Docstoc

College of Dentistry

Document Sample
College of Dentistry Powered By Docstoc
					University of Kentucky
   COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY




                    WELCOME
                       to the
                        year
                     2010-2011




College of Dentistry Bulletin
College of Dentistry

This bulletin is an official publication of the University of Kentucky College of Dentistry. It
contains policies, regulations, procedures, and fees in effect as the publication went to press. The
College of Dentistry reserves the right to make changes at any time to reflect current board
policies, administrative regulations and procedures, amendments by state law, and fee changes.

All applicants meeting the appropriate academic requirements and technical standards shall be
considered equally for admission to any academic program thereof regardless of race, color,
religion, sex, marital status, beliefs, age, national origin, sexual orientation, or disability.


       Dean’s Message                                   • Student Financial Aid
       The University                                   • Career Planning and
            • Mission and Goals                             Counseling
            • The College Strategic Plan                • Withdrawal and Refund Policy
            • Organizational Chart                 Academic Affairs
       Facilities                                        • The Curriculum
            • D.M.D. Student Clinics                     • Evaluation and Grading
            • Techniques Lab                             • Academic and Tutorial Services
            • Faculty Clinic                             • Academic Disciplinary Policies
            • Student Lounge                       Postdoctoral Education
            • Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery             • Application for Postdoctoral
                 Clinic                            Programs (PASS)
            • Center on Implantology                     • General Practice Residency
            • Kentucky Clinic                            • Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
            • Center for Oral Health                     • Orofacial Pain
            • Medical Center Library                     • Orthodontics
       Admissions and Student Affairs                    • Pediatric Dentistry
            • D.M.D. Program Admission                   • Periodontology
            • Undergraduate                        Patient Care
            • Prerequisites/Coursework             Public Service
            • Technical Standards                  Research
            • Application Process                  Continuing Education
            • Transcripts                          Alumni/ae Affairs
            • Letters of Evaluation                Development
            • Dental Admission Tests               Lexington
            • Interviews                                 • Directions
            • Residency Status                     Faculty
            • Personal Health                      Course Descriptions
            • Cost of Attendance


                                                                                                   2
Dear Prospective Student Dentist:
                                                            Sharon P. Turner, D.D.S., J.D.,
                                                            Dean of the University of Kentucky
                                                            College of Dentistry

The College of Dentistry at the University of Kentucky is an exciting community . . . a
community of highly educated and nationally distinguished faculty, a community of talented and
eager students, and a community of caring and dedicated professional staff. Each participant in
our community has something unique to contribute and our spirit of community makes possible
the contribution of all. We work together as colleagues to fulfill our human potential in the
profession of dentistry.

From its beginnings, our College has been acknowledged nationally and internationally as a
College of distinction. What makes the UK College of Dentistry outstanding? While I could
respond with an array of unique qualities, one characteristic always assumes a position of pre-
eminence . . . our commitment to students and to their development as professionals. Kentucky's
vanguard always has been its orientation to students. We are a student-centered College. Our
reason for existence is to enable students to become extraordinary practitioners of dentistry; to
work with them in developing their full potential intellectually, clinically, interpersonally,
creatively, and morally. As a College, we continuously reaffirm that this is why we are here and
what we are about.

Our philosophy is simple and direct “facilitating student learning.” As a faculty, we seek to
model a love of learning and a spirit of inquiry appropriate for students to inculcate into their
professional value system. From matriculation, UK’s student dentists are accepted as colleagues
in the profession and are respected as such. Only in a climate where human individuality and
autonomy are respected can real professional education exist. Dentistry, society, and the world
will change; our commitment to students has not and will not.

The University of Kentucky has a tradition of innovation, leadership, and accomplishment
unrivaled in dental education. We are a distinctive College, and an integral part of an
exceptional Medical Center, on the campus of Kentucky's only land-grant, comprehensive,
research University in Lexington, the heart of the beautiful Bluegrass region.

May I challenge you to consider the exciting opportunities afforded by the profession of
dentistry. I also encourage you to consider the advantages of enrolling at the UK College of
Dentistry and becoming a part of the outstanding Kentucky tradition.

                                                                                                 3
                                                     1954 - UK Albert B. Chandler Medical
                                                            Center is authorized to include
                                                            colleges of dentistry, medicine, allied
                                                            health professions, nursing, and
                                                            pharmacy.

                                                     1960 - 473-bed University of
                                                            Kentucky Hospital opens.

                                                      1962 - College of Dentistry enrolls
                                                              its first class




The University
Founded on Feb. 22, 1865, the University of Kentucky           Pivotal dates in the history of
began as the Agricultural Mechanical College of Kentucky       the University:
University. In 1878, the Agricultural and Mechanical
College was separated from Kentucky University and
reestablished on land given by Lexington and Fayette              1954 - UK Albert B. Chandler
County. Kentucky University is now Transylvania                   Medical Center is authorized
University. To provide a separate campus for the new              to include colleges of
institution, the city of Lexington donated its 50-acre            dentistry, medicine, allied
fairground and park which had been used as bivouac area           health professions, nursing,
for Union troops during the Civil War. President James            and pharmacy.
K. Patterson, whose service to the institution began in
1869, used his personal savings to supplement the building        1960 - 473-bed University of
fund. Thirty years later, the legislature changed the name        Kentucky Hospital opens.
of the institution to State University, Lexington, Kentucky,
and gave it additional financial support. In 1916, the name       1962 - College of Dentistry
was changed to the University of Kentucky. UK is now              enrolls its first class.
among the 93 state universities and land-grant institutions
in America. Other dates have proved pivotal in the history
of the University:



Today, UK has about 30,000 students on the Lexington campus and Medical Center. More than
1,700 full-time faculty are employed at the University. UK is a member of the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools.




                                                                                                 4
VISION

The University of Kentucky will be one of the nation's 20 best public research universities, an
institution recognized world-wide for excellence in teaching, research, and service and a catalyst
for intellectual, social, cultural, and economic development.

MISSION STATEMENT

The University of Kentucky is a public, research-extensive, land grant university dedicated to
improving people's lives through excellence in teaching, research, health care, cultural
enrichment, and economic development.

The University of Kentucky:

      • Facilitates learning, informed by scholarship and research.
      • Expands knowledge through research, scholarship and creative activity.
      • Serves a global community by disseminating, sharing and applying knowledge.

The University, as the flagship institution, plays a critical leadership role for the Commonwealth
by contributing to the economic development and quality of life within Kentucky's borders and
beyond. The University nurtures a diverse community characterized by fairness and equal
opportunity.




                                                                                                 5
                                                    The College of Dentistry

                                                         Currently, the College admits 40
                                                            Kentucky residents and 17 non residents into
                                                            its four-year curriculum leading to the
                                                            Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) degree.
Statement of Mission Goals

College Mission

       The mission of the College of Dentistry is to improve oral health and general health
       through teaching, research, and service. The mission is supported by collaborative
       engagement and by networking with community and academic partners to promote oral
       health literacy and reduce health disparities within Kentucky and beyond.

       The College educates health professionals to become active citizen leaders who are
       conscious of their personal and professional responsibilities in a global society. The
       College values diversity within its community, which includes diversity of thought and
       experience, in order to promote a humanistic approach to education, patient care, and
       community service.



The College of Dentistry is one of six colleges in the University of Kentucky, Chandler Medical
Center. Other colleges include Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Public
Health. The UK Hospital, UK Children’s Hospital, Kentucky Clinic, Sanders-Brown Center on
Aging and Lucille Parker Markey Cancer Center also are integral components of UK’s health
science complex.

The College of Dentistry was established in 1961. In its brief existence, the accomplishments of
the College are unparalleled in dental education. From its beginning, it has been acknowledged
nationally and internationally as a leader in academic dentistry. Since its founding, more than
2,000 aspiring practitioners have selected the University of Kentucky to prepare them for their
chosen profession.

Currently, the College admits 40 Kentucky residents and 17 non-residents into its four-year
curriculum leading to the Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) degree. The goal of the
curriculum is to prepare dentists to meet the oral health needs of the society they are called to
serve. The curriculum, developed at Kentucky, and now used extensively throughout the nation,


                                                                                                      6
focuses on integrating learning in the biomedical and clinical sciences. This is accomplished by
an introduction to clinical dentistry in the first year, and by extension of study in the biomedical
sciences throughout the four years.

The curriculum is increasingly problem-oriented, focusing on developing the student dentists’
critical-thinking skills imperative for the contemporary practice of dental medicine. The faculty
is committed to inculcating in students an attitude of life-long learning, believing that only such
an orientation enables a practitioner to provide competent, state-of-the-art services in a rapidly
changing clinical environment. The expanding knowledge base of the profession requires that
the curriculum focus on principles of dentistry and on teaching future dentists how to learn and
instill in them the desire to continue to learn about the profession.

The College offers advanced educational programs leading to advanced certification in general
practice, pediatric dentistry, periodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orofacial pain, and
orthodontics. In periodontics and orthodontics, students also earn a Master of Science degree
from the University of Kentucky Graduate School. The option of a masters degree is available in
both orofacial pain and pediatric dentistry. Continuing education courses for practicing dental
professionals also are an important dimension of the College's educational activities.


The College of Dentistry and all of its programs are accredited by the Commission on Dental
Accreditation of the American Dental Association.




                                           Accreditation Policy

      The predoctoral educational program at the University of Kentucky College of Dentistry is fully
      accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation.

      It is the policy of this institution and the Commission on Dental Accreditation that all students
      should know how to contact the Commission to obtain a copy of the Accreditation Guidelines and/or
      to file a complaint.

      The Commission on Dental Accreditation will review complaints that relate to a program’s
      compliance with the accreditation standards. The Commission is interested in the sustained quality
      and continued improvement of dental and dental-related education programs but does not intervene
      on behalf of individuals or act as a court of appeal for individuals in matters of admission,
      appointment, promotion or dismissal of faculty, staff or students.

      A copy of the appropriate accreditation standards and/or the Commission’s policy and procedure for
      submission of complaints may be obtained by contacting the Commission at 211 East Chicago
      Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678 or by calling 1-800-621-8099 extension 4653, or at the following
      website: http://www.ada.org/314.aspx




                                                                                                           7
College of Dentistry Strategic Plan: 2010-2014

In 2012, the College of Dentistry will celebrate its 50th anniversary. This five-year strategic plan
will guide the College as it concludes the first half-century of service and begins its second. As
the College begins this new chapter, this Plan reaffirms its commitment to providing a high-
quality education for a diverse student body, developing new strategies to improve health, and
facilitating partnerships within the University, community, and the profession. In this Plan, the
College answers the challenge put forth by the University in its new five-year plan to “improve
the conditions of Kentucky’s people and build a future that provides economic security and
personal fulfillment.” The mission of the College can be synopsized in the following statement:

       Mission Statement
       The mission of the College of Dentistry is to improve oral health and general health
       through teaching, research, and service. The mission is supported by collaborative
       engagement and by networking with community and academic partners to promote oral
       health literacy and reduce health disparities within Kentucky and beyond.

       The College educates health professionals to become active citizen leaders who are
       conscious of their personal and professional responsibilities in a global society. The
       College values diversity within its community, which includes diversity of thought and
       experience, in order to promote a humanistic approach to education, patient care, and
       community service.

University and College Goal 1: Prepare Students for Leading Roles in an Innovation-
Driven Economy and a Global Society
Education is at the heart of the College’s mission. We propose to educate students who will
function as constructive, engaged citizens who will see themselves as part of the larger global
community. Our students will be prepared to make contributions to oral and general health on the
individual and community basis. They will be prepared for these roles through development of
critical thinking skills, appreciation for the scientific method and use of best evidence in making
treatment recommendations. They will appreciate the importance of diversity in our culture and
develop a tolerance and respect for cultural differences. They will learn the ethical
responsibilities inherent in the care of patients entrusted to their care.

       Objective 1-1: The College will target and recruit high ability students by providing
       educational programs of academic and clinical excellence.

       Objective 1-2: Improve student success by enrolling outstanding students, monitoring
       student success through rigorous and on-going reporting processes, providing
       intervention and support strategies when needed and developing advising and mentoring
       programs.

       Objective 1-3: Ensure that graduates are able to demonstrate academic and clinical
       excellence and are prepared to succeed in professional and community settings.

                                                                                                  8
       Objective 1-4: Expand training opportunities for pre-doctoral students to enhance the
       reputation of the University and address the critical oral health needs of the
       Commonwealth of Kentucky.

University and College Goal 2: Promote Research and Creative Work to Increase the
Intellectual, Social, and Economic Capital of Kentucky and the World Beyond its Borders
The College of Dentistry is part of Kentucky’s land-grant research university, and is part of an
academic environment that will pursue with equal vigor the dual purposes of research: the
expansion of the body of knowledge and the translation of basic and clinical research into
practical benefits for the people of Kentucky and those beyond the state’s borders. All missions
of the University are infused with and benefit from this dedication to the creation and application
of new knowledge. Research and creative activity in the 21st Century is an interdisciplinary and
collaborative pursuit, requiring theoretical and clinical constructs, analytical tools, and laboratory
techniques. The College of Dentistry continues to make significant advances in its research and
creative activities and enthusiastically embraces the challenge of substantially increasing the
volume and the quality of those efforts during the next 5 year strategic plan activities, targeting
the top 20 aspirations of the University.

       Objective 2-1: Build college research capability.

       Objective 2-2: Increase research and scholarly productivity.

       Objective 2-3: Enhance the impact of the college’s research and scholarship.

University and College Goal 3: Develop the Human and Physical Resources of the
University to Achieve the Institution’s Top 20 Goals
As the University of Kentucky strives to become one of America’s 20 best public research
universities, the College of Dentistry will support that vision with programs of national stature as
well as providing the professional, educated citizenry and scholarship needed to serve the
Commonwealth, nation, and world. To continue to expand our reach for national and
international prominence the College of Dentistry will support our faculty and staff with
opportunities for mentoring, collaboration and leadership in priority areas. Vital to this will be
the recruitment, retention and supportive work environment for all faculty and staff. As part of
this enhancement of our environment, our physical space, technological enhancement, clinical
enterprise and financial resources will be explored and improved to provide the resources
necessary to reach our objectives.

       Objective 3-1: Increase leadership and mentoring capacity for our faculty and staff.

       Objective 3-2: Recruit, orient and retain distinguished faculty and staff and provide a
       quality work environment to support them.

       Objective 3-3: Strengthen the clinical enterprise to effectively enhance all missions of the
       College of Dentistry.


                                                                                                     9
       Objective 3-4: Enhance strategic and financial planning while implementing more
       efficient business and information technology practices. Within this framework, enhance
       both internal and external marketing of the College in support of external funding and
       support.

       Objective 3-5: In collaboration with University and UK HealthCare leadership,
       comprehensively expand and enhance space and facilities available for all College
       functions.

University and College Goal 4: Promote Diversity and Inclusion
The College recognizes the importance of diversity in reaching its goal of educating dentists who
will provide outstanding dental health care to all populations in the Commonwealth. To this end,
the College will promote an appreciation for the value of diversity among its students, staff and
faculty and will provide an environment that fosters and promotes cultural competence.

       Objective 4-1: The College will target and recruit high ability students, staff and faculty
       with diverse racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, rural and urban backgrounds.

       Objective 4-2: Promote curricular and co-curricular transformation that recognizes the
       educational advantages of diversity.

       Objective 4-3: Enhance college/campus/community collaborations in areas where
       opportunities exist to build diversity and increase inclusion.


University and College Goal 5: Improve the Quality of Life of Kentuckians through
Engagement, Outreach and Service
The College of Dentistry is committed to reducing disparities in the oral and general health status
of Kentuckians. College will improve the quality of life in the Commonwealth through
community engagement, outreach, and service. The College will continue to build new
partnerships throughout the Commonwealth that will improve the access to health care services,
promote optimal oral health, and prevent disease through teaching, research and service
particularly in rural communities. While the primary ground for community engagement lies in
the Commonwealth, the College will also carry its outreach to the region, the nation and
internationally.

       Objective 5-1: Enhance faculty, staff, and student connection with community through
       engagement, outreach, and service.

       Objective 5-2: Enhance community access to oral health and dental clinical services
       through the college’s outreach and engagement.

       Objective 5-3: Enhance external recognition and funding of the College of Dentistry
       engagement, outreach, and service.


                                                                                                 10
Organizational Chart




                       11
Academic Structure




                     12
Facilities

The College of Dentistry is located in a six-story
wing of the University of Kentucky, Chandler
Medical Center. The College's physical facilities
include patient care operatories, technique               PROFILE
laboratories, classrooms, conference rooms, and
faculty and administrative offices. There are 200         Robert Kovarik, D.M.D.
patient care operatories providing support for all
dimensions of the College's programming.
                                                                   Dr. Kovarik is
In keeping with the College's commitment to               an associate professor in
                                                          the Department of Oral Health Science,
progress and innovation, new equipment and
                                                          Division of Dental Public Health. He
facilities are continually being introduced to enhance    received a bachelor’s degree in material
the education of student dentists and to enhance the      science engineering from Vanderbilt
patient experience. In 2008, the vacuum system that       University and a doctor of dental medicine
supports all dental operatories was replaced. Also        degree from the University of Kentucky,
completed in 2008 was a refurbishment of the Dental       College of Dentistry in 1982. After
Science Building’s two elevators. In 2009, the            practicing dentistry for five years in the
College refurbished all of its waiting rooms and          greater Cincinnati area, he joined the
reception areas and renovated oral surgery                faculty at the Medical College of Georgia
operatories. In 2010, significant resources were          School of Dentistry. While on the faculty
invested to implement digital radiography and to          there, he earned a master’s degree in oral
                                                          biology.
enhance all radiology facilities.
                                                                   “I returned to teach full-time at the
                                                          University of Kentucky, College of
   • DMD Student Clinics: UK has one of the               Dentistry because I enjoy the collegiate
     most modern teaching facilities in the United        atmosphere here. This school has a long
     States. Each operatory is designed to meet           tradition of treating students with respect
     high infection control standards. Operatories        and providing a very positive learning
     feature chairs that allow for computerized           environment for both students and faculty.
     patient positioning, articulating lights, fiber      I have never visited or been associated with
     optic units, and photopolymerization units for       a dental school that provides a better
     curing biomaterials. In anticipating the future,     learning environment for its students.
     the College included provisions for connecting
                                                                                         continue
     electric handpieces into the 60 operatories.
     UK is the first institution in the nation with
     these new features in its clinics. Similar equipment also exists in oral radiology,
     orthodontics, and pediatric dentistry. Our DMD student clinic facilities also feature
     preclinical simulations using mannequins in a clinical setting. Finally, all operatories on
     the third floor are wired with Ethernet to provide a gateway to the internet and to build a
     foundation for an electronic patient record. Phase II of the axiUm clinic information
     system was completed in 2008 with the addition of laptop computers to each operatory.


