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					        The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT)
  Office of Performance Management & Innovation



Performance Management Report
       December 31, 2010

                 Jeffrey B. Mullan
                 Secretary & CEO




     Leading the Nation in Transportation Excellence
Table of Contents
1.0   Executive Summary
      1.1   Statutory requirements
      1.2   MassDOT’s Senior Leadership Team and Goal Development
2.0   MassDOT Goal #1: Safety
      2.1   Total Number of Incidents That Have Caused Delays or Closures
                2.1.1      Fatality Rate
                2.1.2      Bus Accidents
                2.1.3      Red/Green/Blue/Orange Accidents Incidents
3.0   MassDOT Goal #2: Build and Preserve
      3.1   Number of Projects in Construction Phase
                3.1.1      Active Construction
      3.2   Assessments of Maintenance Performance by Class, Mode and Region
      3.3   Assessments of Highway Pavement
                3.3.1      National Highway System Pavement Smoothness IRI
      3.4   Assessments of Bridge and Track for Subway, Commuter and
            Commonwealth-Owned Freight Rail
                3.4.1      Red/Blue/Green/Orange Speed Restrictions
                3.4.2      Structurally Deficient Bridges
      3.5 Assessments by Condition Level
      3.6 Assessments of the Categories of Maintenance-Related Activity
4.0   MassDOT Goal #3: Stewardship
      4.1   Cost savings
                4.1.1      Reform Savings achieved to date
      4.2   Capital and operating funds and expenditures
                4.2.1      Highway Construction Expenditures
                4.2.2      Highway Capital Expenditures by type
                4.2.3      Federal Reimbursement Rates
                4.2.4      Additional Funds and Extra Work Orders
      4.3   State of Good Repair
                4.3.1      FY2011-FY2015 CIP Focus: State of Good Repair
      4.4   System Availability
                4.4.1      RMV System Availability
      4.5   Salt Usage
                4.5.1      Reduce Salt Usage in MassDOT’s Snow and Ice Program
      4.6   Bicycle and Multi- Use Paths
                4.6.1      Number of Bicycle and Multi-Use Path Projects
5.0   MassDOT Goal #4: Customer Service
      5.1   Throughput of All Selected Divisions
                5.1.1      Average Daily Vehicle Miles Traveled Per Day
                5.1.2      Average Branch Wait Times
      5.2   Utilization of All Modes
                5.2.1      Annual Ridership
                5.2.2      Regional Transit Authority (RTA) Ridership
      5.3   Congestion on All Modes


                                                                                 1
6.0   MassDOT Goal #5: Efficiency
      6.1   Number of Projects Completed
               6.1.1     Aeronautics Grant Expenditures
               6.1.2     Highway projects completed in the Fiscal Year
      6.2   Percentage of Projects Completed Early or On-Time
               6.2.1     Highway Project On-Time/ Early Completion
               6.2.2     Highway Project Average Time of Consultant Procurement
               6.2.3     Highway Project Bidding and Construction
      6.3   Percentage of Projects Completed Under Budget or On-Budget
               6.3.1     Highway Project On-Budget Completion
      6.4   Percentage of Projects Advertised Early or On-Time
               6.4.1    Annual Highway STIP compared to Advertisement
               6.4.2    Trended Ads
      6.5   On-Time Performance on All Modes
               6.5.1    MBTA On-Time Performance
7.0   Conclusion
8.0   Appendix A – MassDOT’s Strategic Plan




                                                                                  2
1.0 Executive Summary

In June 2009, Governor Deval Patrick signed Chapter 25 of the Acts of 2009, “An Act
Modernizing the Transportation Systems of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,” (as
amended by Chapter 26 of the Acts of 2009).

The transportation reform legislation required the Commonwealth to integrate the
state’s former transportation agencies and authorities into the new Massachusetts
Department of Transportation (MassDOT). As an independent authority, MassDOT has
an appointed board and is organized as a body politic. As a component organization of
the Commonwealth, MassDOT is governed by state laws, rules and policies.

