The Technology Machine by P-SimonSchuster

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									The Technology Machine
Author: Patricia E. Moody
Author: Richard E. Morley
Table of Contents

ContentsPrefaceIntroduction 1 How Manufacturing Will Work 2 One Hundred Twenty-seven Wild Cards --
Who We Will Be, and What We Will Do 3 WHACK, Why You Can't Get There from Here 4 Technology
Rules! The PLC Breakthrough 5 Intelligent Systems that Will Get Us There -- Chaos, Complex Adaptive
Systems, and Other Enabling Technologies 6 The Big, Big Wave -- Four Software Meta-Systems that
Will Transform Manufacturing 7 Managing the Technology Machine 8 Two Meta-Systems: The Bullet
Train and Plastics! 9 In the Land Where the Engineer Is King 10 Silicon Life on a Carbon Planet Notes
Bibliography Acknowledgments Index About the Authors
Description

How will autonomous agents, emergent systems, and chaos theory change the way we live and work in
the twenty-first century? As today's manufacturing and production systems grow increasingly complex,
tomorrow's science of complexity will produce paradoxically simple solutions, argue technology experts
Patricia Moody and Richard Morley in this astonishing vision of the year 2020.Containing both cutting-
edge insights and simple truths that provide a roadmap to the future of business -- and illustrated by case
examples from such companies as Motorola, Honda, GM, Solectron, Intel, Silicon Graphics, Modicon,
Flavors, NeXT, Japanese Railway, and Andover Controls -- The Technology Machine challenges readers
to understand the spirit and core drivers of growth: technology, knowledge, and individual excellence.By
combining rigorous research with their extensive experience with technology advances that have changed
industry, Moody and Morley are able to supply simple guidelines for future growth and detail their keen
vision of future systems, leaders, and workers. They isolate the three bad business habits at the root of
manufacturing problems today -- shortsightedness, restrictive structures, and unbalanced improvement
fads -- show how to break them, and supply four infallible predictors of the types of breakthrough
technologies that will come to dominate the world of the future. In that world, customers and suppliers are
linked by real-time, online systems; business is driven by customer-designed, point-of-consumption
replication of product; and a wide gap grows between "The Island of Excellence" organization of the future
-- with its holistic approach, including two-year apprenticeships, uniforms, and morning exercises -- and
"The Others," the non-elite, sweatshop-like, breakeven companies of the past. The book is eloquent,
original, and essential reading for managers in every area of business and industry.
Excerpt

PrefaceWhen I turned four, my father took me on a tour of the St. Regis Paper Mill: We saw the steam
power plant, the cutters and rollers, and the finished paper rolls in the mill yard. He lifted me up to see
over the edge of the pulper, a huge tank that ground sheets into pulp. The machine noise made it
impossible to hear his explanation of the paper-making process -- but I tried to take it all in.I smelled the
river and the pulp paper; we lived by the mill whistle, and we noted when we crossed the covered bridge
on the way to school what color the Nashua River was running, often green-blue, occasionally red. The
water was never clear.Mill StreetManufacturing is an addiction that runs in my family. Since I was little I
have hung out with engineers and factory workers. I too love machines, technology, and manufacturing.
My family lived with the hope, the boom, and the decline of both a mill town and an industrial city -- we
came to understand and expect the strain the swings produced across the town. Schools ran to very lean
budgets, new cars and new homes were rare, and overtime was a necessity. During shutdown the
parking lot at the swimming hole filled up and Main Street was quieter. Our lives ran to the rhythms of the
mills.Vassar StreetAnyone who has ever walked down Vassar Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, a
dirty, well-used side street running off Mass Avenue and parallel to the athletic fields, in the heart of MIT,
will remember the excitement of ideas on the move. Here new companies make their first appearance,
renting temporary space in anticipation of growth -- from the Dome of the academic community, to the
leased concrete row of spinoffs, some of which make the jump to Route 128's golden acres, many of
which fold and are re-created in a different incorporation. Vassar Street is one of a few technology birthing
spots, like Steve Jobs's garage, and the Hewlett-Packard garage, and Henry Ford's shed. These are holy
places that drive the Technology Machine.Patricia E. MoodyThe BarnAndover
Controls...Modicon...Flavors TechnologyWhen I was six I learned how to drive a tractor, and when I was
eight I did my first engine job. I made it to MIT, but got bored with the routine and took a forty-year
sabbatical punctuated by the creation of many new devices and about twenty new companies, raising
twenty-seven kids along the way, making continual forays into new technologies.On New Year's Day in
1968, hung over and tired of deadline-driven holidays, nights and weekends spent designing single-
application automation devices with a six-month shelf-life, I made the decision to change the way
factories work. I knew that we would soon reach the limits of custom, hard-wired automation solutions,
and because I was bored and tired, I created the Programmable Logic Controller (the PLC). We were at
the very beginning of the mini-computer revolution -- standard computer programming fare was punch
cards and tape. Factories were wired up with thousands of unique switches, relays, and human
technicians. But I knew my PLC design would have an impact on factories at least as big as what was
coming in computers.Thirty years later, the industry spawned by the PLC represents $5 billion of
technology growth and wealth and jobs, extending into dozens of process applications, from paper-
making, to chemical processing plants, to steel refineries and bullet trains. For that innovation alone I
was presented in 1997 by the Franklin Institute with the Prometheus...
Author Bio
Patricia E. Moody
Patricia E. Moody is the former editor of AME's Target magazine, where she created breakthrough work
on teams, Kaizen, new product development, and supply chain issues. She is a well-known
manufacturing management consultant and writer with more than twenty-five years of industry and
consulting experience. Her client list includes such industry leaders as Solectron, Motorola, Johnson &
Johnson, and Mead Corporation.<br/>


Richard E. Morley
Patricia E. Moody is the former editor of AME's Target magazine, where she created breakthrough work
on teams, Kaizen, new product development, and supply chain issues. She is a well-known
manufacturing management consultant and writer with more than twenty-five years of industry and
consulting experience. Her client list includes such industry leaders as Solectron, Motorola, Johnson &
Johnson, and Mead Corporation.<br/>
Reviews

A beautifully written, insightful, and important new book. If you want your business to prosper in the 21st
century, your best guide to success is The Technology Machine. It has "bestseller" written all over it.



Filled with innovative insights on what's coming in manufacturing -- ultra-lively writing style, plentiful and
unusual examples, illustrations, and references -- held my attention straight through.



Fasten your seat belt as Moody and Morley reveal the future.



Prepares the business reader to pick the winners and the losers...sets a strategy to put executives
among the winners in the year 2020.

								
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