Curriculum

Document Sample
Curriculum Powered By Docstoc
					                                                         2011-2012




CURRICULUM
    AND
 EDUCATION




                                Curriculum & Education – Part A
Head Start/Developmental Disabilities/Discovery Preschool –Part B
                    New Teacher/Paraeducator Training – Part C
                         2011-2012




       Part A
Curriculum & Education

      Preschool
                                                                                        2011-2012


                              DEFINITION OF CURRICULUM

Curriculum as defined in the Head Start Performance Standard 45 CFR 1304.3(a)(5) is illustrated
below:

                  DEFINITION OF CURRICULUM 45 CFR 1304.3(a)(5)

    The curriculum is consistent with the Head Start Program Performance Standards and is
    based on sound child development principles about how children grow and learn.

    Curriculum means a written plan that includes:

    I. The goals for children’s development and learning;
    II. The experiences through which they will achieve these goals;
    III. What staff and parents do to help children achieve these goals; and
    IV. The materials needed to support the implementation of the curriculum

                                                             Facilities, Materials and Equipment

                                                                     Parents as Partners

                                                                          Nutrition

                                                                     Disabilities Services

                                                                      Health and Safety

                                                                        Mental Health

                                                                     Family Partnerships

                                                                  Community Partnerships

                                                                            …Etc.




                                                                               Curriculum – Part A
                                                                                           Page 1
                                                                                         2011-2012


                 WYOMING CHILD AND FAMILY CURRICULUM:
Wyoming Child and Family Development (WCFD) provides a developmentally appropriate,
comprehensive, individualized, and inclusive curriculum that incorporates an organized series of
experiences for children from birth to age five. WCFD’s curriculum development is a
cooperative effort of parents and WCFD staff. The curriculum is designed to support child
development and education for preschoolers, including those with disabilities, and Dual
Language Learners. The curriculum addresses the goals for children’s development and
learning, experiences to meet these learning objectives, the roles of staff members and parents,
and identifying appropriate materials and equipment. WCFD curriculum utilizes an ongoing
assessment process that includes observations, work sampling, checklists, screenings and a
procedure for referral for further evaluations to address developmental concerns. All
curriculums are evaluated to have appropriate reliability, validity and standardization procedures.
It is research-based and consistent with Head Start Performance Standards, National Association
for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), Head Start Child Outcomes, and the Wyoming
Early Childhood Standards.

MULTICULTURAL/ANTI-BIAS RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ALL CLASSROOMS
The toys, materials, and equipment you put out for children; the posters, pictures, and art
objects you hang on the wall; and the types of furniture and how you arrange them all
influence what children learn. What children do not see in the classroom teaches children
as much as what they do see. Each area should reflect items that are non-biased and are
multicultural. The following are EXAMPLES…use your imagination.
    1. Preschool environments are required to meet the non-bias and multicultural standards.
    2. Use pictures of your children and their families versus prepared posters.
    3. Look at your environment/activities/materials:
            How are you welcoming males and representing males in your center?
               Classrooms?
            How are you representing/welcoming families of all ages and beliefs?
            How are you representing/welcoming families from different cultures in your
               centers? Classrooms?
            How are you including/welcoming children/adults with varying abilities?
    4. In activities such as literacy, music, math, and science, bring the vocabulary from
       cultures and abilities represented in your classroom/community.

             Anti-Bias                                Multicultural (World/Community)
Blocks        People of both genders                  Farm/Ranch Items
              Variety of ages, abilities              Oil/Mining Items
                                                       Blocks of different sizes and
                                                        textures
Books*           Reflecting different                 About various cultures and
                  occupations, roles, and abilities     traditions
                 Reflecting different kinds of        About different houses and
                  families                              neighborhoods
                 Books that challenge unfairness
                  and prejudice
                                                                                 Curriculum – Part A
                                                                                             Page 2
                                                                                       2011-2012


            Anti-Bias                               Multicultural (World/Community)
Art          Non-gender specific art                People paints/crayons (skin tones)
               materials                             Mirrors for children to reflect on
                                                      their own physical features
                                                     Art materials and techniques from
                                                      other countries
Pictures/      Pictures of jobs that parents in     Pictures of the children’s local
Photos          the classroom do                      environment and landmarks
               Pictures of non-traditional roles    Pictures of children from other
                                                      countries
                                                     Pictures of the child and their
                                                      family
House-         Clothing available to all            Ethnic diversity of dolls
keeping         children                             Equipment/utensils from different
               Variety of occupations                cultures
               Dolls of both genders and            Cookbooks, foods from their
                different abilities                   town, Wyoming, and other
                                                      countries
Dramatic       Non-traditional roles                Centers representing their
Play                                                  environment- grocery, vet, fast
                                                      food, mining, farming, etc.
Music &        Dancing exploration with all         Musical instruments from all
Movement        children                              cultures and time periods
               Non-gender/role specific (i.e.       Games from different cultures
                hula or Native American              Music and dance from other
                dancing)                              cultures
Language       Ongoing development of               Regular opportunities to engage
                children’s home languages, and        with American Sign Language
                the development of English            and Braille
                Language skills
               The languages that children,
                families, and staff speak
                through songs, labels, signs,
                stories, and interactions among
                children with adults

*Refer to the Creative Curriculum Implementation Checklist, Literacy Implementation
Checklist, and Anti-Bias Education for Young Children and Ourselves book for additional
clarification.




                                                                               Curriculum – Part A
                                                                                           Page 3
                         2011-2012




         Part B

       Head Start
Developmental Disabilities
  Discovery Preschool
                                                                                                   2011-2012
WCFD CURRICULUM GOALS FOR CHILDREN’S DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING:
  1. Children will gain social competence skills and self-confidence necessary to be prepared to
     succeed in their present home and school environments.
   2. Children will develop cognitive skills through opportunities to organize their experiences,
      understand concepts, and develop age appropriate literacy, numeric, reasoning, problem
      solving, and decision making skills, forming a foundation for school readiness and later school
      success.
   3. Children’s gross and fine motor skills will be enhanced through experiences for play and
      movement, both indoors and outdoors.
   4. Children will incorporate Health and Safety practices into their daily routines.
Head Start Child Development Early Learning Framework
The Framework outlines the essential areas of development and learning that are to be used by Head
Start programs to establish school readiness goals for their children, monitor children’s progress, align
curricula, and conduct program planning. The Framework reflects the legislative mandates of the
Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 and current research in child development and
learning. The Framework also reflects Head Start’s core value to promote all aspects of child
development and learning in early childhood programs.
The Framework is organized into 11 Domains, 37 Domain Elements, and over 100 examples.
Programs are to address the domains in an integrated way, using intentional instruction and scaffolded
learning throughout the day. The 11 Domains represent the overarching areas of child development
and early learning essential for school and long-term success. The Domains include:
      Physical Development & Health
      Social & Emotional Development
      Approaches to Learning
      Language Development
      Literacy Knowledge & Skills
      Mathematics Knowledge & Skills
      Science Knowledge & Skills
      Creative Arts Expression
      Logic & Reasoning
      Social Studies Knowledge & Skills
English Language Development: The domains that are in bold print are domains added during the
most recent revision. Ten of the eleven domains apply to all children. The English Language
Development applies only to children who speak a language other than English at home.
Each site has copies of the Head Start Child Development Early Learning Framework. The document
is available in both English and Spanish through the Office of Head Start Early Childhood Learning
and Knowledge Center http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-
system/teaching/eecd/Assessment/Child%20Outcomes/HS_Revised_Child_Outcomes_Framework.pdf

WYOMING EARLY CHILDHOOD READINESS STANDARDS:
The Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards were created for use as a guide for planning 3 to
5 year old preschool curriculum to promote learning. WCFD teachers will use the standards in