Since the enactment of the reform legislation, MassDOT has four new divisions:
Highway, Rail and Transit, Aeronautics and the Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV), in
addition to an Office of Planning and Programming. In November 2009, the Office of
Performance Management and Innovation was also established by the secretary. This
office provides oversight for performance management efforts across all of the divisions
and offices of MassDOT, and is responsible for providing annual program performance
reports to the public, House and Senate Committees on Ways and Means and the Joint
Committee on Transportation.

This report complies with Section 6.0 of the Act. This section of the Act requires
MassDOT to establish a performance measurement system for the divisions of the
department that necessitates the establishment of program goals, the measurement of
program performance against those goals and public reporting on progress to improve
the effectiveness of transportation design and construction, service delivery and policy
decision making.

More specifically, this report provides factual information on critical performance
indicators that measure success in meeting MassDOT’s strategic goals. The comparative
and informative data assembled for this report allows MassDOT to evaluate the
organization’s progress against specific goals and targets as the organization seeks to
improve overall performance of programs and employees.




                                                                                      3
1.1 Statutory Requirements

Effective November 1st 2009, MassDOT’s Office of Performance Management and
Innovation assumed the performance reporting responsibilities for the department.
Section 6 of Chapter 25 of the acts of 2009 outlines the responsibilities of the office as
follows:

      “The secretary shall establish a performance measurement system for the
      divisions of the department, which shall establish program goals,
      measure program performance against those goals and report publicly
      on progress to improve the effectiveness of transportation design and
      construction, service delivery and policy decision making.

      Performance measurements shall include, for at least the then current
      fiscal year and the previous 5 fiscal years, all modes of transportation.
      Performance measurements shall include the number of projects
      completed, the percentage of projects completed early or on time, the
      percentage of projects completed under budget or on-budget, the
      number of projects in construction phase and the percentage of projects
      advertised early or on time. Performance measurements shall include
      usage information for all modes of transportation, including measures of
      throughput, utilization and ridership. This information shall be presented
      with measurements of congestion, on-time performance, if appropriate,
      and incidents that have caused delays or closures. Performance
      measurements shall include assessments of maintenance performance
      by asset class, mode and region, including a breakdown of highway
      pavement, bridge and track, for subway, commuter and commonwealth-
      owned freight rail, by condition level, with an explanation of current
      year and future year planned maintenance expenditures and the
      expected result thereof.

      …………..The office shall annually publish a ”scorecard” identifying the
      number of projects actively under construction and those completed in
      the previous year by type, value and location and those planned for the
      following year. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the office
      shall determine the appropriate measures and standards of performance
      in all categories and reporting on performance trends.”

1.2 MassDOT’s Senior Leadership Team and Goal Development

Over the course of the past year, MassDOT has created the first ever strategic plan for
Massachusetts transportation. Chaired by the Secretary and CEO of MassDOT, the
department’s senior leadership team conducts weekly meetings to ensure that the
following common goals are implemented throughout the department:




                                                                                        4
Organizational Goals

      Safety - Actively manage the nation’s safest transportation system to minimize
      injuries whenever, wherever, and to whomever possible.
      Build and Preserve - Build a quality transportation system and maintain it in a
      state of good repair.
      Stewardship - Operate the transportation system in a manner that embraces our
      stewardship of the Commonwealth’s natural, cultural, and historic resources.
      Customer Service - Deliver superb service that both anticipates and responds to
      customer needs.
      Efficiency - Invest public funds and other resources wisely while fostering
      economic development.

These goals are integrated into MassDOT’s Strategic and Operating Plans, and define
the Performance categories for MassDOT’s Performance Measuring System - a system
which ensures that MassDOT’s key indicators of performance are clear, specific,
understandable and are aligned with MassDOT’s strategic goals. The strategic plan is
also included as Appendix A to this report.

The department’s strategic plan provides a big picture for leaders to focus on and for
employees to understand. Each division and department of MassDOT has developed
an operating plan that aligns to the strategic plan with specific objectives and measures
that will achieve the goals laid out.

The development of MassDOT’s goals has actuated a path for performance progress
throughout the organization and the execution of these goals will drive MassDOT to
becoming the best department of transportation in the United States.

This report is structured around the five goals of MassDOT.

