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					Table of Contents                                            pages

Eligibility Application, Items 1-20                          2-44

Request for Program Exclusion                                45

Organizational Information, Organization
Charts for Rhode Island College and the
School of Management                                         47

Financial Information about the College and
The Funding of the School of Management                      58

Appendices                                                   64

      Financial Statements: KPMG Audited
      Financial Statements

      Fact Book: Attached for in depth
      Statistical information

      Current College Catalogue 2005-2007
      Per disc included or on line at
      www.ric.edu




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Eligibility Application, Items 1-20
1. Year institution was founded:       Year business academic unit was founded:

Rhode Island College was founded in 1854.

The business academic unit originated as the Department of Economics in the School of the
Faculty of Arts and Sciences in 1969 and evolved into the Department of Economics and
Management in 1974.

The Department of Economics and Management became a free-standing entity, the Center for
Management and Technology, in 1994.

The Center for Management and Technology became a school within the College, the School of
Management, in 2002.



2. Provide the mission statement for the business academic unit below. File a copy of the
business unit strategic plan with this document.

                                    School of Management
                                      Mission Statement

Consistent with the mission of Rhode Island College, the School of Management is committed to
being a premier teaching institution in southern New England in providing the knowledge, skills,
and abilities to help students attain their lifelong learning and professional goals. The school
develops and supports a highly qualified faculty dedicated to teaching excellence enriched
through professional development, scholarly activity, and service. We provide an ethically
based, technologically sophisticated, culturally inclusive environment that nurtures contemporary
and innovative learning. Our accounting, computer information systems, economics, finance,
management, and marketing majors are grounded in a liberal arts foundation and deliver
programs that meld theory and application. We strive for student-centered continuous
improvement and aspire to contribute meaningfully to the learning communities of the college
and the region.




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                   Strategic Plan of the School of Management
                              Rhode Island College
                            Providence, Rhode Island
                                    2004-2007

                         James A. Schweikart, Ph.D., CPA
                                      Dean

                           with updates as of June 1, 2007




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                                       Letter from the Dean




June 1, 2007

Office of the Dean
School of Management

Greetings:

The School of Management at Rhode Island College aspires to be recognized as one of the finest teaching
institutions in New England in the areas of business and economics. We recognize this requires a
commitment to on going development of programs and delivery of these programs through state of the art
technology. We know, as well, that our faculty need to be at the cutting edge of their disciplines, and, as
such, faculty development and scholarship are critical components to what we do.

We believe that the student must have not only a sufficient background in business and economics
coursework and technology usage, but to be successful, the student must have critical thinking skills,
skills in communication, a strong groundwork in liberal arts, an ability to work in teams, a sense of ethical
behavior, and some experiential learning, even if in simulated exercises, prior to entering the workforce.

Our purpose is to prepare students to contribute to the development of the Rhode Island economy in a
meaningful and significant manner. We also desire to contribute to the development of our surrounding
areas.

For these reasons, we have developed the strategic plan that is attached. This plan is our guide to
achieving the results vital to our economy as well as to the success of each and every student who comes
to us. Our plan is dynamic. It changes as our environment and needs change.

I invite you to read our plan which is a sub plan of the Strategic Plan of Rhode Island College-Plan 150
and will be a sub plan of Plan 2010, the extension and revision of the current plan. The College plan can
be viewed at www.ric.edu.

Your comments are welcome.

Sincerely,



James A. Schweikart, Ph.D., CPA
Dean




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       Our Vision for the School of Management at Rhode Island College
Consistent with the vision of the College articulated in Plan 150, Strategic Plan for 2004-2007,
the School of Management seeks recognition for …

1.     excellence in teaching of business and economics where faculty-scholars continually
       inspire students to expand their minds, meet new levels of intellectual challenge, engage
       in a wide range of student development activities, and thoughtfully prepare for life after
       college.

2.     its importance as an intellectual, cultural, social and economic resource for the State of
       Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, and in particular, as a resource to contribute to
       the well being of Rhode Islanders and southern New Englanders.

3.     its character as an open, caring community in which there is demonstrated value for
       community engagement, civility, citizenship, ethical behavior, and development of the
       economy of the State of Rhode Island for the benefit of all.

4.     its success in the identification, recruitment, enrollment, and degree completion with
       subsequent preparation for significant employment of both traditional and non-traditional
       students.

The span of the School of Management Vision and Plan lies within the time frame of the College
Vision and Plan but will renew in 2008 with updates and revisions in Plan 2010.




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                       Goals, Objectives, and Strategic Actions
The strategic planning process has culminated with a series of broad goals for the College, each
with specific objectives, and strategic actions. The goals of the School of Management are
intertwined with the College goals. In this way, we are more accountable to the public and
private stakeholders in both the College and School of Management.

Responsibility to ensure continuous improvement on all objectives is assigned to the Dean of the
School of Management who reports to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Naturally, this is
a task of the faculty and department chairs that is overseen by the dean.

Each objective is supported by strategic actions. These actions are under constant review and
revision as the climate to achieve the School of Management’s goals changes in a dynamic
environment. Success toward these goals has been measured.

For a complete discussion of the strategic actions and measures of success, the reader should
request the expanded version of this plan.


Goal 1

Ensure High Quality Learning Experiences for all Students.
Objective 1.1- Refine the School’s Assessment Process

Objective 1.2- Establish Student Outcomes

Objective 1.3- Expand and emphasize internships


Objective 1.4- Use Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-International
(AACSB) standards as guidelines for continuous improvement of programs

Objective 1.5 – Improve library resources subject to funding

Objective 1.6- Involve the Advisory Board and other exterior organizations in curricula
development


Goal 2

Underscore the Value of Research and Public Service to Contribute to the
Improvement of the State’s Economic Base.
Objective 2.1- Increase engagement in student-faculty mentored research

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Objective 2.2- Identify mechanisms for rewarding faculty research, teaching and service

Objective 2.3- Build funded research through the Office of Grants and Research
Administration

Objective 2.4- Expand continuing education and public speaker forums

Objective 2.5- Expand service for community and corporate organizations

Goal 3

Recruit, Enroll, Retain, and Graduate Diverse Qualified Students

Objective 3.1- Expand recruitment efforts in Rhode Island high schools and from high
schools beyond Rhode Island

Objective 3.2- Identify and recruit evening and alternative learning students by visiting
companies with retraining needs and redeployment needs

Objective 3.3- Establish a reward system for high achieving students

Objective 3.4- Develop the School of Management web site to attract and retain students


Goal 4

Provide an Inviting Environment and Well Organized, Efficient, High Quality
Services to Students and External Constituents
Objective 4.1- Establish a one stop service center to assure that advisement, student
progress, and problem solving are augmented

Objective 4.2- Establish services to the Rhode Island business community

Objective 4.3- Develop a state of the art electronic teaching and service facility for business
and economics

Objective 4.4- Maintain and continuously improve Alger Hall to reflect all necessary new
teaching and service needs


Goal 5



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Ensure Resource Base for the School of Management to Offer Programs at
Affordable Cost
Objective 5.1- Increase giving to the School of Management

Objective 5.2- Increase donations for student scholarships

Objective 5.3- Assure that qualified full time and part time faculty are hired and available
to teach the classes in demand.



3. In no more than two pages, describe the educational system within your country or state
and the environment in which you offer degree programs. For example, describe your
institution’s relationship with any governmental bodies (i.e. ministry of education, board of
regents, system of institutions, etc) and/or relationships with non-governmental entities
related to the governance and oversight of your institution and the business academic unit.
Also, describe the nature of the institution’s governing body as it relates to the
establishment or review of basic operating policies that govern the institution.


Rhode Island College is a member of a statewide system of public higher education. The public
institutions are the University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island College, and Community College
of Rhode Island. Private institutions in the State include Brown University, Rhode Island School
of Design, Providence College, Bryant University, Johnson and Wales University, Roger
Williams University, Salve Regina University, New England Institute of Technology, and the
U.S. Naval War College (federal).

Rhode Island College is established, governed, and partially funded by the State of Rhode Island.
The College’s budget is part of the state higher education funding determined in the annual
budgetary process of the State’s General Assembly. The Governor and the General Assembly of
the State have the ultimate authority and responsibility to oversee the financial planning and
control of the public higher education system in Rhode Island although the exercise of this
authority is delegated to Board of Governors for the Higher Education (RIBGHE) . External
auditing of the management of the College’s funds is provided by independent certified public
accountants. Despite the declines in the proportion of State’s share in the overall budget of the
College, the state’s financial contributions are still very significant.

The College and related public institutions in higher education in Rhode Island operate under the
purview of the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education which is the State’s legal
entity for public higher education. The RIGBHE is empowered to approve a master plan for
higher education, new programs, and budget proposals of public universities.

While the Board is prohibited from engaging in the operation or administration of any
subordinate institution, it is empowered to adopt and submit a budget for public higher education
and to allocate appropriations among its institutions; to approve tables of organization; to create,

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abolish, and consolidate departments, divisions, programs and courses of study; and to acquire,
hold and dispose of property for the three institutions.

The College’s main internal body of governance with regard to establishment and/review of
basic operating policies and procedures is the College Council. The Council is an elective body
and it works with its committee structure. The President and other top administrators are
members of the Council. The resolutions of the Council are presented to the College President
for approval and then are subject to approval of the Board.

By virtue of the fact that the College’s employees are represented by three unions, a significant
portion of the policies and procedures are governed by the contracts negotiated by these unions
and the RIGBHE and administered by College officials.



4. Indicate the national or regional governing body that authorizes the institution to grant
its degrees and operate as an institution of higher education.

The Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education authorizes Rhode Island College to
offer degrees and to operate. Its mission statement is:

“The mission of the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education is to provide an
excellent, efficient, accessible and affordable system of higher education designed to improve the
overall educational attainment of Rhode Islanders and thereby enrich the intellectual, economic,
social and cultural life of the state, its residents, and its communities." http://www.ribghe.org/



5. Indicate the accreditation(s) or other independent institutional reviews that support an
assessment of the overall high quality for the programs offered by the institution.

Rhode Island College holds accreditation as an intuition. The New England Association of
Schools and Colleges (NEASC) is the primary accrediting body for Rhode Island College.
NEASC provides accreditation for schools ranging from pre-K to the doctoral level in
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont
(http://www.neasc.org/). Rhode Island College was first accredited by NEASC in 1958, was last
accredited in 2000, and will be reviewed for re-accreditation in 2010.

NEASC has accredited the following higher education institutions in Rhode Island:

Brown University
Bryant University
Community College of Rhode Island
Johnson & Wales University
New England Institute of Technology
Providence College

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Rhode Island College
Rhode Island School of Design
Roger Williams University
Salve Regina University
University of Rhode Island
The U.S. Naval War College

As part of the accreditation process, Rhode Island College completes a self study. The self study
report that was prepared in 2000 is available for review at http://www.ric.edu/neasc_self-study/.

In addition, several organizations provide accreditation to the various Schools and Programs at
Rhode Island College. These include:

NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) for the Feinstein
School of Education & Human Development.
NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) for the preschool
and kindergartens at the Henry Barnard School.
CSWE (Council on Social Work Education) for the Master of Social Work and Bachelor
of Social Work Programs within the School of Social Work.
CCNE (Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education) for the School of Nursing.
NASAD (National Association of Schools of Art and Design)
NASM (National Association of Schools of Music)
NASDTEC (National association of state directors of teacher education and certification)



6. Describe the administrative connection of the business academic unit to the larger
institution (if applicable).

The School of Management is administratively connected to Rhode Island College in traditional
academic fashion, with the School of Management overseen by the Vice President of Academic
Affairs, who in turn reports to the President of the College. A table (Fact Book 2005-2006,
Rhode Island College, Office of Institutional Planning, p.11, 13)) showing the academic
administration of the College, and the School of Management’s place within that organization, is
attached.


7. Briefly describe the continuous improvement processes or methods the business
   academic unit uses to ensure that its educational programs continually achieve overall
   high quality (see Eligibility Procedures and Standards for Business Accreditation,
   January 1, 2006, Eligibility Procedures B).

(a) SOM Biannual retreats
 Fall, 2000: Spring 2002; Fall, 2004




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These retreats are attended by all faculty and staff of the School of Management. They have
taken place off campus in an informal atmosphere and usually span the course of a day, 8:00 a.m.
to 4:00 pm. At the retreats, faculty and staff have the opportunity to discuss and debate issues in
an in depth manner. The retreats allow the School the opportunity to engage in policy
discussions and long-range planning.

(b) SOM Semiannual meetings
 August, January, and as needed

These meetings are attended by all faculty and staff of the School of Management. These
meetings are usually held during the week prior to the beginning of a semester. They serve as a
welcome back session, and are an opportunity for the Dean to share information with the faculty
and staff regarding issues for the upcoming semester.

(d) Dept monthly meetings
 September through May

These meetings are attended by all department faculty, with occasional invited visitors, such as
the Dean. The meetings are held to discuss day-to-day issues such as enrollment, scheduling,
and recruiting. Faculty also discuss items submitted by department committees such as the
curriculum committee. Policy occasionally is discussed.

(e) Dept curriculum committees
 As needed

These meetings are attended by a subset of volunteering department faculty. The meetings are
held to discuss changes in existing courses, additions and deletions in courses, and changes in
program requirements. Their results are submitted to all department faculty for discussion at
department monthly meetings.

(f) Dept Advisory Committees
 As needed

These meetings are attended by a subset of volunteering department faculty. The meetings are
held to prepare the annual reviews (i.e., performance appraisal) of department faculty members.
Their results are submitted to the Dean and are not shared with other department members.

(g) Student evaluations
 As needed

The evaluations are completed by students anonymously. They are conducted by each faculty
member in at least one of his or her own courses per year, as the faculty member chooses. They
are primarily multiple choice (e.g., Likert-type) evaluations, with space available for narrative
comments. Each department develops its own evaluation forms.




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(h) Peer evaluations
 As needed

These evaluations are completed by faculty members. They are conducted in one course of each
faculty member per year. Each faculty member is expected to observe one other member’s
course and in turn is to be observed by one faculty member. The reports are narrative answers to
pre-determined questions.

(i) Ad-hoc SOM committees (e.g., writing committee)
 As needed

These meetings are attended by a subset of volunteering department faculty. The meetings are
held to discuss various issues. Their results are submitted to all department faculty for
discussion at department monthly meetings or to the entire SOM faculty, as appropriate.

(j) Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
 As needed

Each department is preparing outcomes assessment measures for its students. “In the spring of
2000 the President appointed a Committee on Assessment of Student Outcomes (CASO). Its
charge is to ensure that the College has a comprehensive and effective plan for assessing student
outcomes, which is both College-wide and program specific. Initially, CASO will focus on the
curricular aspects of the College experience; co-curricular elements will be incorporated into the
plan at a later time. CASO will monitor and evaluate College, School, and department efforts in
assessing student outcomes with an aim of program improvement or revision. The Committee
will also make recommendations for improving the assessment process.”
http://www.ric.edu/neasc_self-study/Standard2.html




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8. Indicate the following (see Eligibility Procedures and Standards for Business
Accreditation, January 1, 2006, Eligibility Procedures A, B, and C):

Fall 2006 (typical term)
8a. Enrollment
                       Rhode Island College               School of Management
                           Full TimePart Time Total       Full Time Part Time Total*
Degree Program
Undergraduate              5,186      1,945   7,131              571         239        810
Master’s                     207         318    525                2          13         15
Doctoral                        0         53     53                0           0          0
Others (CAGS)                  23         39     62                0           0          0
Total Degree Seeking       5,416      2,355   7,771              573         252        825

Non Degree Seeking
RITE (Certificate)             3          18       21              0           0          0
Undergraduate                 91         338      429              0           0          0
Graduate                      45         673      718              0           0          0
Total Non Degree Seeking     139       1,029    1,168              0           0          0

Grand Total                5,555       3,384    8,939            573         252        825

   *These numbers reflect total “active” enrollment, i.e., number of students who have declared
   majors in the SOM and are taking classes during Fall 2006 semester. A grand total of 1,192
   undergraduate and 34 masters students for the total of 1,226 degree seeking students are
   reported by the Admission Office for Fall 2006. These figures reflect number of students
   who have taken classes in the SOM during the past three semesters.

8b Number of participating faculty assigned and budgeted for the School of Management: 26, 27
in fall 2007.

8c. A participating faculty is expected to
       1. Teach average load of twelve (12) hours of credit per semester;
       2. Serve on College committees;
       3. Advise student activities;
       4. Engage in scholarly and/or professional development activities;
       5. Engage in community services.

8d. Degrees earned by participating faculty.
       1. Number of participating faculty who have earned Ph.D. or equivalent: 22
       2. Number of participating faculty who have earned Master’s or equivalent: 4
       3. Number of participating faculty who have earned Bachelor’s or equivalent: 0

8e. Number of supporting faculty assigned and budgeted for the School of Management: 17




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8f. Supporting faculty is a faculty whose primary professional responsibility is to an agency
other than the College. They teach on a part time basis and are not covered under the Union
Agreement.

8g. Degrees earned by supporting faculty:

       1. Number of supporting faculty who have earned Ph.D. or equivalent: 1
       2. Number of supporting faculty who have earned Master’s or equivalent: 16
       3. Number of supporting faculty who have earned Bachelor’s or equivalent: 0

8h. Attach Table 9-1 here. Note: We have chosen to use courses taught (sections), as all courses
are 3 credit hours. Some courses have 4 contact hours, but enrollment is consistently between 25-
32 per course due to union contract limitations and subject matter limitations such as computer
information systems with hardware limits of 25 in some courses. Hence, number of courses is a
reasonable means of faculty distribution.

We have chosen to show all course sections taught in 2006-2007 plus anticipated course sections
of new faculty (3) and returning faculty from illness (1) less sections taught by those leaving due
to retirements and otherwise (3) to give a more accurate reflection of where we are. We had
significant turnover this past year. This presentation also provides a conservative calculation, as
some of the courses taught by supporting faculty this past year will not occur next year with the
new hires taking their loads, yet we report those sections. We are still well within the 75% test.