                                                                                         Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                         Page2
                                                                                                 2011-2012
collaboration with Head Start Framework, and Creative Curriculum Outcome data to guide the
curriculum and approaches to individualized learning.
CURRICULUM:
CREATIVE CURRICULUM is the lead curriculum used by WCFD. The curriculum provides young
children with meaningful and long-lasting learning experiences that require active thinking and
experimenting to find out how things work. This is accomplished through purposeful play facilitated
by highly intentional teaching practices and the environment created for learning. Creative
Curriculum’s comprehensive approach to curriculum is based on an understanding of the complex
social/emotional, physical, language and cognitive development of young children and the learning
styles of children. Creative Curriculum’s underlying philosophy incorporates Piaget, Maslow, Erikson,
Smilansky, Vygotsky and Gardner. The Creative Curriculum meets all the requirements of Head Start,
the Wyoming Early Childhood Standards, and NAEYC Standards.
ADDITIONAL CURRICULUM RESOURCES:
Several resources may be used to support learning. Curriculum resources can be found in the center
resource libraries. Some resources are listed below:
     WE CAN provides teachers with learning experiences in language and literacy, math, science,
       and social studies. The program is aligned to Head Start standards. It provides a system of
       classroom management.
     BRIGHT SMILES, BRIGHT FUTURES is a tooth-brushing curriculum designed to encourage
       children to care for their teeth by helping them establish a daily routine of good oral health that
       can last a lifetime. Such a routine fosters positive self-esteem. Bright Smiles, Bright Futures
       has a partnership with the parents to promote health and oral care at home with their child.
       Teachers may go to the following site and find activities for PreK Head Start teachers.
       www.colgate.com/app/BrightSmiles/BrightFutures/US/EN/Homepage.cvsp
     HEAD START DENTAL HEALTH CURRICULUM was developed by Head Start to
       encourage awareness and activities for healthy oral hygiene.
     TEETH ON THE GO provided by Delta Dental, assists teachers with hands-on activities to
       promote healthy dental hygiene.
     ANTI-BIAS EDUCATION includes strategies to strengthen teachers’ ability to work
       effectively with children and families from all backgrounds. It is value based: differences are
       good; oppressive ideas and behaviors are not.
     AL’S PALS: KIDS MAKING HEALTHY CHIOICES –is an early intervention program which
       aims to enhance the resiliency of impoverished or at-risk children 3-8 by reducing risk factors
       and increasing protective factors. The curriculum includes a companion parent education
       material component. The program’s two main goals are to develop the child’s social-emotional
       competence and decrease the risk factor of early aggressive behavior. The Al’s Pals curriculum
       is used by both Natrona County Head Start and the Natrona County School District.
     PROMOTING ALTERNATIVE THINKING STRATEGIES (PATHS) is a research-based
       preschool program that provides tools to help make the classroom a healthy, positive learning
       environment by creating a climate that: supports social and emotional development, fosters pre-
       K literacy, encourages character education that builds the problem-solving abilities and other
       life skills required for positive relationships.
     BEYOND BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT is a proactive approach to managing young
       children’s behavior by helping them build and use essential life skills rather than focusing on
       “problem” behaviors.
     HAND IN HAND is a video/training series that assists teaching staff with children that have
       difficulty interacting with other children and who do not have appropriate playing skills. It
                                                                                       Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                       Page3
                                                                                             2011-2012
    shows teachers how to develop intervention strategies and techniques that will support the
    children through their play opportunities.
   NATIONAL HEAD START S.T.E.P. (STRATEGIC TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM)
    is literacy activity information and ideas for teachers to engage in strategies to support early
    literacy, and social and emotional development, which leads to positive outcomes and school
    readiness.
   BUILDING EARLY LITERACY AND LANGUAGE SKILLS (BELLS) is a resource and
    activity guide for early childhood educators that helps to enhance the development of early and
    emerging literacy skills in young children.
   LITERACY: THE CREATIVE CURRICULUM APPROACH is a resource that provides
    literacy experiences that are intentionally built into the entire daily schedule and all interest
    areas in the classroom. It shows teachers how to create literacy learning opportunities within
    the structure of a comprehensive, integrated curriculum. The Literacy Implementation
    Checklist available in the appendix of this book helps teachers assess how they are doing in
    five areas: literacy in the overall environment, use of books, writing materials and
    opportunities, a library area, and instructional strategies.
   MATHEMATICS: THE CREATIVE CURRICULUM APPROACH provides math
    experiences that are intentionally built into the entire daily schedule and all areas of the
    classroom. It shows teachers how to create math activities as part of a comprehensive,
    integrated curriculum. Mathematics implementation checklists are available in the appendix of
    the book to help classroom staff assess both mathematics in the environment and how they
    guide children’s mathematics learning.
   CREATIVE CURRICULUM STUDY STARTERS: Studies are one of the most effective ways
    for children to learn. These guides help classroom staff identify children’s questions, organize
    and plan the events, facilitate investigations, and involve families. Studies are meaningful to
    children because they provide opportunities to gain information through direct observation and
    experimentation and then to link new ideas to what they already know.
   FOOD, FITNESS AND FUN! is a resource with activities to help children learn about making
    healthy food choices and keeping fit through physical activity. This curriculum uses the 2005
    Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the US Department of Agriculture My Pyramid, and the
    Centers for Disease Control National Health Education Standards as its foundation. The
    curriculum incorporates fun activity plans, support activities and home activities. Please show
    an activity at least once a month under the wellness/safety/ transportation section of the lesson
    plan.
   I AM MOVING I AM LEARNING is a proactive approach for addressing childhood obesity in
    Head Start Children. It seeks to increase moderate to vigorous physical activity every day,
    improve the quality of movement activities intentionally planned and facilitated by adults, and
    promote healthy food choices every day. Additional information is available on the
    Administration for Children and Families(ECLKC) Early Childhood Learning & Knowledge
    Center’s website: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov
   HEAD START BODY START aims to increase physical activity, outdoor play, and healthy
    eating among Head Start children, families, and staff. Ideas for creating healthy learning
    environments and promoting physical activity that leads to physical, cognitive, social, and
    emotional development of young children are all available with this resource.
    www.aahperd.org/headstartbodystart/
   ECKLC – EARLY CHILDHOOD LEARNING & KNOWLEDGE CENTER is a service of the
    Office of Head Start and has a wealth of information and resources. Training and resources for
    virtually any topic of interest to teaching staff can be found on their website.
    http://eclks.ohs.act.hhs.gov
                                                                                   Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                   Page4
                                                                                                  2011-2012
      THE IMPLEMENTATION OF CREATIVE CURRICULUM FOR PRESCHOOL
       CHECKLIST is a tool designed to assess the degree to which the Creative Curriculum is being
       implemented. Teachers are encouraged to use this checklist when setting up their classroom
       environments in September and periodically throughout the year as needed. Supervisors are
       encouraged to use this tool as a resource to assist with evaluating the environment when
       completing the Classroom Observation Tool.
LITERACY:
Literacy: The Creative Curriculum Approach: The Literacy Implementation Checklist will serve as an
evaluation tool for the classroom environment (LIC). The LIC assesses the approaches to literacy in
the classroom environment, contents, writing and teaching strategies. The education staff will use the
LIC, pages 270-272, to assess the classroom in the first two weeks of September. Center Coordinators
will observe teachers interacting with children and document the quality of classroom supports for
literacy utilizing the LIC. The Center Coordinator will include this observation as part of the
Classroom/Video Observation by the designated dates. Once the observations are completed, they will
meet with teachers to review and write goals to work on throughout the year.
Teachers will use the book, Literacy: The Creative Curriculum Approach, as a guide and strategy for
developing appropriate literacy skills in preschool children. The Appendix includes tools to help
teachers with planning, observing children, using the developmental continuum and activities to use in
the classroom. It also provides forms to assist with tracking children’s progress. This resource can be
used as a training tool for the education of staff and parents. Teachers are encouraged to strengthen the
connection from center to home using age appropriate language and literacy activities.
Additional resources available at each site for staff education and activity ideas to use in the classroom
include the Building Early Language and Literacy Skills Book, and the National Head Start S.T.E.P.
Teacher’s Manual.
WCFD has implemented activities and strategies to support children’s early literacy development
throughout the curriculum and daily activities. WCFD will continue to focus on developing activities
and encouraging parents to understand the importance of supporting literacy for the whole family. All
classrooms have lending libraries available so children and families can enjoy books at home together.
FAMILY INVOLVEMENT:
It is important to support and develop family involvement opportunities within Head Start classrooms
and individual children’s educational experiences. Parents/guardians have shown a commitment to
their child’s education by enrolling them in Head Start or Discovery Preschool. The most important
message families can receive when they enter the building and your classroom is that this is also a
place for them. To feel welcome, families need to trust you. Trust between teachers and families grow
over time and are based on many experiences that are positive and respectful. All families come with
expectations – some positive, some negative and some neutral. Responding in a positive and
respectful manner will help them to trust you enough to engage in open exchanges. Communicating
with families on an ongoing basis is critical in building trust. Parent involvement can take many
forms, from contributions parents can make at home, to volunteering in the classroom, and sharing
information on children’s progress. Through the process of partnering, teachers learn a great deal
about children and how to teach them. Parents come to appreciate how much they’ve already taught
their children. The partnership that can develop between parents/guardians and teachers will enhance
the learning opportunities for children.
Every family has something positive to offer. Try to discover the special interest and abilities of all
family members and think of ways of incorporating them into the program. Use the information on the
                                                                                        Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                        Page5
                                                                                                 2011-2012
Volunteer Application, Family Partnership Agreement, and the Connecting Home to School form, to
get to know the family’s values and culture. Families can make things for the program, share their
culture, share a talent or job, assist in the classroom, and serve on a variety of committees, including
Parent Group, Policy Council, local or WCFD Curriculum Committees, Father Activities Committee,
safety committee, and public relations/recruitment (PR)teams. The most important thing to establish
with our parents is that they are their child’s first and primary educator.
ROLES OF WCFD STAFF AND PARENTS IN HELPING CHILDREN ACHIEVE THEIR
GOALS:
   WCFD recognizes that children have individual rates of development as well as individual
    interests, temperaments, languages, cultural backgrounds, and learning styles.
   WCFD is inclusive of children with disabilities, consistent with the Individualized Education
    Plans (IEP). WCFD will include provisions for children with disabilities to be included in a
    full range of activities and services normally provided to all Head Start or Discovery Preschool
    children.
   WCFD provides an environment of acceptance that supports and respects gender, culture,
    language, ethnicity, and family composition.
   WCFD uses a balance of child-initiated and adult-directed activities, including individual and
    small group activities.
   WCFD uses a variety of strategies to promote and support children’s learning and
    developmental progress based on the observations and ongoing assessment of each child.
   Parents are encouraged to become integrally involved in the development of the program’s
    curriculum through trainings, involvement in classroom and home activities, as well as policy
    council and parent center meetings.
   Parents are provided the opportunity to increase their child observation skills and to share
    assessments with staff that will help plan learning experiences.
   Parents are encouraged to participate in parent-teacher conferences and home visits to discuss
    their child’s development and education.
ONGOING ASSESSMENTS:
1. Creative Curriculum Assessment System
   A. Planning for Assessment
       Have a strong knowledge base of the Creative Curriculum Developmental Continuum.
       Set up a systematic way to observe and document a child’s development.
       Use CreativeCurriculum.net for data collection. Your user name and password are the same
          for Creative Curriculum and Child Plus.
       When children are enrolled in a Head Start or Discovery Preschool classroom, they are
          automatically added to creative curriculum.net.
       Set up portfolios for each child and have them located in the classroom for easy
          access for children.
       Online portfolios are also available in Creative Curriculum and make it possible to share
          portfolio work electronically with parents/guardians of enrolled children through Parent
          Central.