2.0    MassDOT Goal #1: Safety
Actively manage the nation’s safest transportation system to minimize injuries
whenever, wherever, and to whomever possible.

2.1   Total Number of Incidents That Have Caused Delays or Closures

2.1.1 Vehicle Crash Fatality Rate




                                                                                       5
According to data provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
Massachusetts’s vehicle crash fatality rate is currently the lowest in the United States. As
shown in the graph, MassDOT’s fatality rate is 53 % lower than the national average.
Decreasing rates of highway fatalities means MassDOT and its partners in safety are
effectively eliminating unsafe road conditions and improving individual and commercial
driver’s abilities and knowledge of proper driving habits. MassDOT focuses on locations
with high accident rates and looks to improve driver education, or initiate construction
projects to reduce the rate of fatalities in those areas.

2.1.2 Bus Accidents

Bus accidents are tracked per 1,000 vehicle miles for ease of comparison between long
and short bus routes within the MBTA service area. There are no clear patterns that
predict the rate of accidents; however, the uptake in fall months could be caused by wet
or icy road conditions. Overall the trend of accidents should decrease, but some
accidents are outside of the control of the MBTA. To lower the bus accidents rate per
1,000 miles, MBTA focuses on routine, proper maintenance of buses and driver training.




                                                                                          6
                                                                                    Bus Accidents

                                              0.100
     Number of Bus Accidents per 1000 miles



                                              0.090

                                              0.080
                                              0.070
                                              0.060

                                              0.050
                                              0.040
                                              0.030
                                              0.020

                                              0.010
                                              0.000
                                                      Mar '10   Apr '10   May '10    Jun '10   Jul '10   Aug '10   Sept '10   Oct '10   Nov '10

                                                                                               Month



2.1.3 Red/Green/Blue/Orange Accidents Incidents

Accidents are tracked per 1,000 vehicle miles traveled to allow longer lines (e.g. the Red
Line) to be compared fairly against shorter (e.g. the Blue Line) lines. Values can
fluctuate greatly from month to month based on weather conditions (slick rails from
snow and ice), vehicle conditions and events (students returning to school, professional
and collegiate games) that draw additional visitors and riders to the Greater
Metropolitan area. Overall the trend should decrease. To lower the accidents per 1,000
vehicle miles, the MBTA focuses on vehicle and track maintenance, signal maintenance,
transit police patrols and educational campaigns about safety on or near rail lines.




                                                                                                                                                  7
                                                               Accidents/ Incidents per 1000 miles
                                        0.07
   Number of accidents per 1000 miles



                                        0.06


                                        0.05

                                        0.04


                                        0.03


                                        0.02

                                        0.01


                                          0
                                               Mar '10   Apr '10   May '10   Jun '10   Jul '10   Aug '10   Sept '10   Oct '10   Nov '10

                                                             Red line        Orange Line         Blue Line        Green Line


3.0    MassDOT Goal #2: Build and Preserve
Build a quality transportation system and maintain it in a state of good repair.

3.1                                      Number of Projects in Construction Phase

3.1.1 Active Highway Construction Projects

This measure represents the number of projects that were in the construction phase in a
given fiscal year. The number of active construction projects is in large part a function of
funding availability and, while not a performance measure, is a leading indicator of the
department’s ability to build or maintain transportation assets. The graph should trend
upward year to year with sustained funding and efficiencies that reduce the amount of
time to scope, design, bid and award projects. This data does not include active
maintenance projects.

For the following graph, 2006-2009 statistics indicate MassHighway data and 2010
statistics indicate MassDOT data.




                                                                                                                                          8
3.2    Assessments of Maintenance Performance by Class, Mode and Region

MassDOT’s performance management program is new and, as such, does not have the
ability to report on maintenance activities by class, by region of the state, or by specific
categories of maintenance-related activity. Future performance management reports
will include this information as it is developed. The following sections of the report
provide information on MassDOT’s and the MBTA’s performance on certain
maintenance activities that were requested in the Act as well as other meaningful
measures that demonstrate our ability to deliver improvements to our road, rail, airport
and other transportation assets.

