About the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine by pengxiuhui

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									Presentation to the 19th Annual Osteopathic Medical Education
                    Leadership Conference
                     Fort Lauderdale, FL
                      January 10, 2009
 The U.S. physician workforce projections
 The current status and projections for
  osteopathic medical school growth
 Key developments in osteopathic medical
  education
 Current and future challenges for
  osteopathic medical education in the U.S.
 AACOM’s priorities in addressing issues in
  OME
   Founded in 1898 to lend support and assistance to
    osteopathic medical schools

   Association of all of the nation’s accredited COMs

   Governed by the Board of Deans (all colleges
    represented on the Board)
   Pacific Northwest University College      Touro University College of
    of Osteopathic Medicine, Washington        Osteopathic Medicine (TUCOM-
    (PNWUCOM)                                  CA), California
   Philadelphia College of Osteopathic          TUCOM–Nevada Campus
    Medicine (PCOM), Pennsylvania
      Georgia Campus–PCOM
                                              University of New England
                                               College of Osteopathic Medicine
   Pikeville College School of
    Osteopathic Medicine (PCSOM),              (UNECOM), Maine
    Kentucky                                  Edward Via Virginia College of
   Rocky Vista University College of          Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM)
    Osteopathic Medicine, Colorado            Western University College of
    (RVUCOM)                                   Osteopathic Medicine of the
   Touro College of Osteopathic               Pacific (Western U/COMP),
    Medicine – New York                        California
    (TOUROCOM)
   A.T. Still University School of         Kansas City University of Medicine
    Osteopathic Medicine – Arizona           and Biosciences – College of
    (ATSU/SOMA)                              Osteopathic Medicine (KCUMB-
   A.T. Still University of Health          COM), Missouri
    Sciences/Kirksville College of          Lake Erie College of Osteopathic
    Osteopathic Medicine                     Medicine (LECOM), Pennsylvania
    (ATSU/KCOM), Missouri                      LECOM–Bradenton Campus
   Arizona College of Osteopathic          Lincoln Memorial University Debusk
    Medicine of Midwestern University        College of Osteopathic Medicine
    (AZCOM)                                  (LMU-DCOM), Harrogate,
   Chicago College of Osteopathic           Tennessee
    Medicine of Midwestern University       New York College of Osteopathic
    (CCOM), Illinois                         Medicine of New York Institute of
   Des Moines University – College of       Technology (NYCOM/NYIT)
    Osteopathic Medicine (DMU-COM),         Nova Southeastern University –
    Iowa                                     College of Osteopathic Medicine
                                             (NSU-COM), Florida
   Michigan State University College of      University of Medicine and Dentistry
    Osteopathic Medicine (MSUCOM)              of New Jersey – School of Osteopathic
                                               Medicine (UMDNJ-SOM)
   Ohio University College of
    Osteopathic Medicine (OUCOM)              University of North Texas Health
                                               Science Center at Fort Worth/Texas
   Oklahoma State University Center for       College of Osteopathic Medicine at
    Health Sciences – College of               Fort Worth (UNTHSC/TCOM)
    Osteopathic Medicine (OSU-COM)
                                              West Virginia School of Osteopathic
                                               Medicine (WVSOM)
   Workforce and COM Growth
       New AAMC workforce projections
       New COM Growth Projections
       GME Scenarios
       Potential new COMs
       Recent Macy Conference
   AACOM Priorities:
       Policy Development and Advocacy
       Implement AACOM Strategic Plan
       Society of Osteopathic Medical Educators
        (SOME)
           Competency Task Force
           Faculty Development and Recognition
           On-line Osteopathic Medical Education Journal
   Workforce and COM Growth
       New AAMC workforce projections
       New COM Growth Projections
       GME Scenarios
       Potential new COMs
       Recent Macy Conference
   AACOM Priorities:
       Policy Development and Advocacy
       Implement AACOM Strategic Plan
       Society of Osteopathic Medical Educators
        (SOME)
           Competency Task Force
           Faculty Development and Recognition
           On-line Osteopathic Medical Education Journal
         Physician Workforce




Source: Sixteenth Report: Physician Workforce Policy Guidelines for the
United States, 2000-2020 (January 2005), Council on Graduate Medical
Education.
                                  400
Active Physicians per 100,000 .



