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					High School Summer Professional
     Development Workshop
              Kemper Fitch, Principal
  Nancy Moody, Director of High School Curriculum
         Penny Crooks, Assistant Principal
        John Eggleston, Assistant Principal
          Julie Pack, Assistant Principal
         Review of Week One
• A Twitter of Day One:
   • D-1: Drafted ES, aka enduring understandings that
     subsumes our SCOS. ES drive assessments and
     instructional decision making.
• Write a twitter message summarizing each day of
  the first week:
   •   Math: day 2
   •   Science: day 3
   •   Social Studies: day 4
   •   English: day 5Quality Check for EQs
Essential Questions
 Teaching the answers without first
  raising the questions takes most
   of the meaning out of learning.
     ~Francis Slater, London School of Education
 Sample EQ: What is your
 explanation for how to
 evaluate whether or not a
 question meets the criteria for
 being an essential question?

What is an
essential
question?
What is your explanation for how
  to evaluate whether or not a
 question meets the criteria for
  being an essential question?


21st Century Skill: Communication & Collaboration
   • Communicate Clearly - use communication for
      a range of purposes (e.g. to inform, instruct,
      motivate and persuade)
 What is your explanation for
how to evaluate whether or not a
 question meets the criteria for
  being an essential question?


21st Century Skill: Communication & Collaboration
   • Communicate Clearly - use communication for
      a range of purposes (e.g. to inform, instruct,
      motivate and persuade)
What is your explanation for how
  to evaluate whether or not a
 question meets the criteria for
  being an essential question?


Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: Analyze and Evaluate
What is your explanation for how
  to evaluate whether or not a
 question meets the criteria for
  being an essential question?


Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: Analyze and Evaluate
  What is your explanation for
how to evaluate whether or not a
 question meets the criteria for
  being an essential question?

21st Century Skill: Communication & Collaboration
   • Communicate Clearly - use communication for
      a range of purposes (e.g. to inform, instruct,
      motivate and persuade)
Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: analyze and evaluate
                     Essential Questions-
                          qualities
• Cause inquiry into core content (Essential Standards)
• Do not have one “right” answer (21st Century Skills,
   Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
• Are arguable, provokes deep thought,
  discussion, inquiry (21st Century Skills)
• Promote understanding (Essential Standards, 21st Century
   Skills, Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
• Require students to consider alternatives, weigh
  evidence, support ideas, and justify answers (21st
   Century Skills)
• Spark meaningful connections with prior learning
   (Essential Standards, 21st Century Skills, Revised Bloom’s
   Taxonomy)

Learning-Focused Framework, Understanding by Design,Wiggins & McTighe, What Works in Schools,
Robert Marzano
     Sample EQ: Why are essential
     questions a key
     component of planning and
     classroom instruction?

 What is the
purpose of an
  essential
  question?
Why are essential questions a key
component of planning and classroom
instruction?
 21st Century Skill: Critical Thinking & Problem-Solving
    • Making Judgments and Decisions – effectively
       analyze and evaluate evidence, arguments,
       claims, and beliefs
 Why are essential questions a
              key
   component of planning and
     classroom instruction?
21st Century Skill: Critical Thinking & Problem-Solving
   • Making Judgments and Decisions – effectively
      analyze and evaluate evidence, arguments,
      claims, and beliefs
 Why are essential questions a
             key
  component of planning and
    classroom instruction?

Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: Evaluate
 Why are essential questions a
              key
   component of planning and
     classroom instruction?

Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: Evaluate
 Why
Why are essential questions a
             key
  component of planning and
    classroom instruction?
 21st Century Skill: Critical Thinking & Problem-Solving
    • Making Judgments and Decisions – effectively
       analyze and evaluate evidence, arguments,
       claims, and beliefs


 Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: Evaluate
              Need for Essential
•                    Questions
   Potpourri problem (Essential Standards)
• Lack of focus (Essential Standards, 21st Century Skills)
• Long term recall (Essential Standards, 21st Century Skills)
• Communication between students and teachers and
  between teachers (Essential Standards, 21st Century Skills, Revised
   Bloom’s Taxonomy, Assessment)
• Clarifying purpose (Essential Standards, 21st Century Skills, Revised
   Bloom’s Taxonomy, Assessment)
• Set direction for learning (Essential Standards, 21st Century Skills,
   Assessment)
• Focus learning (Essential Standards, 21st Century Skills, Assessment)
• Student engagement/application (Essential Standards, 21st
   Century Skills, Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
• Assessment of student learning (Essential Standards, 21st
   Century Skills, Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy, Assessment)
                                                Heidi Hayes Jacobs, 2008
          Purpose: The Big Four of
            Essential Questions
•Reflect content standards (Essential Standards)
•Connection of learning with living (21st Century Skills)
•Thinking, problem-solving, application of learning
 (21st Century Skills, Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
•Engaging, student-based instruction-not teacher-
 driven (21st Century Skills, Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)