3.3    Assessments of Highway Pavement

3.3.1 National Highway System Pavement Condition PSI

MassDOT measures the overall condition of highway pavements using the Pavement
Serviceability Index (or PSI). This measure applies to the National Highway System (NHS)
roadways located in Massachusetts (such as interstate roads, major highways such as
Route 1 and Route 24, and some major arterials). This chart shows the aggregate rating
of all NHS roadways in excellent or good condition. Pavement condition has improved
during the period 2007 to 2009 due to investments in paving projects and roadway
resurfacing, but the average is still below MassDOT’s goal of 70%. 2010 pavement
condition statistics will become available after January 1, 2011.




                                                                                          9
3.4    Assessments of Bridge and Track for Subway and Commuter Rail

3.4.1 Red/Blue/Green/Orange Speed Restrictions

Speed restrictions measure the amount of slowdown caused by track conditions. Speed
restrictions are a good indicator of bridge and track conditions: lines with lower
numbers of speed restrictions are in better condition than those with higher numbers of
speed restrictions. If a section of track falls below a specific maintenance standard or is
somehow damaged, e.g. the rail is worn down, a speed restriction is put in place to
ensure safe operation. As shown in this chart, Light Rail (Green Line) saw a growing
number of speed restrictions from March through August due to wide gauge issues at 4
(four) grade crossings. Wide gauge is when the distance between the rails does not
meet the MBTA track standard. Heavy Rail Lines speed restrictions have been declining
overall for the past several months, due to the MBTA’s concentrated focus on
eliminating restrictions on the Blue, Orange, and Red Lines. In general, as preventive
maintenance and capital improvement projects are completed the trend should
decrease on each line.




                                                                                        10
                                                                     Speed Restrictions

                                 8

                                 7
   Time travel impact/ minutes




                                 6

                                 5

                                 4

                                 3

                                 2

                                 1

                                 0
                                     Dec '09 Jan '10 Feb '10 Mar '10 Apr '10 May '10 Jun '10   Jul '10 Aug '10 Sept '10 Oct '10 Nov '10

                                                                                 Month

                                                         Red line        Orange Line           Blue Line       Green Line


3.4.2 Deficient Bridges

One of the most important indicators of bridge safety and capacity is whether or not the
bridge is structurally deficient. Bridges are rated on a scale of 1 to 10; a structurally
deficient bridge is one with a rating of 4 or less. As of November 2010, of the 5108
bridges in the Commonwealth, 511 are rated as structurally deficient. Structural
deficiency does not mean a bridge is unsafe; rather it means that it needs repairs to
prevent weight or other restrictions on the bridge. Over the past several years, the
Commonwealth, through the Patrick-Murray Administration’s Accelerated Bridge
Program (ABP), has committed $3 billion in state bond funds toward bridge repair as
well as hundreds of millions of dollars of federal funds. This increase in funding has
enabled MassDOT and DCR to reduce the number of bridges from 518 to 494. The
increase in structurally deficient bridges from October 2009 to January 2010 reflects the
impact of the MassDOT reorganization when DCR and Turnpike bridges and the Tobin
Bridge were transferred to MassDOT. In general, MassDOT expects the number of
structurally deficient bridges to continue to decline; however, the number will never
reach zero. As some bridges are repaired, others continue to age with resulting declines
in structural integrity. Programs such as the ABP and federal bridge funding allow
MassDOT to provide continued repairs to these assets.




                                                                                                                                          11
                                                      Trend of Structurally Deficient Bridge Counts
            540
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       532
            530                                                                                                                                                                                                                   524 521
                                                                                                                                               518
            520                                                                                                                 512               511                  507
                                                                                                                   509
                     507                                                                               504
 SD Count




            510                  502                                          502          502                                                                                  502
                                                          500                                                                                                                                     498                                                511
            500
            490
                                             495                     493                                                                                                                                   494
            480
            470
            460




                                                                                                                                                                                                                    2010‐JAN
                  2006‐JAN*

                              2006‐APR*




                                                                  2007‐JAN*

                                                                               2007‐APR*




                                                                                                                    2008‐JAN*

                                                                                                                                2008‐APR*




                                                                                                                                                                    2009‐JAN*

                                                                                                                                                                                2009‐APR*




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               2010‐APR
                                          2006‐JUL*