                                                                                                     13
• Technique Lab: The preclinical technique lab                 Engrained in our College of
  and adjacent support labs include the most          Dentistry is an environment whereby
  modern laboratory equipment. All                    teachers and students work together as
  workbenches have a dust collector and electric      colleagues for the common goal of providing
  and air-driven hand piece controllers. The          a modern education in dentistry and quality
  instructor podium has access to centralized         dental care for our patients at the college.
  audio/visual services, the internet, and custom     Not only is this environment more enjoyable
  in-room audio/visual equipment.                     to students, but it is also more enjoyable and
                                                      rewarding to faculty and that is why I am a
• Faculty Clinic: The faculty clinic has eight        faculty member here at UKCD.”
                                                               Dr. Kovarik maintains a private
  operatories for College of Dentistry faculty to
                                                      practice in the faculty practice clinic,
  provide comprehensive dental care to private        teaches operative dentistry, and participates
  patients, University employees, and their           in research on the links between oral health
  families.                                           and general systemic health in rural
                                                      settings. His research interests are in the
• Student Lounge: Student dentists have a             effects of oral infections on preterm and low
  dedicated area containing 210 lockers, seating      birth weight birthing outcomes, early
  for 20 students and a kitchen equipped with a       childhood caries and oral infections in
  microwave and a refrigerator. Computers with        patients with type 2 diabetes. “I think of the
  Ethernet access are also available for student      University of Kentucky, College of
                                                      Dentistry as being a clinically oriented
  use.
                                                      school where you can get a very good
                                                      education in the actual practice of dentistry
• Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic: The          (clinical dentistry). However, during the
  clinic now contains 10 operatories, including       past several years we have become even
  two large operating rooms for general               broader in our educational focus. We
  anesthesia and extensive surgery. The clinic        provide an outstanding education in the
  also has space for a student case presentation      basic sciences and more and more of our
  area, nursing station, resident room, and           students are participating in research which
  conference room. In 2009, two additional            is the foundation of everything we teach. In
  rooms will be converted to operatories              research, we are constantly discovering
                                                      better materials and techniques. This
  bringing the total number of operatories to 12.
                                                      translates into better teaching and better
                                                      patient care.”
• Center on Implantology: The Center on
  Implantology includes three operatories and an operating room for implant prosthetics and
  surgery. The oral and maxillofacial surgery, periodontics, and prosthodontics divisions.

• Kentucky Clinic: The Kentucky Clinic, a comprehensive ambulatory care center, contains
  a dental facility with 21 patient care operatories. It is connected to the UK hospital by a
  covered skywalk, as is the College of Nursing and Health Sciences Learning Center. The
  top floor of the six-story building contains an audio-visual library and multimedia retrieval
  study area. The self-instructional programs in the curriculum, which are in the form of
  computer digitized slides, audio tapes, slide tapes, slide text and videocassettes, are
  available as well is the equipment necessary for their use. The library also has a
  microcomputer laboratory and a computer classroom with 55 power personal computers.

                                                                                                14
   • Center for Oral Health (COHR): The Center for Oral Health was officially approved by
     the UK Faculty Senate on March 6, 2000. This action brought into reality an initiative
     started by the administration and faculty of the UKCD in 1997. It created a focus and
     research infrastructure for the College, which linked it with the Medical Center and the
     larger UK academic environment. Moreover, the COHR will help to position the UKCD
     as a leader in accomplishing the goal of UK to become a top 20 institution by 2020. Since
     2000, with the creation of the COHR, UKCD research funds have increased to ~$4-5
     million annually. The COHR has propelled the UKCD from near last in NIH funding of
     dental schools in the country to near the top 20. These accomplishments reflect a multi-
     fold increase in grant submissions and publications by UKCD faculty. Another measure of
     research expertise is the emphasis of the research activities in the UKCD to link with other
     aspects of the UK academic environment, as well as with national collaborators. These
     increases were accompanied by substantial increases in collaborative research funds that
     nearly doubled those awards primarily to faculty in the UKCD. The Engagement and
     Outreach Research aspects of the UKCD are now housed under the COHR. This
     realignment has enabled the development of the Kentucky Oral Health Network
     representing partnerships with primary care facilities, community health centers, public
     health departments, and the UK Centers for Rural Health to improve oral health in
     communities across Kentucky.

   • The UK Chandler Medical Center Library: contains more than 160,000 volumes and
     receives about 2,000 serial titles. Individual carrels and group study rooms are available
     for Medical Center students and staff.

Several facilities outside the Medical Center also are used for teaching by the College of
Dentistry. These include various state and federal institutions such as the Veterans Affairs
Medical Center, which has two locations and many practitioner offices throughout Kentucky.
The College also has three self-contained mobile dental units which provide dental services to
children from low-income families. With these units, the College has expanded its pediatric
services and affords student dentists broader clinical experiences.




                                                                                                  15
Office of Admissions and Student Affairs

The College of Dentistry’s Office of Admissions and Student Affairs is organized to support the
educational objectives and programs of the College by aiding and enriching student learning and
contributing to the welfare and individual growth of students.


The office provides a wide range of services, activities, and programs which include:

   •   pre-dental advising and admissions counseling
   •   admission services/application processing
   •   student financial aid and debt management counseling
   •   career planning
   •   registration and academic records keeping
   •   curriculum support
   •   tutorial assistance
   •   testing services (National Board exams)
   •   academic and personal counseling
   •   assistance to classes and student organizations
   •   transcript services and letters of recommendation
   •   liaison and referral to other UK offices (Housing,
       Health Service, Counseling Center, Student Billing
       Services, Students Affairs Division, Registrar, etc.)




                                                                                             16
D.M.D. Program

                                                        PROFILE: Megan McHugh
Admissions                                              2006 UKCD graduate
The College of Dentistry seeks to enroll
individuals whose academic preparation, personal
qualities, and other qualifications suggest that they
will experience success in the curriculum and
afterwards in the dental profession. Currently 40
resident applicants and 17 nonresident candidates
are admitted to the entering class each year.

Prospective applicants are encouraged to contact
the Office of Admissions and Student Affairs early
in their undergraduate careers for guidance on          Dr. Megan McHugh grew up in Maysville, KY.
admission requirements. The College desires              Throughout high school, Megan realized her
applicants who have the requisite academic              love of the sciences and knew she wanted to
preparation to meet the challenges of a rigorous        become a doctor, though she was unsure which
curriculum. In addition to earning a bachelor’s         field was her passion. This uncertainty led her
degree, these individuals should complete courses       to shadow numerous professionals in various
in both science and non-science subject areas to        specialties. She found her “fit” the day she
increase their likelihood of success in the dental      shadowed her family dentist. The doctor-
program. Although many applicants each year             patient relationship and the meticulous nature of
major in the biological and natural sciences,           dentistry solidified her career choice.
students who pursue studies in other majors also
                                                        After attending Transylvania University, Megan
are invited to apply for admission.                     was excited when she was accepted to the
                                                        University of Kentucky College of Dentistry,
The criteria considered by the Admissions               her top choice. UK’s renowned reputation and
Committee includes the quality of the applicant’s       collegial atmosphere was an ideal place for her
pre-professional preparation, Dental Admission          to pursue her dental education. During dental
Test (DAT) scores, knowledge of and exposure to         school, Megan found her niche and chose to
the dental profession, letters of recommendation        continue her education at UK in the Orthodontic
and other relevant factors. Timing is always an         Graduate Program. While serving as a
important element in the application process.           Teaching Assistant in the pre-doctoral courses,
                                                        Megan experienced the excitement of
                                                        connecting with her students. Nearing the end
                                                        of her residency, she was faced with the
                                                        ultimate decision: what to do after graduation.
                                                        Coming from a family of teachers, she felt
                                                        academics was a natural fit. Dr. McHugh is now
                                                        an Assistant Professor in the Orthodontics
                                                        Department at the University of Kentucky
                                                        College of Dentistry.



                                                                                                   17
Undergraduate Prerequisite Coursework



                                                              The College uses a "rolling admissions
                                                              system" whereby applicants are interviewed
                                                              beginning in September, the first offers
                                                              of admission are made on Dec. 1, and the
                                                              Admissions Committee continues to interview
                                                              applicants until the class is filled.




The College is convinced that certain course work on the undergraduate level is necessary for
quality performance in dental school. Therefore, the following courses are required for
matriculating students:

      two semesters or three quarters of biology with laboratories;
      two semesters or three quarters of general chemistry with laboratories;
      two semesters or three quarters of organic chemistry with laboratories;
      one semester or two quarters of general physics with laboratory;
      two semesters or three quarters of English with emphasis on communications

Prerequisite course work must be taken for a grade option, not pass-fail. Applicants are
encouraged to pursue a well-rounded curriculum including courses both in the sciences and the
humanities. Applicants are encouraged to take additional basic science courses. Examples of
courses that will be helpful include anatomy (human), biochemistry, cell biology, embryology,
genetics, histology, immunology, molecular biology, and physiology (animal and/or human) but
only after degree requirements have been completed. An applicant’s curriculum will be enriched
if it also includes courses in the social sciences, history, literature, economics, philosophy, and
psychology.




                                                                                                   18
                                                             PROFILE
Technical Standards for Dental Students

Policy Objective
To define the non-academic criteria for admission into,
continued enrollment in, and graduation from the
Doctor of Dental Medicine program.

Policy Statement:

The University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry is
committed to ensuring that the opportunity to pursue
oral health education is available to all qualified          Dr. Diane Jenkins, D.M.D., M.S.
persons. In this spirit, all qualified individuals will be   UKCD – Class of 2009
considered for admission. Moreover, the College will
work to ensure that all qualified students, consistent        Dr. Diane Jenkins was born in Massachusetts
with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and       and lived there until she was two. Her family
the Americans with Disabilities Act, will have the           moved several times, including time in
opportunity to succeed in the College’s programs of          Colorado and Wyoming. A teaching position
                                                             for her dad in the UK Chemistry Department
study.
                                                             ultimately brought the family to Lexington.
The College recognizes that the Doctor of Dental             Dr. Jenkins grew up surrounded by university
Medicine (D.M.D.) degree carries with it the full            life. Her dad truly loves teaching, and instilled
authority of the institution and communicates to those       in her that learning is a lifelong process. After
who might seek the services of the bearer that he or         graduating from high school, Diane attended
she is competent to practice dentistry. The D.M.D.           the UK College of Nursing, After 15 years as a
degree is unique in that the graduate is prepared and,       nurse in ICU, Recovery Room, and Labor and
when licensed, is allowed to practice all disciplines of     Delivery, she began exploring a profession
                                                             which would allow her to independently
the dental profession. Therefore, the student must
                                                             manage patients, while still having time for
demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that        family. Dentistry stood out as the perfect
the faculty has determined are essential for the practice    choice. Diane took the leap, left her career in
of dentistry. The student must acquire both cognitive        nursing, and returned to school the very same
and technical skills to negotiate the curriculum.            year that her daughter started kindergarten.

The following technical standards describe the               Dr. Jenkins is currently a first year resident in
essential functions that students must demonstrate in        the Department of Periodontics. She feels
order to fulfill the requirements of a general dental        honored to be in the College, loves the UKCD
                                                             academic environment, the specialty field and
education, and thus, are prerequisites for entrance,
                                                             the opportunity to work with amazing
continuation, and graduation from the College.               colleagues and faculty. She hopes to someday
Students must possess the skills and abilities that will     remain on at UK as part-time faculty, while
allow them to successfully complete the course of            also having her own practice here in Lexington.
study and receive the full benefit of dental education.
While enrolled in dental school, students must direct
and perform treatment of the College’s patients. The
College has the responsibility for ensuring the safety of
the patients. Treatment must be completed safely and
within an acceptable time.
                                                                                                     19
The University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry will consider for admission any applicant who
demonstrates the ability to perform or to learn to perform the skills listed in this document.
Continued enrollment and graduation will depend on the successful demonstration of both the
knowledge and the skills listed in this document. The College’s Academic Performance
Committee will monitor each student’s demonstration of such knowledge and skills. Applicants
are not required to disclose the nature of their disability(ies) to the Admissions Committee;
however, any applicant with questions about these technical standards is strongly encouraged to
discuss the issue with the Admissions Committee Chair before the interview. Upon the request
of an applicant or a student, reasonable accommodations will be provided. The ability to meet
the following standards is a requirement for admission to the University of Kentucky College of
Dentistry.


Technical Standards for Admissions For The University of Kentucky
College of Dentistry

Standards

1.     Motor Skills

GENERAL: A student should have sufficient motor function to execute movements reasonably
required to provide general care to patients.

SPECIFIC: A student must possess the motor skills to directly perform palpation, percussion,
auscultation and other diagnostic maneuvers, basic laboratory tests, and diagnostic procedures.
Such actions require coordination of gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and
functional uses of the senses of touch and vision.

SPECIFIC: A student must be able to perform basic life support including CPR, transfer and
position disabled patients, physically restrain adults and children who lack motor control, and
position and reposition himself or herself around patient and chair in a sitting or standing
position. A student must not hinder the ability of co-workers to perform prompt care. A student
must be able to operate controls, move high-speed or low-speed dental drills with precision of
less than one millimeter, and use hand instrumentation including scalpels for surgical procedures.

2.     Sensory/Observation

GENERAL: A student must be able to acquire a predetermined level of required information
through demonstrations and experiences in basic and dental science courses.

SPECIFIC: Such information includes, but is not limited to, information conveyed through: 1)
physiologic and pharmacological demonstrations in animals; 2) microbiological cultures; 3)
microscopic images of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathologic states; and 4)
demonstration of techniques using dental models. A student must be able to acquire information
                                                                                                  20
from written documents, and to evaluate information presented as images from paper, films,
slides, or video. A student must be able to interpret x-ray and other graphic images. A student
must be able to benefit from electronic and other instrumentation that enhances visual, auditory,
and somatic sensations needed for examination or treatment.

GENERAL: A student must be able to accurately observe a patient, at a distance and close at
hand, and observe and accurately interpret non-verbal communications when performing dental
operations or administering medications.

SPECIFIC: A student must be able to perform dental examinations and treatment that requires
the use of sight and touch. He or she must be able to see fine detail, focus at a variety of
distances, and discern differences and variations in color, shape, and texture that are necessary to
differentiate normal and abnormal soft and hard tissues. He or she must be able to use tactile
senses to diagnose directly by palpation and indirectly by sensations transmitted through
instruments. A student must also possess the visual acuity to read charts, records, radiographs,
small print and handwritten notation, and distinguish colors intra- and extra-orally.

3.     Communication

GENERAL: A student must be able to: communicate effectively and sensitively with patients;
convey or exchange information at a level allowing development of a health history; identify
problems; explain alternative solutions; and give directions during treatment and post-treatment.
Communication includes speech and writing. A student must be able to communicate effectively
and efficiently in oral and written English with all members of the health care team.

SPECIFIC: A student must have sufficient facility with English to: retrieve information from
texts and lectures and communicate concepts on written exams and patient charts; elicit patient
backgrounds; describe patient changes in moods, activity, and posture; and coordinate patient
care with all members of the health care team. A student must be able to communicate in lay
language so that patients and their families can understand the patient’s conditions and, thereby,
be more likely to comply with treatment and preventive regimes.

SPECIFIC: In any case where a student's ability to communicate through these sensory
modalities is compromised, he or she must demonstrate alternative means of communicating
with instructors, patients, and other members of the health care team.

4.     Cognitive

GENERAL: A student must be able to measure, calculate reason, analyze, integrate, and
synthesize.

SPECIFIC: A student must be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to
understand the spatial relationships of structures. Problem solving, a critical skill demanded of
dentists, requires all of these intellectual abilities. A student must be able to perform these
problem-solving skills in a timely fashion.

                                                                                                    21
5.     Behavioral

GENERAL: A student must possess the emotional health required for full use of his/her
intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities
attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive, and
effective relationships with patients.

SPECIFIC: A student must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function
effectively under stress. He or she must be able to adapt to changing environments, display
flexibility, and learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of
patients. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interests, and
motivation, are all personal qualities that will be assessed during the admissions and educational
processes. A student must be able to manage apprehensive patients with a range of moods and
behaviors in a tactful, congenial, personal manner so as not to alienate or antagonize them. A
student must be able to accept criticism and respond by appropriate modification of behavior.


Application Process

An application for admission may be obtained from the American Association of Dental Schools
Application Service (AADSAS). Candidates for admission are encouraged to apply early to
receive the strongest consideration. The AADSAS electronic application becomes available on
May 15. You may contact AADSAS at:


                                       http://www.adea.org
                                              (202) 789 7201
                                                 AADSAS
                                   1400 K Street NW, Suite 1100
                                     Washington, D.C. 20005


The College uses a “rolling admissions system” whereby applicants are interviewed beginning in
September, the first offers of admission are made on Dec. 1, and the Admissions Committee
continues to interview applicants until the class is filled. The membership of the entering first-
year class is usually confirmed by early February. Candidates who apply early in the admissions
cycle are at a distinct advantage over those who wait much later to submit their AADSAS
application and other credentials. The Office of Admissions and Student Affairs can provide
applicants information and sound advice to insure that they complete the process in a timely way.




                                                                                                  22
Transcripts                                              PROFILE

                                                         Sharon P. Turner, D.D.S., J.D.,
An official transcript from each college or university
                                                         Dean of the University of Kentucky
attended must be enclosed when candidates send in        College of Dentistry
their AADSAS application. A final transcript is
required prior to matriculation for all applicants who            “I came to UK as Dean for several
have been offered admission and who will enroll.         reasons. First, I was impressed by the fact
                                                         that the State of Kentucky has made a
Letters of Evaluation                                    serious commitment to enhancing higher
                                                         education in the state on the premise that
                                                         such an enhancement would advance the
Three letters of evaluation must be included in each
                                                         economy and the quality of life for
candidate’s admission credentials from individuals
                                                         Kentuckians. Secondly, at the College
who are able to provide information regarding the        level I saw a very fine clinical school with
applicant’s potential for success in the dental          a reputation for innovativeness in
curriculum. Two letters should come from faculty         educational methodologies, a collegial
members and/or preprofessional advisors. The third       atmosphere among faculty, staff and
letter may come from another faculty member, a           students, a new research program that was
dentist or someone else who knows the applicant          taking off like a rocket, and solid financial
well and can provide an assessment of the                base. And finally, in Lexington I found the
individual’s academic qualifications, personal           “college town” atmosphere that I so loved
qualities and potential. A preprofessional committee     during my many years in Chapel Hill,
                                                         North Carolina.
evaluation of a candidate may be substituted for the
                                                                  In fact, the uniqueness of finding
three letters. Applicants must forward the letters to    arts and sciences, fine arts, engineering,
AADSAS when they submit their packets; hardcopy          law, agriculture and health affairs all in one
letters of evaluation sent to the Office of Admissions   campus really intrigued me. Here you find
and Student Affairs will not be connected to the         one of the best opera departments in the
application.                                             country along with nationally recognized
                                                         agriculture and engineering programs. And
Dental Admission Test                                    being a big basketball fan, it was fun to get
                                                         back where there are passionate fans like
                                                         myself!”
Every applicant must take the Dental Admission Test
(DAT). The DAT scores are considered, along with
a candidate’s academic record and other criteria, in the admissions decision. The exam is offered
nationwide by computer through Prometric Testing Centers. The DAT results should not be
more than two years old and the highest set of scores will be used. Information on the DAT is
available by contacting the American Dental Association at:

                                         www.ada.org
                                        (312) 440-2689
                               Dental Admission Testing Program
                                 American Dental Association
                                    211 East Chicago Ave.
                                    Chicago, IL 60611-2678



                                                                                                    23
Interviews

Only the most competitive applicants are invited to participate in an interview at the College of
Dentistry. Interviews are scheduled on specific dates throughout the admissions cycle. All
application materials must be received by the Admissions Coordinator before an interview can be
scheduled. Since Dec. 1 is the AADSAS national notification date, well-qualified applicants
who interview prior to this date have a greater likelihood of being offered admission than those
who interview afterwards.

