/2006          0.50       AL =     15                    0            ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

           Please call our office if you have questions.
      We at the AUDREY F. EDDY TP work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                            WHITE ROAD MOBILE HOME PARK
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005147

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
WHITE ROAD MHP WELL 002                                     Groundwater        1005147-002


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Darrell Landry at 225-647-7368.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
      There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
      December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                      Title                                                  Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria        Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples            Oct          1          0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, August 16, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                    Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               8/31/2004            0.10               4                4                 ppm




      There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
      January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

           Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the WHITE ROAD MOBILE HOME PARK work around the clock to provide top
 quality drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and
 conserve our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our
 children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                               PLANTATION HOME VILLAGE
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005148

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
PLANTATION MH VILLAGE           Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005148-001
WELL


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Troy Canter at 225-445-3706.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
     There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
     December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, September 27, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required
on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year
of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             4/20/2004            0.20               4                4                 ppm




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

        Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the PLANTATION HOME VILLAGE work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                     PINE TRAILER PARK
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005152

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
PINE TRAILER PARK WELL          Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005152-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Calvin Stafford at 225-715-6425.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
  Violation Number Violation Date                   Violation Name
                        Category                           Anaylte Name                                       Anaylte Code
     2007 4              12/31/2006                 MONITORING, ROUTINE (DBP), MAJOR
                        Monitoring                         TOTAL HALOACETIC ACIDS (HAA5)                               2456


     2007 3              12/31/2006                 MONITORING, ROUTINE (DBP), MAJOR
                        Monitoring                         TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANES (TTHM)                                2950




       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on Friday,
June 20, 2003. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an annual
basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of chemical
sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             9/3/2002             0.10               4                4                 ppm




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

           Please call our office if you have questions.
      We at the PINE TRAILER PARK work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                   MARANTHA ACRES S/D
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005153

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
MARANTHA ACRES WELL             Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005153-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, May 31, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            8/9/2006          0.2105      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             5/31/2005            0.20               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            8/18/2006         0.2365      AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the MARANTHA ACRES S/D work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                       BEECHWOOD S/D
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005159

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
PW CO BEECHWOOD S/D WELL        Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005159-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Monday, August 30, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            8/8/2006          0.0172      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             12/2/2003            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            8/11/2006         0.217       AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the BEECHWOOD S/D work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
 water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
 sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                    MIRES TRAILER PARK
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005165

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
MIRES T/P WELL                  Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005165-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact John Gautreaux at 225-673-8773.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
  Violation Number Violation Date                     Violation Name
                           Category                          Anaylte Name                                       Anaylte Code
     2007 4                12/31/2006                 MONITORING, ROUTINE (DBP), MAJOR
                           Monitoring                        TOTAL HALOACETIC ACIDS (HAA5)                               2456


     2007 3                12/31/2006                 MONITORING, ROUTINE (DBP), MAJOR
                           Monitoring                        TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANES (TTHM)                                2950




       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                      Title                                                  Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria        Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples            Sep          1          0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, September 30, 2003. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required
on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year
of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                    Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               9/9/2003             0.10               4                4                 ppm




      There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
      January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

      Please call our office if you have questions.
      We at the MIRES TRAILER PARK work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                               OAK VILLAGE MOBILE HOME
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005171

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
OAK VILLAGE MHP WELL            Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005171-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Fred Robillard at 225-929-9510.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Wednesday, September 28, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be
required on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the
latest year of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                           11/18/2006         0.0084      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             8/27/2002            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                           11/18/2006         0.708       AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the OAK VILLAGE MOBILE HOME work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                TREYVILLE COURTS TR. PK.
                             Public Water Supply ID: LA1005175

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
TREYVILLE COURTS T.P. WELL      Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005175-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Earl Vasseur at 225-647-0503.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, July 26, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            9/13/2006         0.0352      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             4/20/2004            0.20               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            9/13/2006         0.033       AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the TREYVILLE COURTS TR. PK. work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                   MANCHAC POINT W. S.
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005179

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
MANCHAC POINT SUB. WELL         Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005179-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
       There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
       December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 0 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, May 31, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                            6/20/2003          0.20       AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             5/31/2005            0.20               4                4                 ppm
Lead
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits
                                            6/6/2003           1.00       AL =     15                  0              ppb




       There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
       January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the MANCHAC POINT W. S. work around the clock to provide top quality
 drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our
 water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                    CORNERVIEW FARMS
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005186

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
CORNERVIEW FARMS WELL           Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005186-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Pat Kerr at 225-952-7316.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
     There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
     December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, May 31, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Copper
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives
                                           11/16/2005         0.1725      AL =     1.3               1.3           ppm
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             5/31/2005            0.10               4                4                 ppm




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

        Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the CORNERVIEW FARMS work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
 water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
 sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                           COUNTRYVIEW MOBILE HOME COURT
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005202

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
DALLAS TRAILER PARK WELL        Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005202-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Darrell Landry at 225-647-7368.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
     There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
     December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Wednesday, August 17, 2005. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required
on an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year
of chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date               Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Cadmium
   Major Sources:    Corrosion of galvanized pipes; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from metal refineries; Runoff from
                     waste batteries and paints
                                             8/10/2005           1.00                 5                 5               ppb
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             8/10/2005            0.20               4                4                 ppm




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

           Please call our office if you have questions.
        We at the COUNTRYVIEW MOBILE HOME COURT work around the clock to provide
 top quality drinking water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and
 conserve our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our
 children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                    NEW RIVER ESTATES
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005203

