Award-Winning Ideas

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					      Award-Winning Ideas
         A Collection of 2007–2008
Club Achievement Competition Winning Entries




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                                                   Table of Contents

Introduction ....................................................................................................................................4
How to Guide ..................................................................................................................................5


Advertising Education .................................................................................................................11
 Division I – Advertising Federation of Louisville .......................................................................11
 Division II – Advertising Club of Cincinnati ..............................................................................19
 Division III – Advertising Federation of Baton Rouge ...............................................................25
 Division IV – North Central Advertising Federation of Indiana .................................................33
 Division V – Ad 2 Tampa Bay ....................................................................................................39

Club Operations ...........................................................................................................................45
 Division I – AAF – Cleveland .....................................................................................................45
 Division II – AAF – Des Moines .................................................................................................51
 Division III – Advertising Federation of East Central Indiana ...................................................57
 Division IV – AAF – Fort Worth .................................................................................................63
 Division V – Ad 2 Cincinnati ......................................................................................................69

Communications ..........................................................................................................................75
 Division I – Philadelphia Ad Club ...............................................................................................75
 Division II – AAF – Des Moines .................................................................................................81
 Division III – South Dakota Advertising Federation ...................................................................87
 Division IV – Tennessee Valley Advertising Federation ............................................................93
 Division V – Ad 2 San Diego ......................................................................................................97

Diversity & Multicultural Initiatives .......................................................................................103
 Division I – Advertising Federation of Louisville ....................................................................103
 Division II – Omaha Federation of Advertising ........................................................................111
 Division III – Advertising Federation of East Central Indiana ..................................................117
 Division IV – AAF – Greenville ................................................................................................125
 Division V – Ad 2 Honolulu ......................................................................................................131

Government Relations ...............................................................................................................137
 Division I – Advertising Federation of Louisville .....................................................................137
 Division II – AAF – Orlando .....................................................................................................145
 Division III – AAF – Coastal Carolinas ....................................................................................151
 Division IV – AAF – Jackson ....................................................................................................157
 Division V – Ad 2 Orlando ........................................................................................................161




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Membership Development ........................................................................................................167
 Division I – Advertising Federation of Louisville .....................................................................167
 Division II – AAF – Des Moines ...............................................................................................175
 Division III – AAF – Coastal Carolinas ....................................................................................181
 Division IV – AAF – Jackson ....................................................................................................189
 Division V – Ad 2 Cincinnati ....................................................................................................197

Programs.....................................................................................................................................203
 Division I – Advertising Club of Metropolitan Washington .....................................................203
 Division II – Tucson Advertising Federation ............................................................................209
 Division III – Austin Advertising Federation ............................................................................217
 Division IV – North Central Advertising Federation of Indiana ...............................................223
 Division V – Ad 2 Cincinnati ....................................................................................................231

Public Service .............................................................................................................................237
 Division I – AAF – Cleveland ...................................................................................................237
 Division II – Omaha Advertising Federation.............................................................................241
 Division III – Austin Advertising Federation ............................................................................247
 Division IV – AAF – The Midlands ..........................................................................................255
 Division V – Ad 2 Reno.............................................................................................................259




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                                         Introduction
The AAF Club Achievement Competition is designed to recognize and honor the hard work of
the many volunteers comprising the 200 AAF-affiliated local advertising clubs and federations.
Clubs participating in the competition enter any combination of eight categories: advertising
education, club operations, communications, diversity and multicultural initiatives, government
relations, membership, programs and public service. To facilitate the fairest possible judging,
each ad club competes within its membership size division. In addition, Ad 2 clubs—for
advertising professionals under the age of 32—compete in their own division for the Public
Service category.

This year, 65 clubs participated in the competition, submitting 313 entries to be judged. Winning
clubs are awarded certificates of achievement and honored at a special ceremony held during the
annual AAF National Conference. In addition, corporate sponsors, Crain Communications and
Saatchi and Saatchi, provided cash awards totaling $22,500 to winning clubs’ advertising
education, communications, public service and diversity and multicultural initiatives. The Jim
Fish Foundation provides cash prizes totaling $2,500 to clubs who achieve first place in public
service.

The following pages contain the winning narratives from the entries that were awarded first-
place honors in the 2007–2008 competition. Although entry collateral has not been included,
many useful ideas and strategies can be found in the narratives themselves, and should you want
more information, a contact name appears at the beginning of each narrative. Additionally, to
assist your ad club in entering the competition, this publication, Award-Winning Ideas, contains a
“how-to” guide for entering and winning next year’s Club Achievement Competition.

The AAF congratulates all the clubs that entered the competition. If your club has never entered
the Club Achievement Competition, next year is the time to give it a try. Competition guidelines
are mailed to all club presidents, executive directors and club achievement chairs each year and
are posted on our Web site at www.aaf.org. Additionally, you can contact the Club Services
Department at (800) 999-2231.




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                                 How-to Guide for the
                             Club Achievement Competition

                                         Introduction

This “how-to” guide was written to assist you in entering and winning AAF’s National Club
Achievement Competition. The categories of the competition reflect the areas of operation of
local advertising clubs and are recognized by the AAF as the primary objectives of our
organization.

If you have questions regarding the competition, please call the AAF Club Services Department
at (800) 999-2231. We can provide you with ideas and resources to assist you in your role as
president and/or club achievement chair. We look forward to receiving your club’s entries this
year and in the years to come. Your success as a local advertising club is important to both the
AAF and the advertising industry as a whole.

                               Club Achievement Competition

Purpose:

One of AAF’s major objectives is to recognize excellence and encourage high standards among
industry professionals. The Club Achievement Competition is designed to recognize outstanding
accomplishments of AAF-affiliated advertising clubs and to showcase the programs and projects
that these clubs undertake each year.

Structure:

The AAF National Club Achievement Competition recognizes achievement in eight categories:
advertising education, club management, communications, diversity and multicultural initiatives,
government relations, membership, programs and public service. These categories were chosen
to reflect the areas of operation of local ad clubs.

Advertising clubs are segmented into five membership size divisions as follows:

Division I     500+ members
Division II    250–499 members
Division III   100–249 members
Division IV    up to 99 members
Division V     Ad 2 Clubs


Clubs compete within their membership size divisions. These divisions provide for a more
equitable competition and thus for an opportunity for any size club to win. Ad 2 clubs compete in
a separate division regardless of membership size.




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Each category is judged by a separate panel of professionals with expertise in that specific field.
Each panel of judges reviews and scores each entry in each of the membership size divisions.
First-, second- and third-place awards are given in each division for each category, at the
discretion of the judges. A club and president of the year award are designated in each division to
the club with the highest total points. Awards are announced and presented annually in
conjunction with the annual AAF National Conference.

Benefits of Entering:

Gaining district and national recognition is but one of the many benefits of entering the Club
Achievement Competition. Entering the Club Achievement Competition is an excellent way to
document your club’s activity in any given year. This can prove to be a useful tool for self-
evaluation and goal setting for the coming year. Entering consistently provides a historical record
of the progress your club is making.

                                        Preparing to Enter

The Club Achievement Chair:

The AAF recommends that each club appoint a club achievement chair. The immediate past
president is an excellent choice for this position. The club achievement chair should be the
official liaison to AAF headquarters. It is this person’s responsibility to familiarize the
appropriate committees within the club, with the competition categories and the documentation
necessary for entry. It is recommended that all club achievement entries be assembled at the
same time so that materials can be shared and/or redistributed to different committees for entries
in other categories. It is therefore best that the club achievement chair coordinate this activity.

Competition Rules and Guidelines:

In the fall, guidelines and category summary sheets are developed and sent to the presidents,
executive directors and club achievement chairs of all local ad clubs to use as a model to start
preparing entries for competition. In addition, club achievement chairs receive a copy of Award-
Winning Ideas. The individual responsible for your Club Achievement Competition entries
should make sure that he or she obtains a copy of the current rules, categories and guidelines for
the competition from AAF headquarters. The competition may change from year to year, which
makes a current set of competition guidelines important. This information should then be passed
on to the appropriate chairs whose committees correspond to the club achievement categories.
Included with the guidelines are category summary sheets, which preface each entry and contain
points and topics to be covered in the narrative. Each chair should be familiar with the summary
sheet for his or her corresponding category. In January, the call for entries, containing the official
entry form and entry deadlines, is produced and sent to presidents, executive directors and club
achievement chairs.




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                                           Entry Content

Entries are submitted in three-ring binders containing the narrative and collateral. The narrative
is a written description of the project and/or activity and the collateral is the support material,
which relates to the narrative.

Narrative:

The narrative can be up to eight one-sided, or four double-sided, double-spaced, typed sheets of
paper and should be used to describe your club’s activity in each area outlined on the category
description sheet. Judges evaluate objectives versus results. It is therefore advisable to document
the planning meetings where goals were outlined and a plan of action was drawn up and to
outline how these goals and objectives were met. Statistics are an excellent way to provide a
concrete measure of performance and a record of the club’s progress and growth.

For example, in the membership category, a statement of growth in membership should include
the number of new members who joined in the past year, the type of attendance at your programs
and the number of members versus guests. Also, consider the following questions: Are the same
members coming back each time or is attendance different at each event? Are new members
getting involved? Do past officers stay involved? How do your current members compare to last
year’s? What is the difference in the growth and profitability of the club? What is your total
count for participation in all events, compared with that of the previous year?

Additionally, each narrative must also be submitted as a Word document, saved to a PC-
formatted 3.5” floppy disc or CD. Use a separate disc or DC for each category entered. The
Word document on the disc or CD must be single-spaced and in 12-point Times New Roman
font. Clearly label the disc or CD and tape it to the inside cover of the binder.

Collateral:

The collateral portion of the entry contains material that directly supports the points in the
narrative. Please keep in mind that judges look for the degree to which the collateral material
documents the narrative of the project or activities. Collateral pieces may include, but are not
limited to, press releases, flyers, newsletters, testimonial letters, thank-you letters from public
service projects, new member pieces, etc.

The amount of collateral to be included is a great challenge for many clubs. The outside
measurement of the spine of the entry binder may not exceed 1½” so space is at a premium. It is
not necessary to include mounds of collateral. One or two newsletters are sufficient, as is one or
two meeting notices.

It is a good idea to keep at least five extra copies of all publications, news releases, meeting
notices, etc., for use when compiling books. The membership chair should collect minutes from
board meetings in order to accurately keep track of planning sessions and upcoming events. The
membership and program chairs should also track attendance figures to monitor progress.




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Audio/visual is allowed for the public service category but should not exceed three minutes of
television and three minutes of radio. These should be submitted together on a one half-inch
VHS videocassette or DVD. Videocassette submissions are in addition to the entry binder. In all
other categories, scripts and/or storyboards should be submitted in place of film, tapes, etc., as
part of the collateral. All collateral material, in all categories, must have been produced. Layouts
are not permissible.

Keep in mind that the same narrative and collateral can be used in several different categories.
For instance, the advertising education projects that your club undertakes are often eligible in the
programs category as well. Your club newsletter should definitely be included in the
communications category, but it may also be collateral materials for the membership category. A
different panel of judges judges each category and, therefore, the same judges will not review the
material twice.

The narrative may directly follow the category summary or be integrated into the collateral of the
entry. However, if you decide to keep the two elements separate, label the collateral as “exhibits”
and refer to them in the narrative. Integrating narrative has the advantage of providing a better
flow of information. But keep in mind that the competition rules limit the number of sheets of
paper to four two-sided or eight one-sided.

                             Compiling Club Achievement Entries

When to Start:

Ideally, preparations for the Club Achievement Competition should begin as soon as the previous
year’s entries have been sent. It is therefore advisable that the “old” committee chairs continue
collecting material for next year’s competition until the new chairs are elected, in office, and
ready to take over this responsibility.

The Deadline Is Near:

The Club Achievement Competition deadline changes each year, so once the current year’s
deadline has been announced, you should plan three months out to begin writing the narrative. If
you adhere to this timetable, there is sufficient time to collect any extra material needed to
support the narrative.

Once the committee chairs have gathered the material for each entry, it is advisable that the final
compiling be done jointly. Although it is not necessary for books from the same club to be
uniform, it may be helpful to have this sort of “workshop” atmosphere for the sharing of
information and collateral material. Once each book is assembled, ask another committee
member to look it over. Make sure that all of the competition guidelines have been met!




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                                             Awards

AAF Awards:

First-, second- and third-place awards are given in each club membership size division for each
category at the discretion of the judges.

Club and President of the Year:

In each division, a club and president of the year award is presented to the club with the highest
total points.

Sponsored Cash Awards:

Several AAF corporate members sponsor cash awards for categories of the Club Achievement
Competition. Currently, there are cash awards for the advertising education, communications,
diversity and multicultural initiatives and public service categories.




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10
      Advertising Education
       1st Place – Division 1

Advertising Federation of Louisville

  Contact:        Robin Miller
                  Advertising Federation of Louisville
                  200 Distillery Commons, Suite 100
                  Louisville, KY 40206
                  (502) 582-2444
                  robin@louisvilleadfed.org




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Overview/Goals: At the Advertising Federation of Louisville, we maintain the following
educational goals: 1) To promote advertising as a viable and rewarding career choice; 2) To
positively support community efforts through providing marketing assistance when possible; 3)
To offer a diverse range of professional development opportunities; and 4) To position the ad
industry’s activities in a positive light.
                   ADVERTISING EDUCATION FOR THE PROFESSION
Project 1: Monthly Luncheons (Exhibit A)
Event Details: Monthly luncheons are held ten times a year, usually on the third Friday of the
month. We hold them at the same location, which provides free parking, making it easy for our
attendees. Target Audience: AdFed members, prospective members, students. Strategy: To
provide a broad case-study approach for major advertising brands in a large seminar format over
lunch. Execution/Tactics: Our topics this year included: Papa John’s online marketing; our
student presentations; our Louisvillian of the Year Award; TV Day; regional advertising; social
marketing; the Las Vegas branding campaign; the history of 120 year old brand, Four Roses
bourbon; Disney’s in-house agency; and the Cannes reel. Results: We served a total of nearly
1,600 attendees through our monthly luncheons this year.
Project 2: Professional Development Series (Exhibit B)
Event Details: We are currently in our sixth year of our annual Professional Development Series;
a monthly brown-bag “lunch and learn” seminar, which we hold once a month January through
July. Programs are $20 to attend, include a box lunch, are purposely limited to only 35 attendees
for networking purposes and are held at the AdFed office. We have a sponsor for the series, and
100% of their sponsorship fee is donated into our scholarship foundation fund. Target Audience:
AdFed members, prospective members. Strategy: To provide a detailed nuts-and-bolts program
in a workshop style setting that allows for questions and answers. Execution/Tactics: Topics
since last April included: creative uses of paper; trademark law; event marketing; multiple brand
portfolios; copyright law; effective public relations; and the history of our industry. Results: The
written evaluations for each program averaged a four or five out of five. Each program was
nearly sold out. Attendees also include possible program ideas on the bottom of their evaluations,
which help us plan for future years.
Project 3: Breakfast at Winston’s (Exhibit C)
Event Details: We hold three breakfast programs as part of our Government Relations program.
They are sponsored by a local law firm, are free to members, and are held at a teaching restaurant
of a local culinary school. They are also purposely limited to 60 people to provide a more
intimate setting, ripe for thoughtful discussion.
Target Audience: AdFed members, prospective members.
Strategy: For 2006-2007, to feature marketing directors of community and civic organizations,
as well as lobbyists. For 2007-2008, to examine the roles of compliance versus marketing in
highly-regulated industries.
Execution/Tactics: On May 11, Carl Breeding, a registered lobbyist, facilitated a discussion
about the 2007 Kentucky General Assembly. Our program on June 1, “Introducing the 29 Billion
Dollar Man”, featured Marty Kish, the VP of Marketing and Communications for the newly
branded Kentucky Association of Manufacturers. On November 29, we featured Jonathan
Vaughn, VP and Marketing Manager, and Donna Craven, VP and Assistant Compliance Officer,
for Central Bank who presented “Financial Services Marketing: No, you can’t say that.” On
March 20, Mary Barrazotto, VP/Associate General Counsel, and Ann Stickler, VP/Global
Marketing Director for Southern Comfort alcohol for the Brown-Forman Corporation, presented



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“Marketing a 25 year old’s brand in a regulated environment. How we let consumers ‘hijack’
SoCo.” Our third program, scheduled for June will feature the healthcare industry.
Results: These programs have been very well received this year. We have found a niche in
making government relations top-of-mind for our members in a way that affects them each and
every day. Like the professional development seminars, each breakfast program was nearly sold
out.
Project 4: Diversity & Donuts Series (Exhibit D)
Event Details: We hold three Diversity & Donuts (D&D) seminars each year as an extension of
our diversity efforts. The program is now in its third year of existence and it seems to add a
richness to our programming line-up. They are free for AdFed members, but other groups are
welcome to attend at a nominal fee. Each seminar is held from 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m., and
appropriately held at Louisville’s Muhammad Ali Center, a museum created for Ali, a native
Louisvillian. Target Audience: AdFed members, prospective members. Strategy: To generate
awareness about the growing minority population and examine the effects of diversity on
advertising. Execution/Tactics: During the past year, we’ve held four D&D seminars. April 4
featured Sherlene Shanklin, President/Owner of VIPP Communications and Ivy Promotions, and
Assignment Editor for WHAS TV, the local ABC affiliate. Her topic was “What’s the
Difference Between Diversity, Ethnic and Urban Marketing?” On June 22, Ron Crouch,
Director of the Kentucky State Data Center, presented Kentucky’s new realities based on census
data and trending reports. Tierra Kavanaugh Turner, CEO of TKT & Associates, Inc., a D/MBE
certified multidimensional business consulting firm that focuses on small, disadvantaged,
minority and women-owned businesses, spoke to our group on December 7 about “Diversity &
Inclusion – What it is…What it is not.” Finally, Lawrence McGlown, President of Phoenixx
Brand Consulting, presented his seminar, “Multicultural Marketing . . . Taking the High Road”
on February 8. Results: Each program has a terrific crowd and the seminars typically erupt into
a group-wide discussion with evocative dialogue. We have served more than 100 attendees
through these programs this year.
Project 5: YAP Career Construction Series (Exhibit E)
Event Details: Our Young Advertising Professionals (YAP) Career Construction Series is now
in its second year and we have added two more programs to its line-up, resulting into a five-part
series. Each program is meant to be both educational and informative and program topics are
linked to the location at which we have the program, typically with a play on words for the
program title. They are free for YAP members, held in the evenings, and offer free hors
d’oeuvres. Target Audience: YAP members, prospective YAP members, students. Strategy: To
provide educational programs that also include a social networking element. Execution/Tactics:
Over the past year, we’ve held four of these seminars: “Up to Bat: Hitting a Professional
Homerun” at Slugger Field with free baseball tickets (April); “Your Inner Creative: Where the
Wild Ideas Are” at the Louisville Zoo with free twilight admission (July); “Developing Your
Perfect Home” at Central Park Lofts with a walk-through of the unfinished space (November);
and “Building a Bright Financial Future” at Central Bank with a holiday celebration (December).
Results: These programs have been the best way to recruit and retain our YAPs. We have been
very pleased with the results, and they have served nearly 100 new ad professionals. Due to the
success of the first year’s series, we were able to secure a second sponsor for this year’s series,
and our YAP membership has grown exponentially.
Project 6: Communiqué Articles (Exhibit F)




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Event Details: Our Communiqué is a bi-monthly magazine, produced and printed via donation
by AdFed members. Target Audience: AdFed members, prospective members, other members
of the public. Strategy: To provide industry education through professional development
articles. Execution/Tactics: Each issue has a standing governmental relations column, which
discusses issues affecting the advertising industry. Over the past year, we’ve also included
articles about generational marketing, branding case studies, environmental issues, freelancing,
conducting pro bono work, and the history of industry self-regulation. Results: These articles
make a heightened awareness about important issues. Each has been related to the overall theme
for the particular edition of Communiqué, making it a seamless read for our members.
Project 7: National Conference (Exhibit G)
Event Details: In June, we hosted the American Advertising Federation’s (AAF) annual national
conference. Target Audience: AdFed members, prospective members, speakers, sponsors,
conference attendees. Strategy: To assist the AAF in implementing an effective and well-
attended convention, and offer our members a more affordable way to attend.
Execution/Tactics: In addition to helping the national office secure sponsors, program locations,
donors and promotional opportunities, as well as printed collateral pieces, we also provided
suggestions for conference topics and speakers. Additionally, we wanted to send as many local
people as possible. Our board authorized $2,500 to be used in the form of scholarships to any of
our local members who wanted to attend. Ten members received their registration for half-price
by utilizing our scholarships. Results: The conference was a big hit and attracted 1,100 attendees
– a near record. We received many great compliments from conference participants, as well as
from the AAF office. In addition, due to the commission structure associated with securing local
sponsors and donors and offering special events at the conference, our club received $15,696,
which we deposited 100% into our scholarship foundation fund, which rewards two scholarships
each year to students pursuing a degree in advertising.
Project 8: Centennial Celebration (Exhibit H)
Event Details: Our local AdFed turned 100 on January 30. We developed a year-long marketing
plan to celebrate this milestone, including gifts, a party, speakers, and new logos and letterhead.
Target Audience: AdFed members, the general public. Strategy: To educate our members about
AdFed brand history, and general brand sustainability. Execution/Tactics: First, we had a
centennial monthly luncheon to launch our celebration. We featured local bourbon brand, Four
Roses, which has been around for 120 years to be our January topic. Their Master Distiller and
COO discussed the bourbon’s history including how it has survived multiple owners and how it
was taken out of American distribution for decades, but is now being rejuvenated in the U.S. In
addition to the company’s history, he offered a retrospective of the company’s advertising and
public image during its lifetime.
         Second, we utilized our February Communiqué as a special centennial issue and featured
an article about the history of our AdFed, as well as a history of advertising regulation which
coincided with the birth of our organization. Results: The luncheon was highly attended with
141 people. The centennial issue, printed with a gold metallic cover, provides an excellent
history of our organization, and we plan to use the overage copies as a membership recruitment
tool in the future.
Project 9: Azerbaijan Delegation (Exhibit I)
Event Details: We collaborated with the local World Affairs Council chapter, a foreign business
exchange program, to bring in ten public service advertising professionals from Azerbaijan.
Target Audience: AdFed members, non-profit organizations, Azerbaijan delegates. Strategy: To



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teach Azerbaijan public service advertising executives about public service advertising
techniques. Execution/Tactics: We solicited and secured presentations for the Azerbaijan
delegation with AdFed members and contacts while they were here. We coordinated programs
with local non-profits as well as ad agencies regarding how they partner for the purpose of social
advocacy. Additionally, the group was here during the time that we hosted the AAF national
convention and we arranged for them to attend Ad2’s (AAF’s young professional group) Public
Service presentations. Results: We secured 25 presentations. This was our second time in
hosting a group of this nature.
                                Advertising Education for Students
Project 1: High School Marketing Challenge (Exhibit J)
Event Details: We annually hold a High School Marketing Challenge for students, where they
are asked to create an advertising/marketing campaign for a real client, which we secure as a
sponsor. After registering for the competition, students attend a Pre-Challenge Seminar, where
they learn about the competition and the client. About six weeks later, they present their
campaigns in front of a panel of advertising professionals, who serve as judges. Using the money
we get from the sponsorship, students and advisors on the first, second, and third place teams
win cash prizes. They are also invited to present to our membership at our June annual business
luncheon and awards program, which our members love to see. Target Audience: High school
students and teachers, local businesses, AdFed members. Strategy: To engage the students in a
public advocacy campaign, specifically environment issues for the 2007-2008 competition.
Execution/Tactics: For the 2006-2007 year, the sponsor was Kentucky Harvest, a food-raising
organization whose goal is to reduce hunger among the less fortunate population. We added a
new element to the challenge for this competition, and had the students actually implement their
campaign and test its feasibility. For the 2007-2008 competition, the sponsor is Metropolitan
Sewer District and the challenge is “green”, getting students to help keep storm drains clean and
free of debris. Results: At the end of the Kentucky Harvest competition, for which we had 11
teams amongst six schools, the students collected 10,097 cans of food, which allows for 20,000
meals. We are pleased to report that we have 17 teams, amongst 9 schools, participating this
year. The Pre-Challenge seminar was in February and was presented by their Community
Relations director. The competition itself is scheduled for April.
Project 2: Scholarships (Exhibit K)
Event Details: We annually award two $1,000 scholarships (the Bud Ballard and Minority
scholarships) to students who are pursuing a career in advertising, through an endowment fund
we established several years ago. Target Audience: Students of regional colleges, universities,
technical programs. Strategy: To encourage students to pursue a career in advertising through
financial support. Execution/Tactics: Students complete an application and are judged on
academic achievement, community involvement, recommendations and an essay. Due to the
tight economy over the past few years, we have been trying to develop ways to increase the
amount of money we award. In June, we hosted the American Advertising Federation’s national
convention, which brought 1,100 advertising folks to our city. Part of our responsibilities as host
city included assisting in selling sponsorships and implementing two social events; in exchange
for receiving a commission. Our board determined that all proceeds would benefit our
scholarship fund. Results: Collectively we earned $15,696, including an additional $500 the
AAF awarded us for a job well done.
Project 4: Louie Award Involvement (Exhibit L)




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Event Details: Our Louie (ADDY) Awards are the first step in the three-tiered national ADDY
program. Target Audience: Advertising students. Strategy: To encourage student participation
in our creative competition. Execution/Tactics: Students are encouraged to enter the
competition, which we facilitate by offering them a drop-off date prior to their winter break,
when it is typically held for our professional members. In addition, we offer opportunities for
students to attend the awards gala event at a discounted price, as well as see all the work in
greater detail prior to event, by helping us hang it. In early April, we team up with the University
of Louisville and showcase the prior year’s national ADDY reel, as well as discuss membership
possibilities with our Young Advertising Professionals group. Results: This year, we had 16
student entries, and 29 number of students attend the Gala. For the student ADDY presentation,
there were nearly 40 attendees, despite the monsoon-type rain we had that evening, causing
major flooding around town.
Project 5: Dream Team Involvement (Exhibit M)
Event Details: As further discussed in Exhibit N below, we annually engage in a public service
project, where we involve different people from different agencies. Target Audience: Graphic
design students of a technical program. Strategy: To involve students from Louisville Technical
Institute (LTI) to develop possible logos for our public service project beneficiary.
Execution/Tactics: For our 2006-2007 public service project, we enlisted the help of an LTI
advisor and his students, who competed to create the logo for our project’s beneficiary,
Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest. Our project team culled the entries to three finalists,
and we brought those students in to present their creative rationale. Results: Our client loved the
chosen logo. We received press regarding the new logo in a local business publication. The
students received a real-world opportunity and now have real work to include in their portfolios.
                          Advertising Education for the General Public
Project 1: Dream Team Public Service Project (Exhibit N)
Event Details: We annually engage in a public service project and introduced the concept of the
“Dream Team”, comprised of ad professionals from various AdFed member agencies, for the
2006-2007 project. Target Audience: AdFed members, the public, non-profit organizations.
Strategy: To provide pro-bono marketing assistance to local non-profits. Execution/Tactics: We
worked with Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest for almost 13 months. Our work recently
culminated in December and our Dream Team identified and completed several distinct
deliverables on the client’s behalf. After writing a vast client profile, we first developed their
brand essence and value proposition statements; created a new logo and tagline, commissioned a
trademark attorney to conduct a logo search for the new logo; developed a new character icon for
their children’s education program; created for them a much-needed graphic standards guide;
developed fundraising and event ideas; and drafted a research survey. Results: We estimate that
our team provided 600 hours of service, totaling about $72,000. The Bernheim board of
directors has been very pleased with our work and services, specifically helping them identify
their brand essence. Further, after augmenting our selection process for this year’s project, we
just chose our new recipient in February, Paws with a Purpose, and look forward to creating that
campaign with a new team.
Project 2: Center for Nonprofit Excellence Seminar (Exhibit O)
Event Details: We annually partner with the Center for Nonprofit Excellence to conduct a
seminar. Target Audience: AdFed members and staff of non-profit organizations. Strategy: To
offer a seminar to non-profit organizations regarding marketing/ advertising issues.
Execution/Tactics: We solicited three AdFed members – an agency partner, a president of a



                                                16
strategy consultant firm, and the president of a research company -- to conduct a seminar called
“Building a Brand: The Key Driver to Nonprofit Success”, which we held at the Girl Scouts of
Kentuckiana office (due to our relationship with them from our 2005-2006 public service
project) on May 22. Results: The branding seminar had 39 attendees, 95% higher than CNPE’s
average, and was rated a 4.2 out of 5 on the evaluations. The CNPE has continued to use some of
our previously created seminars in their annual line-up, including the e-mail marketing seminar,
which we had coordinated in 2006, and have identified further opportunities where they can
augment their curriculum in the areas of marketing.
Project 3: Press/Public Relations (Exhibit P)
Event Details: Our public relations chairperson maintains a database of reporters and
photographers, to whom we pitch stories and send press releases. Target Audience: The general
public and the media. Strategy: To generate positive press about the AdFed and promote public
confidence in our industry. Execution/Tactics: We pick and choose the most media worthy
stories to distribute to the media and send press releases via e-mail. We also maintain positive
relationships with some reporters who call us when looking for a story, so much of our pitch
work is done verbally and personally. Results: Over the past year, our public relations efforts
have resulted in nearly 20 media announcements spread over a variety of printed, interactive and
broadcast media including WAVE3 TV, “The Joe Elliot Show” on 84WAHS, Business First
(print and online), The Louisville Defender, The Courier-Journal, The Voice-Tribune, Louisville
Magazine, and thevillevoice.com, a new online blog publication.
Project 5: Involvement on Charitable/Community Boards (Exhibit Q)
Event Details: AdFed members and leaders serve on other non-profit boards, as well as
community organizations. Target Audience: AdFed members, non-profits. Strategy: To
provide board level assistance to non-profits to make our community better. Execution/Tactics:
One example is our involvement with the Greater Louisville Branding Project, an initiative
aimed at generating positive buzz about Louisville and positioning it as a top destination city for
talent, tourism and business. Our Executive Director serves on the planning committee and two
member agencies produce the work. Another example is a direct result of the Girl Scouts of
Kentuckiana public service project from 2005-2006, of which several of our members are now
involved. Results: As a result of our involvement in the branding project, we have cultivated and
solidified relationships with many of the community’s top leaders who serve on the more than
30-member Community Branding Alliance. We have also seen many positive press stories
regarding our city and Louisville has found its place on the map. Since AdFed’s involvement
with the Girl Scouts, four AdFed members now serve on their board of directors.
Project 6: Louie Winners’ Book (Exhibit R)
Event Details: We partner with Louisville Magazine, which includes our Louie (ADDY)
Winners’ Book in the April issue of their publication. Target Audience: Readers of the
magazine, and the general public. Strategy: To promote our creative competition winners to the
general public. Execution/Tactics: Louisville Magazine prints the magazine for us and sells ads
to cover the cost of including the publication in their popular Kentucky Derby issue. A volunteer
on our ADDY Committee donates the design. Louisville Magazine also prints an overage amount
for us to distribute the night of our Awards Gala, which has on average between 300-350
attendees. We also distribute the Winners’ Book to attendees at our Spring Race Day at Churchill
Downs event, which attracts more than 1,200 people. Results: Louisville Magazine has a
readership of more than 100,000. The Winners’ Book also serves as a collection item for our
members, and a resource tool for companies searching for award-winning advertising agencies.



                                                17
18
      Advertising Education
       1st Place – Division 2

 Advertising Club of Cincinnati

Contact:     Judy Thompson, Executive Director
             Advertising Club of Cincinnati
             602 Main Street, Suite 806
             Cincinnati, OH 45202
             (513) 984-9990
             jthompson@adclubcincy.org




                19
                              ADCLUB CINCINNATI
                 2007-2008 ADVERTISING EDUCATION INITIATIVES

The mission of the ADCLUB Cincinnati is to advance the region’s advertising and
communications community by creating opportunities for its members to exchange ideas, enrich
careers and inspire creativity. In keeping with our mission, the Advertising Education Committee
sought to reenergize current programs and introduced new ideas to create national awareness
about Cincinnati’s wealth of expertise in emerging new media — growing a strong network for
the future of the club.

DEFINING THE OBJECTIVES
     Help area college students find opportunities and market themselves in the advertising,
     marketing, graphics, communications and related fields marketplace
     Promote benefits of AAF membership to area students & faculty
     Help area firms and professionals find qualified entry-level applicants
     Help the general public and the profession improve skills, professionalism, and standards
     through opportunities to speak in public on the profession, meet, mentor and educate
     students
     Increase respect, understanding of and confidence in the advertising community and its
     place in supporting the economy through giving back to students
     Support overall 2007-2008 goal of increasing membership to 500 by fiscal year end
     Provide professionals with continuing education through great programs year round

DEFINING THE TACTICS
     Website listings
     Weekly email announcements of upcoming events
     Upcoming event table flyers and handouts at all events
     Cincy Business ads featuring upcoming events, and reporting on event news
     Postcard mailings

BUILDING A NETWORK OF STRONG PROFESSIONALS
In the 2007-2008 year to support the desire to grow as an organization and provide innovative
educational opportunities for the evolving advertising community, the committee focused on
providing programs that reinforced the tried and true basics and introduced cutting edge
advertising trends. The professional education series luncheons and breakfast meetings featured
experts in the field of cinema advertising, branding, networking, mobile and promotional
marketing.

       Now at a Theater Near You
       This program challenged attendees to adjust to a whole new way of thinking and imagine
       their favorite movie screen as an out-of-the-box promotional platform — an on-
       location venue for forwarding-thinking advertisers. Speaker, Tom Reilly, Jr., SVP of
       National CineMedia in New York City educated the crowd on how movie theatres now
       have ample screens and space to host customized events built around a specific theme or
       promotion featuring proprietary content that can be distributed to several markets
       simultaneously, thanks to advanced cinema technology. Attendance: 50



                                               20
       Doing What Matters: James Kilts
       Author and brand-builder, James Kilts, shared a few of the lessons he learned while
       resuscitating shaving-company Gillette. Previous to Jim’s arrival at Gillette, great brands
       were being mishandled, operational and financial discipline was non-existent and fanciful
       promises to investors were standard practice. In record time, Jim excised these business
       pathogens and transformed the company. Attendance: 75

       Act to Attract
       Marc Landsberg, Director of Strategy and Development, Leo Burnett Worldwide, President of Arc
       Worldwide, brought his expertise to Cincinnati with examples of companies that use networking sites and
       other online channels in unique ways (e.g. Victoria’s Secret using Facebook to promote their “Pink” line
       and Mentos candy’s use of YouTube). In his funny and relevant examples, attendees saw Burnett clients
       Miller Beer, Visa, Coca Cola, McDonald’s and P&G — all demonstrating how technology can increase
       human connections. Attendance: 107

       Riding into the Wild West of Mobile Marketing
       To explore the new mobile frontier, the program featured an expert on the topic, Evan
       Gerber. Evan is a Principal Consultant in Experience Design for Molecular, an internet
       consultancy specializing in engineering, strategy and creating memorable experiences.
       Evan has developed mobile applications for major global brands, including: Sprite, Boost
       Mobile, Gillette & Adidas. He rode in from the west (San Francisco) to discuss the
       technology, share case studies, provide insight on mobile usability, and help explain
       potential pitfalls. Attendance: 78

       What Happens Here, Stays Here
       Speaker, Randy Snow of R&R Partners, shared his experiences in developing the “What
       Happens Here, Stays Here” campaign and developed ads unlike (and more effective than)
       any the industry had ever — revolutionizing destination marketing. He reviewed the ads
       (and told the stories behind them) that made Las Vegas one of the world’s leading brands.
       He educated the crowd on the media strategies, guerilla tactics, product placement and
       website development that made this campaign such an amazingly successful marketing
       achievement. Attendance: 116

PROMOTING A NETWORK OF EXPERTISE IN CINCINNATI

 To educate the general public and the give recognition to the wealth of expertise in digital
     advertising in the area, and new initiative was born — the Digital Hub Initiative.

After a year of planning, July of 2007 marked the beginning of an important new era for the
ADCLUB in helping to achieve its mission of promoting the Greater Cincinnati area.
Jack Streitmarter, President of ScreamingBob.com and past president Ad Club Cincinnati
spearheaded the new outreach program. The initiative has a dual purpose — promoting the
region’s expertise in digital advertising, and building a strong network of digital media
professionals in non-traditional, newly developing support-related fields.




                                                      21
In less than one year, the Digital Hub Initiative has introduced three innovative programs and
formed committees to drive each program.

   1. Top Achievers — recognizes the movers and shakers in all the skill areas and support
      positions of digital advertising.
   2. Educational Outreach — connects and promotes the digital world of advertising with the
      colleges and universities in the region.
   3. National Conference — will host a national-caliber 2-day conference in the fall of 2008,
      intended to bring top professionals together in a networking and educational forum.

Even in its infancy stage, the Digital Hub Initiative has already reaped rewards, with increased
Ad Club membership from digital agencies, package and design firms, web developers and a
host of digital media related professions.

Highly advertised seminars, forums and luncheons have focused on the initiative resulting in
greater awareness of all three programs throughout the region.

The initiative has been building tremendous energy and a real spirit of community among
everyone involved. It has the beginnings of becoming a powerful force in the region, and is
showing success in growing a strong, diverse network that encompasses a broader group of
professionals on the fringe of traditional advertising… and that’s exciting for the whole
Cincinnati region.


The initiative has been building tremendous energy and a real spirit of community among
everyone involved. It has the beginnings of becoming a powerful force in the region, and is
expected to encompass a much broader group of professionals who have been on the fringe of
traditional advertising…and that’s exciting for the whole Cincinnati region.

REACHING OUT TO THE NEW GENERATION

Annually, ADCLUB helps area college students find opportunities and market themselves in the
advertising, marketing, graphics, communications and related fields marketplace through Career
Day. While this promotes the benefits of ADCLUB and AAF membership to area students and
faculty, it also helps area firms and professionals find qualified entry-level applicants. Career day
is a centerpiece of our efforts to educate the public by serving students — creating a network for
the future of the ADCLUB.

The committee engaged leading professionals from every facet of the advertising and marketing
profession including: Freelance Graphic Design, Television, Agency Account Management,
Market Research, Web Design & Advertising, Media Planning, Outdoor Advertising, Direct
Marketing, Creative Management, Business-to-Business, Non-Profit Marketing, Copywriting,
and Printing. They collaborated with AD2 Cincinnati, the Cincinnati Chapter of the American
Marketing Association, as well as SIG groups from Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati.




                                                 22
Efforts were made to expand the reach of our target audience — students and teachers at colleges
and high schools within a 100-mile radius of Cincinnati — to involve even more colleges and
high schools than in previous years. This resulted in increasing the number of contacts to include
the names of more than 1,500 individuals and their contact information. Using e-mail, a steady
stream of information to students, teachers, professionals, and businesses about Your First
Advertising Project Is You! Gulp! Career Day from November through February.

Enthusiasm for the day was generated by the development of a program that provided
educational and marketing opportunities for sponsors and participants alike, enlisting Mike
Kohlbecker as Keynote Speaker. He is currently an Art Director with Crispin Porter + Bogusky,
where his clients include Volkswagen, Domino’s Pizza, Sprite, American Express OPEN and
Burger King, among others and his work has been featured in annuals and trade publications,
including D&AD, Creativity Magazine, CMYK, The Addys and Show South. Mike brought a
very relevant message — he himself had attended the club’s Career Day event as a Xavier
University student just 5 short years ago. Mike also stayed and reviewed portfolios at the end of
the day, which made a big impression on the students.

The day began with a two hour Advertising Panelist forum represented by every field within the
advertising and marketing industry. They candidly, succinctly and with a great deal of humor
answered questions and shared their personal experiences about their professional careers.

After enjoying the insights and encouragements from the Keynote Speaker, participants heard
from Steve Kissing, the Creative Director of Barefoot Advertising. Steve’s work has been
recognized by the American Advertising Federation, the Public Relations Society of America,
and the International Society of Business Communicators, to name a few. He also writes a
monthly column for Cincinnati Magazine, “Odd Man Out,” which has been honored by several
journalism associations. His Career Day topic, “What working in advertising is really like,”
left no doubt that a career in advertising is not always pretty, is a lot of hard work, requires a
tough hide, sensitivity, and a good sense of humor. But, is worth every minute.

The final two and half hours of the program provided opportunities for the students and teachers
to shine. Over 100 students shared their resumes and talents with advertising, communications
and marketing firms, as well as with representatives from corporations.

RECOGNITION FOR AN EMERGING NETWORK OF TALENT

This year’s ADDY Awards Committee efforts toward promoting student participation branched
out to include students at all colleges in the Greater Cincinnati area. This year’s ADDY theme,
“Party in our Pants”, lightened the traditional mood of the event and promoted it as a huge
“pantastic” celebration — complete with a live band, great food and festivities before and after
the awards presentation — the biggest creative event of the season. There was a “pants” contest,
challenging attendants to wear their most outrageous pants and offering a host of “pants” awards
such as “fancy pants”, “hot pants”, “smarty pants” and many more. This party approach to the
ADDYs caused quite a stir and resulted in the largest overall student participation and attendance
to the awards show in the club’s history — 507.




                                                23
The ADDY approach, coming on the heels of the tremendous achievement of Cincinnati
State College students wins at last year’s District 5 ADDYs, has helped the club build its
presence to the upcoming and developing talent in the Cincinnati area and secure a growing
network of potential new club members. In fact, due in part to their success and recognition,
Cincinnati State is now in the process of chartering a student AAF Chapter, and has fulfilled
four ADCLUB office internships.

SUPPORTING THE FUTURE OF THE CLUB WITH DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS

First set up in 1984, in the 2007 – 2008 year ADCLUB Cincinnati has revitalized its Dollars
for Scholars Program by incorporating a “pass the hat” donation for a door prize at club events
and programs. The program is additionally funded through the club’s highly successful Media
Auction. All donations are collected and distributed to deserving scholars from area colleges.




                                               24
        Advertising Education
         1st Place – Division 3

Advertising Federation of Baton Rouge
 Contact:       Carol Shirley
                B52 Design, Inc.
                5055 Capital Heights, Suite A
                Baton Rouge, LA 70806
                (225) 231-1999
                carolshirley@mac.com




                  25
                                           INTRODUCTION
This year the Advertising Federation of Greater Baton Rouge (AFGBR) president adopted the 7th District
theme “Proud Past, Proud Future”. As the name suggests, the goal was to revive and recognize seasoned
members as well as promote new member growth and retention. The education committee’s initiative was
to meet these goals by developing current and future members by providing professional and education
needs through monthly programs, workshops and networking opportunities

Our education initiative was directed towards three groups: Students, Current/Potential Members and the
General Public. We determined that our primary education objective was to offer an overall educational
message to these groups, enhanced by a variety of learning opportunities and events, in order to increase
membership, provide value to current members and support our role in the community.
The following is a breakdown of our target audiences, our goals and objectives and results.

                                 1. TARGET AUDIENCE: STUDENTS


Goals & Objectives: To maintain a consistent presence at our local universities and position our
organization as a vital provider of advertising education opportunities through a variety of initiatives. To
assist the LSU AAF chapter with fundraising and communications with our professional membership. To
continue our student scholarships, luncheon sponsorship and speakers bureau programs for the students.
To support our local LSU AAF chapter, Graphic Design Student Association (GDSA) and AIGA with
portfolio reviews, critiques of current projects, opportunities to network with professional and gain real
world experience through internships
  Resources of the AFGBR support both the LSU AAF Chapter and the graphic design program in the
LSU School of Art & Design, as well as maintaining contact with faculty and students at Southern
University and Southeastern Louisiana University (SELU). We also reach out to public relations and
marketing students at surrounding Louisiana universities. Recognizing the need to promote education and
assist young professionals entering the market, the AFGBR actively seeks opportunities for these students
to participate in all of its regular activities through our College Connection committee. To facilitate these
activities, professors in advertising and design are active members of our organization.

                                                Scholarships


The AFGBR awards two annual scholarships to outstanding students currently enrolled in advertising,
marketing or communications in Louisiana universities and colleges. Each $1,000 scholarship (plus a
one-year honorary membership in the Federation) is available to juniors and seniors. Both the General and
Diversity scholarships are publicized via direct e-mails to faculty, student organizations and student
publications and providing PDF files of the application and flyers to post on campus. The 2007
scholarships were presented at the May Salute To Students luncheon.
  2008’s materials have gone out and maintain the look established last year creating a consistent and
quickly recognizable presence [EXHIBIT 1–4]. Also, the AFGBR web site has a special student “College
Connection” section with specific information for students including, but not limited to, the student
scholarships [EXHIBIT 5].

Student Diversity Initiatives
In order to generate more interest and participation in our Diversity Scholarship a committee was formed
to identify ways to improve and better promote this scholarship. The AFGBR diversity chair led the
charge and partnered with current Louisiana university professors and students to address not only the


                                                     26
application process but also the language needed to define the term “minority”, thus clarifying eligibility.
[EXHIBIT 6]
  The AFGBR diversity chair also partnered with the International Hospitality Foundation and identified
international students attending LSU who are advertising, marketing or communications majors. Several
students have already been placed in internships, career positions or assigned an ad fed mentor.

Awards and Additional Recognition
In April Ad Fed member XDesign announced the five finalists of their XPrize student award. At our
annual May Salute To Students luncheon, we announced the top three finalists of Ad Fed member Object
9’s first collegiate graphic design scholarship. Approximately 40 juniors in the LSU graphic design
curriculum competed by designing identity pieces for Baton Rouge Earth Day. Ad Fed members
promoted the competition to students, served to develop competition guidelines and served as judges.

                           Speaking Engagements & Education at Universities

The AFGBR is dedicated to actively providing future advertising professionals information on our
industry and participating in events to increase their professional development. We achieve this primarily
by providing speakers at the student chapter monthly meetings. Over the course of the year, several
AFGBR members appeared as guest speakers on topics such as networking, copywriting and interview
skills. In December the AFGBR president and the ADDY® chair held a Student ADDY® workshop for
the LSU Student Chapter, GDSA and AIGA students. During the workshop students were instructed on
the on-line entry procedure and rules and regulations.
  In addition to regular speaking engagements this year the AFGBR was approached by the LSU Ad Fed
student chapter to facilitate a Superbowl Commercial review and critique. The LSU student chapter
opened the invitation to attend, at no cost to the AFGBR general membership and that of the AIGA
student chapter and the GDSA student chapter. The AFGBR helped promote the event via e-blasts and e-
news links to our web site [EXHIBIT 7]. AFGBR members made up a professional panel who answered
questions and give their opinions regarding each spot. Critique packets were handed out at the beginning
of the evening [EXHIBIT 8] and everyone was excited to contribute to the discussion [EXHIBIT 9].
  The AFGBR also helped student advertising education by agreeing to take part in a LSU Marketing and
Advertising Students research project and provided critiques of an Oreo commercial competition held by
the LSU Advertising students via the web and e-mail. [EXHIBITS 10–11]

                                 Student Luncheon Sponsorship Program

The AFGBR believes strongly in providing interaction between industry professionals and students.
Throughout the year, students from Southern University, SELU, and LSU are invited to attend our
membership luncheons for free. The student luncheon sponsorship program encourages professionals to
sponsor students and allows them to interact with members. This year AFGBR members were sent an
“adoption” postcard [EXHIBIT 13] asking them to sponsor a “starving advertising student” as well as an
e-mail and plea in the AFGBR’s newsletter [EXHIBIT 14]. Sponsors received a PDF “thanks” for there
contribution [EXHIBIT 15]. By the time of this writing $560 in sponsorships have been raised.
                                       Salute to Students Luncheon

Our May 2007 membership luncheon has officially become our “Salute to Students” luncheon [EXHIBIT
16]. Two years ago, we brought back the sorely missed tradition of displaying portfolios for graduating
graphic design seniors and will continue to do that at this luncheon. In addition, we had the LSU NSAC


                                                     27
team present their campaign at the program. We also awarded our General and Diversity scholarships,
Xdesign Xprize and the Object 9 scholarship and recognized our student lunch sponsors.

Announcement of the Ralph Sims Award
At the May Salute to Students Luncheon we announced a new award for advertising education in honor of
our oldest living active member and past president, Ralph Sims, on the 40th anniversary of his presidency.
In honor of Mr. Sims continued dedication to the advertising community AFGBR will present an annual
award of excellence to an advertising professional in the Baton Rouge area who has demonstrated
outstanding leadership and mentoring of area college and university students in the fields of advertising,
design, and related fields.

Student Career Conference
The AFGBR hosted a career-building Student Conference for advertising, marketing, design and
communications students in Louisiana and South Mississippi. During the day-long conference students
learned interview and resume tips, attended workshops and participated in portfolio reviews. The evening
prior to the event students had an opportunity to tour the Xdesign agency and enjoy a two-hour “Welcome
Reception”. The conference fee was only $10, and included breakfast, lunch and all workshops. Student
from Louisiana and South Mississippi universities and colleges were invited. “Save-the-Date” postcards
were sent to all of our college contacts to distribute to students (as well as PDF e-mail versions).
Registration forms were e-mailed and mailed to all contacts. Approximately $1400 in sponsorships was
obtained including the grand prize $200 gift card from Dillards. Almost 30 students attended. The
keynote speaker for the Student Conference was Jay Gould, founder and president of The Gould Group.
He will be spoke to all of the attendees on “The Difference between Finishing First and Second in Your
First Job Search.” During lunch, attendees had the opportunity to pose questions about the industry to a
panel of advertising veterans. Breakout workshops included: Portfolio Review, Copywriting, Job
Search/Interviewing, PR, Resumes, and Internships/networking. Wei Wang, associate professor of
graphic design at Auburn University, lead a workshop on the emergence and increasing popularity of
digital portfolios. The AFGBR College Connection chair received several thank yous following the event
expressing the students’ deep gratitude. [EXHIBITS 17–23]


                                   NSAC & Student ADDY® Awards


In January, our local Student ADDY® Awards and its Call for Entries were promoted to the LSU Ad Fed,
GDSA and AIGA, offering student-friendly deadlines and fees. Out of the 59 entries we awarded six gold
and 22 silver entries as well as one Special Judges Award. Students were notified of there winning entries
via email [EXHIBIT 24] and invited to attend the show at a reduced ticket price.
  The AFGBR will continue to provide financial assistance for travel and lodging to the LSU AAF NSAC
team to compete at the level district. It is a continuing commitment and relationship we are happy to
maintain the “Proud Future” of our industry.

LSU Ad Fed Fundraiser
Our “Santa’s Helpers” student auction, held during the December Holiday Social, has become a
permanent addition to our calendar. Disguised as a fundraiser, this is yet another opportunity for students
to not only raise money for their club, but also network with current industry professionals. Members
eagerly bid on the students, knowing that they contributed to the education of future advertising
professionals. [EXHIBITS 25–27] A total of $300 was raised for the LSU Student AAF.


                                                    28
  In addition to this annual fundraising event the AFGBR assisted the LSU Student Ad Fed by helping
promote additional fundraisers by notifying the membership via the E-news on the AFGBR web site.
[EXHIBIT 28]

2. TARGET AUDIENCE: MEMBERS AND POTENTIAL MEMBERS


Goals & Objectives: To educate our board about their duties and obligations to our organization and
provide them with clear goals and objectives. To enhance the value of AFGBR membership by providing
educational opportunities for members and potential members. To educate new members and ensure they
become immediately active in our organization

                                       Board of Directors Education

In keeping with the initiative passed down for the 7th district our president announced at the annual board
retreat that we would adopt the “Proud Past, Proud Future” theme at the local level [EXHIBIT 29]. This
theme couldn’t be more fitting for the AFGBR with it’s a diverse group of advertising professionals
ranging in ages from 21 to 91. New board members brainstormed on how to apply the theme to our local
federation to develop strategies for the year. Plans included consulting and utilizing past presidents’
knowledge; surveying the membership, using data results as guides to increase membership and insure
members receive the most value from their membership dollar; accessing new board members’ skills and
matching them with appropriate committees; and mentoring students at local universities as the future of
advertising and potential new members. Insight was gained in how to achieve these plans by analyzing
the answers from the 2007 membership survey conducted before the latest board took office [EXHIBIT
30]. The survey served as an education tool for the board regarding membership needs. The Director’s
Notebooks were also handed out at the retreat. The Notebook is not only a standard board policy manual
but also a comprehensive resources and how-to education tool.

                                           Workshops Overview

We work to keep long-standing members involved and involve new members through seminars and
workshops. This is achieved by providing them important industry information, offering them a chance to
network and ultimately improve their careers. In turn, this will help them become better leaders in the
advertising industry and possibly our organization, and solidify their belief in the value of the Federation
and maintain their membership.
  In May we offered the Big Ideas: Creativity & Innovation workshop [EXHIBIT 31]. Tom Laughon,
with Catch Your Limit Consulting, held the workshop. He offered innovative techniques to help capture
your imagination, grow and nurture creativity to its full potential and recognize its powerful payback. 40
attendees, both Ad Fed members and non-members, attended the 4-hour workshop. An intensive
workbook was handed out [EXHIBIT 32] and the AFGBR public service organization, Hands On Baton
Rouge, was used as the model during brainstorming. All ideas that were presented that day were for them
to keep and possibly implement in the future.
  In addition to our traditional educational workshops, we once again offered newcomers Ad Fed 101– an
introduction into our advertising federation. This year’s event was held at On The Boarder Mexican
Restaurant, a great casual venue for no-pressure networking [EXHIBIT 33]. The event explained the
benefits of membership in the AFGBR, and provided information about our club, the 7th District and
AAF. Committee members were also there to explain their projects, recruit these new members and plug
them directly into committees. Get to know you games were a big part of the evening. They included a



                                                    29
Bingo game and a Name game [EXHBITS 34–35]. Prior to the event, each new member was sent a
personal invitation via e-mail. [EXHIBIT 36]

Programs Overview
Perhaps nowhere is our professionalism showcased to our target audiences more than in our monthly
membership luncheon programs. It is here that we provide our group their most important benefits:
information, education, entertainment and networking. All of the meetings were heavily promoted prior
to the event via our federation’s extensive communication system to members, non-members, students,
the media and the public in general. This includes our newsletter, e-mails, direct mail pieces and press
releases.



Three Most Successful Programs:


a. Turning Brain Drain into Brain Gain by Stephen Moret, Baton Rouge Area Chamber President;
Salute to Students and presentation by LSU Student NSAC team.
Target Audience: AFGBR members, guests, media, media buyers
Attendance: 66 attendees
Method of Promotion: newsletter, postcard, e-mail, phone calls. [EXHIBITS 37–38]
Feedback Mechanism: speaker comment cards left on tables for attendees to complete and solicited e-
mail evaluations to both Programs and the speaker directly. [EXHIBIT 39]
Results: A sudden spring rainstorm dumped eight inches of rain on Baton Rouge just an hour before the
May Membership Luncheon was to start. That didn’t stop over 65 AFGBR members and student
organization supporters from finding alternate routes to the luncheon. This challenge proved that the
AFGBR membership is very interested in supporting and mentoring the students who are coming up
through LSU’s advertising and marketing programs, re-enforcing that the membership saw honoring its
Proud Future to heart.

b. It's Geek to Me by James Benham, President, JBKnowledge Technologies, Inc.
Target Audience: AFGBR members, guests, media, media buyers
Attendance: 81 Attendees
Method of Promotion: newsletter, postcard, e-mail, phone calls. [EXHIBITS 40–41]
Feedback Mechanism: speaker comment cards left on tables for attendees to complete and solicited e-
mail evaluations to both Programs and the speaker directly. [EXHIBIT 42]
Results: As a direct result of a mid-year survey of AFGBR members, programs focused on bringing an
internet savvy and technologically talented speaker to speak to the evolution of new media as well as
what traditional advertising rules can be applied to it. James did just that. Attendees raved that James
made what can often be technical gobbildy gook reasonable and understandable. Members had lots of
questions at the end of James speech and he gladly sent attendees a copy of his presentation afterwards.

c. The CODE of Advertising by Harry Vardis, Founder, Creative Focus, Inc.
Target Audience: AFGBR members, guests, media, media buyers
Attendance: 63 Attendees
Method of Promotion: newsletter, e-mail, phone calls. [EXHIBITS 43–44]
Feedback Mechanism: speaker comment cards left on tables for attendees to complete and solicited e-
mail evaluations to both Programs and the speaker directly. [EXHIBIT 45]
Results: Harry Vardis brought a fun, interactive, creative approach to creativity. AFGBR members
responded enthusiastically to Mr. Vardis’ interactive approach to creating “creative on demand”
workplaces. In fact, AFGBR’s most seasoned member said it was the most thought prevoking and best


                                                    30
program he had seen in 40 years. These types of commendations from throughout the year further proved
programs achieved the overall board goal to honor and service our Proud Past, Proud Future.

                  4. GENERAL PUBLIC EDUCATION—PR/COMMUNICATIONS

Goals & Objectives: To position the AFGBR as one of the most exciting, active organizations in Baton
Rouge. To communicate our message and to educate those audiences mostly unaware of the AFGBR..
As mentioned, communication to nonmembers as well as potential and new members was important to
position the AFGBR as the premier advertising-related organization in the Baton Rouge area. We did this
through the following means:
External PR: This year we tried to increase our exposure to a greater number of potential members and
the Baton Rouge community, as well as heighten the professionalism of the Federation’s image, creating
and disseminating press releases for programs, events, club leadership, awards and scholarships, and
public service events. The press showcased one of AFGBR’s biggest fundraisers, the Media Auction
[EXHIBIT 46], and our funkiest one, the Bizarre Bazaar [EXHIBITS 47–50]. This year AFGBR Bizarre
Bazaar partnered with a great non-profit organization to spread awareness and raise funds. We decided to
share the wealth and split the proceeds from the live and silent auction with the American Heart
Association thus creating the first Bizz H’art auction. Press coverage was great and we raised a total of
$6,426.

                                              SUMMARY

Education, in any form, is one of the key ways we provide access to our membership and to our future
membership. We have offered exciting, educational programs and workshops for our membership and
guests. Through programs, events, internship opportunities and actual cash scholarships, we’ve provided
students a variety of opportunities to gain access to our industry. We continuously strive to educate our
peers and the general community about the professionalism of the advertising industry. Through our
education initiatives we will continue to have a “Proud Past, Proud Future.”