Residency Status

The Council on Postsecondary Education oversees the residency requirements for all public
colleges and universities within the Commonwealth of Kentucky. These requirements are listed
in the University of Kentucky Bulletin. Questions regarding residency status should be referred
to the University’s Registrar Office at http://www.uky.edu/Registrar/.

Personal Health

In accordance with American Dental Association standards, all students must be able to
demonstrate prior to and throughout their enrollment that they are physically and mentally
qualified to undertake dental studies; please refer to the Technical Standards policy above or
contact the Office of Admissions and Student Affairs for questions. Each student must submit a
medical history form and an immunization record at the time of matriculation. All applicants
meeting the appropriate academic requirements and technical standards shall be considered
equally for admission to any academic program regardless of race, color, religion, sex, marital
status, beliefs, age, national origin, sexual orientation, or disability.

Cost of Attendance

Tuition and fees for the 2010-2011 academic year are $25,345 for Kentucky residents and
$51,715 for non-residents. Expenditures for instruments and their sterilization, books, clinic
attire, and CPR comprise the remainder of the required curriculum expense. The tuition and fees
are subject to change.




                                                                                              24
Student Financial Aid

Primary responsibility for meeting the cost of dental education rests with the student dentist and
his or her family. However, the College’s Financial Aid Coordinator, located in the College of
Dentistry, assists students in making application for various types of financial assistance. The
major sources of funding are loan programs administered by the federal government. Eligibility
for financial aid is determined by the following formula:

                   Cost of Attendance (curriculum & living expenses) minus
                 Expected Family Contribution (as measured by federal formula)
                                   equals Financial Need

The Financial Aid Coordinator, who is a member of the Office of Admissions and Student
Affairs, endeavors to meet the demonstrated financial need of all student dentists to the extent of
available funds. Since school managed funds are limited, awards from these sources will be
determined on the basis of in-state tuition and parent information on the federal application.

About 95 percent of enrolled student dentists qualify for and receive some type of financial
assistance. Applicants wishing to investigate financial aid options are encouraged to consult the
financial aid coordinator. Financial need is not a criterion for admission to the College of
Dentistry.

Additional information on loans, scholarships and work-study programs can be obtained by
accessing the UK webpage on financial aid under “Student/Postgraduate Programs; DMD
Program.”


                   Any question related to financial aid should be directed to:




                           Office of Admissions and Student Affairs
                                     University of Kentucky
                                      College of Dentistry
                              D-155 UK Chandler Medical Center
                                   Lexington, KY 40536-0297
                                   Telephone: (859) 323-6071
                                      Fax: (859) 257-5550
                                     Email: dbrow@uky.edu




                                                                                                 25
Career Planning and Counseling
                                                         PROFILE
Student dentists receive formal instruction in the
                                                         Chris Bob, Class of 2011
investigation and development of career options
and practice planning during all four years of the
curriculum. Faculty and staff participate in
counseling student dentists. The College maintains
career resource information on the distribution of
dental manpower and demographic data on all
Kentucky counties; limited information regarding
other states is also available. The College also
provides counseling and placement referral services
to student dentists and practitioners. Most
individuals incur some indebtedness to help finance      Chris was born and raised in Miami,
their dental education. Since the amount of              Florida. He studied at Florida State
educational loans received affects the career options    University where he received a Bachelors
available at graduation, debt management                 of Science in Exercise Physiology. In 2007
counseling is offered throughout the period of           he came to the University of Kentucky
enrollment.                                              College of Dentistry where he became
                                                         involved with the Hispanic Dental
                                                         Association, taking a leadership role as
Withdrawal and Refund Policy                             Secretary. In the spring of 2009 Chris was
                                                         voted in as President for the 2009-2010
A student may withdraw from the College of               academic year.
Dentistry at any time. The official withdrawal date
is designated as the date the College of Dentistry       The Hispanic Dental Association (HDA) at
Registrar receives a written request for withdrawal.     the University of Kentucky has a strong
                                                         history of representing and supporting the
If a student officially withdraws from the College of
                                                         Hispanic population in and around the
Dentistry, tuition will be adjusted as determined by
                                                         Lexington area. The HDA has participated
University regulations using the date the written        in numerous Hispanic Health Fairs and has
request was received.                                    worked on various projects to enhance the
                                                         ability of the non-Spanish speaking
Tuition refunds for students who officially              practitioner to provide care to the Spanish
withdraw through the College’s Registrar will be         speaking population. The HDA at the
made according to the following schedule:                University of Kentucky will strive to
withdraw before the first day of class, 100 percent      provide increasing support for these
refund (for first-year students; this does not include   projects and in participation at Hispanic
the $250 instate/$1000 out of state) enrollment          Health Fairs. The next big step for the
                                                         HDA is a partnership with a local dental
confirmation fee); withdrawal between first day of
                                                         clinic that provides care for the
class to last day to add a class, 80 percent refund;     underserved population. This partnership
withdrawal after last day to add a class until mid-      will give the HDA a setting to provide free
term date, 50 percent refund; withdrawal after mid-      care for the large underserved Hispanic
term date, no refund.                                    population in the Lexington area.




                                                                                                   26
Academic Affairs

The Curriculum

The University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry, in meeting its responsibility to the
Commonwealth, the University, the dental profession and the student, is dedicated to the education
of a dentist who meets defined levels of skills and knowledge and has demonstrated ethical
behavior and judgment that will benefit the public. The content and sequencing of the curriculum
is maintained so that students should be able to complete the curriculum satisfactorily in four years
and be awarded the degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.).

The College of Dentistry offers a curriculum that prepares the student for the general practice of
dentistry. Since the health needs of Kentucky and the nation are constantly changing, an effective
curriculum in dentistry requires relatively frequent revision of courses and requirements. For this
reason, the curriculum described in this bulletin is subject to change from year to year, not only in
content and sequencing but also in the educational methodology utilized.

The dental curriculum is composed of four categories of study: biological sciences, behavioral
science, preclinical dentistry, and clinical dentistry. Courses in these areas may be taught by
lecture, seminar, self-instruction or any combination of the above formats. Laboratory and clinical
settings provide supplemental learning experiences for the didactic information which the students
receive.

In the clinical setting, students treat patients under the supervision of the clinical faculty.
Comprehensive dental care for the patient is emphasized and so, because of the varying needs of
individual patients, the objectives of each clinical treatment experience by each student will vary.
The concept of comprehensive dental care permits learning experiences in all the clinical
disciplines of dentistry.

Students, faculty and staff of the College of dentistry are expected to adhere to the Code of
Professional and Academic Responsibility, and the Medical Center’s Behavioral Standards in
Patient Care, and Health Care Colleges Code of Student Professional Conduct. These documents
call for high standards of professional and human behavior in caring for patients.

Extramural experience in dental practice is a required component of the curriculum. Students are
placed in the offices of dental practitioners, public institutions or other health delivery systems in
AHEC approved urban and rural areas throughout the state of Kentucky. One of the goals of the
extramural experience is to provide the student with a view of dentistry as it is actually practiced.

In addition to the core, or required curriculum, the College offers a number of elective courses in a
variety of biological and clinical dentistry subjects. Electives provide an effective way to satisfy the
individual needs and interests of the students. Fourth-year students are required to take two elective
courses. Enrollment in additional elective courses requires the approval of the course director and
the appropriate Academic Performance Committee.
                                                                                                      27
During the course of study, any student may be denied permission to continue in the formal
educational program if, in the opinion of the faculty and administration, that student's character,
attitudes, mental or physical fitness cast grave doubt upon the student's capabilities as a dentist.
The Doctor of Dental Medicine degree is awarded to those students who have satisfactorily
completed every required component of the dental curriculum and have applied for graduation.

First Year

Course Design.          Title

ANA 530                 Combined Histology and Special Oral Microanatomy
ANA 534                 Dental Gross Anatomy and Embryology
ANA 538                 Dental Neuroanatomy
CDE 814                 Patients, Dentists and Society I
CDE 815                 Fundamentals of Dental Public Health
CDS 812                 Normal Human Growth and Development
CDS 813                 Management I: Intro to Management for the Dentist
CDS 815                 Introduction to Clinical and Community Practice
CDS 818                 Profession of Dentistry I
CDS 824                 Introduction to Oral Diagnosis and Planning (Lecture)
OBI 812                 Dental Biochemistry
OBI 814                 Dental Physiology
ODM 810                 Basic Principles in Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology
PER 810                 Periodontics I
PER 820                 Periodontics II
RSD 810                 Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry I
RSD 811                 Principles of Dental Anatomy, Morphology and Occlusion Lecture
RSD 812                 Principles of Dental Anatomy, Morphology and Occlusion Lab
RSD 814                 Preclinical Operative Dentistry I
RSD 816                 Esthetic Dentistry I
RSD 818                 Preclinical Esthetic Dentistry I




                                                                                                       28
Second Year

Course Design.   Title

CDE 824          Communication in the Dental Health Care Setting
CDS 821          Local Anesthesia
CDS 822          Gerontology/ Geriatric Dentistry
CDS 823          Management II: Intro to Clinical Patient Management
CDS 824          Intro to Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (Lab)
CDS 828          Profession of Dentistry II
END 820          Anterior Endodontics
END 821          Clinical Endodontics I
END 822          Posterior Endodontics
OBI 828          Immunity, Infection and Disease for the Student Dentist
ODM 820          Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging
ODM 821          Clinical Oral Diagnosis I
OPT 820          General Pathology for Student Dentists
ORT 822          Orthodontics I
OSG 820          Oral Surgery I
PDO 822          Pediatric Dentistry I
PER 821          Clinical Periodontics II
PRO 820          Preclinical Complete Denture Prosthodontics Lecture
PRO 821          Clinical Complete Denture Prosthodontics
PRO 822          Preclinical Complete Denture Prosthodontics Laboratory
PRO 824          Removable Partial Dentures
RSD 821          Clinical Restorative Dentistry I
RSD 822          Principles of Dental Occlusion and Articulation
RSD 823          Preclinical Restorative Dentistry II
RSD 824          Preclinical Restorative Dentistry II
RSD 825          Preclinical Restorative Dentistry II
RSD 826          Preclinical Restorative Dentistry II Laboratory



                                                                           29
Third Year

Course Design.   Title

CDE 830          Advanced Concepts in Dental Public Health
CDS 831          Conscious Sedation
CDS 833          Management III: Clinical Patient Management
CDS 835          Dental Implantology
END 830          Endodontics II
END 831          Clinical Endodontics II
OBI 836          Dental Pharmacology
ODM 830          Management of the Medically Compromised Dental Patient
ODM 831          Clinical Oral Diagnosis II
OPT 830          Oral Pathology I
OPT 832          Oral Pathology II
ORT 830          Orthodontics II
OSG 830          Oral Surgery II
OSG 831          Oral Surgery Rotation I
PDO 831          Clinical Pediatric Dentistry I
PDO 834          Pediatric Dentistry II
PER 830          Periodontics III
PER 831          Clinical Periodontics III
PRO 830          Advanced Removable Prosthodontics
PRO 831          Clinical Removable Prosthodontics
PRO 834          Preclinical Restorative Dentistry III
PRO 836          Principles of Fixed Prosthodontics
RSD 827          Dental Biomaterials
RSD 831          Clinical Restorative Dentistry II
RSD 835          Advanced Esthetics in Restorative Dentistry




                                                                          30
Fourth Year

Course Design.         Title

CDE 841                Dental Practice and Field Experience
CDE 844                Dental Practice Management II
CDS 843                Management IV: Clinical Patient Management
CDS 844                Drug Misuse, Abuse and Dependency: What Dentists Need to Know
CDS 846                Diagnosis and Management of Facial Pain
END 841                Clinical Endodontics III
ODM 841                Clinical Oral Diagnosis III
OPT 840                Oral Pathology III
ORT 841                Clinical Orthodontics
OSG 841                Oral Surgery Rotation II
PDO 841                Clinical Pediatric Dentistry II
PER 841                Clinical Periodontics IV
PRO 841                Advanced Clinical Removable Prosthodontics
RSD 840                Restorative Dentistry Update
RSD 841                Clinical Restorative Dentistry III


Evaluation and Grading
          Students have the right to receive grades based only upon a fair and just evaluation
          of their performance in a course as measured by the standards announced by their
          instructor(s) at the first or second class meeting of each course. This information
          should also appear in the course syllabus (i.e. nature of the course, the content, the
          activities to be evaluated, the grading practice to be followed, and the attendance
          policy). Evaluations by anything other than a good faith judgment based on explicit
          statements of the above standards are improper. Students who believe that grades
          have not been assigned in a fair and impartial manner have the right to seek review
          and/or appeal of the grade.

          Approved by the University Senate on November 8, 1999, the grading system (A,
          B+, B, C, and E plus I, W, and P/F) applies to all students.
          Course directors will evaluate the performance of each student on course objectives
          and assign a grade as follows:


                                                                                                   31
                      1. Passing Grades:
                         A = Exceptionally high level of performance;
                              four (4) quality points are awarded for each credit hour.
                         B+ = A high level of performance; three and one-half
                              (3.5) quality points are awarded for each credit hour.
                         B = The minimum expected level of performance;
                              three (3) quality points are awarded for each credit hour.
                         C = A marginal level of performance; two (2.0) quality
                              points are awarded for each credit hour.
                         P = A passing grade in courses taken on a pass-fail basis. It is not
                              used in G.P.A. calculations.

                      2. Failing Grades:
                         E = An unacceptable level of performance; zero (0) quality
                               points are awarded for each credit hour.
                         F = Represents an unacceptable level of performance in
                                courses taught on a pass/fail basis. It is not used in G.P.A.
                                calculations.

                      3. Incomplete Grade:
                         I = Course objectives have not been completed during the allotted
                             course time due to circumstances usually beyond the student’s
                             control. An I grade shall be given only when there is a
                             reasonable possibility that a passing grade will result when work
                             is completed. An I must be replaced by another grade within 12
                             months or before graduation, whichever occurs sooner. After
                             this period, an I grade will automatically convert to an E or an F
                             grade as appropriate.

                             Note: A written report must accompany the I grade. The report
                             shall include the reasons for issuing the I and the work that the
                             student must complete to receive a passing grade.

                      4. Withdrawal:*
                         W = This grade will be awarded to a student who withdraws from a
                             course or from the College. It shall be awarded only after
                             recommendation by the Academic Performance Committee
                             and approval by the Dean.


* Note: Withdrawal from any course will usually result in a delay in the student’s completion
of the curriculum.

Questions regarding policies may be directed to Dr. Karen Novak, Interim Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs (323-5656).
                                                                                                  32
Academic and Tutorial Services

The Offices of Academic Affairs and Admissions and Student Affairs offers various programs
and activities designed to help facilitate the success of students in the dental curriculum. First-
year student dentists are provided instruction in study skills, time management, note-taking and
test-taking. In addition, upper-class student dentists are employed by the Offices of Academic
Affairs and Admissions and Student Affairs as tutors for those individuals needing additional
help in specific courses or for those desiring to improve their overall performance in the didactic,
laboratory, and clinical components of the curriculum.

Academic Disciplinary Policies

         The following policies are initiated in cases involving unsatisfactory academic
         performance.

          Probation

                  A student will be placed on probation if he or she has:

                       1. a grade point average (G.P.A.) for the academic
                          year less than 2.75;
                       2. received a failing grade (E or F); or,
                       3. failed one or more parts of either Part 1 or Part 2 of
                          The National Dental Board Examination

                  Terms of Probation. The terms of probation will be established by the
                  Academic Performance Committee. The duration of probation will be at
                  least one semester. Passing a course that has been failed is a condition of all
                  probations. Additional terms of probation may be established by the
                  Academic Performance Committee. Students on probation are ineligible for
                  certain curricular or extracurricular College activities.

                  If a student has failed a National Dental Board Examination, taking the
                  examination the next time it is available and passing it shall be among the
                  terms of probation. The terms shall also include required activities to help
                  the student prepare to pass the examination.

                  Removal from Probation. A student will be removed from probation by the
                  Academic Performance Committee when he or she has at least a cumulative
                  2.75 G.P.A., has at least a 2.75 G.P.A. in the current academic year, has
                  passed any failed course, and has satisfied the terms of probation in the
                  judgment of the Academic Performance Committee.


                                                                                                    33
 Suspension

  The Academic Performance Committee (APC) shall recommend to the Dean that
  a student be suspended if the student has:

           1.     Received two or more failing (E or F) grades; or
           2.     Received a failing grade (E or F) while on probation; or
           3.     Failed to meet the terms of probation; or,
           4.     At any time after the second year of the curriculum, achieved a
                  cumulative GPA of less than 2.75; or,
           5.     Failed Part 1 or 2 of the National Dental Board Examination a
                  second time.
           6.     Failed Part 1 or 2 of the National Board Examination while on
                  probation.
           7.     Received a failing grade (E or F) and fails Part 1 or 2 of the
                  National Board Examination.


    In addition to satisfying one of the seven criteria above, the APC must have
    determined based on available evidence that the student is capable of completing
    the curriculum after receiving counseling and/or completing work outside the
    College. The Academic Performance Committee will recommend the terms for
    the consideration of reinstatement following suspension and make
    recommendations to the Dean regarding these terms.

  Review. A suspended student may request an appeal hearing. Procedure will
  follow the College of Dentistry policy “Appeal Procedures.”

  Reinstatement following suspension. When the student has met the terms of
  suspension, has demonstrated that he or she can perform at the level required to
  graduate from the College, and has met the terms of reinstatement recommended by
  the APC, the Dean may reinstate him or her. However, granting a request for
  reinstatement is not automatic. A reinstated student will be placed on probation,
  subject to terms recommended by the Academic Performance Committee and
  approved by the Dean. A student who has not been reinstated within 18 months of
  the original suspension date will be considered dismissed and will no longer be
  eligible for reinstatement.

