Docstoc

BCPP6e_TB_Ch08

Document Sample
BCPP6e_TB_Ch08 Powered By Docstoc
					Chapter 8—Positive Letters and Messages
     DIFFICULTY (DIF)          TYPE                            OTHER CODES
     5 = Most difficult        Ap: Application question        ANS: Answer
     3 = Average difficulty    Con: Conceptual question        REF: Page Reference
     1 = Least difficult       Def: Definition                 OBJ: Chapter Objective
                                                               NOT: Note (feedback/explanations)
                                                               AAC: AACSB Competencies


MULTIPLE CHOICE


1.   Letters are a primary channel of communication for delivering messages
     a. inside an organization.
     b. outside an organization.
     c. inside and outside an organization.
     d. that need to reach the recipient immediately.

     ANS: B           DIF: 3          REF: p. 201 OBJ: 8-1          TYPE: Con
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT A-D:
     Letters are a primary channel of communication for delivering messages outside an organization.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion

2.   A company’s most important letters are written to
     a. the government.
     b. customers.
     c. other businesses.
     d. suppliers.

     ANS: B           DIF: 3          REF: p. 201 OBJ: 8-1           TYPE: Con
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT A-D:
     Letters to customers are the most important because these messages encourage product feedback,
     project a favorable image of the company, and promote future business.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Audience

3.   For which of the following situations would a letter be more appropriate than an e-mail
     message?
     a. Requesting information about a product
     b. Replying to a customer’s e-mail asking about available shipping methods
     c. Thanking your boss for a birthday gift she gave you
     d. Telling all employees how to purchase parking permits

     ANS: C         DIF: 5           REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1          TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT:
     a. An e-mail message would be more appropriate for requesting information about a product.
     b. An e-mail message would be more appropriate to reply to a customer who asked questions
        via e-mail about available shipping methods.

                                                217
218                                                                     UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      c. A letter would be more appropriate for thanking your boss for a birthday gift because
         formality is needed.
      d. An e-mail message would be more appropriate for telling all employees how to purchase
         parking permits.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Receiver reactions, Consequences
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience

4.    Business letters are preferred over e-mail messages when
      a. a permanent record is required.
      b. confidentiality is paramount.
      c. formality and sensitivity are essential.
      d. all of the above occur.

      ANS: D           DIF: 3           REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1           TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
      NOT A-D:
      A business letter should be sent instead of an e-mail message when any of these are required: a
      permanent record, confidentiality, formality, or sensitivity.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Receiver reactions, Consequences
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience

5.    Caroline is writing a recommendation for one of her former employees. What is the best
      communication channel for Caroline to use to send this message to a potential employer?
      a. E-mail
      b. Fax
      c. Bound report
      d. Letter

      ANS: D            DIF: 5         REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1             TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
      NOT A-D:
      It is best to send a recommendation as a letter because it may contain confidential and sensitive
      information.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Receiver reactions, Consequences
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience

6.    What is the best communication channel to use when a persuasive, well-considered message is
      required?
      a. E-mail
      b. Letter
      c. Memo
      d. Fax

      ANS: B          DIF: 3         REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1           TYPE: Con
      TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
      NOT A-D:
      When a business communicator must be persuasive and can’t do it in person, a business letter is
      more effective than other communication channels.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Receiver reactions, Consequences
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                                  219

7.   Luke is writing a letter to a local company to ask about internship opportunities. What should he
     do first?
     a. Prepare the rough draft.
     b. Look up the company’s address.
     c. Decide how he will encourage feedback.
     d. Analyze the purpose of the letter and the reader.

     ANS: D          DIF: 5            REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1            TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT A-D:
     Before writing the letter, Luke should analyze the purpose of the letter and his audience.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

8.   Danielle is about to begin the second phase of the 3-x-3 writing process as she works on a letter
     to her clients. What will she do first in this phase?
     a. Analyze the purpose of her letter.
     b. Collect any necessary information.
     c. Proofread her first draft.
     d. Compose the letter.

     ANS: B          DIF: 5          REF: p. 204 OBJ: 8-1              TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT A-D:
     Danielle will begin the second phase of the 3-x-3 writing process by collecting any necessary
     information.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

9.   Jeremy is working on a business letter and is in the third phase of the 3-x-3 writing process. He
     has already revised his letter for clarity and has proofread the letter for correctness. What is left
     in this phase for Jeremy to do?
     a. Decide on the letter’s organization.
     b. Prepare a cluster diagram.
     c. Evaluate the effectiveness of the letter from the reader’s standpoint.
     d. Check for typos.

     ANS: C           DIF: 5          REF: p. 204 OBJ: 8-1             TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT A-D:
     After revising and proofreading the letter, Jeremy will want to evaluate its effectiveness from the
     reader’s standpoint.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

10. Kathryn booked a hotel through a local travel agency. Her accommodations were not as the agent
    described. Although she stayed in the hotel, she was very unhappy and feels that the agent is at
    fault. The best way for Kathryn to communicate her unhappiness with the accommodations
    would be to
    a. write a memo to the travel agent who booked her hotel.
    b. send an e-mail message to the travel agent who booked her hotel.
    c. telephone the Better Business Bureau to make a complaint about the travel agency.
    d. write a letter to the travel agent who booked her hotel.
220                                                                     UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      ANS: D          DIF: 5            REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1             TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
      NOT:
      a. Because letters are more formal than memos and are sent to external audiences, Kathryn
         should write a letter rather than a memo to the travel agent.
      b. Because Kathryn needs a permanent record of the problem, she should write a letter to the
         travel agent.
      c. Before filing a complaint, Kathryn should write a letter to the travel agent.
      d. Kathryn should write a letter to the travel agent so that she has a permanent record.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

11. Correspondence for everyday business transactions consists mainly of
    a. routine requests and responses.
    b. persuasive requests.
    c. goodwill messages.
    d. claims and complaints.

      ANS: A         DIF: 3         REF: p. 204 OBJ: 8-2             TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT A-D:
      The everyday correspondence of a business consists mainly of routine requests and responses.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

12. Routine business letters should be written using
    a. the indirect strategy.
    b. persuasive techniques.
    c. the direct strategy.
    d. pretty, scented stationery.

      ANS: C          DIF: 3          REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2              TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT A-D:
      Because you expect the reader’s response to routine business letters to be positive or neutral, you
      should use the direct strategy.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

13. The purpose of a routine business letter should be placed in
    a. the body.
    b. the opening.
    c. an attachment.
    d. the closing.

      ANS: B         DIF: 3        REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2             TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT A-D:
      When writing everyday messages, place the main idea or purpose in the opening paragraph.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                               221

14. Which of the following is the best example of frontloading an information request message?
    a. I am writing this letter to ask for information about some of your products.
    b. Our manager recently gave his staff approval to purchase new office printers.
    c. Hi, my name is Charlie Shi, and I have been asked to write to you directly.
    d. Please answer the following questions about your office printers.