                                                    31
32
             Advertising Education
              1st Place – Division 4

North Central Advertising Federation of Indiana

  Contact:          David Huhnke
                    Lafayette Savings Bank
                    101 Main Street
                    Lafeyette, IN 47902
                    (765) 429-2809
                    dhuhnke@lsbank.com




                       33
NORTH CENTRAL ADVERTISING FEDERATION OF INDIANA
ADVERTISING EDUCATION
OPENING STATEMENT AND OVERVIEW
IN THREE SHORT YEARS, NORTH CENTRAL ADVERTISING FEDERATION HAS EMERGED IN OUR
COMMUNITY AS AN INSPIRED AND REJUVENATED ORGANIZATION. PRIOR TO 2005, THE CLUB’S
PROGRAMS WERE POORLY ATTENDED, MEMBERS WERE DISENGAGED, AND THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS WAS UNCERTAIN IF THE ORGANIZATION HAD A FUTURE. AFTER AN EXTREME
REORGANIZATION BY CLUB LEADERS, NCADFED HAS PROGRESSED THROUGH AN INNOVATIVE AND
COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGIC PLAN TO BRING DIVERSE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES, SOCIAL
ACTIVITIES, AND COMMUNITY SERVICE TO OUR MEMBERSHIP. MISSION-DRIVEN, THESE ACTIVITIES
ALLOW NCADFED TO FOCUS ON NETWORKING, EDUCATION, AND RECOGNITION FOR ADVERTISING
AND MARKETING PROFESSIONALS IN THE NORTH CENTRAL INDIANA REGION. ARMED WITH A
STRATEGIC PLAN AND YEARLY POINTS OF ACTION, NCADFED IS COMMITTED TO INNOVATIVE
EDUCATION FOR OUR PROFESSIONAL MEMBERS, STUDENTS AND TO THE COMMUNITY (EXHIBITS:
A1-A3).
GOAL I: EDUCATE NCADFED BOARD OF DIRECTORS.
        TARGET AUDIENCE: NCADFED BOARD OF DIRECTORS
    1.) ANNUAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS RETREAT: EACH YEAR, THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
        MEETS IN A DAY-LONG STRATEGIC PLANNING AND EDUCATIONAL RETREAT. RESOURCE
         BINDERS ARE PROVIDED FOR EACH BOARD MEMBER AND INCLUDE CLUB MANAGEMENT
         DOCUMENTS, AAF AND DISTRICT 6 GUIDELINES, ALONG WITH HELPFUL TIPS PASSED DOWN
         FROM PREDECESSORS. THE BOARD CANDIDLY DISCUSSES PROGRESS SURVEYS REGARDING
         THE PREVIOUS NCADFED YEAR. THE BUDGET IS DETERMINED AND DETAILED BOARD
         RESPONSIBILITIES ARE OUTLINED. BREAK-OUT SESSIONS REVIEWED SPECIFIC CLUB
         OBJECTIVES AND EDUCATED THE BOARD ON THE AAF CLUB ACHIEVEMENT COMPETITION
         (EXHIBITS: B1-B9).
   2.)   PARTICIPATION IN AAF AND AAF DISTRICT 6 TRAINING AND EVENTS: FIVE NCADFED
         MEMBERS (PRESIDENT DAVID HUHNKE, PAST PRESIDENT ALLISON MEADOWS, PRESIDENT-
         ELECT MICHELLE KREINBROOK, SECRETARY JOEL RASMUS AND PROGRAM CO-DIRECTOR
         LAURA EDWARDS) ATTENDED THE AAF NATIONAL CONVENTION IN LOUISVILLE IN JUNE
         2007. WHILE THERE, THE GROUP ATTENDED ALL CLUB MANAGEMENT WORKSHOPS
         INCLUDING CLUB MANAGEMENT ROUNDTABLES, “HOW’D THEY DO THAT,” A CLUB
         WORKSHOP FOCUSED ON CLUB SUCCESSES AND CLUB ACHIEVEMENT ENTRIES (MEADOWS
         ADDITIONALLY SERVED AS A PANELIST), AND “WHAT’S IN A NAME,” A DISCUSSION OF
         BENEFITS ASSOCIATED WITH CHANGING CLUB NAMES TO INCORPORATE THE AAF IDENTITY.
         THE ATTENDANTS ALSO FOCUSED ON WORKSHOPS TO FURTHER PERPETUATE CLUB
         INITIATIVES IN DIVERSITY (DIGITAL INNOVATIONS AND SOCIAL NETWORKING, MANAGING THE
         EMERGING MEDIA LANDSCAPE), GOVERNMENT RELATIONS (LLC: LEGAL AND LEGISLATIVE
         CAVEATS), AND ADVERTISING EDUCATION (NEW FINANCIAL PARADIGMS FOR THE DIGITAL
         AGE, CREATIVELY CONNECTING AND ENGAGING, ADDY AWARDS WORKSHOP, AND THE RISE
         OF PUBLIC RELATIONS). FURTHER, MEADOWS WAS ELECTED INDIANA STATE DIRECTOR FOR
         AAF DISTRICT 6; HUHNKE WAS APPOINTED TO SERVE ON THE DISTRICT 6 SLATING
         COMMITTEE AND FINANCIAL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE AND TREASURER MATT OATES WAS
         APPOINTED TO THE DISTRICT 6 FINANCIAL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE. THESE ASSOCIATIONS
         ALIGN OUR CLUB MORE CLOSELY WITH DISTRICT AND NATIONAL PRINCIPLES. NCADFED
         ALSO MAINTAINED A HIGHLY VISIBLE LEADERSHIP PRESENCE IN DISTRICT 6 ADDY,




                                             34
       NATIONAL STUDENT ADVERTISING COMPETITION AND ADVERTISING TAX LEGISLATION
       ISSUES AND CLUB OFFICER TRAINING (EXHIBITS C1-C2).ADDITIONALLY, NCADFED
       PARTICIPATED IN AAF’S CLUB ACHIEVEMENT COMPETITION FOR THE SECOND YEAR,
       ENTERING ALL EIGHT CATEGORIES. NCADFED WAS RECOGNIZED AT AAF’S SALUTE TO
       ACHIEVER’S LUNCHEON WITH AWARDS IN CLUB MANAGEMENT, ADVERTISING
       EDUCATION, MEMBERSHIP, PROGRAMS, PUBLIC SERVICE AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS
       (EXHIBITS: C3-C5).
       OUTCOMES: AS A RESULT OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING, OUR BOARD IS ADEQUATELY
       EQUIPPED TO LEAD THE FEDERATION WHILE HOLDING TRUE TO THE AMERICAN
       ADVERTISING FEDERATION GUIDELINES AND TO OBJECTIVES SET IN MOTION BY OUR
       STRATEGIC PLAN.
   3.) HOST THE AAF DISTRICT 6 FALL CONFERENCE: NCADFED WAS ALSO CHOSEN TO PLAN
       AND HOST THE DISTRICT 6 FALL CONFERENCE. OVER 130 ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
       PROFESSIONALS ATTENDED THE TWO-DAY EVENT. NCADFED LEADERS AND MEMBERS
      SERVED AS VOLUNTEERS AND FACILITATORS FOR THE EVENT THAT PROVIDED ADVERTISING
      EDUCATION, CLUB MANAGEMENT WORKSHOPS AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS AND
      DIVERSITY INFORMATION. NCADFED MEMBERS DONATED THEIR CREATIVE EXPERTISE AND
      PARTNER COMPANIES PROVIDED ADVERTISING SPACE AND SPONSORSHIP FOR THE EVENT.
      OUTCOMES: THE ADVERTISING AND MARKETING PROFESSIONALS FROM THREE STATES
      CONVERGED ON LAFAYETTE FOR TWO DAYS. SIX ADVERTISING CLASSES WERE PRESENTED
      BY NATIONALLY RENOWNED SPEAKERS INCLUDING: “MAKING A CRISIS WORSE – THE
      BIGGEST MISTAKES IN CRISIS COMMUNICATIONS,” FROM MYRA BORSHOFF COOK,
      BORSHOFF CONSULTING; “CONFRONTING THE FUTURE,” BY JONI SILVERSTEIN, GANNETT;
      “BIG IMPACT ON A SMALL BUDGET” AND “THE COPY WORKSHOP’S CREATIVE THINKING
      WORKSHOP,” WITH AUTHOR BRUCE BENDINGER; “YOU SOLD THEM THAT?” AND
      “COMBINING CONSUMER INSIGHT WITH A LITTLE IMAGINATION TO FIND AN UNEXPECTED
      SOLUTION,” BY RANDY SNOW, R&R PARTNERS (EXHIBITS: C6-C23).
GOAL 2: EDUCATE NCADFED MEMBERS THROUGH PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
LUNCHEONS, PROGRAMS, NEWSLETTER, AND WEBSITE.
      TARGET AUDIENCE: NCADFED MEMBERS.
      MEMBER SURVEY RESULTS ARE THE IMPETUS TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND EDUCATIONAL
      BENEFIT OF MONTHLY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEONS (EXHIBIT D1). IT IS
      NCADFED’S POLICY TO BOOK ALL SPEAKERS ONE YEAR IN ADVANCE AND TO NEVER PAY
      SPEAKER FEES. ADDITIONALLY, PROGRAMS AND SPEAKERS ARE CHOSEN TO ENCOMPASS
      ALL FORMS OF ADVERTISING – PRINT, BILLBOARD, RADIO, TELEVISION AND ELECTRONIC
      MEDIA. A KICK-OFF POSTCARD ANNOUNCING ALL AVAILABLE EDUCATIONAL
      OPPORTUNITIES IS MAILED EACH FALL. MEMBERS ARE SURVEYED AFTER EACH EVENT TO
      DETERMINE ITS SUCCESSES AND FAILURES. THE PROGRAMMING COMMITTEE THEN USES
      THAT INFORMATION TO MEET MEMBER EXPECTATIONS. SOME OF OUR MOST EFFECTIVE
      PROGRAMS HAVE INCLUDED:
      A. MAY 17, 2007: “GUERILLA MARKETING/EFFECTIVE STREET CAMPAIGNS” BY
         CHRISTIAN JURINKA OF ATTACK! MARKETING & PROMOTIONS FROM LOS
         ANGELES. CONSIDERING THIS WAS A DIFFERENT TOPIC DEALING WITH GUERILLA
         MARKETING, OUR CLUB’S GOAL WAS TO ATTRACT AT LEAST 60 PEOPLE. WITH 75
         PEOPLE IN ATTENDANCE, THIS PROGRAM WAS SUCCESSFUL. SPEAKER CHRISTIAN
         JURINKA PROVIDED INSIGHT TECHNIQUES FOR BUZZ MARKETING, PROMOTIONAL



                                        35
     STUNTS, AND OTHER NON-TRADITIONAL EFFORTS EMPLOYED BY HIS AGENCY. THE
     EVENT WAS PROMOTED THROUGH E-NEWSLETTERS, E-MAIL BLASTS, WEBSITE POSTINGS,
     BOARD OF DIRECTOR PERSONAL CONTACTS AND PRESS RELEASES. OF THE SURVEYED
     PDL ATTENDEES, MANY FOUND THE PROGRAM TO BE CREATIVE AND ONE MEMBER
     COMMENTED ON THE SPEAKER’S USE OF HANDS-ON EXAMPLES. THIS PDL WAS
     SPONSORED BY LAFAYETTE SAVINGS BANK AND BRAINSTORM MARKETING, WHO ALSO
     PROVIDED PRIZES FOR OUR MEMBERS (EXHIBITS: D2-D5).
B.   SEPTEMBER 27, 2007: “OFF AND ONLINE ADVERTISING TOOLS” BY KING HILL OF
     DIGIKNOW IN CLEVELAND, OH. OUR GOAL WAS TO ATTRACT 60 PEOPLE FOR THIS
     PDL, AND WE WERE SUCCESSFUL IN HAVING 62 ATTEND. KING HILL KICKED OFF OUR
     FALL PDL BY PROVIDING INSIGHT ON HOW TO WEAVE ONLINE MARKETING ELEMENTS
     WITH MORE TRADITIONAL MARKETING PROGRAMS. HE ALSO CITED A CASE HISTORY
     FROM HIS PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE TO FURTHER EXPLORE THE TOPIC. THE EVENT
     WAS PROMOTED THROUGH E-NEWSLETTERS, E-MAIL BLASTS, WEBSITE POSTINGS,
     BOARD OF DIRECTOR PERSONAL CONTACTS AND PRESS RELEASES. OF THE SURVEYED
     PDL ATTENDEES, SOME SAID THIS WAS “ANOTHER GREAT TOPIC” AND “WISH THERE
     WAS MORE TIME.” (EXHIBITS: D6-D10).
C.   NOVEMBER 8, 2007: “THE LITTLE BLUE BOOK OF ADVERTISING” BY STEVE
     LANCE OF NEW YORK. OUR GOAL WAS TO ATTRACT 60 PEOPLE FOR THIS PDL, AND
     WE WERE SUCCESSFUL IN HAVING 68 ATTEND. STEVE LANCE DISCUSSED HIS RECENTLY
     PUBLISHED “LITTLE BLUE BOOK OF ADVERTISING” AND HOW TO INCORPORATE
     ADVERTISING TECHNIQUES FROM HIS BOOK. HE ALSO CITED A CASE HISTORY FROM HIS
     PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE TO FURTHER EXPLORE THE TOPIC. THE EVENT WAS
     PROMOTED THROUGH E-NEWSLETTERS, E-MAIL BLASTS, WEBSITE POSTINGS, BOARD OF
     DIRECTOR PERSONAL CONTACTS AND PRESS RELEASES. OF THE SURVEYED PDL
     ATTENDEES, SOME SAID THIS WAS “ONE OF MY FAVORITE AD FED PROGRAMS” AND
     “PLEASE BRING STEVE BACK FOR A 1/2 DAY WORKSHOP.” (EXHIBITS: D11-D13).
D.   EDUCATE MEMBERS IN DIVERSITY AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS: ON JULY 21,
     2007, NCADFED HOSTED AN EDUCATIONAL PANEL DISCUSSION WITH LATINO
     COMMUNITY MEMBERS. TOPICS INCLUDED HOW TO REACH THIS MARKET, SOCIO-
     ECONOMIC TRENDS FOR LATINO CONSUMERS, INCLUSION ISSUES WITH THE
     COMMUNITY, AND OTHER MARKETING TOPICS. OUR GOAL WAS TO HAVE 20 PEOPLE
     ATTEND; 21 WERE PRESENT (EXHIBITS: D14-D18). ON AUGUST 23, 2007, NCADFED
     HOSTED SPEAKER JOE SEAMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE NEWLY FORMED
     LAFAYETTE-WEST LAFAYETTE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (LWLDC).
     SEAMAN DISCUSSED HOW THE LWLDC WILL BE INTERFACING WITH LOCAL AND STATE-
     LEVEL GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS TO FURTHER THE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC GOALS OF
     OUR COMMUNITY. OUR GOAL WAS TO HAVE 20 PEOPLE ATTEND; 18 PARTICIPATED.
     BOTH EVENTS WERE PROMOTED THROUGH OUR E-NEWSLETTER, E-BLASTS, BOARD OF
     DIRECTORS PERSONAL CONTACTS, PRESS RELEASES, AND REACHING OUT TO OTHER
     COMMUNITY NONPROFIT E-LISTS. SURVEYS WERE USED TO MEASURE THE FEEDBACK OF
     ATTENDEES AND WERE VERY POSITIVE (EXHIBITS: D19-D21). ADDITIONALLY,
     MEMBERS WERE EDUCATED ON CURRENT TRENDS AND NEWS THROUGH OUR MONTHLY
     DIVERSITY MINUTE AND GOVERNMENT UPDATE (EXHIBITS: D22-D23).
E.   NEWSLETTERS AND WEBSITE: MONTHLY NEWSLETTERS EDUCATE MEMBERS ON
     NEWS FROM THE ADVERTISING INDUSTRY INCLUDING LEGISLATION, TRENDS AND




                                    36
          INNOVATIONS. A CONSTANTLY UPDATED WEBSITE EDUCATES MEMBERS ON CURRENT
          CLUB EVENTS, NEWS, AND ADVERTISING INITIATIVES. THE WEBSITE IS MAINTAINED BY
          THE VOLUNTEER WORK OF HAMSTRA MEDIA, AND HOSTS INTERACTIVE CAPABILITIES.
          IT INCLUDES BLOGS, RSVPS AND “QUESTIONS OF THE MONTH”. ADDITIONALLY,
          MEMBERS SHARED THEIR ADVERTISING KNOWLEDGE THROUGH TWO SOCIAL
          NETWORKING SITES – FACEBOOK AND LINKEDIN (EXHIBITS D24-D31).
  OUTCOMES: THANKS TO THE NUMEROUS GOALS ESTABLISHED BY THE NCADFED LEADERSHIP
          AND THROUGH EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FEATURING TOPICS THAT AFFECT OUR
          INDUSTRY, WE HAVE SEEN THE ATTENDANCE TO OUR MONTHLY PROGRAM
          DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEONS INCREASE. AND, OUR MEMBERS STAY UP-TO-DATE ON
          ISSUES THAT CAN HAVE PROFOUND IMPACT ON THEIR BUSINESSES AND CAREERS. JOB
          POSTINGS, CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS AND ACCESS TO OTHER INDUSTRY MARKETING
          LINKS ARE SOME OF THE BENEFITS THIS WEBSITE PROVIDES TO FURTHER
          COMMUNICATIONS AND EDUCATIONAL EXCHANGES BETWEEN OUR PATRONS.
GOAL 3: EDUCATE AND SUPPORT LOCAL STUDENTS AND YOUNG CAREER PROFESSIONALS.
         TARGET AUDIENCE: HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS, COLLEGE STUDENTS AND YOUNG
         PROFESSIONALS. NCADFED MEMBERS HAVE MADE A CONCERTED EFFORT TO REACH
         OUT TO THE NEXT GENERATION OF COMMUNICATORS BY IMPLEMENTING SEVERAL
         INITIATIVES.
      1.) SCHOLARSHIP: FOR THE THIRD YEAR, A $500 SCHOLARSHIP WILL BE AWARDED TO A
          DESERVING STUDENT WHO SEEKS A CAREER IN THE ADVERTISING, MARKETING OR
          COMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRIES. A SPECIAL ACCOUNT HAS BEEN SET ASIDE TO
          PERPETUALLY FUND THE ONGOING AWARD (EXHIBIT: E1-E3).
      2.) RISING STAR AWARD: MATT OATES, WAS AWARDED THE RISING STAR AWARD AT
          THE 2007-2008 ADDY AWARDS, RECOGNIZING SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENT BY A
          PROFESSIONAL, AGED 32 OR YOUNGER (EXHIBIT: E4).
      3.) STUDENT ADDY COMPETITION: NCADFED HAS MADE A CONCERTED EFFORT TO
          IMPROVE PARTICIPATION FROM STUDENTS IN THE ANNUAL ADDY COMPETITION. THIS
          YEAR, SEVEN STUDENTS SUBMITTED ENTRIES (UP FROM THREE THE PREVIOUS YEAR),
          AND FOR THE FIRST TIME IN CLUB HISTORY, STEPHAN DELGADO, A STUDENT AT IVY
          TECH COLLEGE WAS AWARDED A GOLD ADDY. HIS ENTRY WILL BE AUTOMATICALLY
          FORWARDED TO DISTRICT COMPETITION (EXHIBIT: E5).
      4.) PURDUE MENTORSHIP PROGRAM: NCADFED SECRETARY JOEL RASMUS IS THE
          LIAISON FOR PURDUE UNIVERSITY’S MARKETING AND ADVERTISING STUDENTS. A
          MENTORSHIP PROGRAM IS CURRENTLY BEING ESTABLISHED TO CREATE VIABLE
          PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN THOSE STUDENTS AND OUR MEMBERS.
      5.) INTERNSHIPS & STUDENT MEMBERSHIP: NCADFED BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND
          MEMBER COMPANIES PROVIDE INTERNSHIP RESOURCES AND LOCATIONS AND INVITE
          STUDENTS TO ATTEND MEETINGS ON A REGULAR BASIS. NCADFED ALSO ENCOURAGES
          STUDENTS TO JOIN THE ORGANIZATION AT A REDUCED RATE WITH LOW-COST MEAL
          RATES (EXHIBIT: E6).
      6.) AAF D6 STUDENT COMPETITION: NCADFED PAST-PRESIDENT ALLISON MEADOWS
          SERVES ON THE AAF D6 SUPER DISTRICT NATIONAL STUDENT ADVERTISING
          COMPETITION PLANNING COMMITTEE (EXHIBITS: E1-E5).
  OUTCOMES: THESE INITIATIVES HAVE PROVEN NCADFED’S COMMITMENT TO RECOGNIZING
  AND PROMOTING EDUCATION FOR OUR YOUTH.




                                          37
GOAL 4: EDUCATE OUR COMMUNITY.
    TARGET AUDIENCE: NON-PROFIT EMPLOYEES, THE HEALTHCARE COMMUNITY, SMALL BUSINESS
    OWNERS, COMMUNITY LEADERS IN DIVERSITY.
        1. NCADFED SPEAKER BUREAU: AS A WAY TO REACH OUT AND TO EDUCATE OUR
           COMMUNITY, 25 MEMBERS HAVE VOLUNTEERED AT NO CHARGE AS GUEST SPEAKERS TO
           NUMEROUS COMMUNITY EVENTS AND PROGRAMS. SPEAKING TOPICS COVER ALL ASPECTS
           OF ADVERTISING, MARKETING, COMMUNICATIONS, NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT AND
           DIVERSITY (EXHIBIT F-1).
           OUTCOMES: THIS INITIATIVE HAS PROVIDED 41 SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES
           TO EDUCATE THE COMMUNITY AND PROPEL THE NCADFED IMAGE.
        2. INDIANA ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION CAREGIVER PROGRAM: AS PART OF OUR
           ONGOING PUBLIC SERVICE ENDEAVORS, NCADFED TOOK ON THE MAJOR COMMUNITY
           SERVICE PROJECT OF BRANDING, MARKETING AND DEVELOPING COLLATERAL MATERIALS
           FOR THE INAUGURAL CAREGIVER’S CONFERENCE 2007. NCADFED PUBLIC SERVICE
           COMMITTEE MEMBERS EDUCATED WEST CENTRAL INDIANA ALZHEIMER’S EXECUTIVE
           COMMITTEE ON MARKETING STRATEGY, CREATIVITY IN ADVERTISING AND EXECUTING A
           BRANDING CAMPAIGN.
           OUTCOMES: THROUGH THIS PROJECT, OVER $20,000 IN MEDIA PACKAGES, CREATIVE
           DESIGN AND PRINTING, ALONG WITH COUNTLESS HOURS OF CONSULTING SERVICES WAS
           PROVIDED FREE OF CHARGE TO THE ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION AND AREA IV AGENCY ON
           AGING AND COMMUNITY ACTION (EXHIBITS: F2-F13).
    CONCLUSION: NORTH CENTRAL ADVERTISING FEDERATION HAS EFFECTIVELY MET ITS GOALS IN
    SERVICING THE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF OUR MEMBERSHIP AND COMMUNITY THROUGH A VARIETY
    OF STIMULATING, CREATIVE AND INSPIRING PROGRAMS. EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS ARE A
    VITAL COMPONENT OF OUR EXTREME MAKEOVER AND ONE THAT WILL PROPEL THIS ORGANIZATION
    TO EVEN GREATER HEIGHTS AND SERVICE IN THE FUTRE.




                                             38
      Advertising Education
       1st Place – Division 5

           Ad 2 Tampa Bay

Contact:        Vinny Tafuro
                Dynamic Creations
                12734 N. Florida Avenue
                Tampa, FL 33612
                (813) 240-0739
                vinny@dynamiccreations.com




                 39
Objectives
       Ad 2 Tampa Bay counts Advertising Education among our most important
responsibilities, embracing the challenge of reaching both college students in the area, our young
professional members, and the general public as a whole. Among these audiences, there are
many differences, both from a targeting standpoint and from an educational content perspective.
Though there is significant overlap, which is both expected and welcomed, we have
implemented specific initiatives to satisfy each group.
       Our initiatives can be broken down into the different targets we hope to educate:
    • Students - Increase participation in general meetings, Student Media Tour, Student
       ADDYs, and other Ad 2 events and programs
    • Professionals - Educate regarding specific industry practices, connect with local industry
       professionals to learn about other companies, encourage Ad 2 participation
    • General Public - Educate and raise profile of advertising, Ad 2, and members

Initiatives

Students
       Ad 2 Tampa Bay places special importance on the education of the area's students.
Recognizing that they represent the future of both our organization and the industry as a whole,
we have engaged the student community with a number of programs custom-tailored to their
needs and arranged to fit into their busy schedule.

        Ad 2 Campus Road Show: The inaugural implementation of Ad 2 Tampa Bay's "Ad 2
Campus Road Show" began in October of this club year. This concept was developed to educate
local students in advertising, communication, media, and design programs regarding the value of
Ad 2 Tampa Bay and the Student ADDY Awards. Jeff Morrow, Ad 2 Tampa Bay's Membership
Director, and Kate Whatley, Ad 2 Tampa Bay's Education Director and Student ADDY Chair
spoke to hundreds of students from six area colleges over a three week period. The presentation
was given at the University of South Florida, the University of Tampa, the Art Institute of
Tampa, the International Academy of Design and Technology, Eckerd College, and ITT
Technical Institute. Through the use of a PowerPoint presentation, students were exposed to a
general explanation of Ad 2 Tampa Bay, our public service initiatives, and the value of
networking. A strong push was made for students to attend the Fall Media Tour, and to
participate in the Student ADDY Awards. Attendees were shown a reel of the local Student
ADDY Award winning work from the last two years and encouraged to enter their work and
attend ADDY Gallery Night, an evening showcasing all of the ADDY entries in both the
professional and student divisions. (EXHIBIT A)

    Student Media Tour: Ad 2 Tampa Bay's Student Media Tour is an annual event dedicated to
introducing local college students to career options and employment opportunities in Tampa
Bay. Students are organized at one of the area's colleges and chauffeured by charter bus to a
number of agencies and other industry hot-spots over the course of a day. This fall's Student
Media Tour took place on November 8, 2007. Thanks to the promotional efforts of the Ad 2
Campus Road Show and a series of well-timed email blasts, this iteration found our tour bus full
to capacity, welcoming 50 students from around the area. Throughout the day, the students
received a comprehensive look at what the Tampa Bay advertising community has to offer:


                                               40
   •   OAI, large-format printing facility: Students received an education in the equipment,
       processes, and career opportunities available in this facility.
   •   Pyper, Paul + Kenney, full service advertising agency: Long-time Ad 2 supporter Hal
       Vincent relates the ins and outs of this O'Toole Award-winning agency to our attendees.
   •   Tampa Digital Studios, digital production facility: Students tour the offices of one of
       Tampa Bay's finest production companies and one of Ad 2's most valuable partners.
   •   Grupo D, Hispanic-focused marketing agency: Fabian Yépez educates students on the
       changing climate of multicultural advertising in this division of local agency Dutcher
       Group.
   •   Chipotle, southwestern fast-food casual dining: Through promotions manager and
       strategic partner Kimberly Higgins, Ad 2 arranges a free lunch for the students.
   •   Other presentations: Ad 2 Tampa Bay members Mai Tran, Vinny Tafuro, Kate Whatley
       and Carl Vervisch present on topics including club membership and Student ADDYs.
        (EXHIBIT B)

        Student Mentorship: Ad 2 Tampa Bay recognizes its members are in a unique position to
share their insight with local college students. Several of our members have graduated recently
enough to fully understand the challenges of career-searching young professionals, but have
accrued the experience in the field to understand what prospective employers are seeking.
        Throughout the year, we enlisted our professional members to act in mentorship roles for
local schools. In December, former Ad 2 Tampa Bay Creative Director Carl Vervisch and
Education Director Kate Whatley travelled to the Art Institute of Tampa to provide feedback for
their outbound graduating class. As Whatley is an art director with one of Tampa's traditional,
more established agencies and Vervisch is a copywriter with a newer, more progressive agency,
the two provide a very useful range of perspectives to the students. In February, Ad 2 Tampa
Bay Diversity Chair Fatin Jacob spoke to the University of South Florida's Ad Club regarding
her experience in starting her advertising career. In March, Whatley and Vervisch were
personally invited to provide in-depth consultations to students at the International Academy of
Design and Technology in Tampa. Whatley, along with Membership Director Jeff Morrow, also
used this occasion to educate the students on Ad 2 and our upcoming events. (EXHIBIT C)

        ADDY After-Party: The Tampa Bay Advertising Federation's ADDY Awards are
strongly attended by a host of industry professionals, including decision-making leaders of local
agencies. Ad 2 Tampa Bay has recognized this as a prime opportunity to orchestrate a social
intervention between career-minded students and the faces they need to get in front of, through
the planning of a successful ADDY After-Party.
        This year's ADDY After-Party was particularly successful, owing in large part to a prime
location, convenient transportation, and a cool-factor that acted as a draw for attendees of all
walks of life. Ad 2's "Real Party" took place just blocks away from the award ceremony in a
secret room within an upscale restaurant, appealing in its own right. Promoted by posters, hand-
delivered collateral, and email blasts, this event drew over 150 attendees, and featured an
audience evenly split between students and professionals. (EXHIBIT D)

        Web 2.0 Communications: The expanding popularity of MySpace and Facebook within
the college-aged audience has led us to consider this a primary mode of communication with
local students. Facebook in particular is an entire network built to help students communicate


                                               41
with each other. MySpace bulletins and FaceBook event invites were key in driving attendance
for the Student Media Tour, the ADDY After-Party, and a Tampa Bay Advertising Federation
event called "How to Win an ADDY." (EXHIBIT E)

         University Professor Outreach: In the end, it has been the experience of our organization
that direct, personal contact is often the most effective communication tool of them all. In this
spirit, Ad 2 Tampa Bay's Education Director Kate Whatley made significant efforts throughout
this year to establish and maintain lines of communication with influential targets within local
colleges. These connections were directly responsible for increasing the success of our various
educational initiatives. In December, our organization convinced college professors from two
local schools to add a visit to the "How to Win an ADDY" workshop to their class curriculum,
skewing the attendance so significantly that speaker Mike Weber of District Four AAF chose to
cater his presentation to the students. In the months leading up to the ADDY Award entry
deadline, similar methods helped us to drive participation in that as well. By directly instigating
competition between rival creative schools, Ad 2 helped convince four local colleges to subsidize
their students' entry fees for the Student ADDY competition. In the case of this year's Student
Best of Show winner, one such subsidization was the single factor that made her entry possible.
(EXHIBIT F)


Professionals
        Ad 2 Tampa Bay's overall initiatives and efforts to educate professionals in advertising
are one in the same. In short, Ad 2 Tampa Bay IS advertising education. While we recognize a
pure social atmosphere could possibly bring a quantitatively greater attendance to our meetings,
Ad 2 Tampa Bay strives to provide our members with a well-rounded mix of networking and
educational offerings, and to cultivate a membership base that appreciates such a combination.
This commitment to education results in a format for our general meetings that is based around a
broad range of informative speakers.
        A strong effort from our Programs Director Robin Adkins helped us to populate our guest
speaker segments with local professionals that held a powerful combination of relevance, high
distinction , and effective presentation skills. Our guests included Marketing VP's from both a
Convention & Visitors Bureau and a web development corporation, Account Executives from
two television channels and a print publication, and three advertising agency principals. The
presentations they delivered were all engaging, and each attracted different segments of our
audience to attend. (EXHIBIT G)



General Public
       We understand as an organization that the education of the general public is a central
responsibility held by our group. The major challenge of this charge lies in the fact that this
audience may be uninterested in hearing about advertising, and may already have a negative
perception of our industry based on stereotype and misunderstanding. In order to help break
down these walls, we have created a communications vehicle that introduces our field to the
public while informing them on topics they are already interested in.




                                                42
        AdCast is a monthly internet-based video program created, hosted, directed, and
produced by members of Ad 2 Tampa Bay. Every month, our hosts—former
Creative/Membership Director Carl Vervisch of SPARK and Communications Director Jessica
McDonald of Marriott International—cover a range of exciting topics in an hour-long live
internet broadcast and archived YouTube/Google Video segments. While the primary focus of
the show is to provide content that is relevant to young professionals, AdCast consistently
presents topics of general interest. Now in its second year, we have continually made vast
improvements in all aspects of the show, increasing its consistency, image, and overall
entertainment value. This year, AdCast brought on a producer in Holly Clark of Candour
Marketing+Branding, helping to effectively improve the consistency and quality of our guests.
Since her installation, we have had a full roster of guests for every show, and in most cases
backups were available if needed. We have also significantly increased the prestige of our guest
appearances, most notably welcoming professional boxer and star of Rocky VI Antonio Tarver
on to the show. The producer has helped us to ensure that our guests are all properly prepared,
comfortable with the show, and receive an overall positive experience that they'll spread the
word about. By featuring more prestigious guests on AdCast, we continue to draw more traffic
from the general public. Prominent features such as Antonio Tarver and Super Bowl Host
Committee Chair Reid Sigmond have been picked up on video aggregation sites across the
internet. As we continue to increase the amount of informational content AdCast holds archived
on the web, the show is becoming a legitimate education source for viewers around the world.
(EXHIBIT H)


                                               Results
         Ad 2 Tampa Bay takes great pride in the accomplishments that have sprung from a solid
year of active involvement in advertising education pursuits. Due to the nature of their
objectives, these results can be evidenced through quantitative results, and the numbers tell a
story of success through commitment.
         Our efforts in reaching the general public through AdCast have been extremely
successful. Statistics through Google Video and YouTube indicate that our segments have now
received over 5,000 combined views. Beyond sheer statistics, the most tangible evidence of the
show's success is a sponsorship deal through the St. Petersburg Times. Recognizing the value of
our production, they agreed to feature free advertising for the show in their tbt* newspaper—a
100,000+ readership publication—in direct exchange for a tbt*-related feature on AdCast.
(EXHIBIT H)
         The education of our advertising professionals community through events and programs
can be seen in our increased meeting attendance and consistent offerings. Whereas years past
have seen more social events, our calendar indicates consistent educational content throughout
this club year. This change did not fall on deaf ears—attendance of our general meetings now
falls in the range of 20+ young professionals and students, a notable increase from years past.
(EXHIBIT G)
         Ad 2 Tampa Bay's greatest educational triumph of this club year came in the student
sector, where we increased involvement and awareness beyond any reasonable expectations. The
Ad 2 Campus Road Show reached out to more than 200 students at 6 college campuses across
Tampa Bay. This tour's success fed student attendance at general meetings, which increased
visibly in the months immediately following. Our diversified efforts in promoting the Student



                                               43
Media Tour filled our bus to capacity at 50 students, far in excess of participation in years past.
Finally, all of these efforts culminated with an amazing increase in Student ADDY participation.
This year, the Tampa Bay Advertising Federation confirms that the number of Student ADDY
entries smashed previous totals, skyrocketing from roughly 30-40 in years past to an all-time
record high of 109 entries for this year. When this total was read aloud at this year's ADDY
Gala, it brought the attendees to their feet, but moreover it brought smiles to our faces—we had
effectively helped the students of Tampa Bay toward a better future through advertising
education. (EXHIBIT I)




                                                44
            Club Operations
            st
           1 Place – Division 1

             AAF – Cleveland

Contact:         Rick Squire
                 AAF – Cleveland
                 20325 Center Ridge Road, Suite 670
                 Cleveland, OH 44116
                 (440) 673-0020 x11
                 rsquire@aafcleveland.com




                    45
                           American Advertising Federation – Cleveland
Club Operations 2007/2008
        If anyone tells you it’s easy to run an Ad Fed chapter, they are lying. Why? You’re
basically the CEO of a company staffed by a volunteer workforce. Established club traditions
don’t always make sense in today’s day and age. You’re supporting an industry that’s constantly
evolving to keep up with ever-changing technology and consumer views. The economy isn’t
doing you any favors. And did I mention, that you’ve only got one year?
        But as Clevelanders, we’re used to having the odds stacked against us. When times are
tough, we get tougher. We knew we had to take a hard look at how our club operates and why we
do what we do. So our president issued an invite to a board retreat (and an Indians baseball
game), so we could outline some objectives. Accompanying this invite was his “Markifesto”
listing his expectations for the New Year. (Exhibit I)
        The board retreat was a great success (as was the Tribe game – CLE 10 MIN 4)
producing some great ideas and the following goals for the year:
     1. Make relevant connections with current and prospective members.
     2. Maintain and strengthen our club’s position as Northeast Ohio’s premier communications
        organization.
     3. Ensure that our club is fiscally sound through financial discipline.
        While these admittedly lofty goals might make it seem that we aren’t playing with a full
deck, we did have a few aces up our sleeves:
        Before assuming the office, AAF-Cleveland presidents must first complete the officer
rotation – serving in each role for one year. This gives our leaders a good sense of how the group
works. This year’s president has a bit more history with the club as he actually started his
advertising career as an intern with AAF-Cleveland. This experience has allowed him to provide
our board with the insight on the inner workings of the organization. Plus he’s a “creative,”
which is a break from our client and “account” side presidential trend.
        Our board of directors is diverse in every sense of the word – different races, sexes, ages,
jobs, employers, opinions, ideas and perspectives. This group takes a constructively critical
approach to nearly everything we do, which helps identify problems before they develop.
        We’ve heard Joanne Schecter, AAF Executive Vice President – Club Services, say it
countless times: member involvement is key to member retention. We pair that fact with the
power of the personal touch to engage our membership. If an email is sufficient, a phone call is
better and a personal visit will blow their minds. Every new member gets a welcoming phone
call and acknowledged at luncheons. We’ve established a Keep in Touch Committee to contact
our entire membership on a regular basis. We’ve supplemented past survey feedback with face-
to-face meetings with concerned members. This is the best way to get honest information.
        AAF-Cleveland is a strong brand. We have a 106-year history. Our membership of 640 is
filled with committed, reliable volunteers. We are blessed with a strong staff that helps steer this
enormous ship in the right direction. Now that we’ve let you in on some of our “secrets,” here’s
how we achieved the aforementioned goals:
        GOAL 1: Make relevant connections with current and prospective members.
       At the start of this year, we had only been “AAF – Cleveland” for one year. Most of our
membership was fairly well adjusted (to the name change, anyways). But we felt we needed to
show that the club had changed more than just our name. We were focused on improving the
organization to make it relevant to what our members and community needed. We knew we had
to tweak our club operations to ensure its survival moving forward.


                                                46
        Speaking their language – The world is a-changing, especially in regards to how it
communicates. This is doubly true for the hard-to-reach youth that AAF-Cleveland needs to
reach. Our annual Communications Career Day is a daylong seminar for college students
attempting to get into the business covering a variety of topics. This is a critical event for our
club on two fronts. First, it allows us to showcase Cleveland as a great place for college grads to
get into the advertising industry. Second, it’s a great recruitment tool. Every student in
attendance receives a complimentary one-year AAF-Cleveland membership included in their
registration for the event. This year’s event was our most successful to date, more than doubling
last year’s attendance. Much of this increase is attributed to our committee’s ability to reach
college students on their terms. We expanded our promotions to include the wildly popular social
networking site Facebook.com. This Web 2.0 experiment went so well that we now use it to
promote any event aimed at our younger members and prospects. This event brought us 71 new
members and a great introduction to the next slate of entry-level candidates. We were able to
position AAF –Cleveland as the organization you need to join if you want to work in Cleveland
advertising. We’ve also continued to see results from the use of our official blog
(clevead.typepad.com) – especially with the younger demographic. (Exhibit II)
        Supporting Students – AAF-Cleveland worked with students from Case Western
Reserve University (CWRU) to help them establish a new marketing group on campus. They had
attended some of our events and wanted to model their organization after ours. Unfortunately,
they were getting some resistance from faculty members who wanted them to form an American
Marketing Association chapter. Our executive director and several key members met with the
students and armed them with facts and figures to discuss with their professors. The result? The
newest student chapter of the AAF is now at CWRU. We continue to support and nurture the
chapter by providing local executives as speakers and giving them a chance for one-on-one time
with the national-level speakers that we host for our luncheons. This networking opportunity has
already helped several student members land valuable summer internships. (Exhibit III)
        Scholarships – AAF-Cleveland proudly awarded $21,000 in scholarships funds this year.
Support for this program comes from several donors and a tremendous amount of fundraising via
our Education Foundation. (Exhibit IV)
        Young Prez – At 30, Mark Szczepanik is the youngest president in our organization’s
106-year history. As we previously stated, he began his career as one of our interns and has risen
the ranks to be the Director of Brand Voice (a senior copywriting position) at one of Cleveland’s
largest agencies – making him an ideal “poster boy” for the networking power of AAF-
Cleveland. We started an aggressive public relations campaign highlighting Mark and saw quite
a return. Mark made it easy for AAF-Cleveland to connect with younger prospects. (Exhibits V)
        Board Recruitment – We didn’t limit our efforts to those of the younger persuasion. We
recognize that the advertising industry changes daily and our club needs to keep pace with these
changes. Agency and client strategies are constantly shifting to take advantage of new
technology. Our organization needed an infusion of some new, non-traditional thinking. We
wanted the president of Cleveland’s leading digital technology agency and the mind behind the
AAF’s ADDY Atlas, King Hill. King is known internationally (he has offices in Buenos Aires)
as a “big idea guy.” So, we made him an offer he couldn’t refuse (complete with a decapitated
toy horse head). King agreed to the meeting and soon joined our executive board as our Vice
President – Membership. His impact has already been felt in our membership drive. (Exhibit VI)
        Experimental Programming – AAF-Cleveland had a tradition of holding educational
morning seminars for our members. In recent years, attendance lagged and donuts went uneaten.



                                                47
Fingers were pointed at everything from traffic to boring topics. We decided to turn this
conundrum into a pronundrum with the establishment of “The President’s Programming
Challenge.” Committees were asked to plan seminars. The only rules were the event would cost
members $5 and non-members $10. That’s it. The topic, location, date, time of day, refreshments
and everything else was left up to the committees. The event with the most attendance would be
heralded as the champion and receive a prize. One of the events that emerged from this
competition was a non-profit seminar aimed at helping groups achieve “Champagne Marketing”
on a “Beer Budget,” which hit capacity with 75 in attendance. (Exhibit VII)
    GOAL 2: Maintain and strengthen our club’s position as Northeast Ohio’s premier
                                 communications organization.
          Northeast Ohio is home to at least 24 communication and marketing organizations. But
as the lines between advertising disciplines blur how many of these groups will remain relevant
and necessary? AAF-Cleveland is the cream of the crop among these groups in size,
volunteerism and support. And, we’d like to keep it that way.
         Partnerships – AAF-Cleveland has been reaching out to other communication
organizations with the olive branch of happy hours. We’ve had tremendous success partnering
with PRSA and AMA affiliates for our series of celebrity bartending events, which started as
“Beer and Big Guns” and soon expanded to include “Wine and Big Cheeses.” (Exhibit VIII)
We work with our partner group to staff a local watering hole with C-level executives to pour
drinks for some of our younger members. These have become some of our most successful social
outings with attendance ranging in the fifties compared to the teens for events in previous years.
We’ve also found this to be a low-pressure recruitment technique and promotional tool for other
events.
         We’ve also continued our partnership with the Cleveland Association of Broadcasters to
host the Annual Fall TV Preview Party. We were particularly excited about this year’s event held
at the House of Blues featuring The Bangles of “Walk Like an Egyptian” fame. (Exhibit IX)
         Programming like a Champ – We claim AAF-Cleveland to be the leading resource for
communications professionals. To make this more than puffery, we work hard to present the
best, most timely speakers. We partnered with the Cleveland chapter of the American
Association of Advertising Agencies to host Jim Lecinski, Midwest Director from the Internet
giant Google. Other luncheon speakers included the executive creative director from BBH, the
chief marketing officer from Charles Schwab, two creative directors from Kansas City who let us
in on “Dirty Little Secrets of the Creative Department” and a well-attended panel of local clients
telling their side of the marketing story. This is one of our big success stories as we’ve seen a
17% increase from last year’s luncheon attendance. (Exhibit X)
         Giving back – AAF-Cleveland attempts to help our less-fortunate non-profit brethren by
inviting a different organization each month to make a brief presentation at our monthly
luncheons. AAF-Cleveland has also supported local non-profits with two marketing seminars
(one was part of the previously mentioned “President’s Programming Challenge”). (Exhibit XI)
         Increasing Membership – The aforementioned King Hill put together an exciting
membership recruitment campaign with a goal of increasing our membership by 10% and
decreasing attrition by 5%. The campaign exceeded those goals by adding 149 new members
and losing only 89 members. (Exhibits XII)
         Communications and Promotions – Our members obviously know the importance of
advertising and promotion to cementing a brand’s leadership position. That’s why we continually
advertise our club’s activities and accomplishments. We promote our events locally via donated


                                               48
space in Inside Business (a leading business magazine) and The Plain Dealer (Cleveland’s only
daily newspaper). As we cited earlier, AAF-Cleveland is now regularly using Facebook and our
own blog for further promotion. Thanks to one of our generous board members we utilize high
impact banners and signage at nearly every event. AAF-Cleveland continues to be the only
national AAF chapter that publishes an annual membership roster that also serves as an industry
directory known as Torchlight. (Exhibit XIII)
            GOAL 3: Financial Discipline – Ensure that our club is fiscally sound.
        We run our organization as though it were a business. Our budgets and finances have
always been closely and professionally monitored. This is especially true in light of the current
state of the economy. AAF-Cleveland provides a valuable service to our members and our
community. Our leadership makes every effort to guarantee the financial viability of our
organization.
        Checks and Balances – We adhere to strict fiscal policies and follow a formal annual
budget planning and review process. Detailed financial statements are reviewed at every board
meeting. Our certified public accountant regularly advises us and reviews all financial reports so
thoroughly that we recently honored her with our “Vendor of the Year” award. AAF-Cleveland
also boasts an Investment Committee (comprised of our accountant, an independent financial
advisor, our Secretary-Treasurer and board members) that monitors our long-term investments.
Despite the conservative leanings of our portfolio we did see a return of 6.83%. (Exhibit XIV)
        Budget Controls Policy – Last year, AAF-Cleveland committed one of the biggest sins
that a non-profit organization can make. We lost money on an event. No organization can afford
to do this on a regular basis and be around for long. So we developed a new Budget Controls
Policy that was included in the Board of Director’s Manual that is distributed annually to all
board members. This provides another checkpoint to our established policy that every AAF-
Cleveland event must generate income or break even. Since we’ve instituted the new policy, not
one event has been in the red. (Exhibit XV)
        Paying our dues – 30% of AAF-Cleveland’s operating budget comes from membership
dues. Thanks to our stringent financial policies and other fundraising efforts, we have not had to
raise our dues in 15 years.
        Non-dues income – AAF-Cleveland also receives supplemental income from sales of our
Torchlight directory to non-members. We also receive funding as a result of ad sales in
Torchlight, our Portfolio newsletter and our ADDY Showbook. Together they generate an
additional $5,000.
        ADDY Attack – Our ADDY Awards weren’t doing well. In years past, the program was
vibrant and healthy (and contributed quite a bit to our bottom line). Then suddenly perennial
winners stopped entering, people stopped attending, the show got boring and creative egos went
unstroked. This concerned the board. Our president met with leadership at a number of local
agencies (including the most dominant creative shop in our market that hadn’t entered in two
years). As a result we saw a 13.5% increase in entries, including 26 from agencies who returned
to the competition. Overall the event netted our organization $14,300.
                                         CONCLUSION
It wasn’t always easy but we feel that AAF-Cleveland has achieved the goals we set forth. We
have stayed true to our organization’s roots while continuing to make strides that will ensure a
vibrant future for the club. We’re making headway on using new technologies to reach future
members. We’re establishing policies and procedures that strengthen our position as a leading




                                               49
organization locally and nationally. And we’ve managed to do it all without losing cash and
having a bit of fun along the way.




                                               50
            Club Operations
            st
           1 Place – Division 2

           AAF – Des Moines

Contact:          Jennifer Simpson
                  Radio Iowa/Brownfield News
                  9934 Tanglewood Drive
                  Urbandale, IA 50322
                  (515) 244-7400
                  jen@learfield.com




                    51
Club Biography:
American Advertising Federation of Des Moines, formerly the Advertising Professionals of Des
Moines, celebrates the club's 100 years of leadership in the industry with unification to our
national affiliate's brand identity - The American Advertising Federation (AAF) after a
unanimous vote of support. The AAF of Des Moines is a dynamic, growing organization
dedicated to professional development and networking in Des Moines and central Iowa. The
object of this organization, according to our bylaws, is to foster higher standards of practice in
advertising, to expand recognition of advertising, to further the personal and professional
knowledge of persons in advertising and to promote good fellowship among advertising persons.
President’s Outlook:
With 6 years of history on the Board of Directors, it was now my time to lead our organization. I
found myself attending the National AAF convention for the first time just a few months before
the keys to the car were passed down to me. Needless to say, I was really jazzed for the
challenge. I saw several gaps and goals in our club operations, organization, structure, and fiscal
management that needed to be addressed. It had been nearly 5 years since the advertising club in
Des Moines had submitted Club Achievement stories in all the categories, or truly attempted to
tout our success. It wasn’t due to lack of success, but without a solid goal, at times it became
easy for the board to just live with status quo. Our club began to see drops in membership,
program attendance, ADDY® entries even the overall stamina of the club. It was with this
newly renewed focus after AAF’s ‘07 national convention that I took my passion for change
back to a Board of Directors stocked with 80% first term members and the rest is the history you
are about to read…

Club Operations Objectives:
The board formerly known at that time as the Advertising Professionals of Des Moines hosted a
planning retreat (the first in multiple years) so that everyone could get acquainted and develop a
plan of attack. The first item on the agenda – a name change, more about that later. The second
item on the agenda – a board restructure to mimic the club achievement model. The rest of the
schedule included tackling topics of a budget overhaul, program possibilities, membership
directories, and public service projects just to skim the surface. How exciting to see change on
the horizon. It was quite a learning curve for the first term members, but the new recruits were
infused with motivation that became contagious.
The following is a summary listing of the top areas of focus for our board.
Long Range Planning                        -Name change/brand unification
                                           -Membership Survey Results
                                           -100 Year Proclamation
Analysis of Member’s Needs                 -Online membership directory
                                           -Pay Pal payment system
                                           -Legislative Day 2008
                                           -Electronic meeting surveys
                                           -Local ADDY® categories
                                           -Public service projects/events
                                           -P33 student seminar
Leadership                                 -Board restructure
Organization/Development                   -Committee Recruitment
                                           -Past President’s Leadership Legacy Award


                                                52
Fiscal Management                     -Budget Overhaul
                                      -Event Pricing Review
                                      -Insurance coverage restructure
                                      -Board accountability

Achieving Objective A) Long Range Planning
Name change / brand unification: As was referenced earlier, a name change was on the horizon
for the organization. The proposition of unification with the national AAF was backed by the
executive committee (President, 1st Vice President, and 2nd Vice President), approved by the
Board and passed by a unanimous membership vote. This solidified a brand repackage and the
Advertising Professionals of Des Moines officially became the American Advertising Federation
of Des Moines effective January 1, 2008 in conjunction with a monumental 100th year club
anniversary. The only comments shared with the executive committee during this voting process
were, “I am surprised we didn’t unify sooner!” The 100th year milestone made even the
Governor of Iowa take notice with a special recognition proclamation. (Exhibit ?)




                                             53
Membership Survey: The AAF of Des Moines board of directors believes that effective
planning must begin with solid, insightful market research. Thus, our team began our
2007-2008 Long Range planning efforts by initiating a market research survey (Exhibit
?) in May 2007 to learn more about our members and non-members along with an online
Zoomerang survey program (Exhibit ?) to obtain instant feedback from our active touch-
points with our members such as monthly luncheons. The research strategy was designed
to generate the kind of information that would enable us to effectively evolve our
organization, with the overriding goal to better position our organization for growth and
success over the next five years and beyond and serve as the guidepost for all decisions
made this board year. We were extremely pleased with the response rates, which thus
gave highly quantifiable results, as well as many rich insights and ideas generated from a
significant number of individual comments.
After a thorough analysis of the data, from the member and non-member survey, the
Chair of Long Range Planning and the President developed several recommendations to
be strategically reviewed and implemented. Below are the top three suggestions.
Recommendation #1
Share selected survey results with the Members/Non-Members
Concept: Pick selected results, and share back. Say “thank you” for responding, and
include some high level reference to selected changes/ improvements they can expect as a
result of the survey.
Implementation: Via the President’s welcome letter the expected changes were
communicated with the membership as a result of their survey suggestions.
Recommendation #2
Provide Value-Added services, available to” members only”
Concept: Create exclusive industry/discipline specific roundtable discussions, educational
opportunities for professional development, and isolate areas of the website obtainable
only by member password.
Implementation: The first online password protected membership directory went live
after years of debate this past November 2007 with rave reviews. Several member-only
projects are in the works including the planning for a half day round table offering
intimate access to media buyers / planners in a “salesperson’s dream” seminar, and
exclusive discounts for members to experience customized industry topic training
modules.
Recommendation #3
Revise our current membership strategies, as follows:
Concept: Increase yearly membership fee from $90 to $100 (continue with discount for
multiple members from one company/agency). Increase individual program fees for non-
members from $25 to $30 (keep the member fee the same: $20)
Implementation: After discussions on the topic of raising fees, this year’s board
determined that we had to prove our worth as we accepted the challenges brought to our
attention in the survey and make any fee restructure part of the five year plan.
Results: Based on our analysis of the surveys, we knew where we needed to go. Not
everything could be accomplished in one year so we created phases and took on the
challenges that could be addressed in the first year. These became our 2007-2008 board
objectives and how we measured ourselves at every meeting. We discuss these
objectives in more detail under Leadership Organization/Development.



                                           54
Achieving Objective B):
Analysis of Member Needs
Our long-range planning survey (discussed above) clearly defined what our members
wanted: special members benefits, enhanced learning opportunities and specialized
programming.
Results:
We listened to our members and did the following: developed of an online membership
directory, added a Pay Pal system for streamlined payment processing, enhanced our
feedback response time by using an online survey tool and increased our specialized
programming including: Legislate Day at the Capital, Project 33 student seminar and
half-day morning seminar on branding a non-profit organization.
Achieving Objective C):
Leadership Organization / Development
Board Restructure: There is something to be said when you can take something from
good to great, but this organization needed to go back to basics and rebuild the leadership
model. The board had been comprised of 22 members for so many years that the logic
behind the development of each position had been lost. (Exhibit ?)The club achievement
model with the 8 focus categories seemed a logical choice for the board to use as a guide
in its growth. During the board retreat it was obvious that we could take the same
quantity of board members and funnel their focus into more specific areas to closely
mirror the club achievement goals. Historically AAF of Des Moines had troubles
keeping every one of the 22 board members fully engaged and performing. The
executive committee determined that the new club achievement model would allow the
quantity of the board members to be significantly reduced for future years to provide a
more streamlined approach to management. Utilizing the board members with more
tactical skill sets as committee members in the future will allow the more strategic board
members to focus on moving the club forward, this adding a level of prestige to any
board appointment so that retention and productivity would increase.

Method
During the board retreat, each team created objectives (Exhibit ??). These would serve
as our meter of progress during each and every board meeting. It was important to
narrow our focus because in the past, we had tried to tackle too much and as a result, we
burnt out our board members and didn’t accomplish what our member’s really wanted.

Results:
At each board meeting we analyzed our progress toward the objectives (Exhibit Board
Notes). As we progress closer to our objectives, our path has become clear and our
members are taking notice as demonstrated in their increased satisfaction level with the
club.
Achieving Objective D):
Fiscal Management
Method:
As in many non-profit organizations where the money isn’t truly yours, the wisest
financial decisions weren’t always made. The executive committee performed a profit
analysis to determine where the board should sit financially. This included answering



                                            55
questions such as: Does the board need to hold a carryover balance of $30k each year
until club recruitment the following year? What events should make money and what can
break even or even lose money? How much should we charge at event?
After answering the questions, we were able to look at the budget from a holistic point of
view and only then could we analyze where we could decrease expenses and increase
revenue.
Results:
The executive committee identified key events that would carry the bulk of the
fundraising while others such as monthly programs would break-even or even lose
money. One benefit of this new focus is that we can bring in the best speakers to the club
knowing the budget is designed to balance the expense.
The executive committee also worked with the treasurer to simplify the reporting. Then
the executive committee worked with the other board members to ensure they understood
the budget. Only when everyone understood and was on board could we truly utilize the
revised budget.




                                           56
            Club Operations
            st
           1 Place – Division 3

Advertising Federation of Central Indiana

Contact:           Anne S. Condran
                   Advertising Federation of East Central Indiana
                   4200 W. University Avenue
                   Muncie, IN 47304
                   (765) 289-3676
                   acondran@comcast.net




                    57
Market Overview The Advertising Federation of East Central Indiana (Ad Fed) serves eight
counties in East Central Indiana. The primary territory is Delaware County, a rural area with one
small industrial city, Muncie. Delaware is one of two counties in Indiana that lost population since
the 2000 census. Its current population is 114,897, of which 65,298 live in Muncie and 91% are
white. The 1) rural nature of the area; 2) high unemployment rate; 3) loss of ten large factories;
4) 2% population decline in the counties of East Central Indiana; 5) budget decreases for
professional memberships and business lunches; and 6) “brain drain” of college graduates
moving to larger metropolitan markets provided significant obstacles for regional organizations or
businesses.
I. LONG-RANGE PLANNING
Objective: To develop annual objectives for year four of the 2004-2009 Strategic Plan to
continue the proactive planning process to meet member needs.
Methods to Achieve Objective: The year began with a half-day retreat on June 21, 2007
when the Board of Directors developed 2007-2008 goals, objectives, and strategies for year four
of the 2004-2009 Strategic Plan. The 2007 Membership Survey, 2007 Annual Report, 2006-2007
Budget results, seven program surveys from the 2006-2007 meetings, Mission Statement, and
By-laws were vital documents in developing the current goals, objectives, and strategies. The
2008 Objectives and Strategies were communicated to the membership through our web site and
a hand out at the September program meeting. Goals and results were monitored through
committee reports at the monthly Board meeting. (Exhibits A-F)
  A second Board retreat was held in February 28, 2008 to review the progress of the 2008
Objectives and Strategic Plan. The Objectives and Strategic Plan was intended to be a viable
working document so changes were made when needed and additional objectives were added.
(Exhibit G)
Results: Seven annual goals were established for 2007-2008 through the Strategic Plan. All goals
were accomplished and are described below.