   B. Collecting Facts
       Observe children with curriculum objectives and individual goals in mind.
       Document what you see and hear during classroom activities and home visits.
       Observe children beginning the first day of school and write anecdotal notes. Many of your
         notes will be entered directly into CreativeCurriculum.net.
                                                                                       Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                       Page6
                                                                                                  2011-2012
          Collect samples, recordings, video, and pictures of children’s work over time for portfolios.
          Anecdotal notes are entered into CreativeCurriculum.net. Add the observer initials at the
           end of each note entered into cc.net.
          A minimum of one observation per objective is required for each child per checkpoint.
          One observation can be used for more than one objective. It can also be used for more than
           one child and entered as a group observation.
          The Dial or Brigance protocols may assist teachers in gathering baseline information for
           each child.
          Observation notes should be entered into CreativeCurriculum.net several times each week.
           Each teacher must have a specific plan for entering anecdotal information into
           CreativeCurriculum.net.
     C. Analyzing & Evaluating Children’s Progress
          Enter notes, checklists, samples, and lesson plan documentation into
            CreativeCurriculum.net.
          Use the CreativeCurrculum.net Developmental Continuum to identify which step each child
            has reached for each of the 50 objectives.
          Finalize your data.
          CreativeCurrculum.net will plot the child into the Class Summary Worksheet and
            Individual Child Profile after you have finalized your data entries. This report can be
            generated from the group reports tab in creativecurriculum.net and allows users to view a
            class's progress on the fifty objectives over the course of an entire school year. The report
            provides detail on each child and offers a tally of how many children are at each
            objective/step, at each season.
Once preliminary placement on the developmental continuum is entered for children, you can access a
class profile for each developmental area (social/emotional, physical, cognitive, and language) that
lists each child by name and their current level on the continuum. This is an excellent resource to help
plan individualizations for children. A link to activity suggestions for each level of the children is also
available in this report.
   D. Planning for Each Child & the Group
       You will need to evaluate the class of children and each individual child based on this data.
       Reflect on the progress of your group based on the Class Summary Worksheet and/or class
         profile information. This information will assist and guide you in lesson planning and goal
         setting.
       Decide which objectives to focus on for the whole group and for selected children.
       Plan strategies to support children’s learning through whole group and small group
         activities.
       Use intentional teaching strategies as well as child directed activities to support learning.
       Use ideas from the resource tab to assist with activities to address an entire class, small
         group or one specific child.
       Implement your plan and continue to observe children’s progress.
       You will individualize for at least 4-5 children weekly. Document specific
         individualization plans in the notes section of the Weekly Planning Form.
   E. Parent-Teacher Conference
       After finalizing your data and evaluating each child’s progress, open the Child Progress and
         Planning Report from CreativeCurriculum.net.
       You must have your data finalized in order to use this form.
                                                                                        Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                        Page7
                                                                                               2011-2012
          Check which goals/objectives from each developmental area that you would like to focus
           on with the child and family. You do not have to list all the goals for each area for they
           may overwhelm families. You can edit this information as needed and personalize it.
          Fill in a minimum of one goal per developmental area. This will be translated into Spanish
           automatically for you if needed. You may add more at the parent’s request.
          The Family Comments and Observations as well as the Next Steps at School will be
           completed with the family. These sections are not translated into Spanish.
          Meet with families to share the Child Progress and Planning Report and the portfolio.
           Jointly plan the next steps for the child. Include training on inkind goals for the child.
   F. Deleting, Transferring or Archiving a Child from CreativeCurriculum.net
       Creative Curriculum is bridged with ChildPlus. Children are entered, transferred and
         archived automatically in Creative Curriculum via ChildPlus. The Education Coordinator
         or ChildPlus Coordinator is available to answer questions.
       Children enrolled for more than 30 days will be flagged for archiving once they are
         withdrawn from the program in ChildPlus. There is a two week window to finalize and
         print Creative Curriculum information before the child is automatically transferred to the
         archives.
       Kindergarten bound children will be archived automatically two weeks after their final day
         of school. Outcome reports will be generated by the Central Office within the first two
         weeks of May.
       For all children withdrawing from the program, print the anecdotal notes, electronic
         portfolios, and the individual child profile from CC.Net. File these items in the child’s file
         under Education.
       Print journal notes (accessed in the communication tab of CC.Net) and file them in the
         miscellaneous section of the child file. This includes children transitioning to kindergarten.
       Children that transfer from one classroom to another will automatically be transferred to the
         new classroom when the change is made in ChildPlus. If a child has been terminated in
         ChildPlus and re-enrolls at a later date, please contact the Education or ChildPlus
         Coordinator to have the archived records reactivated so complete information in
         CreativeCurriculum.net will be available for the child.
   G. Changing a Teacher
       If a teacher no longer works for WCFD, please contact the ChildPlus or Education
         Coordinator immediately so they can block access for that person from ChildPlus and
         Creative Curriculum.
       Reassignment of the class in CreativeCurriculum.net will be made as directed by the Center
       Coordinator. No data for children will be affected with the changes.
2. Individual Child Portfolios - WCFD uses children’s portfolios to collect work samples which
   may include pictures, recordings, and video clips as a way of documenting a child’s development
   over time. The work samples can be seen as concrete and representative examples of a child’s
   efforts, achievements, and approaches to learning. Work samples from a portfolio can be used to
   share information with families, to help children reflect on their work and recognize their own
   skills. This information assists teachers and parents with set goals, and plan instructional
   strategies. While collecting a child’s work sample, it is best to take the time to write a brief
   observational note with the date and clip it to the back of the work sample. WCFD will supply one
   portfolio envelope for every child. Portfolios are kept in the classroom for children to place their
   samples into independently. Encourage children to help decorate their portfolio so they have
                                                                                     Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                     Page8
                                                                                               2011-2012
   ownership of them. Portfolio work samples could include (on the back) comments and
   observations on how the work samples were completed. 2:2 and 3:1 option teachers should use the
   Home-based Lesson Plan observation section to record anecdotal notes during the home visit.
   Portfolios must be shared at every parent teacher conference.
   A. Portfolio Requirements
       Writing samples for the Fall, Winter and Spring (i.e. scribbles, labels, letters, names and
         words, numbers, signs and messages)
       Self portrait from the Fall, Winter and Spring
       Samples of art work using various mediums
       Cutting samples from the Fall, Winter and Spring
       At least two photographs d (i.e. a child’s work and play activities, a child’s physical
         development and a child involved in every day routines and activities.)
   B. Examples of Supplemental Items
       Drawings, paintings, collages, weavings
       A story dictated to a teacher and/or illustrated by the child
       A book made by the child
       Graphs or drawings of a science experience
       Videos
       Tape recordings of the child
       Journal samples
       Samples of patterning
       Height and weight
      *Children with special needs may have portfolios which include more photographs and
      additional documentation or samples of progress to illustrate child’s developmental levels to
      enhance the Child Progress and Planning Report.
   3. Child and Family Staffing - An important aspect of supporting children’s growth and
      development, and individualization is utilizing time that is set aside for staffing on children.
      Discussing your classroom observations, analyzing them, and sharing information from parents
      concerning their children’s growth and development will help develop ideas on how to best
      individualize for each child. Guidelines have been developed to support the staffing process.
      These can be located in the Child and Family Staffing section in the Master Manual.
   4. Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework is the basis of our ongoing
      assessment of the progress and growth of enrolled Head Start children. Creative Curriculum
      has articulated the framework in their Continuum. The assessment information on Head Start
      Outcomes is analyzed and used in program self-assessment and continuous improvement. The
      framework is used to guide assessment of 3 to 5 years olds, but is not intended to be used
      directly for assessing individual children.