                                                      2006‐OCT*




                                                                                           2007‐JUL*

                                                                                                       2007‐OCT*




                                                                                                                                            2008‐JUL*

                                                                                                                                                        2008‐OCT*




                                                                                                                                                                                            2009‐JUL*

                                                                                                                                                                                                        2009‐OCT*




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      2010‐OCT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          2010‐JUL
                                                                                                                   Quarter Reported
 * Indicates MassHighway Bridges Only
 (Data collected after Nov 2009 includes, MassHighway, DCR,  Turnpike, Tobin)



3.5   Assessments by Condition Level –MassDOT is currently developing measures to
meet this request and will include performance metrics on this topic in the next
performance management report.

3.6    Assessments of the Categories of Maintenance-Related Activity -MassDOT is
currently developing measures to meet this request and will include performance
metrics on this topic in the next performance management report.

4.0           MassDOT Goal #3: Stewardship

Operate the transportation system in a manner that embraces our stewardship of the
Commonwealth’s natural, cultural, and historic resources.

4.1 Cost savings

Over the past year since the Act went into effect, MassDOT has focused on reforming
the business of transportation, seeking efficiencies, cost savings and improving
collaboration by reorganizing the bureaucracy of state government. As independent
authorities of the Commonwealth, MassDOT and the MBTA continue to aggressively
identify and execute opportunities to reduce costs made possible through the Act. This
following table provides a summary of initiatives that have been implemented by the
Administration, with over $100 million in anticipated, annualized and one time savings
from these efforts. Included are the results of major reform goals such as the
standardization of health care benefits for all transportation employees and retirees as
well as smaller reforms based on the sharing of resources and best practices made
possible through an integrated workforce. As reflected in the FY11 MassDOT and
MBTA budgets, through reinvestment in core services and maintenance, reform has
changed the way transportation services are delivered in Massachusetts.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 12
     Number Reform Initiative                                        Estimate               Scope
     Lower Borrowing Costs
     1          Swap Termination Avoidance                           $261.0 million         One time
     2          Metropolitan Highway System Debt                     $38.0 million          Annual
                Restructuring
     Health Care
     3          Transfer of MBTA Employees &                         $32.0 million          Annual
                Retirees to GIC 1
     4          Transfer of former Turnpike                          $5.1 million           Annual
                Employees & Retirees to GIC
     Payroll and Personnel
     5          MassDOT In-Sourcing Services                         $2.7 million           Annual
     6          MassDOT Payroll Savings (reduction                   $2.7 million           Annual
                in force)
     7          MBTA Payroll Savings (reduction in                   $6.6 million           Annual
                force)
     Best Practices and Efficiencies
     8            Flaggers & Traffic Management                      $15.5 million          $7.75 million per
                                                                                            year saved since
                                                                                            2008.
     9            Salt & Snow Removal Contracts 2                    $9.5 million           Annual
     10           511 Information Service                            $5.7 million           $4.5 million one
                                                                                            time; $1.2 million
                                                                                            annual
     11           MBTA Vendor Contract                               $4.8 million           $4.8 million
                  Renegotiations                                                            realized since
                                                                                            2009. A total of
                                                                                            $10.2 million in
                                                                                            savings is
                                                                                            projected through
                                                                                            FY16.
     12           MassDOT IT Vendor Contract                         $1.0 million           Annual
                  Renegotiations
     13           Toll Road Money Counting Services                  $500,000               Annual
     14           MassDOT Vendor Contract                            $565,000               $303,000 saved in
                  Renegotiations                                                            FY10; $262,000 in
                                                                                            FY11. One time
     15           Aeronautics Division Rent                          $131,000               $56,000 in FY10;
                                                                                            $75,000 in FY11.
                                                                                            Annual
     16         Contractor Payment Website                           $81,000                One time
     Total Savings 3                                                 $124.9 million

1
  Savings will be fully realized in fiscal year 2012 after the expiration of applicable collective bargaining agreements.
Implementation may be delayed by ongoing litigation. The savings estimate assumes litigation does not delay
implementation of the law. $2 million has been saved since the passage of the Act. Estimates were provided by the
Executive Office for Administration and Finance.
2
  Does not include all savings realized through efficiencies made possible by changes in operations that will be
measured during the 2010 – 2011 snow season.
3
  Total does not include one time savings achieved through Swap Termination Avoidance.