     ANS: D         DIF: 5           REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2                TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT:
     a. This statement is too wordy, vague, and indirect.
     b. This statement gives background information that is not needed.
     c. This statement is unnecessary and does not directly specify why you are writing.
     d. This statement is a direct opening that tells the reader specifically why you are writing.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

15. The best business writers do what in the opening paragraph of a routine business letter?
    a. Identify themselves by name and title.
    b. State immediately why they are writing.
    c. Tell a story about the background of the situation.
    d. Greet the reader warmly by asking how he or she is doing.

     ANS: B          DIF: 3            REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2           TYPE: Con
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT A-D:
     The best business writers state immediately why they are writing a routine business letter so that
     the reader can anticipate and comprehend what follows.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

16. The body of a routine business letter should
    a. present details that explain your request or response.
    b. request action from the reader.
    c. give any deadline dates.
    d. reveal for the first time why you are writing.

     ANS: A          DIF: 3           REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2               TYPE: Con
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT A-D:
     The body of a routine business letter is used to present details that explain your request or
     response.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

17. You must ask a series of questions in a routine request letter. What is the best way to present
    these questions?
    a. In a paragraph in the body of your letter
    b. In a separate attached document
    c. In a bulleted or numbered list in the body of your letter
    d. In the closing paragraph of your letter so that they’re not overlooked

     ANS: C      DIF: 5           REF: p. 205 OBJ:              8-2     TYPE:      Ap
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
222                                                                      UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      NOT A-D:
      For maximum readability, a series of questions should be placed in a bulleted or numbered list in
      the body of your letter.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

18. What is the best advice for writing the body of a routine business letter?
    a. Avoid using graphic devices such as lists or headings because they might confuse the reader.
    b. Remember that the biggest problem in business writing is poor organization.
    c. Make sure that the body is no longer than one paragraph.
    d. Use the reader’s name several times in the body to personalize your letter.

      ANS: B         DIF: 3           REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2              TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT:
      a. Consider using graphic devices in the body of a routine business letter to maximize clarity
         and readability.
      b. The biggest problem in business writing is poor organization, and the body of a letter is
         where that failure becomes apparent.
      c. If you have considerable information, you will want to develop each idea in a separate
         paragraph with effective transitions to connect them.
      d. Using the reader’s name several times in the body of a letter is not necessary.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

19. Where should deadlines and action information be placed in a routine business letter?
    a. In the introduction
    b. In the body
    c. In the closing
    d. In a P.S. to the letter

      ANS: C           DIF: 3           REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2               TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT A-D:
      In the closing paragraph of direct letters, readers look for action information, such as schedules,
      deadlines, and activities to be completed.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

20. Three characteristics distinguish good business letters. Which of the following is not one of those
    characteristics?
    a. Clear content
    b. High-quality letterhead stationery
    c. Correct form
    d. A tone of goodwill

      ANS: B           DIF: 3            REF: pp. 205-206        OBJ: 8-2            TYPE:          Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT A-D:
      At least three characteristics distinguish good business letters: clear content, a tone of goodwill,
      and correct form.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                               223

21. Enrique is writing a letter to apply for a job and wants to make sure that his content is clear. What
    should he do?
    a. Use the passive voice.
    b. Use short sentences and paragraphs.
    c. Use high-level vocabulary that will impress the prospective employer.
    d. “Dumb” down his remarks.

     ANS: B          DIF: 5          REF: pp. 205-206          OBJ: 8-2          TYPE:        Ap
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT:
     a. To make his letter clear, Enrique should use the active voice, not the passive voice.
     b. To make his letter clear, Enrique should use short sentences and paragraphs.
     c. To make his letter clear, Enrique should use familiar vocabulary that his reader will
        understand.
     d. Clear letters speak the language of the receiver, but this does not mean “dumbing down” your
        remarks.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

22. Tatiana is writing a letter to a local nonprofit agency and wants to make sure that the letter will
    build goodwill with the organization. What should Tatiana do to achieve a goodwill tone in her
    letter?
    a. Use popular slang and jargon to make the letter sound more down-to-earth.
    b. Format the letter professionally and attractively.
    c. Present the message from the reader’s point of view.
    d. Enclose a few dollar bills.

     ANS: C         DIF: 5          REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-2             TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT A-D:
     To achieve goodwill, Tatiana should write from the reader’s point of view.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience

23. Which of the following statements best demonstrates a goodwill tone?
    a. We are looking for an applicant who has earned his degree from an Ivy League school.
    b. We don’t have any positions available for someone like you.
    c. We are excited to announce an available position in our Finance Department.
    d. Your application for the financial analyst position has been reviewed.

     ANS: D         DIF: 5           REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-2            TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT:
     a. This sentence does not demonstrate goodwill because it shows gender bias (assumes all
        applicants are male).
     b. This sentence does not demonstrate goodwill because it uses negative language and would
        make the reader feel bad.
     c. This sentence does not use the “you” view.
     d. This sentence demonstrates goodwill because it is positive and uses the “you” view.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience
224                                                                      UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

24. Royce wants to make sure that a letter he is sending to a client is properly formatted. What
    should he do?
    a. Use even (justified) right and left margins for a professional look.
    b. Use block style or another accepted business letter format.
    c. Place the letter as close to the top of the page as possible, no matter its length.
    d. All of the above.

      ANS: B           DIF: 5           REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-2           TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT:
      a. To make his letter easier to read, Royce should use a ragged right margin (unjustified).
      b. Royce should use block style or another accepted business letter style.
      c. Royce should balance the letter on the page, both horizontally and vertically. Bunching a
         short letter up near the top of a page looks unprofessional.
      d. Royce should use block style or another accepted business letter style.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience
      AAC: Tier 1—Technology; Tier 2—Word processing

25. Which statement about formatting business letters is most accurate?
    a. The format of a business letter is not important; it is the content of the letter that matters.
    b. Block style means that a business letter contains justified (even) right and left margins.
    c. A carefully formatted letter reflects the writer’s carefulness and experience.
    d. A justified right margin improves the readability of a business letter.

      ANS: C          DIF: 5            REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-2                 TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT:
      a. A business letter conveys silent messages beyond that of its printed words.
      b. In a block style letter, the parts of the letter (dateline, inside address, salutation,
         complimentary close, and so on) are set flush at the left margin.
      c. A letter’s appearance and format reflect the writer’s carefulness and experience.
      d. Experts say that unjustified right margins improve readability.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience
      AAC: Tier 1—Technology; Tier 2—Word processing

26. What should you do first before starting to write a routine letter that requests information?
    a. Choose the font style and letter format you will use.
    b. Call the reader to verify his or her address.
    c. Consider its costs in terms of your time and workload.
    d. Make sure your printer has enough toner.

      ANS: C           DIF: 3           REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-3              TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
      NOT A-D:
      Before you write any letter, consider its costs in terms of your time and workload. Whenever
      possible, don’t write! If you can, find the information yourself.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion

27. Which of the following is a command disguised as a polite request?
    a. I need your sales data by tomorrow.
    b. Will you please send my order by USPS Priority Mail.
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                           225

     c. Can you meet this month’s deadline?
     d. Bring a copy of the report to today’s meeting.