  A student who has been suspended because of a second failure of Part 1 or 2 of the
  National Dental Board Examination shall not be readmitted until she or he takes and
  passes Part 1 or 2 of the National Board Examination. If a student who has been
  suspended for a second failure of Part 1 or 2 of the National Board
  Examination does not retake and pass the Boards within six months of the date of
  the second failure, that student will be dismissed. American Dental Association
  policy now states “effective January 1, 2007, National Board Dental candidates who
  have not passed an examination after three attempts will be required to wait 12
                                                                                    34
months after their third attempt before they can apply for reexamination.” Students
should be aware that the results of some state/regional licensure exams are valid for
a limited time. Students should contact the state/regional board of interest for
information on this issue.

 Dismissal

 The Academic Performance Committee (APC) shall dismiss a student if the
 student has:

1.       Received two or more failing (E or F) grades; or,
2.       Received a failing grade (E or F) while on probation ;or,
3.       Failed to meet the terms of probation; or,
4.       At any time after the second year of the curriculum, achieved a
         cumulative G.P.A. of less than 2.75; or,
5.       Failed Part 1 or 2 of the National Board Examination a second time; or,
6.       Failed Part 1 or 2 of the National Board Examination while on probation;
         or,
7.       Received a failing grade (E or F) and fails Part 1 or 2 of the National
         Board Examination.

In addition to satisfying one of the seven criteria above, based on the available
evidence, the APC has determined that the student is not academically capable of
completing the curriculum or is otherwise unsuitable for dentistry for reasons that
include, but are not limited to: unacceptable personal hygiene; inability to establish
rapport with patients; inability to work effectively with other health care team
members; undependability; lack of integrity, initiative or interest.

Suspended students. A suspended student who has failed Part 1 or 2 of the Boards
for the second time shall be dismissed if he or she does not take and pass the Boards
within 6 months of the date the student took and failed the Boards for the second
time. A student who has not been reinstated within 18 months of the original
suspension date will be considered dismissed and will no longer be eligible for
reinstatement. American Dental Association policy now states “effective January
1, 2007, National Board Dental candidates who have not passed an examination
after three attempts will be required to wait 12 months after their third attempt
before they can apply for reexamination.” Students should be aware that the results
of some state/regional licensure exams are valid for a limited time. Students should
contact the state/regional board of interest for information on this issue.

Previously suspended students. If a student is subject to suspension or dismissal and
has been previously suspended, the Academic Performance Committee shall
dismiss that student rather than suspend him/her again.


                                                                                   35
              Reinstatement following dismissal: A dismissed student shall not be reinstated.

              Appeal. A dismissed student may request an appeal hearing. Procedure will follow
              the College of Dentistry policy “Appeal Procedures.”

              Further information on the College's Academic Disciplinary Policies is available
              from the Office of Academic Affairs (M132).




                                                           General Practice Residency –
Postdoctoral Education                              Ted P. Raybould, D.M.D., Program Director

                                                          Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery –
The College of Dentistry offers advanced                  Larry Cunningham, D.D.S, M.D.
education programs in several areas. The                          Program Director
D.M.D. or equivalent degree is necessary for
acceptance into any of these programs.                             Orofacial Pain –
Residents of Kentucky and non-residents, who        Jeffrey P. Okeson, D.M.D., Program Director
have strong academic and professional records
are given consideration and are encouraged to                     Orthodontics –
apply.                                                     Cynthia Beeman D.D.S., PhD.
                                                                 Program Director
Stipends are paid to general practice, oral and
maxillofacial surgery, orofacial pain and                      Pediatric Dentistry –
pediatric dentistry residents. Graduate             Charlotte Haney, D.M.D., Program Director
students in periodontics, orofacial pain, and
orthodontics register for academic credit.                      Periodontics –
Students should not plan to practice while        Mohanad Al-Sabbagh, D.D.S., Program Director
enrolled in any of these programs.




                                                                                                 36
Application for Admission

Applying for Postdoctoral Programs

The University of Kentucky participates in PASS, the Postdoctoral Application Support
Service provided by the American Dental Education Association. To complete a PASS
application or to learn more about the service, visit the ADEA website at www.adea.org/PASS.
PASS begins processing applications on June 1.

The General Practice Residency, Periodontology and Orofacial Pain programs at the University
of Kentucky, College of Dentistry have their own application process. To receive an application,
contact the office of the Division Chief or Program Director.




General Practice Residency In Dentistry

The General Practice Residency Program is designed to extend the              Stipends are paid to residents in
graduate's capability in performing all phases of general dentistry in        the General Practice Residency, Oral
either private practice or hospital-based settings. Patients of all ages      and Maxillofacial Surgery, Orofacial
                                                                              Pain, and Pediatric Dentistry
are treated with special emphasis placed on the medically
                                                                              programs.
compromised. Residents participate in rotations in general dentistry,
oral surgery, anesthesia, and medicine. Didactic and clinical
experiences are available in the various dental specialties as well as in intravenous sedation and
comprehensive pain control. The clinical aspect of the program includes the treatment of about
10,000 patients per year. There are opportunities for both clinical and non-clinical research. The
residency program is accredited for both a one-year program and a two-year program by the
Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association.

Applicants must be graduates of an ADA-accredited dental school. Selection criteria include
academic performance in dental school education, National Board scores, motivations and goals,
letters of reference and required interviews. Applications from dentists trained outside of the
United States and Canada will be considered on an individual basis. Up to two residency
positions may be filled with internationally trained dentists, who will be required to stay for two
years.

Four general dentists serve as full-time attending program faculty. Seven additional College of
Dentistry faculty members serve as part-time faculty. Numerous other dentists and physicians
participate in seminars and fulfill special program roles. The 12-chair general dentistry clinic is
housed in the Kentucky Clinic.



                                                                                                          37
Oral And Maxillofacial Surgery

The College of Dentistry offers an accredited six-year program in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
designed to meet the requirements of the Commission on Dental Accreditation and the American
Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. A one-year internship in Oral and Maxillofacial
Surgery is also available for those applicants who desire to strengthen their clinical experience
and didactic foundation in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

Educational activities in the biomedical sciences as prescribed by the Commission and the Board
are integrated throughout the six years. The program is clinically oriented, and balanced in
providing experiences in dentoalveolar, implants, orthognathic surgery, temporomandibular joint
surgery, maxillofacial trauma, reconstructive surgery, pathology, and ambulatory pain and
anxiety control. The program includes 33 months of oral and maxillofacial surgery training, 2 ½
 years of medical school, and a year of general surgery internship. Involvement in a research
project and presentation of results at a national meeting are strongly encouraged.

The primary teaching hospitals are the 473-bed University of Kentucky Hospital, the 370-bed
Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the 302-bed Good Samaritan Hospital. Four full-time
attending staff members (all Diplomats of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial
Surgery) assume primary responsibility for the teaching program. Faculty takes an active role in
the teaching by providing weekly lecture topics, participation is weekly conferences,
participation on hospital rounds and directing the overall patient care that is provided.




Orofacial Pain

The College of Dentistry, in cooperation with the University of Kentucky Graduate School, offers a
Master of Science degree in orofacial pain. This program provides advanced training in the
understanding, diagnosis, and management of temporomandibular disorders and complex orofacial
pain.

The Orofacial Pain Center was founded in 1977 and emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach to
managing complex orofacial pain. Patients are routinely evaluated by dentists, clinical
psychologists and physical therapists. Medical and dental specialists are called upon regularly to
assist in the diagnosis and management of complex pain problems. The Master's degree program is
composed of didactic, clinical, and research components which can be completed in 24 months.
Most candidates participate in the one Year Fellowship Program prior to entering the Master of
Science Degree Program.

The didactic portion of this program consists of the completion of 30 hours of designated graduate
courses in the College of Dentistry. Course content includes anatomy, neuroanatomy, growth and

                                                                                                 38
development, pain physiology, craniomandibular biomechanics, masticatory function and
dysfunction, pharmacology, imaging techniques, and statistics.

Lectures also are presented by specialists in psychology, rheumatology, neurology, anesthesiology,
oral surgery, rehabilitative medicine, physical therapy, and pain management. Each graduate
student will evaluate and manage orofacial pain patients. This program emphasizes the diagnosis
and management of orofacial pain rather than the dental skills used to alter dental structures.
Certain orthopedic appliances routinely will be used to manage orofacial pain, together with various
diagnostic and therapeutic injection techniques. Emphasis will be placed on establishing proper
diagnosis and developing appropriate relationships with medical specialists who can assist in
managing the patient's specific pain complaint.

The graduate student receives clinical training in the Orofacial Pain Center under the supervision of
two full-time and five part-time faculty member specializing in pain problems. The graduate
student also will have the opportunity to work with clinical psychologists, a physical therapist, and
other health professionals trained in pain problems.

The Orofacial Pain Center has a private patient reception and waiting area with an adjacent
secretarial office. The treatment area consists of six dental cubicles and a private clinical
psychology room. There also is a graduate students’ office and a dry laboratory.




Orthodontics

A 34-month graduate program is offered in conjunction with the         Facilities of the graduate
Graduate School at the University of Kentucky. The educational        orthodontics’ clinic reflect modern
objectives are to develop clinical and teaching skills, to obtain the practice concepts and style, and special
relevant scientific background in the specialty area, and to design,  emphasis is placed on barrier
execute, and publish master's level research. Upon satisfactory       techniques, sterilization and disinfection
                                                                      in the orthodontist’s office.
completion of the program, a Master of Science degree and a
Certificate in Orthodontics are awarded. Arrangements can be made for graduate programs leading
to the Doctor of Philosophy degree combined with the clinical training. The graduate degrees
require that a thesis (Plan A) or publishable manuscript (Plan B) based upon original research be
completed and the certificate is awarded upon completion of an original manuscript.

The didactic portion of the curriculum is conducted as seminars in which the basic sciences are
integrated with clinical orthodontic topics. Independent library searches and research projects
comprise a major component of this program and it is mandatory that the graduate students be
actively engaged in such activities.

Research projects will be conducted under the guidance of faculty of the section of orthodontics or
under the guidance of faculty outside the division of orthodontics with the approval of the program
director of orthodontics and the college's director of graduate studies. Research opportunities
                                                                                                         39
include clinical orthodontic studies, as well as basic research in bone biology, developmental
biology, microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, physiology, and engineering. Graduate
students are required to teach in clinical and didactic courses in the doctoral dental curriculum.
They also must prepare to take the written exam of the American Board of Orthodontics, when
eligible.

In addition to the program director, three full-time and seven part-time and volunteer orthodontists
make up the specialty faculty. Other College and Medical Center faculty conduct seminars and
special clinics as part of the curriculum. The clinical experiences are varied. Special emphasis is
placed on orthognathic surgery, craniofacial anomalies, facial pain, and management of the
developing child. A series of seminars on business administration and practice management also
are part of the curriculum.
Facilities of the graduate orthodontics clinic reflect modern practice concepts and style, and special
emphasis is placed on barrier techniques, sterilization, and disinfection in the orthodontist's office.




Pediatric Dentistry

The College of Dentistry offers a residency program
for postdoctoral student dentists seeking specialty                    Experiential education opportunities
                                                              are available throughout the state. Our student
training in pediatric dentistry. The development of skill     dentists and residents are expected to participate
in clinical pediatric dentistry is the primary objective of   in extramural service programs and encouraged
the program.                                                  to volunteer their time to treat needy citizens as
                                                              a part of their educational experience.
The program involves clinical exposure and didactic
courses which enable the candidate to experience the
educational activities recommended by the American
Board of Pediatric Dentistry and the American
Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. The didactic
portion consists of a series of interrelated
seminars about basic pediatric dental care, the
care of the handicapped and chronically ill child,
and diagnosis and treatment of occlusion
problems in the primary, mixed and young
permanent dentitions. The basic 24-month
program includes a core curriculum, specialty
course work, and wide range of clinical
experiences. The program has a strong focus on
treatment of medically, mentally, and physically
compromised children and adolescents. It also
focuses strongly on hospital and


                                                                                                            40
pharmacological management of patients; and management of the developing dentition for children
and adolescents under the supervision of a full-time pediatric dentist/orthodontist.

The facilities used by pediatric dentistry residents include modern clinical, seminar, and research
facilities located in the Kentucky Clinic and the dental science wing of the Medical Center.
Additional facilities include 2 self-contained, 40-foot mobile dental units. The faculty and
residents have scheduled blocks in the operating rooms at the Center for Ambulatory Care and
the A.B. Chandler Medical Center.




Periodontology

The advanced education program in periodontology is a           The graduate program in periodontics is
                                                               designed to provide an educational opportunity
36-month program that culminates in the awarding of the
                                                               for individuals interested in limiting their
Master’s of Science degree and a certificate                   practice to this field. The program extends
in periodontology. The goal of the program is to prepare       over a minimum of 36 months. The primary
 individuals for careers in either academic periodontology     objective of the program is to develop a skilled
or private specialty practice. Two graduate students are       sophisticated clinician, well-grounded in
                                                               research and the biological basis of clinical
accepted each year. The program begins on or about
                                                               practice and capable of satisfying the
July 1 and the deadline for application is July 30 of the      requirements the requirements of the American
 preceding year.                                               Board of Periodontology.

The program is a full-time course of study consisting of clinical, research, and didactic
components. The didactic component consists of seminars that involve extensive reading in the
literature. Courses include Biology and Pathogenesis (PER 772), Periodontal Therapy Literature
Review (PER 776), Biomedical Research Methodology (CDS 550), Oral Biology (OBI 650),
Oral Pathology (OPT651), Biostatistics (STA 570), plus a number of other topical seminars.
There is a rotation on anesthesiology, and all graduate students are expected to become ACLS-
certified during their first year. Students document and present their cases in a formal case
presentation/treatment planning seminar (PER 770) as well as a surgical seminar (PER 774). The
case analysis and defense exercises are patterned after the oral examination of the American
Board of Periodontology.

The program is especially strong in the areas of implant surgery, conscious sedation, and
cosmetic surgery. Residents typically place between 60-125 implants, as well as performing sinus
augmentations, ridge augmentation, and a wide range of periodontal surgical procedures. There
are off-service rotations in anesthesiology.

In keeping with the philosophy of the College of Dentistry, the collegial atmosphere of the
program encourages close contact with the faculty. The program has a rich heritage, and
graduates have gone on to positions of importance in the specialty. During the 1960’s, the
program was one of the most progressive and innovative in the country, and in the mid-1980’s
was one of the first to offer formal coursework in implantology. This heritage of innovation
                                                                                                        41
continues as current graduate students are exposed to a wide range of therapeutic modalities,
including regenerative therapy, implantology and sinus augmentation. Close cooperation with
colleagues in other disciplines (orthodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, prosthodontics,
otolaryngology, biomedical engineering) is encouraged, as are interdisciplinary seminars and
educational opportunities. The faculty of the Division of Periodontology includes seven
periodontists, one dental hygienist, and an immunologist. Faculty from other disciplines also
participates in educational seminars.

Application packages may be obtained by contacting Ms. Terri McGlasson by email at
tmcglas@uky.edu or by phone at 859-323-5391. One or two week externships are also available
to qualified applicants.




Patient Care

The Patient Care program at the University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry Student Dental
Clinic seeks to provide comprehensive care in an atmosphere that simulates the private group
practice environment to optimize the clinical experience of the dental students and their patients.

From their first appointment, patients are made aware of their particular disease state and risk of
further dental disease. An emphasis is placed on educating patients concerning their own dental
health and prevention of dental disease. From their first interaction in the student dental clinic
patients are encouraged to participate in the decision making, treatment planning and delivery of
their care. Patients are assigned to a Team and a Team Leader who delegates responsibility for
patient care to student members of his or her team. Patient assignments are based on a thorough
examination and review of a tentative treatment plan. Since the Team Leader is a faculty
member aware of individual student capabilities and skill levels, more appropriate matches of
patient needs and desires with student needs and abilities are possible.

Patient preadmission examinations, assignment, treatment planning, continuity of care and
management are coordinated and facilitated by the Team Leaders with participation of Oral
Diagnosis faculty. During this initial examination, the Team Leader and student dentist elaborate
on College policies and respond to individual patient concerns In addition, a new risk assessment
tool is available to help patients understand their risk of future dental disease. Depending on the
severity of the dental disease, some patients with less disease will be able to have a final plan of
treatment recommended at this initial appointment. Other patients with more dental disease will
likely be reappointed for additional diagnostic data collection and consultations before a
definitive treatment plan and alternatives are discussed with Oral Diagnosis faculty or Team
Leader. From these appointments, patients are informed about their personal dental needs, dental
diagnoses, risk factors influencing their disease and strategies for prevention of future disease.
Patients also have an opportunity to discuss treatment plan options and may select an appropriate


                                                                                                 42
plan for their dental needs. Future dental appointments emphasize disease control and prevention
followed by tooth replacement as necessary.

Team Leaders monitor the progress of patient care delivery of their team of students and are
responsible for development and evaluation of clinical patient management skills throughout the
student’s clinical years. Team Coordinators assist the Team Leaders with these responsibilities
and they assist dental students with their patient and clinical management Teams are considered
large group practices and all treatment is supervised by either discipline specific faculty or team
leaders who are responsible for evaluation of the student performance in their respective clinical
disciplines.




Public Service

The University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry has an extensive public service program. The
Kentucky Oral Health Network (KOHN) was formed by the UK College of Dentistry in 2008 and
is a network of UK clinical sites across the Commonwealth, state health departments, regional
community health centers, and private practitioners. This network is providing oral health
surveillance, oral health care and oral health education for thousands of children and adults
throughout the Commonwealth. Our faculty, staff, student dentists, and residents are committed
to reaching out to the public to improve oral health. In addition to educating dentists, the faculty
and staff strive to provide access to patient care services, promote dental health education,
conduct research, and provide clinical and educational support services to the profession.

Service learning opportunities are part of the curriculum for our student dentists and residents.
They are expected to participate in extramural service programs and encouraged to volunteer
their time to treat needy citizens. Student dentists begin their clinical education with patients in a
school-based sealant project, Seal Kentucky, in rural Kentucky. During their third-year student
dentists participate in a community-based learning experience providing services to underserved
patients throughout the Commonwealth. In addition, student dentists participate in numerous
oral health education and promotion activities that seek to increase awareness about the
importance of oral health.

As part of the dental-safety net, the College of Dentistry provide comprehensive dental services
to large number of underserved and underinsured individuals through its intramural and
extramural clinics. Faculty members provide high-quality comprehensive, general and
specialized dental care at the faculty practice. Student dentists and dental residents render dental
services under the supervision of faculty members at the College of Dentistry’s clinics. Evening
and Saturday morning clinics serving needy children are available. As part of its outreach
program, the College of Dentistry runs three mobile dental units and provides logistical support
for a fourth unit operated by the College of Medicine. Through the mobile dental program,
faculty and staff members provide dental services to school-children in Eastern, Central, and
Western Kentucky.

                                                                                                   43
The Kentucky Oral Health Network partners with Kentucky’s public health agencies, regional
medical centers, practitioners, and dental organizations to provide clinical care and oral health
education and promotion activities seeking to improve the oral health status of Kentuckians. The
College also serves the profession of dentistry. Our Continuing Education program is offered in
Lexington and throughout the Commonwealth. The tissue examination service (biopsy service)
provided by Oral Pathology faculty is one of the Nation’s largest and receives specimens from all
parts of the country. Our faculty provides leadership to the profession nationally and
internationally by serving as speakers, officers, consultants, and board members in all the dental
specialties.




