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The Card by P-HarpercollinsPubl

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Since its limited release just after the turn of the twentieth century, this American Tobacco cigarette card has beguiled and bedeviled collectors. First identified as valuable in the 1930s, when the whole notion of card collecting was still young, the T206 Wagner has remained the big score for collectors who have scoured card shows, flea markets, estate sales, and auctions for the portrait of baseball's greatest shortstop. Only a few dozen T206 Wagners are known to still exist. Most, with their creases, stains, and dog-eared corners, look worn and tattered, like they've been around for almost a century. But one—The Card—appears to have defied the travails of time. Thanks to its sharp corners and its crisp portrait of Honus Wagner, The Card has become the most famous and desired baseball card in the world.Over the decades, as The Card has changed hands, its value has skyrocketed. It was initially sold for $25,000 by a small card shop in a nondescript strip mall. Years later, hockey great Wayne Gretzky bought it at the venerable Sotheby's auction house for $451,000. Then, more recently, it sold for $1.27 million on eBay. Today worth over $2 million, it has transformed a sleepy hobby into a billion-dollar industry that is at times as lawless as the Wild West. The Card has made men wealthy, certainly, but it has also poisoned lifelong friendships and is fraught with controversy—from its uncertain origins and the persistent questions about its provenance to the possibility that it is not exactly as it seems. Now for the first time, award-winning investigative reporters Michael O'Keeffe and Teri Thompson follow the trail of The Card from a Florida flea market to the hands of the world's most prominent collectors. They delve into a world of counterfeiters and con men and look at the people who profit from what used to be a kids' pastime, as they bring to light ongoing investigations into sports collectibles. O'Keeffe and Thompson also examine the life of the great Honus W

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									The Card
Author: Michael O'Keeffe
Author: Teri Thompson
Description

Since its limited release just after the turn of the twentieth century, this American Tobacco cigarette card
has beguiled and bedeviled collectors. First identified as valuable in the 1930s, when the whole notion of
card collecting was still young, the T206 Wagner has remained the big score for collectors who have
scoured card shows, flea markets, estate sales, and auctions for the portrait of baseball's greatest
shortstop. Only a few dozen T206 Wagners are known to still exist. Most, with their creases, stains, and
dog-eared corners, look worn and tattered, like they've been around for almost a century. But one—The
Card—appears to have defied the travails of time. Thanks to its sharp corners and its crisp portrait of
Honus Wagner, The Card has become the most famous and desired baseball card in the world.Over the
decades, as The Card has changed hands, its value has skyrocketed. It was initially sold for $25,000 by
a small card shop in a nondescript strip mall. Years later, hockey great Wayne Gretzky bought it at the
venerable Sotheby's auction house for $451,000. Then, more recently, it sold for $1.27 million on eBay.
Today worth over $2 million, it has transformed a sleepy hobby into a billion-dollar industry that is at
times as lawless as the Wild West. The Card has made men wealthy, certainly, but it has also poisoned
lifelong friendships and is fraught with controversy—from its uncertain origins and the persistent questions
about its provenance to the possibility that it is not exactly as it seems. Now for the first time, award-
winning investigative reporters Michael O'Keeffe and Teri Thompson follow the trail of The Card from a
Florida flea market to the hands of the world's most prominent collectors. They delve into a world of
counterfeiters and con men and look at the people who profit from what used to be a kids' pastime, as
they bring to light ongoing investigations into sports collectibles. O'Keeffe and Thompson also examine
the life of the great Honus Wagner, a ballplayer whose accomplishments have been eclipsed by his
trading card, and the strange and fascinating subculture of sports memorabilia and its astonishing
decline.Intriguing and eye-opening, The Card is a ground-breaking look at a uniquely American hobby.
Excerpt

The tension was as thick as the steel-gray clouds that hung over the Long Island Expressway as the
beat-up old green Honda sped along on a Sunday evening in 1985, past the car washes and the
billboards hard by the highway and into Hicksville, a New York City suburb built on the edges of what
were once the potato fields that stretched into the far reaches of Long Island.Bill Mastro and Rob Lifson
weren't talking much as they drove into town from the Willow Grove card convention near Philadelphia to
the doors of the collectibles shop in a dingy strip mall. The shop was closed to the public that day: Only
Mastro and Lifson would be allowed in for a look at the treasure inside, and Lifson himself would barely
get a glimpse, relegated to the front of the store while Mastro made the deal in the back.What they found
in the store that day would profoundly change both men's lives, even as it transformed the sleepy hobby
of baseball-card collecting into a billion-dollar industry and turned an obsessive vintage-card collector into
its most powerful player. It would ruin a friendship that had endured for years, and it would cast dark
shadows over the hobby they both loved.What they found in the store that day was The Card.Jay
Zimmerman was at the same convention in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, in 1985 when he got the call
from his pal Bob Sevchuk, the owner of a sports-collectibles store in Hicksville. Sevchuk could barely
contain his excitement as he told Zimmerman about a regular customer who had come into the shop with
a bounty of baseball cards. The man's name was Alan Ray, and Ray was eager to sell his wares, which
included an outstanding T206 Honus Wagner card. Ray also had another rare and valuable card—a T206
Eddie Plank—as well as fifty to seventy-five other high-grade cards from the T206 series. This was like
having a stranger walk into the local frame shop with a van Gogh, and Sevchuk knew that it was an
opportunity for a big payday."Bob was selling it on consignment because he didn't want to lay out the
money himself," Zimmerman said. "He asked me to approach people he knew who were into old
cards."Zimmerman's first stop at the show was Bill Mastro, then a thirty-three-year-old vintage-card
connoisseur who had walked away from a career as a respiratory therapist just a few years earlier
because he thought he could make more money selling cards and sports memorabilia. Mastro had been
a fixture in the hobby since he was a teenager in Bernardsville, New Jersey, and he knew as much about
old cards as anybody. Zimmerman told Mastro that Ray wanted $25,000 for a T206 Wagner card, an
outrageous sum in those days even for the "Flying Dutchman." Mastro didn't flinch."You don't have to talk
to anybody else," Mastro said. "I own it."Mastro rounded up his old friend Lifson and told him he had a
potential deal. They raced to Sevchuk's Long Island store with Lifson behind the wheel. "I got to go
because I had the money," Lifson said. "I had no idea where we were going."Mastro and Lifson had been
friends for decades, bonding over their common zeal for trading cards and baseball memorabilia as boys.
At twenty-five, the shaggy-haired Lifson was eight years younger than Mastro, a prodigy in the card-
collecting hobby, a whiz kid who had begun dealing when he was ten years old. He and Mastro were
buying, selling, and trading high-end cards before they could even shave, and their early partnership
would help make both men formidable figures in the world of sports collectibles, eventual owners of two of
the most prestigious sports auction houses in the world, Robert Edward Auctions and Mastro...
Author Bio
Michael O'Keeffe
Michael O'Keeffe is an award-winning journalist who is a member of the New York Daily News sports
investigation team. He has been a reporter and editor for more than twenty years. A graduate of the
University of Colorado, he lives in Brooklyn with his wife and son.


Teri Thompson
Teri Thompson is the editor of the Daily News sports investigative team and Sunday sports section, both
of which have won numerous awards under her direction. One of the first women sportswriters in the
country, she spent twelve years as an award-winning sportswriter and columnist for the Rocky Mountain
News in Denver and worked for ESPN as a coordinating producer for SportsCenter. She is the recipient of
the New York Times Fellowship for Journalists at the Columbia Law School and is a member of the
Connecticut bar. She and her husband split their time between Connecticut and New York.

								
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