     ANS: B          DIF: 5         REF: p. 207 OBJ: 8-3           TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
     NOT A-D:
     “Will you please send my order by USPS Priority Mail” is a command disguised as a polite
     request.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

28. Magdalena is writing a letter to a company to ask about its software for removing malware
    (malicious software) from her company’s network. Which is the best opening statement for her
    letter?
    a. I read about your new malware removal program on TechnologyReview.com.
    b. Our company has recently become the victim of malware, and I have been assigned to do
         something about it.
    c. Please answer the following questions about your new malware removal program.
    d. I am hoping you will be able to provide more information about one of your new products.

     ANS: C        DIF: 5           REF: pp. 206-207           OBJ: 8-3         TYPE:        Ap
     TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
     NOT:
     a. The opening statements of letters that request information should be direct.
     b. The opening statements of letters that request information should be direct.
     c. This opening statement is best because it is direct and specific.
     d. The opening statements of letters that request information should be direct.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

29. Which question will elicit the most information when asked in a letter requesting information and
    action?
    a. What brands and models of smart phones do you recommend?
    b. Do you carry the new Nokia line of smart phones?
    c. What do you charge for shipping?
    d. Do you offer a warranty with a smart phone purchase?

     ANS: A          DIF: 5            REF: p. 207 OBJ: 8-3           TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
     NOT:
     a. Use open-ended questions such as this in the body of letters requesting information and
        action to elicit the most information.
     b. Yes-or-no questions such as this do not elicit as much information as open-ended questions.
     c. Yes-or-no questions such as this do not elicit as much information as open-ended questions.
     d. Yes-or-no questions such as this do not elicit as much information as open-ended questions.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

30. Which of the following is the best closing sentence for a letter requesting information?
    a. Thank you in advance for your cooperation.
    b. Your answers to these questions by May 31 will help us decide which product to purchase.
    c. Thank you.
    d. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call me.
226                                                                   UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      ANS: B          DIF: 5          REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-3              TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
      NOT:
      a. Avoid trite and presumptuous closings such as “Thank you in advance for your cooperation.”
      b. You can save the reader time by spelling out the action to be taken in the closing of your
         letter.
      c. Some careless writers end request letters simply with “Thank you,” forcing the reader to
         review the contents to determine what is expected and when.
      d. Avoid trite closings such as “please do not hesitate to call me.”
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

31. Denzel is writing a letter asking for information and wants so show appreciation to his reader in
    the closing. Which of the following statements best shows his appreciation?
    a. Thank you for your cooperation.
    b. I appreciate this information because it will allow me to make an effective decision about
        which plan to choose.
    c. Thank you in advance for all you have done for me.
    d. All of the above are effective for showing appreciation.

      ANS: B          DIF: 5           REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-3              TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
      NOT:
      a. This closing is not effective because this ending is overused.
      b. This ending is effective because it shows how the information will help Denzel.
      c. This closing is not effective because this ending is trite and presumptuous.
      d. The only closing that effectively shows appreciation is “I appreciate this information because
         it will allow me to make an effective decision about which plan to choose.”
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

32. Which of the following is the best example of a situation justifying a straightforward claim?
    a. The transmission in your car gave out within the warranty period.
    b. A shipment arrived two weeks after it was promised.
    c. Your credit card was billed twice for a purchase you made.
    d. All of the above are examples of straightforward claims.

      ANS: D           DIF: 5           REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4          TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Direct Claims
      NOT A-D:
      All of these are examples of straightforward claims because you would expect the reader in each
      case to agree readily.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

33. Which of the following statements about straightforward claims is most accurate?
    a. Written claims are taken more seriously than claims made by phone.
    b. Straightforward claims require persuasion.
    c. When you have a straightforward claim, your first step should always be to write a claim
       letter.
    d. Straightforward claims should be written using the indirect pattern.

      ANS: A          DIF:    5       REF:    p. 208 OBJ:      8-4     TYPE:     Ap
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                                227

     TOP: Direct Claims
     NOT:
     a. Written claims are taken more seriously than claims made by phone.
     b. Straightforward claims are those to which you expect the receiver to agree readily; therefore,
        they do not require persuasion.
     c. When you have a claim, your first action may be a telephone call or a visit to submit your
        claim.
     d. Straightforward claims use a direct approach.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

34. The opening of a straightforward claim letter should
    a. explain the problem in detail and justify your request.
    b. use an angry tone to show the reader that you are serious.
    c. open with a clear statement of the problem or with the action you want the receiver to take.
    d. remain vague so that the reader can decide on a remedy for the problem.

     ANS: C         DIF: 3           REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4             TYPE: Con
     TOP: Direct Claims
     NOT:
     a. You should explain the problem and justify your request in the body of a straightforward
        claim.
     b. Use a positive, courteous tone in the opening of a straightforward claim.
     c. A straightforward claim should open with a clear statement of the problem or with the action
        you want the receiver to take.
     d. Writers who make straightforward claims should state specifically in the opening what action
        they want to see taken.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

35. Which of the following is the best opening for a straightforward claim letter?
    a. I have been a loyal customer of Tommaso’s for many years.
    b. Please credit my Visa account for $20, the amount I was overcharged on March 12.
    c. I was extremely disappointed to be overcharged on my dinner bill.
    d. All of the above are effective openings for a routine claim letter.

     ANS: B          DIF: 5           REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4             TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Direct Claims
     NOT A-D:
     You should open a routine claim letter with a clear statement of the problem or with the action
     you want the receiver to take; therefore, “Please credit my Visa account for $20, the amount I
     was overcharged on March 12” is the best opening.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

36. What should you do in the body of a straightforward claim letter?
    a. Mention that you have enclosed copies of all pertinent documents.
    b. Show that you are angry about the situation so that you will be taken seriously.
    c. Mention the name of the person who is to blame for the problem.
    d. All of the above should be included in the body of a straightforward claim letter.

     ANS: A       DIF: 3             REF:     pp. 208-210     OBJ:    8-4        TYPE:         Ap
     TOP: Direct Claims
228                                                                    UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      NOT:
      a. Copies of all pertinent documents (invoices, sales slips, catalog descriptions, repair records,
         and so on) should be included with a straightforward claim letter; mention these enclosures in
         the body of your letter.
      b. Avoid becoming angry in a straightforward claim letter.
      c. Avoid trying to fix blame in a straightforward claim letter.
      d. Copies of all pertinent documents (invoices, sales slips, catalog descriptions, repair records,
         and so on) should be included with a straightforward claim letter; mention these enclosures in
         the body of your letter.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

37. Which of the following is the best closing for a straightforward claim letter?
    a. Thank you in advance for your consideration in this matter.
    b. Please credit $20 to my account by March 31, when my next billing cycle begins.
    c. If I don’t get a refund by March 31, I will contact my attorney.
    d. I look forward to having this adjustment made as soon as possible.

      ANS: B          DIF: 5           REF: p. 210 OBJ: 8-4             TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Direct Claims
      NOT:
      a. Avoid trite closings such as “Thank you in advance for your consideration” in a business
         letter.
      b. This straightforward closing tells exactly what is to be done and provides an end date.
      c. This closing is too threatening and is unnecessary in a straightforward claim letter.
      d. This closing needs a specific end date rather than the indeterminate “as soon as possible.”
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

38. Which of the following is the most effective subject line for a direct reply letter?
    a. This is a reply to your June 5 letter.
    b. Reply to Your Letter
    c. Your June 5 Inquiry About Venice Travel Packages
    d. URGENT!!