Research

One of the College of Dentistry's major goals is to conduct biological, clinical, behavioral, and
health services research that will lead to the discovery and application of new knowledge, provide
an opportunity for research training for doctoral and postdoctoral students, and enhance the climate
of scholarship within the College and Medical Center. We actively encourage students to
participate in research projects during their stay in the College and give academic credit for this
participation through a series of elective courses. Most of the research currently under way in the
College falls into several broad categories:

   • infection and inflammation as related to oral diseases
   • biomaterials and dental devices
   • oral disease prevention in children and the elderly
   • oral health related to general health, particularly in pregnancy, cardiovascular disease, and
     diabetes
   • health services research for oral health disparities, targeting oral health care delivery and oral
     health care education
   • salivary biodiagnostics

Students are actively involved in all of these research areas. Students also are active in a formal
Student Research Group, and compete for College-sponsored Student Research Fellowships.

The College's research program is productive, as evidenced by the number of scientific papers
presented by students and faculty at various local and national dental research meetings, and the
number of papers published in scientific journals. The College and the local chapter of the
American Association of Dental Research annually sponsor a series of lectures and seminars that
bring world-renowned researchers to the College to discuss their work.

We strongly believe that an active and dynamic research program benefits both students and faculty
by improving the educational climate of the College, and ultimately benefits the citizens of

                                                                                                      44
Kentucky and the nation by contributing to the overall improvement of society. We strive hard to
make this belief a reality.




Continuing Education

The University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry, recognizes that dental education does not end
when the D.M.D. degree has been conferred. Learning must extend for a lifetime. Consistent with
this philosophy, the college offers a variety of lecture, participation, and home-study courses for
practicing dentists and dental auxiliaries. Highly knowledgeable speakers are sought out for the
courses which are presented in many venues and range from two hour updates to continuums
presented over several weekends. Hands-on courses are also available.

Courses are given in Lexington and at various locations throughout the state and nation. Distance
learning technology is commonly employed and has proven to be effective. Through the College
program, practitioners are able to expand their skill and knowledge base while informing
themselves about new developments in oral health care.




                    For information on continuing dental education visit our
                    website: http://www.mc.uky.edu/Dentistry/ce/default.htm




Alumni/ae Affairs

The College of Dentistry and the College Alumni/ae Association offer a variety of regularly
scheduled educational and social programs to College
alumni/ae. Among these are the Fall Symposium and                     The Alumni Association
Alumni Weekend the summer Golf Scramble, as well as                   strives to acquaint the
special continuing education offerings directed specifically          membership with the
at College alumni/ae.                                                 achievements of their alma mater
                                                                         and focuses on the University’s
                                                                         many contributions to the
The University of Kentucky, College of Dentistry Alumni                  citizens of Kentucky and the
Association conducts its activities with several purposes in             nation.
mind. First and foremost, it is responsible for promoting the
best interest and welfare of the University of Kentucky with specific attention given to the College
of Dentistry. The Alumni Association strives to acquaint the membership with the achievements of
                                                                                                       45
their alma mater and focuses on the University's many contributions to the citizens of Kentucky and
the nation. It also provides information on institutional goals and needs and encourages alumni to
maintain close ties with the College of Dentistry.

The University Kentucky Alumni Association is located in the King Alumni House while the
College of Dentistry Alumni Association is an activity of the Dean's Office.

Perspectives, the College of Dentistry alumni publication, is mailed to alumni and friends twice
during the academic year. It provides information and features of interest designed to foster closer
ties with the University of Kentucky College of Dentistry.




Development

The College of Dentistry's budget allocation from the
University of Kentucky provides funding for only part
of the College's programs and services. Private
contributions from alumni and friends enable the
College to carry out many activities in the area of
education, patient care, research, and service not
covered in the budget. Recent Development
accomplishments have included endowed faculty chairs,
scholarship and award funds, as well as outreach
enhancement funds. The College of Dentistry’s
Development office works closely with the College and
University community as well as with its alumni to raise
some of these funds. Gift programs are in place to be
donor friendly and to provide opportunities for our alumni and friends to invest in the future of
dental education at UKCD. As a result, the College of Dentistry is better able to fulfill its assigned
mission thanks to the generosity of its alumni and friends.




                                                                                                    46
Lexington


                                    An academic institution is more than its campus and
                                    classrooms; it is also the surrounding environment which
                                    supports social, emotional, and intellectual development.

                                    Located in the internationally famous Bluegrass region of
                                    Kentucky, Lexington is 84 miles south of Cincinnati and 80
                                    miles east of Louisville. With a population of 260,512,
                                    Lexington offers a multitude of job opportunities,
                                    entertainment, dining, recreation, and cultural events that add
                                    a special dimension to education.

                                      Encompassing two centuries of history, Lexington was one of
the first settlements beyond the Allegheny Mountains. Today, historical homes and monuments
throughout the city remind citizens and visitors of Lexington's gracious heritage. This, along with
its increasing business community with large corporations such as Lexmark, Ashland Oil, Procter
and Gamble, General Electric, and nearby Toyota help create the unusual atmosphere of a thriving,
growing city which still retains the appeal of a small community.

Cultural life is alive and well in Lexington. The Council of the Arts, Inc., composed of many non-
profit corporate organizations, enhances the area's cultural resources with an active program in all
the fine arts. Lexington is one of the few cities of its size to offer a philharmonic orchestra and a
ballet company. Community theater groups perform regularly and national touring groups present
Broadway attractions at the historic Opera House. The area also enjoys the unique exhibits at the
nationally-accredited Art Museum located in the University's Otis A. Singletary Center for the Arts.

Lexington is known as the horse capital of the world, and for
good reason. Within a 35-mile radius of downtown, several
hundred horse farms can be found ranging in size from a few
acres to 6,000 acres. Area farms breed and train some of the
world's best thoroughbred, standardbred, and saddlebred horses.
Famous horse sites in the region include the Kentucky Horse
Park, Calumet Farm, and Keeneland Race Course. Tourists also
are attracted to the greater Lexington region by the historic and
beautiful scenery of the Bluegrass, which includes the Red River
                                                                                                  47
Gorge, Shakertown at Pleasant Hill, Fort Boonesborough, and an excellent state park system.




Directions to the University Kentucky College of Dentistry
Directions from I-75 South
/I-64 East:
After the merger of I-75 South and I-64
East, take the first exit marked Newtown
Pike (Exit 115). Veer right off the exit and
follow Newtown Pike toward downtown
Lexington. After traveling approximately
3.3 miles, turn left onto West Main Street
(Route 25). Continue on West Main Street
through 7 traffic lights and turn right onto
Rose Street. Follow Rose Street until you
see the pedway that connects the Chandler
Medical Center with the Kentucky Clinic.
Turn left just before the pedway and
follow the signs for Hospital parking.
Enter the hospital through the main entrance revolving door and receive further directions from the
staff at the information desk.


Directions from I-75 North/I-64 West:
I-64 West: Exit on I-75 South
and take the first exit, which is
Winchester Road (Route 60).
Follow directions below.

I-75 North/I-64 West:
Exit on Winchester Road
(Route 60). Follow Winchester
Road West toward downtown
Lexington. After 10 traffic lights
the road will split; stay to the
left, following the sign for
Route 60 West. At the next stop
light (approximately 4 miles
from the interstate exit), turn
                                                                                                 48
right onto Main Street. Immediately make your way into the left lane and turn left at the first traffic
light onto Rose Street. Follow Rose Street until you see the pedway that connects the Chandler
Medical Center with the Kentucky Clinic. Turn left just before the pedway and follow the signs for
Hospital parking. Enter the hospital through the main revolving door and receive further directions
from the staff at the information desk.




                                                                                                    49
Faculty

                                COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY

                                   Sharon P. Turner, Dean

                     DEPARTMENT OF ORAL HEALTH PRACTICE

                                   Mark V. Thomas, Chair


                                         Endodontics

                            Kenneth B. Chance, Division Chief
Ken Chance, Professor, D.D.S., Case Western Reserve, 1979
Paul T. Wehrman, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1973; Cert. Endo.,
    Pittsburgh, 1978
Alfred Wiemann, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1981


                     Oral Diagnosis, Oral Medicine and Oral Radiology

                             Craig S. Miller, Acting Division Chief
Rachael Arvin, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1987
Robert Danaher, Assistant Professor, Ph.D., Maryland, 1994
John E. Lindroth, Associate Professor, D.D.S., West Virginia, 1977; Fellowship, Orofacial Pain,
    Kentucky, 1992
Craig S. Miller, Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1982; Cert., G.P.R., USAF, 1983; M.S., Texas-
    San Antonio, 1987
Sherry Parlanti, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1991
B. Lynn Theiss, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1986; G.P.R., Kentucky 1988; M.S.D.,
    Geriatric Dental Fellowship, Kentucky, 1991


                                         Periodontics

                                Mark V. Thomas, Division Chief
Mohanad Al-Sabbagh, Assistant Professor, D.D.S., Damacus, Syria, 1993; M.S., Buffalo, 2002
Justin C. Clemens, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.D.S., Indiana, 2004; M.S., Kentucky, 2007;
    Cert. Perio., Kentucky, 2007
Dolph Dawson, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Univ. of Louisville, 1993; M.S., Kentucky, 1998
Jeffrey Ebersole, Professor, Ph.D., Pittsburgh, 1975
Sue Humphrey, Associate Professor, M.S., Kentucky, 1994
Samuel J. Jasper, Associate Professor, D.D.S., Ohio State, 1976; M.S., Ohio State, 1980

                                                                                             50
Karen Novak, Professor, D.D.S., North Carolina, 1998; M.S., Rochester, 1989
M. John Novak, Professor, Ph.D., Rochester, 1990
Paulette J. Tempro, Associate Professor, D.D.S., SUNY of Buffalo, 1978
Mark V. Thomas, Associate Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1979; Cert. Perio., Kentucky, 1987


                                    Restorative Dentistry

                                Robert Q. Frazer, Division Chief
Behruz J. Abadi, Associate Professor, D.M.D., Istanbul, Turkey, 1972; Cert. Prosth., Eastman
    Dental Center, Rochester, 1976
Rachael Arvin, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1987
Mai A. Azzam, Assistant Professor, Dental Degree, Jordan Univ. of Science and Technology,
    1993; M.S.D., Indiana-Purdue, 2009
Bertoli, Elizangela, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.D.S., Universidade Federal Do Espirito,
    1995; Cert. Endodontics, Universidade Federal Do Espirito, 1998; Cert. Orofacial Pain,
    Kentucky, 2000; M.S., Kentucky, 2005
Raymond J. Byron, Jr., Associate Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1979
Paula Caskey, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky,
John H. Clements, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1967
Robert Q. Frazer, Associate Professor, D.D.S., Colorado-Denver, 1981; Cert. G.P.R., Chanute
    AFB Hospital, Illinois, 1982; Cert. Prosth., Missouri-Kansas City, 1983
Rodrigo Fuentealba, Assistant Professor (visiting), D.D.S., Univ. of Concepcion, Chile, 1996
David Gore, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1982
James E. Haubenreich, Associate Professor, D.D.S., Memphis, 1977
Thomas Larkin, Assistant Professor (part-time), Creighton University, Omaha, NE, 1980
Harold R. Laswell, Professor, D.D.S., Indiana, 1961; M.S.D., Indiana, 1966
Janet F. Lee, Assistant Professor (part-time), Kentucky, 1982
Stacie Maggard, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1998
Richard J. Mitchell, Associate Professor, M.S., Georgia, 1971; Ph.D., Virginia, 1975
Kristy A. Pepper, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 2005
Gitanjali L. Pinto-Sinai, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.D.S., SUNY of Buffalo, 2001
Fonda G. Robinson, Associate Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1992
Carla Rodriguez, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1981
William M. Sadler, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Alabama, 1975
Stephen P. Selwitz, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1975
Charles A. Thomas, Associate Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1977; Cert., Geriatrics, Duke, 1991
James H. Timmons, Associate Professor, D.D.S., Detroit, 1969; M.S.Ed., Kentucky, 1983
Sharon P. Turner, Professor, D.D.S., North Carolina, 1979; J.D., North Carolina, 1995
Loren Williams, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1978


                                    Comprehensive Care

                                Patricia Nihill, Division Chief
Thomas F. Carroll, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1981
                                                                                             51
Ershal Harrison, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1981
Thomas A. McConnell, Associate Professor, D.D.S., University of the Pacific, 1977
Patricia Nihill, Associate Professor, D.M.D., S. Illinois, 1982; M.S., Northwestern, 1991
Deborah S. Ray, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1987; G.P.R. Cert., Kentucky, 1988


                      DEPARTMENT OF ORAL HEALTH SCIENCE

                                   Jeffrey P. Okeson, Chair

Octavio A. Gonzalez, Assistant Professor, D.D.S., Pontifical Javeriana Univ., Columbia, 1993;
   M.Sc., Pontifical Javeriana Univ., Columbia, 2002; Ph.D., Kentucky, 2010
Chifu B. Huang, Assistant Professor, M.S., Kentucky, 1990; Ph.D., 1995, Kentucky; MBA
   Washington, 2002
Oz, Helieh S., Assistant Professor, M.S., D.V.M., Univ of Tehran, 1976; Univ of Illinois-Urbana,
   1980; Ph.D., Minnesota, 1985


                               Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

                          Larry L. Cunningham, Jr., Division Chief
Gregory A. Cobetto, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Univ. of Pittsburgh, 1978; G.P.R. Cert., Univ.
    of Colorado-Denver, 1979; Cert. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Univ. of Colorado-Denver,
    1982;
Larry L. Cunningham, Jr., Assistant Professor, D.D.S., Texas, 1995; M.D., Texas, 1998
Jeffrey B. Dembo, Professor, D.D.S., Northwestern, 1981; M.S., Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery,
    Iowa, 1984
Gregory Erena, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1979; G.P.R. Cert. Oral and
    Maxillofacial Surgery, Louisville, 1980; OMFS Cert., Medical College of Georgia, 1983
Joseph D. Van Sickels, Professor, D.D.S., Virginia, 1972


                                      Pediatric Dentistry

                              John R. Mink, Acting Division Chief
Shellie A. Branson, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Univ. of Louisville, 1984; Cert.
   Pediatric Dentistry, Univ. of Louisville, 1986
Charlotte Haney, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1976; Cert. Pediatric Dentistry,
   Kentucky, 1983
Wendy K. Humphrey, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 2003; G.P.R. Cert.,
   Kentucky, 2004; Cert. Pediatric Dentistry, Kentucky, 2008
Rodney Jackson, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 2001
Harold D. Lester, **Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Louisville, 1963
Kavita Mathu-muju, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Manitoba, 1993; M.S., Dental Public Health,
   Cert. Pediatric Dentistry, North Carolina, 2006
John R. Mink, Professor, D.D.S., Indiana, 1956; M.S.D., Indiana, 1961
                                                                                             52
David A. Nash, Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1968; M.S., Iowa, 1970; Ed.D., West Virginia,
   1984
Hayden Phillips, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 2003


                                       Adult Dentistry

                                Ted P. Raybould, Division Chief
John B. Burt, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1996
Eric T. Demann, Associate Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 2000
Marc D. Dyer, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Louisville, 2004
Christian S. Fraley, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1996; G.P.R. Cert., Kentucky, 1997
Kathryn Haynes, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1984
Ted P. Raybould, Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1981; G.P.R. Cert., Kentucky, 1985
Sherry Slone, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Louisville, 1997
Daria Stone, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1995
James R. Thompson, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1978


                                        Oral Pathology

                             Douglas D. Damm, division chief
Douglas D. Damm, Professor, D.D.S., Louisiana State, 1977; Cert. Oral Pathology, Emory, 1979
Dean K. White, Professor, D.D.S., Missouri, 1970; M.S.D., Indiana, 1972


                                        Orofacial Pain

                                Reny de Leeuw, division chief
Ronald W. Botto, Associate Professor, M.S., 1969, Ph.D., 1976, Pennsylvania State
Charles R. Carlson, *Associate Professor, Ph.D., Vanderbilt, 1983
Lyle W. Carlson, Assistant Professor (part-time), M.S., Univ of Southern California, 1977;
    Ph.D., Univ of South Dakota, 1992
Reny de Leeuw, Associate Professor, D.M.D., State Univ Groningen, 1988; Ph.D., State Univ
    Groningen, 1994
John E. Lindroth, Associate Professor, D.D.S., West Virginia, 1977; Fellowship, Orofacial Pain,
    Kentucky, 1992
Jeffrey P. Okeson, Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1972
Alan D. Wilkinson, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Louisville, 1973; Fellowship,
    Orofacial Pain, Kentucky, 1991

                                         Orthodontics

                           G. Thomas Kluemper, division chief
Cynthia S. Beeman, Associate Professor, D.D.S., Case Western, 1981; Ph.D., Connecticut, 1989;
   Cert. Orthodontics, Connecticut, 1989
                                                                                             53
Edgar L. Berre, Jr., Assistant Professor (part-time), D.D.S., Ohio State Univ., 1970; Cert.
    Orthodontics, Univ. of Pittsburgh, 1973
Melvin W. Dean, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1977, Cert. Orthodontics,
    Kentucky, 1979
James K. Hartsfield, Jr., Professor, D.M.D., South Carolina, 1981; M.S., Indiana, 1983; M.Sc.,
    Harvard, 1987; Ph.D., South Florida, 1993
Bruce S. Haskell, Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Univ. of Pittsburgh, 1973; Cert. Orthodontics,
    Univ. of Rochester, 1975; Ph.D. Physical Anthropology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, 1978
G. Thomas Kluemper, Associate Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1983; M.S., Orthodontics,
    Michigan, 1991
Judson M. Knight, Associate Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1967; Cert. Orthodontics,
    Kentucky, 1972
Liliana Otero, Assistant Professor (visiting), Ph.D., Javeriana Univ., Columbia SA, 2008
Megan M. McHugh, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 2006; Cert. Orthodontics,
    Kentucky, 2009; M.S., Kentucky, 2010
Charles E. Pritchett, Associate Professor (part-time), D.D.S., Indiana, 1967; Cert. Orthodontics,
    Kentucky, 1970; M.S.D., Kentucky, 1974
C. Michael Stansbury, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1976; Cert
    Orthodontics, Kentucky, 1979
J. Philip Wahle, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1990; M.S., Kentucky, 1993


                                    Public Health Dentistry

                               Robert E. Kovarik, division chief
Joanna A. Aalboe, Assistant Professor, M.S., Eastern Kentucky, 2009
Kelly J. Dingrando, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 2005
Laura D. Hancock Jones, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Louisville, 2003
Robert G. Henry, Associate Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1981
J. David Hardison, Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1980
Alan A. Kaplan, **Associate Professor, Ph.D., Kentucky, 1975
Robert E. Kovarik, Associate Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1982; M.S., Georgia, 1991
Karl Lange, Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Louisville, 1968
M. Raynor Mullins, Associate Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1968; M.P.H., North Carolina, 1970
Judith Skelton, Associate Professor, Ph.D., Florida, 1983
Jenny L. Stigers, Associate Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1984; G.P.R. Cert.,
    Kentucky, 1986
John A. Thompson, Assistant Professor (part-time), D.M.D., Kentucky, 1971
Keith White, Assistant Professor, D.M.D., Kentucky, 1986

*      Joint appointment
**     Adjunct series




                                                                                              54
College of Dentistry Course Descriptions


CDE Community Dentistry


CDE 814 PATIENTS, DENTISTS AND SOCIETY I. (1)
This course aims to orient the student to the place health and health professions play in modern
cultures. Recognition of their own social assumptions and values and those of persons of
different backgrounds is encouraged. Understanding, predicting, and changing dental patient
behavior from a social standpoint is emphasized. (Same as BSC 814.)