                        TABLE 9-1 (using number of courses)
           SUMMARY OF FACULTY SUFFICIENCY IN DISCIPLINE AND SCHOOL

 Using Annual Number of Courses Taught 2006-2007 with anticipated courses for new and returning
                                            faculty
                                                            Amount of         Amount of
                                    Participating or       teaching if P     teaching if S
Name1                             Supporting (P or S)3     (blank if S)2     (blank if P)2   %
Accounting and CIS Department
Accounting
Margaret Blais (Adjunct)                   S                                       4
Lisa Church                                P                     8
David Filipek (Chair)                      P                     8
*Jeanne Haser-Lafond (new 07-08)           S                     8                 1
Frank Mancieri (Adjunct)                   S                                       1
Jane Przybyla                              P                     7
Kenneth Razee (Adjunct)                    S                                       2
James Schweikart (Dean)                    P                     0
Charles Snow, Jr.                          P                     7
Jeffrey Wadovick (Adjunct)                 S                                       1
CIS
Lisa Bain                                  P                     8
*Crist Costa (anticipated/ on
sabbatical F06-S07)                        P                     8
Richard Evans                              P                    10
Michael Hayden                             P                     9


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Faith Lamprey (Adjunct)               S                                2
John Munko (Adjunct)                  S                                2
Richard Perreault                     P                  4
Mariano Rodrigues (Adjunct RIC)       S                                1
Total for Accounting and CIS
Department                                              77             14    84.6
PA / (PA + SA) must be > 60%


Economics and Finance
Suchandra Basu                        P                  8
James Betres (Joint RIC)              S                                3
Jeffrey Blais (Chair)                 P                  8
Gary Garzone (Adjunct)                S                                1
Alema Karim                           P                  9
Abbas Kazemi                          P                  9
James Marsis (Adjunct)                S                                4
Peter Marks                           P                  8
Alex Wilson                           P                  9
Paul Zisserson (Adjunct)              S                                1
Total for Economics and Finance                         51             9     85.0
PF / (PF + SF) must be > 60%

Management and Marketing
Mangement
Shani Carter                          P                 8
Michael Casey                         P                 10
*Halil Copur (Phased Retire)          P                 4
Randy DeSimone                        P                 8
James Dorian (Dir of Records)         S                                2
Frank Farinella (Adjunct-RIC)         S                                1
Lori Martin (Asst to Dean)            S                                2
*James McGuire
(Anticipated/Sabbatical S07)          P                  8
*John O’Del (Returning
Anticipated/Medical Leave F06-
S07))                                 P                  4
Theresa Quinn (Adjunct)               S                                1
Natalie Sahba                         P                  9
Karen Schoch (Adjunct)                S                                1
Charles Synnott (Adjunct)             S                                2
Roeert Tetreault                      S                                1
*Julie Urda (new 07-08)               P                  8
Marketing
Steven Abdow (Adjunct)                S                                1
David Blanchette (Chair)              P                  6
*Deanna Jelovac (new 07-08)           P                  8
Janet Letourneau (Adjunct)            S                                2
*Stephen Ramocki (reduction 07-
08)                                   P                  8
Jane Shanley (Adjunct)                S                                1
Total for Management and                                81             14    85.2

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 Marketing
 PO / (PO + SO) must be > 60%

 OVERALL SCHOOL TOTAL                                                   209                 37         84.9

*Numbers reflect 2006-2007 plus new hires for 2007-2008, returns from medical and sabbatical in 2007-2008 less
retirements and other turnovers. That is, faculty members leaving are not reported, and faculty members hired are
reported. * Marks where changes have occurred. Adjunct usage is actual, although adjunct usage in 2007-2008
should be less.

9. Current annual educational budget (in US dollars) for the institution and the business
academic unit. (see Eligibility Procedures and Standards for Business Accreditation,
January 1, 2006, Eligibility Procedures B).

1. Current annual educational budget for the institution: $ 94,942,790 (FY 07, Allocation as of
7/1/2006)

2. Current annual educational budget for the School of Management: $ 3,197,047 (FY 07,
Allocation as of 7/1/2006)


10. Percent of credits, units or instruction taught by participating faculty for each degree
program in the business academic unit (see Eligibility Procedures and Standards for
Business Accreditation, January 1, 2006, Eligibility Procedures B): Undergraduate %,
Master’s %, Doctoral %

(If programs are not based on academic credits, please describe this information in
relevant terms.)

Percent of credits, units, or instruction taught by participating faculty for each degree program in
the School of Management:

* 82.3% of Course credits for 100-400 Level Courses were taught by participating faculty
members. This is consistent with Table 9-1, as expected.

* 54% of Course credits for 500-600 Level Courses were taught by participating faculty
members.

* These numbers are provisional. The final numbers can be provided only after receiving fall
2006 faculty workload forms from the School/departments.


11. Describe the criteria used to classify faculty as academically qualified in support of the
business academic unit’s mission. Please differentiate between initial qualifications and
continuing contributions to maintain academic qualifications. If graduate programs are
offered, what criteria determine the assignment of academically qualified faculty members
to teach at the graduate level (see Eligibility Procedures and Standards for Business
Accreditation, January 1, 2006, Standard 10)

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Faculty Rank and Qualifications

“… The school develops and supports a highly qualified faculty dedicated to teaching excellence
enriched through professional development, scholarly activity, and service …” (from the School
of Management Mission Statement, p.3 of this document)

Initial Qualifications

Consistent with the mission statement of the School of Management, the following academic
attainment level and professorial experiential requirements for academic rank of academically
qualified faculty are the standards used for initial appointment, as specified by the Agreement
between The RIC/AFT and the Rhode Island Board of Governors, (“The Agreement,” 2004-2007,
Article VII, Section C) :

“Assistant Professor: An earned Doctor’s degree or appropriate terminal degree from an
accredited institution; or an earned Master’s degree together with teaching experience in the
appropriate field. The major field of graduate work must be that for which the candidate is to be
assigned a majority of his/her teaching time. The College teaching experience should be in the
field of study or closely related to the field to which the candidate is to be assigned a majority of
his/her teaching time.

“Associate Professor: Normally, an earned Doctorate or an appropriate terminal degree from an
accredited institution in an appropriate field of study, and seven (7) years in rank at a level of
Assistant Professor. Appropriate academic/professional experience … may be substituted for all
or part of the years in rank. Evidence of meritorious academic and teaching accomplishment is a
basic requirement.

“Professor: Normally only persons with an earned Doctorate or appropriate terminal degree and
appropriate experience will be employed in this rank. Evidence of academic and teaching
accomplishment is a basic requirement.”


Continuing Contributions to Maintain Academic Qualifications

“… the School of Management is committed to … providing the knowledge, skills, and abilities
to help students attain their lifelong learning and professional goals…” (from the School of
Management Mission Statement, p.3 of this document)

These contributions should enrich teaching activities and effectiveness by aiding in teaching the
“why” and not just the “how.” The School of Management specifies that these continuing
contributions for the maintenance of academic qualifications may be in the areas of intellectual
contributions, professional development, and current professional activities.

Intellectual Contributions:



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(1) Learning and pedagogical scholarship
     (contributions influencing education and learning efficacy)
(a) Peer-Reviewed Journal
- Peer-reviewed articles
 (b) Other Intellectual Contribution
- Published cases or other instructional materials
- Preparation of new materials for use in courses (published)
- Book reviews (published)
 (c) Not elsewhere classified
- Creation of teaching aids (WebCT counted only 1 per course, not per semester)
- Design and implementation of new curricula and courses
- Additional certificate, credential, etc., earned
- Conference attended
- Conference or journal reviewer
- Demonstrated and meaningful works in progress
- Grants received

(2) Discipline-based scholarship
    (adding to theory or knowledge base of the faculty member’s field)
(a) Peer-Reviewed Journal
- Peer-reviewed articles
 (b) Other Intellectual Contribution
- Proceedings from scholarly meetings
- Scholarly books
- Papers presented at academic or professional meetings
- Chapters, cases, applications, etc., in scholarly books
- Textbooks (or chapters, etc., therein)
- Research monographs
- Book reviews (published)
- Discipline-based articles in popular publications
 (c) Not elsewhere classified
- Chair or participant in conference panel
- Additional graduate degrees earned
- Editor of discipline journal
- Additional certificate, credential, etc., earned
- Conference attendee
- Conference or journal reviewer
- Demonstrated and meaningful works in progress
- Grants received

(3) Contributions to practice
    (contributions that influence practice in the faculty member’s field)
(a) Peer-Reviewed Journal
- Scholarly publications in trade journals
(b) Other Intellectual Contribution
- Published reports on consulting

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- Development of discipline-based practitioner tools (published)
- Book reviews (published)
 (c) Not elsewhere classified
- Design, creation, and/or delivery of executive education programs or courses, certificate
programs or courses, etc.
- Completion of relevant internship or other training experience
- Chair or participant in professional workshop, seminar, etc.
- Conference attendee
- Conference or journal reviewer
- Demonstrated and meaningful works in progress
- Grants received
- Membership in learned or professional organization
- Consulting, volunteer, or work activities that add field-related knowledge and skills that
augment the currency and relevance of information brought to teaching and learning.


12. Describe the criteria used to classify faculty as professionally qualified. Please
differentiate between initial qualifications and continuing contributions to maintain
professional qualifications. If graduate programs are offered and professionally qualified
faculty members teach at this level, what criteria determine the assignment to graduate-
level teaching? (see Eligibility Procedures and Standards for Business Accreditation,
January 1, 2006, Standard 10).

The following is predicated on the understanding that professionally qualified faculty includes
faculty who are not expected to make mission relevant academic contributions but rather
professional contributions. As such, at the SOM, these include part time and full time faculty on
short term, non-tenure track appointments.

Qualifications required at the time of hiring:
       -Master Degree in the field of teaching
       -Substantial industry experience in the field of teaching

Qualifications preferred at the time of hiring:
       -Teaching experience in the field of teaching
       -Teaching experience in the field of teaching at a four-year college/university.

Qualifications required for continuation of contributions:
       -Demonstrated proficiency in the teaching assignments.

Qualifications preferred for continuation of contributions:
        -Continuation of industry experience
        -Continuing Education to maintain professional qualifications
        -Membership in local/regional/ national professional organizations
        -Contributions to professional organizations such as -Trade publications/presentations
        -Leadership roles
        -Accreditation responsibilities

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        -Organizational activities
        -Demonstrated record of involving students with their professional field.

For professionally qualified graduate faculty:

The criteria for determining the assignment to graduate level teaching for professionally
qualified faculty members is the same as that for the faculty of the undergraduate program and
also includes relevant professional certifications.




