Lee's Lieutenants by P-SimonSchuster

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Lee's Lieutenants: A Study in Command is the most colorful and popular of Douglas Southall Freeman's works. A sweeping narrative that presents a multiple biography against the flame-shot background of the American Civil War, it is the story of the great figures of the Army of Northern Virginia who fought under Robert E. Lee.The Confederacy won resounding victories throughout the war, but seldom easily or without tremendous casualties. Death was always on the heels of fame, but the men who commanded -- among them Jackson, Longstreet, and Ewell -- developed as leaders and men. Lee's Lieutenants follows these men to the costly battle at Gettysburg, through the deepening twilight of the South's declining military might, and finally to the collapse of Lee's command and his formal surrender in 1865. To his unparalleled descriptions of men and operations, Dr. Freeman adds an insightful analysis of the lessons learned and their bearing upon the future military development of the nation. Accessible at last in a one-volume edition abridged by noted Civil War historian Stephen W. Sears, Lee's Lieutenants is essential reading for all Civil War buffs, students of war, and admirers of the historian's art as practiced at its very highest level.

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									Lee's Lieutenants
Author: Douglas Southall Freeman
Table of Contents

ContentsMapsIntroduction: James M. McPhersonForeword: Douglas Southall FreemanEditorial Note:
Stephen W. SearsDramatis PersonæOpening GunsBeauregard's BattlefieldBeauregard's Star 
WanesJohnston Passes a Dark WinterChallenge on the PeninsulaSeven PinesTo Defend
RichmondGuarding the ValleyJackson Launches His OffensiveVictory in the ValleyStruggle for
RichmondRichmond RelievedLessons of the Seven DaysFacing a New ThreatReturn to ManassasAcross
the PotomacDesperate Hours on the AntietamRebuilding an ArmyBattle at FredericksburgIn Winter
QuartersFacing a New CampaignJackson Gets His Greatest OrdersVictory and Tragedy at
ChancellorsvilleRenewal and ReorganizationAcross the Potomac AgainTwo Days of BattleGettysburg and
Its CostChallenges for Longstreet, Hill, and StuartTests and Trials of WinterThe Wilderness and
SpotsylvaniaRichmond ThreatenedNew Fronts, New BattlesThe Darkening Autumn of CommandIn a Ring
of IronThe Last MarchNotesBibliographyIndex
Description

Lee's Lieutenants: A Study in Command is the most colorful and popular of Douglas Southall Freeman's
works. A sweeping narrative that presents a multiple biography against the flame-shot background of the
American Civil War, it is the story of the great figures of the Army of Northern Virginia who fought under
Robert E. Lee.The Confederacy won resounding victories throughout the war, but seldom easily or without
tremendous casualties. Death was always on the heels of fame, but the men who commanded -- among
them Jackson, Longstreet, and Ewell -- developed as leaders and men. Lee's Lieutenants follows these
men to the costly battle at Gettysburg, through the deepening twilight of the South's declining military
might, and finally to the collapse of Lee's command and his formal surrender in 1865. To his unparalleled
descriptions of men and operations, Dr. Freeman adds an insightful analysis of the lessons learned and
their bearing upon the future military development of the nation. Accessible at last in a one-volume edition
abridged by noted Civil War historian Stephen W. Sears, Lee's Lieutenants is essential reading for all
Civil War buffs, students of war, and admirers of the historian's art as practiced at its very highest level.
Excerpt

Chapter 1: Opening Guns1. "OLD BORY'S COME!"He would go at once. The request from the President
that he come to Richmond offered an opportunity as surely as it conveyed an order. Federal troops had
crossed the Potomac. A battle that would assure the triumph of the new Confederacy would be fought ere
long in Virginia. At the same time, departure from South Carolina would be regrettable. From the hour of
his arrival there, March 6, 1861, the patriots of Charleston had welcomed him. After he forced the
surrender of Fort Sumter on April 14, without the loss of a man, they had acclaimed and adopted him.
Some of them seemed to find a certain Huguenot kinship in his name -- Pierre Gustave Toutant
Beauregard -- and all of them united to do him honor.General and staff left on May 29 for Richmond, the
newly selected capital of the Confederate States. Multitudes gathered at every station to have a look at
the "Hero of Sumter." The journey confirmed everything Beauregard had been told of the incredible
popularity he had won by his success in Charleston Harbor. How quickly fame had come to him! When
he had resigned from the United States army, February 20, 1861, he had been fifth-ranking captain in the
Corps of Engineers and had a brevet as major for gallant conduct in the Mexican War. In his profession
he was esteemed; outside of it he was little known till hostilities had been opened at Charleston. Now,
seven weeks after the fall of Sumter, he had received the thanks of Congress and the laudation of the
Southern press as one of the greatest soldiers in the world. Napoleonic myths had grown up about him.
He was said to have warned President Lincoln to remove all noncombatants from Washington by a given
date, as if he were determined forthwith to take the city. Not one doubt of his military genius was
admitted.On May 30, ere his train puffed importantly into the station, hundreds of townfolk had gathered
there. A carriage and four were waiting to carry the general to the Spotswood Hotel, where a suite had
been reserved for him. All the honors that had been paid President Davis upon arrival two days previously
were to be repeated for General Beauregard. He was most grateful when he stepped from the car; but, if
the committee would permit, he would take a simpler carriage and go quietly to the hotel. Quickly he was
wheeled up the hill to the Spotswood. Music and cheers and appeals for a speech were in vain. His
mission was war. He must waste no time in needless words.The next day he conferred with the President
and with General R. E. Lee who, in an ill-defined manner, was responsible for military operations in
Virginia. Old friends they were, old and admiring. Davis as United States secretary of war had known
Beauregard well and, in March 1861, had commended the general to Governor Pickens of South Carolina
as "full of talent and of much military experience." In planning immediate steps to combat the fast-
developing Federal threat against Virginia, Jefferson Davis felt that he could rely on Beauregard.No less
did the President have self-reliance. He had hurried to Richmond in answer to earnest representations
that he and he only could direct aright the defense of the frontier. Montgomery newspapers had reported
that Mr. Davis was having his old Mexican War sword sharpened at a gunsmith's in Market Street. A man
having his blade made ready of course intended using it. Little doubt was expressed that the President
would take the field in person. With others the soldiers would fight and perhaps would win, said the
Richmond Examiner,...
Author Bio
Douglas Southall Freeman
Douglas Southall Freeman was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1886, the son of a Confederate soldier, and
by the age of 22 had received his Ph.D. in history from Johns Hopkins University. Seven years later, he
was named the editor of The Richmond News Leader, a post he would hold for 34 years. Freeman was a
two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, first for his four-volume biography of Robert E. Lee, and later for his six-
volume biography of George Washington, which he finished only hours before his death in 1953.<br/>

								
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