      ANS: C          DIF: 5           REF: p. 212 OBJ: 8-5               TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Direct Replies
      NOT:
      a. A subject line need not be a complete sentence, and it should not end with a period.
      b. This subject line is vague.
      c. This subject line is most effective because it refers specifically to previous correspondence.
      d. This subject line is irrelevant.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

39. Which of the following is the best opening sentence for a direct reply letter?
    a. Here are the answers to the questions you asked about our storage products.
    b. Thank you for your letter of September 19.
    c. We look forward to helping you with all of your storage needs.
    d. Your letter of September 19 was referred to me.

      ANS: A       DIF: 5              REF:    p. 212 OBJ:      8-5     TYPE:      Ap
      TOP: Direct Replies
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                                229

     NOT:
     a. This introductory sentence is effective because it delivers the information the reader wants.
     b. This is a wordy, unnecessary introductory sentence.
     c. This sentence would be better in the closing of a direct reply letter.
     d. This is a wordy, unnecessary introductory sentence.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

40. What is the least accurate statement about direct reply letters?
    a. A reply letter written on company stationery is a legally binding contract.
    b. In addition to supplying answers, a reply letter should promote your organization and
       products.
    c. If your message contains mostly good news but also has some negative elements, use the
       indirect organizational pattern.
    d. Use the subject line of a reply letter to refer to an earlier correspondence so that you can omit
       this reference in the opening of your letter.

     ANS: C          DIF: 3           REF: pp. 210-212        OBJ: 8-5             TYPE:      Con
     TOP: Direct Replies
     NOT:
     a. Because a reply letter written on company stationery is considered a legally binding contract,
        check all facts and figures carefully.
     b. When customers or prospective customers inquire about products and services, your response
        should do more than merely supply answers. It should also promote your organization and
        products.
     c. The direct pattern is appropriate for messages that contain mostly good news but may have
        some negative elements.
     d. Knowledgeable business communicators use a subject line to refer to earlier correspondence
        so that they are free to emphasize the main idea in the first sentence of the letter.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

41. Which of the following is not a goal in writing adjustment letters?
    a. To rectify a wrong, if one exists
    b. To regain the confidence of the customer
    c. To avoid future correspondence with the customer
    d. To promote future business

     ANS: C           DIF: 3          REF: p. 214 OBJ: 8-6              TYPE: Con
     TOP: Adjustments
     NOT:
     Three goals in writing adjustment letters include the following: to rectify a wrong, if one exists;
     to regain the confidence of the customer; and to promote future business.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Purpose

42. Which of the following is the best opening for an adjustment letter?
    a. We appreciate your letter of October 30 wherein you let us know what happened while
       dining with us last month.
    b. We have credited your account for $123 as refund for your dining bill.
    c. We are so sorry that you had a bad experience while dining with us last month.
    d. Although we generally don’t offer refunds, we’re willing to make an exception in this case.
230                                                                    UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      ANS: B          DIF: 5          REF: pp. 214-216        OBJ: 8-6           TYPE:          Ap
      TOP: Adjustments
      NOT:
      a. This opening is indirect and unnecessary; the opening of a positive adjustment letter should
         approve the customer’s claim immediately.
      b. The opening of a positive adjustment letter should approve the customer’s claim
      immediately.
      c. Don’t begin your adjustment letter with a negative comment. This approach reminds the
         reader of the problem and may rekindle the heated emotions or unhappy feelings experienced
         when the claim was written.
      d. This opening sounds grudging and would not promote goodwill.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

43. What should you do in the body of an adjustment letter?
    a. Explain who specifically is to blame for the problem.
    b. Explain how you are complying with the claim.
    c. Promise the customer that the problem will never happen again.
    d. Apologize profusely.

      ANS: B         DIF: 5          REF: p. 216 OBJ: 8-6             TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Adjustments
      NOT:
      a. Blaming individuals or departments within your organization is unprofessional.
      b. In the body of an adjustment letter, explain how you are complying with the claim so that
         you can regain the confidence of the customer.
      c. Don’t make unrealistic promises; you can’t guarantee that the situation will never recur.
      d. Whether to apologize is a debatable issue. The primary focus of an adjustment letter is on
         how you are complying with the request.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

44. Which of the following is the best closing for an adjustment letter?
    a. We apologize for any inconvenience this has caused.
    b. We are deeply sorry for this unfortunate event.
    c. We hope that this refund check proves our commitment to providing excellent customer
       service.
    d. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call.

      ANS: C         DIF: 5           REF: pp. 216-217         OBJ: 8-6           TYPE:           Ap
      TOP: Adjustments
      NOT A-D:
      a. An adjustment letter should end positively, with a focus on future business.
      b. An adjustment letter should end positively, with a focus on future business.
      c. To close an adjustment letter, assume that the problem has been resolved and that future
         business will continue.
      d. Avoid ending any business letter with a trite phrase (“please do not hesitate to call”).
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

45. What is the most accurate statement about goodwill messages?
    a. Goodwill messages are obsolete in today’s fast-paced society.
    b. You’ll make a better impression by giving a ready-made card than by writing your own message.
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                             231

     c. Goodwill messages carry the hidden message that you care.
     d. Most communicators find it easier to write goodwill messages than other types of business
        documents.

     ANS: C         DIF: 3           REF: pp. 216-217        OBJ: 8-7         TYPE:        Con
     TOP: Goodwill Messages
     NOT:
     a. Goodwill messages are still used and appreciated in today’s society.
     b. The personal sentiments of the sender are always more expressive and more meaningful to
        readers than are printed cards.
     c. Goodwill messages carry the hidden message that you care and that you consider an event to
        be important.
     d. Many communicators are intimidated when they must write goodwill messages and find
        writing them more difficult than writing ordinary business documents.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

46. The best goodwill messages concentrate on the five Ss. Which of the following is not one of the
    five Ss?
    a. Specific
    b. Self-serving
    c. Spontaneous
    d. Short

     ANS: B         DIF: 3         REF: pp. 217-219          OBJ: 8-7            TYPE:         Con
     TOP: Goodwill Messages
     NOT A-D:
     The best goodwill messages concentrate on the five Ss: Selfless, Specific, Sincere, Spontaneous,
     and Short.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

47. Which of the following is the best statement to include in a goodwill message?
    a. You must be so excited. I remember how I felt when I finally earned my master’s degree.
    b. Thank you for the wonderful birthday gift.
    c. Good luck in the future.
    d. We are so sorry, Sonia, to learn of the loss of your husband Gary.

     ANS: D          DIF: 5          REF: pp. 219-221         OBJ: 8-7           TYPE:      Ap
     TOP: Goodwill Messages
     NOT:
     a. The best goodwill messages focus solely on the receiver, not the sender.
     b. Personalize the message by mentioning specific details of the gift received.
     c. Keep the message fresh and enthusiastic. Avoid canned phrases such as “Good luck in the
        future.”
     d. Refer to the death or misfortune sensitively, using words that show you understand what a
        crushing blow it is.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

48. When thanking someone for a gift, you should cover three points. Which of the following is not
    one of these points?
    a. Describe how you’re not worthy of such a gift.
232                                                                     UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      b. Identify the gift.
      c. Explain how you will use it.
      d. Tell why you appreciate it.