Results of Long-Range Planning:
2007-2008 GOALS, OBJECTIVES, ACTIVITIES AND RESULTS
Goal #1: To be recognized as a diverse, strong, vibrant, regional resource for the
advertising industry of East Central Indiana
1-A.     Recruit and retain paid membership
Methods and Results: The 2007-2008 Membership Campaign began in April 2007 with renewal
invoices forwarded to the members. Reminders were included in the April, May and June e-
newsletters. Members who did not renew by July 1, 2007 were contacted by phone, e-mail, and
personal contacts by the Executive Director. Members who did not renew their dues were sent an
Exit Survey to determine how we could better meet member needs. Thirteen new members
joined this year and 87% of the 2007 members renewed their memberships! (Exhibits H-I)
1-B.     Outreach to new member
Methods and Results: New members were contacted by the Executive Director and members
of the Board of Directors through e-mail, personal contacts and phone calls to welcome them to
Ad Fed. Our proactive outreach approach to new members was very successful. Sixty nine
percent of our new members selected a committee to become active volunteers in our
organization!
 Goal #2: To be recognized for innovative educational opportunities to members,
prospective members, and the business community
2 - A. Offer national level speakers with topics that focus on innovative trends in
     advertising
Methods and Results: This program year could be titled “Forging Strong Alliances.” We
collaborated and shared expenses with Ball State University and two other Ad Clubs to bring seven
stellar speakers to our market.
2 - B. Increase attendance at monthly program meetings



                                                58
Methods and Results: Due to the quality of our programs and interest from partners who
shared program expenses, attendance averaged 11% over goal for the year. Eight guests joined
our organization after attending their first program meeting.
2 - C. Educate business leaders in East Central Indiana to the diverse media of advertising

Methods and Results:
EXPO 2007: Ad Fed participated in the2007 Delaware County Chamber of Commerce Business-
To-Business Trade Show on September 13, 2008. This trade show enabled us to meet mid-level
managers of local businesses in Muncie. The event was very beneficial with two new members
joining Ad Fed, three members renewed their dues, and we had the opportunity to show the
benefits of the advertising industry to the business community. (Exhibit J)
Chamber-After-Hours: Ad Fed collaborated with the Muncie Chamber of Commerce, Muncie
Downtown Business Council, and Muncie Young Professionals to showcase the entries for the
2008 ADDY® Competition during the Business-to-Business After-Hours on January 24, 2008. This
event provided a preview of the 2008 ADDY entries before judging the following day. The event
provided an opportunity for business leaders to learn about advertising and its economic impact
on our community. One hundred and thirty five people attended the event, which far exceeded
the goal. Overall, this was an excellent partnership that promoted the Chamber, Ad Fed and the
ADDY® competition to the Muncie business community. (Exhibit K)
Goal #3: To be recognized as the premiere resource for educational and training
opportunities to students
3 - A. Scholarships
Methods and Results: East Central Indiana has suffered from the “brain drain syndrome” of
young professionals leaving to pursue careers in larger markets in the advertising industry. Our
strategy was to help fund students who eventually seek employment in the advertising industry
in our market. We want to turn students into members when they graduate! The education
committee was responsible for the application, promotion, and selection of our annual
scholarships. Three $1,000 scholarships were awarded for the 2007-2008 academic year and one
recipient has accepted employment in our market when he graduates in May. (Exhibit L)
3 - B. Internships
Methods and Results: Ad Fed worked closely with the BSU AAF Chapter throughout the year.
The President and Executive Director met three times with the student chapter to explain the
benefits of AAF, ADDY® Competition, financial opportunities available to students, and internship
resources. The Executive Director helped coordinate local and regional resources to place five
students in internships. Additionally nine Ad Fed members offered internship sites for 20 BSU
students. This included Joseph David Advertising Agency, Cardinal Health System, Rutter Media,
Creative Fuel Design, SpinWeb Net Design, Muncie-Delaware County Chamber of Commerce,
Hillcroft Services, Muncie YMCA, and Minnetrista Cultural Center. (Exhibit S)
Goal #4: To provide effective innovative communication to members, students, and
businesses
4 - A. Electronic Newsletters
Methods and Results: Bi-monthly electronic newsletters kept our members, prospective
members, and students fully informed of our events and programs. Delivra.com provides
technical support, database management, e-mail software, production, and electronic
management to produce our electronic newsletters at no cost to our organization. Cost for these
services was $3,600 per year and was donated by the service provider. (Exhibit M)
4 - B. Web Site
Methods and Results: The club’s web site was updated at least weekly to maintain current
information. Eleven new members used the website to join Ad Fed while another eleven
members renewed their membership on line! We averaged 20 to 25 reservations for our monthly
program luncheons from the web and average 6,390 individual “page views” per month! Member
feedback validated the site was helpful for registering in the 2008 ADDY® competition. Actual


                                               59
cost for these services of approximately $3,200 was donated by SpinWeb Net Designs, Inc.
(Exhibit N)
4 - C. Membership Directory
Methods and Results: Our Membership Directory was one of most valued benefits of
membership. Members frequently request to pay for a second copy of the directory so they can
have one at their desk and the second copy in their car. The deadline for printing was an
incentive during the summer Membership Renewal Campaign because members know if dues are
not paid by August 15th they are not guaranteed inclusion in the directory. A member of our
Board of Directors volunteered the in-house printing services of our regional hospital which saved
the club $1,539 for printing costs. (Exhibit O)


4 - D. Media Releases
Methods and Results: The Communication Committee was responsible for publicity of all
programs, events, and news. During 2007-2008 club year 25 newspaper articles were published.
Two radio and five television spots were aired and six billboards promoted a program meeting or
ADDY competition. This publicity resulted in an expected 11 new members; 7% increase over
goal for program attendance; 87% member retention. (Exhibit P)
Goal #5: Monitor advertising-related legislation on local, state and federal levels.
5 – A. Keep members fully informed of advertising-related policy and legislative
developments at federal, state and local levels
Methods and Results: The club’s web site was designed to include government relations news.
The AAF Government Affairs Report was posted every five to ten days during the congressional
year. These reports provided a brief overview of advertising-related policy and legislative
developments on the federal, state and local levels. When issues arose that impacted advertising,
we used our electronic newsletter to fully inform our members. The newsletter described the
issue and included contact information where comments could be submitted.
Goal #6: Implement best-practice management and operating processes to protect
the resources and assets of the association.
6 - A. Organizational Self-Audit
Methods and Results: An Organizational Self Audit was completed by Executive Director to
review the: 1) Operating Documents and Policies; 2) Finances and Budgeting Processes; 3)
Membership Records; 4) Member Benefits & Services; 5) Member Input; 6) Publications and
Communications; 7) Branding & Marketing; 8) Board of Directors and Committee Structure; 9)
Contracts, and 10) Disaster Management Policy. This comprehensive Self-Auditing Process
ensured the resources and assets of the organization were protected and that the organization
was managed as a professional trade association and not as an informal club. (Exhibit Q)
6 - B. Strengthen the committee structure, which offers an opportunity for all
     members to become involved in the club.
Methods and Results: Member involvement provided a vehicle to increase member
commitment and retention. Members selected their first three choices for committee assignments
on their renewal applications. Members who didn’t volunteer for a committee were contacted by
committee chairs and asked to serve on a committee. Committees include: Programs/Hospitality,
Membership, Communications, Education, Auction, and ADDY®.
    Those members who said, “I’m too busy for committee work” were not ignored! We asked
these members to volunteer for one of the following tasks: working at the reservation table,
introducing our speaker, or being a greeter at a program meeting. Others secured an item for the
auction or provided financial support through a sponsorship. We’re happy to report that 82% of
our membership was involved in service to our club! (Exhibit R)
II. ANALYSIS OF MEMBER NEEDS
Objective: Obtain member input for all programs and events




                                               60
Methods to Achieve Objective: The Board recognized that member input was vital to
maintain a strong, committed, diversified, and active membership. Member needs were
continually evaluated through monthly program surveys, an ADDY® survey, 2007 Membership
Survey, and a Board who listened to the verbal comments of its members.
Results: Survey results and verbal comments were forwarded monthly to the Board of Directors.
The Board openly discussed corrective action, changes, and adjustments needed to meet
member needs. Member retention of 87% shows we are meeting member needs. (Exhibits S)
III. LEADERSHIP ORGANIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Objective: To develop leadership abilities and skills of members of the Board of Directors
Methods to achieve Objective: Orientation and Board development was implemented at the
initial planning retreat in June 2007. Members receive an in-depth orientation to the policies,
procedures, budgeting process, Mission Statement, By-laws, Board and committee
responsibilities, and strategic planning process as shown in the following chart:


         •   Policy Manual                             •   Board Orientation Manual
         •   Operations Manual                         •   Communications Policy
         •   Anti-Trust Policy                         •   Anti-Trust Policy
         •   Public Disclosure Policy                  •   Disaster Management Plan
         •   Financial Policies Manual                 •   Records Retention Policy
         •   Annual Report                             •   Use of Letterhead
         •   Release of Confidential Information       •   Membership Benefits
             of Members                                •   Membership Renewal Policy

  The President, Vice President, immediate Past President, and Executive Director attended a
leadership training meeting hosted by the American Advertising Federation, (AAF) at the 2007
Convention. The President, Membership Chair, and Executive Director attended the half day club
management training at the October AAF District 6 Leadership Conference in Lafayette, Indiana.
These conferences provided training sessions on leadership development and the roles and
responsibilities of the Board of Directors. (Exhibit T)
Results: The Ad Fed Board of Directors provided strong leadership for the organization through
the 2007-2008 Strategic Planning process, financial planning and monitoring of the operating
budget, and monthly Board meetings which were conducted with a business-like approach.
IV. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Goal: Obtain funding to carry out programs and financial obligation of the association
Methods to Achieve Objective: The Board secured a broad diversity of funding so we are not
dependent on one funding source. This broad based approach enables us to weather ups and
downs of economy in East Central Indiana. The chart below shows the diversity of our income:




Results:
A. Sponsorships: We updated our sponsorship opportunities to include: $3,000 Key, $1,250
   Premium, $750 Associate, and $100 ADDY® Category packages. We generated $10,250 from
   our sponsorship opportunities during the current year. (Exhibit U)



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B. Auction: The 2007 Gift and Media Auction goal was $7,500. To our utter amazement we
    made $15,500! The success of the 2008 Auction enabled us to diversify our sources of
    revenue with the auction providing 25% of our operating budget.
C. 2008 ADDY® Awards: The ADDY® Awards Competition was one of our most valuable
    member benefits and the highest source of revenue (33%) for our organization. The 2008
    ADDYS® produced income of $20,700 through entry fees and sponsorships. Participation in
    the ADDY® Awards not only generates revenue, but helps the organization to engage
    members in a very high profile event in the community. Due to the promotion of this event,
    three new businesses joined our club and two participated in the ADDY® Competition.
    Student entries increased 11%! (Exhibit V)
D. Underwriting: Through collaboration with Ball State University and other organizations, we
    received $21,000 in underwriting for our program speakers, ADDY® Preview Night, audio
    visual equipment, venue rental for our program meetings, and printing. More than $16,000
    in-kind donations were made to the ADDY® Competition and the 2008 Communication
    Campaign. Total donations exceeded $38,000! Without the in-kind donations, member dues
    would have to increase from $70 per year to $335 to cover operating costs.
IN SUMMARY Ad Fed continues to remain a fiscally sound, healthy and vital organization with a
growing enthusiastic membership. (Exhibit W) Our management, fiscal, and strategic-planning
practices enable us to manage the organization as a professional member based trade
association and not as an informal club. We’ve had a tremendously successful year with a 42%
attendance increase at our program meetings, 25 new members, 82% member involvement,
86% membership retention, and 10% increase in the ADDY® Competition.
    Bob Farnsworth, our October speaker, recognized the enthusiasm and commitment of our
member when he concluded his program. He stated, “You probably don’t realize what a unique Ad
Cub you have in Muncie. There is an underlying synergy in the room and with your members.
There is an excitement and a buzz here. Do you realize how many people were here networking for
about 30 minutes before the meeting? You have amazing marketing materials and certainly run a
professional organization. No wonder this is a strong Ad Club!”




                                             62
       Club Operations
       st
      1 Place – Division 4

       AAF – Fort Worth

Contact:        Kent Dean
                Rosa’s Café – Texas
                4055 International Plaza, Suite 100
                Fort Worth, Texas 76109
                (817) 877-5615
                kent@boobycox.com




               63
      It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was
      the age of foolishness. OK we’re lying. With all due respect to Charles Dickens,
      2006-2007 may simply go down as the worst of times and the age of foolishness in
      club manage-ment for the Advertising Club of Fort Worth. Of course, when you’ve
      been around for 98 years and serve as the oldest civic and service organization in
      your hometown, you should expect that crisis would rear its ugly head from time to
      time. Right? Right. I just don’t think we were expecting such a hideous crisis -- one
      that had us clearly scoped within the cross hairs of incompetence, irresponsibility
      and Uncle Sam.
This was the opening for last year's Club Achievement entry in this category. And,
unfortunately, last year, the story didn't get a lot better - with only minimal improvements
that allowed our club to survive until a new president and board were installed, and to
limp along to the board retreat in August 2007, where the entire group reassessed our
situation at the time, created a plan of action and made a commitment to see it through.


THE SITUATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF OPERATIONAL OBJECTIVES:
From overdrawn bank accounts to unbilled dues, from no budgets and no financial
statements, from three years of taxes not filed to fines up to our necks, our club was an
administrative mess. During the 2006-07 fiscal year, a new club administrator who was
also a CPA was hired to do some forensic accounting and prepare the past-due tax
returns. One of the missing tax returns was filed and the other two were prepared except
for a couple of minor details but were not finished and filed. Also, while the work on the
old financial data was ongoing, it was difficult for the new administrator to provide
current financial reports. By the end of the 2006-07 fiscal year, the board had not seen
even one current financial report.
July 1, 2007. Enter new president, Kent Dean. Kent attended the Tenth District
Governor's Retreat and Presidents' Training Day in July. With a program presented by
Bob Harris, a well-known association management expert, this workshop provided
essential information regarding the running of a club and the responsibilities of the board
and officers. Kent left that workshop with a mission: to get the Advertising Club of Fort
Worth back on track or, in Kent's words, "Overhauling Ad Club's Engine with a New
V8," which became the theme of the Ad Club's Board Retreat and mission for the 2007-
08 year. (Exhibit A)
Kent scheduled the board retreat for August 11 and met with the executive committee
ahead of time to make plans. The EC laid out a new organization and followed up on
some of Bob Harris's suggestions for educating the board regarding its fiduciary
responsibility. At the board retreat, Kent presented the "State of the Club" to the board,
underscoring some of the important areas where we were deficient. He then went through
the responsibilities of the board and reviewed new policies he asked the board to adopt,
including conflict of interest, anti-trust/anti-competitive statements and a policy regarding


                                             64
apparent authority, as suggested by Bob Harris. (Exhibit B)
Then came the work. Since our club was on the brink of disaster, Kent suggested that the
board begin its work by focusing on those things that we needed to do to stay alive. He
asked the board to determine what those things were. The list, as compiled by the board
looked like this:
     What must we do to exist?
               • Luncheons/programs
               • ADDY Awards
               • Bill Membership
               • Pay Dues (to district and national)
               • Pay Bills
               • File Taxes

He then asked the board to look at some things we could do to make it a better club, as
well as an outstanding club:
        What should we do to be better?
               • Create an accurate roster
               • Communicate to Members and Public
               • Provide Value to Membership
                        - Programs
                        - Training
               • Install and start firing on the new V8
               • Provide board/member recognition
               • Get our Business Entity in Order

       What could we do to be the best?
             • Student Initiatives
                    - portfolio review event
                    - Mini-NSAC
             • Prove relevance to community
             • Become the authority voice in Advertising
             • Job Bank/Resource
             • Implement metrics
             • Membership trades


It was acknowledged that all things on the "exist" list MUST be attended to, and that we
should work towards the "better" list, with an eye towards building the foundation for the
"best" list - which we would hope to begin addressing within the next two-three years.

Next, the new organization chart was presented to the board, and members were asked to
select their core committee responsibilities within the organization. Subcommittees were
then assigned to each core committee as appropriate, and core committee chairs were
instructed to recruit chairs for each subcommittee.



                                            65
The board retreat concluded with the board's commitment to return the club to a state of
fiscal responsibility and overall excellence.

METHODOLOGY and RESULTS

Each core committee chair was asked to attend to anything on the "exist" list that fell
under their purview first. Those committees that did not have an assignment on the
"exist" list were directed to focus on the "better" list. In addition, each was given a form
to complete regarding reporting on the activities of each committee prior to each board
meeting. (Exhibit C)

From the "exist" list:

   •   Luncheons/programs – The programs committee got busy very quickly,
       scheduling programs that were likely to appeal strongly to a broad range of
       members and potential members. The quick upward swing in attendance shows
       just how affective this committee was. For the programs held in March – July of
       2007, the average attendance was 32. For the programs held in September 2007-
       February 2008, the average attendance was 70 – a 119 percent increase! (Exhibit
       D)
   •   ADDY Awards – Kent Dean approached one of the “hottest” agencies in Fort
       Worth with a challenge: increase interest in the ADDYs among the advertising
       industry in Tarrant County, increase entries and increase gala attendance. The
       resulting campaign (Submit or be Dominated) was extremely controversial, but it
       did its job. Interest in not just the ADDYs went up, but also interest in the club
       (new members have joined at a rate we haven’t seen in years!). ADDY entries
       increased from 388 last year to 530 this year (nearly 40 percent) and the gala
       sold out at 300 (a 114 percent increase over last year’s attendance of 140).
       (Exhibit E)
   •   Bill Membership – During the prior year, a method of online billing had been
       implemented, but much of that system was manual, making the process a bit
       unwieldy. During the course of this year, the process has been upgraded and
       automated, helping make sure new members are added to the billing cycle and
       bills go out prior to membership expirations. This system has allowed us to
       ensure that we receive dues from each member and have those who have not
       paid their dues correctly reclassified as non-members. (Exhibit F)
   •   Pay Dues – We are current and up-to-date on our dues to both district and
       national
   •   Pay Bills – We have paid all bills, on time.
   •   File Taxes – All of our back tax returns have been filed and we are on track for
       timely filing of this year’s taxes.

From the "better" list:
   • Create an accurate roster – This project was contingent on getting our
      membership records and dues payment records up-to-date. (Most of our
      membership renewals take place between October and April, so we wanted to get



                                             66
    as up-to-date as possible before publication.) That project should be completed by
    April 15, and the roster should be published shortly thereafter.
•   Communicate to Members and Public – Press releases about each meeting and
    activity of the club have been sent to a variety of media and ads have been run in
    the Star-Telegram prior to each program. In addition, programs are posted on the
    web site and emails are sent to each member to provide information about each
    program and activity. Snail mail is also used to provide support for special events
    such as Magazine Day, Silver Medal Award and ADDYs. A new blog was also
    started in January 2008 to facilitate the posting of information and a 2-way dialog
    about Ad Club events and issues. (Exhibit G)
•   Provide Value to Membership
         o Programs – as mentioned above, high-quality programs were scheduled,
            with increased interest and attendance the result.
         o Training – Produced a Photoshop seminar that resulted in 28 attendees –
            about 25 percent of whom were members and about 18 percent of whom
            were students. Great evaluations too (overall 4.6 on a 5-pt scale). (Exhibit
            H)
         o Public Service Projects – Two new public service projects were initiated –
            One was a concert staged to raise money for Limbs for Life (contribution
            to LfL was $1500 on this first-time event). The other was a much simpler,
            but very fun and satisfying, night of working at the Food Bank – 45 people
            signed up and worked. (Exhibit I)
•   Install and start firing on the new V8 – Since all objectives on the club’s
    “exist” list have been addressed, and most of the items on the “better” list have
    been addressed – and even one thing on the “best” list – we seem to be firing on
    all cylinders.
•   Provide board/member recognition – We expect to address this item before the
    end of the fiscal year.
•   Get our Business Entity in Order – In addition to the business items
    accomplished under the “exist” list, we have struggled to put our club’s other
    business in order as well. Among the first things we did: Change our name to
    American Advertising Federation – Fort Worth to better align ourselves with the
    national organization.

    Shortly after the board retreat, Kent met with our club’s administrator to tell her
    exactly what was expected of her for the next year. First was the filing of the
    delinquent tax returns. Then, he asked that she prepare current financial
    statements to be presented to the board at each meeting. Thirdly, he asked that she
    accurately record the discussions at each board meeting and prepare minutes
    accordingly. In addition, she was to be present for each membership meeting to
    check in attendees and process payments. In September, the board saw the first
    financial statement in over two years.
    However, it was several months behind. The administrator blamed that on a
    mailing error with the bank statements. The next few months there were more
    excuses (sick
    mother, wedding, moving), and no financial statements, and inaccurate board


                                        67
       minutes. And still, the taxes hadn’t been finalized.

       By the end of the year, it was determined that no amount of coaching would
       improve our administrator’s performance and she must be let go. But that couldn’t
       be done until the last of the taxes were filed and our financial records in hand. The
       last of the past-due taxes were finally filed in January 2008. The administrator
       was asked to prepare electronic backups of our financial data and deliver them to
       the president in February. She was then fired. A new administrator will start on
       April 1. We look forward to much better record-keeping and financial
       transparency.

From the "best” list.

   •   Student Initiatives
          o Portfolio review event – this is the only item from this list we have tackled
              – on a small scale. One AAF-FW member agency asked the club’s
              Advertising Education Committee to help find interns by setting up a
              week of portfolio reviews. This was done and resulted in the agency hiring
              an intern for the semester.


CONCLUSION
The board feels great about the many things that have been accomplished this year to
solidify the club’s financial and business obligations, and the stage is set to move into the
“best” category during the 2008-09 year.




                                             68
     Club Operations
      st
    1 Place – Division 5

           Ad 2 Cincinnati

Contact:         Anne Cafeo
                 Barefoot Advertising
                 602 Main St., Suite 806
                 Cincinnati, OH 45202
                 (513) 984-9990
                 Acafeo@cinci.rr.edu




                 69
As Ad2 Cincinnati began the fiscal year starting July 1, 2007, it was the first time that we
faced a change in leadership. It had only been a year and half since the club was formed
with just fifteen members, five of which served as board members. By this time, though,
we had grown to seventy members. What we had done up till then had obviously worked
very well, but it was time to take it to the next level. Always at the core of Ad2
Cincinnati is the mission to provide area young advertising, marketing and
communication professionals networking, education and leadership opportunities, social
events and the opportunity to give back to their community.

Objective 1: Transition to new leadership and develop a unified strategy for the 07-08
year.
Objective 2: Examine the current operations model and make changes to meet the
demands of a larger organization.
Objective 3: Increase awareness/position within the advertising and traditional
community, placing Ad2 Cincinnati as THE young advertising professional organization.
Objective 4: Maintain contact with and a presence in our local AdClub of Cincinnati, on
a district level and nationally with National Ad2 and the AAF.

Objective 1: Transition to new leadership and develop a unified strategy for the 07-
08 year.
The charter members of Ad2 Cincinnati had the foresight to put a succession plan in
place where the Vice President would transition into the role of President the following
year. In the months leading up to the beginning of the fiscal year, an election process was
put into place to elect the remaining board positions. There was a call for nominations, a
ballot sent to the membership and an election of a twelve-person board. In mid-July, there
was a half-day strategic planning session board retreat. Prior to this retreat, our
membership took an extensive survey where we gathered information about them, what
they wanted from their membership and what type of events they were interested in. At
this retreat, we used this information to reflect on the preceding year and developed
strategies for the coming year. Each board member was challenged to set personal and
committee goals, and the board as a whole set goals and objectives. The board came out
of this retreat with a unified vision of where we intended to take Ad2 Cincinnati. At a
different time, each incoming board member met one on one with their outgoing
counterpart to secure a smooth transition. (Exhibits A–D)

The Ad2 Cincinnati board members meet on a monthly basis to share committee updates
and discuss any important club business. The January meeting, which marked the half
way point of the year, the board reviewed the goals that were set six months prior and
assessed our progress. Many goals were met and even exceeded. New goals were set for
the upcoming six months. Collectively, we have stayed on target to grow and achieve all
that we set out to.

Objective 2: Examine the current operations model and make changes to meet the
demands of a larger organization.
Having experienced such tremendous growth since our inception, we took this time of
transition to see what was working for us and what areas needed improvement. Our first



                                            70
step was to revisit the bylaws that were written when the club only had fifteen members.
A committee submitted changes, which were then ratified by our membership. Next,
leadership decided to change the model of our monthly meetings to be run more as a
business meeting. Up to this point, the meetings were open and doubled as a
social/networking opportunity. In the place of the monthly meetings for the membership,
we started Ad2sdays, a networking happy hour held every third Tuesday of the month.
This is a free event to attend, so it is purely for the benefit of the members, and it is an
opportunity to network with members and non-members and to hear the latest club news.
For example, the first Ad2sday in July was themed “Meet the Board.” This served as an
introduction to the membership and also an opportunity for them to get volunteer for a
committee. These Ad2sdays have been very well received. Each month we consistently
have around twenty in attendance, with as many as forty. Attendees include, Ad2
Cincinnati and AdClub of Cincinnati members, prospective members and various other
area professionals. Also to address the desires of our members and to increase the value
of our membership, all educational programs are offered free to our members, whereas
non-members are charged a small fee. (Exhibits E–F)

Our second big objective was to revamp our communications. Up until now, email
communication came from several different people and they were very frequent, with no
regularity. We streamlined the emails to serve as a newsletter to keep the members up on
the latest club news and events, achievements, opportunities for involvement in the club
and other relevant happenings in the area. The communications usually go out every
Monday and are the responsibility of our Secretary. We have been successful in not
overloading our list’s inbox and bringing the most important news to them. This has
served as a great tool of communication with our members and prospective members.
You can sign up on our email list at any event or online through our website. (Exhibits
G–H)

Another area of communications that needed improvement was our website,
ad2cincy.org. At this point, our website functioned more as a recruitment tool. We now
wanted it to function more as a tool for our members. Our “News and Events” page is
always filled with upcoming events. Our Programs Committee’s goal was to have events
planned at least a month in advance in order to be able to post them. Each month, we
have two events, one educational program and one social (Ad2sday or special event). The
“Get Involved” page lists each committee, a description of what they do and the
committee chair’s name and contact information. If someone wants to get involved,
there’s everything they need to know to get started. New members now have the ablility
to pay online with a credit card if they wish, which we felt was a necessity in today’s
world. And there were many other improvements to the site. (Exhibits I–O)

As Ad2 Cincinnati grows bigger, there is more that we can accomplish. Therefore, this
year we added two new board positions, a Fundraising Chair and an Education Chair.
Fundraising has become necessary to host bigger events, increase member benefits and
send leadership to conferences. When planning events, we work from a zero budget. Over
the past year, our Fundraising Committee has successfully forged relationships with
several vendors and sponsors to support our events. (Exhibit P) A plan is in motion to



                                             71
obtain annual sponsors for the coming year. We felt the need to add an Education
Committee in order to reach out to area colleges. That way, the Membership Committee
can focus on young professionals. The Education Committee also collaborated with the
AdClub of Cincinnati by taking over the responsibility of organizing and promoting the
Student ADDY’s, held in conjunction with the Professional ADDY’s. They also were a
major component in organizing the AdClub’s Career Day. This was one of the most
successful Career Day events, which reflects directly on the involvement of Ad2
Cincinnati.

An obstacle throughout our first year and half was staying on top of our financial
standing. Our money is in a shared account with the AdClub, and we rely on the
Executive Director for updates. We had a meeting with her at the beginning of the year to
create better processes. This past year, we have been successful in receiving more regular
updates and keeping a closer eye on our balance. At the beginning of the year, we wrote
our first budget, in order to better plan for big expenses. The majority of our income
comes from memberships, sponsorships and non-members attending educational
programs. Our biggest expenses are sending members to conferences, ie. we plan on
sending at least three people to the AAF Conference in Atlanta. (Exhibits Q–R)

Objective 3: Increase awareness/position within the advertising and traditional
community, placing Ad2 Cincinnati as THE young advertising professional
organization.
From the outset, this has been a main objective of ours. We joined a young professional
network called YP Cincy, a division of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber. This is a
network where organizations unite to bring opportunities to area young professionals. It
is currently made up of fifty organizations. Young professionals can visit their website,
ypcincy.org, to see what opportunities are available, and an email is sent out to their list
every other week with an event update for the following two weeks. Ad2 Cincinnati posts
information on the site about the club and contact information for those who are
interested. We also post all events on the site, which are included in their email blasts to a
list of about 3,000. (Exhibits S–U)

YP Cincy is also a great opportunity for collaboration and networking. Every year they
have a YP Summit called Bold Fusion which includes the leading area young
professionals. This year we had several members attend, where we heard speeches by the
Mayor, the Governor of Ohio, among others. This is a platform for young professionals
to voice their opinions on the future of Cincinnati, and the city looks to us for suggestions
and help. In conjunction with this event is another event called Discover Cincy. Ad2
Cincinnati had a table at the expo-style event. We were able to hand out promotional
materials and gain more names as prospective members. Together the events had over
500 young professionals in attendance. (Exhibit V) At Bold Fusion, the Cincinnati USA
Regional Chamber rolled out their Agenda 360, a ten-year plan to improve the city. One
main area of focus is to bring more young professionals to the area. The Ad2 Cincinnati
President has been asked to attend meetings to play a role in the development of the plan.
We hope that we can play an integral role in order to help our city thrive as well as gain
more attention for our organization.



                                             72
Though YP Cincy, we have been able to enhance relationships with other young
professional organizations. For example, we partnered with the American Marketing
Association’s Young Professionals to throw a Holiday Party. This group is a logical fit
for us and allows us to grow our network. We have plans to collaborate again in the
future. (Exhibit W)

We have found the internet to be a powerful tool in aiding our objective of increasing
awareness. We have taken advantage of many local websites that cater to our target
where we can post an organization description, contact information and upcoming events.
These site include CinWeekly.com and Zipscene.com. (Exhibits X–Y)

We received media coverage for our big annual event, our second Fire & Ice Soiree.
Cincy, a professional business magazine, ran an ad prior to the event and also published
pictures after. The Cincinnati Enquirer (also Cincinnati.com) had a write-up in the
Sunday business section prior to the event. At another time, they mentioned us in an
article that focused on Cincinnati’s desire to attract more young professionals to the area
and cited Ad2 Cincinnati as a contributor to the effort. (Exhibits Z–DD)

We have continued to build our relationship with the AdClub of Cincinnati, to make it a
collaborative relationship. We feel if we work together, we can accomplish more. For that
reason, we have shared member benefits, ie. members attend events for both clubs at
member rates. Our Membership Chairs have worked together over the past year to
increase benefits. Our President and Vice President participate in the AdClub board,
attending their retreat in July and monthly board meetings where they share Ad2 updates.
We promote each other’s events through our websites (adclubcincy.org) and through
email blasts to our lists. The AdClub publishes a member directory every year, which
also includes our members. Our President wrote a small piece on Ad2 Cincinnati that was
included in the book. We support the AdClub in any way that we can. They are currently
working on a big initiative, called the Digital Hub Initiative, which is intended to promote
the region’s expertise in digital advertising. We are supporting them by serving on
committees, reaching out to colleges and assisting in organizing and running a major
conference in the fall of 08. (Exhibits EE–KK)

Another way to increase awareness of Ad2 Cincinnati in the community was through
increased community outreach. Northlich, a local advertising agency, launched a
mentorship program for the Ohio Tobacco Prevention Foundation, called Emerge. They
invited us to partner with them in their efforts. In August we had a program at Northlich,
where they uncovered their plan and asked for volunteers in our industries to serve as
mentors to local underprivileged teens. This program allowed some of our members to
give back to our community in a different way than our Public Service campaign. It also
allowed us to continue to build our reputation in the community as upstanding young
professionals with a vested interest in our community. (Exhibits LL–MM)

Objective 4: Maintain contact with and a presence in our local AdClub of
Cincinnati, on a district level and nationally with National Ad2 and the AAF.



                                            73
We look to the expertise and guidance of our affiliates locally, regionally and nationally.
We are building these relationships to make us stronger and continue to thrive. As
explained above, Ad2 Cincinnati maintains a close relationship with the AdClub of
Cincinnati. In October, our Vice President attended the AAF District 5 meeting, which
was our first appearance at a regional event. This helped us to gain knowledge of how
things operate on a district level and also to gain some insight into surrounding clubs. We
sent seven members to the National AAF Conference in Louisville to participate in the
Ad2 events, including the Public Service competition, the idea exchange and
networking/social events. This benefits our club by bringing an understanding of the
national affiliation and to gain ideas and insights into other Ad2 clubs. We plan to send at
least three members to the national conference in Atlanta this June. We have worked on
improving our relationship with National Ad2 this year. The President and Vice President
attended the mid-year retreat in Denver. Our President took part in several conference
calls throughout the year with the National Board and also kept in communication
through email. She also served as a Membership Chair, being partnered with a newly
formed club, Ad2 Charlotte, as an advisor. We look to maintain these good relationships
that we have formed and continue to grow them.

Conclusion:
The past year has been a year of change and improvement. We were successful due to the
hard work and dedication of a strong board and active members. We continue to listen to
our membership and offer diverse, informative educational programming (monthly),
various social events (monthly) and the opportunity to develop leadership and
professional skills through committee involvement and the Public Service campaign. We
continue to grow and adapt to meet their needs. We continue to increase awareness of
who we are and establish ourselves as being THE young advertising professional
organization in Cincinnati. And we continue to maintain contact with our affiliates
locally, regionally and nationally. We continue to set high goals and achieve them. If
we’ve come this far in just two and half years, we look forward to see where we can take
this club in the future




                                            74
      Communications
       st
     1 Place – Division 1

     Philadelphia Ad Club

Contact:       Charles Volpe
               Rowan University
               608 Mapleview Court
               Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054
               (856) 778-3692
               volpe@rowan.edu




              75
National Club Achievement Competition
Category: Communications

Philadelphia Ad Club—www.phillyadclub.com, AD NEWS
Magazine


          5th Anniversary:
          Why We Needed To Become
          The Region’s 800-pound Gorilla
          History taught us that the regional industry wanted and demanded
          stronger communications and leadership. “If we lead, they will come!”

          5-Year Perspective: Synergy of marketing thrusts with magazine and
          website as centerpiece helped the Philadelphia Ad Club achieve and
          sustain 1200-plus membership and record event participation. . .while
          making a profit.




BACKGROUND
Financially unstable and with a low, dwindling membership back in the late 90s, the
Philadelphia Ad Club embarked on an aggressive communications program in late 2002.
Even though there was virtually no budget for the effort, the plan became possible with a
local college partnership--Rowan University advertising students. With the combination
of free labor and highly motivated students, the club was able to develop a dynamic
website (www.phillyadclub.com), create a 16-page full color bi-monthly newsletter and
begin regular member communications with an e-newsletter. Five years later, the
website—since redesigned--has grown to 750,000 hits a month. The newsletter evolved
into a 68-page, bi-monthly, full color “news magazine” and has jumped its circulation to
10,000 (25,000 readership).

The bottom-line: The tools have positioned the Philadelphia Ad Club as “the region’s
800-pound gorilla” and are generating 5-figure net profit, annually. Membership has
exceeded 1200 and the club is experiencing record attendance at all meetings.

TODAY’S OBJECTIVES:
There was a void in the region and the Philly Ad Club was being “pushed” and
encouraged to take the lead.




                                           76
With the initial success of the three tools, the Club was ready for Phase II in 2007:
establishing a dominant market presence and re-focusing its communications from “The
Voice of the Philadelphia Ad Club” to “The Voice of the Greater Philadelphia
Communications Community.”

Our new objectives became:
   • To have the PAC website, www.phillyadclub.com, and its printed AD NEWS
      magazine become “The Voice of the Greater Philadelphia Communications
      Community” by creating a high involvement with both the membership and the
      regional communications community. By downplaying the “Philly Ad Club” slant
      in the magazine/website and emphasizing the “industry news source” thrust, we
      would attract a far greater audience. We encouraged area associations (PRSA, Art
      Directors Club, PDMA, etc) to write articles and to promote their events. Our role
      was also not to compete with the national publications (AdWeek, Ad Age, etc.)
      but rather focus solely on the regional industry. There is no other similar
      publication in this market. Because it felt right, we also changed our magazine
      cover logo from “the Voice of the Greater Philadelphia Industry” to “Greater
      Philadelphia’s Most Comprehensive Industry News Source.”

   •   To increase the news magazine circulation to 10,000. (In 2003, the magazine’s
       circulation was 800. In 2004 and 2005, circulation increased to 2000 then 6000. In
       January 2007, the circulation increased to 10,000 with an estimated 25,000
       readership.) As the magazine/website’s reputation grew as being fair and almost
       neutral, the club was able to get an assortment of mailing lists that represented
       both the agency and corporate side.

   •   To increase the size of the AD NEWS magazine from 32 pages to a perfect bound
       68-page publication. To establish our “comprehensive news source” emphasis, we
       needed to give the publication a “look, heft and feel.”

   •   To make each communications tool a profit center. Currently, the three tools
       generate five-figure net profit. . .making it the third largest club profit center.


TARGET AUDIENCE:
Our members, key personnel in regional advertising/marketing/media, and the regional
corporate marketing community. We achieved this by using our directory of 1,200+ club
members and supplementing with lists from cooperating regional marketing
communication associations and by renting additional key corporate lists. Readership
includes both the agency and corporate communications sides.

THE METHODOLOGY:
We approached the market slowly. Our goal was to “earn a respect” by demonstrating
that our tools were “fair and relatively neutral communications.” Also important was a
product consistency and a regular publication schedule.



                                              77
Advertisers became more responsive to placing their ads in an “industry publication”
rather than a “club newsletter.” As for additional income (beyond the advertising), the
website/magazine policy downplayed costs and fees. We would only charge for
embellishments. For example: website job listings under 200 words are free but are $50
for longer listings. (We were surprised by how companies preferred to pay for longer
versions). It was the same for the directory listings: listings are free but there is a $100
charge for a color logo. (Both directories have over 90% logo participation.)
The website and magazine served as a centerpiece of an aggressive marketing thrust
which included event post cards, email blasts, etc.




BUDGET RECAP:
There are no costs. All tools and all expenses are fully supported by advertising. . .with a
excess net profit of five-figures annually.

Distribution through the mail
All magazine mailings are fully supported by advertising and subscriptions.


KEY RESULTS ACHIEVED:

Web
   •   Today, the site is generating more than 750,000 hits a month with over 8,000
       referrals each month from search engines like Google. (In late 2003, the website
       was generating 90,000 monthly hits and, in 2005, it was generating approximately
       250,000 hits a month.)

   •   The website has become a key regional source for club and industry news, PAC
       and regional events, employment opportunities, idea generation and online
       registration. Since the site is updated daily—often 3 to 4 times a day—members
       expect current news. For example, the day after the ADDY Celebration, we did a
       complete wrap-up of the ADDY Celebration with photos, news story, an
       alphabetical listing of winners and pdf copy of the program. The day following
       the event, our site recorded a significant spike in hits—up 40% from a typical day.

   •   Our website employment section is “red hot.” We receive a minimum of 45 new
       listings each month and the section now includes employment/recruitment firms
       at a yearly fee. An example of our success: we get several emails each month
       asking us to “quickly take down” employment listings because of large and
       qualified responses. Typically, an email states: “thanks for giving us such a high
       quality of applicants. It’s a great service.”

   •   Our site statistics show two distinct trends: A more frequent and a longer visit on
       our site. On average, a visitor visits three to five times a month with 40%


                                             78
       spending between 5-10 minutes per visit. Bookmarking is also at a high and
       increasing.

   •   Response from membership is extremely positive. Based on member suggestions,
       the website was totally redesigned (including bigger bandwidth and additional
       domain names). . .all offset by advertising. For excitement, we have added event
       “flash.”

   •   Homepage banner advertising has sold out. Due to this unexpected demand, we
       added new ads slots on the home page and several on other pages.

   •   As much as 75 percent of event registration is now handled online. This
       significantly cuts phone and payment handling.



(See Exhibit 1)

AD NEWS Magazine
The bi-monthly AD NEWS Magazine, recently redesigned, is consistently 68-pages, full
color with a 10,000 circulation and an estimated 25,000 readership.

Paid advertising has increased from six pages per issue in 2003 to 17 pages in 2005 and
25+ pages in 2007-08. Even with high costs (layout, printing, list rental, postage rates,
etc), the magazine is generating a profit with each issue.

Members are actively involved with the magazine. In a typical week, we receive scores of
releases and queries. It seems that being in our magazine IS the “place to be.”
Ads are up with each issue. As for content, we have a solid information pipeline.
Advertisers, too, are being more responsive.

As the magazine gains respect and evolves, we add new features. In late 2007, we added
a new “Great Advertiser Series” that highlights regional corporate advertising executives.
(The first two issues were the executives from Campbell’s Soup Company and Subaru).
Another series highlights the CEO’s of local agencies. Two semi-annual directories
(Media Contact Directory in March and September and Audio/Film/Video production
directory in May and November) are becoming more successful with each issue.

We are also beginning to see paid subscriptions ($30 per year). And, to increase the
circulation using a “natural channel,” the PAC Board has approved reduced rates for
students and reduced rates for member companies who want additional copies.

Even with an increase of advertising rates/postage (due to the increased circulation),
advertising has increased significantly with an almost non-existent drop-off.




                                            79
Unanticipated results—Driving the club’s success.
Members are becoming more involved with our communication--both website and
magazine. The regional communication community is also actively engaged. It is
apparent that we have filled the void and have become the needed lead organization—the
800 pound gorilla, of sorts. It also seems to have a direct impact in driving the club’s
success.

   •   Membership is at an all-time high, exceeding 1200 members/associates for the
       past two years. There has been record attendance at all events. A breakfast or
       luncheon averages 250 attendees. The recent ADDY Celebration had over 600
       attendees.
   •   The communications has also added dozens of new members. (Some people who
       call the office for a magazine subscription are easily talked into becoming new
       members.)
   •   Each month, online registration and payment is increasing (almost incrementally).
       Because of the very success of online registration, a new payment add-on is being
       implemented.
   •   A greater number of new members are downloading membership applications
       online.
   •   Event sponsorships are at an all time high.
   •   Our 2008 Membership Directory (combined with our ADDY Awards Program)
       had a significant increase in advertising over last year.
   •   Several local organizations have made overtures for us to work collaboratively
       with them. Interesting developments are in the works.
   •   The Philadelphia Ad Club has become a great place for students. More students
       are involved and because of the success of key programs, more scholarships are
       given each year. For example: Forty (40) advertising students were invited to
       attend the ADDY Awards Celebration. While they helped the club at the
       registration table, took photos, helped with the event flow and other such tasks,
       they also had the opportunity to “rub shoulders” with area practitioners and learn
       networking firsthand. Many walked away with job leads and internships. The club
       had free help and saved on photo costs.

In Summary:
The magazine and website—as the centerpiece of our marketing thrusts—has created
both stronger communications and a dominant leadership role for the Club. It has helped
the Club achieve and sustain its 1200-plus membership and makes us highly visible thus
helping to make each event successful. Simply, the regional industry was hungry for
leadership. . .and we filled the role. Best of all, these communications vehicles have
become strong profit centers for the club.

2008 Marks the Fifth Anniversary of the creation of the phillyadclub.com website
and AD NEWS magazine.




                                           80
    Communications
    st
   1 Place – Division 2

    AAF – Des Moines

Contact:     Jennifer Simpson
             Radio Iowa/Brownfield News
             9934 Tanglewood Drive
             Urbandale, IA 50322
             (515) 244-7400
             jen@learfield.com




            81
Club Background:
American Advertising Federation of Des Moines, formerly the Advertising Professionals
of Des Moines, celebrates the club's 100 years of leadership in the industry with
unification to our national affiliate's brand identity - The American Advertising
Federation (AAF) after a unanimous vote of support. The AAF of Des Moines is a
dynamic, growing organization dedicated to professional development and networking in
Des Moines and central Iowa. The object of this organization, according to our bylaws,
is to foster higher standards of practice in advertising, to expand recognition of
advertising, to further the personal and professional knowledge of persons in advertising
and to promote good fellowship among advertising persons.

Communications Goal: During our annual board retreat the club outlined a goal for
communications to provide effective means of two-way communication between the
AAF of Des Moines and its target audience in a creative and timely, yet fiscally
responsible, manner. This provides for more personalized communication with our target
audience and more interaction between the board of directors with the members. This
also provides the board with feedback from our target audience via the newly instituted
membership survey, direct feedback at meetings, online survey tools and online
submission areas at AAFDSM.com.
Historically, the board communications have been challenging as our coordination and
execution have not always been in sync. The board took on the challenge of aligning
these responsibilities and analyzing effective ways of communication with our target
audience.


Target Audience:
From monthly luncheon promotions to legislature alerts, our communication tools
promote, enhance, and support any information presented to the following groups:
   • AAF of Des Moines Board of Directors
   • AAF of Des Moines Members
   • Des Moines advertising community
   • Public Service community
   • Mass media and the general public/diverse audience

Tactic:
A) Alert members of upcoming events via the most effective form of
    communication.
AAF of Des Moines historically alerted members and prospective members of monthly
luncheons or special events via direct mail and supplemental email blasts including
hyperlinks to register for meetings. For special events we continue to use an integrated
approach with direct mail, email blasts and announcements to local media outlets
(Exhibit 1 – October leadership dinner, branding workshop and luncheon
promotional pieces).
In order to test the effectiveness of the direct mail versus the email blasts, the
communications team eliminated the use of direct mail for two consecutive meetings.


                                            82
Results: There was no change in attendance at the test meetings from our average
attendance rate. Furthermore, the survey results (Exhibit 2 – Pre-meeting notification
survey results) showed that overall the attendees felt the meeting notification was good
or excellent, which was consistent with prior meetings. As a result of this test, AAF of
Des Moines has eliminated the postage expenditure on direct mail while continuing to
deliver our message to the target audience.

B) Solicit direct feedback following each monthly luncheon.
After each monthly luncheon, an online survey (Exhibit 3 - Monthly Survey) is sent to
attendees rating items such as quality of the speaker, location, food, pre-meeting
notification and overall rating of event. Each of these surveys has a personal note from
one of our board of directors thanking the attendee for taking the time to attend the
meeting.
Results: The survey provides direct and timely feedback to our program and house
committees so any necessary changes can be made. This feedback has even been passed
on to some of our speakers as requested (Exhibit 4 - Feedback Example).

C) Promote the “extra” benefits of the monthly luncheon to our target audience.
The communications team had a unique challenge of delivering a multi-faceted message
alerting members and non-members about a monthly luncheon featuring a speaker from
the Radio City Music Hall’s Rockettes, the presence of two Rockettes for live photo
opportunities and the chance to eat on the Civic Center Stage where Broadway shows are
performed. Communications developed an email blast (Exhibit 5 – Rockettes Email
Blast) alerting members to the opportunity, placed an announcement on the AAF of Des
Moines website and sent an announcement in the Des Moines Business Record.
Results: Over 90 people attended the luncheon making this one of the most attended
luncheons of the year. The Civic Center, also one of our membership companies, was
able to act as a sponsor and highlight some of the sponsorship programs available at the
theatre. Many people also brought their cameras to capture their special moment with the
Rockettes and their famous leg kicks.

D) Increase participation at AdMania, an annual trivia event, through extensive
    communication efforts to make this event our signature social event.
AAF of Des Moines needed to reenergize this annual event by encouraging members that
had never attended the event to take on the one-night trivia challenge. A series of posters
(Exhibit 6 - AdMania Poster) were designed and printed at no charge to the club and
then distributed to these potential participants as well as the existing challengers.
After the posters were delivered, the AdMania committee followed up with these
potential participants via email and phone to encourage them to join the fun.
Results: AdMania had a total of 13 teams, an increase of 7 from the prior year. The
event netted $500 and increased the total participation from 60 to 130. This event has
once again become the signature social event for AAF of Des Moines.




                                            83
E) The ADDY® Awards Ceremony was the platform for the following:
     a. Highlighting local talent to both the industry and the general public
            i. Posters and direct mail pieces (Exhibit 7 – ADDY® Awards
               collateral) were sent to AAF members and non-members to encourage
               submission of entries and attendance at the show.
           ii. Video clips were shown at the ceremony of all Silver, Gold and Best
               of Class award winning submissions.
          iii. MySpace page (Exhibit 8 – ADDY® Awards MySpace page)
               showing the video clips of winners, online winner book and photos
               taken at the event.
          iv. Press release on winners was sent to local newspapers (Exhibit 9 –
               ADDY® Awards Press Release).
     b. Touting the club’s 100 Year Celebration and the appreciation to all of the
        past Presidents
            i. An online survey was sent to all past Presidents to which we had
               contact information for them to nominate two of their own for an
               award presented at the ceremony (Exhibit 10 – Past Presidents
               Survey).
           ii. Personalized letters presented to each past President at the ceremony
               signed by Wally Snyder, President & CEO of American Advertising
               Federation (Exhibit 11 – Congratulatory letter)
          iii. Picture of all of the past Presidents in attendance was taken and posted
               on the AAF of Des Moines website to capture the living history of the
               Club.

Results: Entries for the show increased from 436 for the 2006 ADDY® Awards to 501
for the 2007 ADDY® Awards. This helped to increase the attendance from an RSVP
number of 288 in 2006 to 301 in 2007. (Due to the largest snowstorm in a decade on the
night of the 2006 ADDY® Awards actual attendance was only 146).
The recognition of the 100 year celebration also led to increased pride of the existing
membership over the club history, reconnection of the past leaders and industry
professionals of AAF of Des Moines and acknowledgement in our community of this
milestone.

F) Encourage college students to come to the reformatted and reenergized Project
    33, hands-on integrated marketing conference.
The Project 33 team created a poster (Exhibit 12 – P33 recruiting poster) and email
blast that were distributed to students and professors at colleges and universities across
Iowa. The Project 33 team also communicated via personal emails to professors to
encourage them to enlighten and persuade their students to participate in Project 33.
Results: The following results proved Project 33 was a success:
    • 67 students attended the inaugural event.
    • Many students reported receiving internships or jobs from the connections they
        made at Project 33.
    • Over 95% of the students report they would come back to the event.




                                            84
   •   100% of the students report being more prepared for their future career because of
       the experience they had at Project 33.

G) Gather an understanding of what our members want from AAF of Des Moines
    as well as why our non-members are not members.
A long range planning survey (Exhibit 13 – Long range survey) was sent to members
and non-members in May 2007 with an incentive for a random respondent to receive $50.
Results: The response rate among members was 52% and the response rate among non-
members was 20%. From these results, the board of directors was able to develop a 5-
year strategic plan.

H) Keep members apprised of what is going on in the industry and in the local
   advertising community.
   • Newsletters (Exhibit 14 - Newsletter Sample): Newsletters are emailed to
      members of the Club. These are graphic-based newsletters with hyperlinked text,
      photos and illustrations. To facilitate two-way communication, by clicking on a
      hyperlink, members can also send news to an administrator.
   • Website (Exhibit 15 - Website Screenshot): The website includes up-to-date
      industry news, job postings, event announcements, new member information,
      board of director contact information and a membership-only membership list.

I) Encourage new and existing members to become active members by helping on
committees.
The Board developed and instituted an ambassador program that partners new members
or prospective members with current members. This program will serve as an important
touch to new members either new to the industry/community or new to the Club.
Results: On average, the program has paired over 25 new or prospective members with
current members. This led to more committee volunteers and provides increased
potential for future leadership within the club.

Conclusion:
Throughout the year we have focused on connecting both the coordination and execution
of our communication deliverables. As a result we have seen increased attendance at
AAF of Des Moines events and measureable satisfaction with the communications
process to our membership. Continuing to develop an active communication forum will
continue to play an integral role in our long-range plan.




                                           85
86
         Communications
          st
        1 Place – Division 3

South Dakota Advertising Federation

    Contact:      Ruth Ann Scott
                  4604 S. Florence
                  Sioux Falls, SD 57103
                  (605) 274-3548
                  ruthann@sdaf.org




                 87
                        SDAF Communications
                                       2007-2008


GOALS
The South Dakota Advertising Federation serves as the unified voice for advertising,
marketing and business professionals in the Sioux Falls, SD, area. The goal and purpose
of the Communications Committee is to clearly and frequently communicate that voice.
In order to reach this goal for 2007-08, it is important to set obtainable objectives, define
strategies, and deploy tactics for the year.

The Communications committee’s objectives for 2007-08 included the following:
      1. Increase readership of the newsletter and track readership (show value)
      2. Increase membership involvement through monthly meeting attendance and
         committee members

Within objectives there must be strategies planned to meet the set objectives. Our
strategies to achieve the 2007-08 objectives were:
        1. Retain interest in SDAF
        2. Ensure meaningful and engaging newsletter content – a “must read.” This also
            holds true for online content to continue to drive Web site traffic.

Strategies bring a list of tactics, which meet the goal of the strategy, and ultimately the
objectives.
         1. Update the visual brand from the military theme in 06-2007 to “cowboy
            chic” for 2007-08.
         2. Develop and implement new ideas for content and involvement.

BRANDING
Updating the visual brand of SDAF was important to achieve the objectives set for 2007-
08. It all began with a creative team’s fascination with rhinestones and cowboy boots.
With buy-in from the SDAF Board and positive feedback from a membership poll, design
began on newsletters, postcards, brochures, and a Web site. SDAF cowboy chic was
born. Within a matter months SDAF had a new brand identity for 2007-08.

To further tie into the visual brand of cowboy chic, the copy within all the
communication pieces reflected the theme. For example, section titles with the newsletter
and Web site included: Huckleberry Hitchin’ Post, Big Stuff on the Horizon, Range
News, Snappy Cowboy Lingo for Everyday Use, Holding Pen, Random Cowboy Ads,
and Welcome AdFed Greenhorns.


                                             88
The Communications Committee worked collaboratively with 3 different committees
within SDAF to carry the cowboy chic brand through all SDAF materials and events.

   •   Membership Committee: Created a compelling membership brochure and eye-
       catching
       3-D companion piece; “Professional Polish” which was a can of saddle soap
       relabeled with the SDAF brand. Developed a postcard to invite members to kick
       off the year at a membership picnic, the “SDAF Ballyhoo BBQ”.

   •   ADDY® Awards Committee: The Annual ADDY® Awards competition theme
       and printed materials took on the cowboy chic brand. This included: the Call for
       Entries “newspaper”; a 3-D invitation disguised as a target practice kit, “Big
       Shot”, which appeared as a faux box of bullets containing a “What are you
       shooting for?” poster, RSVP card, and diamond raffle entry card; 6 variations of
       tickets portraying different types of game; the “Welcome, Trophy Hunters”
       program book, and the “Genius Book” (Winner’s book). Unsolicited comments
       received after the show regarding the theme and materials were very positive.

   •   Programs Committee: Each postcard promoting a program showed another side of
       cowboy chic with witty headlines, engaging graphics, and a “Don’t miss it” call to
       action. The postcard included a brief description of the program, speaker photo (if
       available) and title, and event date, time and location.


CONTENT
To ensure meaningful and interesting content, the newsletter, e-newsletter and Web site
(www.sdaf.org) were updated monthly with area industry news and events. Since some
members crave only online communication, where others prefer printed communication,
all the content used within both the printed and electronic newsletters to meet the needs
of all members.

Members were encouraged to submit news releases, job transitions, industry news
articles, feature articles known as the Executive Spotlight to include in the newsletter as
well as on the Web site. These types of articles were especially interesting to other
members.

SDAF specific content included a letter from the SDAF president; listing of upcoming
programs and events, in-depth descriptions of special events, notice of member awards,
welcome to new members, and other SDAF notifications.

There were a number of fun areas within the newsletter, e-newsletter and Web site that
generate interest. “Ask Addy” gave members and visitors a chance to ask marketing,


                                             89
design and advertising questions and get answers from professionals. The “Snappy
Cowboy Lingo for Everyday Use” listed a cowboy phrase with an industry twist.
Members entered to win a prize at the next program, but they had to be present to win.
It's easy to find great books on management, advertising, marketing and creative, so
“Now Read This” provided a list and summary of great informational Web sites and
blogs. And there was even a hint of nostalgia in the “Random Cowboy Ad” area, where
old commercials and print ads were featured.



Frequency and consistency of the content play a large a part in communicating
effectively with our membership. We sent a save the date card in August that lays out all
the events, including the SDAF Ballyhoo BBQ to kick off the year. The overrun of the
postcards were distributed at each event. At the beginning of each month, the newsletter
is delivered to members’ mailboxes. The e-newsletter is emailed to the membership once
the printed newsletter is in-hand. These newsletters are then followed up one week later
by an oversized postcard promoting that month’s speaker.

In addition to the mailings, the SDAF Executive Director contacts the membership via
email with information about the programs and other events. Members are emailed
information about upcoming programs two weeks prior to the event, with a reminder
email one week in advance as well as the day of the event. Members are able to RSVP
via email with CVENT software, allowing the club to have an electronic RSVP list prior
to the event.


INVOLVEMENT
Communication with members enhanced member relationships, and ultimately
involvement. Maintaining those relationships is what keeps SDAF alive.

In order to improve involvement on an individual membership level, the Communications
Committee increased the number of interactive elements within the Web site. The
example we are most proud of is the monthly prize giveaway. This interactive element
touches members in several different ways.

       •   A prize giveaway is mentioned each month within the newsletter, e-
           newsletter, and Web site, prompting members to enter for the drawing for free
           by submitting a simple entry form online.

       •   The entry form allows for us to survey our membership or simple have them
           enter their name and email. The highest recorded number of entrants was 15%
           of the membership. Tickets for the drawing were also sold for $1each or 6 for
           $5 at the program for those who wanted extra chances to win or may have
           forgotten to enter for free online. The dollars raised from the drawing




                                           90
           benefited the college scholarship fund. An average of $50 was raised per
           program.

       •   Either way it is a great tracking mechanism. Not only are we able to gage our
           online traffic, we can also decipher how many people read the newsletter by
           the number of online entries, or number that clicked on the link via the e-
           newsletter to enter no online. Since the winner of the drawing must be present
           to win, it also drives people to the program.

       •   The prizes were donated by each month’s program sponsor adding even more
           visability for that member.

Along with the prize giveaway, several other ideas were added to encourage member
participation. These tactics include: industry questions and answers with Ask Addy, the
monthly member interview, job and internship postings, a photo gallery of snapshots
taken at the latest events, and a membership listing with contact information for an easy
resource for all members.

Each year a student member is selected to join the Communications Committee. Their
role is to layout the printed newsletter each month. This not only gives the student good
experience for their portfolio, but it also introduces them to working in a “real-world”
environment. The student is recognized by SDAF membership, which helps further
possible future career paths with SDAF members.

Committee involvement is crucial for many of the annual events to be successful. Within
the Web site, members, non-members, and students can volunteer to specific committees
and even specific tasks within that committee. The committee participation request is sent
directly to that committee chair and also the executive director for follow-up. Each
committee chair can update the needs of their committee at any time. Several committee
members were obtained through this online mechanism.

The Communications Committee partnered with several members companies:
      1. Paulsen Marketing for their creative writing, graphic design and web design
         services.
      2. Alphagraphics for printing the newsletters, brochures, and postcards
      3. Panther Graphics for printing the ADDY® Award materials
      4. Imagenation Graphics and Printing for printing and mailing the variable data
         postcard
      5. Qualified Presort Services (QPS) for mailing coordination.

By recognizing their involvement on each communications piece, these companies
benefit from added company brand awareness to the SDAF membership. Without their
involvement, the Communications Committee could not accomplish their goals. The
amount donated to the Communications Committee for 2007-08 totaled $59,888.




                                            91
These types of partnerships allow members to become more actively involved with
SDAF, ultimately strengthening relationships with the organization.


RESULTS
Overall, the cowboy chic brand generated excitement in the membership, especially the
interactive elements of the Web site. Between the new look and enhanced content for
2007-08, the Communications Committee feels the objectives of increasing readership of
the newsletter, tracking readership, and increasing membership involvement were met.
This can be determined through non-scientific means such as verbal member comments,
but also statistical tracking of the sdaf.org Web site traffic.

The 2006-07 sdaf.org number of distinct visits made to the site were averaging 4,038 hits
per month, which was a huge increase from the year before. The 2007-08 sdaf.org
number of distinct visits made to the site averaged 5,470. This is a 43% increase. Another
impressive statistic is the average time spent on the site. In 2006-07 the average time
spent was 2 minutes and 25 seconds. The average visit in 2007-08 was 5 minutes and 18
seconds. This is an average increase of 2 minutes and 52 seconds per visit. Members are
clearly enjoying the new Web site.

To further understand the impact of the 2007-08 initiatives the membership will be
surveyed at the end of the program year. The results of the survey will help guide the
goals and objectives for 2008-09.




                                            92
          Communications
           st
         1 Place – Division 4

Tennessee Valley Advertising Federation

      Contact:      Jackie Brown
                    Redstone Federal Credit Union
                    220 Wynn Drive
                    Huntsville, AL 35893
                    (256) 722-3421
                    jbrown@redfcu.org




                  93
Regular Communications with Members
      The Tennessee Valley Advertising Federation communicates to its members
      through emails, website postings, postcards, and newsletters.
      Emails - Members receive emails about once or twice a month depending on the
      events and/or news items. The club keeps the email blasts to a minimum to
      increase their importance; thereby increasing the chances a member will read the
      email. Email content is usually comprised of event announcements and a few
      items that require timely action.
      Website - The club’s website, www.tvaf.org also reflects event announcements as
      well as job postings and other advertising industry reference material.
      Postcards - Postcards are mailed to members about one or two weeks before each
      regular event. These announce the topic and other pertinent event information.
      Newsletters - The newsletter, “Ad-A-Glance” is produced quarterly and made
      available to members at meetings and as a PDF on the website. TVAF’s
      newsletters have information about upcoming events and member job promotions.
      It welcomes new members, as well as updates each official area of the club. There
      are also snippets of advertising industry hot topics to add more value to the
      newsletters.
Event Promotions and Announcements
      Tennessee Valley Advertising Federation has found a combined communications
      approach works best when promoting events. This combination is an email one or
      two weeks before the event, a postcard one week before the event, a press release
      to the local papers as well as prominent postings on the website. This year, we
      have seen an average increase in attendance of 30%, so this system is really
      paying off.
Communications with Nonmembers
      Tennessee Valley Advertising Federation communicates to its prospective and
      nonmembers through emails, website postings, postcards, press releases, and
      newsletters.
      Emails - Prospective members receive emails about once or twice a month
      depending on the events and/or news items. The club keeps the email blasts to a
      minimum to increase their importance; thereby elevating the chances the email
      will be read. Email content is usually comprised of event announcements and a
      few items that require timely action.
      Website - The club’s website, www.tvaf.org also reflects event announcements as
      well as job postings and other advertising industry reference material.
      Postcards - Postcards are mailed to prospective members about one week before
      each regular event.
      Press Releases – Press releases allow TVAF event announcements to reach
      nonmembers. This year, we have sent regular press releases in a timely manner,
      which has paid off in more regular publishings of our information.
      Newsletter - The newsletter, Ad-A-Glance, is produced quarterly and is available
      to nonmembers at meetings and as a PDF on the website. TVAF’s newsletters
      have information about upcoming events and member job promotions. It
      welcomes new members, as well as updates each official area of the club. There
      are also snippets of advertising industry hot topics to add more value to the



                                          94
       newsletters, so there is something for non-members as well. And by highlighting
       members, this builds a level of preference and publicity, hopefully increasing
       potential members’ desire to be a part of that list.
Self-promotion
       All of the communications discussed previously work together to promote the
       Tennessee Valley Advertising Federation. Through emails, postcards, press
       releases, websites and other such vehicles, the federation is constantly promoting
       our presence, willingness to help the advertising industry grow and desire to help
       the community. Several of our members, and especially board members, also
       belong to other professional organizations. This allows for the excitement of
       TVAF to be heard in those circles as well, through formal announcements at
       meetings to more informal discussions in casual conversations.

Communications Vehicles
  1.) Newsletter (Exhibits 1 & 2)
      Objective: To bring together advertising professionals by providing updates on
      TVAF events, advertising industry hot topics, job listings and promotion news.
      Target Audience: Members and non-members
      Budget Recap: Design and printing of the newsletter are donated, therefore it does
      not impact TVAF’s budget. To keep the impact on the budget low or non-existent,
      it is not mailed.
      Method of Distribution: Produced quarterly. Available in print format at meetings
      and as a PDF on TVAF’s website.
      Results Achieved: Copies of the newsletter are quickly picked up and carried
      away at the meetings it is offered, signaling a keen interest. Membership has
      increased over 31% this year and we attribute part of that success to the value
      members receive from the newsletter, yet it just one part of our total membership
      package.
  2.) Website www.tvaf.org (Exhibit 3)
      Objective: To serve as a reference for local advertising industry people, providing
      job listings and resumes; industry-related links and information; TVAF event
      information; and TVAF history, by-laws and other administrative material. The
      website also serves as an online event RSVP and payment vehicle, giving
      members a convenient way to pre-pay for events and RSVP.
      Target Audience: Members and non-members
      Budget Recap: Design and maintenance of the website are donated. The club pays
      $94.50 for hosting each year.
      Method of Distribution: Internet. Traffic is driven to the website through our other
      communication vehicles, as the web address is listed on every item.
      Results Achieved: One company who had a job opening only advertised it on
      TVAF.org and received over a dozen resumes within a week. Since we have
      started using our online RSVP and payment options, we have seen more
      consistent numbers of RSVPs, allowing for greater reliability as we budget for
      food. And with all the information available online we have seen a reduction in
      phone calls to board members.




                                           95
3.) Direct Mail (Exhibits 4-6)
    Objective: To announce TVAF events (postcards) and welcome members to the
    club (welcome kit).
    Target Audience: Members and non-members
    Budget Recap: For the 2007-2008 year, TVAF has been able to eliminate printing
    and mailing costs through vendor donations and/or sponsorships. As a way to get
    students involved, each postcard has been designed by a local graphic design
    student. The student receives credit on the postcard as well as free admission to
    that event, while the ad fed receives a postcard design at no cost. When students
    are not available, design is donated by a member, as was the case for the welcome
    kit. There have only been a few occasions when we have had to pay for postage. It
    is usually donated. So far, we have paid about $500 in postage.
    Method of Distribution: Postcards and welcome kits were sent via the US Postal
    Service.
    Results Achieved: Each event received excellent attendance, with an average
    increase of over 30% from last year. The welcome kits generated excellent buzz.

4.) E-mail (Exhibit 7)
    Objective: To announce TVAF events and advertising industry hot topics. Drive
    RSVPs and pre-payment via the website.
    Target Audience: Members and non-members
    Budget Recap: Design and execution of the e-mails are donated, therefore it does
    not impact TVAF’s budget.
    Method of Distribution: E-mails are sent on an as-needed basis, usually once or
    twice a month. The email distribution list is at 200.
    Results Achieved: Each event received excellent attendance, with an average
    increase of over 30% from last year. Since we have started using our online RSVP
    and payment options, we have seen more consistent numbers of RSVPs allowing
    for greater reliability as we budget for food. And with all the information that is
    available online we have seen a reduction in phone calls to board members.