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13a. Complete Table 10-1 and 10-2
 (available at http://www.aacsb.edu/accreditation/process/process-toc.asp)

               TABLE 10-1: SUMMARY OF FACULTY QUALIFICATION, INTELLECTUAL CONTRIBUTIONS
                                          AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
                                                      (RE: Standards 2 & 10)
                     This table reports all faculty in 2006-2007 returning for 2007-2008 plus new faculty (3)

                                                                                    Number of Contributions during the last five
                   Highest   Date of First   Percent of                                               years                            Normal
    Name2          Earned    Appointment       Time       Acad    Prof    Other4   Learning &     Discipline-    Contributions      Professional
                  Degree &        to         Dedicated    Qual4   Qual4            Pedagogical       Based        to Practice5     Responsibilities6
                                                                                               5              5
                    Year       School          to the                              Scholarship   Scholarship
                                              School’s                             PRJ OIC/      PRJ     OIC/     PRJ      OIC/
                                              Mission3                                   NEC7            NEC               NEC
 Accounting
 and CIS
 Department
  Accounting
 Margaret Blais   MS, MST      08/1996         50%                YES                                                      0/4           UG
 (Adjunct)          1991,
                    CPA
 Lisa Church      JD 1992,     07/2000         100%       YES     YES               2      0/7      2      1/7      1      0/35          UG
                    MST
                    1999,
                  CPA 1996
 David Filipek      CPA        09/1990         100%               YES                                      0/2             0/8           UG
 (Chair)            1979,
                    MBA
                    1976
 Jeanne Haser-    JD 1999,     06/2007         100%       YES     YES                      1/3             1/2             0/13          UG
 Lafond             MST
                    1986,
                  CPA 1982
 Frank              MBA        09/2005         25%                YES                                                      0/7           UG
 Mancieri
 (Adjunct)



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 Jane Przybyla     CPA         07/1985         100%               YES                      0/5             0/3             0/14          UG
                   1976,
                   MBA
                   1973
                                                                                    Number of Contributions during the last five
                  Highest    Date of First   Percent of                                               years                            Normal
    Name2         Earned     Appointment       Time       Acad    Prof    Other4   Learning &     Discipline-    Contributions      Professional
                 Degree &         to         Dedicated    Qual4   Qual4            Pedagogical       Based        to Practice5     Responsibilities6
                                                                                               5              5
                   Year        School          to the                              Scholarship   Scholarship
                                              School’s                             PRJ OIC/      PRJ     OIC/     PRJ      OIC/
                                              Mission3                                    NEC            NEC               NEC
 Accounting
 and CIS
 Department
   Accounting
   (continued)
 Kenneth           MBA         09/2001         25%                         YES                                                           UG
 Razee             2000       Not on CV
 (Adjunct)
 James           PhD, CPA      09/1998         100%       YES     YES                      0/3             1/4             0/2          ADM
 Schweikart
 (Dean)
 Charles Snow,   PhD 1993,     07/1991         100%       YES     YES                      1/0             2/5             0/11          UG
 Jr.               CPA,
                   CMA
 Jeffrey           CPA         09/2006         25%                YES                                                      0/6           UG
 Wadovick          1992,
 (Adjunct)         MST
                   2004
      CIS
 Lisa Bain       PhD 2003      07/2005         100%       YES     YES                      0/4             2/6             0/1           UG
 Crist Costa     PhD 1970      09/1972         100%               YES                      0/2                             2/4           UG
 Richard Evans                   1996          100%                        YES             0/1                             0/3           UG
                                                                          (USS)
 Michael         PhD 1996      06/2000         100%       YES     YES                      0/6            3/10             0/5           UG
 Hayden
 Faith Lamprey     MBA           1998          25%                YES                                                      2/5           UG



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 (Adjunct)         1977
 John Munko        MBA         09/2006?         25%                   YES                                                      0/2          UG
 (Adjunct)
 Richard           MBA          07/1998         50%                            YES            0/2                                           UG
 Perreault
 Mariano            PhD         09/2006         50%          YES                              3/1             0/2                           UG
 Rodrigues
 (Adjunct RIC)

                                                                                          Number of Contributions during the last five
                    Highest     Date of First   Percent of                                                  years                            Normal
     Name2          Earned      Appointment       Time        Acad     Prof     Other4   Learning &     Discipline-    Contributions      Professional
                   Degree &          to         Dedicated     Qual4    Qual4             Pedagogical       Based        to Practice5     Responsibilities6
                                                                                                     5              5
                     Year         School          to the                                 Scholarship   Scholarship
                                                 School’s                                PRJ OIC/      PRJ     OIC/     PRJ      OIC/
                                                 Mission3                                       NEC            NEC               NEC
 Economics
 and Finance
 Suchandra         PhD 2006        06/2006        100%        YES                                0/3            3/13             0/3           UG
 Basu
 James Betres      PhD 1971        01/2003        50%*        YES                                                                0/2           UG
 (Joint RIC)
 Jeff Blais        PhD 1975        07/1986        100%                 YES                                       0/2             0/6           UG
 (Chair)
 Gary Garzone      MA 1977         09/2000         25%                 YES                                                       0/3           UG
 (Adjunct)
 Alema Karim       PhD 1986        07/1987        100%        YES                                                2/1             0/2           UG
 Abbas Kazemi      PhD 1987        07/1984        100%        YES      YES                       4/3      2      2/9             0/5           UG
                   CFA 2006
 James Marsis      MA 1966         09/1997         25%                 YES                                                                     UG
 (Adjunct)
 Peter Marks       PhD 1978        07/1973        100%                 YES                                       1/1             0/7           UG
 Alex Wilson       PhD 1999        04/2005        100%        YES                         3      5/2            0/11             0/3           UG
 Paul Zisserson    MA 1966         01/2006         25%                 YES                                                                     UG
 (Adjunct)

*50% Elementary Education / 50% Economics and Finance


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                                                                                       Number of Contributions during the last five
                     Highest    Date of First   Percent of                                               years                            Normal
       Name2         Earned     Appointment       Time       Acad    Prof    Other4   Learning &     Discipline-    Contributions      Professional
                    Degree &         to         Dedicated    Qual4   Qual4            Pedagogical       Based        to Practice5     Responsibilities6
                                                                                                  5              5
                      Year        School          to the                              Scholarship   Scholarship
                                                 School’s                             PRJ OIC/      PRJ     OIC/     PRJ      OIC/
                                                 Mission3                                    NEC            NEC               NEC
 Management and
 Marketing
   Management
 Shani Carter       PhD 1994      07/2001         100%       YES     YES                      0/7      3     1/15             1/9           UG
 Michael Casey      PhD 1997      07/1997         100%       YES     YES                      0/4      1      2/5             0/1           UG
 Halil Copur        PhD 1976      07/1986         50%        YES     YES                      0/1             1/7             0/6           UG
 (Phased Retire)
 Randy DeSimone     PhD 1986      07/1986         100%       YES                                              1/2             0/3           UG
 James Dorian       MBA 1982        2000          25%                         YES                                                        UG/ADM
 (Dir of Records)
 Frank Farinella    EDD 1980        1980          25%                         YES                                                           UG
 (Adjunct-RIC)
 Lori Martin        MS 1992       11/1998       25%/100%                      YES                                             0/1        UG/ADM
 (Asst to Dean)
 James McGuire      PhD 1994      07/1972         100%               YES                      0/3                             0/1           UG
 John O’Del         PhD 1994      07/1999         100%       YES     YES                      0/1      1      5/5             0/5           UG
 (Medical Leave)
 Theresa Quinn      J.D. 1982       1994          25%                YES                                                      0/2           UG
 (Adjunct)
 Natalie Sahba      PhD 1986      07/1986         100%               YES                                                      0/5           UG
 Karen Schoch        MBA            2007          25%                YES                                                      0/1           UG
 (Adjunct)
 Charles Synnott    PhD 2000        2007          50%                YES                                                      0/1           UG
 (Adjunct)
 Robert Tetreault   MBA 1973        1991          25%                YES                                                      0/1           UG




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 Julie Urda                PhD 2006            06/2007             100%         YES       YES                                                 9/2                 0/3              UG


                                                                                                                Number of Contributions during the last five
                            Highest         Date of First       Percent of                                                        years                                        Normal
        Name2               Earned          Appointment           Time          Acad      Prof      Other4     Learning &     Discipline-    Contributions                  Professional
                           Degree &              to             Dedicated       Qual4     Qual4                Pedagogical       Based        to Practice5                 Responsibilities6
                                                                                                                           5              5
                             Year             School              to the                                       Scholarship   Scholarship
                                                                 School’s                                      PRJ OIC/      PRJ     OIC/     PRJ      OIC/
                                                                 Mission3                                             NEC            NEC               NEC
 Management and
 Marketing
 (continued)
     Marketing
 Steven Abdow                                                      25%                    YES                                                                                      UG
 (Adjunct)
 David Blanchette          DBA 1990            07/1991             100%         YES       YES                            4/6         1        2/4                 0/3              UG
 (Chair)
 Deanna Jelovac               ABD              08/2007             100%                   YES                                                                                      UG
 Janet Letourneau          MBA 1996            09/2006             50%                    YES                                                                                      UG
 (Adjunct)
 Steve Ramocki             PhD 1978            07/1984             100%         YES                                      2/0         2                                             UG
 Jane Shanley                                                      25%                    YES                                                                                      UG
 (Adjunct)