      ANS: A          DIF: 3           REF: pp. 219 OBJ: 8-7              TYPE: Con
      TOP: Goodwill Messages
      NOT A-D:
      Cover three points in gift thank-yous: identify the gift, tell why you appreciate it, and explain
      how you will use it. Don’t make belittling comments such as feeling that you’re not worthy to
      receive such a gift.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

49. Most international business letters
    a. tend to be written in an informal, conversational manner.
    b. should be written following generally accepted principles for writing American business
       letters.
    c. use active-voice constructions.
    d. should conform to the conventions of the receiver’s country.

      ANS: D         DIF: 3            REF: p. 222 OBJ: 8-8            TYPE: Con
      TOP: International Messages
      NOT:
      a. Most international business letters tend to use a more formal style than that used for
         American business letters.
      b. International business letters should conform to the conventions of the receiver’s country.
      c. International business letters should conform to the conventions of the receiver’s country.
      d. International business letters should conform to the conventions of the receiver’s country.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations
      AAC: Tier 1—Diversity; Tier 2—International applications

50. Which of the following statements about formatting international business messages is most
    accurate?
    a. The placement and arrangement of letter addresses and closing lines in business letters are
        the same worldwide.
    b. For clarity, dates should be expressed in figure format.
    c. If a letter is important, have someone familiar with local customs read and revise it.
    d. Business letters worldwide are typewritten and single-spaced.

      ANS: C          DIF: 3           REF: p. 223 OBJ: 8-8              TYPE: Con
      TOP: International Messages
      NOT:
      a. The placement and arrangement of letter addresses and closing lines in business letters vary
          greatly; you should research local preferences before writing.
      b. To be safe, spell out the names of months instead of using figures.
      c. For important letters going abroad, it’s also wise to have someone familiar with local
      customs         read and revise the message.
      d. In some countries business letters are handwritten and single- or double-spaced.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations
      AAC: Tier 1—Diversity; Tier 2—International applications
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                                 233

TRUE/FALSE

1.   Business letters are preferred over e-mail when a permanent record is required, when formality is
     necessary, and when a message is sensitive and requires an organized, well-considered
     presentation.

     ANS: T          DIF: 3         REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1             TYPE: Con
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT: Business letters are important when a permanent record is required, when formality is
     necessary, and when a message is sensitive and requires an organized, well-considered
     presentation.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Consequences
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience

2.   When a business communicator must be persuasive and can’t do it in person, a business letter is
     more effective than other communication channels.

     ANS: T        DIF: 3          REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1           TYPE: Con
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT: Business letters are more effective than other communication channels when a business
     communicator must be persuasive and cannot do it in person.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

3.   E-mail marketing has made direct-mail letters obsolete.

     ANS: F            DIF: 3            REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1      TYPE: Con
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT: Direct-mail letters remain a powerful tool to promote services and products, boost online
     and retail traffic, and solicit contributions.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience

4.   Most routine letters should be organized using the indirect strategy.

     ANS: F         DIF: 3         REF: p. 204 OBJ: 8-1            TYPE: Con
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     NOT: Most routine, everyday business letters should be organized in the direct manner with the
     main idea expressed immediately.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

5.   The everyday transactions of a business often require the writer to use special techniques to be
     convincing, to soften bad news, or to be tactful.

     ANS: F           DIF: 3           REF: p. 204 OBJ: 8-2             TYPE: Con
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT: The everyday transactions of a business consist mainly of routine requests and responses
     that do not require special techniques to be convincing, to soften bad news, or to be tactful.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns
234                                                                       UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

6.    Our company will be holding an employee retreat early next year is an example of frontloading
      in a letter to a hotel requesting information about accommodations.

      ANS: F          DIF: 5         REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2           TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT: “Our company will be holding an employee retreat early next year” is an indirect
      introductory sentence. An example of frontloading would be “Do you have retreat facilities to
      accommodate 115 people from April 13-16, 2010?”
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

7.    Numbered or bulleted lists, headings, columns, bolding, and italics are all examples of graphic
      devices that can be used to highlight details in a letter.

      ANS: T          DIF: 3            REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2        TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT: Use graphic devices to highlight the details: a numbered or bulleted list, headings,
      columns, or boldface or italic type.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Rhetorical considerations
      AAC: Tier 1—Technology; Tier 2—Word processing, Data conversion

8.    Most business letters are better if they start with the action desired or the main idea.

      ANS: T          DIF: 3        REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2             TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT: Most business letters are better written “backward”; they should start with the action
      desired or the main idea.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

9.    Action information, including deadline dates, should be placed in the body of a business letter.

      ANS: F           DIF: 3           REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2           TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT: In the closing paragraph of direct letters, readers look for action information: schedules,
      deadlines, or activities to be completed.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

10. Clear business letters answer all the reader’s questions or concerns so that no further
    correspondence is necessary.

      ANS: T          DIF: 3           REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-2            TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT: As many as one third of business letters do nothing more than seek clarification of earlier
      correspondence. Clear letters avoid this problem by answering all the reader’s questions or
      concerns so that no further correspondence is necessary.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                                235

11. Using the “you” view is one way to build goodwill in business letters.

     ANS: T          DIF: 3          REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-2            TYPE: Con
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT: To achieve goodwill, look for ways to present the message from the reader’s perspective.
     In other words, emphasize the “you” view and point out benefits to the reader.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience

12. A popular business letter format is block style.

     ANS: T           DIF: 3          REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-2             TYPE: Con
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT: Block style is a popular business letter format; in this style the parts of a letter (dateline,
     inside address, salutation, complimentary close, and so on) are set flush at the left margin.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Technology; Tier 2—Word processing

13. If you can get the information you need on your own, don’t write a business letter asking for it.

     ANS: T        DIF: 3            REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-3             TYPE: Con
     TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
     NOT: Before you write any letter, consider its costs in terms of your time and workload.
     Whenever possible, don’t write.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Syn./Asyn. choice

14. Polite requests, such as Will you please send a catalog, require a question mark.

     ANS: F           DIF: 5        REF: p. 207 OBJ: 8-3            TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
     NOT: Polite requests, such as “Will you please send a catalog,” are punctuated with a period
     rather than a question mark.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Standard English

15. To elicit the most information about a product, use questions such as Do you carry the Motorola
    Razr V3 cell phone?

     ANS: F          DIF: 5           REF: p. 207 OBJ: 8-3            TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
     NOT: To elicit the most information, pose open-ended questions (“What brands of cell phones
     do you carry?”) instead of yes-or-no questions (“Do you carry the Motorola Razr V3 cell
     phone?”).
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

16. Please provide answers to these questions by August 15 so that we can make a decision before
    our next fiscal year begins is an effective closing for a letter requesting action.

     ANS: T       DIF: 5            REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-3             TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
     NOT: This closing is effective because it includes an end date and a reason.
236                                                                      UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

17. Thank you in advance for your cooperation is an effective and professional way to show
    appreciation in a request letter.