5.) Press Releases (Exhibits 8 & 9)
    Objective: To announce TVAF events to the general public and ultimately
    increase attendance.
    Target Audience: General public
    Budget Recap: The writing and coordination of press releases is donated, handled
    by the Publicity Chair, therefore it does not impact TVAF’s budget.
    Method of Distribution: Press releases are sent before each event and to announce
    special happenings such as ADDY call for entries.
    Results Achieved: More than 80% of the press releases were picked up in the local
    paper, The Huntsville Times. And attendance at events has increased an average of
    30% over last year.




                                        96
   Communications
    st
  1 Place – Division 5

         Ad 2 San Diego

Contact:       Cheri Reeves
               Marketing Media & More
               8405 Rio San Diego Drive #5118
               San Diego, CA 92108
               (619) 296-4677
               cheri@cherireeves.com




               97
Ad 2 San Diego’s believes that in order to build our brand and image we needed to
rethink our communications strategy. We made the decision to GO GREEN!!! By
eliminating all forms of paper communications we were able to cut costs and better
segment our audience to delivery our communications more effectively.
Ad 2 San Diego’s 2007-08 Communications Committee Objectives:
    1. Better communicate with our members.
   2. Effectively communicate information about events.
   3. Communicate with non-members.
   4. Self-promotion.




Vehicle #1: Website

Target Audience: General public, professionals including Ad 2 San Diego members,
San Diego Ad Club members, potential members and students.
Objective: Revamp website to create a user friendly vehicle for members and those of
the general public to get information about Ad 2 San Diego, 24 hours a day, seven days a
week. The website meets all four of our committee objectives: better communicate with
our members; effectively communicate information about events; communicate with non-
members and self-promotion.
Budget: $96 per year for web hosting and domain registration.

Distribution/Details: www.ad2sd.com was re-launched on August 7, 2007. (Exhibit A)
The website is updated weekly and includes information about Ad 2 San Diego,
membership, Public Service Campaign, programs and a blog. The website is also used to
purchase tickets for events. The website address is included in all Ad 2 San Diego
Communications. This site can also easily be found through Internet search engines as a
result of optimization efforts.
Results: Our new website has proved successful. Since its launch on August 7, 2007, we
have 2,759 unique visitors! (Exhibit B) Considering our membership to date is 77, this is
phenomenal and believe that our objective of not only reaching our member, but also
non-members. Our blog has generated an average of 3 posts per month since its launch.



Vehicle #2: Email Marketing


Target Audience: Ad 2 San Diego members, San Diego Ad Club members, potential
members and students depending on the nature of the email.



                                           98
Objective: Immediate contact with the ability to alter the message if it is not producing
the desired result.
Budget: $0. Email service donated by member.

Distribution/Details: Key component in staying in touch with our members while
keeping our commitment to “Going Green”. Targeted lists invite Ad 2 San Diego
members, San Diego Ad Club members, potential members and students to programs and
Happy Hours. (Exhibit C1 – C8) Our email marketing campaigns instantly meet all four
of our committee objectives: better communicate with our members; effectively
communicate information about events; communicate with non-members and self-
promotion.

Results: The average read rate on email blasts sent in 2007-2008 is 46.7%. (Exhibit D1 –
D9) Our most successful campaign was for our holiday party where the read rate was
66%!!! (Exhibit D5)

Vehicle #3: Phone Trees

Target Audience: Communicate with Ad 2 San Diego members and non-renewals.

Objective: Increase attendance by personally inviting Ad 2 San Diego members and
those who have not renewed their membership to encourage them to attend an upcoming
programs and events.

Budget: $0 to the club. Nominal phone bill expenses to the board members.

Distribution/Details: Before each educational event and selected Happy Hours, each
board member is a sent a phone tree to call 5-10 Ad 2 San Diego members and non-
renewals. This allows us to immediately and personally connect with members and on-
renewals to speak to them about the event and encourage them to attend. (Exhibit E)

Results: Hard to measure specifically how many attend simply because of the phone
calls. Board members are able to develop relationships with other members through the
contact which contributes to Ad 2 San Diego’s high member retention rate. We have
received positive feedback from members in that they are more likely to attend an event
if they will know someone there.

Vehicle #4: Myspace page


Target Audience: General public, professionals including Ad 2 San Diego members,
San Diego Ad Club members, potential members and students.
Objective: Vehicle for members and those of the general public to get information about
Ad 2 San Diego on the largest social networking site, 24/7. Ad 2 San Diego’s Myspace
page meets all four of our committee objectives: better communicate with our members;



                                            99
effectively communicate information about events; communicate with non-members and
self-promotion.
Budget: $0

Distribution/Details: Board members with Myspace pages add Ad 2 San Diego as a
friend. Friends receive bulletins of events and Happy Hours. Additionally, we seek out
students and those in the advertisings field to add as friends.

Results: We currently have 285 friends. Myspace is used as another marketing tool to
better communicate with our members; effectively communicate information about
events; communicate with non-members and self-promotion.

Vehicle #5: Partner Events

Target Audience: Non-members and potential members.

Objective: Strengthen relationships with other Young Professional Associations to
network and potentially gain new members.

Budget: $0

Distribution/Details: In December 12, 2007, Ad 2 San Diego partnered with the PRSA
New Pros and The Rotaract Club of Downtown for “The Premier Holiday Party for
Young Professionals.” This was a Holiday Happy hour to raise money for Ad 2 San
Diego’s Public Service recipient the San Diego Humane Society and SPCA. Tickets
were $5 for students, $6 for members and $8 for non-members. All three organizations
collected prizes to raffle off. We negotiated a complementary cocktail for the first 50
through the door and free pizza the first hour, therefore incurring no cost for this event. It
strengthened relationships with other Young Professional Associations to network and
potentially gain new members. (Exhibit C5 and D5)

Results: Strengthen relationships and became a top-of-mind organization! Most
importantly we were able to raise $664 for Ad 2 San Diego’s Public Service recipient the
San Diego Humane Society and SPCA!!!



Vehicle #6: Speaking Engagements
Target Audience: Various student organizations, non-members.

Objective: To inform various groups about Ad 2 San Diego.

Budget: $0




                                             100
Distribution/Details: The San Diego State University Ad Club (AAF Chapter) and the
San Diego State University chapter of the American Marketing Association have both
invited Ad 2 San Diego as guest speakers to discuss our organization.

Results: Through these appearances, we are able to talk with students about careers in
Advertising and Ad 2 San Diego and strengthen our relationship with students. Each of
these speaking engagements resulted in increased student membership!




                                          101
102
Diversity & Multicultural Initiatives
        1st Place – Division 1

 Advertising Federation of Louisville

     Contact:      Robin Miller
                   Advertising Federation of Louisville
                   200 Distillery Commons, Suite 100
                   Louisville, KY 40206
                   (502) 582-2444
                   robin@louisvilleadfed.org




                 103
Overview: Like most major cities across the U.S., Louisville’s cultural “mosaic”
continues to expand both in terms of its size and its impact on business in a global
marketplace. But, surprisingly and sadly enough, many businesses have yet to fully grasp
the changing landscape or recognize the need to respond to it – not only as a potential
resource for growing their human capital, but also for contributing to their bottom line
profitability. These new and diverse populations are intelligent, fiscally sound and savvy
consumers, which means that advertisers must be prepared to communicate with these
groups effectively if they stand to win their business and their brand loyalty.
         Diversity and multiculturalism extends beyond just race, nationality or ethnicity.
What we’re also finding here in Louisville, and specifically within our ad industry, is a
large sense of multi-dimensionalism, based on attitudinal predisposition which may or
may not be a result of ethnic or cultural differences. We always joke that for our 750
members we have 770 opinions, but it is quite true. We are finding that not only do
diverse audiences want to associate themselves with diverse people, but they also demand
diverse programming to reach their own individuality.
         Using this more encompassing sense of multi-dimensionalism as our framework
for our diversity platform, the Advertising Federation of Louisville has established the
following six objectives in an effort to increase the minority representation and
participation in our market:
OBJECTIVE 1: To offer programming that expands perspective on what diversity
really means and how to truly leverage it effectively.
Project 1: Diversity & Donuts (Exhibit A) – Our Diversity & Donuts (D&D) seminar
series is now in its third year of existence and it seems to add a richness to our regular
program line-up. The goals of the program include generating awareness about a range of
diversity issues and examining the effects of diversity on advertising and marketing. The
programs are targeted to and free for AdFed members, but we also extend the invitation
to other groups including the Louisville Urban League and some predominantly minority
businesses. Each seminar is held from 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m., and appropriately held at
Louisville’s Muhammad Ali Center, a museum created for Ali, a native Louisvillian.
They donate the space to us and allow us to bring in our own food and equipment,
keeping our costs minimal. Our sponsor for this year’s series is the program’s founding
sponsor and their support helps keep this program free to our members, an excellent
member benefit.
         During the past year, we’ve held four D&D seminars. April 4 featured Sherlene
Shanklin, President/Owner of VIPP Communications and Ivy Promotions, and
Assignment Editor for WHAS TV, the local ABC affiliate. Her topic was “What’s the
Difference Between Diversity, Ethnic and Urban Marketing?” On June 22, Ron Crouch,
Director of the Kentucky State Data Center, presented Kentucky’s new realities based on
census data and trending reports. Tierra Kavanaugh Turner, CEO of TKT & Associates,
Inc., a D/MBE certified multidimensional business consulting firm that focuses on small,
disadvantaged, minority and women-owned businesses, spoke to our group on December
7 about “Diversity & Inclusion – What it is…What it is not.” Finally, Lawrence
McGlown, President of Phoenixx Brand Consulting, presented his seminar,
“Multicultural Marketing . . . Taking the High Road” on February 8. Each program has a
terrific crowd and the seminars typically erupt into a group-wide discussion with




                                           104
thoughtful dialogue. We have served more than 100 attendees through these programs
this year.
OBJECTIVE TWO: To foster interest in the advertising industry among minority
students
                                    and young careerists.
Project 1: Urban League Job Fair (Exhibit B) – We annually reserve funds in our
diversity budget to participate in the Louisville Urban League Career Expo, which targets
minority job-seekers. We distribute literature about membership in the AdFed, as well as
content supporting our professional development programs, including Diversity &
Donuts. Additionally, our members frequently call the office inquiring if we know of any
potential minority employees. To serve not only this need, but also in an effort to attract
minorities into the field, we further utilize our involvement with the Expo to collect
resumes from job seekers and distribute them to possible employers, as well as promote
our online job shop. Many of our member companies also have booths at the Expo, and
we help direct our attendees to our members’ booths, too.
Project 2: Most Promising Minority Students Program (Exhibit C) – The AdFed has
an ongoing partnership with the University of Louisville’s communications program,
which annually encourages students to enter the Most Promising Minority Students
Program. This is our third year in a row to boast a finalist who traveled to New York for
this event. We connected Courtney Harris, our 2008 winner, with Ben Ruiz, President of
minority-owned Adhawks Advertising & Public Relations, who helped her prepare for
her trip by conducting mock interviews.
Project 3: Middle School Connection (Exhibit D) – We are constantly seeking ways to
educate minority populations about choosing a possible career in advertising. To this
end, we also partner with the Jefferson County Public School System in their annual
“Make a Connection” program, which connects members of the business community with
middle school students. We secured AdFed volunteers to meet with two groups of
students for 30 minutes each to discuss the importance of going to college and how
advertising has been an exciting career choice. We encourage our members to participate
at schools with predominantly at-risk youth, since those schools don’t typically tend to
attract as many volunteers. This year, we secured 12% more volunteers than our efforts
last year.
Project 4: High School Marketing Challenge (Exhibit E) – The High School
Marketing Challenge is an annual fixture in our outreach efforts to encourage students to
get involved in the field of advertising. Each year, we secure a sponsor to serve as the
client and in April the students present, in competition, their advertising/marketing
solution to a stated challenge. For the 2006-2007 year, the sponsor was Kentucky
Harvest, a food-raising organization whose goal is to reduce hunger among less fortunate
– and often minority – population sectors. We added a new element to the challenge for
this competition, and had the students actually implement their campaign and test its
feasibility. At the end of the competition, the students collected 10,097 cans of food,
which allows for 20,000 meals. For the 2007-2008 competition, the sponsor is
Metropolitan Sewer District and the challenge is “green”, getting students to help keep
storm drains clean and free of debris. We are pleased to report that we have 17 teams,
amongst 9 schools, participating this year. The students are extremely diverse in terms of




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race, geography, and socio-economic status, which we hope will ultimately help diversify
the future composition of our industry, should any of them decide to enter the field.
Project 5: Minority Scholarship (Exhibit F) –We annually award a $1,000 scholarship
to a minority student who is pursuing a career in advertising, through an endowment fund
we established several years ago. We e-mail applications to regional colleges,
universities, and technical programs and students are judged on academic achievement,
community involvement, recommendations and an essay. Over the past few years and
due to this tight economy, we have been trying to develop ways to increase the amount
awarded. In June, we hosted the American Advertising Federation’s national convention,
which brought 1,100 advertising professionals to our city. Part of our responsibilities as
host city included assisting in selling sponsorships and implementing two social events;
in exchange for receiving a commission. Our board determined that all proceeds would
benefit our scholarship fund. Collectively we earned $15,696, including an additional
$500 the AAF awarded us for a job well done.
OBJECTIVE THREE: To recognize and promote the achievements of minority
individuals, organizations and small businesses, as well as utilize their services.
Project 1: Communiqué “Small Business Spotlight” (Exhibit G) – Our bi-monthly
magazine, Communiqué, featured a standard “Small Business Spotlight” column for the
2006-2007 year, as an effort to promote our small business members, who sometimes feel
they do not have the same advantages as larger businesses. Two of the businesses
featured are operated by females, often a rarity in the ad business.
Project 2: Louisvillian of the Year (Exhibit H) - Our annual Louisvillian of the Year
award, first given in 1951, publicly recognizes the generous personal contributions to the
life of the community in the areas of civic, educational or business progress in recent
years. This award is for someone whose contribution is above and beyond the
responsibility of his or her chosen profession. In its more than 50 year history, the award
has often gone only to Caucasian males, but over the past several years, the selection
committee has made an active effort to challenge both that perception and reality by
identifying and rewarding women and other minorities. This year’s honorees, of which
there were two, included the Reverend Dr. Kevin Cosby, a prominent African-American,
who during his tenure at St. Stephens Church, has helped improve the condition of the
surrounding neighborhoods and their resident’s lives, by erecting one of the premier
family life centers in the country; purchasing and converting the former only Black
owned and operated Simmons University property into a multi-purpose life enrichment
center; establishing transitional housing for recovering addicts; and purchasing and
demolishing neighborhood liquor stores and nightclubs. The other recipient was the
retiring Archbishop Thomas Kelly of the Catholic Church. The collateral for the event
cleverly exclaimed, “Let’s give praise for this year’s Louisvillians of the Year.” The
honorees were recognized at a luncheon, which targets members of the AdFed, in
addition to members of the business community. We advertised the program through e-
mail blasts, invitations, table tents, press releases, the Web site, and an ad in our local
business publication, Business First. The event attracted 224 attendees.
Project 3: Business Partnerships (Exhibit I) – Organizations, like ours, who represent
competitors amongst their constituency, sometimes get accused of catering to the “big
guys.” With 750 members, our goal is to level the playing field for all of our members,
regardless of size or any other factors that might affect their ability to get business. As



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such, we make it a priority to diversify the portfolio of our business partnerships. We
purchase our promotional items, such as speakers’ gifts, from a woman-owned business.
We also selected a woman-owned marketing strategy group to work on our internal
branding efforts this year, which was one of our featured companies in our “Small
Business Spotlight.” And, instead of typically using a large agency to create our
Communiqué magazine this year, we selected a freelancer’s services.
OBJECTIVE FOUR: To seamlessly weave multicultural issues into all of our
programming.
Project 1: YAP Seminar (Exhibit J) - The Louisville Peace Initiative was created this
past year with a vision to make Louisville "the Geneva of North America" -- a center of
world peace bridging divides at all levels - personal, local, national, and international --
across all issues from interpersonal to racial to economic to political. As part of a special
hands-on seminar that focused on idea formation, one of the peace project’s coordinators,
a local creative director at an AdFed agency, led 27 Young Advertising Professionals
(YAPs) in examining this lofty vision. During the ideation session, the YAPs identified a
major hurdle to the project's legitimacy -- the obvious racial and economic divide that
exists between east (wealthy and Caucasian) and west (poor and African American)
Louisville. To remedy the problem, the YAPs created the idea of a Louisville Peace
Center, to be located in the depressed West End. This idealistic place, located in this
burdened area, would demand more development and positive interaction among the
city's thought leaders. Eventually, the YAPs believed the Louisville Peace Center would
serve as a positive feedback loop for peace through racial coordination, and economic
symbiosis. The YAP's vision for The Louisville Peace Center was warmly received and
found a temporary home at the Muhammad Ali Center. The larger vision is now being
considered in the long-term development plans of the organization.
Project 2: Azerbaijan Delegation (Exhibit K) – From May 22 – June 12, we hosted ten
public service advertising executives from Azerbaijan, in conjunction with the local
World Affairs Council, who hosts business exchange programs. We solicited and secured
25 presentations for them with AdFed members and contacts while they were here,
including facilitation from our Executive Director, who worked with the program
participants to create their action plans for their return home. Additionally, the group was
here during the time that we hosted the AAF national convention and we arranged for
them to attend some of the sessions and social activities associated with that conference.
The program was very well-received and was our second time hosting a group like this.

OBJECTIVE FIVE: To engage all of our members by offering niche programming
opportunities.
Project 1: Breakfast at Winston’s (Exhibit L) – Our Breakfast at Winston’s series is
part of our government relations program and focuses on governmental and community
relations issues. Over the past year, we’ve held four of these seminars, which have served
nearly 300 attendees. Topics included a discussion of the 2007 Kentucky General
Assembly, a look at the new marketing and advocacy efforts of the state manufacturing
trade association, and the role of compliance versus marketing for both the banking and
the alcohol industry, two highly regulated industries. The programs are sponsored by a
local law firm and are free to our members. We hold them at the teaching restaurant of a




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local culinary school. We purposely also have them at 8 a.m. to reach an audience that
might not be able to leave work for a seminar during the day.
Project 2: Professional Development Programs (Exhibit M) – Five years ago, we
introduced our seven-session Professional Development Series, to reach members who
were looking for a more nuts and bolts approach to some topics, as well as a quick
brown-bag seminar. We hold this series at our office and purposely make the maximum
number of attendees small at 30 or 35 to allow for more personal networking time and Q
& A. Over the past year, topics have included: creative uses of paper, trademark law,
grassroots marketing, strategic advertising, copyright law, public relations, and creative.
Each program is $20, and the series is sponsored by a member company, whose
sponsorship dollars are transferred 100% into our scholarship foundation, which funds
our two scholarships, including our minority scholarship.
Project 3: Career Construction Series (Exhibit N) – We are now in the second year of
our Career Construction Series program, which we introduced as a way to immediately
engage our Young Advertising Professionals contingency. The program is intended to be
educational and fun, and each program is thematically held at a particular location. For
example, in early April last year, we held a program at Slugger Field, Louisville’s minor
league baseball stadium, called “Up to Bat: Hitting a Professional Homerun” about
resume writing and interviewing. Attendees also got to attend the game with tickets that
we got donated. As a result of last year’s success, we increased our program offerings for
this year by 25% and now have five instead of four. We were also able to secure two
sponsors for this year’s program.



   OBJECTIVE SIX: To encourage partnership among our older and new members,
                            both in age and tenure in the business.
Project 1: Communiqué “Two Sides” Column (Exhibit O) – The membership of our
organization, in addition to its many other facets of diversity, also seems to be split into
two distinct generational groups. We have members who have been in the business and
organization a long time and set in their ways, including as it relates to how many e-mails
(very little) they like to receive, how they want to communicate with the office and
leadership (via phone), and what kind of programming (social) they would like; and
conversely, our newer members who often think the opposite. As a way to cherish their
differences and explore how times have changed within the industry, as well as achieving
our secondary goal of celebrating our centennial by looking at our history, we established
a “Two Sides” column in our Communiqué. This column which asks a Young
Advertising Professionals member (YAP) and a Life Member (an elite self-elected group
of about 30 AdFed members who are 62 years of age or older and have served the club
for ten years or longer) to publicly comment on a particular issue from their vantage point
– thus prompting a true diversity of perspective.
Project 2: YAP/Life Member Mentoring Program (Exhibit P) – As another effort to
connect our various demographic groups, we established a pilot mentoring program
between our Young Advertising Professionals and Life Members and made 17
partnerships. The relationship between mentor and mentee is meant to be informal and
each dyad can meet or communicate as often or as little as they like. We recently held the



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kickoff event where mentors and mentees had the chance to meet, and we explained the
program. A new local restaurant donated the space and food and about 30 of the 34
participants attended. It was a huge hit!




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110
Diversity & Multicultural Initiatives
        1st Place – Division 2

  Omaha Federation of Advertising

   Contact:        Teri Hamburger
                   Omaha Federation of Advertising
                   5602 Leavenworth Street
                   Omaha, NE 68106
                   (402) 561-6625
                   teri@novia.net




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Omaha Federation of Advertising
Cultural Diversity

Minority Membership and Representation

In Nebraska, the state's population is 85% White/Caucasian, about 7% African American,
4% Hispanic (and increasing rapidly), and 4% "Other." Nebraska is also home to three
different American Indian reservations.

How does the club leadership and membership reflect the minority composition of
the market?

OFA’s minority members are of African American, Hispanic and Pacific Island decent.
Currently, OFA has a minority representation of approximately 3%. We also currently
have a minority board member from Malaysia and a board member who is a current
member of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe from South Dakota. Although we do not
currently have a board member of Hispanic descent, the OFA board added the sales
manager from El Perico, Omaha’s Hispanic newspaper. We believe that minority
representation on the board will have a great impact on recruiting a higher number of
minority members in the years to come.

OFA Activities/Projects

Program Speakers
Goal – To incorporate cultural diversity topics in at least two OFA-sponsored events.
Target Audience – All OFA members and prospects.
Strategy – Program Director scheduled Elisa Camahort from Blogher.com and Josh
Mayer from Peter Mayer Advertising in New Orleans for two of our monthly Adbites
luncheons. Elisa Camahort spoke on blogging to targeted minority demographics. Peter
Mayer discussed how their advertising agency raised funds for parks, housing and other
needed items for the predominantly African-American areas of New Orleans in the
aftermath of Hurricane Catrina.
Execution – E-mail blast to more than 1000 marketing professionals and students.
(Exhibit A)
Results – Nearly 75 attendees at both events and $200 raised for the New Orleans Park.

Education Workshops

Goal – To attract small businesses in the predominantly African-American and Hispanic
areas of Omaha to join the OFA.
Target Audience – Minority and other small businesses in the metro Omaha area.


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Strategy – To develop a small business seminar that was affordable and informative.
Execution – Organized a small business seminar geared toward attracting businesses in
the predominately African-American community of North Omaha and the heavily
Hispanic community in South Omaha. We worked with the Omaha Chamber of
Commerce to identify and contact minority businesses. We also advertised the seminar at
the annual Big O Show – utilizing a booth, signage and flyers. (Exhibit B)
Results – We met our goal of 50 participants at the seminar. Advertising professionals
gave 20 minute presentations and roundtable discussions on topics ranging from guerrilla
marketing ideas to public relations on a small budget. Although we had a higher
participation from non-minority businesses, we considered the event a success in its first
year and the feedback was overwhelmingly positive.

Volunteerism
Goal – To raise funds as well as Teddy Bears and Pajamas for Child Saving Institute – a
non-profit organization that provides emergency services to children and teens in crisis.
They also offer therapy for physically and sexually abused children. A majority of the
children who are helped come from predominantly African-American and Hispanic
neighborhoods in Omaha.
Target Audience – OFA members, Omaha Police Department, multiple media outlets.
Strategy – To ask members to provide teddy bears and pajamas for displaced children and
encourage small business donations for Child Savings Institute.
Execution – The OFA created a Holiday event and invited members, the Omaha Police
Dept. and several small businesses. Those who brought pajamas were given raffle tickets
to win donated prizes. Ornaments were sold and purchasers were entered into another
raffle for a $1,000 diamond necklace. (Exhibit C)
Results – More than 100 teddy bears and sets of pajamas were donated. Nearly $3,000
was raised from business donations and ornament sales. The Omaha Police Department
gave a talk on the importance of Child Savings Institute to the growing Hispanic
population in Omaha as well as the community as a whole.

Advertising Campaigns
Goal – To provide a public service campaign at little or no cost to a charitable
organization whose mission was based on helping minorities in the Omaha community.
Target Audience – General public of Omaha metro area.
Strategy – OFA’s public service committee selected Youth Emergency Services for a
comprehensive advertising campaign. This organization is dedicated to keep young
people off the street. They have helped nearly 500 homeless and street dependant young
people to find a safe place to stay, food and supplies to get through a time of crisis.
Execution – Developed an extensive advertising campaign that included TV, radio,
outdoor, Web site, business cards, newspaper, posters and more. (Exhibit D)
Results – Campaign reached a record $1,000,000 in value based on media exposure and
donations. $50,000 in cash was raised for Youth Emergency Services. The number of
minorities in the Omaha metro who were assisted by this campaign has not yet been
released, but the residual results will be felt for many years.




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Business Relationships With Media Outlets & Multicultural Suppliers
Goal – To increase OFA presence in the Hispanic community and adapt new ideas for
communicating to minority businesses.
Target Audience – Hispanics in marketing roles and Hispanic businesses
Strategy – With a growing Hispanic population in Omaha, we recruited the sales manager
from El Perico, the local Hispanic newspaper to join the OFA Board.
Execution – Secured Carrie Kentch, from the Hispanic newspaper as an OFA board
member.
Results – Our board member presented several ideas for placing ads in El Perico and La
Vision Latina to attract new Hispanic members. (Exhibit E) Since then, we have seen a
10% rise in Hispanic membership.

Educational and Motivational Programs Aimed At Encouraging Multicultural
Students To Pursue Careers In Advertising
Goal – To attract a wide range of minority students to OFA’s annual Meet The Pro’s
conference.
Target Audience – Students from several Midwest colleges and universities.
Strategy – To encourage minority students to attend the OFA’s annual Meet The Pro’s
conference.
Execution – A poster, e-mail campaign and Web site was developed to encourage college
students to attend the conference. (Exhibit F)
Results – Nearly 300 students and professors have enrolled for this year’s event. While
historically, a good representation of minority students have participated, actual minority
numbers will not be available until the end of February, 2008.

Club Leadership/Club Operations
Goal – To increase minority board members and OFA members as well as educate
current members on the importance of cultural diversity.
Target Audience – OFA board and club members
Strategy- The OFA Executive Board met in June, 2007 to discuss how we could increase
minority representation on the board of directors. This seemed like a logical first step in
communicating to minority groups in the Omaha area. Next, we researched other clubs
throughout the country to see how they developed programs in cultural diversity. Lastly,
we sought out minority businesses to get involved with OFA events and programs by
both attending these functions and donating time or services in order to increase their
company’s name recognition.
Execution – Developed a list of possible minority members for the OFA board.
Researched minority-run companies in the Omaha metro area and communicated the
benefits of club membership. We included monthly reminders at OFA board meetings on
the importance of diversity and recruitment of new minority members.



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Results - Successfully recruited 2 minority members and one representative from the
local Hispanic newspaper to the OFA board. Incorporated several ideas from previous
Cultural Diversity Club Achievement winners. Increased minority membership. Added
at least 5 new minority-run businesses to our company roster.




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116
   Diversity & Multicultural Initiatives
           1st Place – Division 3

Advertising Federation of East Central Indiana

        Contact:           Anne S. Condran
                           Advertising Federation of East Central Indiana
                           4200 W. University Avenue
                           Muncie, IN 47304
                           (765) 289-3679
                           acondran@comcast.net




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Market Overview: The Board of Directors of the Advertising Federation of East Central
Indiana (Ad Fed) developed 2007-2008 goals and strategies for year four of the 2004-
2009 Strategic Plan at its June 21, 2007 retreat. The 2007 Membership Survey, 2006-
2007 budget results, seven program surveys from the 2006-2007 meetings, Mission
Statement, By-laws and 2007 Annual Report were vital documents in developing the
current goals, objectives, and strategies. (Exhibits A-E)
    Obstacles to membership growth were identified, at the retreat, included: 1) high
unemployment rate; 2) loss of ten large factories; 3) 2% to 6% population decline in the
counties of East Central Indiana; 4) budget decreases for professional memberships and
business lunches; and 5) “brain drain” of college graduates moving to larger
metropolitan markets. Due to these economic obstacles the Board realized we would
have to increase our efforts to retain a strong membership base.
       Ad Fed’s primary territory is Delaware County, a rural area with one small
   industrial city, Muncie. Delaware is one of two counties in Indiana that lost
   population since the 2000 census. Its current population is 114,897, of which 65,298
   live in Muncie and 91% are white. The rural nature of the area, poor economic
   conditions resulting from the loss of most auto industry factories, and its history of
   racial tension provide significant obstacles to diversification that Ad Fed nevertheless
   is overcoming. The table below shows the lack of ethnic diversity of the counties of
   East Central Indiana.



                                      2006 Demographics

           County        Population     White      Black     Hispanic       Asian &
                                                                             Other
       Decatur            25,184         98%        .5%        .5%            1%
       Randolph           26,684         98%       .25%         1%           .75%
       Jay                21,606         98%       .25%        .5%            1%
       Henry              47,244         97%         1%         1%            1%
       Wayne              69,192         92%         5%         2%            1%
       Delaware           114,897        91%         7%         1%            1%
       Madison            130,412        89%         8%         2%            1%
       Grant              70,557         89%         8%         2%            1%
                        Data provided by Indiana Business Research Center




Development of 2007-2008 Strategies and Objectives:

The 2004-2009 strategic plan was developed with recognition that multiculturalism is a
philosophy and not a plan of action, so that diversity strategies could be incorporated
into our program, membership, and education committees’ goals and objectives. A look
at the 2007-2008 objectives and mid-year results show the practice of carrying this
multicultural philosophy and that it is integrated into each committee’s strategies and



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 responsibilities. This integrated approach has moved Ad Fed closer to reflect the ethnic
 diversity of our geographic area. (Exhibit F)


 2007-2008 STRATEGIC GOALS:

     1. To increase awareness of members of the impact of multicultural diversity on the
        advertising industry
     2. To bring a nationally noted advertising executive to speak to our club about
        multicultural issues in advertising.
     3. To award a Mosaic ADDY® to diversity and multiculturalism.
     4. To increase minority membership
     5. To offer a scholarship to a minority student


 MEMBERSHIP REPRESENTATION COMPARISON WITH THE LOCAL MARKET

     A look at the data reveals Ad Fed is coming to look more and more like its
     environment. Still, there are understandable differences (Table 1 below). For example,
     85% of the club’s members are college graduates and 10% attended college compared
     to a 17% college graduation rate for Delaware County, but this discrepancy is to be
     expected given the professional nature of the club. Similarly, Ad Fed has a much
     younger demographic than its community, as evidenced by Table 2, but the club has a
     wide diversity of age among its members. (Source for all tables: Delaware County 2000
     Census data)




                 Table 1. EDUCATION                                         Table 2. AGE

                                East        Ad                           East          Ad Fed
                               Central      Fed                         Central
                                 IN                                       IN
No High School Diploma          26%          0%         Age 20-29        21%            15%
High School Diploma             38%          5%         Age 30-39        16%            39%
Some Education beyond HS        19%         10%         Age 40-49        16%            18%
College Degree                  17%         85%         Age 50-59        15%            20%
                                                        Age 60+          21%             8%


    It is in the area of race and ethnicity that the club had historically been less
 representative and where we have increased the focus of our diversity efforts. The


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number of African-American professionals in Delaware County is extremely small, and
every major corporation, municipal board, and civic group in the county has had a
difficult time bridging the race divide despite many efforts. Ball State University, for
example, the largest employer in Delaware County, has only 13 (1.5%) African-
Americans among its 836 full-time faculty. Not surprising, there are only five African
Americans employed in marketing and advertising in Delaware County. It is against
these challenges that the Ad Fed has endeavored to diversify its minority membership.




                               Table 3. RACIAL DIVERSITY

                                                     Census Data
                                              Delaware      _____Ad Fed ECI______
                                              County      |     Membership        |
                                    2000            2000          2007
                White               91%             100%          98%
                Black                6%              0%            2%
                Other                3%              0%            0%


GOAL 1: TO INCREASE AWARENESS OF THE IMPACT OF MULTICULTURAL
DIVERSITY ON THE ADVERTISING INDUSTRY



Target Audience: Primary target audience - Ad Fed members and prospective members.
Secondary target audience – Those who surf the web site for general information.
Strategy: To publish a quarterly column titled “Diversity Matters” on the Ad Fed web
site to educate and inform members of diversity issues related to advertising.
Execution: The goal was addressed by distribution of industry trends and news to our members
through the club’s web site. “Daily Briefs” published by the American Advertising Federation,
Ad Age, and New York Times were used to obtain current trends in multicultural diversity and its
impact on advertising. The executive director gleaned key articles and distributed to our
membership through our web site.
Results: Our goal was to publish at least four diversity articles on the club’s web site. The
articles are found under “Diversity Matters” at www.adfeci.org. We published sixteen articles
related to diversity issues in advertising. We exceeded the goal by 400%! We also published
current demographics for the seven counties in our geographic market of Blackford, Delaware,
Grant, Henry, Jay, Wayne, and Madison Counties. (Exhibit G)




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GOAL 2: TO BRING A NATIONALLY NOTED ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE TO
SPEAK TO OUR CLUB ABOUT MULTICULTURAL ISSUES IN ADVERTISING.


Target Audience: Primary target audience - Ad Fed members and minority business owners
Secondary target audience - Prospective members who work in the advertising industry
Strategy: Initially our strategy was to select a well known experienced speaker from the
AAF Speakers Resource Book, contact references for feedback, and then book the
speaker. Once this was accomplished we were approached by the Ball State University
(BSU) journalism department, Indianapolis Advertising Club, and Advertising Federation
of North Central Indiana to “share our speaker.” Our Board of Directors saw this as an
opportunity to collaborate with other organizations so our strategy expanded. We became
the central contact to coordinate the schedule and travel for the speaker during his three
days in Indiana. This collaboration was a win-win situation for all four organizations. It
enabled each to share costs for travel and speaker fees to bring a noted national speaker to
speak to our four organizations.

Event Details: Jo Muse of Muse Communication presented “What’s Multicultural Today Will Be
General Market Tomorrow” at the professional development program on April 13, 2007. Mr.
Muse is president of the first multicultural agency in the United States and one of the most
imaginative and progressive leaders in the advertising industry.
Execution: The executive director of Ad Fed was the point of contact for scheduling, making
hotel reservations, travel, and transportation for Mr. Muse. Each organization was responsible for
promotion of their event and implementation of their event details. The Ad Fed promoted this
professional development program through newspaper, radio, TV, electronic newsletter, e-mail
blasts, and web site. (Exhibits H)
Results: More than 400 attended one of the four events held in Lafayette, Indianapolis, Muncie,
and BSU. Mr. Muse commented that he felt the three days of programs were very successful. He
brought 300 copies of his booklet titled The Multicultural Manifesto to distribute to attendees.
However, he ran out of booklets and mailed more than 100 copies the week following his
presentations.
   Mr. Muse was well received by our membership with evaluation scores at 89% for informative
and interesting content of the program and 91% felt the speaker held their attention. Some
comments included: “Muse’s information was a black history.” “The best and most entertaining
speaker/content this year.” “I only wish the program was longer!” “Strong program! Much
information to process. Speaker was polished and interesting.” Much (Exhibit I)



GOAL 3: TO AWARD A MOSAIC ADDY® TO INCREASE AWARENESS OF
ADVERTISING TO PROMOTE DIVERSITY AND MULTICULTURALISM.


Target Audience: Members, prospective members, and students
Strategy: To promote diversity and issues related to multiculturalism through the ADDY
Competition.
Execution: The Mosaic Award was promoted through the 2008 ADDY rules,


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regulations, and guidelines so that all entrants would be aware of this special ADDY
award prior to entering their pieces. During the day of judging the three judges were
instructed to look for entries that promoted multicultural diversity. At the conclusion of
the regular judging day the three judges selected one piece by consensus judging that
represented diversity.
Results: A Mosaic ADDYS® were awarded during 2008 to the Joseph David
Advertising agency. All three judges felt the ADDY® entry made a bold statement to
break racial labels and barriers in public schools. (Exhibits J-K)


GOAL 4: TO INCREASE THE MINORITY MEMBERSHIP OF AD FED

Target Audience: African Americans employed in marketing and advertising in Delaware
County
        Strategy 4-1: Due to the results of past efforts to recruit minority members we changed
        our strategy this year to face to face contact by the club’s leadership. We chose members
        from our board who had an on-going relationship with the prospective minority member.
        Execution 4-1: The Chamber of Commerce was contacted to obtain a copy of the
        Minority Businesses in Delaware County. The executive director and president of Ad Fed
        personally contacted African Americans employed in marketing, advertising, and non-
        profit organizations. The club participated in the Muncie Chamber of Commerce
        Business-to-Business Trade Show on September 13, 2007 which provided another
        opportunity to recruit minority business owners. (Exhibit L)
        Strategy 4-1: Seek out minority members engaged in marketing and advertising and
        introduce them to the ADDY® Competition
        Execution 4-2: Personal contact was made to graphic designer at Ball State University
        Miller College of Business; Marketing Director of Cardinal Health Service-Ball Hospital;
        publisher of the Muncie Times, an African American newspaper; and web designer of
        SpinWeb Designs to encourage them to enter the 2008 ADDY competition and to
        showcase their work at the ADDY Preview held in conjunction with the Muncie
        Delaware County Chamber of Commerce After-Hours. (Exhibit M)
Results: Two of the four minority members entered the 2008 competition! Seven percent of the
attendees of the 2008 ADDY banquet were African Americans which was the most minority
representation we’ve ever had at an ADDY banquet. Minority membership increased 300%
during the year! The publisher of the Muncie Times (African American newspaper) was
physically well and not able to attend our meetings but she did donate a full page ad to our 2007
Media Auction. She said, “I can’t join your organization because of my health but I can support
you through this donation.”


GOAL 5: TO OFFER A SCHOLARSHIP TO A MINORITY STUDENT

Target Audience: Sophomore to senior level minority students pursuing careers in advertising,
marketing, communications or a related field who are 1) a permanent residency in Delaware,
Blackford, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph or Wayne County; 2) a relative of paid member
of AdFed; or 3) a paid student member of American Advertising Federation in Delaware,
Blackford, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph or Wayne County.
Strategy: East Central Indiana has suffered from the “brain drain syndrome” of young
professionals, especially minority professionals, leaving to pursue careers in larger markets in the



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advertising industry. Our strategy is to help fund minority students who eventually seek
employment in the advertising industry in our market. The guidelines noted above in the target
audience ensure our scholarship recipients have ties to East Central Indiana and are more likely to
remain in the market after graduation.
Execution: The Ad Fed education committee was responsible for selecting the 2008-2009
scholarship recipients. Applications were forwarded to contacts at the five universities in East
Central Indiana. We promoted our scholarship program through newspaper, radio, electronic
newsletters, and web site. Applications were available at the universities and can be downloaded
from our web site. (Exhibit N)
Results: The Ad Fed education committee was responsible for selecting the 2008-2009
scholarship recipients. Recipients will be chosen at the committee meeting before the April 11,
2008 program meeting where we will introduce the recipients to our membership.



SUMMARY
We will continue to recognize multiculturalism as a philosophy and not a plan of action in next
year’s Strategic Plan because it works! Ad Fed has have had a tremendously successful year with
attendance exceeding goal at all program meetings, 82% member involvement, 87% membership
retention, 19% increase in the Student ADDY® Competition, and 300% minority membership
increase! We have met or exceeded all goals established for diversity. All five goals for diversity
and multicultural initiatives were met or exceeded for the 2007-2008 year.
    We are proud of these continuing accomplishments in the area of diversity. We are confident
our current efforts will allow us to continue to increase the diversity of our membership and
enable us to serve important segments of our community in the future. We have proven that
diversity is a priority and are proud to report that even though we set a higher bar for ourselves
this year than last year, we met or exceeded all goals we set for ourselves in every category.
    Bob Farnsworth, owner of Hummingbird Productions, described our success by saying, “You
probably don’t realize what a unique Ad Club you have. There is an underlying synergy in the
room and with your members. There is an excitement and a buzz here. Do you realize how many
people were here networking for about 30 minutes after the meeting? You have amazing
marketing materials and certainly run a professional organization. No wonder this is a strong Ad
Club!”




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124
Diversity & Multicultural Initiatives
        1st Place – Division 4

            AAF – Greenville

 Contact:           Peyton Lewis
                    The Cliffs Communications
                    3580 Highway 11
                    Travelers Rest, SC 29690
                    (864) 640-9602
                    plewis@cliffscommunities.com




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2007 – 2008 DIVERSITY & MULTICULTURAL INITIATIVES
OVERVIEW

A committee was formed in 2007 to implement a more focused approach to diversity and
multicultural issues of concern to AAF Greenville. The chair is an advertising
professional with more than ten years of experience, who also leads the Diversity &
Inclusion Council for Erwin-Penland Advertising, a Division of Hill Holliday. Under her
leadership, the group set out to integrate educational opportunities and programs of a
multicultural nature. The Diversity Committee quickly established great momentum,
which resulted in remarkable strides towards promoting a better understanding of and
solutions to diversity and inclusion issues within the advertising profession. The
committee has nurtured newly-implemented ideas, refined repeat initiatives and expanded
efforts to reach beyond the club itself into local schools and the community.


MINORITY REPRESENTATION

As part of AAF Greenville’s commitment to diversity and multiculturalism, one goal we
strive for is to increase minority representation within our advertising community.
According to the 2005 census bureau report (Exhibit 1 – 2005 Census Bureau)
Greenville County has a total population of 396,399. Of this total population, 76% are
Caucasian, 19 % African-American, 5.8% Hispanic/Latino, 1.7% Asian, 0.2% American
Indian and 4% other. The mix of minority advertising professionals in our market reflects
the percentage of minorities in the community.


OBJECTIVES:

To achieve our diversity goals, AAF Greenville established the following objectives:
   • Educate our membership on multicultural issues pertaining to advertising and
       marketing.
   • Lend our expertise and resources to support significant diversity programs and
       initiatives important to the local community.
   • Develop grassroots educational programs and internship opportunities for
       minority high school students in an effort to interest them in careers in
       advertising.
PROGRAM SPEAKERS/EDUCATION WORKSHOPS

A continued goal of AAF Greenville is to deliver diversity in the speakers we invite, as
well as educate our membership on effectively marketing to multicultural audiences.
AAF Greenville’s monthly programs cover a wide variety of topics of interest to our
membership throughout the year. Knowing that Hispanics are a fast-growing segment of



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the population, the objective of our April 2007 luncheon was to help our members
understand this ever-important consumer and how to market their clients’ products and
services to them in a meaningful way. Manny Gonzalez, VP/Managing Director for
Abece/Hill Holliday Hispanic, was the guest speaker at the April program. He spoke on
the topic of “The ‘New’ American Latino” [Exhibit 2] explaining the mainstreaming of
Hispanic culture and how to effectively penetrate the Hispanic marketplace. Gonzalez’s
presentation included snapshots of U.S. Hispanics (demographics, attitudes,
psychographics, lifestyles and attitudes), brand case study reports and the process for
planning Hispanic marketing, including brand strategic positioning and brand
programming platforms.
We promoted the event through our calendar that was given to _________ people, our
website, www.aafgreenville.org., and through postcards that were sent to club members,
prospective members and members of our community who might be interested in the
program. [EXHIBIT XX]
Goal: Educate members on effectively marketing to the Hispanic audience.
Target Audience: All club members, prospects and students.
Strategy/Execution: Luncheon with guest speaker as an expert on the topic.
Results Achieved: 33 people attended. The report card summary report (Exhibit 3)
showed that attendees gained a lot from the experience and found it to be informative.

EDUCATIONAL & MOTIVATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS

As part of an effort to support diversity and inclusion within the advertising industry, the
AAF Greenville Diversity Committee has developed an execution plan to offer a
Minority High School Internship Program for June 2008. As of March 2008, we are
receiving student application packets [Exhibit 4] for consideration. This program is
designed to provide students with a hands-on experience in the
advertising/communications field with the ultimate goal of encouraging them to consider
advertising as a career. The internship offers minority high school students the
opportunity to gain insightful experience and establish contacts within the advertising
industry. One or two students will be selected to participate in a two-week summer
internship program that will expose them to the advertising industry, while paying them a
stipend of $500. The 12 host organizations will ideally consist of advertising agencies,
printers and media outlets. During the first week, the students will spend each day in a
different organization getting hands-on experience with a variety of areas of our industry.
They will spend the second week at the host organization in which they have the most
interest. We plan to measure the program’s success by submitting evaluation forms to
host organizations [Exhibit 12] and the selected interns [Exhibit 13]. Through this
experience, interns will gain an understanding of the different disciplines and
opportunities that exist within the field. The interns selected must be either a rising high
school junior or senior, or rising college freshman at the time of the internship. Students
that meet this requirement can submit an application packet for consideration. The packet
includes an application; a typed 150-word essay on the topic, “Why a career in
advertising interests me;” a letter of recommendation from a teacher or guidance
counselor; an official transcript with class rank; and a parental consent form with a




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medical release. These materials will be used to make final selections using the
evaluation guides developed by the committee [Exhibit 5].
For successful completion of the program, interns are asked to meet the following
expectations:
• Keep a journal of their intern experience throughout the two weeks.
• Share their experience at a future AAF Greenville meeting.
• Adhere to the policies of the host organizations in which they will intern.
• If school permits, allow AAF Greenville to present the award at their end of year
awards banquet for greater exposure and recognition of the program.
• Be willing to be featured on the AAF Greenville website.
To continue communication to students interested in the advertising field, the committee
developed a student advertising resource file with links to several industry-related sites
[Exhibit 6]. Students were asked to sign up to receive this information via email by
simply providing their name and email address during the student presentations [Exhibit
7]. Posters provided by District Three of the AAF were branded with the AAF Greenville
logo and distributed at local high schools, churches and youth organizations such as Big
Brothers Big Sisters [Exhibit 8].
Host packets were also developed and distributed to approximately 100 AAF Greenville
members [Exhibit 9]. To further engage organizations to participate, the host packet was
placed on our website [Exhibit 10] and an eblast went out to the membership with a link
to download the packet from the website. The Diversity Committee also recruited hosts at
a Thursday Twist event on March 11th, 2008, where club members met after hours at a
local restaurant to network. Additionally, a formal appeal was made at the March 20th,
2008, program with an audience of about ________________. This evening program was
leveraged because it was anticipated to be one of our most-attended events of the year
with speaker Kevin Kirksey, ESPN’s Director of Marketing. Members were encouraged
to sign up as a host organization, and we generated ____________ host applications of
the 12 needed.
Goals: Obtain a pool of at least 15 qualified, diverse applicants. Secure at least 12 host
organizations. Make at least three formal presentations to students over a two-month
period to interest them in careers in advertising/communications field.
Target Audience: Minority High School Students, Guidance Counselors/Youth Group
leaders.
Results Achieved: The student packets are in circulation and posted on the AAF
Greenville website with a submission deadline of April 15th. Due to diligent planning on
the committee’s part, we have presented the internship opportunity via live presentations
to over 400 students at four schools: Carolina, Southside, Hillcrest, and Mauldin with
additional schools being scheduled each day [Exhibit 11]. Furthermore, we have already
secured more than half of the host organizations needed with several weeks to go before
the deadline. These early results are encouraging and make us confident that we will
reach our goals and make this program successful. This program has also allowed us to
establish solid relationships with local schools, increasing the opportunities to continue
offering educational programs to students.




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VOLUNTEERISM & DIVERSITY-FOCUSED COMMUNITY OUTREACH
INITIATIVE

MLK Dream Weekend (www.mlkdreamweekend.com)
This year’s newly-assigned Diversity Chair of AAF Greenville brought an opportunity to
the club with a diversity emphasis on the entire Greenville community to support a local
effort known as MLK Dream Weekend. This initiative was supported by many
organizations throughout the area. The Diversity Chair is a member of the Executive
Board of MLK Dream Weekend and oversees the marketing and communications effort
for the nonprofit group. MLK Dream Weekend was designed to not only honor the
memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., but to celebrate the diversity of our local
community through many programs and initiatives that include a Diversity Banquet,
Voter Registration Drive, Employment Fair & Career Workshops, Health Fair and Blood
Drive and Young Dreamers’ Day activities for the youth of the community. This effort
was a great show of diversity, volunteerism and collaboration. 2008 marked the third
annual year for MLK Dream Weekend and, as in previous years, the weekend of events
attracted thousands of people from the community, including high-profile individuals
such as Louis Gossett Jr. and Dr. Terrence Roberts of the Little Rock Nine. Young
Dreamers’ Day (YDD) took place on the MLK holiday when the schools were closed.
The events were for all school-aged kids and consisted of forums, community service
projects and KidBiz – a program designed to teach kids some of the basics of business.
The mere show of support by so many organizations that are a part of AAF Greenville
demonstrates our commitment to diversity not only in the advertising industry, but in the
community as well. The support of club members who participated is described below:
    • Erwin-Penland – donated over $50,000 worth of brand development services
         including the creation of all communication components such as the TV and
         Radio spots [Exhibit 14]. The agency also planned and executed the PR strategy
         resulting in phenomenal coverage and positive press.
    • Fairway Outdoor – donated space for three outdoor boards that will remain up all
         year long to continue to increase awareness. The value of the donation is
         approximately $15,000 [Exhibit 15].
    • Skyline Post – donated editing services of the TV PSA for a value of
         approximately $4,000.
    • WYFF – ran the PSA and covered all of the events.
    • Charter Media – served as a media sponsor providing $15,000 worth of air time.
    • The Greenville Journal – provided positive coverage [Exhibit 16].
    • Greenville Tech – served as a sponsor providing use of the college to serve as the
         venue for the Employment Fair/Workshops & Health Fair and Blood Drive – a
         value of $10,000.
    • WASV- ran the PSA.
MLK Dream Weekend events are very significant to Greenville. The county was the last
one in the nation to recognize Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with an official paid holiday
for its employees until 2006. The effort was monumental in promoting diversity,
awareness and acceptance in our community.
Goals: The primary goals and objectives of 2008 MLK Dream Weekend were as
follows:


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   •  To present the Greenville community as a culturally diverse and economically
      progressive area.
   • To provide scholarships to deserving youth [Exhibit 17].
   • To recognize individuals in the community who represent the character of Dr.
      King and Coretta Scott King [Exhibit 18].
   • Acknowledge companies who exhibit commitment to diversity.
Target Audience: The greater Greenville community.

Results Achieved -see Sponsors and Partners Report [Exhibit 19]
• Thumbs Up from The Greenville News [Exhibit 20]
• Approximately 900 people attended the 2008 MLK Dream Weekend Diversity Banquet
including seven public officials, celebrity Louis Gossett Jr. and high-profile speaker, Dr.
Terrence Roberts of the Little Rock Nine (www.littlerock9.com). [Exhibit 21].
• Received substantial local coverage by all major networks and print publications
(WYFF, WSPA, FOX, WMYA, Greenville Journal, Greenville News, Greenville
Magazine)
• Over 100 sponsors and contributors supported MLK Dream Weekend (including several
members of AAF Greenville)
• Approximately 40 blood donors participated in the Blood Drive.
• Approximately 800 attended Young Dreamers’ Day [Exhibit 22].
• Three scholarships were awarded to college-bound students.
• Three organizations (BI-LO, Greenville Hospital System and the Diversity Leadership
Academy of the Riley Center) were awarded the Champion of Diversity Awards.
• A member of the community was recognized with the Martin Luther King, Jr. Award
and another with the Coretta Scott King Award.
Pictures from MLK Dream Weekend can be found in Exhibit 23.


CONCLUSION

AAF Greenville continues to develop new ideas to promote multiculturalism among the
membership including relevant and timely education programs on diversity issues. We
will continue to support internships and other educational opportunities to students with
diverse backgrounds in hopes of exposing them to our industry. Our efforts and
dedication to matters of diversity will continue to be fostered and strengthened as we
identify new opportunities for our advertising community.




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Diversity & Multicultural Initiatives
        1st Place – Division 5

               Ad 2 Honolulu

    Contact:          George A. Zamarripa
                      Communications Pacific
                      754 Fort St., Fort Street Tower, Penthouse
                      Honolulu, HI 96813
                      (808) 521-5391
                      gzamarripa@commpac.com




                    131
Introduction:
        Diversity and multiculturalism are key issues in Hawaii. We live in a place with a
very unique mix of ethnicities, backgrounds, and cultures. Minority groups make up
roughly seventy percent of the population in Hawaii, whereas the minorities in the
mainland United States only account for twenty-three percent (Exhibit A).
        According to an article from the The Honolulu Advertiser, Hawaii leads the nation
with the largest percentage of a nonwhite population (Exhibit B). California, New
Mexico, and the District of Columbia were the only other areas where minorities made up
the majority of the population. In terms of ethnic diversity, nearly all of the States
significantly fall behind in mixture and variety. The mainland United States is not as
culturally and ethnically diverse as Hawaii, but we wanted to have programs to alert our
members of the issues advertisers outside of our State face. Hawaii tends to have a
strong Asian and Hawaiian or Pacific Islander presence that is exclusive to our State.
With such a diverse background, issues of cultural sensitivity become more important in
local advertising.
        The Diversity Committee focused on creating programs and events that
enlightened Ad 2 members about Hawaii’s dynamic multicultural environment and
acknowledged the importance of understanding how this diversity can affect how
businesses communicate in the Islands. During our research we found that Hawaii is one
of the few places in the world where you will find a product or service marketed to over
20 different ethnic groups (in one state or country). In order to better educate members,
the committee focused on the following objectives:
    1. Educate members on the role of diversity in the community.
    2. Support the professional development of minority students and encourage the
        pursuit of a career in advertising.
    3. Provide members with current articles pertinent to diversity and advertising.

1. MULTICULTURAL PROGRAMS & EVENTS

A. Ethnic Media Panel
Objective: Educate Ad 2 Honolulu members and guests about the importance of diversity
in Hawaii’s market (Exhibit C).

Description: A panel of professionals from various local ethnic media outlets were
invited to share their expertise on reaching local ethnic markets effectively. The panelists
included:
        • Chuck Cohen, Senior Vice President and Media Director of Laird
            Christianson Advertising
        • Randy Rivera, Publisher of Mabuhay Publications LLC
        • Leona Jona, President of KNDI Radio
        • JP Orias, Marketing and Sales Account Representative of Hawaii Filipino
            Chronicle
        • Karleen Chinen, Editor of Hawaii Herald
        • Robert Kim, Reporter of The Korea Times Hawaii
The session opened with each panelist introducing themselves and speaking briefly about
their company and target audience. The first part of the discussion was moderated with a



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set of questions provided to the panelists ahead of time and the last twenty minutes of the
discussion was then opened up to the audience in order to give them a chance to ask their
own questions. After the event, time was dedicated for panelists and participants to
network and meet in person over light refreshments.

Target audience: Ad 2 Honolulu and AMA (American Marketing Association) members

Results achieved: Panelists shared their thoughts on ethnic marketing and participated in
a collaborative discussion. Some of the key points which came out of the discussion
included:
Know What’s Important to your Audience
        Panelists discussed the importance of identifying a target audience and really
understanding their perspective and what is important to them. Understanding an
audience’s values seemed to be of the utmost importance. Randy Rivera, publisher of
Mabuhay Publications, explained when targeting first-generation immigrants the idea of
community is of key importance to them. This factor is a major influence on the content
and purpose of the publication. JP Orias, marketing and sales account representative of
the Hawaii Filipino Chronicle, shared how popular dialects could be used to create an
unconscious tie to listeners in radio. It’s equally important to know what will offend or
alienate your audience. Leona Jona, president of KNDI Radio, shared examples of taboo
topics which offended her audiences, while Chuck Cohen, media director of Laird
Christianson Advertising, talked about the negative business repercussions of running a
national commercial that alienates local customers.
Generational Values
        As each group has their own set of values, so does each generation within that
group. Identifying generational values is equally important in knowing your audience.
Karleen Chinen, editor of Hawaii Herald, explained that her paper specifically targeted
second-generation Japanese readers and discussed some of the challenges in targeting
such a specific audience.
Marketing Broadly Across Ethnic Groups
        The large number of ethnic groups in Hawaii makes marketing broadly a
challenge. Kanae Tokunaga, a sales and advertising assistant at PacRim Marketing Group
Inc. asked if it was possible to do so without alienating any specific groups. Chuck
Cohen answered by speaking about a popular advertising campaign which was currently
running. He explained that the target audience was defined as ‘locals’; he further
explained what they had defined as being ‘local’ (i.e. people who identified Hawaii as
home and felt a connection to it). The campaign posed the broader question to high
school students, ‘What is your Hawaii?’. In essence, ‘What does it mean to live in
Hawaii?’. The content they received back shaped the message of the campaign which
communicated the company’s connection to Hawaii and cemented its place within the
community and economy. While the campaign isn’t ethnically specific, it’s locally
relevant. Chuck went on to explain that, in his eyes, the terms ‘ethnic marketing’ and
‘local marketing’ are synonymous. The key to successful ethnic and local marketing is
respecting the values and shared beliefs of the target audience.

B. Ad 2 Honolulu Diversity Spotlight – Email Blasts



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Objective: Highlight relevant diversity articles in advertising magazines and news
sources.

Description: Ad 2 Honolulu’s board of directors kicked off the 2007-2008 year with a
meeting to brainstorm different ideas and upcoming programs. During this time we
decided that one of our objectives would be to draw attention to advertising articles that
could stimulate discussion about diversity issues. The board agreed that the definition of
“multicultural” should also include race, gender, sexual orientation, and social class.
This allowed us to think more broadly in terms of the value we could offer to our
members (Exhibit D).
         The first Diversity Spotlight email blast focused on targeting the gay and lesbian
market, which can be very controversial for some businesses. However, it is an
important target market to consider since it is a lucrative target market for many
advertisers. According to Community Marketing’s 2007 Gay and Lesbian Consumer
Index, the average annual household income among gays & lesbians is approximately
$80,000. The email blast from AdAge.com talked about the ease of creating two
different spots at a very low cost while targeting different audiences. Levi’s
advertisement, which depicted two males running off in their Levi’s together, also aired
on mainstream television stations involving a male and female. Our message for this
email topic was that diversity comes in all forms, not just ethnicity (Exhibit E).
         The following month featured an article about AAF’s Mosaic Awards and
diversity in the workplace. The diversity committee wanted to show our members that
while diversity may be commonplace locally, it is not the same throughout the United
States. This was a reminder that we live in a place that provides a uniquely diverse
experience (Exhibit F).
         The last article we featured in the Diversity Spotlight series was especially
critical, since it came out prior to Chinese New Year. During the Super Bowl,
Salesgenie.com aired a commercial that featured talking pandas with Chinese accents.
This drew criticism from many viewers who were offended by the commercial. It was a
reminder to our members that advertisers must be sensitive to their viewers’ opinions.
What may seem harmless to one person may not be to another (Exhibit G).

Target Audience: Ad 2 Honolulu members

Results Achieved: The main purpose of these Diversity Spotlight blasts was to increase
member awareness of different issues pertaining to diversity. Hawaii’s innate diversity is
sometimes taken for granted and part of Ad 2 Honolulu’s commitment is to keep our
members informed.

2. PROGRAMS WHICH EDUCATE AND MOTIVATE MULTICULTURAL
    STUDENTS TO PURSUE CAREERS IN ADVERTISING
A. Most Promising Minority Student Interview Workshop
Objective: Set a mock interview session to prepare Krista Catian the AAF interview
sessions in New York.




                                            134
Description: Every year, the American Advertising Federation’s (AAF) Most Promising
Minority Student finalists are given the unique opportunity to meet with numerous
recruiters from ad agencies across the country at a special event to honor their
accomplishments. Krista Catian, one of this year’s Most Promising Minority Student
finalists, was invited by Ad 2 Honolulu to a 2-hour long mock interview and coaching
session at advertising firm, Communications Pacific to help prepare her for her trip to
New York. Included in the mock session were Harriet Kirihara and Jill Brockett
representing the Human Resources perspective; Laurie Arakawa representing the client
perspective; Ad 2 Honolulu Board members, Tyson Yamada and Darren Matsuda; and
Ad 2 Honolulu President, George Zamarripa. The panel provided helpful feedback to
Krista’s responses as well as her resume (Exhibit H).

Target audience: Finalists of the 2007 AAF Most Promising Minority Student Award.

Results achieved: Krista reported back that the NY trip was extremely beneficial. She
attended seminars, industry immersions, and enjoyed the opportunity to network with
people from NY advertising agencies. She was also able to receive some information
about companies on the west coast. Through a contact made with the Gannett Co. Krista
was able to set up an interview with the The Honolulu Advertiser. She found the
preparation to be an invaluable experience.

