The Best American Crime Writing 2006 by P-HarpercollinsPubl

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A sterling collection of the year's most shocking, compelling, and gripping writing about real-life crime, the 2006 edition of The Best American Crime Writing offers fascinating vicarious journeys into a world of felons and their felonious acts. This thrilling compendium includes:Jeffrey Toobin's eye-opening exposé in The New Yorker about a famous prosecutor who may have put the wrong man on death rowSkip Hollandsworth's amazing but true tale of an old cowboy bank robber who turned out to be a "classic good-hearted Texas woman"Jimmy Breslin's stellar piece about the end of the Mob as we know it

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									The Best American Crime Writing 2006
Author: Mark Bowden
Editor: Otto Penzler
Description

A sterling collection of the year's most shocking, compelling, and gripping writing about real-life crime,
the 2006 edition of The Best American Crime Writing offers fascinating vicarious journeys into a world of
felons and their felonious acts. This thrilling compendium includes:Jeffrey Toobin's eye-opening exposé in 
The New Yorker about a famous prosecutor who may have put the wrong man on death rowSkip
Hollandsworth's amazing but true tale of an old cowboy bank robber who turned out to be a "classic good-
hearted Texas woman"Jimmy Breslin's stellar piece about the end of the Mob as we know it
Excerpt

The e-mail arrived unbidden four years ago, bearing the stamp of a sender whose name he didn't
recognize. All the message said was, "Are you the Lawrence Lessig who went to the Boychoir School?"It
had been a long time since anyone had identified the Stanford Law School professor that way. But it was
true: From 1972 to 1976, Lessig had spent his sixth-through-ninth-grade years at the American Boychoir
School in Princeton.So Lessig wrote back, "Yeah, I'm the guy who went to the Boychoir School. What's
up?" And with that, he opened up a closed doorway to his past—and found himself swept right through
it.Now, on the last Monday of November 2004, Lessig has just arrived at the Richard J. Hughes Justice
Complex in Trenton, New Jersey. He is here to make an argument before the Supreme Court of New
Jersey. His client, the plaintiff, is his e-mail correspondent. The defendant is their alma mater.Since its
founding in 1937, the nonsectarian Boychoir School has gained worldwide renown for producing a choir
rivaled only by the more famous one in Vienna; its kids have sung for presidents, popes, and behind
Beyoncé at this year's Academy Awards. But now Lessig's client, John Hardwicke, is claiming that in the 
seventies, the school was a ghoulish sanctuary for the sexual abuse of children. In his two years there,
Hardwicke says he was repeatedly molested and raped—induced, as the brief on his behalf to the state
supreme court puts it, to "perform virtually every sexual act that could conceivably have been
accomplished between two males"—by the music director, the headmaster, the proctor, and the
cook.This is not the sort of case for which Larry Lessig is famous. At forty-three, Lessig has built a
reputation as the king of Internet law and as the most important next-wave thinker on intellectual property.
The author of three influential books on the intersection of law, politics, and digital technology, he's the
founder of Creative Commons, an ambitious attempt to forge an alternative to the current copyright
regime. According to his mentor, the federal appellate judge Richard Posner, Lessig is "the most
distinguished law professor of his generation." He's also a celebrity. On a West Wing episode this winter,
he was featured as a character. "The Elvis of cyberlaw" is how Wired has described him.I have known
Lessig well, professionally and socially, for nearly five years. I've never seen him look as nervous as he
does this morning. Dressed in a dark suit, his hair slicked back, tiny wire-rims perched on his nose, he
moves slowly, ponderously, as if the weight of the stakes in the case is resting literally on his shoulders.
The school (known until 1980 as the Columbus Boychoir School) has argued that, under New Jersey's
Charitable Immunity Act, a statute designed to shield nonprofits from negligence lawsuits, it can't be held
financially liable no matter how heinous Hardwicke's abuse. If the supreme court agrees, Hardwicke's
case will be dismissed before even being heard by a jury. And scores of sex-abuse suits against New
Jersey Catholic churches and schools will be rendered void as well. The church, not surprisingly, has
weighed in on the side of the school.During his work on the case, Lessig has been asked more than once
by the press if he had experiences at the school similar to Hardwicke's. And Lessig has replied, "My
experiences aren't what's at issue here. What's at issue is what happened to John Hardwicke."
Reviews

'“Solid and diverse ... Anyone interested in true crime should find something to enjoy in this wide-ranging
collection.”

								
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