CDE 815 FUNDAMENTALS OF DENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH. (2)
Fundamentals of Dental Public Health is a first-year course designed to introduce student dentists
 to the dental specialty of Dental Public Health, to dental epidemiological concepts,
terminology, and methods used in population-based health care. Community oral health
problems in Kentucky and the United States will be reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on
public health research, programming, and outcome evaluation strategies related to oral disease in
populations. Lecture, 28 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

CDE 824 COMMUNICATION IN THE DENTAL HEALTH CARE SETTING. (1)
This course aims to improve the student's ability to communicate with patients and the public in
an empathetic and professional manner. Methods of obtaining necessary health information from
all types of patients are taught. Prereq: Second year standing in the College of Dentistry. (Same
as BSC 824.)

CDE 830 ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN DENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH. (2)
The American Dental Association’s Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct state
that the dentist has a “primary duty of service to the public”. The Dental Public Health
Curriculum is designed to prepare students to assume this obligation. The student will acquire a
basic understanding of the scientific method through course work in epidemiology, research
design, and evaluation of scientific literature. This basis of knowledge will provide the basis for
the planning and evaluation of community based preventive dental programs. The student will
understand the dental delivery system and the variety of financing mechanisms that are available
to meet the dental needs of specific population groups. To provide a framework for the dental
student’s professional development, the instructional content in dental public health will be
coordinated with CDE 841 (Community Based Dental Education), helping the student to prepare
for the extramural learning experience. Lecture, 24 hours. Prereq: Admission to the College of
Dentistry or consent of course director.

CDE 841 DENTAL PRACTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE. (6-10)
Students are provided a full-time, off-campus assignment to a dental practice environment for a
period of 6-10 weeks. Students spend an average of 32 hours each week participating in practice
management and patient treatment activities under the supervision of a dentist. Approximately

                                                                                                   55
eight hours a week are spent in career plan development and in study of the community or region,
particularly its health care delivery system and the role of dentistry in that system. Prereq: CDE
830.

CDE 844 DENTAL PRACTICE MANAGEMENT II. (4)
This course is primarily designed to give the student dentists, prior to graduation, practical,
useful knowledge on establishing and maintaining a private dental practice. The course will be
presented in an active learning format. Course sessions and activities will also include special
sessions designed to introduce students to the current environment of dental practice, to
organized dentistry in Kentucky, to the College's Alumni Association and to new developments
and continuing education in the dental profession. Lecture 69 hours. Prereq: CDE 830 or consent
of course director.

CDE 880 TREATMENT OF DENTAL FEAR. (1)
This advanced course in the treatment of dental fear is intended to prepare the student to manage
very fearful dental patients. Topics covered include etiologies, diagnosis and types, relaxation
and distraction, and case histories. Note: Scheduling for the course will take place outside of
regularly scheduled clinic/class time. Prereq: CDS 823 and consent of course director. (Same as
BSC 880.)

CDE 883 COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE ELECTIVE. (1)
This Community-Based Service elective is designed to give students greater opportunities to
provide dental services to diverse, underserved populations. The goals of this course are to
further develop a service ethic in students, to add to the spectrum of clinical skills of students,
and to address the needs of populations who do not have access to dental care. The majority of
the time requirements for this course will be rotations to community clinics where students will
work under the supervision of a College of Dentistry faculty providing dental services.
Individual contracts will be developed with participating students to determine credit hours (32-
64 clinical contact hours = 1 credit hour). In addition, there will be 2, one-hour seminars to
discuss and debrief on the experiences of participating students. Scheduling of this class will be
outside regularly scheduled clinic/class time. Prerequisites: Completion of Third Year
Courses/or Academic Performance Committee Special Approval. Requirement: Submission of
letter of intent to participate.


CDS    Conjoint Dental Science


CDS 611 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT PART I. (2)
This is a seminar course on nature and physiologic control of physical growth, for graduate
students in dentistry. Prereq: Admission to a graduate program of the College of Dentistry;
D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree.

CDS 612 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT PART II. (2)


                                                                                                  56
This is a seminar course for graduate students in dentistry covering emotional and intellectual
growth of children, and diseases and congenital anomalies of children. Prereq: Admission to
graduate program of the College of Dentistry; D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree.

CDS 613 CONTEMPORARY LEADERSHIP IN DENTISTRY. (1)
The purpose of the course is to explore the current leadership dilemma in the health professions
(specifically dentistry) and to prompt extension of the role of oral health professionals to serve as
leaders who engage a richer “public good” agenda as part of their role as “doctor/teacher.”
Service learning opportunities will be integral components of the course. The course will
concentrate on important issues such as leadership development and theories of leadership; team
building; personality preferences and leadership; peer assessment; transformational and
transactional leadership; mentoring,; personal leadership; stress management; leading change;
negotiation; and giving and receiving feedback. Lecture, 16 hours.

CDS 631 DIAGNOSIS AND MAMATEMENT OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS
AND OROFACIAL PAIN. (1)
This course provides information regarding the normal anatomy and function of the masticatory
system and then highlights some of the common disorders related to dysfunction of this system.
Emphasis is placed on temporomandibular disorders and how they are identified and
management in the clinical practice. Other disorders associated with orofacial pain complaints
will be discussed so that students are able to identify these conditions and successfully manage
them or refer the patient to the appropriate health care provider. Prereq: Admission to dental
graduate program; D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree.

CDS 660 RESEARCH DESIGN, METHODS AND DISSEMINATION. (2)
This lecture/seminar course is designed to provide students with an overview of the basic
principles of study design and protocol development, with a focus on clinical and translations
research. It also is designed to expose students to the interplay between patient care and
clinical/translational research and to provide the students with tools that will assist them in
dissemination of their research findings. Prereq: Admission to dental graduate program.

CDS 670 ADVANCES IN ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL PATHOLOGY. (1)
This course consists of 16 hours of lecture on the major disease topics in Oral and Maxillofacial
Pathology including oral mucosal, salivary gland and bone pathology. Current classifications of
these major categories will be presented and selected topics of current importance will be
discussed. Prereq: Admission to dental graduate program

CDS 680 CLINICAL MEDICINE FOR POSTGRADUATE DENTAL STUDENTS. (2)
This course is designed to provide graduate students and dental residents with an advanced
understanding of how various medical disorders and medical therapies can affect oral health and
the delivery of dental care. Prereq: Admission to dental graduate program.

CDS 748 MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH. (0)
Half-time to full-time work on thesis. May be repeated to a maximum of six semesters. Prereq:
All course work toward the degree must be completed.

                                                                                                  57
CDS 768 RESIDENCE CREDIT FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE. (1-6)
May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

CDS 812 NORMAL HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. (1)
This is a lecture course which introduces basic concepts of normal human growth and
development from birth through adolescence. Lectures emphasize the time-dependent changes
that normally occur during physical and psychological maturation. A special emphasis is directed
toward basic knowledge and understanding of craniofacial growth and development of the teeth
and occlusion. Lecture, 22 hours. Prereq: Admission to the College of Dentistry or consent of
course director.

CDS 813 MANAGEMENT I: INTRO TO MANAGEMENT FOR THE DENTIST. (2)
CDS 813 is the first in a series of conjoint courses to improve the management of patients by
student dentists. The course is co-directed by the patient care Team Leaders. Special didactic
and clinical activities are included to provide the student with an introduction to clinical protocol
and to the fundamentals of patient management. The course spans both semesters of the
academic year, and includes all clinical activities and interactions with Team Leaders. Lecture, 3
hours; laboratory, 69; clinic, 6 hours. Prereq: Admission to the College of Dentistry.

CDS 815 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL DENTISTRY. (3)
This survey course presents an introduction to the dental field of operation (operatory), basic
assisting procedures, preventive dentistry, infection control, application of sealants and oral
isolation techniques. It is designed to prepare students to function in dental environments, safely
and efficiently and to prepare them for the school-based sealant. Lecture, 21 hours; laboratory, 20
hours; clinic, 16 hours. Prereq: Admission to the College of Dentistry.

CDS 818 THE PROFESSION OF DENTISTRY I. (1)
This course is an introduction to life in the profession of dentistry. The course will explore
normal everyday morality, and consider whether a case can be made for an extraordinary morality
or ethic for practitioners. The course will conclude with a brief review of the history of dentistry
to enable the student to place the profession of dentistry in cultural and historical perspective.
Lecture, 16 hours. Prereq: Admission to the College of Dentistry.

CDS 821 LOCAL ANESTHESIA. (1)
The action and dosage of local anesthetic agents used in dentistry are taught as are the proper
injection techniques. The technique of venipuncture and administration of intravenous drugs are
also included. Patient evaluation and emergency techniques for cardiac and respiratory
resuscitation are reviewed. Lecture, 15 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. ANA 534; corequisite: OBI
822.

CDS 822 GERONTOLOGY/GERIATRIC DENTISTRY. (1)
This course is designed to help students gain an appreciation for the significant opportunities as
well as challenges the aging population will bring to their oral health practice. This course will
provide students basic knowledge and information in gerontology/geriatric dentistry. Lecture, 17
hours. May be repeated to a maximum of two credits. Prereq: Admission to the College of
Dentistry or discretion of course director. (Same as GRN 720.)
                                                                                                   58
CDS 823 MANAGEMENT II: INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PATIENT
MANAGEMENT. (1)
CDS 823 is the second in a series of conjoint courses designed to improve the management of
patients by student dentists. The course is directed by the patient care Team Leaders with other
faculty. Special didactic and clinical activities are included to improve and maintain the
students’ ability to manage patients safely and efficiently. One of the primary goals of this course
is to improve students' ability to interact with patients in an empathetic and professional manner.
The course spans both semesters of the academic year and includes all clinical activities and
interactions with Team Leaders. Instruction leading to recertification in cardiopulmonary
resuscitation is also included. Prereq: CDS 821 or consent of course director.

CDS 824 INTRODUCTION TO ORAL DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT PLANNING. (2)
This course presents the rationale for the development of the University of Kentucky College of
Dentistry Preliminary, Phase I and Phase II treatment plans and a method of critically evaluating
treatment results. Basic UKCD clinical protocol is presented and discussed. Lecture, 22 hours;
laboratory, 16 hours. Prereq: CDS 815 or consent of course director.

CDS 828 PROFESSION OF DENTISTRY II. (1)
This course focuses on ethical practice in clinical dentistry. In the life of a health-care clinician
circumstances arise daily which are ethical in nature. The dentist, and the patient, must respond
to these circumstances in ways that result in the best for all parties concerned. This course will
explore the duties assumed by dentists in becoming a provider of oral health care for patients. In
doing so, the major question to be addressed is, “How do dentists interact with their patients for
the good of both?” Lecture, 20 hours. Consent of the course director.

CDS 831 CONSCIOUS SEDATION. (1)
This course is designed to teach the principles of nitrous oxide-oxygen inhalation sedation and
intravenous sedation in dentistry. The management of emergencies associated with these
techniques and an introduction to the principles of general anesthesia are also included. Lecture,
21 hours; clinic, four hours. Prereq: CDS 821, OBI 824.

CDS 833 MANAGEMENT III: CLINICAL PATIENT MANAGEMENT. (1)
CDS 833 is the third in a series of conjoint courses to improve the management of patients by
student dentists. The course is directed by the four patient care Team Leaders. Special didactic
and clinical activities are included to improve and maintain the student dentist’s ability to
manage patients and provide care. The course spans both semesters of the academic year and
includes all clinical activities and interactions with Team Leaders. Instruction leading to
recertification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation is also included. Lecture, 20 hours; laboratory,
12 hours. Prereq: CDS 823.

CDS 835 DENTAL IMPLANTOLOGY. (2)
Dental implantology has become an integral part of dental services. This course contains
information on patient centered criteria for implant services, surgical considerations, and
prosthetically driven treatment results. The student will have the opportunity to familiarize
him/herself with the components used in providing such treatment through a hands-on laboratory
session. Lecture; 24 hours; laboratory, 12 hours. Prereq: Admission to College of Dentistry or
                                                                                                   59
discretion of course director.

CDS 843 MANAGEMENT IV: CLINICAL PATIENT MANAGEMENT. (2)
CDS 843 is the fourth in a series of conjoint courses to improve the management of patients by
student dentists. The course is directed by the four patient care Team Leaders. Special didactic
and clinical activities are also included to improve and maintain your ability to manage patients.
The course spans both semesters of the academic year, including all clinical activities and
interactions with Team Leaders. Instruction leading to recertification in cardiopulmonary
resuscitation is also included. Lecture, 27 hours; laboratory, 12 hours; clinic, 6 hours. Prereq:
CDE 810 and CDS 833 or consent of course director.

CDS 844 DRUG MISUSE, ABUSE AND DEPENDENCY: WHAT DENTISTS NEED TO
KNOW. (1)
This course is designed to provide new insights and understanding into prevention, recognition
and treatment of patients with, and at risk for, drug misuse and abuse. The course enables dental
students to understand addiction as primary, chronic and progressive disease and to demonstrate
an understanding of the pharmacology, abuse potential, as well as the behavioral and
physiological effects of the commonly abused drugs. Emphasis will be on increasing dental
students skills and abilities to recognize the signs and symptoms of drug abuse; identify and
manage patients at risk for drug problems; and become effective in providing successful care for
drug dependent patients while minimizing their potential for relapse.

CDS 846 DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF OROFACIAL PAIN. (3)
This course will present information regarding the diagnosis and management of orofacial pain
and temporomandibular disorders. The course will consist of lectures and one laboratory session.
The information provided in this course will allow the student to understand the dentist's role in
managing complex orofacial pain problems. The area of temporomandibular disorders will be
emphasized since the dentist plays a major role in managing these pain disorders. Lecture, 45
hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prereq: ANA 534, OBI 829, OSG 820, and RSD 822.

CDS 860 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORAL HEALTH. (Elective) (1-3)
This course will engage students in a variety of activities including lectures, independent
literature review and reading, community-based projects, and individual or small group
discussions to address current topics of special interest or concern in oral health. Projects and
discussion areas for students participating in an interdisciplinary colloquium will be developed in
conjunction with other health care providers. May be repeated to a maximum of six credit
hours. Prereq: Enrollment in the College of Dentistry; approval of the course director.


END Endodontics


END 820 ANTERIOR ENDODONTICS. (2)
This is a lecture-laboratory course which is designed to introduce the student to the diagnostic
terminology of pulpal and periapical disease and the techniques of endodontics in anterior teeth.

                                                                                                 60
Lecture, 10 hours; laboratory, 30 hours. Prereq: RSD 812 and RSD 814, or consent of course
director.

END 821 CLINICAL ENDODONTICS I. (1)
In this course, students will treat two clinical endodontic cases, one of which shall be a molar.
Clinic, 6 hours. Prereq: END 820.

END 822 POSTERIOR ENDODONTICS. (2)
This is a lecture-laboratory course which is designed to introduce the student to the diagnostic
terminology of pulpal and periapical disease and the techniques of endodontic in posterior teeth.
Lecture, 10 hours; laboratory, 30 hours. Prereq: END 820 and RSD 824, or consent of course
director.

END 830 ENDODONTICS II. (1)
This course concerns the diagnosis and treatment of endodontically related problems. Traumatic
injuries, controversies in instrumentation and filling procedures, periodontic-endodontic
consideration, surgical endodontics and other selected topics are discussed in depth. Lecture, 20
hours. Prereq: END 821.

END 831 CLINICAL ENDODONTICS II. (1)
In this course students will treat routine endodontic cases. Clinic, 35 hours. Prereq: END 821.

END 841 CLINICAL ENDODONTICS III. (1)
This course offers dental students further experience in providing endodontic treatment. Clinic,
40 hours. Prereq: END 831 or consent of instructor.

END 880 CLINICAL ENDODONTICS SEMINAR. (Elective) (1)
This course is designed to give a more in-depth hands-on view of some of the newest concepts in
endodontics. Seminars will be presented including new concepts of instrumentation and root
canal obturation. Demonstrations and hands on class participation will supplement the seminars.
Note: scheduling for this course will take place outside of regularly scheduled class/clinic time.
Prereq: END 830, END 831, ranked in the upper half of the class, and consent of instructor.


OBI    Oral Biology


OBI 650 ORAL BIOLOGY FOR POSTGRADUATE DENTAL STUDENTS I. (2)
This seminar course provides a review of selected biological science topics. Emphasis is placed
on the use of current literature for an in-depth study of those aspects of the subject particularly
relevant to dental practice. Lecture: 32 hours. Prereq: Admission to an advanced education
program of the College of Dentistry or consent of instructor.




                                                                                                    61
OBI 651 ORAL BIOLOGY FOR POSTGRADUATE DENTAL STUDENTS II. (2)
This course is a continuation of OBI 650. It is a seminar that uses the scientific literature to
review selected biological science topics with emphasis on those especially relevant to dental
practice. Lecture: 32 hours. Prereq: OBI 650 or consent of instructor.

OBI 812 DENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY. (6)
This is a comprehensive course in biochemistry designed to fulfill the specific needs of student
dentists. Course content is generally as outlined in the American Association of Dental Schools
suggested curriculum guidelines for biochemistry. Part I acquaints students with the chemical
constituents of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; topics include the chemistry of lipids,
carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins and coenzymes, and the nature of enzyme action. Part II
integrates the chemical principles learned from Part I with concepts of cell dynamics, structure,
function, subcellular organization, and metabolism. Topics include intermediary metabolism,
bioenergetics, DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular regulatory and control
mechanisms. Course content, where possible, is related to current concepts concerning the
etiology of oral diseases, their treatment, and prevention to assist student dentists in attaining
institutional goals and objectives for clinical competency. Prereq: Admission to the College of
Dentistry. (Same as BCH 812).

OBI 814 DENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. (5)
This course provides in-depth instruction on the physiological mechanisms of body function
from the single cell to the organism level. The course is team taught by medical scientists and
clinicians. Teaching methodologies include didactic and Socratic lectures, small group
discussions, demonstrations and live model and computer simulated laboratories. Lecture, 80
hours. Prereq: Admission to the Dental School.