3. BUSINESS RELATIONSHIPS WITH MEDIA OUTLETS AND
    MULTICULTURAL SUPPLIERS AND VENDORS
A. Partnership with Ethnic Media Outlets and Cultural Organizations
Objective: Develop stronger relationships with ethnic media outlets and cultural
organizations to reach a multicultural audience, extending beyond the traditional means
of advertising and public relations to the general population.

Description: Ad 2 Honolulu extended invitations to various ethnic media outlets and
cultural organizations for important programs that would interest these groups. The
announcement for this year’s Public Service Campaign recipient, Consumer Credit
Counseling Service of Hawaii, was sent to several ethnic media outlets and cultural
organizations. Many people throughout the State of Hawaii are in need of services from
this organization and although problems may not always be associated with a specific
ethnicity we felt that assisting an organization with a broad reach would positively impact
the people and community. Ad 2 Honolulu contracted QMark Research & Polling to
conduct a telephone poll among Hawaii residents with varying backgrounds to determine
their credit situations. Results of the poll can be seen in Exhibit I.
        In addition to the Public Service campaign, Ad 2 Honolulu also helped other
organizations to promote their Diversity and Multicultural events. From April 5-21,
2007, The Pegge Hopper Gallery in Downtown, Chinatown held an exhibition of
propaganda posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Ad 2 Honolulu helped to
sponsor the event by creating postcards featuring some of the posters that would be on
display. Free advertising and publicity was also provided as members of Ad 2 were
invited to attend the event (Exhibit J).




                                           135
        When Doraku Sushi opened up at the Royal Hawaiian Center in the middle of
Waikiki, Ad 2 Honolulu extended the invitation to members so they could participate in
the event. This provided members with an excellent opportunity to experience an
exciting new venue and support our sister organization Public Relations Society of
America Hawaii (Exhibit K).

Target Audience: Ethnic minority populations and the members of diverse business
organizations.

Conclusion
         Ad 2 Honolulu’s programs helped members, students, and the general public to
learn about ethnic differences, celebrate cultural differences, and network into areas
outside their existing acquaintances. Our Ethnic Media Panel allowed our members the
opportunity to see how different ethnic media sources reached their audiences. The
session informed the participants that knowing what is important to your audience is very
critical when dealing with ethnic media in Hawaii. They also found that marketing to
different generations and among different ethnic groups can be very complicated. The
Diversity Spotlight email blasts highlighted relevant diversity articles in advertising
magazines and other news sources. These emails provided Ad 2 Honolulu members with
a different perspective about diversity and several issues that may become more
important in the near future. In addition, Ad 2 Honolulu reached out to students in the
local Universities with opportunities to learn about diversity and become involved with
our organization.
         Hawaii’s rich cultural and ethnic landscape provides a solid foundation from
which businesses and individuals can both discover and create opportunities for
understanding, unity, and community building. Living in a world that is increasingly
multiracial and multiethnic, it is not only necessary to understand, cultivate and embrace
our differences in order to communicate, it is the vital key to successful communication
strategies.




                                           136
      Government Relations
       1st Place – Division 1

Advertising Federation of Louisville

   Contact:       Robin Miller
                  Advertising Federation of Louisville
                  200 Distillery Commons, Suite 100
                  Louisville, KY 40206
                  (502) 582-2444
                  robin@louisvilleadfed.org




                137
Overview and Goals: Government relations is one those topics that our membership
would sometimes prefer to ignore. We believe that this is more a function of frustration
with the political process and lack of understanding than lack of interest. Therefore, we
believe that it is an important role of the Advertising Federation of Louisville to inform
and educate our members about politics, the political process, and the impact these have
on the advertising industry. We don’t always have a big “fight” going on in our local
legislature, but we need to be prepared to meet local challenges when they arise. This
requires education of our members, keeping them informed on current events, and
fostering relations with our local leaders. Our challenge is to devise creative ways to keep
government relations top of mind with as many of our nearly 750 members as possible so
that we can be prepared to serve as a collective voice for them with legislative leaders as
the opportunity arises.
        As a voluntary and diverse organization, we are careful not to align ourselves with
one particular political group over another, but rather seek to educate our members about
particular issues so they can make a choice that is right for them. We do recognize,
however, that we need to have a unified front and strong civic partnerships should we
ever need to be successful in taking a specific stand. To meet this goal, we strive to keep
our membership educated and to maintain an arsenal of positive, healthy partnerships
with lawmakers, government and community officials. More specifically, we maintain
the following annual Government Relations goals:
        To offer seminars about governmental regulations as they relate to advertising.
       To cultivate and maintain relationships with civic and government leaders to
       monitor legislation.
       To alert and educate our members about issues involving the advertising industry.
       To remind members about, and connect them to, our historical roots as a self-
       governing organization.
       To partner with other organizations to promote civic advocacy efforts, using
       advertising as a strategy.
Target Audience: For all of our government relations projects, we target not only
AdFed members, but also the community as a whole, specifically civic leaders.
OBJECTIVE ONE: To offer seminars about governmental regulations as they
relate to advertising.
Breakfast at Winston’s Programs (Exhibit A) - Our Breakfast at Winston’s Series
focuses on governmental and community relations issues. Over the past year, we’ve held
four seminars as part of this series. On May 11, Carl Breeding, a registered lobbyist,
facilitated a discussion about the 2007 Kentucky General Assembly. Our program on
June 1, “Introducing the 29 Billion Dollar Man”, featured Marty Kish, the VP of
Marketing and Communications for the newly branded Kentucky Association of
Manufacturers (K.A.M.), formerly the Associated Industries of Kentucky. Much of
K.S.M.’s efforts include lobbying and advocacy and we were anxious to hear how its new
brand helped in those efforts.
         We know that many of our member companies have a bank, an alcohol company,
or other regulated industries, in their client portfolios. For the 2007-2008 Winston’s


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series, we thought it would both be interesting to examine the role of compliance versus
marketing in these highly regulated industries, and to also demonstrate the importance of
being knowledgeable about the government’s role in regulating advertising. On
November 29, we featured Jonathan Vaughn, VP and Marketing Manager, and Donna
Craven, VP and Assistant Compliance Officer, for Central Bank who presented
“Financial Services Marketing: No, you can’t say that.” On March 20, Mary Barrazotto,
VP/Associate General Counsel, and Ann Stickler, VP/Global Marketing Director for
Southern Comfort alcohol for the Brown-Forman Corporation, presented “Marketing a 25
year old’s brand in a regulated environment. How we let consumers ‘hijack’ SoCo.”
         Our Breakfast at Winston’s Series is sponsored by a local law firm, and as a
result, the programs are free to our members. We hold them at the teaching restaurant of a
local culinary school. Further, we purposely have them at 8 a.m. to reach an audience that
might not be able to leave work for a seminar during the day. We’ve served nearly 300
attendees with this program this year.
Professional Development Series Programs (Exhibit B) – We annually include a
government relations topic in our seven-part Professional Development Series program,
which launches in January and goes until July. For the May program of the 2006-2007
series, we invited Amy Berge, trademark and copyright attorney to present, “Imitation
Isn’t Always Flattery”, as it relates to trademark and copyright infringement. Due to the
success of the program and the feedback from our members, we invited Amy back for our
January program of our 2007-2008 series, where she focused specifically on copyright
law in her seminar titled, “Yours, Mine or Public?: Understanding Copyright.” We
attracted more than 50 people for these seminars.
         We hold this series at our office and purposely make the maximum number of
attendees small to allow for more personal networking time and Q & A. Over the past
year, other topics have included: creative uses of paper, grassroots marketing, strategic
advertising, public relations, and creative. Each program is $20 to attend, and the series is
sponsored by a member company, whose sponsorship dollars are transferred 100% into
our scholarship foundation, which funds our two scholarships for college-level students
pursuing a career in advertising.
OBJECTIVE TWO: To cultivate and maintain relationships with civic and
government leaders to monitor legislation.
Kentucky Association of Manufacturers (Exhibit C) – Manufacturing is a major
industry in Louisville, and hence many of our members have clients in the manufacturing
business. Therefore, we maintain a membership with the Kentucky Association of
Manufacturers (K.A.M.), a group of nearly 500 corporate and individual members.
Another fringe benefit of that relationship is that K.A.M. is known for its commitment to
lobbying and for serving as a legislative watchdog. Receiving their newsletter and
receiving their alerts helps keep us informed of important legislative issues.
Better Business Bureau (Exhibit D) – We are also members of the Better Business
Bureau, with whom our relationship dates back to the early 1900’s. In 1909, we hosted
the fifth annual national convention, with a theme of “Truth in Advertising”. Attendees
there discussed false advertising, resulting in the formation of the Better Business
Bureau. We maintain our partnership with them by including an annual seat on our Board
of Directors. Additionally, we are prepared to coordinate members to serve as needed on




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their Ad Review Council board, whose goal is to promote public confidence in the truth
and accuracy of advertising through education and self-regulation.
Greater Louisville Inc. (Exhibit E) – We are members of Greater Louisville Inc., or GLI,
which is Louisville’s Chamber of Commerce. In addition to the typical functions of
business chambers, GLI extends its efforts to serving as a public relations arm for the
city. As a result, they are very adept at coalescing “mover and shaker” groups within the
city to promote positive change. Sometimes they serve as the public force behind a
movement, but often they serve as the quiet powerhouse, working behind the scenes to
make things happen. They maintain a strong presence in this community and we very
often find ourselves working closely with them.
Greater Louisville Convention and Visitors Bureau (Exhibit F) – We are also members
of the Greater Louisville Convention and Visitors Bureau, which is another powerful
organization in Louisville. They, too, maintain relationships with much of the
community’s influential leadership, and as such we align ourselves with them and help
them promote Louisville whenever we can, including putting in and winning a bid to host
the American Advertising Federation’s national convention this past June.
OBJECTIVE THREE: To alert and educate our members about issues involving
the advertising industry.
E-mail Alerts (Exhibit G) – We receive frequent policy and legislative briefs from the
American Advertising Federation (AAF) office. We create e-mail alerts to disseminate to
our members regarding these issues. One of the major issues facing the advertising
industry this year was a proposed advertising ban of up to two years for new prescription
medicines, as well as a law demanding the Food and Drug Administration to preapprove
advertising before it airs. We sent an e-mail to our members with proposed talking points
about the issue and the names of their legislative contacts should they choose to call and
discuss the issue. To date, Congress’ efforts to pass these restrictive laws have not been
successful, though Congress did recently expand the authority of the FDA with respect to
false and misleading advertisements.
         We have also advised our membership of legislative efforts before Kentucky
General Assembly relative to advertising. A bill which will allow for vegetation control
around outdoor billboards has been introduced for the second year in a row. This
legislation was supported by our last year, but it did not reach a vote. Efforts are
underway again to obtain passage. The Kentucky General Assembly is also considering a
bill that would limit unsolicited facsimiles and text messages to cellular devices. We have
alerted our membership to this proposal and will continue to monitor the status.
Communiqué Articles (Exhibit H) – A standard feature in the 2007-2008 volume of our
bimonthly magazine, Communiqué, which has a readership of 1,000, is the government
relations article, which we utilize to inform members about laws and legislation that
might affect what they do on a daily basis. The theme of each article matches the
particular theme of the issue, creating a seamless relationship for the reader. For
example, October’s issue focused on freelancers. The government relations article
concerned copyright and who actually owns the creative once produced – the designer or
the client, an important issue for freelancers and all design firms to understand. The
December issue focused on the pro-bono work our members do on behalf of non-profits.
The government relations article explored the regulations surrounding how non-profit




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organizations need to utilize the funds they solicit through their marketing and
advertising efforts.
OBJECTIVE FOUR: To remind members about, and connect them to, our
historical roots as a self-governing organization.
AAF National Convention (Exhibit I) – As aforementioned when discussing our ties to
the Better Business Bureau, in 1909 we hosted the fifth annual national convention of the
Ad Writer’s League. Nearly 100 years later, in June 2007, we once again hosted the
National Convention, this time for the American Advertising Federation (AAF), our
national organization. We were excited to welcome 1,100 of our advertising brothers and
sisters and show off our city. We created a special issue of Communiqué, which we
distributed to all conference attendees, in addition to our membership. It included several
self-promotional articles about how Louisville is emerging as one of America’s most
dynamic urban communities, as well as an article about how we are a local organization
with a national presence, due to our involvement with the AAF.
         We were thrilled for the opportunity to work more closely with the AAF and
further develop our relationships with them. They truly serve as the “unifying voice for
advertising” and are an important arm in advocating positive legislation for the industry.
Additionally, we utilized the opportunity as host city to help suggest speakers and topics
relevant to issues facing today’s advertising industry. Due to our daily phone calls with
them for several months in preparation for the conference, we now have a cadre of people
in D.C. who know our organization and our city well and would be willing to help us
with our government relations efforts should we ever need to call on them.
         Finally, part of our responsibilities as host city also included assisting in selling
sponsorships and implementing two social events; in exchange for receiving a monetary
commission. Our board determined that all proceeds would benefit our scholarship fund.
Collectively we earned $15,696, including an additional $500 the AAF awarded us for a
job well done.
Centennial Celebration (Exhibit J) – 2007-2008 was a big year for us. Not only did we
host the AAF national convention, we also celebrated our centennial. We began as the Ad
Writer’s League, a casual group which didn’t have its first official meeting until 1906. In
1907, we changed our name to the Advertising Club of Louisville and became official in
1908 when our Articles of Incorporation were filed. To remind members of our historical
roots, our February issue of Communiqué focused solely on the centennial. It included an
article about advertising regulations over the past 100 years and how they have evolved.
It connected the birth of our organization with the birth of regulation, and validated our
organizational goals of self-regulation, truth in advertising, and our rights to advertise in
a responsible and ethical manner. Additionally, we included an article that recapped the
civic partnerships and relationships we’ve had through the years. Other centennial
celebration efforts included: a special centennial logo to be used for all of 2008; a free
cocktail party for our members where we showed old photos from our archives; featuring
a 100 year-old brand as the topic of our January luncheon; and opening our 75th
anniversary time capsule at our March monthly luncheon. Finally, the Mayor of
Louisville presented us with a Proclamation celebrating our birthday.
Web Site (Exhibit K) – Under the “About the AdFed” section of our Web site, we
maintain a static page of the Code of Advertising. This is a prominent way to display our




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commitment to operating in an ethical, responsible, and truthful manner on behalf of our
industry consumers. The Better Business Bureau also distributes the Code to its members.
OBJECTIVE FIVE: To partner with other organizations to promote civic advocacy
efforts, using advertising as a strategy.
Greater Louisville Branding Project (Exhibit L) – The Greater Louisville Branding
Project, which has been ongoing for about three years, is aimed at generating positive
buzz about Louisville and positioning it as a top destination for talent, tourism and
business. The project is a joint partnership between Greater Louisville Inc. (Louisville’s
Chamber of Commerce), the Mayor’s office, and the Greater Louisville Convention &
Visitors Bureau. The project includes both a traditional and viral marketing strategy, and
the two primary agencies hired to work on the project are AdFed member companies. In
addition to the AdFed Executive Director serving on the planning committee, we have
also assisted the project through articles in the Communiqué and including brand essence
messaging in our involvement with hosting the national convention. As a result of our
involvement, we have cultivated and solidified relationships with many of the
community’s top leaders who serve on the more than 30-member Community Branding
Alliance.
Azerbaijan Delegation (Exhibit M) - From May 22 – June 12, in conjunction with the
local World Affairs Council who hosts business foreign exchange programs, we hosted
ten public service officials from Azerbaijan. They were here to learn about how our
country, and specifically our community, works in regards to public/private partnerships
in affecting social change. They wanted to know how social groups and advertising firms
partner to engage in advocacy efforts, while working within the confines of established
governmental regulations. We solicited and secured 25 presentations for them with
AdFed members and contacts while they were here, including facilitation from our
Executive Director, who worked with the program participants to create their action plans
for their return home. Additionally, the group was here during the time we hosted the
AAF national convention and we arranged for them to attend some of the sessions and
social activities associated with that conference. The program was very well-received and
was our second time in hosting a group like this. Not only were we able to share many of
our best practices, we also learned a lot about other governmental structures along the
way.
High School Marketing Challenge (Exhibit N) - The High School Marketing Challenge
is an annual fixture in our outreach efforts to encourage students to get involved in the
field of advertising. Each year, we secure a sponsor to serve as the client and in April the
students present, in competition, their advertising/marketing solution to a stated
challenge. Past clients include Sullivan University System, whose goal was for the high
school students to develop a recruitment campaign targeted to students, and Jewish
Hospital and HealthCare Services, who utilized the competition as a way to recruit
students into the healthcare field.
        Our 2006-2007 competition featured a different type of sponsor, Kentucky
Harvest, a food-raising organization whose goal is to reduce hunger among the less
fortunate population. We added a new element to the challenge for this competition, and
had the students actually implement their campaign and test its feasibility. At the end of
the competition, the students collected 10,097 cans of food, which allows for 20,000
meals.



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        We were so pleased with the competition’s civic involvement and the many facets
that come with these types of social advocacy issues, that we specifically sought another
public interest topic for this year. For the 2007-2008 competition, the sponsor is
Metropolitan Sewer District and the challenge is “green”, getting students to help keep
storm drains clean and free of debris. We are pleased to report that we have 17 teams,
amongst 9 schools, participating this year. The program not only connects us to numerous
civic leaders and their partners, it also gives young people the opportunity to see how
advocacy efforts work and ultimately be prepared to be involved as adult citizens.

Summary: Members of professional organizations have long come together for common
interests and to positively affect change for their industries. By maintaining annual
government relations goals and initiatives, we are able to position our members as
educated, involved, and articulate professionals in the advertising industry. Our positive
civic and governmental relationships further strengthen us as an organization and serve as
an additional benefit to our membership in our goals of recruitment and retention.




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144
    Government Relations
     1st Place – Division 2

           AAF – Orlando

Contact:          Wagner Bucci Dos Santos
                  Beloved Experiential
                  14 E. Washington Street, Suite 405
                  Orlando, FL 32801
                  (888) 689-8903
                  cmall@tnc.org




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         AAF - Orlando began the legislative process early in the year with training and updates
from the 4th District AAF chair, Tom Hayes and lobbyist, Jack Hebert. Club president, Larry
Meador, attended the session held in Daytona Beach. Member surveys indicate that the legislative
issues are considered a strong priority to the Orlando advertising community. The club is an
advocate for the advertising industry and a resource for the business community. AAF - Orlando
educates its members on issues affecting the industry and stays connected to its legislators.
Overview: The service sales tax was put to rest on many occasions; however the AAF -
Orlando keeps tabs on rumors of new bills/amendments that may bring the issue back
again. We keep members informed of local and national issues with email updates.
Because of state budget cutbacks, there is concern that the service tax may come up as a
way to add dollars to the bottom line. Maintaining relationships with state legislators and
familiarizing them with the Advertising industry is an ongoing process.
         AAF - Orlando maintains an institutional memory of past issues such as; the
repealed 1987 sales tax on professional services, the “Sales Tax Exemption/Advertising
Agencies” bill that Governor Jeb Bush passed in 1999, and Senator John McKay’s 2001
tax bill. Learning from past legislative efforts helps the AAF - Orlando to strategize and
act quickly on new issues that face the advertising industry (Exhibit A).



AAF – Orlando’s Government Relations Objectives:
      A. Develop positive relations with local and state government officials by
         attending events and visiting them during the fly-in to Tallahassee.
      B. Gain support within the local advertising industry and local government for the
         passage of        legislation and to fight negative issues.
      C. Partner with other organizations to build relationships and collations to enhance
         the advocacy of the industry as a whole.
AAF – Orlando’s Government Relations Initiatives:
I. Legislative Training
        In the Fall of 2007, AAF - Orlando club legislative chair , and Larry Meador,
AAF - Orlando Club President attended the Fourth District Meeting in Daytona Beach for
a legislative meeting that was run by district chair, Tom Hayes and Jack Hebert, lobbyist.
Target Audience: Club Legislative Chairs, Presidents and Members
Details: Hebert discussed industry concerns with issues such as the service tax and
budget concerns. Because the legislature is looking for new revenue streams, a service
tax among the elimination of other exemptions is often suggested by some of the
legislators.
       •   Key Facts (Exhibit B)
       •   Advertising Agencies Exemption from Sales Tax (Exhibit C)
Results:
        The club received some valuable insights and a preview of what may come up in
the future with some good advice to share with the AAF - Orlando members. The key to
fighting a service tax is to stay in touch with supportive legislators and to know where the


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legislators are stand on industry issues. Jack Hebert keeps a pulse on what’s going on in
the house and the senate in order to be proactive in having a voice and in educating the
legislators on the negative impact that a tax will have on the advertising industry and the
business community.


II. Legislative Updates
Target Audience: AAF - Orlando/Ad2 Members and the advertising business
community
Details: The objective was to track and provide the most current news and initiatives
that affect the advertising industry (Exhibit D). Each month, AAF - Orlando/Ad2
showcase news related to legislative issues affecting advertising in the AAF - Orlando
weekly updates, which are emailed to AAF - Orlando members with a link to the AAF -
Orlando website for further details on the AAF government report, communicating issues
from local to national sources, on issues such as obesity in children and the threat of the
service tax.
Results: AAF - Orlando members are reached monthly with the AAF - Orlando/Ad2
Legislative updates.


III. Political Events
Target Audience: Political and Business Events
Details: The objective is to attend events to show support and to learn about the
candidates and their issues. It’s an advantage to know the candidate and to help them get
elected if they are supportive of the industry. Senator Victor Crist from Tampa owned an
advertising agency and is a strong supporter. He began his legislative career during the
4th District AAF Fly-In. Events attended this year include (Exhibit E):
        • 4th District AAF Reception
        • Lydia Gardner, Clerk of the County Court
        • Regional Orlando Chamber Fly-In
        • Congressman Keller Event with Governor Crist
        • Giuliani Event
        • Joe Mantilla for State Representative (District 40)
        • Shannon Gravite for Orange County Commissioner
Results: These events build relationships and give AAF - Orlando a stronger voice on
legislative issues so we can fully represent the industry. It’s good to be supportive
before we ask for favors. Getting involved opens the door to better access to legislators.


IV. Legislative Fly-In
AAF - Orlando participated in the 4th District AAF legislative fly-in (Rally in Tally) with
six people representing Orlando. The message this year is “We’re concerned about the
budget cut backs and don’t want to see the service tax exemption threatened. How can



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the ad industry help the economy and the community?” We held a press conference to
highlight the districts public service campaign, “Think Eco-Logically.” The goal is to
teach kids to reduce, reuse, and recycle. The butterfly mascot came with us to visit some
of our legislators. It’s nice to bring them good news in the midst of cut backs. There are
no current bills that directly affect the ad industry, but we’re watching closely.
Target Audience: State Representatives and State Senators from Central Florida
Details: This is the time to meet with new and experienced legislators to educate them
on the advertising industry. We met with the Central Florida legislators and their
legislative aid to provide them with information and to learn about their issues. We want
to be a resource for them if they have questions about the industry or if we can contribute
our talents, which is the reason we highlighted the public service effort by the district.
Details of the message (Exhibit F):
       • Agenda & List of Legislators to visit
       • Advertising Fuels the Economy
       • Sales Tax would Cripple Florida’s Economy
       • Tax Would Decrease Sales
       • Regional Chamber Fly-In at the same time as AAF
       • Public Service Press Conference Talking Points
       • Letter from Representative Gardiner
Results: Increased presence in Tallahassee, and exposure to the inner workings of
session and the legislative process. Face to face talks with legislators. Photos were taken
during the Rally in Tally. (Exhibit G)


V. 2007 Hob Nob
This year’s Orlando Regional Chamber of Commerce Hob Nob was held at Sea World.
Hob Nob was heavily attended by local business leaders and legislators. The objective is
to meet this year candidates. It’s a good way to show support and to shake hands with
the incumbents and the challengers in state races. In addition, everyone fills out an
electronic survey and the poll results are mentioned at the end of the evening.
Target Audience: State and Local politicians, candidates, and business leaders
Details: This was a good opportunity to meet current and aspiring politicians and to
talk to them about the advertising industry. Approximately 1500 business people
attended to participate in a straw poll to eat barbecue and to listened political speeches.
There was a Shamu performance too. (Exhibit H)
Results: Hob Nob gave AAF - Orlando/Ad 2 an opportunity to meet, greet and “be
seen” by legislators. The attendance was approximately 2,000 people among both local
and state politicians and candidates.


VI.    PAC Contributions
The 4th District Florida AD PAC helps to raise money for candidates who support
advertising issues and legislation.


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Target Audience: AAF - Orlando members, prospects and other Orlando advertising
professionals
Details: The Florida AD PAC is built to fund legislators who support the ad industry.
We need to elect and re-elect people who share our vision and political values. (Exhibit
I)
Results: AAF - Orlando contributed $100 to the 4th District FL Ad PAC in the 2007-
2008 and another $400 will be raised by the next district meeting.
Conclusion:
        Government Relations is an important area of interest for AAF - Orlando
members. Being informed on current issues and educating the membership is vital to the
state of the advertising industry. AAF - Orlando must continue its relationships with the
legislature and the business community, while reinforcing the economic benefits of the
advertising industry. Partnerships with the Chamber and the EDC prove to be a valuable
way to gain impact and influence on topics such as the sales tax.
        AAF - Orlando met its goals of fostering positive relationships with local and
state government officials, gaining pro business support within the local advertising
industry and local government to fight future attempts to pass legislations that may
negatively affect the industry. Partnering with the film commission and broadcast
companies build relationships and collations to enhance the advocacy of the industry as a
whole.




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150
   Government Relations
    1st Place – Division 3

   AAF – Coastal Carolinas

Contact:       Matthew Hewitt, Michelle Cantey
               MB Pelicans
               1251 21st Avenue North
               MB, SC 29577
               (843) 267-7889
               mhewitt10@aol.com,
               michelle_cantey@yahoo.com




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                2007-2008 Club Achievement – Government Relations
                     AAF-Coastal Carolinas – Myrtle Beach, SC

Government relations committee is a very important committee to AAF-Coastal
Carolinas (AAFCC). Legal changes on local, regional or national issues can have large
implications on all our member’s careers. Historically, there always the unknown factor
regarding issues that may come before the government relations committee. If necessary,
a grassroots effort is implemented to assure that negative legislation against our industry
does not transpire. Initially, we thought this may be a lackluster year; however, 2008
presented AAFCC with an unfathomable scenario which enabled us to garner more
member participation than ever before in Government Relations for AAF-CC – Myrtle
Beach hosted the 2008 Republican and Democratic Primary Debates. What a
monumental year for AAFCC Government Relations!
    We developed the following objectives for Government Relations:
    • To communicate with members regarding current and pending governmental
issues.
    • To increase member participation in governmental issues, including the nationally
televised 2008 Presidential Debates and election process.
    • To nurture relationships with other groups and information sources to help us
monitor and address legislative activities.
    • To foster relations with our local, state, and federal government, while urging our
members to get involved.
    Target Audiences:
    • AAFCC members and member organizations
    • State senators and members of the legislative body
    • Local government representatives
    • Other groups who monitor legislative activities(i.e. Myrtle Beach Area Chamber
of Commerce and the Better Business Bureau)
A. Communicate with members regarding current and pending governmental issues.
1. Venue: Professional Development Luncheon. (Exhibit A)When the situations arose,
the Government Relations Chair made announcements during our monthly Professional
Development meetings. This venue enabled him to educate the general membership and
guests on issues and events. At our September Kickoff meeting, our chair distributed the
“Connections” political survey for members to complete.
Due to a phenomenal opportunity to volunteer with the nationally televised Republican
and Democratic debates, we wanted to prominently position AAFCC and our members as
debate volunteers. We first approached membership at the October luncheon about
AAFCC volunteering as a club. (More info follows below on Debates.)
Strategy/Execution – Meeting announcements occurred as scheduled. In regards to the
debates, AAFCC president and committee chair invited the debate coordinators to our
November professional development luncheon to explain the scope of AAFCC’s
involvement. In addition, Government Relations chair Fran Tuite and club President
Michelle Cantey spoke at the December and January Meetings to encourage participation.
2. Venue: Electronic communications. (Exhibit B) E-newsletters and e-blasts were
distributed to our database of 699 members/potential members encouraging them to
volunteer for the 2008 Presidential Debates. Legislative content, including a Legislative


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and Government Directory is posted on the Government Relations page on the AAFCC
web site (www.aafcoastalcarolinas.com).
Strategy/Execution – Multiple communication approaches helped remind people that
this is an important event for the community. In approaching the Chamber of Commerce
to be placed in prominent volunteer positions, we determined that our membership boasts
many professionals who work with local and national media outlets daily, which can be
of valuable use to incoming national press corps. Using our stealthy relationship with
Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce, its legislative committee and special events
coordinators, we were able to secure enviable positions for our volunteer members.
AAFCC volunteers would be assigned to the media and spin rooms rather than serve as
ticket takers or parking attendants. Through frequent communications, we repeatedly
encouraged participation. Meeting announcements, e-mail communications and web site
postings. Step Up’s (volunteer organization assisting Chamber in debate volunteer
assignments) web site registration response was beyond our wildest dream – over 37
members registered, trained and participated as volunteers!! (That translates to over 30%
of our membership!)
B. Increase members’ participation in governmental issues.
1. CAMP Political “Connections” Survey (Exhibit C)
Event Details – Survey members to discover who has political connections and willing
to contact legislators to express our side of an issue, should the need arise.
Strategy/Execution - The committee with the assistance of the club president developed
a written survey with a list of legislators. The “Connections” survey was distributed and
collected at our initial meeting for the year. Marked by record attendance, we thought
September was the best luncheon to launch the survey and the message for member
participation. If an industry issue should come before lawmakers we would have a person
in our club familiar with a politician who could advocate our stance. We vocally
encouraged participation and collected the surveys at the end of the luncheon. Survey
results are on-going as we add to last years “Connections” and update as membership
evolves. Our database was updated; however, we’ve not had a local or national need to
upon our grassroots lobbying (as informed from AAF national government relations
committee).


2. 2008 Republican and Democratic Presidential Debate Volunteers (Exhibit D)
Event Details – The Coastal Carolinas region was overwhelmingly pleased that US Rep
James Clyburn (SC), the Black Caucus Institute and Republican leaders worked tirelessly
to gain both primary Presidential debates to be held in our club’s hometown. Publicity of
that magnitude had never been thrust on our area. For five months there was a lot of
planning and organizing to make our beach area have a long-lasting positive impression
on both the media and the viewing public. As a major component of the media it was
only natural that our club would want to participate in a leadership fashion. Upon rumor
of the debates coming to Myrtle Beach, AAFCC President Michelle Cantey jumped at the
opportunity for us to help lead such a visible event and immediately contacted the
Chamber President Brad Dean.
Strategy/Execution – Get our members to volunteer for the 2008 Presidential Debates.
Early on, we had lunch with Chamber of Commerce organizers and they agreed that



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   putting our volunteer registrants in critical media positions would help make the event
   run smoothly. Then it was our duty to generate excitement among our members to get
   them to participate. We communicated verbally at our professional development
   luncheons and had registration forms on hand. The chamber’s special events coordinator
   came in November and made a speech to our members. Training and Security were a
   separate issue once we had people involved. We e-mailed members and talked about
   participating constantly. After all this is the biggest issue of 2008 – Who will be
   nominated and elected to be the next president? One convention-like debate for each
   party right before critical primary elections. Step-Up had a mandatory training as did the
   Chamber of Commerce. When all was said and done we had 37 participants. The media
   barrage for the Democratic convention had us assisting the press room for 4 days prior to
   the event and culminating with supervising at the “Spin Room”. CNN (Cable News
   Network) conducted the debate; therefore, we reported directly to them. Total numbers
   for the AAF-CC participation were hard to get hold of due to security constraints. Ms.
   Cantey however got to see a volunteer manifest sheet at the conclusion and counted 37
   AAF-CC members registered to volunteer in the media room/spin rooms. Hip Hip
   Hooray!!! We have never had this volume of participation in government relations in the
   near 25 year history of our club! It certainly was the highlight for the Government
   Relations committee. Over 30 % of our club took part in a committee project that rarely
   surpasses 5 % participation. The Chamber hosted a thank-you reception for volunteers
   which many of our members attended. The Government Relations Chair also participated
   in the “Rock the Vote” voter registration rally held prior to each debate.
   Membership Calls to Action. AAFCC facilitates the communication of AAF national
   “calls to action” to its membership on issues of importance to the advertising and
   marketing industry, such as request for action in the form of correspondence to legislators
   or report on Senate rejecting DTC Advertising Restrictions. Locally, when funding for
   the Academy for Arts Science & Technology’s Digital Communications MAC
   (Macintosh Computer) lab was threatened last fall, the AAST Advisory Board enlisted
   the aid of the AAFCC members to write letters to the Horry County School Board
   supporting the use of MAC’s vs PC’s for the Digital Communications major. They did!
   Results: Today, the Digital Communications Lab is fully equipped with 20 MAC’s.
   (Exhibit E)
C. Governmental Relations Chairman Fran Tuite’s Participation (Exhibit F)
D. AAF-CC members other significant participation (Exhibit G)
   President Michelle Cantey attended many events with Chairman Tuite.
   1st Vice President-Programs Cathy Honeycutt (former Diversity Chair) received the
   North Myrtle Beach Chamber of Commerce “Ambassador of the Month” Award three
   times!
3. Maintain relationships with other groups and information sources to help us
   monitor and address legislative activities.
   Strategy/Execution - Many officers and members attend the Myrtle Beach Area
   Chamber of Commerce’s Business After Hours and establish ongoing personal rapport
   with Chamber officers. We share information on issues whenever possible. We also
   share information with the Better Business Bureau (BBB); our club treasurer serves as
   the BBB chairman and keeps the club informed of “happenings” at the BBB. (Exhibit H)


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We intend to encourage further interaction. As stated in this narrative the established
relationship with the Chamber enabled us to get priority volunteer positions for the
debates. We hope to springboard upon that success to become involved in other events of
common interest. The better business bureau has 3 board members in common with our
membership. Their president is a member of AAF-CC. She recently took office so we are
getting to know her and encourage the free flow of information relevant to our industry.
We hope she uncovers unscrupulous advertisers and rids them from our marketplace.
Integrity of our business community is of critical importance and also part of our AAF-
CC mission statement.
If there are issues which are of importance to AAF-CC and it’s members we will seek out
other sources of advocacy and continue to publicize our existence at events such as the
March 2008 Chamber of Commerce Business to Business Table Top exposition. Using
the Expo as a branding tool for our new club name, we had a display, handed out club
collaterals and applications, and conveyed our mission statement. An estimated 1,400
business leaders attended the event, including local politicians SC Representative Thad
Viers and US Congressman Henry Brown. AAFCC club leaders in attendance took the
opportunity to discuss the AAF CC with each and invite them to our April luncheon.
(Exhibit I)
4.     To foster relations with our local, state, and federal government, while
urging our members to get involved.
AAF-CC member Rigby Wilson is appointed AAF District 3 Government Relations
Chairman.


Strategy/Execution – AAFCC member Rigby Wilson was appointed the District
Government Relations Chair. Among his duties as 3D Government Relations Chair is to
keep clubs informed if a national issue needs “Grassroots” lobbying from local chapters
and to advocate for our industry whenever possible. During 2007-08, his
accomplishments include club communication with all clubs within Third District;
contacted Chief of Staff of the House, Ways and Means Committee Beverly Smith to
discuss pending legislation regarding Cable TV carriage in the state of South Carolina;
attended a legislative reception for South Carolina Speaker of the House Bobby Harrell
and met two other SC House members (Exhibit J); attended a legislative reception in
Columbia, S.C. with five SC representatives. Additionally, he attended the National
Association of Broadcasters conference in Washington, DC. While in Washington, DC,
he lobbied personally on behalf of advertising with 3 U.S. Senators and 3 U.S.
congressmen.
   Statewide, the Government Relations committee monitored the media and kept
communication lines open with Rigby Wilson (Third District Government Relations
chairperson). When an issue worthy of a call-to-action is identified, our Government
Relations chair initiates a communications alert to AAFCC members and send letters to
government officials. National items were monitored through e-mail communications
from AAF’s Government Relations newsletter.
Locally, the Government Relations chairperson and 5 other club leaders attended the
Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce 2007 Legislative Agenda Luncheon where


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local South Carolina politicians came to address the Grand Strand business community.
Local politicians were also invited to attend the ADDY® Awards. However, none could
attend. In February, two club leaders attended the Horry County Legislation Day at the
State Capitol in Columbia, SC with the Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce
Legislative Reception. They mingled with local legislative delegation of both the House
and Senate and Governor Sanford.
AAFCC President Michelle Cantey and other AAFCC volunteers worked our booth at the
2008 Table Top Expo for the Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce on March 27,
2008. An estimated 1,400 business leaders attended the event, including local politicians
SC Representative Thad Viers and US Congressman Henry Brown. AAFCC club leaders
in attendance took the opportunity to discuss the AAF CC with each and invite them to
our April luncheon. (Exhibit J)
In conclusion, this year has been a monster success for AAFCC’s Government Relations
committee. We began the year not knowing the excitement in store for us. The two
Presidential debates were very well organized and were received well by the public. In
the meantime no adverse legislation has been proposed that we would need to swing into
action and address. Additionally, we had the most participation ever in our Government
Relations committee. This is a year of monumental achievement for AAF-CC!




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     Government Relations
      1st Place – Division 4

           AAF – Jackson

Contact:          Jeff Pedigo
                  GodwinGroup
                  188 East Capital Street, Suite 800
                  Jackson, MS 39211
                  (601) 354-5711
                  jpedigo@godwin.com




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        The 2007-2008 fiscal year of the American Advertising Federation of Jackson,
Mississippi (AAFJ), formerly known as the Jackson Advertising Federation, was a key
year for us as a club, as well as for the entire industry. With 2007 being a gubernatorial
election year and 2008 a presidential election year, there was, and is, a great deal of
information that needs to be shared with club members.

       The primary government relations goals for 2007-2008 were as follows:
       • Finalize the web tax assessment issue
       • Communicate legislative information
       • Encourage members to become involved and attend functions

Finalization of the web tax assessment issue
Target Audience: Mississippi Advertising Industry

         A coalition was formed in 2006, headed by Immediate Past President Karen
Johnson, in response to Mississippi State Tax Commission actions that began in 2003.
The coalition requested funds from key companies in the advertising industry to obtain
the services of a lawyer to investigate options available to oppose the taxation of web
design services.
         Following our strategy from last year, we clearly defined “web design” as being
“a person or company who utilizes existing authoring tools and/or application programs
to conceptualize, design or publish the contents of a website, regardless of the location or
the presence of the hosting server.” (Exhibits A-B)
         One JAF member agency was assessed with back taxes, so the coalition voted to
utilize them as the example. With lawyer retained, a meeting was set with the State Tax
Commission in May of 2007. Several agencies and freelancers, as well as the example
agency, were present at the meeting. We presented our case, and while there was some
admission that the tax ruling is vague, the commission did not vote in our favor.
(Exhibits C-D)
         We immediately filed for an appeal. With the timeline from the first hearing to the
decision and then the appeal, the next hearing was not set until December 2007.
(Exhibits E-G)
         During this time, we evaluated our stance to be sure that there were no loopholes.
But with technology being as it is, one of the tax commission’s biggest concerns about
modifying the ruling was making it too restrictive that it didn’t allow for future
technological growth.
         Even with our public awareness efforts, we were unsuccessful in getting
advertising companies throughout the entire state involved in opposing the taxation. We
had no luck getting anyone outside of our immediate communities fired up about the
prospect of additional tax. Even with the caveat that this would make Mississippi
companies’ charges automatically 7% higher than those of companies right outside our
state, neither side (state income lost/competitive pricing) acknowledged the concern.
         Results: Due to this limited participation from companies affected by the issue,
we decided to cancel that last hearing and abandon any further active opposition to the
issue. The example company paid the taxes that had been assessed. (Exhibits H-I)




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       The general feeling was that this was just a test subject and that more companies’
services would be assessed in the near future. In spite of our efforts, a better description is
needed for these line items when invoicing in order to avoid audit complications.

Communicate legislative information
Target Audience: General Membership & The Advertising Community at Large

         We have been very fortunate to have on AAFJ’s board a longtime Legislative
Coordinator, Jake Smith. Jake knows the legislative system inside and out and keeps the
membership up-to-date on what is going on locally, as well as on the national level. Jake
also serves the 7th District in this capacity.
         Jake forwards copies to membership of the AAF Governmental Reports, which are
sent out every quarter. (Exhibits J-M) Meetings are held with our elected officials to be
sure that all information is on the right track and that we hear it first-hand. This past year,
Jake attended the meeting of the Joint Government Affairs Conference in Washington,
D.C., and met with a few of our representatives to discuss issues relevant to our district.
(Exhibits N-R)
         Topics are also highlighted at the club’s monthly meetings, and Jake is always on
hand to follow up with further questions. Also at monthly meetings, we keep the
membership informed of the economic growth of our city and surrounding areas. The
Jackson metro area has a lot to be thankful for, even in the wake of the economy slowing
down.
         Another communication device is AAF SmartBriefs. We encourage our
membership to subscribe to this service, as it is a great source of information on the
national level.
         AAFJ board members attend the district and national meetings and conferences
(Exhibits S-V) to be sure we are always aware of decisions that affect us as employees,
employers, and an industry as a whole. One such decision for the year was to have local
clubs adopt the AAF as a prefix to each organization’s name. Jackson was on board with
this adaptation, and voted in October 2007 to rename the club as “American Advertising
Federation of Jackson, Mississippi” (AAFJ) to better reflect the national brand. The
announcement was formally made in the AAF’s 2007 fall issue of Interact.
(Exhibits W-X)
         Tammy Smith, a former president, took on the task of updating our by-laws to
reflect this transition officially, as well as to replace information that had become
outdated since the last revision in 1995. The updated by-laws were accepted in January
2008 by a unanimous vote of the membership. (Exhibits Y-AA)
         Email has been a source of communication to the membership, as well as to
solicit prospective members. For the elections in 2007, voting reminders were sent out by
AAFJ’s president and also past 7th District Governor Maggie Clark. Members expressed
appreciation for these reminders, which made the voting registration process easier.
(Exhibits BB-GG)
         Results: AAFJ increased the number of communication tools utilized to distribute
appropriate government relations news, views and activities. Therefore, the membership
was better informed about the topics of the day and made more aware of whom to contact
with their interests and concerns.



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Encourage members to become involved and attend functions
Target Audience: General Membership

        AAFJ is very fortunate to be in the capital city of Mississippi. With so much
going on during the 2007 and 2008 election years, there were many events to attend. The
board members are well threaded through the industry, and also among civic boards
throughout the city. (Exhibits HH-MM)
        The Mississippi Economic Council puts on two big annual events: Hobnob
Mississippi in the fall and Capital Day in January. AAFJ members and board members
attend these events and share the experience with membership.
        Hobnob Mississippi is held so individuals can meet and talk to the prospective
candidates. Dress is casual and the atmosphere is “fair-like,” to encourage a relaxed
environment that enables everyone to feel comfortable to ask questions of the people who
will potentially be running and representing our state. (Exhibits NN-QQ)
        Capital Day consists of a more formalized atmosphere, but still gives the
opportunity to hear from and meet with legislative leaders and state officials. This event
is normally during the first week of the legislative session. (Exhibits RR-VV) The day
includes a trip to the Capitol, which is quite an experience all its own. The Capitol of
Mississippi is over 100 years old and truly a spectacular architectural site. (Exhibit WW)
        Results: AAFJ encouraged our members to participate in government-related
civic events, to which there was good response. Increased AAFJ representation at these
events increases awareness of our club and improves the image of AAFJ throughout the
community. In addition, these events provide our members with even further networking
opportunities that could benefit their respective companies.

Overview
        In politics many things are hopeful. Going forward in 2008, AAFJ is continually
striving to give our membership what they want and what they need. This combination is
not always on the same path, but to keep our industry strong and well-informed, we
choose the path best for the membership.
        Our tax issue had an unfortunate ending, but we did get ourselves heard.
With our AAF Legislative Coordinator being a constant, we maintain a history of
knowledge that is easily accessible. Metro Jackson will always have the events to offer to
our membership. Our hope is that the significance is seen and acted on. We love our city,
our group of active members and our industry, and we look forward to the changes and
challenges of the future.




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    Government Relations
     1st Place – Division 5

           Ad 2 Orlando

Contact:         Kristen Zucks
                 Push
                 150 N. Orange Avenue, Suite 300
                 Orlando, FL 32801
                 (407) 841-2299
                 kzucks@pushhere.com




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Ad2 Orlando
2007-2008 Club Achievement
Government Relations

SITUATION:
As the state of Florida faces the need to cut the 2008 budget by more than half a billion
dollars and the 2009 budget by more than three billion, government relations is more
important than ever. Since the late 80s, the advertising industry has enjoyed a tax
deferment on services. Yet, as lawmakers look for ways to make up for the deficit, the
potential to lift this deferment and impose a service tax on advertising in Florida has
reemerged as a possibility.

During these tough economic times, the advertising industry should be seen as a partner,
rather than a place to generate tax dollars. Advertising professionals help boost the
economy by donating their time and talents to non-profit organizations, who are typically
the first groups to feel the burden of budget cuts. The advertising industry also works
with businesses throughout the state to help them retain market share and maintain jobs.
It is important to remind lawmakers of the industry’s positive effects on the economy and
community we serve.

As we unite as an industry and an organization to ensure this message reaches
lawmakers, it can be difficult to communicate our message and rally members behind it.
This year, we took steps to ensure our message was heard, as outlined below.

And because 2008 is also a Presidential election year, Ad2 Orlando felt that there was an
opportunity to encourage members and young people in the community to register to
vote. We were able to take the same dedication to building positive relationships with
lawmakers and supporting those who support our industry one step further. We also
worked with the 4th District on a campaign to help register young people in our
community to register and vote in the election.

GOALS:
  1. Build effective relationships with local, state and national governments.
  2. Contribute to the defeat of adverse legislation.
  3. Educate lawmakers on the industry’s contributions and dedication to public
     service and non-profit organizations.
  4. Help members understand the importance and role of government relations in
     their professional and personal lives.

INITIATIVES:
I. Rally in Tally
Event details:
As state legislators returned to the state capitol in early March 2008, the 4th District
American Advertising Federation (4AAF) held the annual Rally in Tally. The event was
schedule from March 11-12, as this is the absolute busiest time of year. Upon receiving
the information about the conference, communication was sent to the Ad2 Orlando Board



                                            162
of Directors, and members were encouraged to attend to meet with lawmakers (Exhibit
A).

4AAF offered to pay for two delegates from Ad2 Orlando to attend the conference; and
although the conference was held on a Tuesday and Wednesday, Ad2 Orlando was able
to send two members. The President and Public Service Chair attended all of the events
outlined on the agenda for the conference (Exhibit B).

The agenda included an industry-wide reception, featuring Dale Brill, Director,
Governor’s Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic Development. Brill encouraged the
industry to focus on innovation, which is key to bringing and retaining talent and
businesses in the state of Florida (Exhibit C). His presentation supported the 4AAF’s
slogan, “Advertising Fuels the Economy,” which communicates advertising’s positive
effect on the economy (Exhibit D). A surprise guest, Senator Victor Crist, also attended
the reception and spoke to attendees about the challenges currently facing the state and
potential solutions (Exhibit E). Crist stayed after the reception to meet with Ad2 Orlando
and AAF-O (Exhibit F).

The following day, Ad2 Orlando and AAF-O held a press conference for the 4AAF
public service initiative, Think Ecologically (Exhibit G). Following the press conference,
Ad2 Orlando and AAF-O attended individual meetings with the legislators.

Target Audience:
   1. Florida state senators and representatives.
   2. Aides of Florida state senators and representatives.

Strategies:
   1. Set meetings with state senators and representatives to communicate how
       advertising fuels the economy and the benefits of self-regulation in the advertising
       industry.
   2. Tour the state capitol to meet all legislators and aides.
   3. Communicate Ad2 Orlando, AAF-O and 4AAF public service initiatives.

Execution / tactics:
   1. Review talking points prior to touring the capitol and attending meetings to
      deliver a unified message to lawmakers.
   2. Wear buttons stating “Advertising Fuels Florida’s Economy” (Exhibit F).
   3. Leave business cards with all state lawmakers and aides.
   4. Hold a press conference in front of the state capitol building for the 4AAF public
      service campaign to show legislators advertising’s contributions to a non-profit
      organization first-hand. Release butterflies at the event to launch the campaign
      and garner attention (Exhibit H).
   5. Tour the state capitol building with “Eco” the Butterfly, the front person for the
      Think Ecologically campaign (Exhibit I).




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Results:
Ad2 Orlando, in conjunction with the American Advertising Federation – Orlando (AAF-
O), contacted the offices of all of the legislators and successfully set appointments with
four state representatives and two state senators (Exhibits J-K). For all of those we were
unable to set meetings with, we visited their offices in person to meet their aides and
introduce ourselves and our industry. We collected business cards from all of the
senators, representatives and aids (Exhibits L-N).

Overall, this was the best-attended, annual Rally in Tally to-date, with the most delegates
attending from Orlando in history. We received very positive feedback from the
lawmakers. They were happy to see people who were there to be proactive and maintain a
positive relationship. The President of Ad2 Orlando received a thank you letter from
Representative Andy Gardiner resulting from the visit (Exhibit O). None of the
legislators believed that a service tax would be an option in the near future. Through the
planning and workshops prior to the tour around the state capitol, Ad2 Orlando served a
strong role in delivering a unified message to lawmakers (Exhibit P). Both Ad2 Orlando
delegates that attended the conference felt the experience was very rewarding and were
happy to leave with a better understanding of the legislative process and contact
information for all those who represent us (Exhibit Q).

II. 2 for Change Campaign
Details:
To engage Ad2 Orlando members to get more involved with government relations and
the legislative process, Ad2 Orlando worked in conjunction with 4AAF to create a
campaign to encourage people to register to vote and get more involved with government
relations (Exhibit R). The campaign would be used to rally volunteers who would go to
related events to sign up the community to vote in the upcoming election. Taking a non-
partisan stance on politics, Ad2 Orlando would serve as a neutral supporter of
government relations and taking a stance on political issues.

Target Audience:
   1. Ad2 Orlando members who are not currently involved with government relations.
   2. Orlando community, specifically young professionals, who are not registered to
      vote.
   3. Students at area colleges who are interested in getting more involved in politics
      and government relations.

Strategy:
   1. Utilize pro bono creative talent to create a logo and campaign that inspires Ad2
       Orlando members to volunteer to register to vote.
   2. Inspire those who are not participating in government relations to start.
   3. Solicit volunteers at well-attended student events.
   4. Partner with the Board of Elections to obtain free voter registration forms and
       help with the registration process.
   5. Create t-shirts for Ad2 members and volunteers to wear at the events.




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Execution / tactics:
   1. The “2 for Change” logo and campaign were designed to affiliate Ad2 with
      positive change in the industry and community (Exhibit S – version 2).
   2. Obtain a table at the popular student event, Intern Pursuit, for students to sign-up
      to volunteer.

Results:
Ad2 Orlando created a logo that can be used at the local, district and national level. The
logo can be used as the starting point for a public service campaign to increase the
number of young voters in the upcoming election. To-date, Ad2 Orlando has several
board members who have committed to continuing the initiative and have signed up 10
local students who are interested in supporting the cause.




                                            165
166
    Membership Development
      1st Place – Division 1

Advertising Federation of Louisville

  Contact:        Robin Miller
                  Advertising Federation of Louisville
                  200 Distillery Commons, Suite 100
                  Louisville, KY 40206
                  (502) 582-2444
                  robin@louisville.org




                167
Objectives: In today’s fragile economic climate where “share of pocket” is so
competitive, it is of the utmost importance for any business, service, or product to
provide the best combination of quality, trust, and return on investment. As a voluntary
membership association, the Advertising Federation of Louisville’s our membership
objectives for the year were as follows: For Recruitment (REC) – 1) To increase
membership, specifically among our Young Advertising Professionals group; 2) To
position ourselves as an industry leader; 3) To offer significant and tangible member
benefits. For Retention (RET) – 1) To “give back” to our members by using some of our
recent financial gains; 2) To actively solicit and use member feedback; 3) To maintain a
fiscally responsible and efficient operation; 4) To utilize our milestones as a positioning
tool that demonstrates our sustainability; 5) To plan for our future growth; and 6) To
promote our members’ achievements. For Involvement (INV) – 1) To provide niche
programming opportunities to reach a diverse audience; 2) To offer networking
opportunities to further engage our members; and 3) To engage in projects that require a
variety of volunteers.
Projects/Programs (Subcategorized as Recruitment, Engagement, Recognition, and
Special Projects)
RECRUITMENT
Member Packets [REC #1] (Exhibit A) – We’ve been using a new member recruitment
brochure for the past year, which includes information about joining, as well as event
promotions. We targeted several new potential members through a direct mailing. But,
our efforts have primarily been word of mouth, which we find to be the most effective
recruitment technique. We specifically send the packet to those people with whom we’ve
first made personal contact, or to recommendations from our volunteers. Knowing that
potential members often research our Web site after receiving a packet, we added the
personified icon that is a featured graphic element on the packets, to the home page
banner of our Web site, so that they could make the immediate connection. As an added
feature, we included a link to our online roster right next to this icon, with a notice that
indicates getting access to the online roster is a member benefit. Due to our recruitment
efforts, at the end of 2006-2007, we had reached 75% of our goal for new Corporate
Level III members; 110% of our goal for new individual members; and 260% of our goal
for Young Advertising Professional (YAP) members. With four months still remaining
for the 2007-2008 year, were are already at 120% of our goal for Corporate III’s, 76% of
our goal for individuals; and 153% of our goal for YAPs. Our membership currently
stands at 753 -- the highest it’s been since September 11, and from March 2004 until
now, we have grown by 21%.
Benefits [REC #3] (Exhibit B) – Members receive a 30% discount to attend most events,
and several are free to paid members only. In addition, members are given priority
seating at our popular social events held at famous Churchill Downs racetrack, where
everyone wants finish line seating. Additionally, corporate members are given
complimentary ads in our bi-monthly magazine, the opportunity to bring guests and
clients at the member price, and can transfer their tickets and membership to new
employees. Only members receive our Communiqué magazine, are on our e-mail alert
list, and have access to the association roster. Finally, we have a host of member
discounts to restaurants and other services, which list on a static page in our




                                            168
Communiqué. We find that these added benefits serve as a tangible reason for our
members to join.
Media Relations [REC #2] (Exhibit C) - To generate positive press about the AdFed and
promote public confidence in our industry, we distribute our most media worthy stories
via press releases via e-mail. We also maintain such positive relationships with reporters
who call us when looking for a story that much of our pitch work is done verbally and
personally. Over the past year, our public relations efforts have resulted in nearly 20
media announcements spread over a variety of printed, interactive and broadcast media
including WAVE3 TV, “The Joe Elliot Show” on 84WHAS, Business First (print and
online), The Louisville Defender, The Courier-Journal, The Voice-Tribune, Louisville
Magazine, and thevillevoice.com, a new online blog publication.
ENGAGEMENT
President’s Postcards [REC #3] (Exhibit D) - Our 2007-2008 president has been writing
personal postcards to all members as they join for the first time or renew their dues. We
created postcards as a welcome gift for our guests who attended the American
Advertising Federation National Conference, which we hosted here in Louisville in June
2007. We utilized the remaining postcards to send these notes. With nearly 750 members,
this has been quite an undertaking, but it has been well worth it. Our members have very
positive things to say about it, which we recently witnessed “behind the mirror” during a
focus group session when a member commented that this was the first time they’ve ever
received a personal note from the president.
Orientation Sessions [INV #2] (Exhibit E) – We periodically hold New Member
Orientation Sessions as a way to make our new members aware of all of our activities, as
well as how they can get involved with a committee. The sessions are held immediately
prior to our monthly luncheon at the luncheon’s location. This set-up encourages new
members to also attend the luncheon, thus increasing attendance, and gives them an
opportunity to meet someone with who they can sit. Our staff and leadership also use
these orientation sessions as a tool for soliciting feedback from our members, in terms of
identifying the reasons they joined and how they hope to benefit from their membership.
Niche Programming [INV #1] (Exhibit F) – We understand members and prospective
members get connected to the organization when there is a meeting topic or seminar that
directly addresses their needs. Therefore, we offer nearly 30 different educational
opportunities, categorized into five niche series: our Monthly Luncheons, featuring big-
brand case studies; our nuts-and-bolts lunch-and-learn Professional Development Series;
our Diversity & Donuts Series, examining how the changing demographic landscape is
positively affecting our business; our Breakfast at Winston’s government relations series,
exploring the role of compliance versus advertising in highly regulated industries; and
our Young Advertising Professionals Career Construction Series, a line-up of educational
seminars held at social locations. Together, our programs served nearly 1,600 people this
past year.
YAP/Life Member Mentoring Program [INV #2] (Exhibit G) – In February, as an effort
to engage two of our demographic groups, we established a pilot mentoring program
between our Young Advertising Professionals (YAP) and Life Members (an elite self-
elected group of about 30 AdFed members who are 62 years of age or older, and have
served the club for ten years or longer) and made 17 partnerships. The relationship
between mentor and mentee is meant to be informal and each dyad can meet or



                                           169
communicate as often or as little as they like. We recently held the kickoff event where
mentors and mentees had the chance to meet, and we explained the program. A new local
restaurant donated the space and food and about 30 participants attended. It was a huge
hit.
RECOGNITION
Communiqué [RET #6] (Exhibit H) – We utilize our bi-monthly magazine,
Communiqué, for which the design and printing is completely donated, as a tool to not
only highlight our members’ achievements, but also to give them the opportunity to
publicly share their insights. During the past year, we featured two standing columns
called “Small Business Spotlight” where we featured freelancers and small agency
businesses, and “Meet Your AdFed” where we interviewed a randomly chosen member.
We also distributed a frequent member survey, asking members to submit their thoughts
regarding a particular issue or theme. Finally, each Communiqué edition includes a
“News” section, announcing awards, new hires, and new accounts. Members love seeing
their name in print, which makes the publication interactive with our members.
Hot 10 Awards [RET #6] (Exhibit I) – We conducted our second annual Hot 10 Awards
program in late Spring and featured the winners in our August Communiqué, as well as in
an awards ceremony at our June Annual Meeting luncheon. The Hot 10 Awards program
recognizes ten advertising professionals under the age of 30 who have already made
significant progress in their careers. We received 34 entries this year, up 31% from the
program’s inaugural year.