                                                                           

                                  350
         of Population




                                  300
                                                               

                                  250

                                  200

                                  150
                                             
                                  100
                                        $0   $10,000 $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000

                                                     GDP per Capita
Projected National Supply & Shortfall of Physicians
          with/without GME Expansion
                                      900,000

   
                                      850,000
   FTE Physicians (excl. residents)




                                      800,000


                                                                       Shortfall
                                                                                     Additional
                                      750,000
                                                                                    Supply from
                                                                                   GME Expansion



                                      700,000

                                                                     Baseline Supply


                                      650,000
                                                2005   2010   2015         2020               2025
                                                              Year
                                               DO First Year Medical School Enrollment
                6000
                                                                                                                           5,449   5,519
                                                                                                                   5,404
                                                                                                           5,219
                                                                                               4,994
                5000                                                                   4,732
                                                                               4,408
                                                                       4,055
                                                               3,908
                4000
                                                       3,646
                                               3,308
# of students




                                       3,079
                3000
                               2,692


                       2,035
                2000




                1000




                  0
                       1992    1997    2002    2003    2004    2005    2006    2007    2008    2009        2010    2011    2012    2013
                                                                                               Projected
                                 First year Enrollment, Public/Private
                                  Private COM FY Enrollment   Public COM FY enrollment
                6000




                5000                                                                            1155
                                                                     1135                1135
                                                    1081
                                1037
                       888
                4000
# of students




                3000



                                                                     4269                4314   4364
                2000            3957                4138
                       3844



                1000




                  0
                       2008      2009               2010             2011                2012   2013

                              Projected
These projections are based on a survey of the deans of the
Osteopathic Medical Colleges administered in
November/December 2008. All but one college responded –
data from that has been extrapolated from the response to
the 2007 survey.

Two additional institutions are in the process of seeking
accreditation would add an additional 350 first-year seats
between 2009 and 2011.

In prior years versions of this survey, first-year enrollment in
2012 was projected to be 5227.
                                    24,012 Entered MD and DO Training in 2004
                                                                              Other+
                                        US IMGs                              144 (0.6%)
               IMGs                    1,300 (5%)
            6,013 (25%)
                             Non-US IMGs
                              4,713 (20%)




Osteopathic            Osteopathic
 Graduates             Graduates
                                                                                           Allopathic
2,756 (11%)            in DO Programs
                       1,285 (5%)                                                          Graduates
                                                                                          15,099 (64%)
                         Osteopathic Graduates
                         in MD Programs
                         1,471 (6%)


 * Total IMGs = 6,013; Distribution among US and Non-US IMGs is estimated.
 + Includes Canadian Graduates (72)
 Source: AAMC GMETrack and AOA Master File
   25,400 (estimate) PGY1 GME positions 2006
       13% DOs (2700)
       27% IMGs (6800)
       60% LCME (15800)
       LCME + DO grads = 18500
   In 2016 expect:
       5500 DO grads
       19,000 MD grads
       LCME + DO grads = 24,500 for 28,000 PGY1 positions
   Current scenarios, by 2020 expect 27,000 MD +
    DO grads, 8500 more than 2006 for 29,500 PGY 1
    positions
The Number of IMGs Entering GME Has Increased
More Than 25% Over The Past Decade
                                          IMGs Entering GME*
                1996-1997                       5,379
                1997-1998                       5,414            Sources: 1995/96 to 2002/03
                                                                 data based on Form 246
                1998-1999                       5,371            filings as of Aug. 2004.


                1999-2000                       5,905            2003/04 to 2006/07 data are
                                                                 from AAMC GME Track.

                2000-2001                       6,097
                2001-2002                       6,170
                2002-2003                       6,208
                2003-2004                       5,985
                2004-2005                       6,338
                      2005-                     6,570
                       2006
             2006-2007                          6,802
   Change 1996 – 2006                             +1423 (+26%)

Note: IMG numbers include Fifth Pathway
India and Pakistan Continue to be the Largest Sources of
IMGs, but the Caribbean Islands
Continue to Increase
                              2003           2004           2005        2006
  India                      1,442          1,578           1,627       1,621
  Pakistan                    475            440             476        392
  Grenada    (St.
  Georges)
                              348            348             361        375

  Dominica    (Ross)          312            323             377        360
  Netherland
                              177            227             255        333
  Antilles
  Philippines                 245            268             237        275
  China                       156            198             209        259
  Nigeria                     138            162             144        151
  Iran                         92            123             143        140
  Colombia                     95            133             129         115
  Mexico                      132            159             144         114

                       Note: IMG numbers do not include Fifth Pathway   Source: AAMC GME Track.
   Projections continue to show shortage
       Most plausible scenario based on current trends: 160,000
        shortage by 2025 (AAMC-2008)
   Assumptions:
       Increased utilization
       Older physicians likely to retire earlier
       Younger physicians (especially females) likely to perform
        less clinical care
       MD schools likely to grow near 30% over next 10-15 years
       DO schools likely to grow another 30% over next 10 years
       GME expansion not sufficient to handle DO/MD growth
   Number of IMGs continuing to grow
   Number of PAs/NPs growing rapidly
 The current projections of U.S. physician
  workforce supply.
 The factors influencing the need/demand for
  physician services.
 The factors influencing physician workforce
  supply.
 The developments in osteopathic medical
  education related to the physician workforce
  in the U.S.
 LECOM – additional location at Seton
  Hill, PA
 MSU-COM– additional locations at
  Detroit and Clinton Township, MI
 Western University COM—additional
  location in Corvallis, OR
 William Carey University—new COM
  in Hattiesburg, MS
 Heartland University of Health
  Sciences—new COM in Kansas City,
  MO
               AACOMAS Applicants 2003-2009
14000