                 Essential Question
          Reflect    Connection     Reflect    Engaging,
          content    of learning    content     student-
         standards    w/ living    standards     based
      Purpose: Essential Questions
  Essential questions
become . . . the “mental
  velcro” for content
       learning.
        Essential Question
            Connection     Reflect
            of learning    content
 Reflect     w/ living
            Connection    standards
                           Reflect    Engaging,
 content    of learning    content     student-
standards    w/ living    standards     based
       Sample EQ: How do you
       determine appropriate
       essential questions for
       content area learning?


  What are appropriate
essential questions for my
     content area?
     How do you determine
 appropriate essential questions
   for content area learning?

21st Century Skill: Creativity & Innovation
   • Think creatively, Elaborate, refine, analyze and
      evaluate their own ideas in order to improve and
      maximize creative efforts
       How do you determine
 appropriate essential questions
   for content area learning?

21st Century Skill: Creativity & Innovation
   • Think creatively, Elaborate, refine, analyze and
      evaluate their own ideas in order to improve and
      maximize creative efforts
     How do you determine
 appropriate essential questions
   for content area learning?


Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: Analyze & Evaluate
      How do you determine
 appropriate essential questions
   for content area learning?

Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: Analyze & Evaluate
      How       determine
        How do you determine
     appropriate essential questions
       for content area learning?

21st Century Skill: Creativity & Innovation
   • Think creatively, Elaborate, refine, analyze and
      evaluate their own ideas in order to improve and
      maximize creative efforts

Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: Analyze & Evaluate
  Essential Questions: Quality
             Check
• Criteria – Refer to Handout

• EQs – Practice Handout
                                                                                Need to
          EQs -                                                                 check
        Practice
Social Studies
•   What rights are guaranteed as a citizen and which are most important to me?
    ~E.S. - √
    ~21st C. - √
    ~RBT - √ / X
    ~A’ment - √
    ~Form - √
•   How are governments created, structured, maintained, and changed?
    ~E.S. - √
    ~21st C. - √
    ~RBT - X
    ~A’ment - √
    ~Form - √
•   How do the structures and functions of government interrelate?
    ~E.S. - √
    ~21st C. - √
    ~RBT - √
    ~A’ment - √
    ~Form - √
•   How do different political systems vary in their toleration and encouragement of change?
    ~E.S. - √
    ~21st C. - √
    ~RBT - √
    ~A’ment - √
    ~Form - √
                                                                                   Need to
                                                                                   check
      EQs - Practice
Science
 How can we apply scientific skills, processes, and methods of inquiry to solve real-world
    problems? ~E.S. - √
    ~21st C. - √
    ~RBT - √ / X
    ~A’ment - √
    ~Form - √
•   How do developments in science and technology affect our lives?
    ~E.S. - √
    ~21st C. - √
    ~RBT - X
    ~A’ment - √
    ~Form - √
•   What decisions must be made prior to measurement of an object?
    ~E.S. - √
    ~21st C. - √
    ~RBT - √
    ~A’ment - √
    ~Form - √
•   How do humans affect the environment and the environment affect humans?
    ~E.S. - √
    ~21st C. - √
    ~RBT - √
    ~A’ment - √
    ~Form - √
                                                                             Need to
                                                                             check
    EQs - Practice
Math
•  What role does prediction play in mathematics and in decisions we make?
   ~E.S. - √
   ~21st C. - √
   ~RBT - X
   ~A’ment - √
   ~Form - √
•  How can we represent mathematical relationships?
   ~E.S. - √
   ~21st C. - √
   ~RBT - X
   ~A’ment - √
   ~Form - √
•  How can we mathematically predict the outcomes of some future events?
   ~E.S. - √
   ~21st C. - √
   ~RBT - √
   ~A’ment - √
   ~Form - √
•  Why do we need standard units of measure in math and daily activities?
   ~E.S. - √
   ~21st C. - √
   ~RBT - √
   ~A’ment - √
   ~Form - √
                                                                          Need to
                                                                          check
     EQs - Practice
Language Arts
•  How can fiction reveal truth in literature and in human nature?
   ~E.S. - √
   ~21st C. - √
   ~RBT - √ / X
   ~A’ment - √
   ~Form - √
•  What do good readers do when the text doesn’t make sense?
   ~E.S. - √
   ~21st C. - √
   ~RBT - X
   ~A’ment - √
   ~Form - √
•  Does experience and belief influence reading and our perceptions?
   ~E.S. - √
   ~21st C. - √
   ~RBT - √
   ~A’ment - √
   ~Form - √
•  How are stories from other places and times relevant to our society?
   ~E.S. - √
   ~21st C. - √
   ~RBT - √
   ~A’ment - √
   ~Form - √
 Essential Questions: Quality
            Check
• Quality Check – Sample Curriculum
  Guides