SPECIAL PROJECTS
Centennial Celebration [RET #4] (Exhibit J) – Our AdFed turned 100 years old on
January 30 and we engaged in a large celebration effort to commemorate this important
milestone with our members. We rolled over nearly $7,700 from 2006-2007 surplus
funds to implement this initiative. We secured the design donation of a special centennial
logo and letterhead, to be used with our original logo. Additionally, we secured the
donation of a centennial logo wall graphic and pull-up banner. We purchased travel
coffee mugs for each member, balloons, and chocolates – all with the new centennial
logo. Additionally, we created a special issue of Communiqué, featuring a gold metallic
cover, archive photos, articles about our history, memories of AdFed events, and a
Proclamation letter from the mayor recognizing our birthday.
        From a programming perspective, we held a centennial monthly luncheon to
launch our celebration. We featured local bourbon brand, Four Roses, which has been
around for 120 years, to be our topic. We worked with the caterer to secure tablecloths -
which matched the colors of our logo, and to serve cupcakes, complete with a candle and
the number 100 on it - as the dessert. For centerpieces, we promoted our centennial
celebration through our specialty balloons that we tied to a bottle of bourbon, which Four
Roses gave us to use a prize. There were 141 attendees at the luncheon. And, we gave
$100 as a door prize.
        The most major component to the centennial celebration was our free to members
Centennial Cocktail Party, which we held on our actual birthday in January. We elected
to hold the party at the AdFed office as a way to not only be cost effective by saving
room rental fees, but also to tangibly demonstrate the real infrastructure behind our



                                           170
operation. Members, who might not have ever been to the office before for a professional
development seminar or other meeting, had the opportunity to utilize the space. We
utilized our LCD projector and projected the nostalgic photo slideshow onto the wall in
the primary “party” room. There was a cash bar, but most people took advantage of our
complimentary Korbel champagne (a local brand) celebratory bar, which was located
right as they walked into the office. We also used the party as an opportunity to give our
members the commemorative travel coffee mug gift, which they could redeem by
handing us their event invitation. The party was a big success with 110 attendees. Our
goal was 100.
National Conference [REC #2] (Exhibit K) - In June, we hosted the American
Advertising Federation’s (AAF) annual national conference here in Louisville. In
addition to helping the national office secure sponsors, program locations, donors and
promotional opportunities, as well as printed collateral pieces, we also provided
suggestions for conference topics and speakers, based on feedback from our members.
Additionally, we wanted to send as many local people to the conference as possible.
Besides utilizing ads, e-mail blasts and printed promotions, to promote attendance we
also conducted a two-day phone bank targeted at reaching every AdFed member. The
Courier-Journal donated access to their call center and we secured ten volunteers to call
our members. We asked members if they had heard about the conference, if they were
going, and if there was someone else we should contact that they thought might be
interested in going as well.
        To further promote attendance, our board authorized $2,500 to be used in the
form of scholarships to any of our local members who wanted to attend. Ten members
received their registration for half-price by utilizing our scholarships. The conference was
a big hit and attracted 1,100 attendees – a near record. We received many great
compliments from conference participants, as well as from the AAF office. In addition,
due to the commission structure associated with securing local sponsors and donors and
offering special events at the conference, our club received $15,696, which we deposited
100% into our scholarship foundation fund, which annually rewards two scholarships to
students pursuing a degree in advertising.
Volunteerism
Public Service Project [INV #3] (Exhibit L) - We annually engage in a public service
project and introduced the concept of the “Dream Team”, comprised of ad professionals
from various AdFed member agencies, for the 2006-2007 project. Fifteen AdFed
members worked on a project for Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest for almost
13 months. Our work recently culminated in December, resulting in several distinct
deliverables on their behalf. After writing a vast client profile, we first developed the
client’s brand essence and value proposition statements; created a new logo and tagline,
commissioned a trademark attorney to conduct a logo search for the new logo; developed
a new character icon for their children’s education program; created a much-needed
graphic standards guide; developed fundraising and event ideas; and drafted a research
survey. We estimate that our team provided 600 hours of service, totaling about $72,000
in value. The Bernheim board of directors has been very pleased with our work and
services, specifically helping them identify their brand essence.
Azerbaijan Delegation [INV #3] (Exhibit M) - From May 22 – June 12, in conjunction
with the local World Affairs Council who hosts business foreign exchange programs, we



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opened our doors to ten public service officials from Azerbaijan. They were here to learn
about how our country, and specifically our community, works in regards to
public/private partnerships in affecting social change. They wanted to know how social
groups and advertising firms partner to engage in advocacy efforts, while working within
the confines of established governmental regulations. We involved 25 different AdFed
members and contacts who made presentations to the delegates while they were here,
including one-on-one facilitation with the program participants to create their action
plans for their return home. Additionally, the group was here during the time that we
hosted the AAF national convention and we arranged for them to attend some of the
sessions and social activities associated with that conference. The program was very
well-received and was our second time in hosting a group like this. Not only were we
able to share many of our best practices, our members also learned a lot about other
governmental structures along the way.
Committee Leadership [INV #3] (Exhibit N) – We have found that getting members
involved in the leadership of the club not only helps with our succession planning, but
also with engaging our members by deeply connecting them to the organization. There
were two major opportunities for volunteer leadership development this year. The first
was within our Young Advertising Professionals (YAP) committee structure. The
chairperson delegated committee work among a secretary, an activities chair – who in
turn named a sub-chair for each of the nine YAP events, and a treasurer. In fact, the
succession planning was so effective that when our YAP chair recently announced that
she had resigned her job and was moving out of the market, we immediately had
someone to take her place. The second example is our National Conference planning
committee, which had chairs for the seven following areas: volunteers; sponsorship;
social events; golf outing; marketing; programs/content; and bells & whistles.
Member Feedback
Branding Project [RET #2] (Exhibit O) - To examine member and stakeholder
perception of our organization, we engaged in an internal branding project targeted to
AdFed members, prospective members, and other stakeholders. We rolled over nearly
$6,500 from 2006-2007 surplus funds to assist with our internal branding efforts for
2007-2008. The primary objectives of our overall branding project include: increasing
brand awareness and positive perceptions among local, regional and national audiences;
increasing new member acquisition; minimizing membership “churn”; increasing
sponsorship commitments; and solidifying alignment with national/regional AAF
affiliates. Our first phase included one-on-one in depth interviews with key stakeholders.
We secured an AdFed volunteer to conduct these interviews and we provided her with a
script when calling to invite the person to participate. She also had discussion guidelines
to follow when conducting the interviews. Our next phase included two comprehensive
focus groups, for which we secured a moderator and paid her a discounted rate. We
crafted a detailed discussion guide, which encompassed the major areas of interest from
the in-depth interviews.
         To date, we’ve conducted 12 key stakeholder interviews, which we then
transcribed and incorporated into a top line report, which harnessed ten areas of interest.
Our focus groups included two groups of seven, for a total of 14 people. We now have
important data, highlighting our value-drivers, which can be used for the next phase when
we talk to potential members.



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Evaluations [RET #2] (Exhibit P) – To gauge member perception regarding our various
events, we utilize written evaluation forms, which we distribute at the actual event. These
have really helped us indentify our strengths and our areas for needing improvement.
Additionally, members will often note suggestions for possible future speakers. Finally,
much of our feedback is garnered personally through direct verbal contact and informal
e-mail communications.
Membership Pods [INV #2] (Exhibit Q) – When we attended the Division I networking
session at the AAF Conference here in June, we learned that some of our colleagues were
beginning to form special interest groups of like-minded disciplines within their
membership. After talking with many of our internal groups, we confirmed that this idea
would resonate very well within our membership. In fact, one of our members recently
approached us with a proposal to launch a Creative Membership Group, which we’re
calling pods as a working title. Our Executive Committee and Board approved the
proposal at their respective March meetings, and we are very excited to get started.
Louie Awards [RET #2] (Exhibit R) - Our local ADDY competition, which we call the
Louie Awards, has increasingly become stale over the past few years. While the gala
event was an overall nice event and we were still receiving decent attendance,
involvement, and a healthy profit, the program was starting to lose ground and attendance
was starting to falter. In the past we have had two events to celebrate the competition.
Our Preview Party event, which was typically held the last Wednesday in January,
showcased all of the competition’s entries, featured a cash bar, some light hors d’oeuvres,
and was very affordable to attend at $20. Our Gala event, which was typically held the
first Friday in March, was the celebration of the winning work, and featured a video of
the Gold and Silver Awards. The event was more elaborate, often black-tie optional,
heavier and fancier hors d’oeuvres, and more expensive. Over the past few years, our
Preview Party had been gaining in popularity and attendance, while our Gala was losing
attendance. In addition, the Louie celebration, which had long included a playful theme,
such as a Dog Show or Prom, was being mocked by some members. Based on member
feedback, we knew we needed to breathe life into the whole program, and we challenged
this year’s committee to do that.
         For starters, they developed an anti-theme theme, “It’s an awards show.” Their
creative depicted a big “NO” on it and carefully made a comparison to other year’s shows
by saying things like, “No barking dogs, No cheerleaders.” In addition, the committee
took a big chance this year and abandoned the stand-alone Preview Party, opting to hang
all the work at the actual Awards Gala, in hopes that the people who only attended the
Preview Party in the past would now attend the Gala.
         Above and beyond all the other major changes with the event for this year, our
Gala was victim to a major snowstorm the night of the show – Friday, March 7.
Louisville was slated to receive 14 inches of snow that evening, causing us to have to
postpone it first thing that morning. We quickly got word out to all of our vendors and
attendees, and were able to reschedule for Wednesday, March 19. Interestingly enough,
we ultimately picked up nearly 20 additional attendees, from our originally scheduled
date. In total, we had 42% more attendees than last year’s event. We also determined,
albeit serendipitously, that a weeknight might be the better way to go and we are
currently evaluating that for next year.
Club Operations



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Roll-Over Funds [RET #1] (Exhibit S) – Our club has had the great fortune over the past
few years to really turn ourselves around and significantly increase our financial
situation. We’ve been careful with expenses and great with new members, additional
attendance, and effective sponsorship recruitment. As a result of this new more
comfortable cash position, we felt that for the 2007-2008 year we owed it to ourselves
and to our members to reinvest some of this money back into the organization. Our
Executive Committee identified the following five areas that would greatly benefit from
additional funds in the 2007-2008 budget: the Centennial Celebration; the internal
Branding Project; our Louie Awards; the scholarship foundation account; and our
investment portfolio account. We utilized the $34,000 surplus funds that were generated
above and beyond what we had projected as a net income for last year and broke it down,
weighted by percentage, into those five areas, resulting in significant enhancements for
our major priorities.
Investment Account [RET #5] (Exhibit T) – In September, we moved $150,000 into an
investment portfolio, delineated as follows: $25,000 into a three-month CD; $25,000 into
a 12-month CD; $75,000 among stocks & bonds; and $75,000 into a money market
account. Unfortunately, the market hasn’t been as fruitful as we hoped as of yet, but we
know that duration is key, so we’re sticking with it. We’re thrilled to be able to establish
this reserve fund.
Financial Historical Analysis [RET #3] (Exhibit U) – We recently conducted an
analysis of our financial growth since the end our fiscal year 2000-2001, which ended
7/31/01. At that time, we had negative ($30,521) in net assets and only $19,880 in cash.
As of 7/31/07, we had $225,532 in net assets – an 839% increase, and $283,341 in cash –
a 1325% increase. In 2001-2002 club/fiscal year, which was plagued by September 11,
our revenues dropped. Over the past five audited years, however, our revenues have
increased by 28%, for which we couldn’t be any more pleased.




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 Membership Development
   1st Place – Division 2

      AAF – Des Moines

Contact:      Jennifer Simpson
              Radio Iowa/Brownfield News
              9934 Tanglewood Drive
              Urbandale, IA 50322
              (515) 244-7400
              jen@learfield.com




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                                    Club Background:
American Advertising Federation of Des Moines, formerly the Advertising Professionals
    of Des Moines, celebrates the club's 100 years of leadership in the industry with
     unification to our national affiliate's brand identity - The American Advertising
   Federation (AAF) after a unanimous vote of support. The AAF of Des Moines is a
dynamic, growing organization dedicated to professional development and networking in
 Des Moines and central Iowa. The object of this organization, according to our bylaws,
     is to foster higher standards of practice in advertising, to expand recognition of
advertising, to further the personal and professional knowledge of persons in advertising
                and to promote good fellowship among advertising persons.

GOAL: MEMBERSHIP RECRUITMENT - Increase recruitment of new members to
register 250 total members for the year to obtain AAF Division II status, an increase
goal of slightly over 25% our membership base from the previous year or fifty-three
(53) new members.

A) Prospective member database
We focused on developing our prospect database by collecting information from guests at
monthly luncheon meetings and collecting contacts that members have within the
advertising community. This database is used to actively communicate with prospective
members about upcoming events and to expose them to our events and encourage
membership in the club. (Exhibit 1, database sample)
B) Ongoing communications with prospective new members
Tapping into new markets with a focus on freelancers, small business owners, and other
non-agency organizations with a marketing presence who could benefit from the
education and interaction with the community the club provides. Email communications
are regularly sent to these professionals, as well as personal hand written thank you notes
from board members. Board members also used their personal and professional
connections in the community to invite prospective members to club events. For
example, the club’s second vice president reached out to the marketing department of the
Civic Center of Greater Des Moines to form a team for our annual AdMania trivia event.
As a result of this personal invitation and following participation, four new members
were garnered from a previously untapped organization in the community.
C) Implement the Club Ambassador Program
The board developed an ambassador program that partners new members or prospective
members with current members. Ambassadors personally connect with their new
member contacts and introduce them to the inner workings of club events, volunteer
opportunities, and networking functions. This program now serves as an important touch
to new members who are new to the club’s opportunities. (Exhibit 2, committee email
correspondence)
D) Targeted Club Events
Promotion of memberships through targeted club events was another key to our success
in 2007 – 2008, with events such as the annual local ADDY® Award Show and AdMania
trivia social event increasing membership. Throughout each event and the related
communications, we promoted the benefits of membership. As a result of including our




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prospects in our promotions of these specialty events there were the following increases
in attendance at each event and subsequent memberships:
        AdMania – Four (4) additional teams of Ten (10) comprised of non-members
        attended the annual trivia event. From each of these teams at least 3 individuals
        converted to members of the club, a 30% close rate.
        2007 ADDY® Awards – Twelve (12) new organizations were represented with
        entries in the competition. One of these new organizations, a small startup
        creative shop, entered a piece in the interactive category, signed his membership
        check the same day he submitted his entries and then ultimately took home a Best
        of Class and a Gold ADDY®. This provided him recognition amongst his new
        peers and helped him connect with other members of the advertising community.
        (Exhibit 3, 2007 ADDY® Call for Entries)
E) Provide quality programming for the membership through monthly luncheons
    and educational seminars
Strategic planning of the programming for the club pays special attention to the interests,
needs, and requests of the local advertising community. Monthly luncheons bring highly
credentialed speakers from a variety of markets (mostly outside of Iowa) to Des Moines
to provide different perspectives on the various issues facing the advertising industry.
Quality programming helps in attracting continued interaction and ultimately new
members to the club. (Exhibit 4, Holiday Social invite)
F) Student Membership Recruitment through Project 33
Student membership is another key component for AAF of Des Moines, as we look to
actively engage the next generation of talent in the market. Through Project 33, an annual
Thirty-three (33) hour student event, the club actively communicates to these students
and promotes the benefits of not only student membership, but ongoing affiliation with
the club throughout their growing career. Project 33 engages students in an actual
marketing campaign for a real client, with AAF of Des Moines members acting in a
support role. (Exhibit 5, 2007 P33 program)
   Results: To date, we have exceeded our goal with 269 active, student, and honorary
members for the 2007 – 2008 membership years.
        Increase in membership by 42% from 2006-2007 (190 members)
        64 new professional members
        30 new collegiate members
        75 Greater Des Moines businesses represented across membership
        80 prospects in our prospective database
        13% higher actual membership income over projected membership income goal

GOAL: MEMBERSHIP RETENTION – Obtain at least an 80% retention rate through
active communication and quality programming.
A) Membership Renewal Mailing
In August 2007, a membership renewal mailing was sent to the entire AAF of Des
Moines membership inviting all members to renew their membership for the 2007 – 2008
year. The membership packet contained information highlighting the many benefits of the
organization, an exclusive Advance Pay Advantage offer for reduced rates at the
luncheons, dues investment summary with corresponding benefits section, and an
application that covered the corporate membership option which would allow more



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individuals from one company to enjoy the many benefits of the AAF of Des Moines at a
package price point. (Exhibit 6, renewal materials)
Members were enticed to respond in a timely manner by setting a deadline of August 31
for renewals in order to be included in the online membership directory that was
introduced this year. We followed up with emails and phone calls by the membership
committee members to individuals that did not respond after the initial mailing. Another
effort involved existing members in recruiting new prospects, including professionals in
the corporate and vendor marketplaces. (Exhibit 7, membership follow up email)
B) Launch online membership directory
In 2007 – 2008 there was a launch of an all new online membership directory, providing
an easy-to-update record of all members for AAF of Des Moines. This membership
database was a highly requested and valued addition to the membership benefit arsenal.
(Exhibit 8, online directory screen shot)
C) Online survey tool
An online Zoomerang survey request followed all meetings and events to gain
perspective on programming from the most important audience - the members and
prospects. These surveys have provided an additional touch point with this audience and
engaged them in the planning of future club events. (Exhibit 9, Zoomerang Survey
Sample & Results)
D) Long-range planning survey to membership
Another new initiative this year was a long-range planning survey tapping into all active
members asking questions about the club paramount to future success. Questions
covered participation in events and activities, ways to improve communications and new
ideas for the future. This survey was taken by 75 members and prospective members, and
the results were shared first with the board of directors to improve activities, events and
communications, and then with the general membership. (Exhibit 10, Long Range
Planning Survey Summary)
E) Personalized communications to new members
All new members this year were sent a personalized email from the club president
welcoming them to the AAF of Des Moines along with passwords to the exclusive
member benefit of the online membership directory. A strong focus was placed on board
of directors to meet all new members in person at upcoming luncheons and to further
solidify membership benefits. This new contact was well received and helped our new
members feel comfortable with the club processes. (Exhibit 11, welcome email,
directory password)
F) Name change to align the local club with the benefits of AAF nationally
In addition to ongoing communications with members and prospects, Advertising
Professionals of Des Moines initiated an official name change to better align the local
club with AAF nationally, transitioning to the American Advertising Federation of Des
Moines on January 1, 2008. This allowed the club to continually promote the benefits of
not only our local club, but all of the professional benefits of becoming a part of a larger,
national organization focused on marketing our profession. (Exhibit 12, Name Change
Announcement)
G) Implement online payment options for club events
Yet another new program to retain members in 2007 – 2008 was the launch of a PayPal
program for all club events. Members can now pay via credit card in advance of all



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events, providing an easy way for everyone to RSVP and plan in advance of events. This
new option has been well received by the membership and other local clubs are looking
to initiate a similar program. (Exhibit 13, pay pal screen shot)
H) Provide quality programming for the membership through monthly luncheons
    and educational seminars
Strategic planning of the programming for the club pays special attention to the interests
and needs of the local advertising community. Monthly luncheons bring highly
credentialed speakers from a variety of markets (mostly outside of Iowa) to Des Moines
to provide different perspectives on the various facets of the advertising industry.
Hosting valuable programs provides a return on investment for our membership and
increases retention. (Exhibit 14, Programs list)
    Result: AAF of Des Moines has achieved a retention rate of 92% from the 2006-
2007 to the 2007-2008 year, far outperforming our retention goal of 80%.
2006-2007 member total:190 members, 2007-2008 member total: 269 – proving retention
plus recruitment allowed for goal achievement and exceeded expectations.

GOAL: MEMBERSHIP INVOLVEMENT – Engage club members to become actively
involved in the Club and the local advertising community.
A) Implement the Club Ambassador Program
As discussed above, the new ambassador program is a way to actively engage new
members into the club immediately and get them involved in decisions and projects.
Specialized committees were developed within the club, to not only engage new
members, but to train leadership for the future of the club.
B) Reengage long-term members of the club
Long-term members of the club are also key components of membership growth and
sustainability and we worked to engage our former leadership with a past presidents
reception at the 2007 ADDY® Awards. Recognizing and reengaging these true leaders
with two inaugural inductees into the new Leadership Legacy Hall of Fame, we found a
way to bring their past knowledge to the forefront and actively share the club history,
within the profession and the community. (Exhibit 16, Past President AAF Award,
picture)
C) Use club events to promote the club as a professional networking forum
Through new and annual activities we also engaged members to become involved and
utilize the club as a professional networking forum. The annual ADDY® Award,
AdMania, Project 33 and new events such a reception with ADDY® judges have
increased member activity.
D) Use online event surveys to invite members to be engaged in the club
The online event surveys that are sent to all event attendees provide a place for members
or non-members to ask to be contacted about becoming more actively involved with the
club.
    Result: Forty (40) club members have been recruited through these tactics to
become actively engaged in the planning and execution of various club events. This
number is significantly higher than previous years when the board members have
carried the majority of the weight regarding club facilitation.




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CONCLUSION
AAF of Des Moines’ membership committee accomplished its goals of growing the
membership base by 42%, retaining 92% of our membership from the previous operating
year and recruiting 40 members to become active participants on planning committees. It
was a membership growth year for the history books!




                                         180
 Membership Development
   1st Place – Division 3

   AAF – Coastal Carolinas

Contact:       Matthew D. Hewitt, Michelle Cantey
               MB Pelicans
               1251 21st Avenue North
               MB, SC 29577
               (843) 267-7889
               mhewitt10@aol.com,
               michelle_cantey@yahoo.com




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                  2007-2008 Club Achievement Entry – Membership
                     AAF-Coastal Carolinas – Myrtle Beach, SC
Overview.

AAF- Coastal Carolinas, formerly known as Coastal Advertising & Marketing
Professional (CAMP), embraced the concept of utilizing the national corporate
positioning and brand identity of the federation into the local personality of the ad club
by initiating efforts to rename our club with a more evident distinction of the federation’s
role as the foundation of more than 200 affiliate ad clubs across the country. With a 12
county market span stretching from Wilmington (NC) south to Myrtle Beach and
Georgetown (SC) and west to Florence (SC), the idea of identifying these regions with a
more unifying name and icon was the first developmental step into the new ad club year.
Through the creative talents of ad club members who represented local agencies, graphics
firms or freelance design, the new club logo, position, and identity emerged. Our newest
inspiration, an icon and club name now known as AAF-Coastal Carolinas, evolved.
(Exhibit A) This emergence allowed us to forge ahead with plans to grow the
membership and expand upon existing club programs to, as our mission statement states,
“provide and promote a better understanding of the functions of advertising and of its
values; to apply these skills, creativity and energy of the advertising industry whenever it
is needed to help social problems; to advocate the standards of advertising through a
voluntary program of self regulation; to promote good fellowship and free exchange of
ideas.” Now, more than ever, it unifies the key regions of our local ad club market to
become a more cohesive voice and face of marketing and advertising in this region of the
state.

Overall Objective: To develop strategies to increase membership numbers,
participation, recruitment and retention.

1. Maintain 80% current membership and acquire new memberships to attain at least
10% growth over 2007-2008, which will promote AAF-CC up to Division III.
2. Increase membership involvement through the multiple facets of club operations.
3. Strengthen communication processes with AAF-CC members and new members.
4. Implement relevant and interesting professional development programs.
5. Answer our membership’s call for more networking opportunities with the launch of
    Tension Tamer Tuesday (T3).
6. Identify a distinguished member of our club and honor that member with the Silver
    Medal Award.
I. Maintain 80% current membership and acquire new memberships to attain at
least 10% growth over 2007-2008, which will promote AAF-CC up to Division III.

The 2007-08 Membership Campaign began with renewal letters and invoices mailed to
the members. Prompt renewals were encouraged by with an Early Bird Discount offer.
Non-renewals were contacted by board members who took the opportunity to poll
reasons for not renewing. The 2nd Vice President/Membership Chair personally welcomes
new members to AAF-CC. New members and guests are recognized at each monthly
luncheon. Board members seek out new members and guests at our meetings. Every



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member received a membership package (Exhibit B) that included pertinent
information about AAF-CC, National AAF, official AAF Certificate of Membership and
membership card, and AAF-CC promotional items. AAF-CC creates a comprehensive
package that reflects AAF-CC professionalism and helps aid in membership retention.
Pro-rated Memberships. After the ADDY Awards on February 10, 2007, we offered
additional reduced membership dues. If someone signed up in February, the membership
fee was $150, March $120; April $90; May $60; June $30. The purpose is to recruit
members at a low cost, get them involved, establish a sense of belonging and hope they
will join next year at full price at the beginning of the AAF-CC year. In fall 2007, 74
members took advantage of the early bird discount and 3 members (to date) have taken
advantage of the reduced membership rate after the ADDY’s.
II. Increase membership involvement through the multiple facets of club operations.
A. Monthly Meetings. Monthly, we encourage members to volunteer at “check-in,”
serve as greeters, sell tickets to upcoming club events and to network with each other at
each of our professional development luncheons. We’ve had great feedback with
members feeling appreciated by the club leaders and inspired to volunteer in other facets
of club operations. (Exhibit C)
B. Public Service. (Exhibit D) Throughout the year, we call upon our membership to
volunteer with our public service or student outreach programs. Some events this year
have included Tools for Schools, Band Aid for Autism, Boo Bash for Breast Cancer,
Taste of Restaurant Row, and our marketing workshop for non-profit organizations.
Members are also asked to donate in-kind contributions to our annual public service
campaign. At our March luncheon, on the eve of our 2007-2008 Public Service
Campaign Launch, we recognized ALL media partners for the 2006-2007 Public Service
Campaign promoting Horry County Humane Society. Local media vendors donated $80,
558.50 in advertising to promote the AAF-CC campaign. Throughout the year, our
average volunteer rate for most AAF-CC events and fundraisers was 26 percent.
C. Government Relations. (Exhibit E)With Myrtle Beach hosting the 2008 Presidential
Primary Debates, we were thrilled that 37 percent of our members participated through
Government Relations to represent AAF-CC as Republican and Democratic debate
volunteers. Through special arrangements with the Black Caucus Institute and the Myrtle
Beach Area Chamber of Commerce, AAF-CC members were given prominent volunteer
positions during both debates, including managing the post-debate Spin Room for CNN.
D. Student Outreach. (Exhibit F) AAF-CC promotes several educational programs for
students. In the Internship, Job Shadowing and Mentoring Programs, the Advertising
Education chairperson works with students in these programs through our educational
liaisons, member contacts and online listings.
• Internship program: Students work in their area of concentration and gain hands-on
experience.
• Shadowing program: By hosting students, members give students a glimpse of their
chosen career.
• Mentoring program: Members mentor students and convey career-related advice.
In 2007-08, we increased membership participation in these programs: six member
companies hosted internships and nine member companies hosted job shadowing
students. Most participants have had multiple students this year. Not only are AAF-CC
members supportive in these programs, we are also grooming future advertising


                                          183
professionals and AAF-CC members. AAF-CC also recruits creative directors to assist in
our annual portfolio reviews each spring. In regards to Speaking Engagements/Career
Days, Creative Competitions and Educational Support, we wanted to increase
membership participation in sharing their professional knowledge with future advertising
professionals. By expanding advertising genres represented in these presentations, we
increased membership involvement to 12 speakers presenting to more than 30 classrooms
and participating in three career days: 16 Diversity in Advertising and 14 in Advertising
Education/Genre Specific Classes. Seven members served as DECA judges for the South
Carolina competition on February 23, 2008. Our Ad Ed co-chair serves as the Chairman
and four club members serve on the Advisory Board for the Academy of Arts Science &
Technology’s (AAST) Digital Communications.
E. Volunteer Appreciation. AAF-CC’s president recognizes volunteers from the
presiding events or previous month at each professional development luncheon. She calls
them by name, states their volunteer efforts and the crowd shows appreciation with its
applause. At the end of the club year, a Volunteer Appreciation Social is scheduled that
brings ALL volunteers together. The volunteers will be presented trophies for their hard
work. This program continues to be a big hit with our members. Recognition among their
peers give members a great sense of pride for their work and helps with membership
retention and involvement. (Exhibit G)

III. Strengthen communication processes with AAF-CC members and new
members.

A. High Frequency Electronic Communications: Electronic newsletters and e-blasts.
(Exhibit H)
Through various frequent e-blasts and e-newsletters, we distribute an efficient, streamlined,
electronic newsletter format to pique members’ and potential guests’ interests. Our
electronic communications is distributed to 699 AAF-CC members and, potential members
throughout our 12-county geographic chapter area. Every piece of electronic
communication includes the new AAF-CC logo; features the AAF-CC web site URL with a
click-through to the web site; and states our mission and numerous club achievements. All
communications to members include updated information on various committees including
programs, membership, advertising education, public service and government relations.
AAF-CC generated club awareness to our target audience with streamlined communication
that is easy to use. More than 90 percent of RSVPs for our monthly professional
development luncheons are made via the e-blast reminder linking to our web site.
B. Web site. (Exhibits I) To accompany the club name change - AAF-Coastal Carolinas,
we implemented a new club web site designed in a student web competition. Securing the
new domain of www.aafcoastalcarolinas.com, we built the AAF-CC web site using minority
student Yaw Odame’s design. The new site launched fall 2007. To keep communication
seamless from year to year, email addresses were created for each committee chair using the
new URL. Newly assigned Interactive Chairs were instrumental in maintaining website
www.mbcamp.com while developing the new website www.aafcoastalcarolinas.com and
using the www.aafcoastalcarolinas.net to gather votes during our logo contest. Web site
features club overview of upcoming event details, AAF news, careers, scholarship/job
shadowing opportunities, public service events, government relations links, photo gallery,



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and membership directory. Our interactive chairs continuously update our web site in order
to provide the most current visitor with accurate information. Meeting reminders include a
link to the RSVP page of our web site. We average more than 90 percent of our monthly
reservations via the web site and 6,500 “page views” per month.
C. New Member and Non-Renewal Phone Calls (Exhibit J) With a personal goal to
personally connect with every one of our members, our 2nd Vice President/Membership
calls our new members welcoming them to AAF-CC and encouraging them to become
involved. She also follows up with non-renewals to urge them to renew their memberships
or to inquire reasons for not renewing. Board members also “claim” non-renewals to follow
up with regarding membership. New members and guests are recognized at each monthly
luncheon. Board members seek out new members and guests at our meetings and welcome
them to AAF-CC. The board reviews the list of non-renewals and signs up to personally
contact non-renewals reminding them to renew or inquire reasons for not renewing. New
members appreciate the personal contact and 20% signed up to volunteer. Converted 50%
non-renewals to re-join.
D. Information Table at Professional Development Luncheons (Exhibit K) AAF-CC
committee member mans the information table and answers any questions. Materials
include AAF-CC Mission Statement, membership applications, committee forms, AAF and
Third District information, upcoming event materials/fliers, professional development
materials, and member-to- member communications/discounts. Table tents on each table
also provide the professional development agenda and AAF-CC mission statement.
F. Program Surveys (Exhibit L) Comment cards are made available for members and
guests to fill out at our monthly professional development luncheons. We choose to inquire
monthly, because we feel frequent membership feedback provides a great opportunity for
AAF-CC to make timely adjustments based on their feedback instead of implementing ideas
the following year after an annual survey is completed in the summer. We have been
fortunate to receive comment cards during each luncheon. We have learned that networking
and professional development are what they love most about AAF-CC.
E. Board of Directors’ Resource Binder (Exhibit M) Personalized binders outlining each
person’s role were distributed at our leadership retreat in July 2007. The binders helped the
club leaders to remain focused on their responsibilities and goals as outlined and adhere to
their approved budgets. Board of Directors and Committee Chairs felt a sense of
responsibility and accountability after signing the Commitment Statement.

IV. Implement relevant and interesting professional development programs.
(Exhibit N) Our 1st Vice President/Program Chair booked the entire year in advance and
has already booked the first two meetings for 2008-09 to assist the new chair in planning.
Along with monthly professional development luncheons, AAF-CC also offers other
educational marketing workshop for local non-profit organizations, the ADDYs® and
partnerships with local organizations. Through programs and leadership opportunities,
AAF-CC promotes diversity awareness among our membership, club leaders and the
community. Due to the quality of our programs, luncheon attendance increased 11
percent for the year and ADDY® entry participation increased 15 percent while
attendance maintained at 300 for the Gala. Our inaugural ADDY® Preview Party
attracted 200 attendees. The ADDY Awards, an annual event sponsored by AAF-CC,
recognizes and showcases the area’s best advertising and creative talent. AAF-CC



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successfully generated member interest and awareness for our local ADDY Awards show
that was held at the 2001 Nightclub on February 9, 2008, by utilizing several media
including broadcast emails, collateral, direct mail, guerilla marketing, newspaper ads,
press releases, AAF-CC web site and a separate ADDY2008 web site. Entries increased
15 percent, totaling 467 with 28 student entries. Professional ADDY Awards: 66 Gold,
53 Silver, Best of Show, Best of Print, Best of Interactive, Best of Broadcast, Special
Judges Award. Student ADDY Awards: 5 Gold, 1Silver and Best of Show. Overall
attendance was up 15% and member attendance was up 10%.

V.      Answer our membership’s call for more networking opportunities with the
launch of Tension Tamer Tuesday (T3). (Exhibit O)Through membership feedback,
we learned that networking opportunities, programs and ADDYs were three of their
preferred membership benefits. They asked for more networking opportunities and the
networking chair, along with the club leaders, answered with Tension Tamer Tuesday
(T3), a traveling networking event that meets after hours on the fourth Tuesday.
Attendance has ranged from 37 at our kickoff T3 in September to 67 at our Holiday
Mixer and 200 at our ADDY Preview Party/Oyster Roast in January. We purposely chose
to “roam” the 60-mile stretch of the greater Myrtle Beach area hitting ‘hot spots” to give
members on either end an opportunity to join us for Happy Hour.
VI.     Identify a distinguished member of our club and honor that member with the
Silver Medal Award. (Exhibit P) The Silver Medal is given to recognize individuals
who have made outstanding contributions to advertising and who have been active in
furthering industry standards, creative excellence and responsibility in areas of social
concern. To showcase the past Silver Medalists, each participated in the ADDY
Presentation to the 2008 Silver Medalist, a la Publisher’s Clearinghouse, surprising the
recipient with the crowd of Silver Medalist, balloons, lights, cameras, signage, the works!
At the notification, the Silver Medalist was asked to say a few words about winning – this
video was used in the introduction to the Silver Medal Reception held prior to the ADDY
Gala. AAF-CC considers the Silver Medal Recognition at the ADDYs to be a success
with 75% of past silver medalists attending. And, of course, we took that opportunity to
encourage the past Presidents and Silver Medalist to get involved with AAF-CC again.

In Summary. Traditionally, a Division IV club, AAF-CC experienced dynamic
membership growth throughout 2007-2008 – hitting the 100 member mark in November
2007! AAF-CC shattered luncheon attendance records in September (109 attended),
October (105) and November (102) – breaking all attendance records when compared to
annual timeframe (i.e. all September meetings). By November, we had reached the 100
member mark! As of March 4, 2008, we have 107 members in the AAF-CC compared to
97 last year. Twenty-nine new members joined AAF-CC this year and 78 renewed their
memberships. At new member growth of 27 percent, we exceeded our goal of 10 percent
new members and achieved our goal of 80 percent retention (Note: Our fiscal year runs
July 1-June 30. We may further exceed our goal as we are still receiving membership
applications for the 2007-08 year.) Based on our Budget Year-to-Date, our guest fees are
up 60% over projected budget income year-to-date; ADDY® gross revenues increased
18%; membership dues are 10% above projected 2007-08 income. We’re thrilled to be
“moving up the ranks” to Division III and looking forward to gauging our hard work and



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efforts against clubs in much larger markets! What a year for AAF-CC – new name, new
brand, and new division!




                                        187
188
   Membership Development
     1st Place – Division 4

           AAF – Jackson

Contact:          Jeff Pedigo
                  GodwinGroup
                  188 East Capital Street, Suite 800
                  Jackson, MS 39211
                  (601) 354-5711
                  jpedigo@godwin.com




                189
       Following a year that featured a decline in our membership numbers, The
   American Advertising Federation of Jackson, Mississippi (AAFJ), formerly
   known as the Jackson Advertising Federation, made it our primary objective
   this year to, at the very least, maintain our membership numbers, from last
   year if not increase them. Along with the Vice President/Membership Chair,
   the membership committee was comprised of three very willing and able
   members. They, along with the club President, have been instrumental in our
   success in meeting membership goals.
       The officers and board of directors adopted the following membership
goals as they relate to:
           1. Recruitment
                a. Engage more professionals
                b. Develop new members
           2. Retention
                a. Retain current membership and enhance scope of member
                    benefits
                b. Survey members to determine their needs and how AAFJ can
                    improve its services
           3. Involvement
                a. Provide membership with dynamic opportunities for
                    networking, socializing, community service and involvement
                    with students
                b. Provide relevant, timely and educational professional
                    development programs
                c. Promote club involvement through effective communication
                    with members
       AAFJ achieved these goals through the following activities:
           1. Projects/Programs
                a. Programs at Monthly Meetings. (Exhibits A-G) In addition to new
                    social events and workshops, our program chairs for 2007 and 2008
                    put together an excellent calendar of programs for our monthly
                    meetings. Highlights include our June 2007 meeting, featuring Randy
                    Snow and the Las Vegas ad campaign. In November, Gary Creek
                    presented the University of Alabama’s student recruiting campaign.
                    The January 2008 meeting featured a representative from Google who
                    talked about the future of internet marketing (more than 100 people
                    attended this meeting.) Average attendance at meetings has increased
                    from 40-60 people at each meeting to 50-75 attendees.
                b. ADDY® Awards Gala and Fundraiser. (Exhibits H-M) This event
                    promotes advertising creativity while fostering good relations among
                    local advertising-related businesses, and generates much-needed funds.
                    Current membership, prospective members and local businesses
                    involved in the advertising industry or related fields are invited. Many
                    members participate in planning and staging the event. Once again,
                    with our “Golden ADDYs,” we enjoyed excellent results, receiving
                    359 entries.



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c. Silver Medal Award. (Exhibits N-Q) The Silver Medal Award
   is our most highly regarded recognition. Each year we prepare
   with the nomination letter. Nominations are reviewed and
   voted on by a group of five past presidents and/or Silver Medal
   recipients. The winner is not announced until the day of the
   regular monthly meeting in May, where a tribute is made to the
   recipient. Many past presidents and past Silver Medal
   recipients attend this annual event.
d. Socials. (Exhibits R-V) To expand the scope of membership
   benefits, as well as providing additional opportunities for
   members to socialize and network, AAFJ hosted several after-
   hours socials. These included a family night at a popular
   catfish restaurant and after-work cocktails at one of the city’s
   most prestigious downtown clubs. These events have been well
   received, and future spring and early summer socials are
   currently in the planning stages.
e. Workshops. (Exhibits W-DD) Additional benefits of
   membership include the opportunity for members and their
   guests to attend workshops. In Fall 2007, AAFJ board member
   Becky White conducted a presentation on creating more
   effective PowerPoint shows. Twelve people attended the
   workshop, which received excellent reviews. A Stress
   Management workshop was conducted by Melissa Harper of
   Magnolia Federal Credit Union. Fourteen highly stressed
   people attended and left feeling wonderful. Following this
   workshop, Magnolia Federal Credit Union’s marketing director
   joined AAFJ!
f. Participation in 7th District and AAF Conferences and
   Conventions. (Exhibits EE-RR) In addition to attending all
   district and national events, our club hosted the 7th District
   Leadership Conference in August 2007. Our presentation of
   “You Don’t Know Jack” was well attended by 129 registrants
   and received many complimentary reviews. We gave members
   and their guests an opportunity to attend at least one portion of
   the conference by holding our regular monthly meeting at the
   conference. Many members of our club, as well as students
   from the AAF student chapter that we sponsor at Antonelli
   College, participated in staging the event.
g. Golf Tournament. (Exhibits SS-VV) In October, we staged our
   Third Annual AAFJ Bob O’Brien Memorial Golf Tournament.
   The objectives of the tournament are to raise funds for AAFJ
   scholarships while honoring deceased AAFJ member Bob
   O’Brien, build camaraderie among AAFJ members and
   introduce non-members to AAFJ. There were over 64 players,
   making up 16 teams. We were pleased to see a good mixture of




                            191
      members and potential members. The net profit from this event
      was $2000.
   h. Funky Furniture Auction. (Exhibits WW-ZZ) This fundraiser
      takes donated furniture, gets it decorated by local artists and
      then auctions it off. In an effort for the club to be more visible
      in the community, the Funky Furniture event tied in with a
      popular community event, Fondren Unwrapped, which was
      held in an eclectic inner city neighborhood that is experiencing
      revitalization. The Fondren revitalization was also featured at
      one of our monthly meeting programs. This year, 20 items
      were produced and 10 items sold. Although we garnered much
      goodwill from the event, the net profit was negligible. The
      board will re-evaluate this event as a fundraiser next year.
2. Volunteerism
   a. Public Service Activities. (Exhibits AAA-NNN) AAFJ’s public
      service efforts offered our support, talents and energies to a
      wide variety of organizations and institutions to garner
      maximum exposure of AAFJ throughout the metro-Jackson
      area. Organizations and activities served include Mississippi
      Symphony Refurbished Instruments Program; Susan G. Komen
      Pink Party; Domestic Violence Shelter; Community Animal
      Rescue & Adoption, Inc.; Methodist Rehab; Blair Batson
      Children’s Hospital; Sunnybrook Children’s Home; Wacky
      Bear Program for U.S. Military Personnel; and others. The
      membership has been responsive to the activities with a good
      mix of people participating in events. Public awareness and
      goodwill gained is immeasurable.
   b. Speakers Bureau. (Exhibits OOO-PPP) AAFJ maintains a
      speakers bureau to provide expertise in various aspects of the
      advertising industry to students in the classroom and through
      mentorships. Countless students in our community have
      benefited from hearing members of the AAFJ Speakers Bureau
      relate experiences in the advertising industry. In addition, those
      Speakers Bureau members who serve as mentors add
      considerably to the value of students’ education and increase
      their hopes for the future.
   c. Student Workshops and Conferences. (Exhibits QQQ-UUU) AAFJ
      conducts regular student portfolio workshops designed to help students
      create résumés and portfolios that will increase their chances of getting
      a quality job upon graduation, thereby injecting new, young talent into
      our marketplace. Area professionals donate their time and expertise to
      share with students their insights into the ever-changing needs and
      expectations of local and national employers. Students report extreme
      satisfaction with these sessions. Capital Gains Student Leadership
      Conference is a free statewide conference for students of advertising,
      marketing, public relations and graphic design, sponsored by AAFJ



                                192
      and neighboring ad clubs in the 7th District. This year’s conference is
      in the planning stages and will feature general sessions and parallel
      tracks of lectures, sessions and workshops. Our goal is to meet or
      exceed last year’s results when 77 students representing 13 community
      colleges, trade schools and universities attended from three states.
   d. Student AAF Chapter. (Exhibit VVV) AAFJ sponsors FDAC,
      the student AAF chapter at Antonelli College. We provide an
      individual sponsor for the club, and members frequently attend
      the student chapter meetings. The student members of the
      FDAC attend our monthly meetings and events and often
      provide much-welcomed assistance at our events.
   e. DECA Activities. (Exhibits WWW-XXX) Our members
      participated in new student activities this year, judging the
      local DECA competition held in February, with plans to judge
      the state competition in March. DECA is an international
      association of high school and college students studying
      marketing, management and entrepreneurship. Each year,
      students compete in Restaurant and Food Marketing, Business
      Services Marketing, Advertising, Sports and Entertainment
      Marketing and many other marketing-related categories.
   f. Internships and Agency Tours. (Exhibits YYY-ZZZ) Our
      member agencies offer internships to students from colleges
      throughout the state. These internships provide valuable
      experience to students and give the agencies a preliminary look
      at potential entry-level staff members. In addition to offering
      internships, agencies offer tours to high school and college
      groups. Every year, several groups take advantage of this great
      opportunity to see advertising folks in action.
3. Member Feedback
   a. Surveys at Meetings, through E-mail and on Website. (Exhibits
      AAAA-CCCC) Program feedback surveys are performed at meetings
      throughout the year to gauge meeting expectations: location, time,
      notification, food, program quality and relevance. Email surveys are
      also sent to members providing additional feedback opportunities on a
      variety of subjects. In addition, our website includes a survey about the
      site’s content. Our surveying activities result in more than 75%
      participation at each meeting.
4. Club Operations
   a. Flyer, Brochure and Application to Targeted Potential
      Members and Inquiries. (Exhibits DDDD-IIII) The Vice
      President/Membership developed a “Free Ticket” flyer to mail
      to a list of 75 targeted potential members. The mailing also
      included a membership brochure and a membership
      application. The mailing list was compiled of selected
      recipients gathered from the Metro Jackson Chamber of
      Commerce membership list (AAFJ is a member, and this has



                                193
     proved to be a valuable resource for us), Mississippi
     Association of Broadcasters membership list, Mississippi
     Business Journal’s Book of Lists, AAFJ member
     recommendations of their colleagues and appropriate contacts,
     and inquiries generated by our website.
b.   Membership Renewal Letter, Invoice and Application to
     Existing Members. (Exhibit JJJJ) Existing members were
     mailed a letter from Amanda Fontaine, the club’s President,
     inviting them to renew their membership. The letter included
     an invoice for this year’s dues along with an application for
     membership.
c.   Follow-up Calls by Membership Committee. (Exhibits KKKK-
     LLLL) Several months following the mailing to potential new
     members and existing members, the President, Vice President
     and/or members of the Membership Committee followed up
     with e-mails or phone calls to encourage their joining AAFJ
     and paying their dues in a timely manner. Reminders were
     published in our newsletter and announcements were made at
     meetings. Getting existing members to pay their dues on time
     was more challenging this year than in the past. We had also
     hoped to retain more of our existing members than we did. The
     Vice President is planning a survey of members who did not
     renew to determine what we can address in the future to insure
     better response and generate increased membership.
d.   Monthly Meetings. (Exhibits MMMM-PPPP) At club
     meetings, members interact and are encouraged to bring guests
     and candidates for membership. Those attending look forward
     to the social half hour prior to calling the meeting to order as
     well as to the valuable door prizes awarded at each meeting.
     Door prizes are often awarded to the seventh person to speak to
     a mystery board member, thereby promoting interaction at
     meetings. As a result of feedback received on our member
     surveys, this year we tried something by meeting at a different
     location each month and enjoying a wide variety of lunch
     menus. Since implementing this plan, meeting attendance has
     increased, and there is much more participation by members of
     the club’s board at the meetings.
e.   Guests at Monthly Meetings. (Exhibit QQQQ) The Treasurer
     provided sign-in sheets for guests at each monthly meeting on
     which each guest provided contact information. Following the
     meetings, the President, Vice President/Membership or a
     member of Membership committee contacted each guest to
     thank them for coming to the meeting and to encourage their
     joining the club.
f.   New Club Logo. (Exhibits RRRR-SSSS) The AAFJ
     membership unanimously voted to adopt the AAF logo and



                             194
     change our club’s name to the American Advertising
     Federation of Jackson, Mississippi. This change has provided
     the club with an additional marketing tool to potential
     members—“join the only nationally affiliated advertising
     industry organization in the Metro Jackson area.”
g.   CVENT. (Exhibits TTTT-VVVV) AAFJ employs an online
     registration system for members to RSVP for meetings. We also utilize
     the system to handle reservations for Capital Gains, our statewide
     student conference, ADDY Awards Banquet, and other events. The
     system helps us simplify registration and obtain accurate headcounts
     for meetings and events and has been well-received by the
     membership for its ease of use.
h.   Scholarships. (Exhibits WWWW-XXXX) AAFJ offers two $500
     scholarships annually to deserving students in advertising and graphic
     design. Our scholarship activities raise the AAFJ profile in academic
     and other circles and honor members of the advertising community.
     We present the scholarships to the winners at one of our monthly
     meetings. Press releases are sent out to recognize the winners. As a
     result, students are encouraged to continue their education in
     advertising, and AAFJ garners gratitude, goodwill and exposure.
i.   Monthly Newsletter. (Exhibits YYYY-AAAAA) Through December
     2007, AAFJ published a printed monthly newsletter, ADitudes, which
     includes information on upcoming programs, community “gossip”
     (hirings, weddings, births, etc.) and updates on important issues
     relevant to the advertising industry. In January 2008, the club tested
     “going green” by eliminating the printed newsletter, replacing it with
     an e-newsletter format—to save money, increase time efficiency in
     creating and publishing, be environmentally sensitive and increase
     readership. The club plans to survey the membership’s response to the
     e-newsletter and adjust accordingly.
j.   Newsletter Features. (Exhibits BBBBB-DDDDD) Each month
     in ADitudes, our monthly newsletter, an article about one of
     our new members is featured. In addition, a “We’re Proud of
     You” feature spotlighted the many contributions our members
     make in the community through their public service, church
     and civic involvement. This newsletter feature provided us
     with a valuable way to recognize our members outside of the
     more elaborate award presentations and events.
k.   Website. (Exhibit EEEEE) AAFJ maintains a website at jaxadfed.org.
     The website is updated by AAFJ board members on a pro-bono basis,
     although we have experienced challenges in keeping the website
     updated this year. The board must address this issue in the coming
     year. In spite of these difficulties, the website has generated inquiries
     regarding membership and other requests, and resulted in acquired
     members. One of the most popular features of the website is the job
     listings section, which assists employers in finding qualified applicants



                             195
            (and vice versa) at no charge. Through this service, many jobs have
            been filled and AAFJ has helped local employers and applicants reach
            their goals.
        l. E-mail Blasts. (Exhibits FFFFF-GGGGG) Monthly emails go
            to all members and various non-members reminding them of
            our monthly meeting dates, times and locations. This year, we
            have also added a series of member socials and workshops to
            the club’s calendar. Members and non-members receive
            invitations to these events through the newsletter and e-mail as
            well.
        m. Membership Handbook. (Exhibit HHHHH) AAFJ publishes a
            comprehensive, yet handy membership manual which is
            distributed to every member. The manual includes information
            about AAF, 7th District and AAFJ, a history of our club and
            outlines all the benefits of membership. We are in the process
            of updating the book to include our new name, new logo and
            other necessary changes.
        n. Governmental Activities. (Exhibits IIIII-NNNNN) Our
            activities regarding taxation of web design continued this year,
            but came to an end when the State Tax Commission made a
            ruling on the issue. We will continue to monitor the legislative
            activity on this matter. Many AAFJ members attend the state’s
            annual Capital Day to hear speeches by and meet legislative
            leaders, local legislators and state officials. Our club President
            also is diligent about sending e-mail reminders to register to
            vote and to vote on election day.
Conclusion/Results
As of this writing, we have 93 members (Exhibits OOOOO-PPPPP),
thereby exceeding last year’s headcount by 15 members, garnering a 19%
increase in membership. Of the 93 members, we recruited 37 new
members. Our efforts to encourage past members to renew their
memberships and to recruit new members is an ongoing process
throughout the year, so we are hopeful our membership numbers will
continue to increase in the coming months.




                                  196
   Membership Development
     1st Place – Division 5

           Ad 2 Cincinnati

Contact:           Anne Cafeo
                   Barefoot Advertising
                   602 Main Street, Suite 806
                   Cincinnati, OH 45202
                   (513) 984-9990
                   acafeo@cinci.rr.com




                 197
                                 Membership Narrative


        Ad2 Cincinnati began in October of 2005 with fifteen members, just enough to
qualify as a club. Since we are now approaching our second year since our inception it
was time for us to see what was working and what wasn’t. So we reached out to our
membership with a causal survey (Exhibit A). Once the survey was analyzed then we
could identify our goals for the year to create events that fulfill our members needs,
increase involvement, all still while retaining them to let them know how much we
valued them as members.

Membership Objectives:
Objective 1: Increase Ad2 Club of Cincinnati membership by 10%.
Objective 2: Create an inexpensive Ad2 Welcome Packet that would be given/emailed to
New Members.
Objective 3: Increase member involvement with educational programs and committees.
Objective 4: Retain members by encouraging involvement through personal interaction.

Objective 1: Increase Ad2 of Cincinnati membership by 10%.
        Since our inception we have had an ongoing goal of increasing membership. In
order to do this we needed to understand what it was that our members wanted to get out
of their Ad2 membership. At the beginning of our year we polled all of our members with
an online survey. Results from this survey stated that in order to increase participation in
membership we would have to establish monthly educational programs. While
professional growth and networking were important it was obvious that our members
wanted to be on the cutting edge of technology and trends in their fields. Today
membership has increased by 17% and we are looking forward to another promising year.

Promotional Materials:
        At every event the Membership chair brings applications (Exhibit B), Ad2
benefits sheets (Exhibit C), Ad2 business cards (Exhibit D) directing potential new
members to the ad2cincy.org website, an email sign up sheet (Exhibit E), and an
upcoming Ad2 events cards (Exhibit F). This serves numerous opportunities to educate
potential new members about Ad2 and gives them the chance to get involved and
therefore increasing awareness and membership.
Internet/Networking:
Ad2cincy.org
        Along with always having promotional materials on hand, we are constantly
updating our website, ad2cincy.org (Exhibit G, H, I, J, K), and MySpace page, which are
kept updated with the latest news. These are the best ways for people who are interested
in advertising in Cincinnati to find out about us. Our senior club also posts information
and events on their site, adclubcincy.org.
YP Cincy
        Ad2 Cincinnati joined a young professional network called YP Cincy. YP Cincy
is a division of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber whose purpose is to unite young
professional organizations and to bring opportunities to area young professionals. This



                                            198
network is currently made up of 48 different organizations. Young professionals can visit
their website, ypcincy.org, to see what opportunities are available. Ad2 Cincinnati posts
information on the site about the club and contact information for those who are
interested (Exhibit L). This is also a site where we can post all upcoming events, in order
to increase awareness and attendance. As a part of this network, an email blast is sent out
every other week listing all of the upcoming opportunities for the next few weeks to a list
of about 3,000 young professionals. Ad2 Cincinnati posts all of our events on this site
therefore we are able to reach all of these potential members. This is also a site where
many people who are new to the area might visit to see how they can get more involved.
        There are other benefits to being a part of this network. Two representatives from
Ad2 Cincinnati are able to attend quarterly YP Cincy meetings. These meetings are an
opportunity for us to network with other leading young professionals in Cincinnati and to
further increase awareness through personal interaction. These meetings feature speakers
designed to help organizations thrive.
        Through YP Cincy we have been able to partner with other organizations. YP
Cincy hosted an event called Discover Cincy. This was an opportunity for young
professionals to learn about ways to get involved in their community. There were over
100 organizations present at the event (Exhibit M). We had a table at the event, which
saw about 200 young professionals come through.
Other local websites
        We have found the internet to be a powerful tool in aiding our objective of
increasing awareness. We have taken advantage of many local websites where we can
post upcoming events, including educational programs and socials. These sites include,
Zipscene.com (Exhibit N), and Cincinnati.com (Exhibit O).
Membership Fire & Ice Party:
        As part of our goal of increasing membership, on September 20th we held our
annual social event and membership drive that celebrated Ad2 Cincinnati as well as
served as a networking event. The event, the Fire & Ice Soiree, was held at the Cincinnati
Fire Museum, a historic museum in the Cincinnati area. We obtained sponsors who
covered the majority of the costs (Exhibit P, Q). There was an acoustic band for
entertainment, and a prestigious raffle, which included a signed football from Bengals
players, spa packages, and weekend stays at local hotels. This event enabled us not only
to reach out to our senior club, but also tell the community that Ad2 is here to stay and
we will support them with their desire to grow as well as ours.
Advertising & Public Relations:
        We advertised the event on all of the aforementioned websites and also obtained
free advertising in a local paper, Cincinnati Enquirer (Exhibit R, S, T), and magazine
Cincy Business (Exhibit U). The Social committee also hand delivered invitations to area
agencies (Exhibit Va) as well as created save the dates (Exhibit Vb) to be handed out at
programs before Fire & Ice. The event was successful in creating a buzz about Ad2
Cincinnati and had a good turnout of both members and potential members. We offered a
membership signup special that night of 10.00 off (Exhibit W). Our hope for the future is
that this will be a party not to be missed.
Career Day:
        Ad2 Cincinnati was involved with our parent club’s Career Day event (Exhibit
X); this was a chance to interact with over 100 graduating seniors. Ad2 had a table at the



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event with promotional materials available. We gained a lot of one-on-one interaction
with the attendees, which allowed us a personal touch. We also had several members
involved with putting on the event, some participated in resume and portfolio reviews and
offered advice. Our goal was to show these students the value of investing in themselves
and how Ad2 accomplishes that. Many of these students expressed interest and added
themselves to our email list. We even had several students signup that day with a chance
of a giveaway. We also offered a special deal for students to bring their ID to the next
Ad2 program and get in free, in hopes of creating an even deeper relationship.
Other tools:
        One of the strongest tools in reaching our goal of expanding membership has been
word of mouth. Our members are very enthusiastic and believe strongly in what we as an
organization are doing. Many have encouraged coworkers and friends to join.
        We also have a very good relationship with our parent club. They have been
instrumental in spreading the word as well, and allow us to speak at all of their events
about Ad2.
        Ad2 Cincinnati is always looking for more opportunities to spread the word. We
have been asked to speak at the University of Cincinnati at the Arts & Sciences Careers
In Communication class as well at world-renowned DAAP. Our board will be visiting
both classrooms this spring to spread the word of Ad2 and after graduation job
opportunities. At the presentation, we will encourage students to join us for our next
program. If they show their student ID we will let them enter for free! This will be an
opportunity for the potential members to meet our current members and talk to them in a
comfortable, educational atmosphere and hopefully stay in Cincinnati to build our already
talented city.

Objective 2: Create an inexpensive Ad2 Welcome Packet that would be given to
New Members.
        When someone joins Ad2 Cincinnati, we try to make him/her feel welcome right
away. The chair of the Membership committee sends them a “welcome” email (Exhibit
Y). This email serves several purposes. We want our new member to know that they have
joined a community, that they can turn to the Membership chair with questions, how they
can get involved in different committees and invite them to the next event. The board
wants them to feel welcome and feel that they can become a contributing member
immediately.
Promotional Materials:
        Our first order of business was to create a “Welcome Packet” for our members.
This packet was an informational packet for new members to refer to regularly. The
packet included, a customized welcome letter with future events (Exhibit Z), the Ad2
committee synopsis (Exhibit AA), the board contact sheet (Exhibit BB), the Ad2 benefits
sheet (Exhibit CC), AAF benefits sheet (Exhibit DD), an AAF membership card (Exhibit
EE), and lastly an Ad2 membership form to pass on to a friend (Exhibit FF). Our mission
remains the same; “fanning the flames of great advertising” by supporting young
professionals in the industry and the welcome packet, reminds members why they have
joined Ad2.

Objective 3: Increase member involvement with educational programs.



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        An additional learning from the survey was consistency, members wanted regular
events; therefore we established monthly programs and Ad2sday, social events. In
addition we have monthly open board meetings that everyone is encouraged to attend and
participate in, as well as monthly luncheon speakers from AdClub. Our Programs
committee has worked very hard constructing monthly programs that are on the cutting
edge of the industry. Through creating thought-provoking and educational programs, Ad2
Cincinnati has earned a respected reputation in the community. These programs have had
an increasing attendance rate. We are always working to capitalize on this captive
audience. At every event, one of our board members speaks about Ad2 Cincinnati and
how you can become a member. We always have information on hand to pass out,
including our brochure and applications and you can sign up to join our email list. We
always have built-in networking time at our events to meet all members’ needs. Our
board members take advantage of this time by making one-on-one contact with potential
members and answering their questions. Programs included a Flash professional from
Visual Scientists, Inc.(Exhibit GG), a Sam Adams beer tasting (Exhibit HH, II),
entrepreneur, Debbie Dent of Willow Creative Group (Exhibit JJ), Word of Mouth
Marketing expert of Empower MediaMarketing (Exhibit KK), Awards Show guru of
Barefoot Advertising (Exhibit LL,MM), Improv Coach, Melissa Whitis (Exhibit NN),
SEO connoisseur of Purple Trout (Exhibit OO), and most recently, marketing manager of
General Mills (Exhibit PP, QQ). With attendance on the rise our programs have been a
hit and we are listening to what our members want in order to make our group stronger.
        Our other opportunity to reach out to our membership has been through our
Ad2sdays. These events are held the first Tuesday of every month and allow young
professionals to let loose, share things they have learned thus far in the advertising
industry and network with follow young Cincinnati professionals.
        Our goal is to get them to join. The Membership committee has worked closely
with the other committees to work towards this goal by ensuring that the benefits of
membership are worth the cost. The same strategies are employed at our social events
(Exhibit RR, SS, TT, UU, VV, WW). When networking with potential members, we try
to relate to their experience and explain how we have benefited from our membership in
Ad2 Cincinnati. If we can relate on a personal level, we start to make a connection; one
we hope to continue once they become members.
        We also take advantage of the senior club’s events by making announcements and
networking.
Community Involvement:
    The Ad2 membership is also urged to get involved with the community. Every year
    Ad2 donates all its advertising capabilities to a local non-profit organization. Non-
    profits are required to apply and then the membership votes on which organization is
    in most need of help as well as how they relate to Ad2. This year the chosen
    organization is The Women’s Connection (TWC). This organization aids to the needs
    of women in need that are struggling to get out of an abusive relationships and get
    back on their feet. Ad2 has designed a full ad campaign to promote an upcoming
    event to honor the success stories of past women who have made it with the help of
    TWC. Committee, design, public relations, and media support has been a huge
    success and once collateral is approved by the organization we look forward to
    sharing the campaign materials.



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       The Ad2 membership was also offered an opportunity from local agency,
Northlich to participate as mentors in their Emerge Program (XX). This program allowed
professionals to get in touch with inner city school students with a passion for art. Our
members apply (YY) to be in touch with our city’s youth and truly make a difference in
someone’s life through just a few hours a week.
Benefits:
   One benefit of being a member of Ad2 Cincinnati is that the majority of our events
   are free to members, whereas non-members are charged a fee. In addition to this, we
   have also offered members-only events. We had a Holiday party with Cincinnati YP
   group, the American Marketing Association (AMA). This group teamed up with us in
   December to celebrate the season (Exhibit ZZ, aa). A promotional offer was made to
   the AMA members to join Ad2 at a discounted rate. This was a relationship waiting
   to blossom and will get stronger in time. In collaboration with our parent club we are
   also working towards creating an AdClub/Ad2 discount card for members to receive
   discounts at commonly visited retail and restaurant locations.

        All of the tools discussed under the first objective also work to aid in increasing
membership. With knowledge of what Ad2 Cincinnati is, also comes knowledge of the
benefits of membership.

Objective 4: Retention of membership.
        Empowerment is key to retention. Ad2 strives to empower their members to get
involved as soon as signing up for membership. The Membership chair sends out new
members’ committee interests to the committee heads as well as sends the committee
head’s information to the new members. Committee involvement has increased
significantly since the beginning of the year and we look forward to having a smooth
board transition thanks to immediate training (Exhibit bb, cc). We have also decided to
base our dues on a fiscal year beginning July 1. To offer memberships year round, we
prorate the amount of membership on a quarterly basis (Exhibit dd).
        In a few months, Ad2 Cincinnati will again face renewal of our entire
membership. Our goal is to have a 100% retention rate. As a check for ourselves and to
understand our growth, the Membership committee will redistribute the original survey to
the membership. The original data and analysis will serve as a benchmark. We will
continue to evolve with our ever-growing membership needs. In conducting this survey,
our goal is to remind members why they joined and to give them a voice in the future of
the club. Member feedback is pertinent to evaluating membership benefits and ensuring a
high rate of retention.
Results:
        Ad2 Cincinnati has worked very hard this past year on increasing membership
and maintaining our current members. We have grown 17%, while also reaching out to
local Universities and other YP groups in order to increase awareness and open the door
to a welcoming community. Our increase in membership also contributes to the growth
and strength of our parent club, which is approaching 500 members. Ad2 Cincinnati has
become an established and respected organization in the young professional world as well
as the advertising world.