                                                                                                                     13
4.2 Capital Expenditures

4.2.1 Highway Construction Expenditures

Highway construction expenditures are a leading indicator of MassDOT’s ability to
improve the Commonwealth’s roads and bridges. This chart provides trended
information for the major spending categories within the department’s operations.
Beginning in 2008, the passage of the Accelerated Bridge Program (ABP) provided
additional funds to rehabilitate structurally deficient bridges. Likewise, the flow of
federal ARRA funds starting in 2009 allowed the department to accelerate spending for
many construction projects. Commonwealth funds have trended lower over the past
two years due to the regional economic crisis that restricted the amount of bond funds
available for projects.

                      Highway Construction Expenditures by Source
  $1,400.0


  $1,200.0


  $1,000.0


    $800.0


    $600.0


    $400.0


    $200.0


       $-
               FY06           FY07          FY08        FY09        FY10            FY11

                   Federal Funds     ARRA      Commonwealth Funds   Accelerated Bridge



4.2.2 Highway Capital Expenditures by Project Type

Similar to the previous section, it is important to review MassDOT expenditures by the
type of programs to understand the performance of the department in meeting its
strategic goals. This chart depicts a five year history of planned expenditures according
to critical functions completed by the department. Since 2008, the department has
focused on reducing both the number of structurally deficient bridges and improving
the general condition of bridges in the Commonwealth. As such, spending for bridges
(red line) has accelerated over the past several fiscal years. The blue and green lines
representing roadway resurfacing (paving, grading) and reconstruction reflect the
commitment of the department to improve the condition of both interstate and local
roads. As noted elsewhere in this report, funds expended for this purpose improve the
smoothness or comfort perceived by riders. General maintenance, guardrail and other

                                                                                           14
expenditures are relatively flat as a result of shifting funds towards bridges and roads,
but also due to the use of a “whole road” approach that ensures all aspects of the road
(guardrail, signs, drainage, and lights) are improved during the project. Thus the slight
decline of spending in these categories does not mean a lack of focus, rather as we fix
bridges and reconstruct roads – other maintenance activities are being completed as
well.

                                        Highway Expenditures by Project Type
  $1,200.00


  $1,000.00


   $800.00


   $600.00


   $400.00


   $200.00


      $-
                     FY06                   FY07                   FY08                  FY09                     FY10
                     Bridge Repair & Replacement                              Roadway Reconstruction
                     Roadway Resurfacing                                      Safety, General Maintenace, Facilities & Other



4.2.3 Federal Reimbursement Rates

                                       Federal Reimbursement Rates as a
                                   Percent of Total Construction Expenditures
 100%
  90%
  80%                                                                                                              46.86%
                                                                          57.23%             53.57%
  70%         61.83%              61.04%
                                                    65.77%
  60%
  50%
  40%
  30%                                                                                                              53.14%
                                                                          42.77%             46.43%
  20%         38.17%              38.96%
                                                    34.23%
  10%
    0%
              FY06                 FY07              FY08                 FY09                FY10                  FY11

                                           Federal Highway Funds     Commonwealth Funds



                                                                                                                               15
MassDOT relies on federal funds to complete highway and other transit projects. Year
over year, MassDOT has been working with federal partners to increase the amount of
federal reimbursement for actual construction costs and overhead (salaries, utilities,
goods and services) associated with projects. Over the past four fiscal years, the total
amount of federal reimbursements or shares in project costs has increased by an
average of 25%. This means that as the total construction program has increased, the
amount paid by the Commonwealth has remained constant.