      ANS: F          DIF: 5         REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-3              TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Direct Requests for Information or Action
      NOT: To show appreciation in a request letter, try to do so in a fresh and efficient manner.
      Avoid using trite and presumptuous expressions like “Thank you in advance for your
      cooperation.”
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

18. Straightforward claims are those to which you expect the receiver to agree readily.

      ANS: T           DIF: 1           REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4       TYPE: Def
      TOP: Direct Claims
      NOT: Straightforward claims are those to which you expect the receiver to agree readily and
      are written using the direct approach.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience

19. A phone call is usually taken more seriously than a written claim letter because it represents a
    personal communication.

      ANS: F       DIF: 3          REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4             TYPE: Con
      TOP: Direct Claims
      NOT: Written claims are taken more seriously and also establish a record of what happened.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

20. Typically, when you have a legitimate claim, you can expect a positive response from a
    company.

      ANS: T        DIF: 3          REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4           TYPE: Con
      TOP: Direct Claims
      NOT: When customers have legitimate claims, they can expect a positive response from a
      company. Smart businesses want to hear from their customers.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Rhetorical considerations, Audience

21. Showing that you are angry is an effective technique for getting a claim granted because it shows
    the intensity of your emotions..

      ANS: F           DIF: 3             REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4            TYPE: Con
      TOP: Direct Claims
      NOT: Bear in mind that the person reading your claim letter is seldom responsible for the
      action; therefore, state the facts logically, objectively, and unemotionally.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Rhetorical considerations, Audience
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                               237

22. Delay in writing a claim letter makes the claim appear less important to the receiver.

     ANS: T       DIF: 3          REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4           TYPE: Con
     TOP: Direct Claims
     NOT: Prompt claims show the importance of the claim and are easier to verify.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Audience

23. Subject lines are used in e-mail messages and memos but never in letters.

     ANS: F           DIF: 3         REF: p. 212 OBJ: 8-5             TYPE: Con
     TOP: Direct Replies
     NOT: Subject lines are often used in letters; for example, the subject line in a reply letter often
     refers to previous correspondence.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

24. An effective opener for a letter replying to a customer’s request might be Your letter of
    September 13, in which you request information about our new line of digital cameras, was
    forwarded to me.

     ANS: F          DIF: 5          REF: p. 212 OBJ: 8-5            TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Direct Replies
     NOT: Open a letter replying to a customer’s request directly: “Here is information you
     requested about our new line of digital cameras.”
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

25. When answering several of a customer’s questions in a letter, consider using lists or other graphic
    devices.

     ANS: T        DIF: 3          REF: p. 212 OBJ: 8-5            TYPE: Con
     TOP: Direct Replies
     NOT: Listing the answers to a customer’s questions will make the information more readable.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

26. When replying to a customer’s request for information, supply the answers only. Promoting your
    organization and products might appear to be pushy to the reader.

     ANS: F         DIF: 3         REF: p. 212 OBJ: 8-5           TYPE: Con
     TOP: Direct Replies
     NOT: When replying to a customer’s request for information, do more than merely supply
     answers. Try to promote your organization and products in a way that focuses on reader
     benefits.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

27. When writing a letter that contains mostly good news but may have some negative elements, use
    the direct approach.

     ANS: T       DIF: 3              REF:     p. 212 OBJ:     8-5      TYPE:     Con
     TOP: Direct Replies
238                                                                   UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      NOT: The direct pattern is appropriate for messages that are mostly good news but may have
      some negative elements.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

28. A letter granting an adjustment or a claim should be arranged using the indirect pattern.

      ANS: F       DIF: 3           REF: p. 214 OBJ: 8-6               TYPE:     Con
      TOP: Adjustments
      NOT: Use the direct pattern for letters granting adjustments or claims.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

29. One reason for granting adjustments is to satisfy customers and retain their business.

      ANS: T            DIF: 3          REF: p. 214 OBJ: 8-6          TYPE: Con
      TOP: Adjustments
      NOT: Businesses grant adjustments for two reasons. First, consumers are protected by
      contractual and tort law for recovery of damages. Second, most organizations genuinely want to
      satisfy their customers and retain their business.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Rhetorical considerations, Audience

30. A statement such as Even though we normally don’t repair printers that have been mishandled by
    their owners, we have decided to repair your printer this one time only is an effective way to
    grant a customer’s claim because it shows generosity.

      ANS: F           DIF: 5         REF: p. 216 OBJ: 8-6        TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Adjustments
      NOT: When granting a customer’s claim, do so willingly without placing blame on the
      customer; this statement sounds grudging.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

31. If you choose to apologize, the apology should be placed in the closing of an adjustment letter.

      ANS: F          DIF: 3           REF: pp. 216-217         OBJ: 8-6         TYPE:         Con
      TOP: Adjustments
      NOT: To close an adjustment letter, assume that the problem has been resolved and that future
      business will continue; therefore, you should end positively. Any apology should be placed
      elsewhere in the letter.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

32. Using words such as regret, inconvenience, and misunderstanding in an adjustment letter shows
    the reader that you care.

      ANS: F          DIF: 5           REF: p. 216 OBJ: 8-6        TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Adjustments
      NOT: Don’t use negative words (trouble, regret, misunderstanding, fault, error, inconvenience,
      you claim) in an adjustment letter.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                           239

33. Resale information should never be included in an adjustment letter.

     ANS: F           DIF: 3      REF: p. 217 OBJ: 8-6             TYPE: Con
     TOP: Adjustments
     NOT: To regain the confidence of your reader, consider including resale information in an
     adjustment letter.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

34. Writing goodwill messages—such as thank-you notes and condolence messages—is usually
    easier than writing other types of routine business documents.

     ANS: F          DIF: 3          REF: p. 217 OBJ: 8-7           TYPE: Con
     TOP: Goodwill Messages
     NOT: Finding the right words to express feelings in a goodwill message is often more difficult
     than writing ordinary business documents.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

35. Oral messages are usually more expressive and more meaningful to receivers than written
    goodwill messages.

     ANS: F           DIF: 3          REF: pp. 217-219         OBJ: 8-7           TYPE:       Con
     TOP: Goodwill Messages
     NOT: Written goodwill messages are always more expressive and more meaningful to receivers
     than are printed cards or oral messages. Taking time to write gives more importance to our well-
     being and also provides a record that can be reread, savored, and treasured.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

36. An effective goodwill message is Your presentation to the board about various funding options
    was well-researched and informative.
    ANS: T          DIF: 5         REF: p. 219 OBJ: 8-7             TYPE: Ap
    TOP: Goodwill Messages
    NOT: This message is effective because it has been personalized by mentioning a specific
    incident.
    AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
    AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

37. Goodwill messages should use phrases such as Thank you from the bottom of my heart or It gives
    me great pleasure to extend my congratulations.

     ANS: F       DIF: 5          REF: p. 219 OBJ: 8-7            TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Goodwill Messages
     NOT: Avoid pretentious, formal, or flowery language. Expressions like these do not sound
     sincere.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

38. Thank you for your letter congratulating me on my recent promotion to section supervisor; it was
    really nothing is an appropriate response to a letter congratulating an individual.