12000                                                                 11849
                                                       11459


10000                                    9736
                            8596
 8000          7628
        7140

 6000
                                                                              11309
                                                       10101          10519

 4000                                    8089
                            7131
        6326   6473

 2000


   0
        2003   2004         2005         2006          2007           2008    2009
                Applicants as of 12/31    Total applicants in cycle
Key Findings:
 Medical education has not kept pace with the
  growing public expectations of physicians or with
  the novel demands of an increasingly complex
  healthcare system. As a consequence, medical
  students too often graduate without all of the
  knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes that 21st
  century physicians need.
 Medical schools should make substantial
  modifications in both the content and the processes
  of their educational programs, and give greater
  priority to the teaching mission of faculty. In
  addition, special attention must be focused on the
  hidden and informal curricula.
Key Recommendations:
 Medical school leadership should improve
  institutional culture to prioritize social
  needs
 Medical school missions should be aligned
  with the health needs of the society
     Generalists and Specialists
     Diversity throughout
   Medical school admissions should broaden
    the definition of merit and downgrade the
    importance of standardize tests and GPAs
Key Recommendations:
 Medical schools have an obligation to
  substantially reduce the level of student debt.
  Examples include:
      making increased funds available for needs-based
       scholarships
      organizing the curriculum to allow students the option
       of meeting graduation requirements in three rather
       than four years
      advocating the creation of more programs that provide
       substantial debt forgiveness in return for a period of
       public service
      ensuring that all students receive appropriate
       counseling for minimizing and managing debt
Key Recommendations:
 In order to promote innovation across the continuum of
  undergraduate and graduate medical education, LCME, COCA,
  ACGME and COPT should:
       begin immediately to share information with one another
       collaborate to assure maximal flexibility in designing and implementing
        accredited undergraduate and graduate education programs
       develop methods to disseminate information about innovative programs
   High-stakes evaluations (i.e., for admission, licensure, and
    certification) should be aligned with educational objectives
    throughout the continuum of education
   Accreditation standards should foster team training and the
    efficient use of faculty and clinician resources across professions
   The AAMC and AACOM should accelerate their efforts to
    reassess and update the MCAT examination and the pre-medical
    requirements for admission to medical school
   Workforce and COM Growth
       New AAMC workforce projections
       New COM Growth Projections
       GME Scenarios
       Potential new COMs
       Recent Macy Conference
   AACOM Priorities:
       Policy Development and Advocacy
       Implement AACOM Strategic Plan
       Society of Osteopathic Medical Educators
        (SOME)
           Competency Task Force
           Faculty Development and Recognition
           On-line Osteopathic Medical Education Journal
 GME
 Title VII
 Scholarship and Loans
 Osteopathic Medicine Research
     NIH
     AHRQ

 Higher Education
 HRSA advisory bodies
 AOA-AACOM Joint Statement of Principles
  on the Relationship between Undergraduate
  and Graduate Osteopathic Medical Education
 Clinical Education
 Osteopathic Medical Workforce
 International Osteopathic Medical Education
 NBOME Licensure Examination Changes
 Conflict-of-Interest
1.   Growing the numbers and maximizing the
     quality of the osteopathic medical colleges’
     applicant pool.
2.   Improving the system of accreditation of the
     nation’s osteopathic medical colleges.
3.   Improving the collaboration and influence
     of osteopathic medical education with
     federal governmental and non-governmental
     entities, as well as with other health
     professions education and osteopathic
     organizations.
4.   Developing the data systems and analyses
     required to assess osteopathic medical
     education issues related to physician workforce
     shortage projections; the impact of a growing
     number of osteopathic, allopathic and
     international medical graduates; and graduate
     medical education resources.
5.   Creating development and leadership training
     opportunities for osteopathic academic
     administrators and faculty.
6.   Supporting the development of best practices in
     pedagogical and curriculum models to achieve
     competency-based learning outcomes in
     osteopathic medical education
7.   Supporting research and publishing information
     related to osteopathic principles and practice.
8.   Providing colleges of osteopathic medicine with
     marketing and public relations tools that will
     facilitate consistent osteopathic medical
     education messaging and branding.
 Competency-Based Medical Education
  Task Force
 Osteopathic Medical Education
  Research
 Faculty Development/Recognition
       National Academy of Osteopathic Medical
        Educators
   On-line peer-reviewed Osteopathic
    Medical Education Journal
The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine promotes excellence
in osteopathic medical education, in research and in service, and fosters innovation
and quality among osteopathic colleges to improve the health of the American
public. – AACOM Mission Statement

								
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