1 Information in this table, supplemented by information in individual faculty members’ vitae, is useful in making judgments relative to:
         Standard 2: The pattern of types of intellectual contributions will indicate whether “the portfolio of intellectual contributions reflects the mission of the school and
          includes contributions from a substantial cross-section of the faculty in each discipline.”
         Standard 10: The table as a whole will assist the judgment of whether “The faculty has, and maintains, intellectual qualification and current expertise to accomplish the
          mission….”
2 Faculty should be listed alphabetically by discipline. Administrators who hold faculty rank and directly support the school’s mission should be included relative to their percent
of time devoted to the mission including administrative duties. If a faculty member serves more than one discipline, list the individual only once under the primary discipline to
which the individual is assigned and where his/her performance evaluation is conducted. Provide a footnote explaining the nature of the interdisciplinary responsibilities of the
individual. Graduate students who have teaching responsibilities should be included in accordance with the guidance provided in Standard 10.
3 This column should show the percent of total time devoted to teaching, research, and/or other assignment represented by the faculty member’s contribution to the school’s overall
mission during the period of evaluation (i.e., the year of the self-evaluation report or other filing with AACSB International). Reasons for less than 100% might include part-time
employment, shared appointment with another academic unit, or other assignments that make the faculty member partially unavailable to the school.
4 Faculty members may be academically qualified (AQ), professionally qualified (PQ), AQ and PQ, or other. Indicate by placing “YES” in the appropriate column(s) or by
leaving columns blank. Individual vitae should be provided to support this table. The “Other” category should be used for those individuals holding a faculty title but whose



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qualifications do not meet the criteria for academically and/or professionally qualified. A faculty member should be counted only once for use in Table IIa even if the individual is
AQ and PQ. At Rhode Island College, faculty members are considered to be AQ if they have at least one item that is PRJ or OID in the Pedagogy or Discipline areas (NEC items
do not count for this – see footnote 7). Faculty members are considered to be PQ if they have at least one item that is PRJ or OID in the Contributions to Practice area.
5 The number of intellectual contributions should be listed in these columns. The peer reviewed journal columns marked “PRJ” should enumerate all of those intellectual
contributions that have appeared in journal article form reviewed by academic and practitioner colleagues. The other intellectual contributions columns marked “OIC” should
enumerate all other intellectual contributions regardless of the form of the contributions, including (but not limited to) research monographs, scholarly books, chapters in scholarly
books, textbooks, proceedings from scholarly meetings, papers presented at academic or professional meetings, publicly available research working papers, papers presented at
faculty research seminars, publications in trade journals, in-house journals, book reviews, written cases with instructional materials, instructional software, and other publicly
available materials describing the design and implementation of new curricula or courses. Generally, intellectual contributions will exist in a publicly written form and will be
available for scrutiny by academic peers and professionals, i.e., proprietary and confidential research and consulting reports do not qualify as intellectual contributions.
6. Indicate the normal professional responsibilities the faculty member is expected to perform, e.g., (UG for undergraduate teaching; GR for graduate teaching; UG/GR for
teaching at both levels; ADM for administration; RES for research; NCR for non-credit teaching; SER for service and outreach activities) A faculty member may have more than
one category assigned.
7. At Rhode Island College, NEC indicates activities that are “not elsewhere classified.” These are activities which did not result in a publicly-available written document, and can
include [1] pedagogy-related: (creation of teaching aids; design and implementation of new curricula and courses; additional certificate, credential, etc., earned; conference
attendee; conference or journal reviewer; demonstrated and meaningful works in progress; grants received); [2] discipline-related: (chair or participant in conference panel;
additional graduate degrees earned; editor of discipline journal); and [3] practice-related: design, creation, and/or delivery of executive education programs or courses, certificate
programs or courses, etc.; completion of relevant internship or other training experience; chair or participant in professional workshop, seminar, etc.; membership in learned or
professional organization; consulting, volunteer, or work activities that add field-related knowledge and skills that augment the currency and relevance of information brought to
teaching and learning..




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TABLE 10-2. CALCULATIONS RELATIVE TO DEPLOYMENT OF QUALIFIED FACULTY
                                 (RE: Standard 10)
    This table reports all faculty in 2006-2007 returning for 2007-2008 plus new (3) and
                                      returning faculty (1)
Name                      Qualification    Aq Faculty-     Pq Faculty-       Other2      Qualification
                         (Academic-Aq,     % Of Time       % Of Time Faculty- % Of Time     Ratios
                         Professional-Pq    Devoted         Devoted        Devoted To     Per Std 10
                            Other-O)       To Mission      To Mission        Mission
                         (From Table II) (From Table II) (From Table II) (From Table II)
Accounting
Margaret Blais (Adjunct)      PQ                              50
Lisa Church                   AQ              100
David Filipek                 PQ                              100
Jeanne Haser-Lafond           AQ              100
Frank Mancieri (Adjunct)      PQ                               25
Jane Przybyla                 PQ                              100
Kenneth Razee (Adjunct)        O                                               25
James Schweikart (Dean)       AQ              100
Charles Snow, Jr.             AQ              100
Jeffrey Wadovick (Adjunct)    PQ                              25

CIS
Lisa Bain                     AQ              100
Crist Costa                   PQ                              100
Richard Evans                  O                                              100
Michael Hayden                AQ              100
Faith Lamprey (Adjunct)       PQ                              25
John Munko (Adunct)           PQ                              25
Richard Perreault              O                                               50
Mariano Rodrigues (Adj/RIC)   AQ               50
TOTAL Accounting and CIS                      650             450             175
AQ %                                                                                          0.51
AQ+PQ %                                                                                       0.86

Economics and Finance
Suchandra Basu            AQ                  100
James Betres (Joint)      AQ                   50
Jeffrey Blais             PQ                                  100
Gary Garzone (Adjunct)    PQ                                   25
Alema Karim               AQ                  100
Abbas Kazemi              AQ                  100
Peter Marks               AQ                  100
James Marsis (Adjunct)    PQ                                  25
Alex Wilson               AQ                  100
Paul Zisserson (Adjunct)  PQ                                   25
TOTAL Economics and Finance                   550             175              0
AQ %                                                                                          0.76
AQ + PQ%                                                                                      1.00

Management & Marketing
Management
Shani Carter                  AQ              100
Michael Casey                 AQ              100
Halil Copur (Phased Ret.)     AQ              100


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Randy DeSimone                  AQ          100
James Dorian (Dir of Records)    O                                         25
Frank Farinella (Adjunct/RIC)    O                                         25
Lori Martin (Asst to Dean)       O                                         25
James McGuire                   PQ                         100
John O’Del (Med Leave)          AQ          100
Theresa Quinn (Adjunct)         PQ                          25
Natalie Sahba                   PQ                         100
Karen Schoch (Adjunct)          PQ                          25
Charles Synott (Adjunct)        PQ                          50
Robert Tetreault (Adjunct)      PQ                          25
Juliie Urda                     AQ          100

Marketing
Steven Abdow (Adjunct)     PQ                               25
David Blanchette           AQ               100
Deanna Jelovac             PQ                              100
Janet Letourneau (Adjunct) PQ                               50
Stephen Ramocki            AQ               100
Jane Shanley (Adjunct)     PQ                               25
TOTAL Management and Marketing              800            525             75
AQ %                                                                                     0.57
AQ + PQ %                                                                                0.94

TOTAL FOR SCHOOL                           2000            1150            250
AQ %                                                                                     0.59
AQ + PQ %                                                                                0.92




14. Describe general expectations for faculty intellectual contributions for academically and
professionally qualified faculty members.

According to the RIC/AFT contract (2004-2007), there are no required “intellectual
contributions” but the following types of activities may be used to rate a professor’s
“professional competence.” Numbers indicate the clause in the Union contract.

8.12 The following shall be used, not necessarily in priority order or limited to the following, in
determining the professional competence and other value of a faculty member:
    a. Research, publication, grants in a special field, or creativity and performance in the fine
    arts;
    c. Professional improvement, such as is shown by the completion of additional graduate
    courses; attendance at professional meetings and holding office in professional organizations;

8.14 For faculty recommended for tenure and/or promotion, a comprehensive review covering
the faculty member's entire professional career shall be submitted by the department chairperson
to the appropriate dean in support of that recommendation. This review will include the
following:
    c. A tabulation of accomplishments. This tabulation shall include but not be limited to
    the following:
         (2) Journal articles or books published or accepted for publication, papers presented,

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            workshops conducted at professional meetings, and research accomplishments.


15. Describe methods used, including the role of the participating and supporting faculty,
in evaluating the quality of teaching and the development and evaluation of the business
academic unit’s educational programs.

The quality of teaching is evaluated through Peer Classroom Observation, evaluations by
students, and occasionally class visits by the department chairperson or the Dean. A faculty may
revise his/her course syllabi by incorporating the feedback received. Participating faculty are
actively involved with program development and curriculum changes. Curriculum changes and
new course proposals are initiated at the Department level and will be transmitted to the College
Curriculum Committee after approval from the Dean’s office. In program development and
curriculum changes, participating faculty have sought suggestions and feedback from the
business community and on occasions have incorporated those into their final proposals.


16. List five to six business schools or units in the world, region, country, or area that are
considered comparable to the applying business academic unit.