                                                Federal Reimbursement Rates
                                $1,800

                                $1,600

                                $1,400
   Expenditures (in millions)




                                $1,200

                                $1,000

                                 $800

                                 $600

                                 $400

                                 $200

                                    $-
                                         FY06    FY07       FY08         FY09         FY10   FY11

                                                Commonwealth Funds   Highway Federal Funds


4.2.4 Additional Funds & Extra Work Orders

Since 2008, MassDOT’s actual and planned capital investment program has increased by
nearly 119% to over $1.1 billion in fiscal year 2011. Since 2007, the Administration has
made a committed effort to reduce the number and dollar value of extra work orders for
projects. Additional funds are an important indicator of how well projects are designed
and managed. Decreasing amounts of funds is good – it means that contractors had
adequate specifications to build the project and MassDOT engineers are providing
adequate oversight of projects. However, additional funds will never trend to zero.
Unforeseen issues at construction sites (e.g. ledge, rock or increases in raw material
costs) mean that some projects will require additional funds beyond the budgeted
amount. MassDOT reviews these requests to ensure that the request for additional
funds is legitimate.



                                                                                                    16
                                                Additional Funds & Extra Work Orders
                               $120.00


                               $100.00
  Expenditures (in millions)




                                $80.00


                                $60.00


                                $40.00


                                $20.00


                                 $0.00
                                         FY06        FY07             FY08             FY09   FY10
                                                               Federal Fiscal Year



4.3. State of Good Repair

4.3.1 FY2011-FY2015 CIP Focus: State of Good Repair (SGR)

An MBTA asset is in State of Good Repair (SGR) when it functions properly and operates
within its useful life. When the components of a transit system (revenue vehicles,
bridges, stations, tracks, signals, power systems, etc.) degrade due to “wear and tear”
and/or age, they become part of the SGR backlog. To maintain the current level of
service and reduce future maintenance costs, the MBTA’s capital program focuses on
funding SGR projects.

The following bar chart excludes all State-funded projects but includes all ARRA-funded
projects. Each bar represents planned capital investment for a 5-year period. The graph
does not capture actual expenditures and does not measure the percent of SGR backlog
completed. In FY2012, there will be a noticeable decrease in SGR investment (from 99%
in FY2011 to an expected 93% in FY12). The explanation for this drop is the amount of
ARRA funds going to projects other than SGR. The MBTA’s Draft Capital Investment
Plan (CIP) (FY12-FY16), which is the Authority’s planned capital investment over a five-
year cycle, contains approximately $240 million in projects outside the scope of SGR.




                                                                                                     17
                                                          FY2011- FY2015 CIP Focus: State of Good Repair
                                                                SGR $450 million annually over the last 5 years
                                        120%

                                                                                                                                                99%
                                                                                                                                          97%
      Percent of CIP Allocated to SGR




                                        100%                                                                                    94% 94%
                                                                                                                          91%
                                                                                                                    86%
                                                                                                              83%
                                                                                                        80%
                                                                                                  77%
                                        80%
                                                                                   71% 71% 72%
                                                                             68%
                                               65% 63% 64%
                                                              61% 61% 62%
                                        60%


                                        40%


                                        20%


                                         0%
                                               1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

                                                                                           Year


4.4 System Availability

4.4.1 RMV System Availability 4

In an effort to improve RMV customer service delivery, the MassDOT Information
Technology Department began in August to measure the uptime of computer systems
that augment services to the public. This is part of an overall quality initiative launched
by the office of the Chief Information Officer of MassDOT. In general, higher system
availability means less wait time in branch locations while providing the full spectrum of
services to the public.

For the past quarter, the availability of automated RMV systems that support the public
has improved at a steady rate, month over month; examples of these types of systems
are license application and renewal, system networks and automated branch queuing.
While the theoretical uptime goal for these systems is 100%, the actual uptime goal is set
at 97%. This reflects the age of the related infrastructure components, system life cycle
maturity and MassDOT’s dependency on outside service providers.
 




4
    This measure directly supports Section 5.1.2 – Average Branch Wait Times

                                                                                                                                                      18
                                   RMV Public Facing System Uptime

                    100.00


                     98.00


                     96.00
      Percent (%)




                     94.00


                     92.00


                     90.00


                     88.00
                             Aug      Sep        Oct        Nov      Dec
                                                Month


4.5 Salt Usage

4.5.1 Reduce Salt Usage in MassDOT’s Snow and Ice Program

Minimizing the use of salt demonstrates MassDOT’s willingness to become better
stewards of our highway assets while ensuring safe driving conditions. This measure
demonstrates commitment to preserving the environment, and illustrates commitment
to reducing operating costs. Using less salt reduces the deterioration of highway
structures, and increases the life expectancy of highway bridges.