   5. Assessments of Children with Special Needs evaluations are coordinated through the
      Developmental Disabilities Program after a referral is made.
WCFD OUTCOME REPORTING:
Every Head Start program is required to implement an appropriate child assessment system that aligns
with their curriculum and gathers data on children’s progress in each of the eleven Domains of the
Head Start Early Learning Framework. Discovery Preschool and the Developmental Disabilities
programs follow the same Framework in addition to their own program requirements. Programs are
                                                                                     Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                     Page9
                                                                                                2011-2012
mandated to assess their outcome data at a minimum of three times a year. Wyoming Child and
Family Inc. has chosen to use the Creative Curriculum Developmental Continuum Assessment, which
aligns with the Head Start Child Development Early Learning Framework. The information for the
Assessment is obtained from multiple sources, such as teacher and home visitor observations, analysis
of samples of children’s work (portfolio) and parent reports. The Continuum is developed around the
principle that areas of children’s development and learning are all important and interrelated. The
Continuum is available in both English and Spanish.
Outcome data will be analyzed for specific goals:
 WCFD Administrators will analyze the child outcome data to support program self-assessment and
   continuous program improvement.
 Teachers will analyze their classroom data to ensure learning opportunities and environments are
   designed to encourage the individual growth and development of all the children in the classroom.
 The Board of Directors and Policy Council members will analyze outcome data to ensure Head
   Start goals and mandates are being met.
CreativeCurriculum.net:
CreativeCurriculum.net is a comprehensive, online service that will link the curriculum, assessment
and communication with parents and administrators. The web-based program will manage ongoing
assessment and analyze the results. It will organize observation notes and plan for an individual child
and groups of children. CreativeCurriculum.net will produce comprehensive progress and outcomes
reports. It engages and involves parents in their children’s learning at school and at home.
CreativeCurriculum.net will meet the OSEP requirements as well. Therapists can enter anecdotal
notes to support progression of the child as related to their Individual Education Plan.
Each teacher and classroom will be registered on CreativeCurrculum.net. Anecdotal notes will be
entered directly into the computer for each child. When entering anecdotal notes into the computer,
the initials of the staff member who made the observation should be included at the end of the
observation. Portfolio entries can be scanned or downloaded into an online portfolio for each child.
Parents can participate in their child’s ongoing observation from their own computer if available,
through Parent Central. Child Progress and Planning Reports, activities for teachers and for parents
are produced online based on the data entered and finalized by the teacher. Individualization is
addressed for each goal. Classroom Summaries can be produced to assist the education team in
planning for the next level of achievement. An Individual Child Profile can be evaluated and printed to
provide progress reports for each child.
PARENT/TEACHER CONFERENCES OVERVIEW:
 A minimum of four Parent-Teacher conferences are held during the year. The focus of the first
  conference is to share baseline information about the child’s development and hear from the
  parent’s perspective how their child is developing.
 The first Parent/Teacher conference will be completed between the middle of September and the
  second week in October.
           The initial conference allows for a time to explain the curriculum and assessment in
              more detail, including how this information will be used and who will have access to it.
           Teacher and parents will develop inkind goals for the child. Teachers will train parents
              on the inkind goals.
           Classroom volunteer opportunities, as well as additional volunteer opportunities will be
              reviewed. Parents will be invited to share ideas for the classroom and to volunteer.
           The first conference will be documented in the Family Partnership Agreement.
                                                                                      Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                    Page10
                                                                                                 2011-2012
              Teachers will record the inkind goals on the Inkind Tracking Form.
   The Connecting Home to School form will be completed with the family on or before the first
    parent/teacher conference.
   The 2nd, 3rd and 4th conference will be documented on the Child Progress and Planning Report
    Form. The child’s portfolio will be shared. In addition, the Family Services Assistant or teacher
    will record the dates for each conference on the Family Partnership Agreement.
   When progress regarding IEP goals is shared with parents, the date the information is shared is
    documented in Child Plus under the disabilities tab --- additional information --- parent
    conferences.
The more prepared you are for a conference, the more positive the experience will be for both you and
the child’s family, and the more you will be able to accomplish. Prior to meeting with the family:
 Review the portfolio and update work samples.
 Consider the family’s culture, interest and values.
 Pull out the information that will be of most interest to a child’s family.
 Think about which areas of development, objectives, and strategies you will discuss with the
    child’s family.
 Develop the Child Progress and Planning Report.
 During the Parent-Teacher Conference, begin talking with the family by asking open ended
    questions to learn about the family’s perspective of their child’s level of development and progress.
            o How do you feel __ (child) __ is doing this year?
            o What are some things he/she tells you about school?
            o Does he/she talk about children he likes to play with?
            o What does __ (child) __ like to do at home?
            o What are your questions for me?
   Sharing information about their child’s progress and sharing work samples is a way to establish
    rapport with parents.
   Review what you have written about the child’s development.
   Highlight the child’s strengths, as well as any areas of concern, and share specific examples from
    your observation notes or the child’s work samples.
   Invite the families to share their own observations. After hearing what families say, share some
    specific objectives you want to focus on for the child and invite families to identify any that are
    important to them.
   Describe several strategies you will be using and ask the family what they might enjoy doing at
    home with the child. Ideas and strategies should be written down on the Child Progress and
    Planning Report.
   Discuss how parents can help connect the home to the classroom and the classroom to the home
    through activities to support the child. Discuss how you will provide ongoing extension activities.
   Discuss the Kindergarten Transition process if applicable.
   Inkind goals should be suggested at this time and training provided.
   Provide the parents with a copy of the report so it becomes a true blueprint for supporting the
    child’s development and learning. When you meet again, you and the family can assess the child’s
    progress and write goals accordingly.
Schedule for Parent-Teacher Conferences:
Four parent/guardian/teacher conferences are required for every enrolled Head Start and Discovery
Preschool child. At least two of the conferences should be held in the Center (preferably in the child’s
                                                                                       Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                     Page11
                                                                                               2011-2012
classroom). Center-based teachers should schedule enough time to discuss curriculum topics, the
child’s individual progress and strategies and ideas developed by the teacher and parents aimed toward
supporting the child’s learning. 2:2 and 3:1 option teacher conferences may not require the same time
segments, as all of the topics should be discussed during ongoing Home Visits. If the family members
are Dual Language Learners, all information shared with the family must be presented in their primary
language (unless they request that it be in English). Teachers are expected to have ongoing contact
with the families throughout the year.
September/October
 Center-based teachers – The first conference is in the home with the family service assistant in
   attendance. Parents/guardians will be introduced to the curriculum and the assessment process.
   The child’s classroom routine will be shared with the family, as well as work samples/portfolio.
   The teacher will complete the parent-teacher section on the front page of the FPA with the family.
   Teachers will discuss literacy opportunities with families. Inkind goals will be reviewed, updated,
   and recorded on the Child Progress and Planning Report in the next steps box. Complete the
   Connecting Home to School form if it has not already been completed.
 2:2 and 3:1 combination teachers – The first conference of the year should be scheduled in the
   Center. The teacher will show the parents around the classroom and discuss the center-based
   classroom environment as it relates to the activities on the lesson plan. Work samples/portfolio
   will be shared with the family. The teacher will complete the FPA form with the family. The
   child’s center-based classroom routine should also be shared with the family. Teachers will
   discuss literacy opportunities with families. Inkind goals will be reviewed, updated, and recorded
   on the Child Progress and Planning Report in the next steps box. Complete the Connecting Home
   to School form if it has not already been completed.
 Discovery Preschool Teachers will hold this conference in the home. Parents/guardians will be
   introduced to the curriculum and the assessment process. The child’s classroom routine will be
   shared with the family, as well as work samples/portfolio. The teacher will complete the parent-
   teacher section on the front page of the FPA with the family, and update the remainder of the FPA.
   Teachers will discuss literacy opportunities with families. Complete the Connecting Home to
   School form if it has not already been completed.
 All conferences must be completed by the middle of October.
November/December
All teachers should use the Child Progress and Planning Report form for documenting the second
Parent-Teacher Conference. A copy of the report will be made for the parent/guardian.
 Center-based teachers – The second conference will be held in the child’s home or the Center (2nd
    and 3rd conference locations will be determined by the Center Coordinator with the understanding
    that one conference must be in the home and the other in the Center).
    Teachers and parents will develop strategies to support the child’s development. Transition
    opportunities for the coming months will be discussed. Teachers will encourage literacy activities
    within the classroom and at home. Inkind goals will be reviewed and recorded on the Child
    Progress and Planning Report in the next steps box.
 2:2 and 3:1 combination teachers – The second conference will be in the home. Teachers may add
    more time to the scheduled home visit to accommodate activities. Teachers will share the child’s
    portfolio and review the child’s progress on the Child Progress and Planning Report. Parent
    involvement in the curriculum will be reviewed as well as reviewing and updating inkind goals.
    Upcoming inkind goals will be listed in the next steps box on the Child Progress and Planning
    Report.


                                                                                     Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                   Page12
                                                                                                2011-2012
   Discovery Preschool Teachers will hold this conference in the center. The teacher and parents will
    develop strategies to support the child’s development. Transition opportunities for the coming
    months will be discussed. Teachers will encourage literacy activities within the classroom and at
    home.
   All parent teacher conferences must be completed by the end of the second week in
    December.
The second Monday in November is a designated checkpoint when information on the child’s
development should be entered on CreativeCurriculum.net. The ELL Matrix is also due. Please
submit the ELL Summary form to the Central Office.

February/March
All teachers will use the Child Progress and Planning Report when documenting the third Parent-
Teacher Conference.
 Center-based teachers- The third conference will be held at either the home or the Center
    (determined by the Center Coordinator). Teacher will review the progress of the child by sharing
    the child’s portfolio work and the child’s progress from the Child Progress and Planning Report.
    Strategies that were developed at the last conference will be reviewed and the new strategies
    developed. Transition opportunities will be discussed for the coming months. Literacy will
    continue to be highlighted as well as volunteerism. Inkind goals will be updated and recorded on
    the Child Progress and Planning Report. The Family Partnership agreement will also be reviewed
    and updated. Spring enrollment for the coming year will be discussed.
 2:2 and 3:1 option teachers- The third conference will be in the home. Teachers may add more
    time to the scheduled home visit to accommodate activities. Teachers will review the progress of
    the child by sharing the child’s portfolio work and the child’s progress from the Child Progress and
    Planning Report. Strategies that were developed at the last conference will be reviewed and new
    strategies developed. Transition opportunities will be discussed for the coming months. Literacy
    will continue to be highlighted was well as volunteerism. Inkind goals will be updated and
    recorded on the Child Progress and Planning Report. The Family Partnership agreement will also
    be reviewed and updated. Spring enrollment for the coming year will be discussed.
 Discovery Preschool Teachers will hold this conference in the center. The teacher will review the
    progress of the child by sharing the child’s portfolio work and the child’s progress from the Child
    Progress and Planning Report. Strategies that were developed at the last conference will be
    reviewed and the new strategies developed. Transition opportunities will be discussed for the
    coming months. Literacy will continue to be highlighted as well as volunteerism. The Family
    Partnership agreement will also be reviewed and updated. Spring enrollment for the coming year
    will be discussed.
 All parent/teacher conferences must be completed by the end of the second week in March.
The first work day of February is a designated checkpoint when information concerning the
child’s development should be entered on CreativeCurriculum.net. The ELL Matrix is also due.
Please submit the ELL Summary form to the Central Office.


May
All teachers should use the Child Progress and Planning Report when documenting the fourth Parent-
Teacher Conference.
 Center-based, Discovery Preschool, 3:1 and 2:2 option teachers will have conferences in the Center
    to accommodate spring enrollment. Acceptance letters for returning children will be provided at
    that time, along with physical and dental exam forms. Teachers will again review the progress that
                                                                                      Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                    Page13
                                                                                                2011-2012
   the child has made by sharing work samples, Kindergarten Readiness Checklist (if appropriate) and
   the Child Progress and Planning Report. Transitions will be finalized and summer activities will be
   highlighted. Parents who have children enrolled in the full year option will continue to develop
   strategies to support children during the summer. Inkind goals will be updated and recorded on the
   Child Progress and Planning Report. The Family Partnership agreement will also be reviewed and
   updated. Summer literacy opportunities will be discussed.
The first workday in May is the final designated checkpoint when information on the child’s
development should be entered on CreativeCurriculum.net. The ELL Matrix is also due. Please
submit the ELL Summary form to the Central Office.
CLASSROOM OBSERVATIONS:
Each classroom will be formally observed by the Center Coordinator using the WCFD
Classroom/Video Observation Form. Center-based classrooms will be observed in October. Home-
based classrooms will be observed in November. All classrooms will be observed again in February.
All new teachers and teachers needing support will be videotaped as part of their observation.
Teaching teams will meet with the Center Coordinator to review the observation form. A Professional
Development Plan will be written as a team at both observation dates. Teaching teams will evaluate
strengths and look for opportunities for growth. Goals will be written to include areas needing
strengthened as identified by the observer but also as a teaching team. An evaluation of Child
Outcomes from CreativeCurriculum.net will be included. Teachers will be given support and training
as identified. Goals from the Professional Development Plan may be included in the annual
Performance Evaluation.
The Creative Curriculum Implementation Guide, NAEYC observable criteria checklists, Literacy
Implementation Checklist, and Mathematics Implementation Checklists are all classroom environment
resources available for setting up the environment and checking it periodically throughout the year.
Each classroom will also have a reliable Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) coder
observe in the classroom and complete a minimum of three cycles of observation (20 minutes of
observation and 10 minutes of coding) both during the Fall and Spring. The organizational trends
obtained from the observation data will help identify professional development training needs for staff.
Once Center Coordinators are trained on proving feedback about teacher-child interactions in the
CLASS framework, they will partner with the area coordinators to ensure each teacher receives regular
observations, feedback and opportunities to reflect on their teaching practices using the CLASS
dimensions as a guide. Observation and consultations/reflections should occur at a minimum of every
4 - 6 weeks.
WCFD is NAEYC Accredited in six DD locations. All WCFD classrooms will follow the NAEYC
standards. The following schedule will provide guidance on which observation tool to use for
observations.
   2010-2011: all sites will use the WCFD Classroom/Video Observation Form. NAEYC quick
    checks will also be completed during the year for observable criteria that relates to the preschool
    age group. All DD sites will review classroom portfolios and make updates as needed.
   2011-2012: all sites will use the WCFD Classroom/Video Observation Form. NAEYC quick
    checks will also be completed during the year for observable criteria that relates to the preschool
    age group.
   2012-2013: all HS only sites will use the WCFD Classroom/Video Observation Form. Non-DD
    sites will continue to use the NAEYC quick checks for each classroom for observable criteria that
    relates to the preschool age group.