                     Derived from the RIBGHE-Approved Peer Institution List for Rhode Island College




                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Expenditure Dollars
                                                                                                                                                                                                  % Master's Degrees
                                                                                           Ave HS Rank %ile




                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Total Research
                                                                            Average SATs
                                                             FTE Students




                                                                                                              % Applicants


                                                                                                                             % Applicants




                                                                                                                                                                                   % Bachelor's
     INSTITUTION              LOCATION
                                                                                                                                            % Part-Tim
                                                Headcount




                                                                                                                                            Headcount

                                                                                                                                                         Headcount

                                                                                                                                                                      Headcount
                                                                                                                                                         % Minority

                                                                                                                                                                      FT Faculty
                                                                                                              Accepted


                                                                                                                             Enrolled




                                                                                                                                                                                   Degrees
 Rhode Island            New England (Mid-                                                                                                     44.
                                               8,513        5,998             959                   66              72             35                     12.2          302          76.2         23.6                 218,871
 College                 Sized City)                                                                                                            3
 Bridgewater State       New England (Urban                                                                                                    36.
                                               8,839        6,681           1007                     ---            69             36                       8.7         258          83.2         16.7                                       0
 College                 Fringe)                                                                                                                6
 Central Connecticut     New England (Urban                                                                                                    43.
                                              12,252        8,687             984                   55              64             34                     17.6          391          70.9         29.1                 751,003
 State University        Fringe)                                                                                                                7
                         New England (Urban                                                                                                    50.
 Salem State College                           8,587        5,703             954                    ---            59             18                     14.2          305          72.0         28.0                                       0
                         Fringe)                                                                                                                4
                                                                            430-
 Western Connecticut     New England (Mid-                                  520;                                                               42.
                                               5,806        4,162                                   53              55             40                     15.5          186          74.3         25.1                 190,214
 State University        Sized City)                                        420-                                                                5
                                                                             520
                         Mid-East (Urban                                                                                                       40.
 Kean University (NJ)                         11,468        8,375             973                    ---            62             50                     45.1          376          77.1         22.9                 235,084
                         Fringe)                                                                                                                5
 William Peterson        Mid-East (Urban                                                                                                       31.
                                               9,945        7,849             999                   61              67             28                     28.4          357          85.4         14.6                 357,170
 University              Fringe)                                                                                                                6
* Aspirational Peers.




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17. Consistent with your mission and within your cultural context, describe how diversity
in your business programs is demonstrated (see Eligibility Procedures and Standards for
Business Accreditation, January 1, 2006, Eligibility Procedures D).

Staffing

The staffing process at RIC strongly expresses and follows the principles of EEO and affirmative
action (AA), and advocates the goal of hiring a diverse faculty.

The AA process has been successful in improving representation of women and minority group
members in faculty positions (e.g., see the 2005-2006 Affirmative Action report – over 50% of
College faculty positions are held by women).

The SOM participates fully in the AA process fully and has been particularly successful in
recruiting and selecting diverse individuals. In 2007, three women were hired as full time and
participating faculty.

Faculty Development

Two campus-wide committees exist to promote diversity understanding and teaching, and to
foster an environment that embraces a diverse workforce and student body: Dialogue on
Diversity and a local “chapter” of the New England Consortium on Inclusive Teaching (NECIT).
These committees offer workshops for both faculty (presenting panels at our annual January
Faculty Development workshop) and students (the annual Promising Practices workshops, which
focus exclusively on diversity issues).

The College offers Sexual Harassment prevention workshops.

Teaching

General Education: All RIC students are required to take a course focusing on the non-Western
World (Core 3) and a critical inquiry course that focuses on multicultural issues (Core 4).

Many SOM courses (and the texts used for those courses) include coverage of diversity and
international issues, including cross-cultural application of course topics. In addition,
International Management Concentration under the Management Major has several courses,
mostly in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, in which the students can focus on the culture,
economics, management, and geography in different regions and countries. Within the School of
Management regular course offerings such as Management of Diverse Workforce, Global
Marketing, International Finance, and International Economics aim to expand the horizons of the
students beyond the traditional treatment of these subjects.

Other

Two standing subcommittees of the Human Relations Committee exist to address diversity
issues, the Gender Relations and Racial Understanding.

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A recent volume of the RIC online journal, Issues in Teaching and Learning, was devoted to
articles that explored the ways in which faculty have applied inclusive teaching ideas gained by
participating in NECIT.

Student organizations that focus on specific demographic and interest group issues, including
Harambee, the Latin American Students Association, NAACP, the Organization of African
Students and Professionals.

There is a Unity Center on campus that promotes diversity issues.

Other campus organizations with diversity-related missions include the Women’s Center and a
group focusing on raising awareness of and support for gay, lesbian, transgender, and
questioning individuals.



18. Describe the established expectations of the institution or the business programs of the
institution for ethical behavior by administrators, faculty, and students (see Eligibility
Procedures and Standards for Business Accreditation, January 1, 2006, Eligibility
Procedures E).

Eligibility Procedures E
INTERPRETATION: AACSB believes that ethical behavior is paramount to the delivery of
quality business education. Schools are encouraged to develop “codes of conduct” to indicate
the importance of proper behavior for administrators, faculty, and students in their professional
and personal actions. Schools also may foster ethical behavior through procedures such as
disciplinary systems to manage inappropriate behavior and through honor codes.


The College Handbook is a comprehensive guide to all relevant policies, practices, regulations,
and other documents that govern activities and operations at Rhode Island College. In addition
to the College Handbook, there are other important documents which include basic regulations
and policies governing the College community. These include:

   •   Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education Personnel Policy Manual
   •   Contract between the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education and the
       Rhode Island College Chapter, American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO, Local #1819
   •   Contract between the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education and the
       Rhode Island College Staff Association, American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO,
       Local #3302
   •   Student Handbook
   •   College Catalog
   •   Academic Adviser’s Manual




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Code of Student Conduct
(Located in the Student Handbook - http://www2.ric.edu/studentlife/handbook.php)

Student Conduct

Rules governing the conduct of students while on the campus or when representing the College
were established by the Committee on Student Regulations (presently the Committee on Student
Life), a committee of the Council of Rhode Island College. Actions of this group, composed of
representatives of the student body, faculty and administration, are made within the guidelines
established by the council and are subject to the approval of the President.

General Principles

Rhode Island College recognizes its obligation to provide each student who enrolls with a
maximum amount of freedom for self-development in accordance with the unique objectives and
programs of the College. In a similar fashion, each student is obligated to conduct his/her affairs
without infringement on the rights of other members of the College community and without
interference with the program of the College. In short, all members of the campus community
share a responsibility for maintaining and enhancing an environment where the actions of all are
guided by mutual respect, high standards of integrity, and reason.

Alleged violations of the rules are adjudicated by the Board of College Discipline or its agent.
Procedural safeguards ensure fair play.

A student who desires clarification of the College policies or has a grievance of College policies
or procedures should confer with the staff member primarily involved. If the outcome of the first
level is not satisfactory to the student, the student should then bring the matter to the next level
of supervision, normally the director of the service. Most concerns can be resolved at this level.

If the outcome with the supervisor is not satisfactory, the student may pursue the matter with the
appropriate college committee, or in the absence of a committee, with the appropriate vice
president.

The final procedure is to request a review by the President of the College. Information regarding
academic grievances may be found in this handbook in the section titled College Policies and
Procedures.

Honesty

The Rhode Island College community expects all of its members to maintain the highest
standards of integrity. Dishonesty in the classroom (e.g., plagiarism or cheating) or in the
conduct of one’s affairs on the campus (e.g., stealing or falsification of records) is cause for
disciplinary action.




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Expressions of Opinions

All members of the college community are encouraged to express their opinions. It is expected
that such expressions, including debate, picketing or demonstration, will respect the rights of
others. Willful obstruction of College activities (e.g., classes, lectures, meetings or the work of
an office), or threats to the safety of person or property are cause for disciplinary action.

Academic Honesty
(Located in the College Handbook - http://www.ric.edu/president/handbook.html)
An academic community cannot achieve its aims unless its members subscribe to a basic
principle of intellectual honesty. The search for truth and the communication of truth demand
that the participants have a deep-seated mutual confidence in the integrity of those with whom
they work. All members of the Rhode Island College community ought to be sensitive to the
need for intellectual honesty, even as a member of the larger community ought to be sensitive to
the need for intellectual honesty. As the larger community expects its citizens to refrain from
breaching its rules of personal property and rights, so also the academic community expects its
members to refrain from breaching its rules.

A student who searches sincerely and honestly for knowledge and truth achieves a meaningful
education. Students who willfully violate principles of academic honesty (e.g., by cheating on
examinations and assignments, plagiarizing, altering or changing records, etc.) cheat themselves,
destroy any presumption of personal integrity, and debase the meaning of education.

Therefore, students, faculty, and administration are expected to strive for academic excellence:
the faculty through constant appraisal of their teaching and examining methods and through
intellectual challenge to their students; students through constant appraisal of their own needs
and desires in the educational process and through honest achievement of their goals; and the
Administration through support of the ethical and academic goals of both students and faculty.
When willful violation of intellectual honesty does occur, the effect will be felt throughout the
entire academic community. Just as violations of the laws of society are met with certain
sanctions, a student who is willfully dishonest academically is subject to a range of
consequences, including grading penalties, academic probation, or expulsion from the College
depending on the seriousness of the act.

Academic Freedom
(Located in the Contract between the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education
and the Rhode Island College Chapter, American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO, Local
#1819 - http://www.ric.edu/ricaft/contract.htm)

3.1 Academic freedom consists of a body of rights, not written into law but well established in
custom and grounded in traditions of long standing in the colleges and universities of the
Western world, designed to protect professional scholars and teachers from hazards that might
interfere with the obligations to pursue truth. The justification of academic freedom is that it is
indispensable to the scholar in the preservation, extension, and dissemination of knowledge.
Though it is a specific kind of freedom peculiar to members of the teaching profession in higher

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education (and in this respect it is somewhat analogous to the freedom of judges from political
control in Anglo-Saxon jurisprudence), its benefits ultimately accrue as much to the public at
large as the scholars themselves.

3.2 The body of rights referred to in Section 3.1 above has been defined and codified in a
statement of principles that was prepared over a period of years by representatives of the
American Association of University Professors and the Association of American Colleges.
Adopted by both organizations in 1941 and later endorsed by many other professional and
learned societies, it is known to the profession as "The 1940 Statement of Principles on
Academic Freedom and Tenure."