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                Programs
                 st
            1 Place – Division 1

Advertising Club of Metropolitan Washington

      Contact:          Carol Montoya
                        DC Ad Club
                        717 Princess Street
                        Alexandria, VA 22314
                        (703) 683-5954
                        carol@dcadclub.com




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Overview
The DC Ad Club hosts program, networking, and awards events throughout the year.
Goals of the club’s programming are:
   • Provide a member benefit with top-notch programs that provide education as well
       as networking opportunities
   • Engage advertising professionals in programs that show the wealth of talent and
       resources in the DC area
   • Create revenue opportunities for the club through registration fees and
       sponsorships
See Tab 1 for the club’s 2007-2008 event calendar.

Program: Advertising Week DC (Tab 2: samples of promo materials; wrap up
summary, event close report)
Event Details: In 2004, the DC Ad Club created Advertising Week DC to complement
the Advertising Week activities being planned in New York City. Planed by a steering
committee of agency heads and media general managers, the week-long series of events
features two days of conference-style presentations and three evening events: a highlight
of Cannes Advertising Festival winners, a Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) program, and
a Wrap Party. Advertising Week DC was celebrated September 17-21, 2007.
Highlights of the schedule of events include:
    • Sessions on The Future of Customer Engagement; Cultivating Talent for Digital
          World; Advocacy Advertising: Public Opinion to Public Action; Future of Media;
          Citizen Journalism; The Impact of the Internet on the Political Landscape;
          Marketing Generations, Not to Life Stages; Digital and Online Marketing’s Latest
          Trends and Tools; The ROI of Going Green; Successful Strategic Planning in the
          Era of Massive Media Change; Marketing to the “Minority”; and Greatly
          “Improv” Your Presentations
    • Luncheons featuring Tim Russert, Moderator of Meet the Press and
          SVP/Washington Bureau Chief, NBC News; and Robert Mankoff, The New
          Yorker Cartoon Editor
    • Domestic Premier of the Cannes Advertising Festival Winners
    • Invitation Only CMO Reception and Dinner, with a panel discussion on Defining
          and Aligning the CMO
    • Wrap Party featuring a live band and lots of networking
Target Audience: Communications professionals of all levels, from agencies, design
shops, and media, as well as local clients, with a specific emphasis on CMOs..
Method of Promotion: A mixed media campaign of direct mail, email promotions, and
print and broadcast ads. A save the date card and email were sent in July to the Ad Club’s
full list and a targeted list of area CMOs. Regular email promotions started in August and
continued up until the event in September. An overall schedule email was produced,
along with emails that promoted the events by day and by type (e.g., luncheons). The
Washington Business Journal ran weekly ads leading up to the event, which included a
call to visit the website and a list of sponsors. The local NBC4 affiliate and Clear
Channel affiliates put ads into rotation as well. Porter Novelli, a member of the Steering
Committee, created a public relations plan and distributed pre- and post-event releases to
local and industry media. Web banners were included on Steering Committee member


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and local media websites. The event program was printed by the Washington Business
Journal and included articles by local agency and media professionals, sponsor
recognition, the local listing of the top advertising agencies, and agency ads. The program
was handed out at the event and distributed with both the Washington and Baltimore
Business Journal editions at the close of Advertising Week.
Average Attendance: The overall attendance for all sessions was 2,598, up from 2,019 in
2006. This included:
    • Panel and Speaker Sessions: average of 181 attendees
    • Luncheons: average of 136 attendees
    • Cannes Winners: 103 attendees
    • CMO Reception & Dinner: 90 attendees
    • Wrap Party: 57 attendees
Feedback mechanism: A survey was sent via Survey Monkey to all attendees following
the event. Sixty-three surveys were completed.
Results: Advertising Week 2007 continued to build on the success of past year, with top
notch, highly visible speakers and timely panel discussions. Eight-one percent of survey
respondents said the event met their expectations and almost 97% said they would
recommend the event to others. Professional development and networking were cited as
the top reasons for attending Advertising Week. Anecdotal comments from attendees
praised the quality of speakers, the mix of content and networking, the relevance of
topics, and the “energy” generated at the event. Most keynote speakers were nationally
recognized experts, but the use of local industry players on panels demonstrated the
wealth of information and talent that calls the DC market home. Advertising Week
generated $125,345 in revenue ($87,000 from sponsorship, $38,345 from registration
fees). With expenses of just $69,823, the event resulted in a net profit of $55,522 for the
Ad Club.

Program: Luncheon Programs (Tab 3: samples of luncheon promo emails, evaluation
results, and event close reports)
Event Details: The goal of the Programs committee is to deliver top quality events that
bring in local and national expert speakers to discuss topics of relevance to people with
moderate to high levels of industry experience. Three luncheon events were held this
year:
    • May 22, 2007: The Dos and Don’ts of Online Advertising, featuring Phil Sawyer,
         SVP of Starch Communications discussing the results of a survey of thousands of
         individuals as they reacted to 54 different online ads
    • October 16, 2007: Mobile Marketing, featuring Brad Beckstrom, President of
         ApolloBravo, discussing how to harness the power of wireless marketing
    • February 7, 2008: Lunch with Authors of MEDIA RULES!, featuring Dan
         Solomon, CEO of Virilion, and Brian Reich, Director of New Media for Cone,
         Inc., discussing their new book and how to interact with customers to increase
         perception, loyalty, and activity towards brands
Networking prior to each luncheon increases the value of the event to attendees.
Target Audience: While some members tend to attend any event put on by the club,
varied topics for lunches are meant to draw in different audiences for each program, to
increase our reach and the message of the Ad Club as a valuable professional


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development tool for audiences within te advertising realm and those on the fringes (i.e.,
new media companies); the level of presentation is aimed at people who have mid- to
senior-level status in their organization
Method of Promotion: Lunches are promoted through emails distributed to the Ad Club
member and prospect list and the Ad Club Member Bulletin. We also work with speakers
to distribute information to their client, prospect, and contact lists as well. Posting the
events to area online events calendars helps spread the word to a broader audience.
Average Attendance: An average of 111 people attended each lunch (with a high of 137
attendees for the Online Adverting event)
Feedback Mechanism: Paper evaluations are placed at each seat and collected at the
registration table as people leave the event.
Results: Contrary to the 2006 luncheons, the events this year brought in an average net
profit of $1437. This was achieved by securing a sponsor for each lunch and not
producing printed promotions (prior survey results showed that few people indicated
hearing about the events via postcard promotions). Program evaluations show that
attendees feel the presenters are knowledgeable and well-spoken. Most agree that they
take something away that will help them in their jobs. Attendees also feel that the pricing
of the events is fair.

Program: Morning Training Series (Tab 4: samples of promo emails, evaluation
results, and event close reports)
Event Details: This program series utilizes experienced local talent to share the ins and
outs of the advertising industry to students and others interested in and just getting started
in industry. The three-part series included:

   •   May 1, 2007: How to Attain Consumer Insight in Developing Great Creative,
       featuring Gary Duke, EVP of Strategic Planning, and Richard Coad, Executive
       Creative Director, both of MDB Communications
   •   June 26, 2007: How to Sell Yourself Through Your Reel, Book & Resume,
       featuring Chuck Husak, Principal and Executive Creative Director of August,
       Lang & Husak, and Christina Molzen, Vice President of Human Resources, RTC
       Relationship Marketing
   •   October 23, 2007: How to Win Clients Over with Stellar Presentation Techniques,
       featuring Sheila Campbell, President of Wild Blue Yonder

Target Audience: Entry-level professionals looking for basic, 101-level information about
working in the advertising industry; Agency CEOs looking for a low-cost, yet quality
professional development program for their staff
Method of Promotion: The series is promoted through emails distributed to the Ad Club
member and prospect list, the Ad Club Member Bulletin, and postings to area online
events calendars.
Average Attendance: An average of 53 people attended each session (this is skewed by
97 people attending the final session; otherwise, the average attendance is 31)
Feedback Mechanism: Paper evaluations are given to each attendee and collected at the
registration table as people leave.




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Results: The morning seminars generated a total net profit of $815. The Ad Club
budgeted for the sessions to operate as a loss, viewing them as a member/community
benefit. By securing the Art Institute of Washington as a sponsor for the final session, the
series was able to turn a profit. This partnership also greatly expanded the reach of the
program and generating awareness of the Ad Club among the Art Institute students.
Program evaluations indicated that attendees felt the speakers were knowledgeable and
they gained insight and information that will help them in their jobs.


Special Event: One Holiday Party (Tab 5: samples of promo emails, sample website
pages, sponsorship and event overviews, event close report))
Event Details: For the second year, the Ad Club took the lead on an industry-wide
holiday celebration. Initially began as a way to reduce the number of competing events
around the holidays, The One Holiday Party has become a force to be reckoned with
when it comes to celebrating and networking. This year eight local communications
organizations (up from five in 2006) came together to throw a party for their members:
     • DC Ad Club
     • American Marketing Association-DC Chapter
     • American Photographers Association-DC Chapter
     • Art Directors Club of Metropolitan Washington
     • Association of Women in Communications-DC Chapter
     • Capital Cabal
     • Production Club of DC
     • Public Relations Society of America-National Capital Chapter
Each host organization paid a “buy-in” fee of $3,500 to participate in the event. This was
used to cover upfront costs such as the venue deposit. Each group solicited their own
sponsors, using established sponsorship packages, and kept any proceeds from
sponsorship sales. At the completion of the event, the net proceeds were split equally
amongst all host organizations.
Target Audience: All area communications professionals
Method of Promotion: HTML email templates were developed by the Ad Club’s
committee chair and distributed to each organization for them to send to their respective
lists; the DC Communicator sent stand-alone emails to its list; a One Holiday Party
website was also developed; estimated reach through all the email lists is over 10,000
unique users
Average Attendance:375 people attended
Feedback Mechanism: No formal evaluation was conducted, as this was a social event.
Results: Anecdotal information from the host organizations, sponsors, and attendees was
very positive. No other event exists to bring together a critical mass of industry
professionals. Seven of the eight host organizations indicated they would participate
again in 2008. Each group lost $746 of their buy-in fee, due mostly to the number of
comp’ed tickets provided for sponsors and the fact that the ticket price just covered the
per person cost at the venue, but not other event costs such as signage, décor, and
teleconferences. Most groups, including the Ad Club, offset that loss with sponsorship
sales.



                                            207
208
          Programs
       st
      1 Place – Division 2

Tucson Advertising Federation
Contact:        Pearl Ford-Fyffe
                Tucson Advertising Federation
                Mailing: P.O. Box 90167
                Tucson, AZ 85752
                (520) 326-1060
                membership@tucsonadfed.org




              209
National AAF Club Achievement Competition — Category of Entry: Programs
Tucson Advertising Federation
The Opportunity: Because Tucson is a compact market with a diverse industry base,
many agency, media and creative professionals, and industry suppliers find the Tucson
Advertising Federation’s (TAF) luncheons essential. They provide a critical opportunity
to build strategic alliances and civilly take measure of the competition. Because of this,
the TAF Programs Committee has served as a nexus for our chapter’s outreach,
fundraising, education, and membership development efforts. In a survey of TAF
members at beginning of 2007, over half those responding said one (or all) of the
luncheons served as their single favorite aspect of the organization. Simply put, TAF’s
programs are critical to its success as an organization and serve as a tool to: Build
Community, Increase Membership, Identify Leadership, and Promote Local Advertising
Services.
The Background: Because of this importance, care has been taken to document and
evaluate past program successes and shortcomings. During the prior 2006/07 year,
attendance and profit were up, and this helped TAF reach record membership levels.
However, feedback from event attendees showed room for improvement. It was noted
that more time was spent on the mechanics of the programs than on underwriting. Also
noted, the highest attended programs included local speakers. The 2006/07 Programs
Chair affirmed that interesting, educational programs providing take-with value are
important — and that it was critical to provide timely information that appealed to the
broadest range of our membership. Improved marketing of programs was urged, with a
focus on subjects and speakers that would appeal to larger audiences.
    Analysis of Previous Years’ Programs: Impeccable records kept by our club
administrator, Pearl Ford Fyffe, allowed us to complete comprehensive analyses of the
three prior years of TAF’s programs:
• Eight luncheons and two mixers per year with 102 attendees per luncheon and 105
attendees per mixer
• $2,854 in average ticket sales and $655 in underwriting per luncheon
• $615 in average profit per luncheon
In addition to analyzing the positives of previous years’ programs, shortcomings were
compiled. Vigorous discussion was held (at both Board and Committee levels) with many
suggestions offered. The following issues rose to the top of everyone’s list:
• Inconsistent Quality of Food and Service Across Locations
• Confusion Regarding Inconsistent Pricing
• Lack of Continuity from Luncheon to Luncheon
• Fundraising Too Dependent on a Single Luncheon (Hispanic Marketing)

The Changes: With research in hand, it was clear that luncheons were generally regarded
as positive events, but that a few changes could move them up to a level where they could
better support TAF objectives.
Change 1 Standardize Event Location and Quality: The Ad Fed’s previous years’
practice of shuttling luncheons between two different venues (one posh and the other not-
so-much) had a negative impact. This two-site practice created just one more reason for
members to pick and choose between events, rather than seeing the overall luncheon


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program as a continuous package of consistent, desirable quality. The pros and cons of
cost vs. quality at low- vs. high-cost venues were debated. Also, room availability with
consistent a Tuesday date was a priority. Only a few hotels were able to host a luncheon
series such as ours with date consistency and appropriate room sizes. Potential luxury
venues were inspected and it was agreed to hold all luncheons at the same upscale
location we had used only on occasion in the past. By holding all luncheons at this single
location (although pricier) it was hoped that it would help instill a friendlier “our
clubhouse” quality to all events, and, over time, would reinforce the perceived value of a
TAF membership.
Change 2 Standardize Event Pricing: Once the venue was set, we needed to deal with
the luxury-level $30-per-plate banquet expense — up from the $13-per-plate costs the
year before. Because the Westin La Paloma was clearly upscale, we were careful not to
overprice tickets — once overhead costs had been established, we set standard pricing
(Member Advance Payment) at $30 — a figure that was pennies below break-even, and
$5 less than what had been charged for luncheons held there in the previous year.
Change 3 Establish a Continuous Program: In previous years, the topics for
luncheons fell into a general template — TV/August, Hispanic Marketing/September,
Technology/October, etc. While this helped committees quickly plug-in speakers that “fit
the template”, it limited opportunities to expand the club’s vision. Also, this template
tended to allow detailed event planning on a just-in-time basis with much scrambling to
line up speakers only a few weeks before the luncheons’ announce dates. A priority was
set to establish and communicate all seven luncheon topics in as much detail as possible
before the season began.
Change 4 Improve Advertising and Outreach: By establishing a clear package
definition in advance, our committee was able to craft early-stage marketing that bundled
the luncheon events as a “must-see” series — creating an incentive to attend multiple (if
not all) events.
Change 5 Expand the Audience: The Tucson Ad Fed’s marketing infrastructure is
excellent — with a mailing list of 870 names, and an email list that nears 1,000 — a
volunteer effort expanded these lists by incorporating over 300 new names of area
agencies, media and marketing professionals, and industry-related vendors. Based on this
new list, the 2007-08 luncheon marketing began with a postcard mailing. To expand
email contacts, a simple sign-up field was also added to the TAF Web home page.
Change 6 Recruit Underwriters by Aligning Them with Topics of Common
Appeal: Historically, the Ad Fed depended on one or two luncheons to generate profit,
with the Hispanic Marketing Luncheon carriying this burden annually. While this
affirmed a positive component of our membership, it overlooked the potential for
participation by others. Underwriter development was incorporated into the planning
cycle for every luncheon, with dollar targets spread out so individual events could each
be profitable.
Change 7 Improve Feedback: Previous efforts soliciting feedback by post-luncheon
email generated limited response. Through volunteer work by a local research firm, a
one-page printed survey was created and distributed at every luncheon. With this survey,
the detail and utility of feedback vastly improved.
Change 8 Celebrate Local Talent and Achievement: TAF members have a huge
appetite to learn about professionals practicing locally. So, the Programs Committee



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identified local industry professionals who deserved exposure for the work they provide.
Often, these speakers were able to inform our members not only of work they undertook
locally, but also to demonstrate their national (if not global) impact. This created a
win/win atmosphere at luncheons where TAF members were invited to essentially “root
for the home team” again and again. An added benefit? Most local speakers were willing
to work without a fee.

The Process: To get the ball rolling on the 2007-08 Programs, a kickoff meeting was
announced in the dead of Arizona’s mid-summer season. The TAF membership received
an emailed invitation and a capacity crowd of 33 attended that first planning session in
July. Those attending included a number of veteran Ad Fed members, but also several
first-time volunteers as well. The festive meeting, held at a local watering hole, once it
was called to order, had a clear agenda — identify seven topics, assign them to the seven
dates, so we could create seven sub-committees, that would elect seven subcommittee
chairs.
     Prior to that meeting, a broad list of potential topics was distributed by email. This list
served to seed suggestions from the floor. Each person contributed one large Post-it note
to the idea-wall and the full group consensually edited and grouped the ideas down to
isolate the seven most desirable topics. Key areas of historic interest (Hispanic Marketing
and Women in Advertising) easily rose to the top. With a little more discussion, interests
such as Youth, Viral and Online Social Marketing all began to merge into neat groupings
that could serve as a single luncheon focus (e.g., MySpace and Beyond). With the seven
luncheon topics identified, the group split into seven just-born committees who wrote a
brief synopsis for each luncheon, began establishing subcommittee schedules, and
identified leadership.
     The direction set that night allowed us to define our year’s schedule, confirm details
for immediate luncheons, and provided ample time for planning events. Each
subcommittee's notes were distributed and to help solicit interest from potential new
volunteers. Over the next few weeks, communications were begun between the
subcommittee chairs and the VP for Programs with a goal to establish clear standards for
speakers, underwriting and event promotion, and to position the day-to-day planning of
each luncheon as the responsibility of the individual subcommittee chairs.
     The early establishment of luncheon dates, location, pricing and topics allowed us to
create a first-ever mail campaign to promote the entire series. Our Ad-Fitness campaign
was designed to create interest in attending multiple luncheons, and, because pricing was
now clearly defined, this promotion served as an incentive for members to join the Ad
Fed so that they could benefit from lower member pricing. The mailing list of current and
potential members was expanded by almost 50% to engage local agencies, media and
marketing professionals that had never received communications from the Ad Fed before.
An online opt-in form was added to the TAF website allowing visitors to sign up for
regular email invitations.
     Once these elements were all in place, each subcommittee moved forward creating
unique graphics packages, email invitations and print advertising promoting their
individual luncheons. Community partners who could offer email lists were identified
and expanded the Ad Fed’s ability to reach larger audiences — doubling the outreach for
some of events. The events’ show-biz quality was also improved — a pre-luncheon



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PowerPoint was created for each luncheon that provided a synopsis of current and
upcoming luncheons, including listings of underwriters, new members, board members,
and a membership solicitation. This presentation, along with the printed program, print
and web advertising, and underwriter solicitation materials all presented a consistent
“event identity” developed to support each luncheon and the program.
The Programs
       August 2007 Newsvertising: Is it news? Or is it an ad? Over the summer
months, both local television news and the newspapers had heavily featured openings of
new franchises (Krispy Kreme) and product introductions (the iPhone). Addressing this
topical issue, a panel was invited to tackle some of these coverage extremes where
doughnuts, burger joints and cell phones all dominated local reporting. A special
"Newsvertising" panel featured a local TV news director and the publisher of Tucson’s
largest newspaper discussed the blurring line between advertising and news. The
luncheon attracted an above-average 155 attendees, and made a small profit of $148. This
small profit demonstrated that our strategy of break-even pricing could work, but it was
clear that significant profit would depend on underwriting. The Ad Fed distributed its
new luncheon survey at the August luncheon, and, while the evaluation of the event’s
overall value was high (5.8 out of 7), the audience’s candid, critical evaluations of panel
members were an
eye-opener and extremely helpful in understanding how presentations and panels could
be improved.
       September 2007 Tucsonora: The Art of Advertising in La Nueva Arizona
This was TAF’s 5th Hispanic Marketing Luncheon, an event that consistently draws the
largest audiences and underwriting support. The event featured Phoenix’s largest
Hispanic-focused agency and the manager of Hispanic marketing for Tucson
Newspapers. The identity for the event, “Tucsonora”, was designed to reach across
national borders with volunteers soliciting underwriters from both the Tucson and
Phoenix. Several past underwriters reenlisted, and the buzz from the luncheon attracted
193 attendees including representatives from the Governor’s office, the Mexican
Consulate, and the office of the U.S. Congressman Raúl Grijalva. Some of the first-time
contacts who attended went on to become Ad Fed members. Again, feedback was
exceptionally helpful. The depth and detail of the presenters drew rave reviews, but
seasoned lunch-goers were clearly intolerant when egotistical self-promotion trumped
substantive content. “Great dynamic between the three presenters — they did a fantastic
job of covering different facets of the topic (stats, approach, creative) with one consistent
theme.” The luncheon attracted $3,000 in cash underwriting and $2,500 of in-kind
contributions. After expenses, the event closed out with a profit of $2,050.
    October 2007 MySpace and Beyond: New Media Strategies for Advertising
Two online marketing experts (one from Phoenix and one from Tucson) introduced the
essentials of online marketing. The audience came to the event with a wide range of
experience (from luddites to geeks) and the speakers provided a quick overview of all
basic social media categories. This was the first event that allowed enough time for the
subcommittee to fully direct every detail of the luncheon. Accordingly, a young energetic
crew of volunteers executed many technological firsts: to promote the event, the speakers
appeared on a local Tech-Talk radio show; the event was videotaped and converted to a
podcast that was posted on a volunteer-built MyspaceandBeyond.info website; a blog was


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incorporated allowing discussion to extend beyond the event; a text-message blast was
distributed to attendees’ cell-phones just as they were leaving the hall thanking them for
attending; and, the profitability of the previous luncheons allowed us to incorporate a
drawing for an Apple iPod Touch into the luncheon. A crowd of 177 attended. While
overall response was positive, specific comments indicated that there were perils in
tailoring talks to the least experienced with most attendees indicating an eagerness to be
challenged. The luncheon’s excellent attendance coupled with $1,500 in cash and $1,000
in-kind underwriting contributions, generated an overall profit of $251.
    November 2007 Advertising and ROI: It’s not madness. It’s about method.
November’s luncheon tackled the metrics of success. Dr. Kapil Jain, an educator and
consultant based in Austin provided a dense, eye-opening, experience with detailed
strategy on ways to help advertisers rise to the increasing challenge of ROI. The
presentation was focused and rich in detail and challenged even the most sophisticated of
those attending. Accordingly, responses regarding the speaker and topic were the most
positive to date. Comments included: “I love Kapil. For real. Great topic. Great venue.”,
“Without question the best program I have attended.”, “Great. Very interesting. Lots of
details. Loved it.”, and “This was by far the most valuable luncheon that I attended.
Excellent identification and utilization of the speaker and members’ time. With 145
attending, and underwriting of $1,000 cash and $500 in-kind, this luncheon finished with
a profit of $184.
    December 2007 Mingle Bells Holiday Mixer Every December, the Tucson Ad
Fed suspends its luncheon program and provides a mixer in the early evening. This year’s
Mingle Bells event drew over 100 attendees and many corporate Ad Fed members
provided door prize items that were distributed during the event. The event generated a
cash profit of $243 and much goodwill among members.
    January 2008 The Power of 2: Creating Cause-Marketing Success Tucson’s
nonprofits play a big role in the local ad community and cooperative partnerships
between for-profit and nonprofit organizations abound. At the January luncheon, we
looked inside the workings of what is the area’s most visible cause-marketing
partnership. Following a brief introduction explaining how both businesses and
nonprofits benefit, a corporate communications director provided a series of case
histories of projects where collaborative cause-related campaigns were employed. He
included detailed descriptions of the processes employed to evaluate cause-marketing
opportunities. And, in accord with the topic, the Ad Fed introduced a new element of the
TAF luncheon program — the featured nonprofit. This was inaugurated with the
announcement that Ad2 Tucson would provide the regional Down Syndrome agency with
much needed pro bono design and advertising services. Because of the luncheon followed
soon after the year-end holidays, underwriting and ticket sales were compromised with
approximately 140 attending and a modest loss of $120.
    March 2008 Green is Good: How Advertising Can Create Green Leaders The
topical nature of this luncheon drew a passionate group of first-time volunteers, and,
because of their energy and early start on underwriting, significant contributions allowed
TAF to attract a nationally recognized speaker. There was much discussion on how best
to tackle the controversial subject of environmental responsibility in a way that
encouraged ad community members to take a pro-active stance. Many sub-committee
meetings (lubricated by more than a few glasses of wine) allowed this committed group



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to generate a sophisticated, complex and rewarding event that drew the Ad Fed’s largest
luncheon audience ever.
    Building on an early sponsorship by Mohawk, the subcommittee transformed their
recycled paper giveaway into a cooperative “Goody Bag” filled with 42 pieces of
information on energy and resource-savings products and services. This scale of outreach
and giveaway was a first for the Ad Fed, with 22 organizations contributing a total of
8,400 items assembled into 200 bags. The real reward came on the day of the luncheon.
Record underwriting produced $3,800 in cash and $2,000 of in-kind contributions from
eight Ad Fed supporters. This event drew 196 advance registrations with approximately
210 attending — the recent start-up organization, Sustainable Tucson, served as the
featured nonprofit.
    Additional aspects of this luncheon included: one subcommittee member purchased
carbon credits on behalf of the Ad Fed making this luncheon our club’s first “carbon-
neutral” event; the hotel staff created a unique menu that included locally grown
vegetables and organic chicken and coffees; and underwriting allowed the Ad Fed to give
back to the community by purchasing 200 compact fluorescent light bulbs that were
individually packaged and distributed as part of the free Goody Bag. Finally, the
centerpiece of the luncheon was the presenter. Brian Dougherty of Celery Design in
Berkeley made a stimulating presentation about ways to rethink how incorporating
sustainability and resource savings into the creation of advertising and design can add to
the value of the process rather than simply adding costs.
    May 2008 Women of Excellence Awards Luncheon This is the last luncheon
event of the season and will include an awards ceremony honoring one local Woman of
Excellence, and DDB Chicago VP and Creative Director Becky Kozlen as guest speaker.
Both the nominating and underwriting have begun with (again a first) an online
nomination form brought live to expand nominations outreach.
The Outcomes: Submitting this entry as the Tucson Ad Fed’s VP of Programs, I could
neither be more biased in my review of this year’s Programs, nor could I be more proud
of our accomplishments. Many, many experiments were attempted this year. Some
worked spectacularly and others provided lessons that will be passed on to future
Programs’ Chairs. Critical areas that deserve constant fine-tuning include:
• Diligence in selecting local speakers to assure they are not there solely for self
promotion
• Finding content and a presentation level that matches audience interests and
challenges expectations
• Maintaining an affirming process that allows volunteer creative latitude but with clear
Board oversight
    Core to the success of this year’s Programs was the trust extended by the Board to its
members, and the greater advertising community — from the creation of our first truly
effective survey documentation, to the willingness of local professionals to tell their
stories (warts and all), and to the many new volunteers and companies who have used
these single events as a point of entry for club membership. Summarized, this year’s
accomplishments include:
• Increased attendance with (to date) an average 171 per luncheon, up from the
previous average of 102


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•  Increased underwriting contributions with a total (to date) of $9,300 cash plus $7,700
   in-kind, or an average $1,550 + $1,283 in-kind per luncheon — this is up
   significantly from previous average of $655
• Increased luncheon profitability with $803.45 average profit per luncheon, up from
$615
• Increased numbers of volunteers, achieved by distributing luncheons among multiple
subcommittees
• Clear foundation and improved processes established for launching next year’s
programs
• New pool of eager, committed volunteers for both board participation and leadership
positions

Ken Godat Tucson Advertising Federation, Second Vice President for Programs




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          Programs
           st
      1 Place – Division 3

Austin Advertising Federation

Contact:          Heather Ledage
                  Austin Business Journal
                  111 Congress Avenue, Suite 750
                  Austin, TX 78701
                  (512) 494-2544
                  hladage@bizjournals.com




                217
Club Achievement – Programs 2007/2008
Austin Advertising Federation, Larry F. Hill
The programming we provide is one of the most visible and desirable benefits of Ad Fed
membership. Indeed, a common theme we heard in our surveys and listening tour was,
“Give us better/more interesting/relevant programs.”
    Thus, our programming—especially our monthly luncheon programs—became a hot
topic, especially in light of the Austin Ad Fed’s main three overall objectives for
2007/2008:
    1. Make the Austin Advertising Federation relevant, then essential to the Austin
        advertising community.
    2. Help Austin become one of the most respected ad communities in the country.
    3. Provide clear and valuable benefits to the membership.
    Our choice of programs would clearly impact at least two of these, if not all three, and
the Program committee then created its own goals for the coming year to support the
club’s objectives. The Program Committee’s goals for 2007/2008 were:
    1. Create relevancy in programming across all subgroups (agencies, media,
        marketing/communication professionals, vendors) with high-octane, out-of-
        market, or local heavy hitters.
    2. Work with AIGA, WIC, AMA, UT, Texas State and 4 A’s to produce programs
        and workshops that generate buzz in the community
    3. Create one or two workshops showcasing practical applications of new
        technology.
    4. Increase student attendance at events.
    As of the date of submission, we believe we have had significant success in meeting
the Committee’s goals as well as the overall Austin Ad Fed Objectives. Overall
satisfaction with programming, as measured by member-completed feedback sheets,
which measured a combination of relevancy and satisfaction with the speaker on a scale
from 1 to 10, increased from 7.7 in 2006/2007 to 9.026 in 2007/2008.
Program Calendar
This calendar highlights Austin Ad Fed’s formal programming (does not include happy
hours, holiday parties, etc.):
May 16      Meet the Future of Advertising—Re-creation of NASC pitches by UT and
                 Texas State student teams

June 14     The Event Formerly Known as Big Wigs

Sept 19     Second Life; Virtual World Advertising — Joel Greenberg, VP Marketing
                 Innovation, Electric Sheep Company, New York, NY

Oct 17      Sound Design—Wally Williams, CEO and Co-Founder of Tequila
                Mockingbird, Austin, TX

Nov 13      When Your Brand Is Hijacked—Mark Krauter, Creative Director,
                Williamson-Dickie, Ft. Worth, TX

Dec 11      Connection Planning—Knox Duncan, Senior Planning Director,



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                  WongDoody, Seattle, WA

Jan 23      How not to suck: The importance of craft.—Luke Sullivan, Group Creative
                Head, GSD&M/Idea City, Austin, TX

Feb 22      The Austin Show/2008 Addy® Awards

Mar 17      Regional Advertising and the Hybrid Shop—Robert Campbell, Creative
                 Director and Partner, 808inc., Houston, TX

Apr 16      Intellectual Property Rights—Charles Moster, Senior Partner, Moster
                  Wynne, Austin, TX

May 14      TBD

TBD         Joint Interactive Conference/Workshop with IMA, AIGA

Success Stories
The 2007/2008 luncheon programs as a whole have been extremely well received by
members. However, three programs in particular garnered rave reviews.
        Second Life; Virtual World World Advertising. Presented by Joel Greenberg,
VP of Marketing Innovation for the Electric Sheep Company, this program addressed the
confusion and controversy—especially in advertising and marketing circles—that swirls
today around virtual worlds like Second Life. Are they little more than cool video games?
Or are they the marketing and advertising business model of the future? Joel discussed
real opportunities using case studies. Attendees agreed that they came away with a better
understanding of virtual worlds, 3-D life and their marketing and advertising
opportunities. Target Audience: Creatives, ad planners, programmers, agency principals,
marketing execs. Promotion: Email invitations and featured on Austin Ad Fed Web site.
Attendance: 43 paid attendees. Feedback: Via feedback sheets at event; average score
8.98 out of 10.
        When Your Brand Is Hijacked. Mark Krauter, Creative Director for Williamson-
Dickie—the overall/workclothes people—described how his department and company
managed the challenges and opportunities when urban grungers and hip-hoppers were
suddenly and unexpectedly drawn to the 80+-year-old company’s merchandise. Target
Audience: Creatives, ad planners, account execs, client-side execs, marketing execs.
Promotion: Email invitations and featured on Austin Ad Fed Web site. Attendance: 53
paid attendees. Feedback: Via feedback sheets at event; average score 8.61 out of 10.
        How not to suck. Clearly our most successful luncheon program to-date, we sold
out space for members to come and hear Luke Sullivan, author and Group Creative Head
at GSD&M/Idea City, present a lively, funny and insightful program on the importance
of craft. Luke’s books on advertising are used as college texts, and everyone took
something special away from this program. Target Audience: Creatives, agency
principals, account execs, leaders in every creative-related industry. Promotion: Email
invitations and featured on Austin Ad Fed Web site. Attendance: 149 paid attendees.
Feedback: Via feedback sheets at event; average score 9.47 out of 10.




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Special Event: The Austin Show/2008 ADDY® Awards
We decided to capitalize on Austin’s reputation as a hotbed of creativity by rebranding
this year’s ADDYs as “The Austin Show/2008 ADDY Awards.” We built our
promotional materials around the Austin chapter’s unique, heavy, 3-D lower-case “a”
ADDY trophy and celebrated the things that Austin is known for: alternative thinking,
live music and margaritas! The initial call-for-entries poster featured an elaborately
tattooed arm with The Austin Show “a” front and center and the headline, “Winning is
Forever.”
         ADDY entries were adversely impacted by the downsizing of Austin’s biggest
agency, GSD&M’s Idea City. Fortunately, a surge in entries from medium and small
shops provided a more diverse entry pool than any we’d seen in years. While actual
entries dropped from 701 in 2007 to 676 in 2008, the slightly higher entry fees meant a
net increase in entry income—$45,715, up from $44,095. This was coupled with an
increase in sponsorship dollars, from $8500 in 2007 to $12,000 in 2008.
         Our constituency demands top-level judges, and this year we went all-out on
recruitment. Paul Hains, Chief Creative Officer of The Marketing Store/Toronto
brought an international flavor to the proceedings. Bill Oberlander, ECD of McCann
Erickson New York (he coined “Hello Moto”) brought a wealth of experience as former
president of the Art Directors Club of New York. Bryn Mooth, the editor of HOW
magazine and no stranger to award shows, brought a keen eye for print and a great feel
for concept and execution. And what panel would be complete without a Monkey?
Mark “Monkey” Watson, a protégé of Tracy Wong at WongDoody, Seattle, brought his
track record (Emmy, Clio, Cannes—all the big ones) and some pretty amazing insight.
         We hosted a “meet the judges” happy hour for more than 100 Austin creatives at a
local watering hole that just happens to be owned by TV’s “The Bachelor.” The creative
for the invitation featured a margarita with a lime shaped like the ADDY “a,” continuing
our theme. The judges left town with a high level of respect for the talent in Austin.
More than one indicated a strong desire to relocate here. That happens a lot to our
visitors.
         Many members of the local ad community pitched in to promote and produce the
show. Sherry Matthews Advocacy Marketing, led by their ECD Charles Webre, created
the outstanding promotional campaign and one of Austin’s best printers, The Whitley
Company, printed and mailed the material. Austin Graphics created event signage,
including a giant banner welcoming people to the event, featuring—of course—the
Austin Show “a,” tie-dyed to play off Austin’s throwback hippie culture.
         For the show itself we chose the Austin Music Hall, a recently renovated Austin
institution, famed as a live-music venue. The invitation featured a guitar shaped like the
ADDY “a” with a musician playing in the background and the headline, “Celebrate Your
Day Job.”
         On February 22, 2008, the crowd was treated to an hour-long set of local music,
spun by ad industry veteran- slash-DJ, DJ Lyman, followed by an original lyric and
music video created by Tequila Mockingbird, a local music house, and Revelator
Productions. The lyrics and video, titled “Ad Man” (set to David Bowie’s “Starman”),
was both a spoof and homage to our advertising community.




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        “Best of Show” Awards consisted of a glass mosaic plate, each handcrafted by a
famed local glass artist, Kathleen Ash, featuring the ADDY “a” set in a field of colored
glass.
       By the end of the night, 30 different agencies took home the hardware. And for
one night, 550+ members of the Austin Advertising community celebrated their common
ground—an unrivaled commitment to creativity.

Special Events: The Event Formerly Known as Big Wigs (TEFKABW)
For more than 15 years, the annual Big Wig Awards had been the Austin Ad Federation’s
way of recognizing excellence in the behind-the-scenes vendors who help the local ad
community produce marketing collateral and award-winning ads. Deciding the event
needed an upgrade, we established five goals for the June 14, 2007 event:
   1. Re-invent the affair as a “must-attend” among industry professionals
   2. Increase attendance by 20% over prior year
   3. Re-brand and market event; give create new identity for the event
   4. Change from a luncheon to a dinner/evening awards ceremony
   5. Rename top awards – add/delete categories at committee recommendation

     We built our event strategy around a masquerade theme that played off the
overarching objective to recognize people behind the scenes in the industry. Our theme
was also a nod to one of our other key goals, renaming the event. All of our collateral
and communication referred to it as The Event Formerly Known as Big Wigs. At one of
our happy hour gatherings, a model dressed in masquerade attire distributed Save-the-
Date cards that solicited recommendations from the ad community for the new name.
This created early buzz and engaged the whole ad community to play a role. We
received over 75 new name suggestions.
         We also announced our new awards process that allowed members and non-
members in the ad community to both nominate and vote for winners in 30 categories.
We deleted some categories and added a few, including Best Up and Coming and Best
Receptionist. Finalists were determined by majority of nominations; winners by majority
vote. Responding to our email blasts, hundreds of nominations were submitted. We
tallied the finalists, emailed theses names to the ad community, and solicited votes.
         We marketed this year’s event as a dressier affair; in other words, “give your flip-
flops a night off.” We hosted the event at a historic hotel and literally rolled out the red
carpet to our guests, who were served appetizers by stylish servers in the courtyard,
serenaded by a local band. We had invited our guests to embrace their creativity and wear
masks (the invitations included blank white masks, feathers, glitter and sequins). We
were pleasantly surprised to see all of the many unique creations, and awarded gift
certificates for the two best masks.
         With an eye toward the next generation of ad professionals, we held a silent
auction during cocktail hour for goods and services donated by local Austin businesses
and ad professionals. The $2,705 in proceeds went to our two local universities’ student
ad clubs competing in AAF’s National Student Advertising Competition.
         Previously, winners received a certificate. In 2007, winners took home engraved
acrylic stars. We included all nominees’ names in the program, and listed prior years’




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winners. Nominees’ names were projected as winners were announced and came to the
stage for their award.
        The event closed with the unveiling of its new name, “The Vendies.” The person
who had suggested the name was awarded a free annual Ad Fed membership and a cash
prize.
        The sold-out evening accomplished all of our five goals, and then some. We
hosted 190 people at our event, versus the 120 at the prior year’s luncheon—a 58%
increase in attendance. And we clearly achieved our goal of creating a “must-attend”
event, as we were receiving ticket requests just hours before the doors opened.




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                 Programs
               st
             1 Place – Division 4

North Central Advertising Federation of Indiana

         Contact:       David Huhnke
                        Lafayette Savings Bank
                        101 Main Street
                        Lafayette, IN 47902
                        (765) 429-2807
                        dhuhnke@lsbank.com




                      223
NORTH CENTRAL ADVERTISING FEDERATION OF INDIANA
PROGRAMS
OPENING STATEMENT AND OVERVIEW
IN THREE SHORT YEARS, NORTH CENTRAL ADVERTISING FEDERATION HAS EMERGED IN OUR
COMMUNITY AS A REJUVENATED AND INSPIRED ORGANIZATION. PRIOR TO 2005, THE CLUB’S
PROGRAMS WERE POORLY ATTENDED, MEMBERS WERE DISENGAGED, AND THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS WAS UNCERTAIN IF THE ORGANIZATION HAD A FUTURE. AFTER AN EXTREME
REORGANIZATION BY CLUB LEADERS, NCADFED HAS PROGRESSED THROUGH AN INNOVATIVE
AND COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGIC PLAN TO BRING DIVERSE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES,
SOCIAL ACTIVITIES, AND COMMUNITY SERVICE TO OUR MEMBERSHIP. DRIVEN BY OUR
ORGANIZATIONAL FRAMEWORK, ANNUAL BOARD RETREAT AND STRATEGIC PLAN (EXHIBITS:
A1-A11), THESE ACTIVITIES ALLOW NCADFED TO FOCUS ON NETWORKING, EDUCATION,
AND RECOGNITION FOR ADVERTISING AND MARKETING PROFESSIONALS IN THE NORTH
CENTRAL INDIANA REGION. IN ADDITION TO OUR MONTHLY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
LUNCHEONS (PDL), NCADFED OFFERS OTHER SOCIAL AND EDUCATIONAL EVENTS SUCH AS
OUR DIVERSITY AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS BREAKFASTS, THE DISTRICT 6 FALL
CONFERENCE, AND THE ANNUAL ADDY AWARDS.
PROGRAMMING GOALS:
  1.) PROVIDE EXCITING AND MARKET-APPROPRIATE PROGRAMS TO INCREASE OUR OVERALL
ATTENDANCE AVERAGE BY 10 PERCENT.     (EXHIBIT: B1).
  2.) SECURE ONLY REGIONAL OR NATIONAL-LEVEL SPEAKERS FOR MONTHLY PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEONS (EXHIBIT: B-2).
  3.) PAY ABSOLUTELY NO SPEAKER FEES TO STRETCH CLUB RESOURCES TO A MAXIMUM
EFFICIENCY FOR OUR MEMBERS (EXHIBIT: B3).
  4.) PLAN THE ENTIRE CALENDAR YEAR OF PROGRAMS ONE YEAR IN ADVANCE TO ENSURE
TOP-QUALITY SPEAKERS ON CURRENT TRENDS ARE PROCURED (REFER TO EXHIBIT B2).
  5.) SECURE SPONSORSHIPS FOR EACH PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEON AND
OTHER RELEVANT PROGRAMS (EXHIBIT: B4).
  6.) INCREASE BENEFITS OF ATTENDING OUR PROGRAMS BY GIVING AWAY VALUABLE
PRIZES, PROVIDED BY SPONSORS, ALLOWING AD FED TO BE FINANCIALLY SOLVENT AND
EFFICIENT (REFER TO EXHIBIT B3).
  7.) PROVIDE PROGRAMMING WHICH APPEALS TO OUR COMMUNITY’S BUSINESS
PROFESSIONALS, OUTSIDE THE REALM OF THE NCADFED MEMBERSHIP (EXHIBIT B5).
  8.) PROVIDE INFORMATIONAL PROGRAMMING TO PROMOTE DIVERSITY AND
MULTICULTURALISM IN THE LAFAYETTE-WEST LAFAYETTE AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES
(EXHIBIT: B6).
  9.) PROVIDE NETWORKING AND SOCIALIZATION THROUGH SUPPLEMENTAL PARTIES AND
MINGLES.
  10.) ENGAGE MEMBERS IN PUBLIC SERVICE INITIATIVES AND PROGRAMS IN ORDER TO
SUPPORT OUR COMMUNITIES.
TARGET AUDIENCE
THE TARGET AUDIENCE FOR NCADFED PROGRAMS INCLUDES OUR MEMBERSHIP BASE,
PROFESSIONALS IN COMMUNICATIONS, MARKETING AND ADVERTISING INDUSTRIES, STAFF
AND STUDENTS FROM PURDUE UNIVERSITY AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC.
METHODS OF PROMOTION




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1.)   INTERNET AND NCADFED WEBSITE: THE NCADFED WEBSITE HAS BEEN
      CONTINUALLY UPDATED AND NEW INTERACTIVE COMPONENTS WERE ADDED THIS YEAR
      THROUGH THE VOLUNTEER WORK OF HAMSTRA MEDIA. JOB POSTINGS, CLASSIFIED
      ADVERTISEMENTS, A NEW BLOG SECTION, LINKS FOR EVENT INFORMATION AND
      CALENDARS, AND INDUSTRY MARKETING LINKS MAY ALL BE ACCESSED WITH EASE. AS
      AN ADDED INCENTIVE FOR BECOMING A MEMBER OF NCADFED, THE SYSTEM ALLOWS
      FOR A MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY COMPLETE WITH CONTACT INFORMATION ACCESSIBLE
      TO MEMBERS ONLY. FINALLY, OUR NEW SYSTEM ALSO ALLOWS DETAILED TRACKING
      FOR MEASURING VISITORS AND THEIR CLICK-THROUGH SELECTIONS FROM THE WEBSITE
      THAT ARE USED TO ANALYZE THE VIABILITY OF OUR SITE (EXHIBITS: C1-C6).
2.)   NEWSLETTER, REMINDERS AND E-BLASTS: NCADFED HAS EMBRACED AN
      ELECTRONIC NEWSLETTER THAT IS SENT MONTHLY TO OVER 560 MEMBERS AND
      INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS AS OUR PREDOMINANT COMMUNICATION TOOL. EACH
      MONTH, THE NEWSLETTER AND FOLLOW-UP E-BLASTS HOST INFORMATION ON
      GOVERNMENT ISSUES, DIVERSITY, GENERAL CLUB NEWS, AAF NEWS, UPCOMING
      EVENTS AND A PRESIDENT’S LETTER. RECIPIENTS ARE ABLE TO RSVP DIRECTLY FROM
      THESE COMMUNICATIONS FOR AD FED EVENTS. ADDITIONALLY, CONFIRMATIONS ARE
      IMMEDIATELY FORWARDED TO THE MEMBER ENSURING THE RESERVATION AS THE
      SYSTEM TRACKS NAMES AND PERTINENT INFORMATION FOR CLUB RECORDS (EXHIBITS:
      C7-C10).
3.)   DIRECT MAIL INITIATIVES: DIRECT MAIL IS INTEGRATED INTO THE OVERALL
      MARKETING PLAN FOR AD FED TO BE USED AS A SUPPLEMENTAL METHOD OF
      PROMOTION TO E-COMMUNICATIONS. THIS IS FISCALLY EFFICIENT GIVEN THE COSTS
      ASSOCIATED WITH PRINT AND DIRECT MAIL FOR OUR CLUB. THIS YEAR, THE CLUB
      UTILIZED DIRECT MAIL TO PROMOTE THE KICK-OFFS OF BOTH THE MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
      AND OUR PROGRAM LINE-UP FOR THE NEW YEAR. ADDITIONALLY, A SIMILAR
      MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION WAS DISTRIBUTED DURING THE ANNUAL DRIVE (EXHIBITS:
      D1-D3).
4.)   ADDY AWARDS: IN PREVIOUS YEARS, NCADFED HAS PRODUCED ADDY
      COMMUNICATIONS VIA PRINT. WITH SIGNIFICANT PRINTING COST INCREASE, AND TO
      STEWARD THE CLUB’S TREASURY WISELY, BOTH THE CALL-TO-ENTRY FORMS AND THE
      ADDY EVENT INVITATION WERE SENT ELECTRONICALLY. IN FACT, ADDY AWARD
      ENTRIES WERE UP OVER 32 PERCENT THIS YEAR WITH A TOTAL OF 171 ENTRIES.
      PRINTING EFFORTS DID INCLUDE POSTERS DONATED WITH A VALUE OF $450, WHICH
      WAS DISTRIBUTED TO LOCAL PROFESSIONALS AND COMPANIES AND A DVD WINNERS
      REEL WITH IN-KIND PRODUCTION AT THE EVENT WORTH MORE THAN $7,500 DONATED
      BY A LOCAL COMPANY. ADDITIONALLY, THE DVD WILL BE MORE COST EFFICIENT FOR
      DISTRIBUTION TO WINNERS. FINALLY, ADDY PARTICIPANTS WERE REQUIRED TO
      UTILIZE THE AAF’S ELECTRONIC ENTRY SYSTEM TO STREAMLINE EFFORTS, (EXHIBITS
      E1-E9).
5.)   TABLE TENTS: TO HEIGHTEN INTEREST IN THE FOLLOWING MONTH’S PROGRAMMING,
      AND WHILE HAVING AN ALREADY CAPTIVE AUDIENCE, AD FED TARGETED
      PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEON ATTENDEES THROUGH TABLE TENT
      ADVERTISING. THESE FOUR-COLOR CARDS, DISPLAYED ON ELEVATED RESERVATION
      HOLDERS, PUBLICIZED UPCOMING SPEAKERS, COMMUNITY SERVICE DRIVES AND ADDY




                                        225
        AWARDS. TOTAL COST FOR THE DESIGN WORK AND PRINTING, ESTIMATED AT $1,100,
        WAS DONATED BY NCADFED MEMBERS, (EXHIBITS F1-F2).
  6.) PRESS RELEASES AND NEWS COVERAGE: CONVEYING MISSION AND PROGRAMMING
        TO THE GREATER COMMUNITY IS VITAL TO OUR FEDERATION’S SUCCESS. A CONCERTED
        EFFORT WAS MADE TO UTILIZE THE PRESS IN PROMOTING OUR CLUB AND ITS PROGRAMS.
        IN ADDITION TO PRESS RELEASES BEING SENT TO ALL LOCAL MEDIA, WE HAVE
        CONTINUALLY UPDATED THE AAF D6 WEBSITE TO KEEP OTHER CLUBS INFORMED OF
        OUR EVENTS (EXHIBITS: G1-G8).
  7.) SOCIAL NETWORKING WEBSITES: KEEPING WITH THE INDUSTRY TRENDS TO ENGAGE
        OUR YOUNGER DEMOGRAPHICS ABOUT NCADFED AND OUR PROGRAMMING, THE
        ORGANIZATION BRANCHED OUT TO UTILIZING FACEBOOK AND LINKED IN. THESE
        POPULAR SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES HAVE ALLOWED NCADFED TO POST EVENTS,
        CLUB NEWS AND INFORMATION, AND A MEMBERSHIP BLOG (EXHIBIT: G9-G10).
FEEDBACK MECHANISMS
1.) MONTHLY PROGRAM SURVEYS: BEYOND ENGAGING MEMBERS, SURVEYS FOLLOWING
THE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEONS PROVIDE HONEST FEEDBACK TO GAUGE THE
OVERALL SUCCESS OF THE PROGRAM, SHARE IDEAS FOR FUTURE SPEAKERS, AND REFER
POTENTIAL NEW MEMBERS FOR AD FED (EXHIBITS: H1- H2).
2.) ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP SURVEY: ANNUAL SURVEYS TO THE ENTIRE MEMBERSHIP BASE
WERE UTILIZED PRIOR TO THE BOARD’S STRATEGIC PLANNING SESSION TO GUIDE OUR
PLANNING FOR THE UPCOMING YEAR. THIS WAS ANOTHER MEANS OF ALLOWING OUR MEMBERS
TO HAVE A MORE ACTIVE ROLE IN PROGRAMMING (EXHIBIT: H3).
3.) E-MAIL: THE BOARD ALWAYS ENCOURAGES E-MAIL AS A METHOD FOR MEMBERS TO
CONNECT WITH THE BOARD TO SHARE FEEDBACK. MEMBERS THAT ARE NETWORKED WITH
CLUB LEADERS OFTEN SHARE ANECDOTAL THOUGHTS AND SUGGESTIONS ABOUT NCADFED
(EXHIBITS: H4-H5).
4.) WEBSITE: NCADFED’S WEBSITE (WWW.NCADFED.ORG) COMPLETE WITH A NEW BLOG
FUNCTION, ALLOWS OUR MEMBERSHIP TO INTERACT WITH THE SITE IN ADDITION TO LEAVING
THEIR FEEDBACK OR PERTINENT QUESTIONS (EXHIBIT: REFER TO C1).
5.) PERSONAL CONTACT: NCADFED STRATEGICALLY DEVELOPED A MENTOR PROGRAM TO
FACILITATE PERSONAL CONTACT BETWEEN MEMBERS AND PROSPECTS WITH THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS. EACH BOARD MEMBER HAS ASSIGNMENTS OF USING PERSONAL CONTACT TO
EXTEND INVITATIONS TO EVENTS, ANSWER QUESTIONS, AND GREET THEIR LIST OF MEMBERS AT
EACH EVENT (EXHIBIT: H6).
TOP THREE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEON PROGRAMS (PDL): AS PART OF
OUR CHAPTER’S STRATEGIC PLAN, NCADFED BOARD MEMBERS HAVE WORKED DILIGENTLY
THIS YEAR TO SECURE NATIONALLY RENOWNED SPEAKERS THAT HAVE SHOWN A DIRECT
CORRELATION TO THE INCREASE IN ATTENDANCE TO OUR MONTHLY PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEONS. IN ADDITION TO A COMPLETE OVERHAUL OF OUR PDLS,
NCADFED LEADERS ALSO INITIATED A MEMBERSHIP DRIVE, AS WELL AS SEVERAL WELCOMING
EXERCISES.
    1.) MAY 17, 2007: “GUERILLA MARKETING/EFFECTIVE STREET CAMPAIGNS” BY
        CHRISTIAN JURINKA OF ATTACK! MARKETING & PROMOTIONS FROM LOS
        ANGELES, CA. CONSIDERING THIS WAS A DIFFERENT TOPIC DEALING WITH GUERILLA
        MARKETING, OUR CLUB’S GOAL WAS TO ATTRACT AT LEAST 60 PEOPLE. WITH 75
        PEOPLE IN ATTENDANCE, THIS PROGRAM WAS REALLY SUCCESSFUL. SPEAKER




                                          226
       CHRISTIAN JURINKA PROVIDED INSIGHT TECHNIQUES FOR BUZZ MARKETING,
       PROMOTIONAL STUNTS, AND OTHER NON-TRADITIONAL EFFORTS EMPLOYED BY HIS
       AGENCY. THE EVENT WAS PROMOTED THROUGH E-NEWSLETTERS, E-MAIL BLASTS,
       WEBSITE POSTINGS, BOARD OF DIRECTOR PERSONAL CONTACTS AND PRESS RELEASES.
       OF THE SURVEYED PDL ATTENDEES, MANY FOUND THE PROGRAM TO BE CREATIVE AND
       ONE MEMBER COMMENTED ON THE SPEAKER’S USE OF HANDS-ON EXAMPLES. THIS PDL
       WAS SPONSORED BY LAFAYETTE SAVINGS BANK AND BRAINSTORM MARKETING, WHO
       ALSO PROVIDED PRIZES FOR OUR MEMBERS (EXHIBITS: I1-I4).
   2.) SEPTEMBER 27, 2007: “OFF AND ONLINE ADVERTISING TOOLS” BY KING HILL OF
       DIGIKNOW IN CLEVELAND, OH. OUR GOAL WAS TO ATTRACT 60 PEOPLE FOR THIS
       PDL, AND WE WERE SUCCESSFUL IN HAVING 62 ATTEND. KING HILL KICKED OFF OUR
       FALL PDL BY PROVIDING INSIGHT ON HOW TO WEAVE ONLINE MARKETING ELEMENTS IN
       WITH MORE TRADITIONAL MARKETING PROGRAMS. HE ALSO CITED CASE HISTORY
       FROM HIS PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE TO FURTHER EXPLORE THE TOPIC. THE EVENT
       WAS PROMOTED THROUGH E-NEWSLETTERS, E-MAIL BLASTS, WEBSITE POSTINGS,
       BOARD OF DIRECTOR PERSONAL CONTACTS AND PRESS RELEASES. OF THE SURVEYED
       PDL ATTENDEES, COMMENTS INCLUDED THAT THIS WAS “ANOTHER GREAT TOPIC” AND
       “WISH THERE WAS MORE TIME.” THIS PDL WAS SPONSORED BY CITYBUS (EXHIBITS:
       I5-I9).
   3.) NOVEMBER 8, 2007: “THE LITTLE BLUE BOOK OF ADVERTISING” BY STEVE
       LANCE OF NEW YORK. OUR GOAL WAS TO ATTRACT 60 PEOPLE FOR THIS PDL, AND
       WE WERE SUCCESSFUL IN HAVING 68 ATTEND. STEVE LANCE DISCUSSED HIS RECENTLY
       PUBLISHED “LITTLE BLUE BOOK OF ADVERTISING” AND HOW THESE TECHNIQUES ARE
       INCORPORATED. HE ALSO CITED CASE HISTORY FROM HIS PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
       TO FURTHER EXPLORE THE TOPIC. THE EVENT WAS PROMOTED THROUGH E-
       NEWSLETTERS, E-MAIL BLASTS, WEBSITE POSTINGS, BOARD OF DIRECTOR PERSONAL
       CONTACTS AND PRESS RELEASES. OF THE SURVEYED PDL ATTENDEES, COMMENTS
       INCLUDED THAT THIS WAS “ONE OF MY FAVORITE AD FED PROGRAMS” AND “PLEASE
       BRING STEVE BACK FOR A 1/2 DAY WORKSHOP.” THIS PDL WAS SPONSORED BY KATHY
       MAYER PR, CATHY SWICK DESIGN, FULL MOON COMMUNICATION & DESIGN, JOHN
       CONDREAY PHOTOGRAPHY AND PRO DESIGN (EXHIBITS: I10-I12).
DIVERSITY FOCUSED PDL
 APRIL 11, 2007: “MULTICULTURAL MARKETING” BY JO MUSE, MUSE
 COMMUNICATIONS FROM HOLLYWOOD, CA. WITH 68 MEMBERS IN ATTENDANCE, THIS
 SESSION ADDRESSED HOW TO COMMUNICATE WITH DIVERSE MARKET SEGMENTS, SUCH AS
 AFRICAN AMERICANS, HISPANICS, ASIANS, AND PACIFIC ISLANDERS. THE EVENT WAS
 PROMOTED THROUGH E-NEWSLETTERS, E-MAIL BLASTS, WEBSITE POSTINGS, BOARD OF
 DIRECTOR PERSONAL CONTACTS AND PRESS RELEASES. ACCORDING TO POST-SURVEY
 RESULTS, THE PROGRAM WAS PERCEIVED AS INTERESTING AND INFORMATIVE BY THE
 MAJORITY OF ATTENDEES AND MANY FELT THEIR EXPECTATIONS HAD BEEN MET. THIS
 PROGRAM WAS TARGETED TO MEMBERS THAT WORK WITH DIVERSE CLIENTELE AS WELL AS
 TO ORGANIZATIONS SUCH AS THE BLACK CULTURAL CENTER AND THE LATINO COALITION OF
 TIPPECANOE COUNTY. THE GOAL WAS TO ATTRACT 60 MEMBERS TO THIS SPECIFIC PDL, AND
 THAT WAS EXCEEDED WHEN 68 PEOPLE ATTENDED. THIS PROGRAM WAS SPONSORED BY THE
 “JOURNAL & COURIER” (EXHIBITS: J1-J3).




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OUTCOMES: ATTENDANCE FOR THE 2007-2008 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
WAS AN AVERAGE OF 60 PEOPLE, WHICH WAS 7 PERCENT HIGHER THAN OUR AVERAGE OF 55
LAST SEASON AND 40 PERCENT HIGHER THAN OUR AVERAGE OF 36 IN 2005-06. THE CLUB
ATTRIBUTES THE INCREASED PARTICIPATION IN THE ORGANIZATION AS BEING A DIRECT RESULT
OF THE HIGHER CALIBER NATIONAL SPEAKERS AND A WIDE ARRAY OF TOPICS FOR OUR
MEMBERS. ADDITIONALLY, THE GROWTH AND IMPLEMENTATION OF OUR NCADFED MENTOR
PROGRAM FACILITATES PERSONAL CONTACT BETWEEN MEMBERS AND THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS.
DISTRICT 6 FALL CONFERENCE: FOR THE FIRST TIME, NCADFED HOSTED THE AAF
DISTRICT 6 FALL CONFERENCE. THE TARGET AUDIENCE WAS AAF DISTRICT 6 AD CLUB
LEADERS AND ADVERTISING, MARKETING, AND COMMUNICATIONS PROFESSIONALS IN THIS
REGION. OUR GOAL WAS TO HAVE 75 PARTICIPANTS; OUR ATTENDANCE GOAL WAS SHATTERED
WHEN 133 PEOPLE REGISTERED. SPEAKERS INCLUDED BRUCE BENDINGER, MYRA BORSHOFF
COOK, JONI SILVERSTEIN, JOANNE SCHECTER, AND RANDY SNOW. TRACKS INCLUDED
RESOURCES FOR OTHER AREA AD CLUB LEADERS, AS WELL AS FOR MARKETING AND
ADVERTISING PROFESSIONALS IN THIS REGION. THE EVENT WAS PROMOTED WITH DONATED
PRINT ADVERTISING IN THE NEWSPAPER, WEBSITE PRESENCE, E-NEWSLETTER AND E-BLASTS,
BOARD OF DIRECTORS PERSONAL CONTACTS, PROGRAMS, PRESS RELEASES AND RESULTING
PUBLICITY. SURVEYS WERE PROVIDED FOR EACH SESSION TO ENSURE THAT WE COULD
MEASURE FEEDBACK. THE D6 FALL CONFERENCE FAR EXCEEDED OUR CLUB’S GOALS AND
EXPECTATIONS (EXHIBITS: K1-K16).
DIVERSITY BREAKFAST: ON JULY 21, 2007, NCADFED HOSTED A PANEL DISCUSSION WITH
LATINO COMMUNITY MEMBERS. TOPICS INCLUDED HOW TO REACH THIS MARKET, SOCIO-
ECONOMIC TRENDS FOR LATINO CONSUMERS, INCLUSION ISSUES WITH THE COMMUNITY, AND
OTHER MARKETING TOPICS. OUR GOAL WAS TO HAVE 20 PEOPLE ATTEND; 21 WERE PRESENT.
THE EVENT WAS PROMOTED THROUGH OUR E-NEWSLETTER, E-BLASTS, BOARD OF DIRECTORS
PERSONAL CONTACTS, PRESS RELEASES, AND REACHING OUT TO OTHER COMMUNITY
NONPROFIT E-LISTS. SURVEYS WERE USED TO MEASURE THE FEEDBACK OF ATTENDEES AND
WERE VERY POSITIVE (EXHIBITS: L1-L4).
GOVERNMENT RELATIONS BREAKFAST: ON AUGUST 23, 2007, NCADFED HOSTED SPEAKER
JOE SEAMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE NEWLY FORMED LAFAYETTE-WEST LAFAYETTE
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (LWLDC). SEAMAN DISCUSSED HOW THE LWLDC
WILL BE INTERFACING WITH LOCAL AND STATE-LEVEL GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS TO FURTHER
THE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC GOALS OF OUR COMMUNITY. OUR GOAL WAS TO HAVE 20
PEOPLE ATTEND; 18 PARTICIPATED. THE EVENT WAS PROMOTED THROUGH OUR E-
NEWSLETTER, E-BLASTS, BOARD OF DIRECTORS PERSONAL CONTACTS, PRESS RELEASES, AND
THROUGH THE LWLDC’S E-NEWSLETTER LIST. SURVEYS WERE USED TO MEASURE THE
FEEDBACK FROM ATTENDEES AND WERE VERY FAVORABLE. SEVERAL PEOPLE SUGGESTED
BRINGING SEAMAN BACK NEXT YEAR TO PRESENT ON LWLDC’S PROGRESS MADE TO DATE
(EXHIBITS: L5-L8).
SOCIAL AND MINGLING EVENTS: ADDITIONAL EVENTS WERE PROVIDED FOR MEMBERS AND
PARTICIPANTS TO NETWORK IN SOCIAL SITUATIONS, SUCH AS OUR SUMMER BASH, HOLIDAY
PARTY AND PUBLIC SERVICE PROJECT (EXHIBITS: M1-M4).
OUTCOMES: THESE EVENTS SOLIDIFIED NCADFED’S COMMITMENT TO BRINGING DIVERSE
PROGRAMMING TO ITS MEMBERS IN THE PROFESSIONAL REALM, PROVIDING PUBLIC SERVICE
OPPORTUNITIES, AND CULTIVATING FUN AMONG OUR CLUB MEMBERS.