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
NEW RIVER ESTATES WELL                                      Groundwater        1005203-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'unknown'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Patricia Valega at 225-673-8560.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
     There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
     December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, July 06, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                  Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Fluoride
    Major Sources:   Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                     aluminum factories
                                             2/3/2004             0.10               4                4                 ppm




     There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
     January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

        Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the NEW RIVER ESTATES work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
 water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
 sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                    RIVER RUN ESTATES
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005206

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
RIVER RUN ESTATES WELL          Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005206-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'medium'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Patricia Valega at 225-673-8560.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
      There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
      December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
   There Were No Positive Bacteriological Samples During the Monitoring
   Period of January 1st to December 31st, 2006
       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Thursday, August 26, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on
an annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                    Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               7/20/2004            0.10               4                4                 ppm
Gross Alpha Particle Activity, Total
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits
                                               7/20/2004           3.00                15                0              pCi/l




      There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
      January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

         Please call our office if you have questions.
       We at the RIVER RUN ESTATES work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
 water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
 sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.
                                The Water We Drink
                                       CYPRESS LAKES
                            Public Water Supply ID: LA1005208

       We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the year 2006.
This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and services we deliver
to you every day (Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable.
Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien). Our constant goal is to provide you
with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts
we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water
resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source(s) are
listed below:
Source Name                      Source Location           Source Type         Source ID
CYPRESS LAKES WELL 001          Southern Hills Aquifer      Groundwater        1005208-001


       The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive
material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
     Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
     sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
     wildlife.
     Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring
     or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater
     discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
     Pesticides and Herbicides - which may come from a variety of sources such as
     agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
     Organic Chemical Contaminants – including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals,
     which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
     also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
     Radioactive Contaminants – which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil
     and gas production and mining activities.
       A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) is now available from our office. This plan
is an assessment of a delineated area around our listed sources through which contaminants,
if present, could migrate and reach our source water. It also includes an inventory of potential
sources of contamination within the delineated area, and a determination of the water
supply's susceptibility to contamination by the identified potential sources. According to the
Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system had a susceptibility rating of 'unknown'. If
you would like to review the Source Water Assessment Plan, please feel free to contact our
office at the number provided in the following paragraph.
       In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit
the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and
Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must
provide the same protection for public health. We are pleased to report that our drinking water
is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. We want our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. If you have any questions about this report, want to attend
any scheduled meetings, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please
contact Patricia Valega at 225-673-8560.
      The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public Health routinely
monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The
tables that follow show the results of our monitoring during the period of January 1st to
December 31st, 2006. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected
to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does
not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.

       In the tables below, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be
familiar with. To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the following
definitions:
    Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
    Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/L) – one part per million corresponds to one
    minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
    Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/L) – one part per billion corresponds to one
    minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
    Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (ng/L) – one part per trillion corresponds to one minute
    in 2,000,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000,000.
    Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (pg/L) – one part per quadrillion corresponds to
    one minute in 2,000,000,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000,000,000.
    Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
    Millirems per year (mrem/yr) – measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
    Million fibers per liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers
    that are longer than 10 micrometers.
    Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of
    water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.
    Variances & Exemptions (V&E) – State or EPA permission not to meet MCL or a treatment
    technique under certain conditions.
    Action level (AL) – the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
    requirements that a water system must follow.
    Treatment technique (TT) – a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the
    level of a contaminant in drinking water.
    Maximum contaminant level (MCL) – the “Maximum Allowed” MCL is the highest level of a
    contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible
    using the best available treatment technology.
    Maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) – the “Goal” is the level of a contaminant in drinking
    water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLG’s allow for a margin
    of safety.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
    drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control
    of microbial contaminants.
    Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant
    below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of
    the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
During the period covered by this report we had the below noted violations of drinking water
regulations.
      There Were No Violations During the Monitoring Period of January 1st to
      December 31st, 2006
       Our water system tested a minimum of 1 monthly sample(s) in accordance with the
Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. During the monitoring period covered by
this report, we had the following noted detections for microbiological contaminants:
Contaminant                      Title                                                  Month      Samples MCLG
 Total Coliform Bacteria        Month with Greatest Number of Positive Samples            Sep          1          0
 MCL:For systems that collect more than 39 samples per month, if 5 percent are positive for Coliform. For systems that collect
 less than 40 samples per month, if 1 sample is positive for coliform.
 Major Source: Naturally present in the environment



       In the table below, we have shown the regulated contaminants that were detected at
levels BELOW their maximum contaminant level. These samples, except for Lead and
Copper results and surface water systems, were collected at the raw water source and
represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap
levels could be less. The last chemical sampling of our source water was collected on
Tuesday, July 06, 2004. Chemical Sampling of our drinking water may not be required on an
annual basis, therefore, information provided in this table refers back to the latest year of
chemical sampling results.
Contaminant                                    Date              Level               MCL             MCLG              Unit
Arsenic
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastes
                                               1/14/2003            4.00                10                0              ppb
Fluoride
    Major Sources:     Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and
                       aluminum factories
                                               1/14/2003            0.10               4                4                 ppm




      There Were No Positive Nitrate Samples During the Monitoring Period of
      January 1st to December 31st, 2006
++++++Environmental Protection Agency Required Health Effects Language++++++

       Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk for
infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care
providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
       Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this
 year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make
 improvements that will benefit all of our customers.

           Please call our office if you have questions.
      We at the CYPRESS LAKES work around the clock to provide top quality drinking
water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water
sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children's future.

								
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