Policy on Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action
(Located in the College Handbook and online at http://www.ric.edu/president/handbook.html)

Pursuant to the philosophy of the Board of Governors for Higher Education, Rhode Island
College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin, gender,
religion, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital, citizenship
status or status as a special disabled veteran, recently separated veteran, Vietnam era veteran, or
any other veteran who served on active duty during a war or in a campaign or expedition for
which a campaign badge has been authorized (except in those special circumstances permitted or
mandated by law). This nondiscrimination policy encompasses the operation of the College's
educational programs and activities including admissions policies, scholarship and loan
programs, athletic and other College-administered programs. It also encompasses the
employment of College personnel and contracting by the College for goods and services. The
College is committed to taking affirmative action to employ and advance in employment
qualified women and members of minority groups identified in state and federal affirmative
action laws and executive orders, persons with disabilities (including qualified special disabled
veterans), and veterans of the Vietnam Era.

Harassment Policy
(Located in the College Handbook and online at
http://www.ric.edu/admin/illegalharassmentpolicy.html)

In accordance with its policy of nondiscrimination, Rhode Island College prohibits sexual
harassment and harassment on the basis of race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin, gender,
religion, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital, citizenship
status or status as a special disabled veteran, recently separated veteran, Vietnam era veteran, or
any other veteran who served on active duty during a war or in a campaign or expedition for
which a campaign badge has been authorized.

Complaints about illegal harassment will be responded to promptly. Retaliation against an
individual bringing a complaint of illegal harassment constitutes a violation of College policy as
well as state and federal law. An individual found guilty of illegal harassment or retaliation, or
any individual who initiates a fraudulent claim of harassment, shall be subject to disciplinary
action. All persons who believe that they are or may have been victims of illegal harassment are
encouraged to seek resolution promptly through the established informal and formal procedures

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of the College as set forth in the “Complaint Resolution Policy.”
(http://www.ric.edu/admin/complaintresolutionpolicy.html).

Complaint Resolution Policy
(Located in the College Handbook and online at
http://www.ric.edu/admin/complaintresolutionpolicy.html)

Rhode Island College affirms its commitment to ensuring an environment for all students and
employees that is fair, humane, and respectful; an environment that supports and rewards
students and employees on the basis of relevant considerations, and which is free from
discriminatory, inappropriate, and disrespectful conduct or communication. As an institution of
higher education dedicated to fostering and upholding higher order values of human dignity and
respect for the individual, Rhode Island College expects standards of professional behavior that
exceed those minimally prescribed by law.

Policy Advising

Individuals seeking information regarding the process of complaint resolution may consult with
any of the following offices or individuals for advice and assistance. (A list can be obtained by
clicking here.)

Informal Resolution Procedure

Members of the College Community are encouraged normally to seek an informal resolution of
their complaints. This informal procedure is intended to encourage communication between the
parties involved, either directly or through an intermediary, in order to facilitate a mutual
understanding of what may be different perspectives regarding the complained of action or
behavior, and to find a solution.

Formal Resolution Procedure

Any member of the College community may submit a formal complaint alleging a violation of
College policy to the appropriate administrator at any time. However, time limits contained in
law or contracts may limit the College's ability to respond fully.

Purely academic complaints shall be handled in accordance with the College's academic
grievance policies and are not covered by this policy. Those policies and procedures may be
found in the Student Handbook (see Appendix B, page 75).

Filing a Formal Complaint

A formal complaint shall be in writing and shall set forth a statement of the facts, the College
policy/policies or practice/practices violated, and the specific remedy sought.




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Hearings

Hearings are conducted according to set processes. Readers may request the step processes.

Board of College Discipline

The Board of College Discipline shall consider cases referred to it and has the option to
recommend any of the penalties available to the faculty member. It also may place the student on
academic probation or expel that student from the College.

Any student accused of academic dishonesty may appeal action taken by the instructor in a case
to the Board of College Discipline.


School of Management Courses Covering Ethical Behavior

MGT 341: Business, Government, and Society
Acct 201: Principles of Accounting I: Financial
Acct 202: Principles of Accounting II: Managerial
Acct 311: External Reporting I
Acct 312: External Reporting II
Acct 321: Cost Management I
Acct 331: Taxes for Business Decision
Acct 441: Auditing
Acct 543: Personal Income Tax Planning

Ethics considerations are integrated into Acct 310 and Acct 461 mainly through discussions of
recent business news involving fraud and other accounting scandals. Since this changes based
on current events, I didn’t include them in the list above.


19. List all business degree programs at all levels and in all locations offered through the
business academic unit and non-business academic unit (see Eligibility Procedures and
Standards for Business Accreditation, January 1, 2006, Eligibility Procedures C and F).
Please include a complete list of all business degree programs offered through the
institution even if you intend to seek exclusion for particular programs based on the
criteria listed below. Failure to report all business degree programs on this application
may result in a delay of the accreditation review process. If your institution intends to seek
exclusion of a particular degree program, the business academic unit must complete and
submit a “Request for Program Exclusion” to the PreAccreditation Committee Chair. A
copy of the exclusion request form is found below.

Degrees

Master of Professional Accountancy Program (M.P.Ac.) (excluded from AACSB accreditation
       application)
Accounting (B.S.)

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Computer Information Systems (B.S.)
Management (B.S.)
Marketing (B.S.)
Economics (B.A.)
Finance (B.S.)

Minors

Accounting
Computer Information Systems
Economics
Management
Marketing
Finance

Participation/Independence


Independence is achieved when 25 percent or more of the teaching for an undergraduate
program or 50 percent or more of teaching for a graduate program is in traditional business
subjects.

At RIC, only programs in the School of Management meet these criteria. Each major requires
120 credits total, and of these credits Accounting requires 66 in SOM (55%), CIS requires 63
(53%), Economics requires 36 (30%), Finance requires 51 (43%), Management requires 60
(50%), and Marketing requires 63 (53%).


Branding/Distinctiveness

Students, faculty, and recruiters can easily distinguish SOM programs from other RIC programs.

The School of Management is independent from other Rhode Island College programs in terms
of location and administration. Location: All SOM offices are located in Alger Hall, and no other
academic departments or administrative offices are located permanently in Alger Hall.
Administration: The SOM dean is independent of other deans, and only the three SOM
departments (containing seven degree programs) report to this dean. All offices on campus, from
the records office to the library and student advising recognize SOM as a distinct entity.

Publicity

Rhode Island College makes the distinction between SOM and other schools clear in its catalog
(pages 304-322), where SOM is discussed as a distinct entity. In addition, the RIC web site at
http://www.ric.edu/academics/schdept.html, lists SOM and its department separately from other
departments and schools. Further, RIC publicizes SOM as being distinct from other schools
during open houses, orientations, and in the freshmen advising process. Last, SOM maintains its

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own web site at http://www.ric.edu/som/, and the three departments maintain their own sites at:
http://www.ric.edu/acctcis/, at http://www.ric.edu/ecfin/, and at http://www.ric.edu/mgttech/.

Control/Autonomy

The level of administrative control the faculty and administration of included programs have
over the program in such areas as program design; faculty hiring, development, and promotion;
student selection and services; curriculum design; and awarding of degrees is consistent with
peer schools and normal business school operations.

Faculty governance responsibilities include: program requirements; curriculum design; course
content; course scheduling; faculty hiring; faculty development and promotion; and student
advising. Some of these areas are governed by faculty independently, some are governed by
faculty committees, and some are governed by the chair, who is a faculty member.

These items are later approved by College-wide committees and the administration prior to
approval.

Degrees Included in AACSB Accreditation Application

Accounting (B.S.)
Computer Information Systems (B.S.)
Management (B.S.)
Marketing (B.S.)
Economics (B.A.)
Finance (B.S.)


Degrees Excluded from AACSB Accreditation Application

Master of Professional Accountancy Program (M.P.Ac).
Labor Studies (B.A.), a degree offered within the Faculty of Arts & Sciences

The Master of Professional Accounting requires all credits to be taken in the School of
Management.

The Labor Studies Major in the Faculty of Arts & Sciences allows students to take up to 15 of 36
credits in SOM, but it is also possible for Labor Studies majors to take only 3 of 36 credits in
SOM. Therefore, the Labor Studies program is independent of SOM.




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20. For the business degree programs, please identify the learning goals and outcomes
assessment strategies being used to improve student learning and curriculum development.

                           School of Management Content Standards
                                     Core Knowledge Bases

Upon completion of any Bachelor of Science program, major, or concentration offered by the
School of Management, each graduate should know:

1. the concepts, processes, and institutions involved in the production of goods and/or services.

2. the concepts, processes, and institutions involved in the marketing of goods and/or services.

3. the concepts, principles and practices of financing a business enterprise and/or other forms of
  organization.

4. the concepts and principles of accounting practices.

5. the concepts, principles, and tools of economics essential to the analysis and solutions of
  resource allocation problems faced by managerial decision makers.

6. the concepts and principles of quantitative methods, including basic arithmetic, algebra,
  probability, and inferential statistics.

7. the concepts, principles, and theories of management information systems. including computer
applications of e-mail, telnet, file transfer protocol, the World- Wide Web, interactive multi-
media, word processing, spreadsheet data processing, and statistical analysis packages.

8. the concepts, principles, and theories of organizations, including their behavior and
  interpersonal communications.

9. administrative processes under conditions of uncertainty, including integrating analysis and
  policy determination at the overall management level.

10. the effects of the physical environment and ecological developments on organizations.

11. the effects of technology and technological developments on organizations.

12. the effects of ethical considerations on organizations.

13. the effects of the economic environment and economic developments, both domestically and
  internationally, on organizations.

14. the effects of the legal environment, both domestically and internationally, on organizations.

15. the effects of social and political influences and developments, both domestically and

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 internationally, on organizations.