     ANS: F          DIF:    5       REF:    p. 221 OBJ:     8-7     TYPE:     Ap
240                                                                  UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      TOP: Goodwill Messages
      NOT: Avoid minimizing your achievements when responding to congratulatory notes.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience

39. When writing foreign business letters, use figures to express months and years such as 06/09/10
    because figures are concise and easily recognized.

      ANS: F        DIF: 5           REF: p. 223 OBJ: 8-8           TYPE: Ap
      TOP: International Messages
      NOT: To be safe, spell out the names of months instead of using figures in foreign business
      letters.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Diversity; Tier 2—International application

40. Businesspeople in all countries appreciate efficiency, straightforwardness, and conciseness in
    business letters.

      ANS: F           DIF: 3           REF: pp. 222--223 OBJ: 8-8               TYPE:         Con
      TOP: International Messages
      NOT: Although American businesspeople appreciate efficiency, straightforwardness, and
      conciseness in business letters, foreign correspondents may look upon such directness as
      inappropriate, insensitive, and abrasive.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Audience
      AAC: Tier 1—Diversity; Tier 2—International applications



COMPLETION

 1. Business ______________ are important when a permanent record is required, when formality is
    necessary, and when a message is sensitive and requires an organized, well-considered
    presentation.

      ANS: letters
      DIF: 3          REF: p. 201 OBJ: 8-1            TYPE: Con
      TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
      NOT: Business letters are important when a permanent record is required, when formality is
      necessary, and when a message is sensitive and requires an organized, well-considered
      presentation.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

 2. You should use the ____________ strategy for positive, everyday messages.

      ANS: direct
      DIF: 3       REF: p. 204 OBJ: 8-2             TYPE: Con
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
      NOT: You should use the direct strategy for positive, everyday messages.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                              241

 3. Numbered or bulleted lists, headings, columns, or boldface or italic type, also called
    ____________________ highlighting, can be used to highlight details in the body of a business
    letter.

     ANS: graphic
     DIF: 3          REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2              TYPE: Con
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT: Numbered or bulleted lists, headings, columns, or boldface or italic type, also called
     graphic highlighting, can be used to highlight details in the body of a business letter.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns
     AAC: Tier 1—Technology; Tier 2—Word processing, Data conversion

 4. Action information and deadlines belong in the ____________ of a business letter.

     ANS: closing
     DIF: 3       REF: p. 205 OBJ: 8-2            TYPE: Con
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT: Action information and deadlines belong in the closing of a business letter.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

 5. Characteristics of good business letters include clear content, goodwill tone, and correct
    ____________.

     ANS: form (or format)
     DIF: 3       REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-2              TYPE: Con
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT: Characteristics of good business letters include clear content, goodwill tone, and correct
     form.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns

 6. ____________________-style letters are formatted with all parts of the letter—dateline, inside
    address, body, and so on—set flush left.

     ANS: Block
     DIF: 1          REF: p. 206 OBJ: 8-2            TYPE: Def
     TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business Letters
     NOT: Block-style letters are formatted with all parts of the letter—dateline, inside address,
     body, and so forth—set flush left.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns
     AAC: Tier 1—Technology; Tier 2—Word Processing

 7. Some routine messages open with a(n) ____________________ command, such as Will you
    please answer the following questions about your new line of computer products.

     ANS: polite
     DIF: 5          REF: p. 207 OBJ: 8-3            TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Direct Requests for Information and Action
     NOT: Some routine messages open with a polite command, such as “Will you please answer
     the following questions about your new line of computer products.”
242                                                                      UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 8. The closing of a direct request that requires action may include an end ____________________
    so that the reader knows when an action is required.

      ANS: date
      DIF: 3       REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-3               TYPE: Con
      TOP: Direct Requests for Information and Action
      NOT: The closing of a direct request that requires action may include an end date.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 9. ____________________ letters are written by customers to identify or correct a problem with
    products or services they have purchased.

      ANS: Claim
      DIF: 1          REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4          TYPE: Def
      TOP: Direct Claims
      NOT: Claim letters are written by customers to identify or correct a problem with products or
      services they have purchased.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 10. ____________________ claims are those to which you expect the receiver to agree readily and
     are written using the direct organizational pattern.

      ANS: Straightforward
      DIF: 1           REF: p. 208 OBJ: 8-4              TYPE: Def
      TOP: Direct Claims
      NOT: Straightforward claims are those to which you expect the receiver to agree readily and
      are written using the direct organizational pattern.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 11. Knowledgeable business communicators use a(n) ____________________ line in a direct reply
     letter to refer to earlier correspondence so that in the first sentence they are free to emphasize the
     main idea.

      ANS: subject
      DIF: 1            REF: p. 212 OBJ: 8-5               TYPE: Def
      TOP: Direct Replies
      NOT: Knowledgeable business communicators use a(n) subject line in a direct reply letter to
      refer to earlier correspondence so that in the first sentence they are free to emphasize the main
      idea.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 12. The ____________ pattern should be used for messages that are mostly good news but may have
     some negative elements.

      ANS: direct
      DIF: 3      REF:         p. 212 OBJ:      8-5     TYPE: Con
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                                  243

     TOP: Direct Replies
     NOT: The direct pattern should be used for messages that are mostly good news but may have
     some negative elements.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 13. When a company receives a claim and decides to respond favorably, the letter is called a(n)
     ______________ letter.

     ANS: adjustment
     DIF: 1          REF: p. 214 OBJ: 8-6       TYPE: Def
     TOP: Adjustments
     NOT: When a company receives a claim and decides to respond favorably, the letter is called
     an adjustment letter.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 14. Adjustment letters that grant customers’ claims should be written using the ________
     organizational pattern.

     ANS: direct
     DIF: 3          REF: p. 214 OBJ: 8-5          TYPE: Con
     TOP: Adjustments
     NOT: Adjustment letters that grant customers’ claims should be written using the direct
     organizational pattern.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 15. Deciding whether to ______________ to a customer in an adjustment letter is a debatable issue.
     Some attorneys discourage doing so, but many customers appreciate it.

     ANS: apologize
     DIF: 3          REF: p. 216 OBJ: 8-6              TYPE: Con
     TOP: Adjustments
     NOT: Deciding whether to apologize in an adjustment letter is a debatable issue. Some
     attorneys discourage apologies, fearing that they admit responsibility and will trigger lawsuits;
     but many customers like to hear apologies.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 16. ____________________ messages are those that express thanks, congratulations, recognition, or
     sympathy.

     ANS: Goodwill
     DIF: 1       REF: p. 217 OBJ: 8-7           TYPE: Def
     TOP: Goodwill Messages
     NOT: Goodwill messages are those that express thanks, congratulations, recognition, or
     sympathy.
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations
244                                                                   UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

 17. Goodwill messages should be selfless, specific, sincere, spontaneous, and ______________.

      ANS: short
      DIF: 3       REF: pp. 218-219        OBJ: 8-7         TYPE: Con
      TOP: Goodwill Messages
      NOT: Goodwill messages should be selfless, specific, sincere, spontaneous, and short.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 18. ____________________-you notes should be written for favors, gifts, and hospitality.

      ANS: Thank
      DIF: 1       REF: p. 219 OBJ: 8-7            TYPE: Def
      TOP: Goodwill Messages
      NOT: Thank-you notes should be written for favors, gifts, and hospitality.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 19. ____________________ notes should refer to a death or misfortune sensitively and offer
     assistance without going into excessive detail.