OBI 815 DENTAL GROSS ANATOMY AND EMBRYOLOGY. (6)
Study of gross and developmental anatomy with particular emphasis on functional anatomy of the
head and neck. Lecture/laboratory course, with dissection being an essential component of the
laboratory portion. Hours: 1:1 ratio. Prereq: Admission to the College of Dentistry or some
background in biology and consent of instructor. (Same as ANA 534.)

OBI 817 DENTAL NEUROANATOMY. (2)
Study of human dental neuroanatomy with emphasis on functional neuroanatomy of central
nervous system, especially related to cranial nerves 5, 7, 9 and 10, pain, and long tracts. Lecture
1 hour a week. 25 hours. Prereq: Admission to the College of Dentistry, or some background
in biology with permission from instructor. (Same as ANA 538.)

OBI 828 IMMUNITY, INFECTION AND DISEASE FOR THE STUDENT DENTIST. (6)
The course provides basic concepts of immunology and bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoal
biology. It focuses on mechanisms of human immunity, immunologically mediated disease, and
pathogenesis in infectious disease. The material covered includes relevant pathology associated
with both immunologic and infectious diseases, and a summary of infectious diseases from a
clinical perspective. Lecture: 6 hours per week. Prereq: Enrolled in the DMD curriculum.


                                                                                                   62
OBI 836 DENTAL PHARMACOLOGY. (3)
This course will provide students of dentistry with a fundmental understanding of the
pharmacology and the therapeutic uses of drugs commonly used in their practice or by their
patients. This course will reinforce topics discussed in CDS 821 (Local Anesthesia); in addition,
the course will integrate with ODM 830 (Management of Medically Compromised Patient) and
provide focused preparation for CDS 831 (Conscious Sedation). Lecture, 49 hours. Prereq: OBI
812 (Dental Biochemistry), OBI 814 (Dental Physiology), and CDS 821 (Local Anesthesia)
Prereq: OBI 812 and OBI 814. (Same as PHA 822.)


ODM Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine


ODM 810 BASIC PRINCIPLES IN ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL RADIOLOGY. (2)
This course presents the basic principles of oral and maxillofacial radiology, including radiation
biology, radiation physics and imaging principles, radiation protection and safety, and radiology
techniques. Lecture, 20 hours; seminar, 4.5 hours. Prereq: Admission to the College of
Dentistry.

ODM 820 ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL RADIOLOGY AND DIAGNOSTIC
IMAGING. (2)
This course presents the principles of radiographic anatomy, extra-oral projections (including
panoramic film and lateral skull film), radiology of caries and periodontal disease, digital
radiology, advanced imaging techniques (including CBCT), and the process of radiographic
interpretation. Lecture, 24 hours; seminar; 4.5 hours; practicum, 24 hours (three (3) days of
rotation in radiology). Prereq: ODM 810.

ODM 821 CLINICAL ORAL DIAGNOSIS I. (1)
This course consists of two components: 1) examination, diagnosis, and treatment planning for
patients assigned to dental students in general clinics; and 2) an emergency clinic assignment in
which the students will diagnose and treat patients with acute oral problems. Clinic, 40 hours.
Prereq: CDS 815; Coreq: CDS 824.

ODM 830 MANAGEMENT OF THE MEDICALLY COMPROMISED DENTAL
 PATIENT. (3)
This course will provide students with the knowledge required to manage medically
compromised patients in the outpatient dental office. Basic clinic pathological information about
commonly occurring medical disorders, the impact medications that these patients take have, the
special problems they have, and their effects on dental health care will be presented. Critical
thinking is encouraged so that the students can use their diagnostic skills in the appropriate
manner to identify and manage patients with systemic disorders. Lecture, 43 hours; laboratory, 4
hours. Prereq: Approval of dean and/or his designee for academic affairs and the course director.

ODM 831 CLINICAL ORAL DIAGNOSIS II. (1)
This course is a continuation of ODM 821 and also consists of two components: 1) examination,
diagnosis and treatment planning for patients assigned to dental students in general clinics; and
                                                                                                 63
2) emergency clinic assignments in which the students will diagnose and treat patients with acute
oral problems. Clinic, 77 hours. Prereq: ODM 821; coreq: CDS 832.

ODM 841 CLINICAL ORAL DIAGNOSIS III. (1)
This course is a continuation of ODM 831 and also consists of two components: (1) examination,
diagnosis and treatment planning for patients assigned to dental students in general clinics; and
(2) emergency clinic assignments in which the students will diagnose and treat patients with
acute oral problems. Clinic, 114 hours. Prereq: ODM 830 and ODM 831.


OFP    Oral Health Practice/Orofacial Pain Center


OFP 634 CURRENT CONCEPTS IN TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS. (3)
This course provides the student with information on the anatomy, physiology and function of
the masticatory system. The etiology, diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders
will be emphasized. Lecture, 41 hours; laboratory, 15 hours per semester. Prereq: Acceptance
into the College of Dentistry M.S. Program and/or consent of the College of Dentistry's Director
of Graduate Studies and the course director.

OFP 636 CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS. (3)
This course provides the student with clinical experience in the diagnosis and management of
temporomandibular disorders. The student will provide treatment for patients referred to the
Orofacial Pain Center under the supervision of the course director. Clinic, 144 hours. Prereq:
Acceptance into the College of Dentistry M.S. Program and/or consent of the College's Director
of Graduate Studies and the course director.

OFP 700 OROFACIAL PAIN TREATMENT PLANNING SEMINAR. (2)
This course will provide the student with experience in diagnosing and treatment planning
various orofacial pain patients. Lecture: 32 hours per year or 16 hours per semester. Prereq:
Acceptance into the College of Dentistry M.S. Program and/or consent of the College's Director
of Graduate Studies and the course director.

OFP 734 CURRENT CONCEPTS IN OROFACIAL PAIN. (3)
This course provides the students with information on non-masticatory orofacial pain problems.
The etiology and differential diagnosis of head and neck pain will be emphasized. The student
will learn the dentist's role in the management and/or referral of complex facial pain problems.
Prereq: OFP 634 and OFP 636.

OFP 736 CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF OROFACIAL PAIN. (3)
This course provides the student with clinical experience in the diagnosis and management of
complex orofacial pain problems. The student will provide treatment for patients referred to the
Orofacial Pain Center under the supervision of the course director. Clinic, 144 hours. Prereq:
OFP 634 and OFP 636.


                                                                                               64
OFP 790 RESEARCH IN OROFACIAL PAIN. (1-6)
May be repeated for a total of 12 hours. Prereq: Admission to the Orofacial Pain graduate
program and consent of the Director of Graduate Studies.


OHP Oral Health Practice


OHP 850 INDEPENDENT WORK IN ORAL HEALTH PRACTICE. (1-3)
An elective course offered by the department of Oral Health Practice. Students may work on
individual projects in one or more of the disciplines encompassed by this department under the
direction of a faculty member. The work should involve independent laboratory or clinical
research and include supporting literature searches. The end result should be either a table clinic
presentation or a paper suitable for publication. The minimum number of hours to be spent on the
project and the means of evaluation will be decided before beginning the project. May be
repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: Specific course prerequisites and year in dental
school will depend on the nature of the proposed project; consent of instructor.


OHS Oral Health Science


OHS 850 INDEPENDENT WORK IN ORAL HEALTH SCIENCE. (1-3)
An elective course offered by the department of Oral Health Science. Students may work on
individual projects in one or more of the disciplines encompassed by this department under the
direction of a faculty member. The work should involve independent laboratory or clinical
research and include supporting literature searches. The end result should be either a table clinic
presentation or a paper suitable for publication. The minimum number of hours to be spent on the
project and the means of evaluation will be decided before beginning the project. May be
repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: Specific course prerequisites and year in dental
school will depend on the nature of the proposed project; consent of instructor.


OPT Oral Pathology


OPT 650 GRADUATE ORAL PATHOLOGY I. (2)
This is a seminar course in advanced oral pathology in which students study the microscopic,
radiographic, and clinical features and the management of diseases that affect oral and perioral
tissues. A case study format is used to discuss both common and rare conditions that illustrate all
major disease categories and to provide a framework for developing a systematic approach to
disease diagnosis. Lecture: 36 hours. Prereq: Dental degree and enrollment in a College of
Dentistry postgraduate program, or consent of instructor.




                                                                                                 65
OPT 651 GRADUATE ORAL PATHOLOGY II. (2)
This course is a continuation of OPT 650. It is a seminar in advanced oral pathology in which
students study the microscopic, radiographic, and clinical features and the management of
diseases that affect oral and perioral tissues. A case study format is used to discuss both common
and rare conditions that illustrate all major disease categories and to provide a framework for
developing a systematic approach to disease diagnosis. Lecture: 36 hours. Prereq: OPT 650 or
consent of instructor.

OPT 820 GENERAL PATHOLOGY FOR STUDENT DENTISTS. (3)
This basic course covers general pathology, which will prepare the student dentist to concentrate
on the specialized area of oral pathology. Emphasis is placed on cell damage, inflammation and
repair, neoplasia and hemostasis, as well as the in-depth study of selected systemic diseases that
may affect dental patient management. Lecture, 54 hours. Prereq: Enrollment in the College of
Dentistry and second year class standing, ANA 530, ANA 532, or consent of course director.

OPT 830 ORAL PATHOLOGY I. (3)
This is a comprehensive lecture course on oral and paraoral diseases. The course deals mainly
with the clinical aspects of oral disease, with emphasis on clinical and/or radiographic
appearance, etiology, management and prognosis. Lecture, 41 hours and 4 one-hour
examinations. Prereq: OPT 820.

OPT 832 ORAL PATHOLOGY II. (1)
This course teaches the dental student an effective approach to patients with oral lesions. It will
stress the following: development of a reasonable differential diagnosis list, procedures to be
used in obtaining a definitive diagnosis, management of the patient after a diagnosis has been
made, and treatment if indicated. Attendance at one lecture and one session of Head and Neck
Oncology Clinic is included in the course. Seminar, 26 hours; clinic, three hours. Prereq: OPT
830.

OPT 840 ORAL PATHOLOGY III. (1)
This is an advanced course in oral pathology in which various diseases and abnormal conditions
of the head, neck and oral cavity are presented. The pertinent information on several selected
cases will be on display for a week each and then followed by a lecture/discussion period for the
development of a differential diagnosis, establishment of a definitive diagnosis, and discussion of
treatment and prognosis. Attendance at one lecture and one session of Head and Neck Oncology
Clinic is included in the course. Lecture, 21 hours; clinic, three hours. Prereq: OPT 832.

OPT 850 ORAL PATHOLOGY ELECTIVE. (1-10)
Elective courses offered by the Department of Oral Pathology provide opportunities for further
study of or experience in various aspects of oral pathology. Topics may include principles of
clinical and histologic diagnosis, the management of patients with oral disease, and discussions
of specific oral diseases. Hours variable, ranging from a minimum of 16 hours lecture/discussion
to a maximum of 10 weeks clinical experience. May be repeated to a maximum of 10 credits.
Prereq: The minimum year in dental school and any course prerequisites will be announced for
each topic.

                                                                                                  66
OPT 880 CLINICAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR DENTAL PRACTITIONERS. (Elective) (1)
This course is designed to teach dental health professionals basic photographic principles and an
effective technique of intraoral photography. Topics of interest include photographic equipment,
film, and lighting and exposure techniques. The effects of alterations in shutter speed, aperture
and lens focal length will be stressed. A step-by-step procedure for dental clinical photography
will be presented. Note: scheduling of this course will not interfere with regularly scheduled
class/clinic time. Prereq: 4th year standing in the College of Dentistry.


ORT Orthodontics


ORT 610 CRANIO-FACIAL FORM. (2)
This is a two credit-hour seminar course that introduces students to the basic concepts and
principles of cephalometrics in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment. The course reviews
historical literature as well as contemporary articles. Prereq: Admission to graduate dental
programs; D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree.

ORT 620 ORAL-PHARYNGEAL FUNCTION, PART I. (2)
Basic and applied physiology for graduate students in dentistry. Class, two and one-half hours.
Prereq: Admission to a graduate program of the College of Dentistry; D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree.

ORT 621 ORAL-PHARYNGEAL FUNCTION, PART II. (2)
A continuation of ORT 620, emphasizing speech physiology and language development. Lecture,
two and one-half hours. Prereq: Admission to a graduate program of the College of Dentistry;
D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree.

ORT 660 ORTHODONTIC DIAGNOSIS. (2)
This is a two credit-hour seminar course offered at the graduate level within the specialty
program in orthodontics. The course provides in-depth information concerning methods and
rationale for gathering a comprehensive database for orthodontic patients. Analysis and
interpretation of the database is approached by using the orthogonal analysis technique. The
process of developing a treatment plan from the database will be thoroughly explored. Prereq:
Admission to a postdoctoral program of the College of Dentistry.

ORT 661 ORTHODONTIC SEMINAR-CLINIC. (3)
Seminar, laboratory and clinical instruction in orthodontic theory and practice. Lecture, three
hours; laboratory, 15 hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: ORT 660.

ORT 662 ORTHODONTIC TECHNIQUE. (2)
This is a two credit-hour graduate level course designed to introduce or reacquaint the student
with some of the most commonly used techniques in orthodontic practice. It is closely related to
the diagnosis and treatment planning course and to the course on mechanics. Prereq: Admission
to a postdoctoral program of the College of Dentistry.

ORT 664 BIOMECHANICS. (2)
                                                                                                  67
This is a two-credit-hour seminar course. The purpose of the course is to introduce the
foundational concepts for understanding both the laws of mechanics and the typical tissue
responses to force systems used in orthodontic appliances. Students will learn theory-guided
approaches to planning safe, predictable and efficient orthodontic treatment. Students will be
expected to read and critique background material in assigned textbooks and journal articles for
seminar discussions. This course will supplement subject matter covered in the typodont course,
ORT 662. Prereq: Admission to a postdoctoral program in the College of Dentistry.

ORT 710 MANAGEMENT OF COMPLEX OROFACIAL DEFORMITIES. (1)
Seminar discussions of techniques in orthodontic problem solving and planning treatment for
patients with orofacial deformities refractory to either orthodontic therapy or oral surgery but
which are resolvable by utilizing combinations of orthodontic and oral surgical therapies.
Lecture, one hour per week; laboratory, one hour per week. Prereq: ORT 660 or permission of
instructor.

ORT 770 ORTHODONTIC SEMINAR. (1)
Seminar in orthodontic theory and practice for advanced graduate and postdoctoral students in
orthodontics. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Lecture, three hours. Prereq:
Admission to the Orthodontics Graduate Program and consent of course director.

ORT 790 RESEARCH IN ORTHODONTICS. (1-5)
Research in orthodontics. May be repeated to a maximum of five credits. Prereq: Admission to
the orthodontic graduate program of the College of Dentistry; special permission.

ORT 822 ORTHODONTICS I. (3)
This course concerns the development of knowledge and skills needed to conduct a thorough
orthodontic diagnosis and to plan orthodontic therapy. Lectures are oriented to data base
collection, analysis and interpretation. Laboratory exercises provide opportunity to develop skills
in analysis of facial proportions, analysis of diagnostic dental casts, cephalometric tracings,
formulating a prioritized problem list and development of long-term and short-term treatment
goals. A clinical experience is provided to collect records in a child patient. Seminar discussions
are provided to discuss and review the data base. Lecture, 15 hours; laboratory, 12 hours;
seminar, 22 hours. Prereq: Second year standing in College of Dentistry, CDS 812.

ORT 830 ORTHODONTICS II. (2)
This course is concerned with the teaching of pre-clinical orthodontic technique and theory. The
course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of the skills required to fabricate
fixed and removable appliances that are typically indicated for limited tooth movement and
retention in interceptive orthodontics and adjunctive orthodontic treatment in a general practice
setting. The role of the general dentist in the management of their patients' orthodontic needs will
be delineated. Special emphasis will be placed on coordination of treatment between the
specialist and general practitioner and maintenance of occlusion over the life span of the patient.
Lecture; 16 hours; laboratory, 16 hours. Prereq: CDS 812, ORT 822.

ORT 841 CLINICAL ORTHODONTICS. (1)

                                                                                                   68
This clinical course requires the students to analyze and diagnose the present and developing
occlusal disharmonies in their assigned patients and to provide therapy for those patients who
need tooth movements judged to be within the scope of the general practice of dentistry. Clinic,
57 hours. Prereq: ORT 820 and consent of course director.


OSG Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery


OSG 651 ANATOMICAL RELATIONSHIPS IN SURGERY. (1)
A seminar course for dental graduate students in areas other than surgery, emphasizing
anatomical and surgical principles applicable to all dental specialties. Prereq: Admission to
graduate or post-doctoral programs of College of Dentistry; D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree.

OSG 820 ORAL SURGERY I. (1)
The general objectives of this course are to teach the student the significance of a history and
physical examination, how to identify and use basic oral surgery instruments, how to perform
basic oral surgical techniques including the removal of teeth and preparation of the mouth for
dentures. Lecture, 20 hours. Prereq: CDS 811 or consent of course director.

OSG 830 ORAL SURGERY II. (1)
This course is an overview of the specialty of oral surgery. The student is introduced to the
surgical management of congenital and acquired abnormalities of the oral structures and
associated parts. Management of odontogenic infection, cysts and tumors is presented, as well as
the role of the dentist in the care of head and neck cancer patients. The diagnosis and
management of facial fractures also are presented, particularly as they relate to the general
practitioner. Lecture, 25 hours. Prereq: OSG 820 or consent of course director.

OSG 831 ORAL SURGERY ROTATION I. (2)
This course teaches the management of the ambulatory oral surgical patient. It includes patient
evaluation, control of pain and anxiety, performance of minor oral surgical procedures, treatment
of acute and chronic oral infections and of complications associated with oral surgery, and the
use of the problem-oriented record. Slide-text programs and reading assignments supplement the
outpatient clinical experience. Prereq: CDS 821 and OSG 820 or consent of course director.

OSG 841 ORAL SURGERY ROTATION II. (2)
In this course students learn the management of oral surgical patients in a hospital. It consists of a
full-time rotation on the oral surgery hospital service, including standing in-hospital night call
with the oral surgery house staff. Students assist in patient care and perform procedures such as
exodontia and biopsy. Oral surgical management of comprehensive care patients in the outpatient
clinic is also included. Clinic, two weeks. Prereq: OSG 830 and OSG 831.


PDO Pediatric Dentistry


                                                                                                   69
PDO 610 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY SEMINAR I. (2)
This seminar course is the first of a series of three such courses that discuss essential elements of
clinical pediatric dentistry, with emphasis on the scientific evidence supporting contemporary
practice. Topics for the seminars include: management of the child patient, prevention dentistry,
restorative dentistry, pulp therapy, management of the arch circumference, abnormal dental
development and treatment of children with special care needs. Lecture, 32 hours. Prerequisite:
Enrollment in the College of Dentistry’s Master of Science degree program.

PDO 620 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY SEMINAR II. (2)
This course is a continuation of PDO 610, addressing the issues of the clinical practice of
contemporary pediatric dentistry. Lecture, 32 hours. Prerequisite: PDO 610.

