Winning by P-HarpercollinsPubl

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Jack Welch knows how to win. During his forty-year career at General Electric, he led the company to year-after-year success around the globe, in multiple markets, against brutal competition. His honest, be-the-best style of management became the gold standard in business, with his relentless focus on people, teamwork, and profits.Since Welch retired in 2001 as chairman and chief executive officer of GE, he has traveled the world, speaking to more than 250,000 people and answering their questions on dozens of wide-ranging topics.Inspired by his audiences and their hunger for straightforward guidance, Welch has written both a philosophical and pragmatic book, which is destined to become the bible of business for generations to come. It clearly lays out the answers to the most difficult questions people face both on and off the job.Welch's objective is to speak to people at every level of an organization, in companies large and small. His audience is everyone from line workers to MBAs, from project managers to senior executives. His goal is to help everyone who has a passion for success.Welch begins Winning with an introductory section called "Underneath It All," which describes his business philosophy. He explores the importance of values, candor, differentiation, and voice and dignity for all.The core of Winning is devoted to the real "stuff" of work. This main part of the book is split into three sections. The first looks inside the company, from leadership to picking winners to making change happen. The second section looks outside, at the competition, with chapters on strategy, mergers, and Six Sigma, to name just three. The next section of the book is about managing your career -- from finding the right job to achieving work-life balance.Welch's optimistic, no excuses, get-it-done mind-set is riveting. Packed with personal anecdotes and written in Jack's distinctive no b.s. voice, Winning offers deep insights, original thinking, and solutions to nuts-and-bolts

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									Winning
Author: Jack Welch
Author: Suzy Welch
Description

Jack Welch knows how to win. During his forty-year career at General Electric, he led the company to
year-after-year success around the globe, in multiple markets, against brutal competition. His honest, be-
the-best style of management became the gold standard in business, with his relentless focus on people,
teamwork, and profits.Since Welch retired in 2001 as chairman and chief executive officer of GE, he has
traveled the world, speaking to more than 250,000 people and answering their questions on dozens of
wide-ranging topics.Inspired by his audiences and their hunger for straightforward guidance, Welch has
written both a philosophical and pragmatic book, which is destined to become the bible of business for
generations to come. It clearly lays out the answers to the most difficult questions people face both on
and off the job.Welch's objective is to speak to people at every level of an organization, in companies
large and small. His audience is everyone from line workers to MBAs, from project managers to senior
executives. His goal is to help everyone who has a passion for success.Welch begins Winning with an
introductory section called "Underneath It All," which describes his business philosophy. He explores the
importance of values, candor, differentiation, and voice and dignity for all.The core of Winning is devoted
to the real "stuff" of work. This main part of the book is split into three sections. The first looks inside the
company, from leadership to picking winners to making change happen. The second section looks
outside, at the competition, with chapters on strategy, mergers, and Six Sigma, to name just three. The
next section of the book is about managing your career -- from finding the right job to achieving work-life
balance.Welch's optimistic, no excuses, get-it-done mind-set is riveting. Packed with personal anecdotes
and written in Jack's distinctive no b.s. voice, Winning offers deep insights, original thinking, and
solutions to nuts-and-bolts problems that will change the way people think about work.
Excerpt

Bear with me, if you will, while I talk about mission and values.I say that because these two terms have
got to be among the most abstract, overused, misunderstood words in business. When I speak with
audiences, I'm asked about them frequently, usually with some level of panic over their actual meaning
and relevance. (In New York, I once got the question "Can you please define the difference between a
mission and a value, and also tell us what difference that difference makes?") Business schools add to
the confusion by having their students regularly write mission statements and debate values, a practice
made even more futile for being carried out in a vacuum. Lots of companies do the same to their senior
executives, usually in an attempt to create a noble-sounding plaque to hang in the company lobby.Too
often, these exercises end with a set of generic platitudes that do nothing but leave employees
directionless or cynical. Who doesn't know of a mission statement that reads something like, "XYZ
Company values quality and service," or, "Such-and-Such Company is customer-driven." Tell me what
company doesn't value quality and service or focus on its customers! And who doesn't know of a
company that has spent countless hours in emotional debate only to come up with values that, despite
the good intentions that went into them, sound as if they were plucked from an all-purpose list of virtues
including "integrity, quality, excellence, service, and respect." Give me a break -- every decent company
espouses these things! And frankly, integrity is just a ticket to the game. If you don't have it in your
bones, you shouldn't be allowed on the field.By contrast, a good mission statement and a good set of
values are so real they smack you in the face with their concreteness. The mission announces exactly
where you are going, and the values describe the behaviors that will get you there. Speaking of that, I
prefer abandoning the term values altogether in favor of just behaviors. But for the sake of tradition, let's
stick with the common terminology.First: About That Mission ....In my experience, an effective mission
statement basically answers one question: How do we intend to win in this business?It does not answer:
What were we good at in the good old days? Nor does it answer: How can we describe our business so
that no particular unit or division or senior executive gets pissed off?Instead, the question "How do we
intend to win in this business?" is defining. It requires companies to make choices about people,
investments, and other resources, and it prevents them from falling into the common mission trap of
asserting they will be all things to all people at all times. The question forces companies to delineate their
strengths and weaknesses in order to assess where they can profitably play in the competitive
landscape.Yes, profitably -- that's the key. Even Ben & Jerry's, the crunchy granola, hippy, save-the-world
ice cream company based in Vermont, has "profitable growth" and "increasing value for stakeholders" as
one of the elements of its three-part mission statement because its executives know that without financial
success, all the social goals in the world don't have a chance.That's not saying a mission shouldn't be
bold or aspirational. Ben & Jerry's, for instance, wants to sell "all natural ice cream and euphoric
concoctions" and "improve the quality of life locally, nationally and internationally." That kind of language
is great in that it absolutely has the power to excite people and motivate them to stretch.At...
Author Bio
Jack Welch
JACK WELCH began his career with the General Electric Company in 1960, and in 1981 became the
company’s eighth chairman and CEO. During his tenure, GE’s market capitalization increased by $400
billion, making it the world’s most valuable corporation. Mr. Welch is currently the head of Jack Welch,
LLC, where he serves as an advisor to a small group of Fortune 500 CEOs and speaks to businesspeople
and students around the world. He is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Jack: Straight from
the Gut. www.JackWelchWinning.comDon’t miss the next book by your favorite author. Sign up now for
AuthorTracker by visiting www.AuthorTracker.com.


Suzy Welch
SUZY WELCH is the former editor of the Harvard Business Review. She attended Harvard University and
Harvard Business School, and is the author of numerous articles about leadership and organizational
behavior, and a contributor to several books about management. She is a columnist for Fast Company
magazine. www.JackWelchWinning.comDon’t miss the next book by your favorite author. Sign up now for
AuthorTracker by visiting www.AuthorTracker.com.

								
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