                              EQ’s
               Brain Dump
• 5 min-Individually-List all that you know about
  assessments
  • Take into consideration personal experiences,
    research, and practice
• 10 min-In groups-on chart paper, come to a
  consensus about what you know as a group
  about assessments and develop a KWHL.
  • These will be shared with everyone
                         Proposed System            LT 2   LT 3
Assessment                                          LT 4   LT 5


                             To Evaluate Knowledge…
      Summative              o Transparent
      (Statewide)
                             o Appropriately Used
       Benchmark             To Inform Instruction…
   (Classroom, School,
         District)           o Centralized Benchmarking
                             Tool
  Formative Assessment       o Systematic Formative
      (Classroom)            Assessment PD Modules


                            Built on what is most
   Essential Standards      important for students to
                            learn in the 21st century

                                                             7
   Pre-Assessment provides:
• Diagnostic information – a measurement of prior
  knowledge
• Informs instruction
• Flexible grouping
• Opportunities to adjust/tier assignments

****Pre-assessments MUST occur prior to units of study
   allowing time for regular education teachers to
   “intentionally” plan with support staff to
   scaffold/modify/frontload/accelerate instruction.
pr
                                                LT 2    LT 3
    Assessment
                                                LT 4    LT 5
Summative Assessment
                              Measures of achievement
           Summative
                              to provide evidence of
           (Statewide)
                              student competence or
                              program effectiveness.
           Benchmark
       (Classroom, School,
             District)

      Formative Assessment
          (Classroom)



        Essential Standards


                                                           11
                                           +    + +                            LT 6
Accountability
                                                                               LT 7


     Growth           Achievement (EOCs and EOGs)
                K-12


                          +                        Future-Ready
              Summative          Graduation    +       Core
                                                                +       Readiness
                                    Rate



                                                      9-12 only
   Benchmark
                              Formative and Benchmark to inform instruction
    Formative
                              Essential Standards to define what students must know,
Essential Standards           understand and be able to do to compete in the 21st
                              century



                                                                                  15
 Work Session: Essential Questions
   and Assessment Prototypes
• Work with your subject partners to
  • develop Essential Questions that reflect identified
    Essential Standards and incorporate 21st century
    skills and RBT.
     • These should be put into the electronic copy of your
       curriculum guide.
  • develop a diagnostic pre-assessment (based on
    your work on the ACS Curriculum Guide) to be
    given in the first week of school.
LUNCH!!
   COMMON ASSESSMENTS:
A Product of Professional Learning
      “If all students are expected to
demonstrate the same knowledge and
skills, regardless of the teacher to which
they are assigned, it only makes sense
that teachers must work together to asses
students learning.”

                    Dufour, Dufour, Eaker, and Many
 COMMON ASSESSMENTS
        (CA)

“… represent the most effective
  strategies for determining whether the
  guaranteed curriculum is being taught
  and more importantly, learned.”

                   Dufour, Dufour, Eaker, and Many
     CA Created by Same Subject
        Teachers/Department

Instructional
 Strategies
                          GOAL:
Instructional
Strategies              Essential
                        Standards
Instructional
 Strategies
  PLCs STUDY DATA FROM
           CAs
• Analyze line items to identify:
  •  where students’ learning lagged
  • areas of shortcomings
  • areas of strengths
  • what to reteach
  • which students require additional
    support/enrichment/intervention
  • short-term/long-term systemic solutions
      Words from teachers…
“Teaching your favorite way doesn’t always work so
  well. Sometimes you have this wonderful lesson that
  you love, but they aren’t learning. You have to
  change.”