                                                                                      Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                    Page14
                                                                                                2011-2012
  All DD sites with reaccreditation due in 2013 will use the NAEYC Preschool Observable
   Criteria Tool available online through NAEYC TORCH. All 2013 reaccreditation DD sites
   will submit their intent to renew along with the 4th annual report to NAEYC. These sites will
   also complete and submit the renewal materials by May 31, 2013.
  2013-2014: Most sites will use the WCFD Classroom/Video Observation Form. Non-DD sites and
   reaccredited sites will use the NAEYC quick checks for each classroom for observable criteria that
   relates to the preschool age group. DD sites with reaccreditation due in 2014 will use the
   NAEYC Preschool Observable Criteria Tool available online through NAEYC TORCH. All
   2014 reaccreditation DD sites will submit their intent to renew along with the 4th annual
   report to NAEYC. These sites will also complete and submit the renewal materials iby May
   31, 2014.
HOME VISITOR OBSERVATION:
All new Home Visitors will have a formal observation by the Center Coordinator prior to their first
Performance Evaluation. They will receive a second observation by the Area/Education Coordinator
prior to their second Performance Evaluation. Seasoned Home Visitors will have a formal observation
by the Center Coordinator prior to their Performance Evaluation. Area/Education Coordinators may
complete an observation as needed.
CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT SCORING SYSTEM (CLASS):
The CLASS will be used only by reliable coders. All classrooms will be evaluated with this tool in
October/November and again in March/April. Reliable coders will meet prior to the fall and spring
observations to practice coding, and compare scores on video segments to ensure interrater reliability.
Reliable coders will take the drift test annually to maintain certification.
During the 2010-2011 program year, a system of using CLASS dimensions as a means to individualize
professional development and improve the quality of teacher-child interactions will be developed and
implemented as a means to increase the social and educational outcomes for children. Center
Coordinators, classroom staff, and therapists will be trained in the CLASS dimensions. Center
Coordinators and Area Coordinators will also receive training on providing quality feedback to
teaching teams.
There is a link between effective teacher-child interactions and improved social and academic
outcomes for children. Children learn more and develop the social skills necessary for future
achievement when they are in well organized classrooms with high quality emotional and instructional
support. The instructional support dimensions of the CLASS include concept development, quality of
feedback, and language modeling. Some behavior indicators of quality interactions in these
dimensions are listed below:
Concept Development:
Concept development is the development of higher order thinking skills. Teachers encourage analysis
and reasoning through the use of why and/or how questions, problem solving,
prediction/experimentation, classification/comparison, and evaluation of experiences. Children are
encouraged to generate their own ideas and products. Teachers consistently link concepts and
activities to one another and to previous learning. Teachers consistently relate concepts to the
students’ actual lives. Increasing the quality of concept development in WCFD classrooms can be
achieved with intentional planning and focus by teaching teams, which include coordinated efforts to
bring the real world into the classroom and study real things.
Quality of Feedback:
True quality feedback goes beyond clear specific praise that recognizes and reinforces student
persistence. It expands children’s engagement and learning. Quality interactions in the classroom that
                                                                                      Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                    Page15
                                                                                               2011-2012
provide instructional support to children are evident when teachers can be seen giving hints and
assistance to children who are having a hard time understanding a concept, answering a question, or
completing an activity. There are back and forth exchanges between teachers and children that help
keep the child engaged as the teacher provides information to expand on children’s understanding or
actions, or asks follow-up questions so children continue to think. When teachers prompt children to
explain their thinking, they are also helping children to develop higher order thinking skills.
Developing high quality feedback skills takes practice.
Language Modeling:
Early childhood classrooms are language labs where children are exposed to quality language and
practice their language skills. High quality language modeling is evident in classrooms where there are
frequent conversations that include back-and-forth exchanges, contingent responding and peer
conversations. Teachers ask many open-ended questions where they are not seeking a specific answer.
Teachers often repeat or extend children’s responses, use a variety of words, including advanced
language, and connect familiar words and ideas. Language modeling also includes self and parallel
talk when teachers consistently map their own actions and the children’s actions through language and
descriptions.
Progress towards improving the quality of teacher-child interactions can be realized with intentional
focus. Teaching teams are encouraged to video tape segments of their classroom to allow them to
reflect on their own classroom practices. It is far easier to recognize strengths you can see on video
than to recall what happened from memory. Teachers can reflect on how their interactions increased
student engagement, so they can continue to use the most effective strategies and minor adjustments in
the future to further increase student engagement and interest.




                                                                                     Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                   Page16
                                                                                                 2011-2012
OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT PROCESS
Observations

                                         SEPTEMBER
Teachers     1. Complete an evaluation of the classroom environment. We recommend using
                the Creative Curriculum Implementation Checklist. In addition, teachers must
                use the Creative Curriculum Literacy Implementation Checklist. Set up your
                classroom based on your observations from these checklists.
             2. Set up individualization codes and review individualization with paraeducators.
             3. Begin to observe children, beginning the first day of school and writing
                anecdotal notes.
             4. A minimum of one observation per objective is required for each child per
                checkpoint.
             5. Start collecting work samples for children’s portfolio
             6. Have observation notebooks organized with a system of entering
                anecdotal notes, checklists, Child and Family Staffings, Developmental
                Continuum, etc. Many of your notes will be entered directly into
                CreativeCurriculum.net. Add the observer initials at the end of each note
                entered into cc.net.
             7. Begin the process of matching anecdotal notes with objectives and enter them
                into the computer. One observation can be used for more than one objective and
                also could be used for more than one child. This should be done several times
                per week. Portfolio work samples could include (on the back) comments and
                observations on how the work samples were completed. 2:2 and 3:1 option
                teachers should use the Home-based Lesson Plan observation section to record
                anecdotal notes during the home visit. During Child and Family Staffings, the
                teaching staff should discuss the observations and analyze them using the
                Continuum.
             8. The Dial or Brigance may also assist teachers in gathering baseline information
                for each child.
             9. Schedule Parent-Teacher Conferences for September/October in conjunction
                with the FSA.
  Center     1. Evaluate the classroom environments.
Coordinators 2. Review the observations entered into the CreativeCurriculum.net on a weekly
                basis to ensure the assessment is being updated and finalized.
             3. Check and approve lesson plans.
             4. Observe in the classroom. Document observations and follow up.
             5. If staff is having difficulty, the Education Coordinator should be notified to give
                support.




                                                                                       Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                     Page17
                                                                                            2011-2012
                                           OCTOBER
 Teachers    1.   Observations and recordings continue.
             2.   A minimum of one observation per checkpoint for each child is required.
             3.   Teachers should plan the Weekly Lesson Plans, Combination Home-based
                  Plans, and individualization based on the data analyzed from
                  CreativeCurriculum.net.
             4.   Portfolio work samples are being completed and filed.
             5.   Staff completes their first Parent-Teacher Conference between the middle of
                  September and the first two weeks of October.
             6.   Information that has been completed on the Family Partnership Agreement that
                  assists the teacher in understanding the individual family culture should be
                  reviewed.
             7.   The Connecting Home to School form needs to be completed on or before the
                  first parent/teacher conference.
  Center     1.   Continue to monitor observations in CreativeCurriculum.net, Classroom
Coordinators      Summary Form, portfolios, and Parent-Teacher Conference section of Family
                  Partnership Agreements.
             2.   Review the CC Implementation Checklist if used.
             3.   Review the LIC Self-evaluation.
             4.   Check and approve lesson plans.
             5.   Observe in the Classroom. Document observation and follow up.
             6.   Complete the Classroom/Video Observation form for Center based only. Include
                  the LIC and the Outcome Checkpoint data when writing goals with staff.




                                                                                  Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                Page18
                                                                                               2011-2012
                                          NOVEMBER
 Teachers      1.   The first workday of November is the due date for all checkpoint
                    information to be finalized and the ELL Matrix.
               2.   Parent-Teacher Conferences should be scheduled with families. All
                    conferences need to be completed by the second week in December.
               3.   Observations and recordings continue for next checkpoint in Feb.
               4.   Staff should continue to use the Classroom Summary Worksheet and/or the
                    Class Profile information from CreativeCurriculum.net in staffings.
               5.   Portfolio work samples are being completed and filed.
               6.   The Child Progress and Planning Report needs to be written using the
                    information from observations and work samples. This report will be generated
                    from CreativeCurriculum.net.
  Center       1.   Ensure that checkpoint information and reports were completed by all teachers
Coordinators        and finalized in CreativeCurriculum.net.
               2.   Review the Child Progress and Planning Reports prior to teachers sharing them
                    with parents.
               3.   Observe in the Classroom. Document observation and follow up.
               4.   Continue to monitor CreativeCurriculum.net, Classroom Summary form,
                    portfolios, and Parent-Teacher Conference section of the Family Partnership
                    Agreements.
               5.   Review the CC Implementation Checklist if used.
               6.   Review the LIC Self-evaluation.
               7.   Check and approve lesson plans.
               8.   Observe in the classroom.
               9.   Complete the Classroom/Video observation form for Home based teachers.
                    Include the LIC and the Outcome Checkpoint data when writing goals with
                    staff.

                                          DECEMBER
 Teachers      1.   Observations and recordings continue for the next checkpoint in February.
               2.   Staff should continue to use the Classroom Summary Worksheet from Creative
                    Curriculum.net in staffings.
               3.   Portfolio work samples are being completed and filed.
  Center       1.   Continue to monitor CreativeCurriculum.net.
Coordinators   2.   Check lesson plans.
               3.   Observe in the Classroom.




                                                                                     Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                   Page19
                                                                                               2011-2012
                                            JANUARY
  Teachers     1.   Continue to observe and record observations.
               2.   Classroom Summary Reports should continue to be used during staffings.
               3.   Portfolio work samples should continue to be collected.
               4.   Use information from the November/December checkpoint to develop
                    curriculum and lesson plans.
             5.     Schedule Parent/Teacher conferences for February.
  Center     1.     Discuss with teachers how they have implemented changes in the classroom
Coordinators        using the data from the first checkpoint. Document these adaptations.
             2.     Continue to monitor observation on CreativeCurriculum.net.
             3.     Check lesson plans.
             4.     Observe in the classroom.