                        School of Management Performance Standards
                                   Core Competencies/Skills

Upon completion of any Bachelor of Science program, major, or concentration offered by the
School of Management, each graduate should be able to:

1. prepare written communications such as reports and proposals that are correct, clear, concise,
    and appropriate.

2. present oral communications that are correct, clear, concise, and appropriate to small or large
    groups, in planned or extemporaneous formats, and in response to formal or informal
    requests.

3. work effectively with individuals, and in groups with diverse members.

4. influence others.

5. manage and resolve conflicts.

6. identify, analyze, and solve both structured and unstructured problems in a logical and/or
    creative manner.

7. use value-based reasoning to develop appropriate responses to ethical situations.

8. manage restricted resources such as time, capital, human resources, and materials.

9. locate, collect, organize, analyze, and evaluate information and data.

10. draw inferences, reach conclusions, and apply knowledge to new situations.

11. use efficient learning techniques to acquire and apply new knowledge and skills.

12. reason mathematically and apply quantitative analysis methods; including interpreting charts,
    tables, and graphs; and applying concepts to word situations.

13. use computers to process information for communications, mathematical applications,
    problem solving, and decision-making.

Specific Program Goals: Accounting Major

1. Graduates will be well grounded in fundamental accounting knowledge relating to financial
statement preparation and analysis, management decision making, internal controls and business
processes, and principles of federal income taxation.

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2. Graduates will be able to analyze, integrate and communicate complex information to
facilitate management decision making.

3. Graduates will be able to work well in a team and communicate results effectively, in both
oral and written form.

4. Graduates will be able to think analytically and critically, and research basic problems
independently.

5. Graduates will be aware of their professional responsibilities concerning ethical choices they
will encounter in the accounting and financial reporting area.

Assessment Strategies for Accounting:

Students are evaluated through their senior seminar. Students are tracked with performance on
professional examinations, professional awards and recognition, feedback from employers, and
entry into our MPAc program or other relevant master’s program.

Specific Program Goals: Master of Professional Accountancy (MPAc)

1. Graduates will be well grounded in all aspects of personal financial planning, including
income tax and estate planning, retirement planning, investment allocation and risk management.

2. Graduates will have the ability to perform basic research on tax planning issues.

3. Graduates will have the ability to prepare a comprehensive personal financial plan for an
individual.

Assessment Strategies for MPAc:

Performance on professional examinations such as the CPA examination is monitored, and
accreditation for CFP certification is maintained. Feedback by professionals is sought, as well.


Specific Program Goals: Computer Information Systems Major

1. Graduates will understand the roles of information systems in organizations, and how these
systems relate to the organizations’ functional areas.

2. Graduates will be able to analyze, design and develop information systems which achieve the
goals of the organization.

3. Graduates will have a basic understanding of computer hardware and software and their
interrelationship, and will understand the software development life cycle.



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4. Graduates will understand the role of networking in a business environment.

5. Graduates will have a basic understanding of web technologies, and will have basic web
development skills.

6. Graduates will be able to develop technical solutions for information systems users and
communicate these effectively, in both oral and written form.

7. Graduates will have a basic level of competency in programming and logic skills.

Assessment Strategies for Computer Information Systems:

Students are observed through their internship experience in CIS 462 by evaluating their final
written report, oral presentation, and evaluation by their client. They are further examined
within their classroom experience.

Specific Program Goals: Economics Major

1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the core knowledge of the discipline.

2. Students will demonstrate the ability, both independently and in groups, to find relevant
economic data and use it appropriately, including statistical and other quantitative analysis.

3. Students will demonstrate the ability to read, comprehend, synthesize, and critically evaluate
economic literature.

4. Students will demonstrate the ability to write in a manner appropriate to the discipline, and
critically evaluate their own work and the work of others.

5. Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate their knowledge in oral presentations.

6. Graduates who wish to attend graduate school will be prepared to do graduate-level work.

7. Graduates who seek employment will find their training in economics to be useful to them in
their careers.

Assessment Strategies for Economics:

A filed exam is administered to economics majors. This exam was created by Educational
Testing Service and covers the economics outcome constructs. In addition, students are
observed in the senior economics seminar.

Specific Program Goals: Finance Major

1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the core knowledge of the discipline.



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2. Students will demonstrate the ability, both independently and in groups, to find relevant
financial data and use it appropriately, including statistical and other quantitative analysis.

3. Students will demonstrate the ability to read, comprehend, synthesize, and critically evaluate
financial literature.

4. Students will demonstrate the ability to write in a manner appropriate to the discipline, and
critically evaluate their own work and the work of others.

5. Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate their knowledge in oral presentations.

6. Graduates who wish to attend graduate school will be prepared to do graduate-level work.

7. Graduates who seek employment will find their training in finance to be useful to them in
their careers.

Assessment Strategies for Finance:

Students seeking the status of certified financial analyst are monitored as well as students
seeking careers in finance.

Specific Program Goals: Management Major

1. Students will achieve competence in quantitative analysis and decision making.

2. Students will learn the fundamentals of manufacturing, production techniques and control of
related operations.

3. Students will develop and use interpersonal skills of r business problem solving.

4. Students will understand the legal and ethical framework of management.

5. Students will understand and apply financial analysis and control

6. Students will apply concepts of strategic management.

Assessment Strategy for Management:

A series of thirteen tests cover the main School outcomes as well as the specific Management
outcomes. These tests have been pre-tested and will be used to collect data for analysis in
spring, 2007. In addition, skill competencies are observed in Mgt 461, Senior Seminar.

Specific Program Goals: Marketing

1. Demonstrate an understanding of general business foundation concepts.



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2. Apply quantitative analysis and decision making techniques.

3. Demonstrate an understanding of marketing foundation concepts.

4. Demonstrate an understanding of marketing issues and problems related to the global
marketplace.

5. Conduct and interpret marketing research.

6. Demonstrate an understanding of consumer behavior concept.

7. Develop and apply strategic marketing plans

Assessment Strategy for Marketing:

A series of tests cover the main School outcomes as well as the specific Marketing outcomes.
These tests have been pre-tested and will be used to collect data for analysis in fall, 2007. In
addition, skill competencies are observed in Mgt 461, Senior Seminar.




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Request for Program Exclusion
A separate copy of this form is required for each degree program for which exclusion from the
AACSB International accreditation review is requested. Please complete every required section
of the form (marked with an *), and as many of the optional sections as apply.

* Name of Institution: Rhode Island College


* Name and Title of Person Completing Form: James A. Schweikart, Dean, School of
Management


*Full Title and Descriptive Information for Program for which Exclusion is being
requested: Master of Professional Accountancy (M.P.Ac.)

This is an evening part-time program that serves the State of Rhode Island Board of Licensing’s
five year education need to sit for the Uniform CPA Examination. This program also allows
completion of requirements for a Certificate in Financial Planning without completing the degree
requirements. Finally, this program qualifies for continuing education for the accounting
profession.

The enrollment has been kept deliberately small, about 25-30 students, to accommodate the
service needs of the State of Rhode Island. There is no intention to grown master’s degree
programs at this time, although additional certificate programs may be explored. The choice to
offer a master’s degree was for market purposes. Until this fall, this was the only M.P.Ac. degree
available in Rhode Island and perhaps elsewhere, indicating that its focus was for practitioner
purposes. Rhode Island College cannot offer competing upper level degrees with the University
of Rhode Island who offers the M.B.A. and M.S. degree in accounting per Office of Higher
Education policy.

Bases for exclusion:

To be excluded a program must satisfy the conditions of the first three categories below.
Justification from additional categories may assist the Accreditation Coordinating
Committee in its review of your request. Provide a brief, clear description of how the
program satisfies all of the relevant categories. Descriptions of the category expectations
can be found in the Eligibility Procedures and Standards for Business Accreditation of
AACSB International (pages 4-9).

    a. Independence – All of the classes are accounting and finance classes. Even so, these
       classes are not related to the undergraduate curriculum and are taught primarily by
       practitioner specialists such as members of the legal and taxation communities. Given
       that we are not seeking any accounting accreditation, we ask that the same consideration
       be given to the five year extension of that accounting curriculum.


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   b. Distinctiveness – Other than a comprehensive catalogue for the College and a separate
      page on the website for this program listed on the School of Management website, all
      brochures are distinct and separate from the undergraduate programs, and all
      advertisement of the M.P.Ac. are independent. For view of the website see
      http://www.ric.edu/som/mastersprograms.htm.



   c. Autonomy – In general, departments initiate and control programs in conjunction with
      the other School of Management departments. Departments control faculty hiring,
      development, etc. The College, however, controls admission and services for students,
      final curriculum approval, and awarding of degrees within the framework of the
      undergraduate program.

      The M.P.Ac. program admits its own students, provides its own services to those
      students, and has more autonomy over its offerings. Clearly, there are minimum
      graduate standards from the College within which this program must comply, but
      this program is more in house than the undergraduate program. All programs,
      however, are under the review of the College Curriculum Committee, including
      certificate programs. While the President awards all degrees and certificates, the
      Dean of the School of Management approves M.P.Ac. degrees for awarding at
      Graduation. The undergraduate degree is approved through the Office of
      Records.


   d. Subject to non-business accreditation – This program would likely be accredited by
      special accounting accreditation and no non-business accrediting organization.


   e. Specialized field – This is a specialized program to prepare for the Uniform CPA
      Examination with supporting continuing education and professional qualification
      purposes. It is not part of undergraduate general and business education.


   f. Separate location – The program is located on the single campus of Rhode Island
      College.


   g. Participate, but not named – The program is operated and controlled entirely by the
      School of Management, Rhode Island College.




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Organizational Information, Organization Charts for Rhode Island
College and the School of Management




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