      ANS: Sympathy
      DIF: 1          REF: p. 221 OBJ: 8-7         TYPE: Def
      TOP: Goodwill Messages
      NOT: Sympathy notes should refer to a death or misfortune sensitively and offer assistance
      without going into excessive detail.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 20. Letters going to individuals in other parts of the world, such as Japan and Europe, should
     probably use a more ____________________ tone than letters written for American
     businesspeople.

      ANS: formal
      DIF: 3          REF: p. 222 OBJ: 8-8             TYPE: Con
      TOP: International Messages
      NOT: Letters going to individuals in other parts of the world, such as Japan and Europe, should
      probably use a more formal tone than letters written for American businesspeople.
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion
      AAC: Tier 1—Diversity; Tier 2—International applications
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                                 245

ESSAY

 1. Although e-mail is incredibly successful for both internal and external communication, many
    important messages still call for letters. Business letters are necessary in four situations. List and
    give a work-related example of each of these situations.

     ANS: Student answers will vary:

     a. When a permanent record is needed. For example, when a company enters into an agreement
     with another company, business letters introduce the agreement and record decisions and points
     of understanding.
     b. When information is confidential. For example, when you must send a letter of
     recommendation that may contain confidential information, a business letter is preferred over
     other channels.
     c. When formality or sensitivity is required. For example, when you have to deliver bad news to
     a client, business letters carry the nonverbal message that the writer considered the message to be
     significant.
     d. When a persuasive, well-considered message is needed. For example, direct mail letters
     remain a powerful tool to promote services and products to customers and potential
     customers.

     DIF: 5       REF: p. 202 OBJ: 8-1          TYPE: Ap
     TOP: Understanding the Power of Business Letters and the Process of Writing
     AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Analysis
     AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 2. Good business letters share three primary characteristics. List and briefly describe these
    characteristics; then provide three techniques for achieving each characteristic.

     ANS: Student answers will vary.

     Clear Content: A good business letter should be understood by the reader. Techniques to achieve
     clarity include:
     a. Divide letter into short paragraphs.
     b. Use short sentences.
     c. Use clear transitional expressions.
     d. Use familiar words.
     e. Use the active voice.
     f. In reply letters answer all the reader’s questions or concerns so that further correspondence is
     unnecessary.

     Goodwill Tone: Good letters build goodwill. Goodwill is a positive feeling the reader has toward
     an individual or an organization. Techniques to achieve goodwill include:
     a. Present the message from the reader’s perspective.
     b. Use the “you” view.
     c. Point out reader benefits.
     d. Be sensitive to words that might suggest gender, racial, age, or disability bias.
     e. Frame your ideas positively.

     Correct Form: A business letter conveys silent messages beyond that of its printed words. The
     letter’s appearance and format reflect the writer’s carefulness and experience. Techniques to
     achieve good form include:
     a. Select an appropriate format, such as block style.
246                                                                     UNIT 3 Business Correspondence

      b. Center the letter on the page framed by white space.
      c. Use ragged right margins.

      DIF: 5       REF: pp. 205-206        OBJ: 8-2      TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Analyzing the Structure of Business letters
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Analysis
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

 3. Your company was charged twice last month for its rent. This amount is automatically deducted
    from your company’s checking account, and you just noticed the double entry for June. You must
    write a claim letter to your landlord asking for a refund of $2,000. Write a clear, concise claim
    letter. Because you expect your landlord to agree readily, use the direct strategy. Omit the letter
    address, salutation, and complimentary close.

      ANS: Student answers will vary.

      Please issue a refund check for $2,000, which is the amount our company was overcharged for
      our rent in June 2008.

      Our rent is automatically deducted from our checking account each month (Account No.
      xxxxxxxxx). In June the $2,000 amount was deducted twice. Enclosed is a copy of our June bank
      statement with the double entry highlighted.

      Please issue the refund check by July 20 so that we can deposit it before our next rent payment is
      due.

      DIF: 5       REF: pp. 208-210        OBJ: 8-4      TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Direct Claims
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Theory application
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Standard English

 4. You are a landlord for an office building. You just received a claim letter from a tenant asking for
    a refund of $2,000 for extra rent that was paid in June. You check your records and find out that
    the June rent was deducted twice from the tenant’s bank account. You think this must have been
    a bank error, but the double amount was transferred to your bank account. Write an adjustment
    letter to the tenant, and enclose a refund check. Omit the letter address, salutation, and
    complimentary close

      ANS: Student answers will vary.

      Enclosed is a check for $2,000 as refund for the double rent you paid in June 2008.

      Our research shows that the automatic deduction for your rent was accidentally processed
      twice last month, and we have communicated with the bank to make sure that this
      doesn’t happen again.

      You were most helpful in informing us of this situation and permitting us to correct it.

      DIF: 5       REF: pp. 214-217        OBJ: 8-6      TYPE: Ap
      TOP: Adjustments
      AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Theory application
      AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations, Standard English
CHAPTER 8 Positive Letters and Messages                                                         247

 5. Goodwill messages are used in business to express thanks, recognition, and sympathy. Explain
    why these messages are valuable in the workplace and the five Ss that apply when writing them.
    Then describe three work-related scenarios where it would be appropriate to send each of these
    types of messages.

    ANS: Student answers will vary.
    Goodwill messages are important in the workplace because they make the receiver feel good.
    Goodwill message show that you care and that you consider an event to be important. The five Ss
    to remember when writing goodwill messages include:

    a. Selfless: Be sure to focus the message solely on the receiver not the sender.
    b. Specific: Personalize the message by mentioning specific incidents or characteristics of the
    receiver.
    c. Sincere: . Let your words show genuine feelings. Use conversational language in your
    written message. Avoid pretentious, formal, or flowery language.
    d. Spontaneous: Keep the message fresh and enthusiastic. Avoid canned phrases. Strive for
    directness and naturalness, not creative brilliance.
    e. Short: Although goodwill messages can be as long as needed, try to accomplish your purpose
    in only a few sentences.

    Scenarios in which each type of message would be appropriate include the following:

    A thank-you note can be written to thank someone for:
    a. Giving you a gift.
    b. Treating you to lunch or dinner.
    c. Hosting a party or other event.
    d. Helping you on a project.
    e. Doing a great job.

    A congratulations note can be written to recognize someone for:
    a. Getting married.
    b. Having a baby.
    c. Graduating from college.
    d. Retiring.
    e. Landing a big account.
    f. Getting a promotion.
    g. Completing a successful project.

    A sympathy note can be written when:
    a. A coworker’s spouse or other loved one dies.
    b. A coworker becomes ill or injured.
    c. A coworker dies (message sent to family).
    d. A coworker has a love one who is ill or injured.

    DIF: 5       REF: pp. 218-219        OBJ: 8-8      TYPE: Ap
    TOP: Goodwill Messages
    AAC: Tier 1—Reflective Thinking; Tier 2—Conclusion, Analysis
    AAC: Tier 1—Communication; Tier 2—Patterns, Rhetorical considerations

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:3957
posted:8/17/2011
language:English
pages:31