                                       FEBRUARY
  Teachers   1. The first workday of February is the due date for all checkpoint
                information to be finalized and ELL Matrix.
             2. Child Progress and Planning Reports should be completed.
             3. Parent-Teacher Conferences should be scheduled with families. All conferences
                need to be completed by the last workday of February.
             4. Observations and recordings continue for next checkpoint in May.
             5. Discuss Kindergarten transition plan.
             6. Staff should continue to use the Classroom Summary Worksheet from
                CreativeCurriculum.net in staffings.
             7. Portfolio work samples should continue to be collected.
             8. As a teaching team, review the CC Implementation Checklist (if used), LIC and
                Classroom/Video Observation Sheet. Analyze outcome data. Meet with Center
                Coordinator to discuss goals.
  Center     1. Review Child Progress and Planning Reports prior to conference scheduled for
Coordinators    February.
             2. Continue to monitor observation, and outcome reports.
             3. Check lesson plans.
             4. Review the CC Implementation Checklist (if used), and LIC.
             5. Complete the Classroom/Video Observation Sheet for all teachers and home
                visitors. Analyze outcome data. Meet with teaching teams to discuss goals.




                                                                                    Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                  Page20
                                                                                                   2011-2012

                                                MAY
  Teachers                                    MARCH
                1. The final checkpoint and ELL Matrix is due the first workday in May.
  Teachers      1. Observations and recordings continue for next checkpoint in May.
                2. Finalize data and print the Child Progress and Planning Report.
                2. Staff should continue to use the Classroom Summary Worksheet from
                3. Prepare portfolios to give to parents. Make sure all the required entries are in
                    CreativeCurriculum.net in staffing.
                    the CreativeCurriculum.net.
                3. Portfolio work samples are being completed and filed.
                4. Use the Child Progress and Planning report data and Kindergarten Readiness
                4. Schedule spring screening. Use this data for observations.
                    Checklist for transitioning IEP meetings and Kindergarten transition meetings.
   Center       1. Continue to monitor CreativeCurriculum.net.
                5. Complete the final Parent/Teacher Conferences.
Coordinators 2. Check and approve lesson plans.
                6. Print all Individual Child Profiles and electronic portfolios andup. under
                                                                                     file
                3. Observe in the Classroom. Document observation and follow
                    Education in the child’s file.
                7. All observation notes should be filed under education in the child’s file.
                                               APRIL
                8. Print any journal communications from Parent Central and file in the
  Teachers      1. Continue with observation process using the Classroom Summary Worksheet.
                    miscellaneous section of the child file.
                2. Continue to add work samples to portfolios.
   Center       1. Review Child Progress and Planning Reports prior to the Parent-Teacher
                3. Schedule final parent-teacher conference for the first two weeks of May.
Coordinators        Conference.
   Center       1. Continue to monitor CreativeCurriculum.net.
                2. Check and approve lesson plans.
Coordinators 2. Check and approve lesson plans.
                3. Observe in the Classroom. Document observation and follow up.
                3. Observe in the Classroom. Document observation and follow up.
*Full year teachers should continue to gather portfolio work samples in June and July.

*Center Coordinators will continue to check and approve lesson plans, observe in the classroom,
document observation and follow up.

End of the Year Activities and Celebrations
Wyoming Child & Family Development and the National Association of the Education of Young
Children (NAEYC) agree that graduation ceremonies are developmentally inappropriate for preschool
children. It is the responsibility of the staff and parents to ensure the “end of the year” activities are
developmentally appropriate for young children. Caps and Gowns will not be permitted because of
their connotation to graduation ceremonies. Parents have been advised of this in the WCFD Parent
Handbook.

                     COMBINATION HOME VISIT LESSON PLAN
General Information:
 Fill out the top section completely.
 If the home visit is cancelled, please check and complete “Reason for Canceled Visit” and “Date
   Rescheduled”.
 Home Visit # - remember to put the actual number of the visit for the individual family, i.e., if the
   family starts in November, that would be visit #1.
 If a home visit is rescheduled one time, you may use the same form, adding the new home visit
   number. If a home visit is rescheduled, more than one time, create a new lesson plan with parent
   input.
Area(s):
 One or more areas may be checked. They should be from the parent’s perspective and child
   progress goals based on what their child’s individual needs may be. A minimum of three (3)
   activities should be planned.
Skills Identified by Parent/Guardian:
                                                                                         Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                       Page21
                                                                                                2011-2012
   The parent/guardian identifies the skills that they would like the home visitor to work on during
    home visits.
   Possible resources to assist the parent: Child Progress & Planning Report child goals, Weekly
    Lesson Plans, portfolio/child’s work samples, observations/anecdotal records from the teacher, and
    educational resources. An example the parent may have identified is cutting. The home visitor
    would guide them in activity ideas to strengthen this skill for the child.
     Skills Identified By Parent: cutting
     Activity: (1) cutting play dough, (2) cutting matching shapes out of magazines
     Skills Observed: Held scissors properly with dominant hand, able to open and close
Materials Provided By:
 Family – List all materials provided by family. Use as many materials from the family home as
  possible.
 Home Visitor – List all materials provided by the home visitor.
Continuing Parent/Child Activities:
 Note all activities to be developed by the parent and home visitor to encourage continued progress
   of identified skills. These activities will be worked on between home visits. These can also be used
   as an extension of the Weekly Lesson Plan activities.
Resources Reviewed:
   ___ Portfolio/Work Samples
   ___ Child Progress and Planning Report
   ___ IEP Goals/Objectives
       Family Partnership Agreement
       Handouts (see FPA)
       Weekly Lesson Plan




Signatures:
 Parent/Guardian and Home Visitor must sign the form and date it.
 The second Parent/Guardian Signature line is for a second parent/guardian or other adult
   participating in the home visit.
Second Page:
 Use the second page of the lesson plan when more skills/activities have been planned or when
   skills/ activities are emergent during the home visit.
File and Parent Copies:
 Give the unsigned pink copy to the parent/guardian after the next home visit’s planning is
    completed, to provide the family with the activities to do during the week, as well as a list of
    materials and reminders for the next home visit.
 The parent/guardian signs the lesson plan after completion of the plan and documentation. The
    parent/guardian is then given the signed yellow copy.
 Nothing should be written on the plan after the parent/guardian signs it.
 The white copy (signed and completed) is placed in the child’s file under Education.
 Enter home visit observation notes in creativecurriculum.net.
                                                                                      Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                    Page22
                                                                                                    2011-2012

                                       Weekly Planning Form
   WCFD will require all teachers to use the lesson plans on Creative Curriculum.net.
   The lesson plan Study/Project must support the environment throughout the room. A teacher can
    have more than one Study, but Learning Centers and group activities need to reflect the Study and
    children’s interests. Teaching teams must have a purpose for the materials and toys that they are
    choosing to have in the environment as related to what they are studying. The classroom is a
    community. The Weekly Planning Form and the environment need to reflect the culture and
    diversity that is present in the community. Teaching teams should communicate with parents about
    upcoming studies and solicit parent input. Families can be a great resource in lesson planning.
   Fill in the document online and add the following information:
      Individualization will be listed under the “Notes” section. Individualize by skill that you are
        working on rather than by activity.
      Wellness/Safety/Transportation will be added to the “Other” in the Planning for Groups
        section. Please document transportation/pedestrian training within the first 30 days of a child’s
        enrollment. Also document weekly Social/Emotional activities such as PATHS/Al’s Pals
        lessons. Include Food, Fitness and Fun activities one time per month. Other activities would
        include any other health and safety lessons. Often these can be tied to the current study or
        theme.
   Family/Community Involvement should list activities that are an extension of the class “Study” to
    the home. Provide information about hands on activities that families can do together at home. In
    addition to including this information on the Weekly Planning Form, the extension activities should
    be sent home with the children so all families have access to the extension activities.
   Lesson plans will be submitted for approval to the Center Coordinator weekly. These must be
    submitted 2 weeks in advance.
   Weekly Lesson Plans must be posted in the classroom at a place that is visible for all staff,
    parents/guardian and volunteers.
   Lesson Plans should be interpreted if requested for those families that are Dual Language Learners.
   When plans change as teaching teams follow children’s lead and interests, the posted lesson plans
    will be updated in writing.
   Teaching teams will select a CLASS dimension and specific behavior to focus on each week or
    two. The CLASS dimension and area of focus will be hand-written in the notes section of the
    lesson plan so teaching teams and administrators are aware of the CLASS dimension focus.
                                      PLANNING FOR GROUPS
WCFD serves children primarily in a part day preschool program. If a classroom is using a rotation
chart, children will not be allowed to rotate more than two times to small group activities within a class
session. This will allow for fewer transitions and more quality time in learning centers.
GROUP TIME (songs, stories, games, discussion, etc.):
Describe or list in a few words what songs, movement, games, literacy, and discussions you are
planning with the children. Include the materials you will need.
STORIES:
List the stories that you will be telling, reading, drawing or acting out with children. Write the titles of
the books. Consider extension ideas to concepts, movement, language and social/emotional.