“Teachers need to understand that common
  assessments do not grade the teacher. It doesn’t
  mean you have failed – it means you must change.”
        SUMMARIZE CA:
• What do we want our students to know?
  (Essential Standards)
• How will we know they have learned it?
  (Common Assessment)
• What do we do when they do not learn
  it? Or already know it?
  (Support/Enrichment/Intervention)
    WHAT CA ARE NOT…
• CA are not a lock-step, mechanical
  manner in which to teach

• CA are not designed to evaluate
  teachers
   COMMON ASSESSMENTS
        ASSURE…

• that all students will learn a set of
  specific common unit objectives.

• that every student will learn the same
  content regardless of which teacher
  they were assigned.
          Data is Conclusive…
One of the most powerful, high-leverage strategies
for improving student learning that is available to
schools:
      frequent, high-quality formative
      assessments by teachers who are working
      collaboratively to help students develop
agreed-upon knowledge and skills.


Research: Fullan, 2005; Hargreaves & Fink, 2006; Reeves, 2004;
Schmoker, 2003; Stiggins, 2005
Using Rubrics to Evaluate
      Assessments
         What is a Rubric?
• A rubric is a printed set of scoring
  guidelines for teachers to evaluate & to
  give feedback to individual learners and
  to evaluate groups of student work
  • lists the criteria for assessment
  • clearly qualifies the degree of quality for
    each criterion
 What Does a Rubric Look Like?

• Typically in the format of a table.
• The top row lists the degrees of quality
  • Poor to excellent
  • Developing to mastery
  • 1 to 4
• The left column lists the criteria of
  assessments
           Components of a Rubric
                               Levels of Achievement ** (typically 3-4)
Criteria              Exemplary                Accomplished           Developing             Beginning
(competencies)        4                        3                      2                      1
Stated Objective or   Description- defining    Description-           Description-           Description-
Performance within    features of each         defining features of   defining features of   defining features of
the assignment        work or performance      each work or           each work or           each work or
#1                    reflecting the highest   performance            performance            performance
                      level of performance     reflecting mastery     reflecting             reflecting a
                                               of performance         development and        beginning level of
                                                                      movement toward        performance
                                                                      mastery of
                                                                      performance

Stated Objective or
Performance within
the assignment
#2




    **variations- excellent, satisfactory, unsatisfactory; or exemplary, proficient,
    marginal, unacceptable; or sophisticated, competent, not yet competent
                               Sample Rubric
Criteria              Exemplary                       Accomplished                   Beginning
(competencies)        3                               2                              1

Writing Style:        Logical progression of           Most thoughts and ideas       Illogical progression of ideas,
                      thoughts and ideas.                 progress logically with    disorganized paragraphs and
Organization & flow   Concepts are clearly               satisfactory examples.      sections of paper. Poorly
                      presented using good             Vocabulary is primarily at    written, vocabulary not at
                      examples and college level          college level. Paper is    college level. Many
                      vocabulary. Paper is well         fairly well organized but    grammatical errors.
                      organized from introduction       may lack adequate flow
                      to conclusion statements.                    and transition.




References:           Reference list is typed; the    Reference list is typed,       No Reference list; or
                      citations match reference       most are within the last       incorrectly formatted,
Citations in APA      list and are current (most      five years, and/or a few       references are primarily
format, current and   within last five years), from   are inappropriate to the       secondary sources such as
appropriate           peer reviewed journals,         topic. Minimal secondary       textbooks and/or from non-
                      and are appropriate to the      sources and are                peer reviewed journals, and/or
                      topic.                          appropriate to the topic.      lay literature.
          Sample Rubric with Different Scoring Example

Criteria          Excellent                   Satisfactory              Unsatisfactory
(competencies)




Appropriate       The article has excellent   The article has good      The article has little or no
journal article   and sufficient scientific   and moderately            scientific merit. Not from
selected          merit. From a current       sufficient scientific     a current peer reviewed
10 points         peer reviewed nursing       merit. From a current     nursing journal (>5
                  journal                     peer reviewed nursing     years) or from a
                  (1-3 years).                or medical journal (3-5   newspaper or magazine.
                  9-10 points                 years).                   0-6 points
                                              7-8 points