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COMMUNITY SERVICE EVENTS: TO ENGAGE OUR MEMBERS IN ACTIVE COMMUNITY
INVOLVEMENT, A MASSIVE PUBLIC SERVICE CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETED EACH YEAR.
   A. WEST CENTRAL INDIANA ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: AN ESTIMATED 3,813
      RESIDENTS OF OUR COMMUNITY HAVE ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND ANOTHER 9,545
      FAMILY MEMBERS PROVIDE THEIR CARE. THE LATEST NUMBERS FROM THE AMERICAN
      MEDICAL ASSOCIATION SHOW THOSE NUMBERS ARE ON THE RISE. AS MANY AS 1 IN 2
      INDIVIDUALS OVER THE AGE OF 85 WILL DEVELOP THE DISEASE. NCADFED TOOK ON
      THE CAUSE OF THE INDIANA ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION THROUGH A MASSIVE PUBLIC
      SERVICE CAMPAIGN. AFTER A PUBLICLY ANNOUNCED APPLICATION PROCESS,
      NCADFED COMPLETED A MULTI-MEDIA BRANDING, MARKETING AND ADVERTISING
      CAMPAIGN FOR THE INAUGURAL ALZHEIMER’S CAREGIVERS CONFERENCE. THE
      PROJECT, ALSO BENEFITING THE AREA IV COUNCIL ON AGING AND COMMUNITY
      ACTION, PROVIDED A FREE TWO-TRACT EDUCATIONAL TRAINING SESSION TO HELP
       FAMILIAL AND PROFESSIONAL CAREGIVERS COPE WITH CARING FOR THOSE DIAGNOSED
       WITH ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE. NCADFED WAS COMPLETELY RESPONSIBLE FOR A
       BRANDING PACKAGE VALUED AT MORE THAN $20,000 (EXHIBITS: N1-N10).
    B. BIG BROTHERS/BIG SISTERS: THE SECOND ANNUAL NCADFED COMMUNITY SERVICE
       PROJECT WILL BE A COLLABORATION WITH BIG BROTHERS/BIG SISTERS OF WABASH
       VALLEY AS THEY SEEK MALE MENTORS FOR 74 BOYS, MANY WITH DIVERSE
       BACKGROUNDS, IN THE LAFAYETTE COMMUNITY WHO WOULD LIKE A BIG BROTHER.
       ALTHOUGH THE PROJECT HAS NOT COME TO FRUITION, A COMMITTEE HAS BEEN
       FORMED, A CHAIR HAS BEEN NAMED AND PROJECT TIMELINES HAS BEEN ESTABLISHED.
       THE PROJECT FURTHER CONFIRMS NCADFED’S COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE AND
       DIVERSITY ISSUES (EXHIBITS: N11-N12).
    OUTCOMES: THE ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION CREDITED NCADFED FOR DOUBLING THE
    PROJECTED ATTENDANCE AT THE CAREGIVER CONFERENCE. ADDITIONALLY, 17 FAMILIES
    WERE INTEGRATED INTO SUPPORT GROUPS AND 112 PARTICIPANTS SIGNED UP TO RECEIVE
    REGULAR INFORMATION FROM THE ASSOCIATION. EIGHT NCADFED MEMBERS AND SIX
    PARTNER COMPANIES WERE ALSO RESPONSIBLE FOR OVER $15,000 IN SPONSORSHIP AND IN
    KIND DONATIONS FOR THE FOURTH ANNUAL ALZHEIMER MEMORY WALK.
GOALS MET
1.)    OUR OVERALL PROGRAM ATTENDANCE INCREASED 8 PERCENT FROM LAST YEAR TO AN
AVERAGE OF 60 ATTENDEES.
2.)    OUR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEON SPEAKERS CAME FROM THE NATIONAL
LEVEL, TRAVELING FROM NEW YORK AND LOS ANGELES.
3.)    OVER $2,500 WAS WAIVED IN SPEAKER FEES; NCADFED PAID $0 IN SPEAKER FEES THIS
YEAR.
4.)    ALL NCADFED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEON SPEAKERS WERE PLANNED
ONE YEAR IN ADVANCE.
5.)    ALL NINE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEONS, THE DISTRICT 6 FALL
CONFERENCE, THE DIVERSITY AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS, AND THE ADDY AWARDS
EARNED SPONSORSHIPS RANGING FROM $500-$3,000.
6.)    PRIZES WERE GIVEN AWAY AT EACH PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEON TO
FOSTER MEMBER RELATIONS.




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7.)   NCADFED PARTNERED WITH THE LAFAYETTE-WEST LAFAYETTE CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE TO PROMOTE OUR ORGANIZATION. AS A RESULT 24 BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS
ATTENDED OUR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEONS.
8.)   THREE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT LUNCHEONS, THE DISTRICT 6 FALL CONFERENCE,
AND THE DIVERSITY BREAKFAST SHARED A DIVERSITY MESSAGE OR PROVIDED EDUCATION FOR
PROFESSIONALS WORKING WITH DIVERSE CLIENT BASES.
9.)    A SUMMER BASH, A HOLIDAY PARTY AND OTHER CASUAL MINGLES PROVIDED
SOCIALIZATION AND FUN FOR OUR MEMBERS.
10.) A PARTNERSHIP WITH THE INDIANA ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION FOR THE CAREGIVERS
CONFERENCE ENGAGED 20 NCADFED MEMBERS IN A LARGE-SCALE COMMUNITY SERVICE
PROGRAM THAT NETTED OVER $20,000 IN CONTRIBUTIONS AND OVER 500 HOURS OF
VOLUNTEER TIME.

CONCLUSION: NCADFED LEADERSHIP HAS MADE PROGRAMMING THE FOCAL POINT OF THIS
ORGANIZATION. WE RECOGNIZE THAT QUALITY PROGRAMMING WILL BE THE LIFEBLOOD OF
OUR ORGANIZATION’S SUCCESS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH A STRONG, THRIVING MEMBERSHIP. THIS
FOCUS HAS BROUGHT A RENEWED ENERGY TO OUR MONTHLY PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT
LUNCHEONS AND HAS SIGNIFICANTLY BOLSTERED OUR MEMBERSHIP GROWTH EFFORTS. WITH
OVER 40 PERCENT MEMBER INVOLVEMENT IN NCADFED PROGRAMS, 664 ATTENDEES TO ALL
NCADFED PROGRAMS AND EVENTS, 85 PERCENT MEMBER RETENTION, EIGHT NEW MEMBERS, A
HEALTHY BANK ACCOUNT AND A 32 PERCENT INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF ENTRIES TO OUR
ADDY AWARDS, IT HAS BEEN A SUCCESSFUL YEAR FOR THE ORGANIZATION. IN THOSE THREE
SHORT YEARS, A DEDICATED BOARD AND AN ENGAGED MEMBERSHIP – DRIVEN BY A COMMON
STRATEGIC PLAN – HAVE CREATED AN AWARD-WINNING, SERVICE-ORIENTED FEDERATION.




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          Programs
           st
      1 Place – Division 5

                Ad 2 Cincinnati

Contact:                Anne Cafeo
                        Barefoot Advertising
                        605 Main Street, Suite 806
                        Cincinnati, OH
                        (513) 984-9990
                        acafeo@cinci.rr.com




                      231
              2007-2008 AAF National Club Achievement Competition
                                  Ad2 Cincinnati
                           Category of Entry – Programs

Ad2 Cincinnati works to make connections throughout our community by bringing
today’s industry leaders and tomorrow’s promising leaders together through their
monthly programs. It comes in the form of networking, teaching, learning, sharing and
having a great time.

Objective 1: Grow and retain Ad2 Cincinnati Membership
Ad2 Cincinnati works to create a successful line-up of program topics in an effort to
appeal to a wide audience. Our goal is to keep our current membership base engaged and
to attract potential new members.

Objective 2: Educate our members and non-members on the advertising industry
Ad2 Cincinnati works to continually educate our members on the industry we enjoy and
to provide them with programs that will educate them on what’s happening now and
what’s just around the corner in this fast-paced industry.

Program 1:
How to Build a Successful Business
Ms. Deborah Dent, CEO & Owner of Willow Creative Group
September 2007

Event Details: Providing an inside look into the entrepreneurial world, this Ad2 program
gave the attendees an insight as to what it really takes to start your own business. This
event catered specifically to our younger audience, considering Debbie founded Willow
at the age of 24. The event was hosted at Willow and included 30 minutes of tours of the
building and networking opportunities for those in attendance. After introductions,
Debbie discussed her role in the advertising entrepreneurial business, the challenges she
faced climbing the ladder, the many successes and failures she encountered and the
challenges you face as a business owner. The program was an interactive, relaxed round
table discussion and included a 30 minute Q&A after Debbie’s presentation.
Target Audience: Our target audience consisted of Ad2 Cincinnati Members, ADCLUB
members and interested non-members.
Method of Promotion: These targeted audiences were sent several promotions which
included e-blasts sent over a series of three weeks to both Ad2 Cincinnati members,
ADCLUB members and prospective members. The event was also posted on the online
Cincinnati’s Chamber Young Professionals Calendar, on zipscene.com, a community
event listing website, and the event was mentioned at the monthlyAd2 Happy Hour and
ADCLUB luncheon.
Average Attendance: Approximately 20 people attended this program which made it a
nice size group for a successful roundtable discussion and allowed everyone to interact
with our presenter.




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Feedback Mechanism: Those who attended the event were invited by Debbie to contact
her with any additional questions. Attendees were told to visit the website and watch their
inbox for upcoming program details and were encouraged to join our email list.
Results: Positive feedback was received on this event, which kicked off our fall list of
programs. This event’s speaker hit several levels with our attendees, including her drive
to start a business at age 24 and her knowledge of our industry. Several attendees
scheduled meetings and lunch dates with Debbie after the event. The event location, food
and drinks were all donated and we gained a profit of $30.
Collateral (Samples A, B & C): Event flyer on ad2cincy.org, posting on ZipScene.com
and flyer handout

Program 2:
Word of Mouth Marketing & Emerging Media
Mr. Jason Price, Vice President of Innovation & Mr. Mike Adams, Director of Digital
Strategy of Empower MediaMarketing
October 2007

Event Details: Hosted at Empower MediaMarketing, Mike Adams and Jim Price opened
the door to new age marketing and the effects it has on our industry. The presentation
was given by two energetic Empower employees who helped the audience identify the
new ways companies are looking to communicate and market to their consumers through
digital technology. They highlighted tools that help companies directly interact with
consumers including mobile texting, video broadband and integrated online campaigns.
Blogs and social network sites such as MySpace and Facebook were presented as
successful word of mouth examples.
Target Audience: Ad2 Cincinnati Members, ADCLUB Members and potential non-
members were targeted for this program.
Method of Promotion: A variety of e-blasts went out leading up to the event to Ad2
Cincinnati members, ADCLUB members and potential non-members. In addition, an
incentive was added to see who had the “biggest mouth” and could get the most people to
attend the program. The winner was rewarded a gift card for their word of mouth
marketing efforts.
Average Attendance: This program hosted approximately 35 people.
Feedback Mechanism: Attendees gave positive feedback on the event and were
encouraged to visit our site, ad2cincy.org, for information on our upcoming programs and
to see a recap of the event, including photos. A few individuals who were unable to
attend the program requested the presentation to catch up on what they had missed.
Results: This event presented a hot topic to our members and interested non-members.
With a strong attendance and a profit of $50, this event was successful for Ad2 Cincinnati
Programs.
Collateral (Samples D, E & F): Event flyer on ad2cincy.org, flyer handout and sample
ADCLUB e-blast

Program 3:
Improv in the Business World
Ms. Melissa Whitis, Improv Coach



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January 2007

Event Details: The attendees might not necessarily be ready for stand-up comedy since
attending the Improv in the Business World program, but they definitely got a hands-on
presentation of how the basic rules of comedy improvisation can apply in their everyday
9-5. Professional Improv Coach, Melissa Whitis, engaged this audience at the elite
Bankers Club in downtown Cincinnati. Through a range of improv games and activities,
the group learned how improv can help with creativity, communication, eye contact and
teamwork in the workplace. The event provided 30 minutes of networking and cocktails
prior to the main presentation. Melissa started the event off by sharing the history of
comedy improvisation and how she got her start in the business. She then took the
audience through several group activities that, besides getting them out of seats, enforced
how communication can be blocked, how body language can speak for itself and how
hard it can be to stand up for yourself. Following the event, attendees were able to
interact with the presenter and network with other participants.
Target Audience: Ad2 Cincinnati members, ADCLUB members and potentional non-
members were all targeted for this event.
Method of Promotion: Promotions for this event included several e-blasts sent to Ad2
members, ADCLUB members and potential non-members. The event was posted on the
Cincinnati Chamber’s Young Professionals Calendar and zipscene.com.
Average Attendance: This program had approximately 38 attendees.
Feedback Mechanism: A large amount of positive feedback was received from this
event. The innovative topic provided a lot of interactive ice breakers that encouraged the
attendees to talk about the topic at hand. Attendees were encouraged to visit ad2cincy.org
for details on upcoming programs and to see pictures from this event.
Results: This event was a great success for Ad2. It brought a new, innovative concept to
an audience that works in and enjoys the fast-paced advertising industry. The venue also
provided appetizers and beverages, which created a nice networking atmosphere for those
in attendance. This was one of our highest attended programs and it started the New Year
strong for Ad2 programs and brought in $110 profit.
Collateral (Samples G, H & I): Event flyer posted on ad2cincy.org, posting on
zipscene.com and sample AD2 e-blast.

Special Event:
Fire & Ice Soiree
September 2007

Event details: The Fire & Ice Soiree served as a networking and social event that strived
to be the don’t-miss young professional occasion of the year. Besides live music, food,
drinks and a raffle, this past year’s event was especially exciting as AD2 partnered with
the Cincinnati Fire Museum, located in downtown Cincinnati. The Museum, a 1906
National Register firehouse that presents more than 200 years of Greater Cincinnati’s
firefighting artifacts, also served as the host of the event. In lieu of supporting of the
event, advertising services were arranged for the Museum and provided by Xavier
University's student run agency, Xu Advertising.




                                           234
Target Audience: This event targeted Ad2 Members, ADCLUB Members, potential
non-members, upcoming or recent college graduates, other young professional groups
including AMA and CincyUpdate, local sponsors and Cincinnati Fire Museum
Supporters.
Method of Promotion: Promotions for this event included information and flyers being
posted on several Cincinnati community websites including ad2cincy.org,
adclubcincy.org, zipscene.com, cincyupdate.com and ypcincy.com. Email blasts were
sent to over 2,000 recipients as were posters and postcards. A full colored ad ran in the
September edition of Cincy, a local business magazine. The magazine also recapped the
event in their December 2007 edition. Announcements went out at Ad2 and ADCLUB
events
Attendance: 78 people were in attendance at the 2nd annual Fire & Ice Soiree.
Feedback Mechanism: The event received great feedback. Attendees were encouraged
to find out more about Ad2 by visiting ad2cincy.org and attending our September
program the following Thursday. Attendees were also able to join our email list and to
learn more about membership opportunities.
Results: The event was a big success for Ad2. Those who attended enjoyed a great party
and networking event. The event brought $2350 in sponsorships from area companies
that included Cheerios, Creatives on Call, Queen City Jobs and more. A $250 profit was
gained from the event.
Collateral (Samples J, K, L, M & N): Poster sample, event flyer posted on
ad2cincy.org, event posting on zipscene.com, sample ADCLUB e-blast and the Cincy
Magazine recap of the event.




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236
        Public Service
           st
      1 Place – Division 1

            AAF – Cleveland

Contact:            Rick Squire
                    AAF Cleveland
                    20325 Center Ridge Road, Suite 670
                    Cleveland, OH 44116
                    (440) 673-0020 x11
                    rsquire@aafcleveland.com




                  237
            AMERICAN ADVERTISING FEDERATION–CLEVELAND
                             2007-2008 PUBLIC SERVICE
OVERVIEW
Cleveland is a city like many in the Midwest, beset by poverty and unemployment, rising
home foreclosures and a public school system in need of reform. But the city is still an
economic powerhouse, with rising high-technology and medical care industries, a vibrant
arts and cultural scene and most important, a wealth of public-spirited, generous and
compassionate people working together to build a better community. American Advertising
Federation - Cleveland (AAF-Cleveland) plays a vital part in public service efforts in
Cleveland, continuing the organization’s long-standing tradition of service to the
community. The AAF-Cleveland provided pro bono assistance to several nonprofit
organizations in the past year, including the production of a promotional video, graphic
design of marketing materials, photography, and other projects. AAF-Cleveland members
have also volunteered, raised funds and personally donated money to programs and events
to help charitable organizations and individuals in our community. AAF-Cleveland gave
$21,000 in scholarships to deserving college-bound students pursuing careers in
communications. (Exhibit I) The following are highlights of AAF-Cleveland public
service work performed in 2007-2008:
EDUCATIONAL/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
Overall Objective: To provide educational and professional development programs to
help nonprofit organizations learn better strategies and techniques for marketing, public
relations and fundraising.
2007 Nonprofit Marketing Workshop: This all-day workshop presented in May 2007
for Northeast Ohio nonprofit professionals featured top public relations, marketing and
event planning experts. Workshop topics included marketing nonprofit programs and
services, online and traditional media, letter-writing campaigns and creating winning
concepts for special events. The workshop program also included a “Media Roadshow”
session where attendees had the opportunity to consult one-on-one with top public
relations, marketing and special events executives, including several PR agency
presidents. Nearly 60 professionals from numerous Northeast Ohio nonprofit
organizations attended the workshop. Promotional materials for the 2007 nonprofit
workshop included direct mail, an e-mail flyer and newspaper advertisements. Copies of
the workshop’s Event Overview, Agenda and Workshop Program are included with this
report. Printing, media placement and production costs for the promotion of the
workshop, as well as the use of the Corporate College meeting site and food service, was
donated by AAF-Cleveland member companies and partner organization sponsors.
(Exhibit II)
Champagne Marketing, Beer Budget Nonprofit Workshop: Answering a challenge
issued by our current AAF-Cleveland Chapter President, the Public Service Committee
brought back the popular nonprofit marketing workshop in January 2008 in a new,
streamlined and low-cost format. A concise, 2-hour workshop titled, “Champagne
Marketing, Beer Budget: Telling Your Story With Limited Funds” featured a panel of
executive and marketing directors from several prominent local nonprofit organizations,
plus a low registration fee of only $10 per non-member and just $5 for AAF-Cleveland



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members. We sold out. Over 75 nonprofit professionals attended this afternoon event.
(Exhibit III)
Communications Career Day: This annual event was held in December 2007 to offer
college students and recent graduates the opportunity to learn about careers in
advertising, communications and marketing and network with potential future employers.
Students and graduates from colleges throughout the region attended this informative
event, and for a heavily discounted registration fee, were given lunch at the Terrace Club
at Jacobs Field, speaker sessions on industry trends and landing a job in communications,
one-on-one resume review with a communications professional, a one-year student
membership in AAF-Cleveland, an internship guide and a membership directory!
(Exhibit IV)
GOAL-ORIENTED PROJECTS
Overall Objective: To assist nonprofit organizations with marketing, advertising and
public relations services to help them achieve specific goals.
During the 2007-2008 program year, AAF-Cleveland assisted several nonprofit
organizations in marketing projects. The following are project requests the committee
completed during the past program year:
    YMCA of Greater Cleveland’s mission is to develop the total person — spirit, mind
    and body — through character development programs that build strong kids, strong
    families and strong communities.
        NEED: To produce a YMCA promotional/informational video.
        SOLUTION: A project team was formed to produce a video to target prospective
        contributors, decision-makers, city leadership and executives of local companies
        and business associations. The resulting product, a DVD that includes a :30
        second spot and a video highlighting YMCA’s City Agenda community outreach
        programs, was enthusiastically received by the YMCA of Greater Cleveland’s
        Board of Directors, and a thousand copies were subsequently ordered by the
        organization for distribution to potential donors. (Exhibit V)
    Geauga County Historical Society (GCHS) ensures that the history of Geauga
    County is preserved for the education and appreciation of present and future
    generations. GCHS is responsible for Century Village Museum, a 65-acre museum
    depicting an authentic Western Reserve village with 22 historically restored and
    preserved buildings.
        NEED: Redesign and update the museum’s current brochure.
        SOLUTION: A volunteer project team created and delivered electronic files of
        the new brochure to GCHS. (Exhibit VI)
VOLUNTEER PARTICIPATION AND SPONSORSHIPS
 AAF-Cleveland has supported other good causes through volunteer participation. Some
of the organizations helped through these efforts include the Cleveland Food Bank,
Women’s Alliance for Recovery Services, Make-A-Wish Foundation and The Downtown
Cleveland Alliance. One of our AAF-Cleveland board members has become very active
in The Downtown Cleveland Alliance, a nonprofit organization dedicated to building a
more dynamic downtown. (Exhibit VII) AAF-Cleveland also invites nonprofit
organizations to its monthly luncheon program to promote their mission. Nonprofit and
charitable organizations represented at AAF-Cleveland luncheons during the 2007-2008


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program year include YMCA, YWCA, Shoes and Clothes for Kids, Cleveland Foodbank,
The Gathering Place (programs for patients touched by cancer), Huntington’s Disease
Society Northeast Ohio Chapter, Starting Point (resource for child care), Boy Scouts of
America and The Hunger Network of Cleveland. The following were our biggest
volunteer-driven events:
  Real Men Cook: Fundraising event held in May 2007 to benefit Women’s Alliance
  for Recovery Services, Inc. Four members of AAF-Cleveland volunteered as cooks.
  Media/Lifestyle Benefit Auction: This unique annual fundraising event held in May
  2007 auctioned newspaper, magazine and broadcast media donated by organization
  sponsors. Proceeds from the event benefited the AAF-Cleveland Education Foundation
  Scholarship Program. (Exhibit VIII)
  Walk For Wishes 2007: Fundraiser to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation – Our
  Chapter President was the team captain of AAF-Cleveland members who participated
  in this worthwhile event. (Exhibit IX)
  Walk to Cure Diabetes: Once again, our Chapter President led the charge to involve
  AAF-Cleveland members in this event held at the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo in
  September 2007. (Exhibit X)
  Cleveland Foodbank: In 2007-2008, AAF-Cleveland members continued a yearly
  tradition of volunteering one night each month over a seven-month period to sort and
  repackage food at the Cleveland Foodbank, Northeast Ohio’s largest nonprofit
  distributor of food to hundreds of charity shelters, soup kitchens and other agencies that
  feed thousands of low-income and poor people in the region.
RECOGNITION OF COMMUNITY SERVICE
In keeping with AAF-Cleveland’s strong tradition of public service, we honor and
recognize outstanding members who have not only proven themselves accomplished in
their professional fields, but have also demonstrated exceptional involvement in our
community. The AAF-Cleveland Hall of Fame inductees in 2007 are examples of this, as
evidenced through their years of mentoring young people entering the advertising and
communications fields, and through their strong involvement in community service.
(Exhibit XI)
CONC LUSION
      The American Advertising Federation-Cleveland’s many public service efforts
    throughout the 2007-2008 program year clearly demonstrate our Chapter’s sincere
     commitment to serving the community and the public good. We successfully and
                   enjoyably met our objectives for this year’s programs




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      1 Place – Division 2

Omaha Federation of Advertising

Contact:          Teri Hamburger
                  Omaha Federation of Advertising
                  5602 Leavenworth Street
                  Omaha, NE 68106
                  (402) 561-6625
                  teri@novia.net




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                                        Introduction
Every year, the Omaha Federation of Advertising (OFA) designs and executes a pro bono
public service campaign for a nonprofit organization. In 2007, the public service
committee sent out more than 100 letters to eligible organizations soliciting applicants.
We received a 20 percent response rate – more applicants than any other year. After
carefully reviewing all requests, we selected Youth Emergency Services (Y.E.S.) to
receive a fully-integrated campaign. (Exhibit A)


A Million Dollar Campaign 
The Y.E.S. campaign is the largest ever produced in OFA history. More agencies,
vendors and suppliers, donated time, space, services and expertise than ever before. In
fact, the campaign is valued at slightly over $1 million dollars.

Why Y.E.S.?
The committee chose Youth Emergency Services for four critical reasons:
      1. The cause of homeless youth in Omaha is of genuine concern to the
         community and broad enough to be of interest to all of us
      2. Y.E.S. is purely a local organization with Omaha roots and totally dependent
         on local funding
      3. Y.E.S. is not similar to other organizations in its mission, scope or intent
      4. Advertising was deemed to be an effective means of furthering the
         organization’s objectives


Youth Emergency Services
Youth Emergency Services was founded in Omaha in 1974. The purpose was, and
remains, to provide needed services to at-risk youth in the metropolitan area.

Y.E.S. focuses on homeless teens (13-18) who are denied support from other sources. It
strives to prevent street-dependent at-risk youth from becoming victims of bigger issues:
drugs, prostitution or acts of violence. Shelter and street outreach are the foundation of
Y.E.S. and the two programs that differentiate it from other organizations.
                                             Shelter
Y.E.S. opened its first shelter – four beds – in 1976. Today, there are two facilities, each
with a capacity to house 12 youth. Teens at the shelters are expected to act responsibly by
doing their own laundry, assisting in meal preparation, staying in school and contributing
to the social structure of their shelter family.
                                         Street Outreach
In 1999, Y.E.S. activated its street outreach program targeting homeless, street-dependent
teens. Y.E.S. outreach workers spend time “on the street” engaging with youth to assess
their needs. The workers distribute a variety of basic needs supplies, such as personal
hygiene products, drinks, snacks and clothing.

Communication Problem




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Past communication efforts have been sporadic and “homegrown,” and have not
successfully differentiated Y.E.S. from other teen-focused organizations. In addition,
people in Omaha do not believe that homelessness among youth is a relevant problem.
Lack of awareness about this issue has kept fundraising – a major source of support – at
low levels.

Target Market
The target is adults in the Omaha metropolitan area ages 35-64 with household incomes
of at least $100,000. They already give either time or money to other organizations,
because they may feel a sense of duty to give back to the community.

Communications Objective
After we carefully reviewed all past communications materials, and backgrounded
ourselves on Y.E.S., we determined that we had one primary goal: to raise awareness
about the homeless teen issue. That objective had to be achieved before anything else
could be accomplished (such as increasing donor contributions).

Strategy
We formulated a strategy that encompassed all media (traditional and non-traditional).
We agreed that the campaign had to include broad-based elements – such as outdoor –
coupled with highly targeted components – such as direct mail. We also were in
consensus that the campaign had to drive people to the Web site. Everyone was also in
agreement that a new logo should be part of the campaign launch.

Once the strategy was determined, the creative team began its work. Knowing that
Y.E.S.’s primary goal is to prevent at-risk youth from becoming victims of street life, we
developed the theme and tag line:
                      Help Take Homeless Kids Off the Streets
                      Before Something Else Does

The line includes an implied call-to-action, as well as encapsulates Y.E.S’s mission: to
provide support for at-risk homeless teens. This line appears on all campaign materials.

Creative Execution
We wanted to accomplish two simple goals with our creative approach.
        1. Invoke an emotional reaction by using real-life teens – not models – in a
            lonely, vulnerable situation.
        2. Use a provocative visual to symbolize the dangers faced by homeless teens.
Central to each ad, outdoor board and TV spot is a homeless teen leaning against a wall.
The wall is covered with graffiti – drawings of grotesque forms actually reach out to try
to capture the teen. The graffiti is symbolic of the threats faced by homeless youth. By
opting to use non-model teens as subjects, we were able to project a level of vulnerability
that wouldn’t have been possible with seasoned professionals.




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The line, Help Take Homeless Kids Off the Streets Before Something Else Does, is
positioned dominantly in each piece to dramatically convey the message and the need for
intervention. The Web site address is included as a call-to-action.

We used dark colors to heighten the sense of isolation. In contrast, the new logo appears
as a bright spot -- an affirmation of hope.

Campaign Elements/Execution
Logo
The old logo was difficult to “read” and didn’t convey any particular image about Y.E.S.
The new logo immediately conveys the idea of “emergency” through the use of color,
while the “talk bubble” suggests communication and reaching out. (Exhibit B)
                               Stationery and Business Cards
We redesigned Y.E.S.’s stationery, envelopes and business cards to include the new logo.
(Exhibit C)
Outdoor Boards
Twenty-three posters and junior posters were placed in key traffic areas all over Omaha
May through October. Production and space were donated. (Exhibit D)

Campaign Brochure
Sized to fit in a #10 envelope, the campaign brochure explains in detail organization’s
mission, as well as the need to Help Take Homeless Kids Off the Streets Before
Something Else Does. Production was donated. (Exhibit E)

Oversized Handout 
This two-sided piece provides a snapshot of the issue and how Y.E.S. – and you – can
help. Production was donated. (Exhibit F)

30-Second TV Spot
We produced one 30-second television spot. The star of the spot is one of the teens who
appears in the print materials. Moody original music, gritty downtown alley settings and
tight shots contribute to the same isolated feel as the print material. Six stations agreed to
run the spot. Production and time were donated. (Exhibit G)
10-, 15- and 30-Second Radio Spots
We produced a variety of spots to increase the chance of having them air as PSAs. The
Journal Broadcasting Group agreed to run 10 spots per week per station. NRG, Clear
Channel and Salem stations committed to running them as part of their PSA rotator.
Approximately 3,500 spots ran. Production and time were donated. (Exhibit H)
Small Space Black and White Print Ads
Small space ads appeared in local special interest magazines: Omaha Magazine, Her
Magazine, Encounter Magazine, B2B Quarterly, Holland Performing Arts Program, The
Reader and City Weekly. Production and space were donated. (Exhibit I)
Non-Traditional Media – Mall Posters
Village Pointe Mall – We placed posters in high traffic areas in upper-end malls – places
frequented by prospective donors. Vertical and horizontal formats were available.
Production and space were donated. (Exhibit J)


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Public Relations Program
The public service campaign was launched at a media event on May 16 at the Y.E.S.
drop-in center. Hand-in-hand with the event was an invitation to the press to ride along
with street outreach staff. A media alert was sent to all local TV stations inviting them to
attend the press conference and ride-along. (Exhibit K)
                                          Results
The campaign launch at the press conference enjoyed exceptional coverage by all major
broadcast media. The issue of at-risk teen homelessness garnered news reports and live
interviews with OFA public service committee members and Y.E.S. staff immediately
following the press conference. (Exhibit L)

Web Site
The Web site was updated to include the new logo, as well as reflect the campaign look
and feel. Consistency across all media – including the Web site – would help us raise
awareness about teen homelessness. (Exhibit M)
                              Results
Web traffic increased substantially after the campaign began running. In fact, according
to Robert Storey, executive director, donations were actually made via the Web site,
something that had never happened before.

Golf Fundraiser
Every year, Y.E.S. conducts a golf tournament in the spring as a fundraiser. Our media
buyers/planners were able to procure broad pre-tournament media coverage. In addition,
we filled the registration tent with campaign posters and handout materials. KGOR radio
interviewed Y.E.S. Executive Director Robert Storey and the tournament chairmen in
advance of the event to raise interest.

                              Results
Fifty-thousand dollars were raised -- $10,000 more than the previous year.

Media Schedule
We were able to obtain commitments from all major media to donate time or space to
disseminate the word about Y.E.S. and the issue of at-risk homeless youth. (Exhibit N)

Estimated Value of Campaign
The 2007 campaign is the largest – in terms of donated time, services and materials –
ever planned and executed by the OFA public service committee. More agencies and
vendors were involved than any time in the past. Considering hours, donated services and
media time, the campaign value is estimated at over $1 million dollars. (Exhibit O)




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246
       Public Service
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     1 Place – Division 3

Austin Advertising Federation

Contact:       Heather Ladage
               Austin Business Journal
               111 Congress Avenue, Suite 750
               Austin, TX 75701
               (512) 494-2544
               hladage@bizjournals.com




             247
Club Achievement – Public Service 2007-2008
Austin Advertising Federation
Ted Burton, VP Public Service

Letting Go, Moving Forward
Parents understand the emotional angst involved in raising and nurturing a child, then
saying goodbye when their child is ready to leave the nest. With similar mixed emotions,
the Austin Advertising Federation in 2007-08 decided next year would be the time to say
goodbye to two of its longtime public service clients — the Hill Country Ride for AIDS
and Art From the Streets.
After leading their pro-bono marketing efforts for several years, the Austin Ad Fed made
the painful but necessary decision that it’s time to let them go and look for new public
service projects to support in the future. While it’s hard to say goodbye, letting go has
also created a new and exciting opportunity for the Austin Ad Fed, which you’ll read
about later.

2007-08 Public Service Objectives
   1. Increase participation in three annual projects (Hill Country Ride for AIDS, Art
      From the Streets, Other)
   2. Increase income by10 percent for Hill Country Ride for AIDS
   3. Increase income total by three percent for Art From the Streets


Project: Hill Country Ride for AIDS
Records tumble. Riders don’t. In 2006, the Hill Country Ride for AIDS once again
exceeded fundraising and participation goals, and organizers asked themselves, “How can
we possibly top that next year?” The Austin Ad Fed quickly put to rest any fears of
failure and transformed concerns into celebrations: In 2007, the Ride easily topped its
goal of $550,000 by raising $573,000; a record-breaking 400+ riders participated in the
event; and media exposure and public awareness were at an all-time high.

Background
When the Austin Advertising Federation adopted the Hill Country Ride for AIDS as its
premiere public service client in 2003, few expected it to be a long-term relationship. The
goal was to help the Ride for one year and move on. Thankfully for both parties, nothing
worked out as planned, and the love affair between the two organizations has been long
and intense.
The cycling event raises money for ten Central Texas nonprofit agencies that provide
basic services — from food and housing to clothing and prescriptions — to thousands of
people living with HIV/AIDS. After the first year, no one involved in this life-changing
event could imagine walking — or riding — away. So the Austin Ad Fed stayed, and
what a ride it has been.
In 2006, we helped the Hill Country Ride for AIDS top the $2 million mark for total
funds raised since the event’s 1999 inception. Then, in 2007, we out-did ourselves,
raising $573,000 to reach the $2.5 million fundraising milestone. Just how successful has




                                           248
this relationship been? Since the Austin Ad Fed and the Hill Country Ride for AIDS
hooked up in 2003, fundraising and participation have more than doubled.

Strategies and Tactics
When the Austin Ad Fed and the Ride first joined forces in 2003, the event was at a
crossroads. It was considering dropping “AIDS” from its name and calling itself “Hill
Country Ride.” Just as we would for paying clients, the Austin Ad Fed turned to
qualitative research for answers, which showed most people supported the Ride because
of its mission — helping people living with HIV/AIDS. So the Austin Ad Fed
recommended keeping the name, creating a new brand package, and regularly featuring
real people and their personal stories in our marketing materials.
This tried-and-true strategy continued through 2007. Marketing and media relations’
efforts for the 2007 Ride focused on a simple, motivating question: “What moves you?”
It was also the second year the Ride was only one day — scaled back from a two-day
event with overnight camping — to make it simpler, shorter and hopefully, more
attractive to less-seasoned cyclists. Last year proved to event organizers their somewhat
risky decision to dramatically change a well-established Ride format was the right choice,
as ridership and fundraising skyrocketed.

Media Relations
Every annual nonprofit event faces the challenge of coming up with fresh story angles
each year that will interest reporters and generate meaningful coverage. The Hill Country
Ride for AIDS is no different. In 2006, the Austin Ad Fed secured a front-page feature
story in Central Texas’ major daily newspaper, the Austin American-Statesman, written
by fitness columnist Pamela LeBlanc. In 2007, not wanting to “go to the well” too often,
we focused most heavily on broadcast coverage to raise awareness about the event.
Through strategic morning-show interviews, we allowed riders to tell the public “what
moves them” and explain why they ride.
We featured well-known Austin musician Sara Hickman, who was training and riding in
memory of a dear friend lost to AIDS, in media materials. Media relations tactics
included a media alert to publicize the annual kickoff party at La Zona Rosa, pre- and
post-event news releases and alerts, and placement of interviews on local morning TV
shows to generate awareness and excitement leading up to the Ride.
[Exhibit: Press releases and media alerts]
EnviroMedia Social Marketing continued to provide pro-bono media relations and PR
help. The 2007 total media relations value from broadcast exposures passed 2006 totals,
with $33,090 and almost 400,000 impressions.
[Exhibit: Media relations coverage report and transcripts, DVD of coverage]

Advertising
The “What Moves You?” theme was refreshed and re-energized in 2007. With direction
from the Austin Ad Fed’s Public Service Committee, local interactive agency nFusion
again produced the creative at no cost, using photography by former Austin Ad Fed
President Scott Van Osdol. Clampitt Paper and Whitley Printing donated their products
and services, saving the Ride thousands of dollars in printing and paper costs.
[Exhibit: Campaign collateral]



                                           249
Additionally, Carly Gloge with Maverick Graphics donated Web master services for free
for the Ride’s Web site — developed by Convio, and popular with riders, volunteers and
staff because of its easy navigation and functionality.

Results
Results for the 2007 Ride exceeded everyone’s expectations. With sustained, savvy and
passionate support from the Austin Ad Fed, the Hill Country Ride for AIDS solidified its
position as one of the most successful, well-recognized and popular fundraising events in
Central Texas, as well as the premiere event supporting HIV/AIDS efforts.
In our first year, fundraising spiked 42 percent, rising from $290,000 in 2003 to $412,000
in 2004. From 2004 to 2005, fundraising increased another $40,000 to $452,000, and in
2006, the Ride raised $493,000. Last year was one of the event’s biggest fundraising
years, with contributions increasing almost $100,000 in one year, for a total of $573,000.
But as anyone who has completed the Ride will tell you, it’s not just about money. It’s
about building community, creating friendships and changing lives. Every year, the Ride
touches more and more people. In 2003, 175 riders completed the two-day event,
supported by dozens of roadside and pit-stop volunteers; by 2007, 401 cyclists and more
than 150 volunteers participated in the Ride.
As a bonus, the Austin Ad Fed’s work for the Ride has been honored with ADDYs every
year; last year, the Hill Country Ride for AIDS won an special ADDY called "The Rode
Hard and Put Up Wet Award for Public Service.”



2008 Campaign
As the Austin Ad Fed began preparing for 2008, we once again turned to nFusion for
support. Every year, we wonder how we can top last year’s advertising and media
relations campaigns — yet every year, we manage to do just that.
For 2008, the Ride’s ninth year, the goals remain relatively the same — creating a
compelling, newsworthy, nontraditional campaign that drives registration, and raises
awareness and funding.
NFusion’s 2008 look and feel for marketing materials channels the familiar WPA project
posters from the 1930s and ‘40s, featuring colorful illustrations and catchy headlines like:
“Easy on the eyes, hell on the thighs,” or “If the scenery doesn’t take your breath away,
the ride will,” or “Enjoy the Hill Country Ride for AIDS, especially the downhill parts.”
[Exhibit: Postcards]
New in 2008 is a buzz-worthy guerilla marketing campaign that placed red bikes
throughout Austin. Each bike is affixed with memorable signage serving up headlines
like, “This bike equals five months of life-saving medication for person with HIV/AIDS,”
or “This bikes equals one-month’s rent for a person living with HIV/AIDS.”
Fourteen red bikes have been stationed strategically around town at coffee shops, grocery
stores and other businesses, creating compelling visual metaphors to raise awareness
about HIV/AIDS and the upcoming Ride.
[Exhibit: Guerilla campaign pictures]




                                            250
They are symbolic, with each bike representing 500 people infected with HIV each day.
This powerful message has already grabbed media and public attention.
Coverage for the launch of the Red Bike Project alone resulted in $18,810 of media
relations added value and 183,989 audience impressions.
[Exhibit: Press release and media-relations coverage spreadsheet and transcripts]

Project: Art From the Streets
Established in 1991, Art From the Streets (AFTS) is a volunteer-driven program that
provides a safe and encouraging environment where the positive spirit and creativity of
homeless people is nurtured through artistic expression. The effort culminates every
November with a two-day show and sale featuring the work of over 100 homeless and
formerly homeless artists. Proceeds help the artists with food, medical care, clothing and
housing. Last year, Austin Ad Fed volunteers exceeded expectations, and surpassed all
prior years’ events.

Strategies and Tactics
The vision for the 2007 event was to raise awareness among existing supporters and new
audiences alike. The Austin Ad Fed’s AFTS volunteers met weekly basis and divided
into four committees: creative and design; guerilla marketing; public relations; and
sponsorships. These groups provided services deliverables including direct mail, print ads
and calendars; new in 2008 was a television public service announcements.
[Exhibit: Campaign collateral]

Media Relations
We launched an aggressive, targeted, three-month public relations campaign — via local
broadcast, print and radio media — leading up to the show and sale. Targeted media
relations materials featured artists and their stories — who better to promote the event
than the artists who benefit from it?
[Exhibit: Press release]

Coverage was featured on five local television stations, toptier radio stations (KGSR-FM,
KLBJ-FM, KUT-FM), and a variety of local publications such as the Austin American-
Statesman, Austin Business Journal, Austin Chronicle and Austin Fit.
[Exhibit: Clippings, media coverage report and transcripts]

Advertising and Marketing
Direct-mail pieces were sent to Austin-area art lovers via mailing lists obtained from
Austin's most popular art museums. Wide-ranging support came from volunteers and
donated services from the Austin-American Statesman, Scott Van Osdol Photography,
Rebecca Davis Photography and OK Paper.

Results
The November 3-4 show and sale raised more than $70,000 through admission donations
and art/calendar sales. Sales were down slightly from projections, partly because the
event was held the same weekend as other popular Austin-area events, including Fun Fun
Fun Fest, the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure and the Texas Book Festival. This point



                                           251
was brought to the attention of AFTS organizers, but they felt it was best to move
forward with the event since the date had already been printed on the 2007 AFTS
calendars. Though the Austin Ad Fed’s volunteer team did not meet its attendance and
revenue objectives, we were successful in increasing awareness of the show via the
direct-mail campaign. Additionally, the show experienced an increase in the average sale
of artwork per purchaser.
           “This year’s show was a bit of a learning experience for us. With all of
           the other events going on in town that weekend, I was happy to see
           that we had the sales we did. Next year, we’ll be able to repurpose our
           new TV spot and be ahead of where we have been in the past.”
                                   Bill Jeffers, volunteer co-director, Art From the Streets

Overview
To date, more than 500 homeless artists have taken part in the annual shows, earning
more than $475,000 through sales of their art to more than 27,000 attendees. Since its
inception in 1991, AFTS has become an Austin tradition, attracting a loyal audience of
art lovers, collectors and people of social conscience. By increasing momentum each
year, thinking creatively about how to raise awareness, and relating to our audience by
promoting community betterment, we have continued to raise our goals and expectations.



Project: AustinProBono.org

In 2007-08, the Austin Advertising Federation decided it was time to find new pro-bono
clients, which launched a discussion about how we could create a sustainable Request for
Proposal (RFP) program that would allow organizations to apply for our services in the
future.

The answer: AustinProBono.org.

The brainchild of Paul Janowitz, CEO and Founder of Sentient Services, LP,
AustinProBono.org is a Web community that connects advertising and marketing
professionals who offer pro-bono services with nonprofits that need them.

The Web site is designed to be a low-maintenance clearinghouse, allowing nonprofits to
solicit services directly from pro-bono donors. Donors indicate their willingness to take
on new clients by simply turning on the “green light” next to their name on the Web site
(a red light indicates they are not currently taking on new clients). AustinProBono.org
has no role in brokering relationships — it simply helps make those relationships
possible.

[Exhibit: Screen-grab of Web site, e-invitation, Greenlights newsletter]




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As an inaugural sponsor, Austin Ad Fed will not only support and manage
AustinProBono.org, but also plan to use the matchmaking tool to find our next pro-bono
clients.

A launch party is planned for March 6the to introduce AustinProBono.org to the waiting
world.
In addition to Austin Ad Fed, inaugural sponsors include EnviroMedia Social Marketing,
GamePlan Marketing & Events, Greenlights for Nonprofit Success, GSD&M Idea City,
Master Web Design, Sentient Services, Terminal B and Watershed 5 Studios.




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254
        Public Service
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      1 Place – Division 4

     AAF – The Midlands

Contact:        Abey Coker
                The Colonial Center
                801 Lincoln Street
                Columbia, SC 29208
                (803) 576-9072
                abeycoker@sc.edu




              255
            AAF DISTRICT 3 Club Achievement Awards
    American Advertising Federation of the Midlands - Public Service
The American Advertising Federation of the Midlands selected Sistercare, a nonprofit
whose mission is to provide services for battered women and their children residing in
Fairfield, Kershaw, Lexington, Newberry, and Richland counties in South Carolina. Sistercare
serves more than 5,000 domestic-violence victims yearly.

Goals for project

After several meetings by the community service committee we summed up that Sistercare is
challenged by small staffs and no marketing budget. They are limited in what they can do because
their services protect and hide the women that they currently help who are in abusive
relationships.

Therefore the primary goal was to provide general awareness for Sistercare’s mission by
creating broadcast, radio and print collateral using the key messages below that would
push the website we would create, helpushelpher.org for public awareness and
fundraising purposes.

Key Messages for collateral:
   • 687 women died from domestic abuse in SC last year
   • Twenty-five percent of women who are beaten are pregnant
   • One in three women in South Carolina is beaten, raped, or abused by her partner
   • Women of all socioeconomic classes, races, religions and educational
     levels are vulnerable to violence by an intimate partner

Target Audience

The prime target audience for the Sistercare campaign was aimed across all
demographics on awareness of domestic abuse and promoting money raising
opportunities. Secondary audience would be women of all ages for awareness of abuse
and how to receive help for themselves or friends.

Strategy/Execution

A committee was formed to come up with a logistics game plan on how to execute the
creative campaign and to organize Ad Club members to help in the fundraising by
utilizing their own particular resources as well as donating their time to the effort.

Once the committee was formed, a meeting was set up with Nancy Barton, Executive
Director for Sistercare to go over the plan and to implement the elements with her
participation, guidance and input.

After several meetings among Sistercare, the community service committee and two local
agencies in town, the www.helpushelpher.org creative campaign was formed. Riggs



                                              256
Advertising Agency and Mad Monkey Inc. helped produced the television spots and print
ads.

We utilized students from the University of South Carolina’s Mass Communication and
Information Studies program to write, create and record the radio spots that were later
aired on partnering radio stations. Students used ad club members and community
celebrities for voiceovers and Clear Channel Radio donated the studio time for the
recording and helped with finalizing the spots.

Solicitation letters were sent to broadcast, radio and print partners in the Midlands area to
aquire written pledges for media donations to run collateral created. We asked for
monthly spot checks from media partners to make sure everything was up and running
and reported back to Sistercare monthly on campaign progress.

The overall effort of the campaign included 20 AAF of the Midlands members and
represented hundreds of billable hours and more in dollars of professional services.

Media/material used

Enclosed in this entry notebook are many samples of design, production and publicity
efforts, including television spots, radio spots, print ads, website creation and Christmas
card collateral distributed at our club’s annual Oyster Roast.


Results attained may include club publicity

Print had over $3,000 donated in media support by two individual publications: The State
Paper Newspaper and The Free Times Newspaper. Broadcast donated over $53,480
worth of media towards the campaign across ABC, CW, My 63 and Time Warner Cable.
Over 12 stations across three radio partners with Clear Channel Radio, Innercity
Broadcasting and Columbia radio group donated over $56,000 dollars in media time. The
total media donated across print, broadcast and radio was over $112,480 dollars.

In addition to media support Sistercare expressed a need for PR for an annual event they
hold called the SongBird Café, an annual music fundraiser hosted by Darius Rucker,
Patrick Davis and Brian Leighton from nationally known Hootie and the Blowfish. We
were able to pitch an interview and color, full page article in the daily newspaper in
Columbia, The State Newspaper. We also secured preview interviews with local tv on
NBC, CBS and FOX promoting the event.

Overall more than $40,000 dollars worth of funding was raised as a result of the media
and pr campaign for Sistercare. Nancy Barton, Executive Director for Sistercare was
thrilled with the success of the overall awareness campaign and monies raised.




                                            257
258
     Public Service
     st
   1 Place – Division 5

           Ad 2 Reno

Contact:     Melissa J. Molyneaux
             Colliers International
             10765 Double R Boulevard, Suite 100
             Reno, NV 89521
             (775) 762-7990
             mmolyneaux@colliersreno.com




              259
                  is comprised of forward-thinking individuals who are passionate about
making a difference in Northern Nevada. The sought after public service campaign
allows members to gain valuable experience and create lasting personal and professional
relationships. Ad2 Reno is one of the smallest Ad2 clubs in the nation and 100% of our
members participate in the public service campaign. Public Service Committee (PSC)
members assist the chairperson with the following elements: research, social/media,
creative, public relations, sponsorships, promotions, events and client communication.
        The selection process was promptly initiated 06.01.07 by submitting press
releases (1.1) to media outlets, gaining statewide attention and sending e-blasts to non-
profit email lists. The strong coverage regarding the public service campaign RFP (1.2)
led to a tremendous response rate that exceeded last year’s application responses by 40%.
        The PSC reviewed each application in great length, looking for true insight to the
organization’s specific needs and current integrated marketing communication efforts.
We narrowed our candidates to five finalists and conducted interviews with the Executive
Directors to get an even deeper understanding of their current situation and future goals.
There was only one organization that unequivocally believed in their product; their
passion and desire to help the community particularly touched our hearts. This
organization was the Reno Sparks Gospel Mission (RSGM). (1.3)
        Nevada produces exciting nightlife and 24-hour entertainment, but when the
glamour fades and thousands of guests come and go, our community is left with a
transient population, who are able to live off the casino’s cheap food and weekly motel
rooms.
        In fact, Nevada is ranked 18th in the nation for having the highest percentage of
homeless population.(2.1) The 24-hour lifestyle gives them easy access to drugs, alcohol
and gambling; this addiction is the main culprit of our increasingly high homeless
population in northern Nevada. (2.2)
        The RSGM has made it their mission to end homelessness in our community and
provide a recovery program to cure the root of the problem: addiction. Ad2 has
witnessed the homeless population and its effects on the quality of life in our region. As
active residents we took special interest in improving the current homelessness condition.
Discovery
        RSGM research began immediately in order to complete a needs analysis based
on internal interviews and pre-campaign surveys through SurveyMonkey.com. (2.3)
Primary research consisted of gathering newspaper clippings, reading blogs and other
literature about the homeless and addicted in northern Nevada. We also looked at the
region from a historical perspective and learned that homelessness was steadily
increasing along with other negative impacts that addiction brings. (2.4)
        In our initial research we discovered that the general public knew of the RSGM
but were unaware of their most effect service, the Christian Addiction Recovery and
Education Program (C.A.R.E.). Only 17.5 % of those surveyed knew of C.A.R.E. even
though it is currently the most successful 12-step addiction recovery program in northern
Nevada. (2.5) C.A.R.E. has helped 50 to 70 percent of their graduates stay sober from
drug, alcohol and gambling addictions, as well as aiding those who suffer from suicidal
tendencies and abuse. (2.6)


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         The objective of this campaign was to re-introduce the RSGM to the public as a
multi-faceted non-profit that not only works with several community members to better
the quality of life in northern Nevada, but also changes the lives of individuals giving
them a second chance at life itself.
Goals
    • Re-brand the RSGM by re-designing all logo, website and collateral material to
         enhance their image and incorporate their C.A.R.E. program into the brand equity.
    • Establish an event that differentiates the RSGM from all the other charitable
         organizations in our community and act as a launching catalyst for the awareness
         campaign while correlating the new brand and educational efforts.
    • Educate the community through online communication, television, print, social
         media, special events and business partnerships about the recovery programs.
    • Provide sustainability through new funding sources and an integrated marketing
         communications campaign that provides longevity in content and design.
Target Segments
    The PSC entrenched themselves into the RSGM programs and events. We defined the
current donors and volunteers that had the ability to increase their donations and
volunteer participation. Primary research (3.1) unveiled potential audiences that could
lend themselves to the RSGM in a variety of ways.
•        Young Active: Men and Women ages 21-45 who have the disposable income,
    time and talent to benefit the RSGM through donations and volunteerism. These
    individuals, generation X and Y, are actively involved and donate more time to
    philanthropy than any other age group. (3.2)
•        Mature Contributors: Women ages 46 to 70 primarily baby boomers, not only
    have the income to make a difference, but also act as decision makers among their
    peers, friends and family for volunteer time and donations. (4.1)
    • Traditionalists: Men ages 50+ and conservative. Growing up in the Great
         Depression era, they believe homelessness is a problem of personal responsibility.
         They are influencers in the community by voicing their opinions in newspapers,
         blogs, political radio talk shows and city hall meetings. (4.2)
Research
         Primary and secondary research confirmed that northern Nevadans had a negative
image of the RSGM; it was often seen as a “soup kitchen” or “slop house” for the dirty
and addicted. Through our focus group we found that many felt hostile about the tax
dollar spending as northern Nevada budgets almost $15 million (4.3) on homelessness
each year. Many resented the services they receive and view homelessness as a self-
inflicted problem without a solution. In a pre-campaign survey, over 75% of respondents
in the target segments had never made charitable contributions to the RSGM. (4.4)
Creative
         Ad2 became a part of the RSGM family by experiencing everyday life at the
mission from feeding times to counseling and graduations. Breaking stereotypes, we
became extremely close to many of the students; applauding them as they recovered and
grieving for those who relapsed into their own deaths. We witnessed the darkest of times
and lowest of people transform into positive individuals.
         Every success story reinforced the idea that people are not defined by their
afflictions, but by their God-given name; their identity. This led us to our creative


                                           261
concept, “What’s in a Name?” Instead of being an “addict” or a “user” most graduates
became the people they were born to be; the RSGM in northern Nevada was
                                        Changing Lives
        The campaign became more than a public service, but a mission to help those who
want to change. The C.A.R.E. program became the vehicle for changing lives.
Implementation
        The C.A.R.E. students were given standard nametags to identify themselves. We
then asked each of them write their name and addiction beneath the “Hello my name is”.
A closer look reveals hope as the addiction has been crossed off; leaving just the name, a
new identity…a new life…a changed life. (5.1) Nametags were given at all events and
“Hello my name is” was used in all of the promotional materials helping us tell the story
of addiction to recovery. Actual C.A.R.E. graduates were used in all of our creative. (5.2)
The campaign began by aligning our goals, objective and creative strategy. The attached
media calendar shows the schedule time and release of all media throughout the
campaign. (5.3)
Branding
    Re-designing the logos into one consistent look allowed the RSGM to unify all of
their messaging and the addition of the tag line, “Changing Lives”, specifically
highlighted the C.A.R.E. program. (5.4) This new logo was updated on all collateral
materials and tangible assets. Their website underwent a complete re-design as their
website was difficult to navigate and lacked information on their programs. It was not
suitably designed to optimize their presence online. The existing site was not user-
friendly and made it difficult for the RSGM staff to make changes or additions, leaving
them with an out-dated site. (6.1) The new site incorporated search engine optimization,
education on all of their programs and more importantly, their success stories; so that
everyone that visited could discover how RSGM was changing lives. (6.2)
        The new RSGM website provides sustainability and functionality as it allows
RSGM to maintain and update the site while keeping the brand intact. The RSGM has the
ability to add/remove photos from the rotating header, add links, and upload monthly
newsletters.
Changing Lives Day
        Our second goal was achieved by creating a memorable event that educated the
public and increased awareness of the C.A.R.E. program. The event acted as a launching
pad for the campaign and embraced our main objective. (6.3) Changing Lives Day (CLD)
was a formally dedicated day through the City of Reno and was held on 12.12.07 at
12:00pm to symbolize the twelve steps of change in the C.A.R.E. program. (6.4)
        The inaugural event was held in downtown Reno within close proximity to
homeless refuges, retail establishments and restaurants. CLD allowed community
members to post messages, in the form of the “Hello my name is” nametag, exemplifying
the ways they have changed or have been changed in their lives. Messages were posted
on a physical Wall of Change exhibit from 12.12.07 to 01.11.08. (6.5)
        CLD was truly a community event as we partnered with the City of Reno, Parks
and Recreation Department and the Mayor’s office. Refreshments were provided by
Krispy Kreme, Fruitful Juice and Java Jungle Coffee. The event included inspirational
speeches and live entertainment. (6.6)



                                           262
        The following tactics were put into place to promote the event and create
momentum for the campaign:
• Guerilla/Social Marketing encouraged “Young Active” to download a printable name
        tag to bring to CLD and display on the Wall of Change.
• Direct Mail (7.1) Targeted “Mature Contributors” with a call to action
•       Print Advertising (7.2) Targeted “Traditionalists” with the Northern Nevada
        Business Weekly, the largest business publication in the region.
• Radio PSA’s: Live DJ announcements through six diverse radio stations.
• TV Commercial: Invited the public to CLD and highlighted the RSGM coat drive that
        was taking place in conjunction with CLD. (CD)
Education and Community Outreach
        Education of the RSGM and their recovery programs began with a robust media
schedule and community outreach, incorporating the “What’s in a name?” creative
concept throughout to remain consistent. Brief descriptions of our PR, media and
additional special events are below:
    • Public Relations consisted of news write-ups (7.3), networking events (7.4),
        placement on all community calendars and live on-air mentions about RSGM
        programs and events.
    • TV commercials relayed a heart-felt storyline that was spoken as pictures changed
        from each individual highlighting their prior addiction and how their lives
        changed. (CD) We created a 10 minute educational video about the RSGM that
        was played through Charter On Demand. (CD)
    • Print advertising ran in several publications. (7.5)
    • Events held included the Bordertown Coat Drive, Make a Difference Day and
        Mingle Bells. (8.1)
    • Social Media included a customized RSGM Myspace, circulated YouTube video
        and placement on www.godtube.com. (8.2)
Outcome
        This comprehensive campaign was achieved through specific goals that led to the
accomplishment of our main objective. Ad2 re-introduced the RSGM to the public
through extensive re-branding, increasing the awareness by 20%. The Changing Lives
tagline and strategy increased the C.A.R.E. program awareness from 17% to 45%. The
focus group indicated that the majority of people identified with the recoveries in a
positive light and were more willing to help after seeing the creative. There was a 22%
increase in those who donated to the RSGM within a six month period. (8.3) Of the
25,000 nametags distributed through direct mail, websites and events; 20% were used for
the Wall of Change alone. Social media educated the public by driving more than 8,000
people to the RSGM website, providing all information and resources they have to offer.
A 10 minute educational video aired through Charter On Demand leading to over 4,000
hits per month (CD).
        As the campaign comes to a close Ad2 has helped the RSGM receive $58,848 in
in-kind donations and $3,525 in direct cash donations. (8.4) The campaign has allowed
the RSGM to secure professional partnerships that will prove monetarily helpful in the
future, it demonstrates the depth of the RSGM and most importantly it exudes a powerful
message about Changing Lives…



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"We are absolutely blown away with Ad2Reno. In just a few short months they re-branded our
     image and reached thousands of people with our message...”~ Rick Redding (8.5)




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