                                                                                          Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                        Page23
                                                                                                    2011-2012

SMALL GROUP ACTIVITIES:
Small group sessions are no larger than six children. If the group is all three years olds, a smaller
group of two to four children is recommended. Small group can be planned more than once during the
activities of the day. Different areas of focus should be considered when planning the small group
experiences. Describe or list in a few words what activities in: Literacy, Art, Math, and Science &
Discovery you are planning with the children. You may not include activities on a daily basis in all the
areas but there needs to be at least one activity from every area at a minimum of once a week. The
activities should be based on the needs of individual children and analysis of checkpoint data. Make
sure to plan for individualization in small group activities that fosters children’s engagement and offers
all children the opportunity to be successful in the activity.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES (field trips, special events, etc.):
Teachers will discuss field trips, special events, guest presenters, and celebrations in this section.
OTHER:
Please label this section as Wellness/Safety/Transportation. Teachers will discuss what activities
they will use to teach on these topics. Wellness should include social/emotional, dental, physical and
nutrition activities. Safety should include pedestrian training, hand washing, trike safety,
stranger/danger, etc. Transportation should include activities related to child goals during daily
transportation, field trips, and bus safety.
NOTES/INDIVIDUALIZATION (reminders, changes, children to observe):
Please list codes for individualization and the skills to be observed in this section. Individualization
for each child should be evident at least monthly and is tied to child learning goals, IEP goals, and
inkind.
                           CHOICE/WORK TIME (Children’s Interests)
Children choose the interest area in which they would like to work, whom they want to work with, and
what materials to use. Choice/work time lasts a minimum of 45 minutes to an hour excluding
cleanup time. Symbols of some form will be used by all children so that children can focus on what
areas are available to them and assist them in transitioning. As the year progresses, children may not
need the symbols as much, but you must consult with your Area Coordinator before discontinuing their
use. Each center generally will have a designated number of children that can work in a center to
maintain appropriate classroom management. All centers should be open as much as possible, but at
times a teacher may need to close one for a specified purpose. Please communicate with the Center
Coordinator if you are going to close a center.
A written plan for each learning center box will have materials and toys listed. Many materials and
toys will support the Study, yet others will be chosen based on what the individual child might need.
Teachers need to rotate these items according to children’s interests to help engage children and extend
their learning. Parents will be able to see the lesson plan on-line through Parent Central and can make
suggestions on the lesson plan.
REQUIRED CENTERS ARE:
 Dramatic Play: this area is designed to inspire creative and imaginative play. A house area can
  also be available if there is ample room. Dramatic play needs to support the study. Teachers do
  not have to have it set up as a “home center” all the time. Other examples could be flower shop,
  hospital, vet clinic, post office, etc. Multicultural/multi-ability babies and clothing, dress up props,
  writing, and books should be part of this learning center along with other props that support the
  study. Arrange the area so that it is attractive and invites children in to play.
                                                                                          Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                        Page24
                                                                                                  2011-2012

   Blocks: this area encourages children to construct, create, and represent their experiences with a
    variety of sizes and shapes of blocks. We recommend that each classroom have three types of
    blocks (wooden units, large blocks and some other type such as textured, etc.) Props also need to
    be added to the block area that supports the study. Books and writing materials are also present.
    There should be enough blocks for each child in the area to build elaborate constructions. A full
    set of unit blocks is recommended. Organize blocks by size and shape on shelves with outlines to
    show where each shape goes. Consider how you will tie the block area into your classroom
    study/theme.
   Toys and Games: this area includes manipulatives, puzzles, collectibles, matching games, and
    games with rules that children can play at a table, on the floor, or on top of a divider shelf. These
    are quiet activities that children can do alone, with a friend or in a small group. As you are setting
    up this area be mindful of each developmental area of the child and what types of toys and
    resources would support these areas. Consider how you will link materials to your current
    study/theme. Books and writing materials are also present.

   Art: This area is filled with materials that children can enjoy on a purely sensory level. They can
    create and represent their ideas in a visual form. On a table, floor, easel or workbench, children
    draw, paint, knead, cut, glue, and put together unique products of their own choosing. Include
    materials for three-dimensional constructions. Children should be given the opportunity to use all
    their senses in this area. Art should be open-ended exploration, not teacher prepared patterns and
    models. This should be located near a water source. Consider how you will link materials to your
    current study/theme. Books and writing materials are also present.

   Library: This area is an attractive, quiet space with soft furniture and soft lighting. A variety of
    books such as beautiful picture books, informational, factual (math, science, health, and social
    studies related), rhyming, multicultural, range of difficulty, alphabet, self concept, classical and
    other, should be present. Provide books and related props for retelling stories. Books that relate to
    the study are present. Books should be neatly displayed with titles facing out. Many teachers
    include a listening center with head phones near the library that offer books and music on tape or
    CD. Writing materials are also present.

   The Discovery Area: Many teachers refer to this as the science area. This area offers a variety of
    interesting materials that children can explore using all their senses. It is hands-on and should
    include living science items and topics for children to investigate. Sensory tubs can be used in this
    area. Keep in mind that science includes observing, exploring/doing, and recording. Materials to
    provide opportunities for all areas of discovery should be present. Consider how you will link
    materials to your current study/theme. Books and writing materials are present.
   Sand and Water: This area involves sensory experiences for children to use their senses to
    investigate, manipulate, and explore. This should be located near a water source for children to
    wash hands before and after play. If you use other sensory materials, you still need to provide
    opportunities for sand and water play daily (indoors or out). Consider how you will link materials
    to your current study/theme. Books and writing materials are also present if appropriate.

   Music and Movement: This area can be a separate center that is carpeted (if possible) with a
    variety of musical instruments, record player, CD player, rhythm sticks, kazoos, drums, shakers,
    etc. Some teachers include this as a large group or small group activity. Children should have
    access to musical instruments and other materials as a choice. It is best practice to have this

                                                                                        Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                      Page25
                                                                                                 2011-2012
    available as a center if possible. Consider how you can link music and movement to your current
    study/theme. Books and writing materials are also present.
   Cooking: Most classrooms do not have a separate area for this, but cooking experiences should be
    offered at least monthly as a small group activity. All areas of development, including health and
    well-being, are fostered with cooking experiences. These experiences offer healthy habits that last
    a lifetime. Cooking activities should model healthy food choices. Consider how you can link
    cooking activities to your current study/theme. Books and writing materials are also present.
   Computers: This areas is placed where children can explore, problem solve, question and
    manipulate the software. Teachers can begin this instruction for this center with small group
    activities. After children learn how to use it, they should have this center open for independent use.
    Teachers must know the software prior to loading it for children and ensure it is quality software
    and living books. We suggest that children are monitored in this area and encouraged to explore all
    learning centers. Books and writing materials are also present.

   Outdoors: Children should be given outdoor experiences each day if weather permits. The
    outdoor classroom is an extension of the indoor classroom. Games, toys, art, blocks, discovery,
    music, sand and water should be planned the same as the indoor study. Consider how you can
    extend the classroom study/theme outside. Books and writing materials are also present if weather
    permits. Gross motor activities must be provided indoors when classes are not able to go outside
    due to unsafe weather conditions. The alternate gross motor activity should be documented on the
    lesson plan as needed.
*Please refer to the Creative Curriculum for Preschool, 4th Edition for additional information regarding
interest areas and materials. The Creative Curriculum Implementation Checklist can also be a useful
tool for appropriately setting up learning centers.


                            INDIVIDUALIZATION (NOTES SECTION)
    The Individualization will be identified under the “Note” section and should be used to plan for
    supporting individual children in identified skills. Please do not use the child’s name when
    identifying because of confidentiality concerns (other symbols or numbers can be used). Focus on
    a small number of children each week e.g. 5 of them. Individualization does not mean you will
    focus on the entire class or the same children from week to week. Teaching teams meet weekly to
    coordinate lesson plans, activities, and individualization of children’s needs.
Example 1:
1) Following classroom routines: Following directions (IEP goal) to classroom routines (INKIND 2B)
4) Expressing self using words and sentences: during conversation work on /f/ and /k/ sounds (IEP
goal)-informal conversation with child
9) Uses tools for writing and drawing: model and encourage child to try writing
7) Answering questions: working on IEP goals-ask questions during meal times
13) Caring for classroom environment and materials: picking up after centers
Example 2:
Fine motor practice - 8, 9
Promote positive self-concept and self confidence - 13, 12, 9
Pretend roles, Make Believe - 9, 12, 13
Counting 1 – 5: 8, 12

                                                                                       Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                     Page26
                                                                                                2011-2012
Example 3:
5B, 7B, 9B, 12B, 13B--articulate sounds as needed in conversation
12B, 13B--pronoun usage-he, she, me, I etc.
7B , 13B--efficient writing grasp
5B--efficient writing grasp, using only one hand when cutting, writing
Example 4:
#6 Sing Twinkle Twinkle Little Star and Row, Row, Row your boat to encourage participation in large
group
#7 Encourage peer interactions/cooperative play during worktime
#10 continue to support child with understanding boundaries (following rules, personal space)
#4 writing name with capital and the rest lowercase
#19 Fine Motor Activities: handwriting strokes, drawing. Encourage writing table during worktime.
                                             “TO DO” LIST
The section is reserved for notes the teaching staff may want to write to assist them in implementing
the lesson plan with the children and volunteers during the week.
                          LABELING AND SIGNS IN THE CLASSROOM
Labels and signs in the environment assist children in being independent in their classroom and
throughout the building. It provides order and is especially important for children with special needs
who require consistency and predictability in their environment. Labeling should be meaningful to
children so have them assist in what is being labeled. Provide pictorial and written labels to create a
print rich environment. The written label should be in English and Spanish (English in black and
Spanish in red). All other languages in the classroom should be in a different color to show the
distinction from one language to another. This not only helps emergent readers but parents that are
learning more than one language. It is more respectful to families with different home languages to
use the same size of print for all languages. We want to send the message that we honor and value
their culture. Make sure labels and signs are neat and recognizable. Labels will get a great deal of use
and may need to be replaced periodically.




                                    CLASSROOM PRACTICES
It is important to remember that what we model for children will have a lasting impact on them and
how they perceive people, school, the community, and the world. Throughout the day there are
numerous opportunities to model appropriate behavior, good health practices, good nutrition, safety,
social skills, and more. We need to be intentional about the messages we convey, both overtly and
covertly.
Meals are served family style with children serving themselves. Food is not used as a punishment or
reward. Each child is encouraged, but not forced to eat or taste his or her food. Sufficient time is
allowed for each child to eat. Children and staff brush their teeth and wash after eating. When we eat
with children, model tasting new foods, using manners, conversing during meals and brushing our
teeth and washing after we eat, children learn these skills.
Schedules are posted for families and staff. They should also be posted for children in a way they can
understand. Schedules must include both pictures and words. Ideally, child classroom schedules
should allow you to show children the changes that may occur. To help children connect the idea of
                                                                                      Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                    Page27
                                                                                                  2011-2012
time associated with a schedule, include a clock with the activities and a real clock for the children to
easily look at and compare with the schedule clocks.
Children need to move. Movement opportunities should be embedded in activities throughout the day.
Be conscientious about the amount of time children are asked to remain seated and still.
Better brain connections result from real experiences, with real objects that involve our senses.
Children learn more when the ideas they are exposed to are grounded in concrete, real experiences.
Consider having field trips that connect the community with your topic or study at the beginning of the
study to honor the developmental progression from real to more abstract experiences. Pay attention to
what the children do on the field trip and listen to what they say to help guide planning for other
activities to further the study. Field trips tend to heighten children’s interest and promote engagement
in activities.
Preprinted materials can be a controversial topic in early childhood programs. They are easy to
prepare and are an easy way to fill time. Best practice indicates their use should be very limited.
However, there are times when the purposeful use of preprinted materials can be appropriate. Teachers
must be able to articulate how the materials relate to a specific developmental skill.
Preprinted materials don’t allow children to generate or create their own ideas and products.
Generally, more meaningful hands-on activities can be provided to practice the skills. This is a better
choice. Sometimes preprinted materials may be appropriate for some of the children, but not all of the
children. When the materials become the cookie-cutter, blanket answer for working on a skill, the line
has been crossed. None of our classrooms include all children at the same developmental level. Our
role as early childhood professionals is to help educate others about the value in open-ended, child
created, process oriented activities, versus product oriented activities. Any use of preprinted materials
must be preapproved by the on-site education coordinator.