Major points of   Clearly and concisely       Adequately stated         Summary of major points
article           stated summary of major     summary of most           of article not concise-
summarized in     points of article. 9-10     points of article.        misses some points.
introduction      points                      4-7 points                0-6 points
10 points
            Sample Rubric with Varied Scoring Weights



Criteria           Exemplary           Proficient          Marginal             Unacceptable
Content           Essay covers the      Essay covers         Essay covers         Essay covers
30 points           entire topic,      most of the topic    only part of the    little of the topic
                   creatively with      with average        topic with weak      in a superficial
                  excellent depth &    depth & scope.       depth & scope.            manner.
                       scope.            20-25 pts             15-20 pts              < 15 pts
                     25-30 pts


Readings            75-100% of            50-75% of           25-50% of             < 25% of
25 points          readings used        readings used       readings used        readings used
                     completely.          completely.         completely.          completely.
                      20-25 pts            15-20 pts           10-15 pts            < 10 pts

Logic, flow       Ideas flow clearly       Ideas flow      Ideas flow poorly    Ideas flow poorly
and evidence       and essay uses         adequately;        OR examples         AND examples
25 points           many strong         some examples       are insufficient.    are insufficient.
                     examples.               given.            10-15 pts            < 10 pts
                      20-25 pts             15-20 pts
          Sample Rubric with Varied Scoring Weights
Criteria             Excellent                Satisfactory               Unsatisfactory
(competencies)

Critical Thinking:    Consistent evidence     Majority of analysis has    Little or no evidence of
                         of strong critical     evidence of some         critical thinking, synthesis
Agreement with         thinking, synthesis       critical thinking,        or thoughtful analysis.
author’s opinion          and thoughtful          synthesis and                 0-20 points
analyzed &           analysis in comparing     thoughtful analysis.
discussed                     opinion.             21-26 points
30 points                  27-30 points



Critical Thinking:        Excellent and          Incorporates a fair       Poorly incorporated
                         comprehensive            discussion of the           relationship to
Issues’ impact on       description of the    impact on nursing care     economics, use of health
nursing care           impact on nursing           but not entirely        care resources, and
analyzed                care in relation to        comprehensive          health promotion in the
20 points              economics, use of            relationship to      description of the impact
                     health care resources,     economics & use of           on nursing care.
                     and health promotion.        resources health              0-13 points
                         18-20 points                 promotion.
                                                   14-17 points
           Why a Rubric?
• Can teachers describe excellent work?
• Do teachers agree on what excellent work is?
• Do teachers have a tool that can be used to
  evaluate student work and ultimately to
  gather data to evaluate the effectiveness of
  their assessments?
       Benefits to Teachers
• Objective, consistent evaluation tool:
• Evaluates individual student work
                AND
• Evaluates grouped student work
  enabling teachers to gather data to
  evaluate the effectiveness of
  assessments
      What a Rubric Offers
           Learners
• Roadmap for excellence
• Reveals “what counts”, “what is
  important”
• Clear sense of what is to be achieved
• Standards of the profession/discipline
                   Links
• http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/rubrics.s
  html
• http://www.middleweb.com/rubricsHG.html
• http://webquest.sdsu.edu/webquestrubric.htm
  l
• http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schrock
  guide/assess.html
• http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php
• http://www.suelebeau.com/assessment.htm
    Work Session: EQs, Pre-
     Assessments, and CA
• Continue to develop EQs for your Curriculum
  Guides
• Continue to develop your Diagnostic
  Assessment
• Identify Assessment Prototypes for your
  Curriculum Guide
• Begin to develop Ongoing Common
  Assessments for at least the first 6 weeks of
  school
• We will meet back here at 3:30
                      Pacing
• While working with your subject partners on
  Assessment Prototypes, feel free to revisit any or all
  parts of the ACS Curriculum Guide.

• Also, please come to consensus by subject/grade
  around what Essential Standards and Clarifying
  Objectives will be covered each six weeks and
  indicate this on your guide.
                  Tomorrow
• Sign in and out with Cathy Wray
• Continue to work on refining your Curriculum
  Guides
  • ES, CO, EV, EQs, AP
  • A draft of the electronic copy will be collected on
    Wed. afternoon
• Continue to work on your Ongoing Common
  Assessments
  • Diagnostic Pre-Assessment, Ongoing Common
    Assessments
           Wednesday
• Blue Diamond Training
• Continue Workshopping
 Ticket Out the Door
What am I squared away with?


What am I still circling around?


What three things do I need to do in
priority order to advance the work?

				
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