PDO 630 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY SEMINAR III. (2)
This course is a continuation of PDO 610 and PDO 620, addressing the issues of contemporary
practice in pediatric dentistry. Prerequisites: PDO 610 and PDO 620.

PDO 640 PEDIATRIC SEMINAR IV. (2)
This course reviews all the required and suggested readings in preparation for the comprehensive
written section of the examination for certification by the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry.
Lecture, 32 hours. Prerequisites: PDO 610, PDO 620, and PDO 630.

PDO 790 RESEARCH IN PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY. (1-3)
Participation in clinical, biomedical or biobehavioral research in pediatric dentistry. Research
must be conducted independently, but with the supervision of a faculty mentor. Completed
research is submitted as either a Master’s degree thesis or a manuscript for submission to an
appropriate peer review journal, and must be defended before a faculty committee. Prereq:
Enrollment in Pediatric Dentistry/College of Dentistry M.S. degree program.

PDO 822 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY I. (2)
In this course in dentistry for children, emphasis will be placed on principles of oral surgical
procedures, advanced restorative techniques, diagnosis and treatment of traumatic injuries,
preventive dentistry and diagnosis and treatment of oral habits and cosmetic dentistry. Lecture,
26 hours; laboratory, 6 hours. Prereq: Second year standing in the College of Dentistry.

PDO 831 CLINICAL PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY I. (2)
This is an introductory clinical course instructing student dentists in oral health care for children.
Clinic Hours: 75 Prereq: PDO 822 Coreq: PDO 834

PDO 834 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY II. (2)
This course is designed to introduce basic modern concepts in dentistry for children. Emphasis is
placed on principles of child behavior management and basic restorative dentistry techniques.
Lecture: 32 hours. Prereq: 2nd year standing in the College Dentistry.

PDO 841 CLINICAL PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY II. (4)
This is an advanced clinical course instructing student dentists in oral health care for children.
Clinic Hours: 75 Prereq: PDO 822, PDO 834, and PDO 831.
                                                                                                     70
PER    Periodontics


PER 626 ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN GENERAL DENTISTRY. (1)
This course presents, by seminar, lecture or continuing education courses, advanced concepts in
general dentistry that are essential to the clinical practice of periodontics. It includes advanced
instruction in orthodontics, periodontal prosthesis, prosthodontics and oral surgery. May be
repeated to a maximum of four credits. Prereq: Admission to a postdoctoral program of the
College of Dentistry or consent of course director.

PER 661 MODERN CONCEPTS IN PERIODONTICS. (2)
A seminar course designed to present the present understanding of the etiology of periodontal
disease and current techniques for treatment of periodontal problems. Prereq: Admission to
graduate program of College of Dentistry; D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree.

PER 770 TREATMENT PLANNING SEMINAR. (2)
In this seminar course, graduate students present and discuss diagnosis, prognosis, ideal
treatment plans and alternative treatment plans for patients with periodontal disease. Each
student gives at least eight case presentations. May be repeated to a maximum of eight credits.
Lecture, 40 hours. Prereq: Admission to the Periodontics postdoctoral program or consent of
course director.

PER 772 PERIODONTAL BIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY. (2)
Seminar discussions, review and evaluation of the literature covering periodontal anatomy,
periodontal biology, the pathology of periodontal diseases and etiological factors in periodontal
disease. The subject area will be covered in four semesters. May be repeated four times for a
maximum of eight credits. Lecture, 40 hours. Prereq: Admission to the Periodontics postdoctoral
program or consent of course director.

PER 774 PERIODONTICS SURGICAL SEMINAR. (1)
In this seminar course participants present, discuss and critique surgical procedures that have
been accomplished in the clinic. Reading assignments from the literature augment the clinical
discussions and students are encouraged to use the literature to justify their procedures. Cases are
presented on a rotating basis. May be repeated to a maximum of four credits. Prereq: Admission
to Periodontics postdoctoral program or consent of course director.

PER 776 PERIODONTAL THERAPY SEMINAR. (1)
This is an advanced series of seminars on the clinical aspects of periodontal therapy. During the
course, the students will learn about various modalities of periodontal therapy as presented in the
periodontal literature, e.g., mucogingival treatment, implants and curettage. May be repeated to a
maximum of two credits. Prereq: Admission to the Periodontics postdoctoral program or consent
of course director.

PER 790 RESEARCH IN PERIODONTICS. (1-3)
                                                                                                  71
This course involves direct student participation in a research project. Projects and thesis are
approved by the course director and may be clinical, laboratory experimental or related to dental
education. Projects may include original or ongoing research within the Department of
Periodontics or other departments of the Medical Center. May be repeated to a maximum of six
credits. Prereq: Admission to the Periodontics postdoctoral program and consent of the
department involved.

PER 810 PERIODONTICS I. (1)
This course is an introduction to periodontology. Emphasis is on recognition of healthy gingival
characteristics and early disease progression. The student is also introduced to etiology,
epidemiology and immunology related to periodontal assessments, and plaque control measures.
Lecture, 23 hours; laboratory, nine hours. Prereq: CDS 815 or consent of instructor.

PER 820 PERIODONTICS II. (3)
This course presents the components of the first stages of periodontal therapy. Emphasis is on
diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and non-surgical treatment of the periodontally involved
patient. Lecture, 36 hours; laboratory, 24 hours. Prereq: PER 810 or consent of instructor.

PER 821 CLINICAL PERIODONTICS II. (2)
This is a course designed to provide the student with clinical experience so that he can obtain a
minimal competence in the applications of periodontal procedures. Therapeutic procedures
involving initial periodontal therapy will be performed by each student. Prereq: PER 811, or
consent of instructor.

PER 830 PERIODONTICS III. (2)
This is a surgically oriented course which presents information necessary for the diagnosis,
treatment planning, and treatment of surgical cases. The information gained is applied to
planning treatment for actual surgical cases. Lecture, 27 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. Prereq: PER
820, or consent of course director.

PER 831 CLINICAL PERIODONTICS III. (2)
This is a clinical course which offers the student the opportunity to treat patients with more
advanced periodontal disease. Therapeutic procedures will be performed by each student as his
patients' needs dictate. Prereq: PER 821; corequisite: PER 830; or consent of instructor.

PER 841 CLINICAL PERIODONTICS IV. (4)
This clinical course is a continuation of PER 831. The student receives further instruction and
experience in diagnosing, planning treatment and treating patients with periodontitis and
mucogingival problems. Prereq: PER 830 and PER 831, or consent of instructor.


PRO Prosthodontics


PRO 820 PRECLINICAL COMPLETE DENTURE PROSTHODONTICS (Lecture). (2)

                                                                                                    72
This preclinical lecture course provides an introduction to basic concepts of diagnosis and
treatment planning, fabrication, placement and maintenance of complete dentures, as well as the
related biological and mechanical factors that must be incorporated for living tissue to be
compatible with complete dentures. Lecture, 36 hours. Prereq: Advancement to second year
standing or consent of course director. Coreq: PRO 822

PRO 821 CLINICAL COMPLETE DENTURE PROSTHODONTICS. (1)
The treatment of a patient with complete maxillary and mandibular denture needs is performed in
the clinic by the student. The student will assist an upper level student in the examination of a
complete denture and a removable partial denture recall patient. Coreq: PRO 820.

PRO 822 PRECLINICAL COMPLETE DENTURE PROSTHODONTICS (Lab). (2)
This preclinical laboratory course provides an introduction to basic concepts of diagnosis and
treatment planning, fabrication, placement and maintenance of fabrication of complete dentures
as well as the related biological and mechanical factors that must be incorporated for living tissue
to be compatible with complete dentures. Lab, 63 hours. Prereq: Advancement to second year
standing or consent of course director. Coreq: PRO 820

PRO 824 REMOVABLE PARTIAL DENTURES. (2)
This course is designed to teach the student the basic principles and the practical procedures in
providing a therapeutic and functional removable restoration. The course also presents the laws
and effects of leverages as related to removable partial dentures as well as the considerations for
support, occlusion, and health of all oral structures. Lecture, 19 hours; laboratory, 45 hours.
Prereq: PRO 820.

PRO 830 ADVANCED REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS. (1)
This course is a continuation of PRO 820. It presents more advanced technique and treatment
planning for complex prosthodontic needs. Subjects included are immediate dentures,
overdentures and dental implants. Lecture, 21 hours. Prereq: PRO 820 and PRO 824.

PRO 831 CLINICAL REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS. (2)
A patient with complete denture needs is treated by the student clinically in the course. The
student may opt to treat a patient with immediate, intermediate or overdenture needs. He may
initiate and/or complete the treatment of two patients with removable partial denture needs. The
student may also treat an optional, additional patient in need of a complete or removable partial
denture. The student will recall a minimum of two removable prosthodontic patients and perform
any treatment necessary for these patients. Prereq: PRO 821; coreq: PRO 830.

PRO 834 PRECLINICAL RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY III. (3)
This is a preclinical course with emphasis on dental hard tissue surgery and restorative
procedures for anterior and posterior fixed prosthodontics. Contemporary principles of fixed
prosthodontics, including the long term maintenance of dental health, are presented in lectures
and applied in practice using manikins. Knowledge gained in previous restorative dentistry
courses are applied to more extensive restorations. Lecture, 24 hours; laboratory, 84 hours.
Prereq: RSD 822, 823, 824, 825 and 826.

                                                                                                  73
PRO 836 PRINCIPLES OF FIXED PROSTHODONTICS. (2)
This course is a lecture series concerning diagnosis and treatment planning for fixed
prosthodontics care and the principles of providing that care. The relationship of tooth restoration
and replacements to occlusion, periodontics, orthodontics and removable prosthodontics in both
treatment planning and treatment is emphasized. Lecture, 30 hours. Prereq: RSD 823, RSD 821,
RSD 822, RSD 824; and/or consent of course director.

PRO 841 ADVANCED CLINICAL REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS. (2)
This course covers basically the same area as PRO 831 with the exception that the student is to
treat the patient with complete denture needs with less supervision from the instructors. If not
done previously, the student must initiate and complete the treatment of two patients with
removable partial denture needs. The student will recall three removable prosthodontic patients
and will perform any treatment necessary for these patients. Prereq: PRO 831.


RSD Restorative Dentistry


RSD 810 FUNDAMENTALS OF OPERATIVE DENTISTRY I LECTURE. (2)
This lecture course in operative dentistry is designed to provide a beginning student with basic
knowledge about cavity preparation and restorative techniques for amalgam and resin composite.
This course, together with a complementary laboratory course, RSD 814, is directed at preparing
the student with knowledge and skills in the diagnosis and treatment of carious lesions necessary
for patient care in operative dentistry. Lecture, 29 hours. Prereq: RSD 812, or consent of course
director; coreq: RSD 814.

RSD 811 PRINCIPLES OF DENTAL ANATOMY, MORPHOLOGY AND OCCLUSION
LECTURE. (3)
This introductory course is designed to provide the student dentist with the necessary knowledge
of dental anatomy, dental morphology and basic dental occlusion for all succeeding courses in
preclinical and clinical dentistry. This includes a detailed description and study of individual
teeth, the relationship of dentoform and function, mandibular movement and introduction to
muscles of mastication. Lectures related to biomaterials are added as needed. Lecture, 45 hours.
Prereq: Admission to the college or the consent of the course director. Coreq: RSD 812.

RSD 812 PRINCIPLES OF DENTAL ANATOMY, MORPHOLOGY AND OCCLUSION
LABORATORY. (3)
This introductory course is designed to provide the student dentist with the necessary working
knowledge of dental anatomy, dental morphology and basic dental occlusion for all succeeding
courses in preclinical and clinical dentistry. This includes a detailed study of individual teeth, the
relationship of dentoform and function, mandibular movement and the basic introduction and use
of the dental articulator. Lectures and laboratory experiences related to dental biomaterials are
included as needed. Laboratory 99 hours. Prereq: Admission to the college or consent of the
course director. Coreq: RSD 811.

RSD 814 PRECLINICAL OPERATIVE DENTISTRY I. (2)
                                                                                                   74
This first-year preclinical laboratory course in operative dentistry is designed to provide a
beginning student with basic skills for cavity preparation and restorative techniques for amalgam
and resin composite. This course, together with the complementary lecture series course, RSD
810, is directed at preparing the student with the knowledge and skill necessary for patient care in
operative dentistry. Laboratory 69 hours. Prereq: RSD 812, RSD 810 as corequisite, or consent of
instructor.

RSD 816 ESTHETIC DENTISTRY I. (1)
This lecture course is designed to provide a beginning student the basic principles of cavity
preparation and restoration with esthetic dental materials. Materials include resin composite,
resin ionomer and glass ionomer. This course, together with the complementary laboratory
course, RSD 818, is directed at preparing the student with knowledge and skills in the diagnosis
and treatment of defective tooth structure associated with anterior teeth. Lecture, 16 hours.
Prereq: RSD 812, RSD 810, RSD 814 or the consent of the course director.

RSD 818 PRECLINICAL ESTHETIC DENTISTRY I. (1)
This first-year preclinical course in esthetic dentistry is designed to provide a beginning student
with the basic skills for cavity preparation and restorative techniques for using tooth-colored
restorative materials. This course, together with the complementary lecture series course, RSD
816, is directed at preparing the student for patient care in esthetic dentistry. Laboratory, 39
hours. Prereq: RSD 812, RSD 810, RSD 814 or consent of the course director.

RSD 821 CLINICAL RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY I. (3)
This course emphasizes clinical application of the principles taught in preclinical courses.
Concepts of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures as well as preventive measures are applied in
the clinic with emphasis on the demonstration of competency in rendering primary care type
treatment procedures. Prereq: RSD 814; coreq: RSD 824.

RSD 822 PRINCIPLES OF DENTAL OCCLUSION AND ARTICULATION. (3)
This course is directed toward the examination, diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment of
various occlusal problems. The student will learn the skills needed to analyze the dental
occlusion of patients and to plan successful occlusal therapy including restorative procedures and
fixed prosthodontic treatment. The course will concentrate on developing technical skills and
learning assessment criteria related to mounted study casts, occlusal examination and analysis,
selective occlusal adjustment, diagnostic pre-waxing and planning, and the fabrication of a
muscle relaxation occlusal splint. Lecture, 23 hours; laboratory, 27 hours; clinic, 27 hours.
Prereq: CDS 815, RSD 812, or with approval of the course director.

RSD 823 PRECLINICAL RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY II. (1)
This is a didactic course with emphasis on the basic knowledge required for tooth preparation
and indirect single tooth dental restoration. The materials science and correct manipulation of
dental stones, alloys and luting agents are emphasized. Lecture, 22 hours. Prereq: RSD 812, RSD
810, RSD 814, RSD 816, or consent of instructor.

RSD 824 PRECLINICAL RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY II. (2)

                                                                                                  75
This preclinical course places emphasis on dental hard tissue surgery and on their restoration to
meet the biological needs of the patient. Tooth preparation and extracoronal restorations are
performed on manikins and extracted teeth. The materials science and correct manipulation of
investments, alloys and cements used to make case restorations are emphasized. Knowledge
gained in dental morphology and occlusion is applied in the course. Laboratory: 54 hours. Prereq:
RSD 812, RSD 814, RSD 818; concur: RSD 823, or consent of instructor.

RSD 825 PRECLINICAL RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY II. (1)
This course is a continuation of RSD 823 with emphasis on single tooth indirect intra-coronal
restorations and restorations of the endodontically treated tooth. Lecture, 17 hours. Prereq: RSD
823.

RSD 826 PRECLINICAL DENTISTRY II LABORATORY. (2)
This is a preclinical course with emphasis on dental hard tissue surgery and restorative
procedures for single tooth indirect restorations. Clinical simulation procedures are performed on
manikins and extracted teeth. Laboratory, 54 hours. Prereq: RSD 823, RSD 824, or consent of
course instructor. Coreq: RSD 825.

RSD 827 DENTAL BIOMATERIALS. (2)
In this course, the materials science, proper manipulation and biocompatibility of a wide variety
of dental biomaterials are examined. The durability and biocompatibility of similarly utilized
materials are compared. Diagnosis of the causes of clinical materials-related failures is
emphasized. Lecture, 40 hours. Prereq: PRO 820 and RSD 824 or consent of course director.

RSD 831 CLINICAL RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY II. (4)
A continuation of RSD 821 as well as some clinical application of principles taught in RSD 824.
The emphasis continues to be on the delivery of primary care type treatment with increasing
competency and proficiency. Some emphasis is directed toward elementary experiences in
rehabilitative type treatment procedures and occlusal dysfunctions. Prereq: RSD 821 and RSD
824; coreq: RSD 830 and RSD 834.

RSD 835 ADVANCED ESTHETICS IN RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY. (2)
This course is designed to introduce current concepts in esthetic restorative dentistry to
undergraduate dental students in their third year. The techniques presented will build upon
previously developed restorative didactic and clinical knowledge, but incorporate additional
dental techniques and materials developed specifically for esthetic dentistry. Current dental
materials being used by this discipline will be discussed as they apply to specific topics. Lecture,
16 hours; laboratory, 27 hours. Prereq: RSD 810, 812, 814, 816, 818, 821, 822, 823/825, 824,
826, and 827.

RSD 840 RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY UPDATE. (1)
Students are provided current information on advanced restorative dentistry clinical procedures
and materials. Emphasis will be given to diagnosis, treatment planning and treatment of the
complex restorative dentistry patient. The format of the course will be "clinical case
presentation". Lecture 10; laboratory, 10 hours. Prereq: RSD 830 and RSD 834.

                                                                                                  76
RSD 841 CLINICAL RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY III. (3)
As the final phase in the undergraduate clinical continuum, this course continues to emphasize
primary care concepts and proficiency. In addition, more complicated rehabilitative type care and
occlusal dysfunction problems are encountered by the student under faculty supervision. Prereq:
RSD 830, RSD 831 and RSD 834.

RSD 880 COMPACTED GOLD RESTORATIONS. (Elective) (1)
This course introduces the student to the use of compacted gold as a restorative material. The
restoration of Class III and Class V lesions is performed in the laboratory. Students are required
to purchase gold they use in the course. Note: scheduling for this course will be outside of
regularly scheduled class/clinic time. Prereq: RSD 824, third year standing.

RSD 882 ESTHETIC DENTISTRY ELECTIVE. (1)
This course is designed to introduce current concepts in esthetic restorative dentistry to
undergraduate dental students in their 4th academic year. The techniques presented will build
upon previously developed restorative didactic and clinical knowledge, but incorporate additional
dental techniques and materials developed specifically for esthetic dentistry. Current dental
materials being used by this discipline will be discussed as they apply to specific topics. Lecture,
nine hours. Note: scheduling for this course will be outside of regularly scheduled clinic/class
time. Prereq: RSD 810, 814, 816, 818, 821, 822, 823/824, 825/826, 827 or consent of course
director.




                                                                                                 77

				
DOCUMENT INFO