                              CLASSROOM/CENTER APPEARANCE
Each time someone walks into our centers or classrooms we convey a message about our attitude and
values. How do our environments communicate the values of WCFD?
Respect: A culture that recognizes the value and individuality of everyone. Have we included
pictures, print and familiar items or experiences that embrace the diversity of our families and
community? Can a parent, child, or visitor identify with something in our environment?
Excellence: A commitment to quality in all that we do. Does your center or classroom look first day
ready, tidy and clean? Is pride in our environment evident the moment someone arrives, or are visitors
met with clutter, and an environment that needs care and attention? If the prize patrol dropped in to
present a quality environment reward, would they be in the right place?
Environment: A positive, safe, nurturing environment. Is the environment welcoming? Do people
feel good the moment they walk in. By having a well cared for environment, we send the message that
we are a caring community.

                                          SIGN LANGUAGE
Basic sign language is used in preschool classrooms to assist with behavior management, develop fine
motor skill, assist children with focusing their attention, and providing a link between languages when
there are children learning another language in the classroom. The “We Can Curriculum” includes
sign language materials. “A Word in the Hand” is another sign language resource available at all of
the centers.
                                                                                        Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                      Page28
                                                                                                 2011-2012
                                  DUAL LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Teaching teams with dual language learners in their classroom need to ensure that these children have
the same access to the social and educational activities as the other children. Specific strategies to
assist dual language learners are available through http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/.
Teaching Strategies GOLD also has resources with specific strategies teaching teams can use to help
children develop both receptive and expressive English skills.
For dual language learners it is important to continue to support the development of a child’s home
language. The loss of the first language can be detrimental for personal, familial, religious and cultural
reasons. Research shows that second-language learners who do best in school are those who have a
strong grounding in their home language.


                                 CHILD AND FAMILY STAFFING
An important aspect of supporting children’s growth, development, and individualizing is utilizing
time that is set aside for staffing on children and families. Discussing observations and sharing
information regarding the child’s growth and development will help develop ideas on how to best
individualize services for each child and family. Guidelines have been developed to support the
staffing process. These can be located in the Child and Family Staffing section in the Master Manual
                                 TEACHING STRATEGIES GOLD
During the 2011-2012, WCFD will begin using Teaching Strategies GOLD as the Assessment System
to document and track child progress towards educational outcomes. We currently have access to this
system, which presents us with an opportunity to learn and understand the system before we implement
it. Teachers and administrators can access the GOLD Assessment system by clicking the link in
CreativeCurriculum.net or directly through teachingstrategies.com. The user name and password for
both programs is the same. Online orientation sessions are available, and registration is available on
line once you log into the system.

Professional development is built into the Teaching Strategies GOLD Assessment system. Twelve
hours of STARS training credit will be available for completing the online training modules which
introduce teachers to the components and structure of Teaching Strategies GOLD™.

Through video clips, individual reflections, activities, and quizzes, teachers will explore the
progressions of development and learning for children birth through kindergarten. They will practice
using the 4-step assessment cycle, including evaluating a child’s portfolio and developing a
communication plan. Additionally, teachers will have the opportunity to explore and practice using the
technology side of Teaching Strategies GOLD™. Administrators can also participate in these training
opportunities.

By the end of the sessions users will have the basic skills to begin implementing Teaching Strategies
GOLD™ using the online system. Additional practice opportunities are available in the GOLD
Sandbox. In the Sandbox you can practice using all the features of Teaching Strategies GOLD™
without the worry of making a mistake! You will be able to access sample child portfolios, create new
portfolios, practice evaluating and planning for children, and access all other teacher functionality on
the site.


                                                                                       Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                     Page29
                                                                                                  2011-2012
The Sandbox comes preloaded with sample documentation for two children. You have the option to
create two additional practice portfolios. Please note that the children and data added here will not be
part of your regular Teaching Strategies GOLD™ account.
Expectations: Teaching staff and administrators will complete the online Teaching Strategies GOLD
training modules by the first of May.




                                                                                        Curriculum – Section B
                                                                                                      Page30
                          2011-2012


         Section C

New Teacher and Paraeducator
         Training
                                                                                         2011-2012
      Recommended Training Guidelines for New Teachers and Home Visitors

Month 1
  1. The Center Coordinator and Area Coordinator will match the staff member with a seasoned
     mentor.
  2. Read the Curriculum/Education section of the Master Manual.
  3. Begin reading the Creative Curriculum for Preschool.
  4. Watch the Creative Curriculum Room Arrangement and Creative Curriculum For Early
     Childhood Video.
  5. Complete CC.net training with the Area Coordinator or Education Coordinator.
  6. Complete training by Area Coordinator or Center Coordinator on lesson planning.
  7. Complete the Creative Curriculum Implementation Checklist and the Creative Curriculum
     Literacy Implementation Checklist training by the Area Coordinator or Center Coordinator.
  8. Home Visitors will complete training in other aspects of their job according to the Master
     Manual.
  9. Complete Beyond Behavior Management PowerPoint training. This resource will be very
     important in guiding positive teaching strategies.

Month 2
  1. Continue contact with the mentor.
  2. Complete the Creative Curriculum Implementation Checklist and Creative Curriculum.
  3. Complete training on the parent-teacher conference process and reports.
  4. Complete training with Center Coordinator or Area Coordinator on Social Emotional
     Support Plans. Refer to the Mental Health section of the Master Manual for further
     assistance.
  5. Continue reading Creative Curriculum .
  6. Complete CLASS Overview training with CLASS trainer.

Month 3
  1. Begin watching the CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National
     Head Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
  2. Continue reading Creative Curriculum.
  3. Begin reading Beyond Behavior Management.
  4. Request further training in desired content or procedures as necessary through the Center
     Coordinator. The Center Coordinator will contact the appropriate trainer.

Month 4
  1. Continue watching CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National
     Head Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
  2. Continue reading Creative Curriculum.
  3. Continue reading Beyond Behavior Management.

Month 5
  1. Continue to read Creative Curriculum.
  2. Continue watching CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National
     Head Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
  3. Continue reading Beyond Behavior Management.
                                                                               Curriculum – Section-C
                                                                                               Page 1
                                                                                              2011-2012
   Month 6
     1. Continue to read Creative Curriculum.
     2. Continue watching CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National
        Head Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
     3. Continue reading Beyond Behavior Management.

   Month 7
     1. Continue to read Creative Curriculum.
     2. Finish watching CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National Head
        Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
     3. Continue reading Beyond Behavior Management.

   Month 8
     1. Continue to Read Creative Curriculum.
     2. Continue reading Beyond Behavior Management.

   Month 9
     1. Finish reading Creative Curriculum.
     2. Finish reading Beyond Behavior Management.

   Ongoing
     1. Participate in ongoing CLASS dimensions trainings and monthly video observations and
         reflections.
     2. Begin reading other resources outlined in the Curriculum Section of the Master Manual.

Training may be extended over a longer period of time for both teachers and paraeducators.


                  Recommended Training Guidelines for New Paraeducators
   Month 1
     1. The Center Coordinator and Area Coordinator will match the staff member with a seasoned
        mentor.
     2. Watch the Creative Curriculum Room Arrangement and Creative Curriculum For Early
        Childhood Video.
     3. Begin reading Creative Curriculum for Preschool (one chapter).
     4. OPTIONAL: complete CC.net training with the Area Coordinator. Some centers do not
        have paraeducators enter anecdotal notes into CC.net.
     5. Sign up for CDA.
     6. Complete Beyond Behavior Management power point training. This resource will be very
        important in guiding positive teaching strategies.

   Month 2
     1. Continue contact with the mentor.
     2. Complete the Creative Curriculum Implementation Checklist and the Creative Curriculum
        Literacy Implementation Checklist training with the Teacher.
     3. Begin watching CIRCLE tapes and read corresponding chapters from the National Head
        Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Watch one segment and chapter per month.
     4. Read one chapter of Creative Curriculum for Preschool.
                                                                                    Curriculum – Section-C
                                                                                                    Page 2
                                                                                       2011-2012

Month 3
  1. Complete CLASS Overview training with CLASS trainer.
  2. Continue watching the CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National
     Head Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
  3. Read one chapter of Creative Curriculum for Preschool.
  4. Begin reading Beyond Behavior Management.

Month 4
  1. Continue watching CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National
     Head Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
  2. Read one chapter of Creative Curriculum for Preschool.
  3. Read one chapter of Beyond Behavior Management.

Month 5
  1. Continue watching CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National
     Head Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
  2. Read one chapter of Creative Curriculum for Preschool.
  3. Read one chapter of Beyond Behavior Management.

Month 6
  1. Continue watching CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National
     Head Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
  2. Read one chapter of Creative Curriculum for Preschool.
  3. Read one chapter of Beyond Behavior Management.

Month 7
  1. Finish watching CIRCLE videos and read corresponding chapters from the National Head
     Start STEP Teacher’s Manual. Complete one per month.
  2. Read one chapter of Creative Curriculum for Preschool.
  3. Read one chapter of Beyond Behavior Management.

Month 8 and 9
  1. Read one chapter of Creative Curriculum for Preschool.
  2. Read one chapter of Beyond Behavior Management.
Ongoing
  1. Participate in ongoing CLASS dimensions trainings and monthly video observations and
      reflections.
  2. Begin reading other resources outlined in the Curriculum Section of the Master Manual.

Contact your Center Coordinator if you would like further training content or procedures.




                                                                             Curriculum – Section-C
                                                                                             Page 3

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:110
posted:8/18/2011
language:English
pages:39