                                                                                19
4.6 Bicycle and Multi- Use Paths

4.6.1 Number of Bicycle and Multi-Use Path Projects

Continuing to design and construct multi-modal transportation solutions that enhance
communities and that embrace natural, cultural and historic resources, is consistent with
MassDOT’s stewardship goals. The number of projects in a year does not necessarily
equate to the amount of available funding. During some years MassDOT may be able
to initiate a large number of projects with low individual values. The opposite is also
true, when MassDOT can only initiate a few high value projects. MassDOT is committed
to continuing to advance these projects and ensuring that they are designed to meet
the public’s needs.




                                                                                      20
5.0    MassDOT Goal #4: Customer Service
Deliver superb service that both anticipates and responds to customer needs.

Each day, MassDOT’s transportation infrastructure serves approximately 5.5 million
people, including over 4.7 million licensed drivers in the Commonwealth, an estimated
half-million public transit customers, and several hundred-thousand drivers from out-of-
state. Of this total using the system every day, over 5 million – 90% – are using our
roads for some portion, or all, of their trips.

While the figures above provide overall estimates for total system usage, the statistics
below present a snapshot of daily commuting behavior for over 3.3 million workers in
Massachusetts as compared to national averages:

      •   Over 2.6 million, or 81%, drive their car (vs. 86.7% nationwide).

      •   Around 293,000, or 8.9%, take transit (vs. 4.8% US).

      •   About 152,000 (4.6%) walk to work (vs. 2.9% US)

      •   About 24,000 (0.7%) ride a bicycle to work (vs. 0.5 % US)

      •   The remaining 162,000 (4.9%) use other means, including working at home (vs.
          5.1% US)

Massachusetts Commuting Mode Shares 5
                                                          Walk 4.6%

                                          Transit 8.9%        Bicycle 0.7%
                                                                  Other Means 4.9%




                                 Automobile
                                   80.9%

Additional information and statistics regarding customer usage of Massachusetts’
transportation system are further detailed in the sections that follow.




5
    2008 data from the American Community Survey (ACS)


                                                                                     21
5.1   Throughput of Selected Divisions

5.1.1 Average Daily Vehicle Miles Traveled Per Day

MassDOT’s Highway Division is responsible for managing the state’s highway system of
over 9,000 lane miles of road, 27 tunnels and over 5,000 bridges. Average daily vehicle
miles traveled per day is the total volume of vehicle traffic of a highway or road for a
year divided by 365 days. This is a useful and simple measurement of how busy the
Commonwealth roads are.

2010 statistics for the average daily vehicle miles traveled per day will become available
after January 1, 2011.




5.1.2 Average Branch Wait Times

MassDOT’s Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) Division thirty branch offices provide over
five million customers with license, registration and other motor vehicle operation
services. While a growing number of online services are available to residents, many
continue to visit branch offices for routine transactions or services not available on the
web. Recognizing the importance of prompt, accurate service to customers, the RMV
has focused on meeting a 15-minute maximum wait time for all customers at branches.
The following chart shows the performance of the RMV in meeting this goal over the
past year.

The 15-minute goal was exceeded through August for two primary reasons; (1) there
were insufficient customer service representatives at branches and (2) April and August
saw a seasonal spike in demand for services as students applied for driving permits and
licenses during school vacation. Since the hiring of additional customer service


                                                                                       22
representatives in August, wait times have continued to decline with October and
November falling below the targeted 15-minute mark.


                                                                         Branch Wait times


                                350,000                                                                                               35
   Number of Customers Served




                                300,000                                                                                               30

                                250,000                                                                                               25

                                200,000                                                                                               20

                                150,000                                                                                               15

                                100,000                                                                                               10

                                 50,000                                                                                               5

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                                                                                                                       N
                                                                              Months

                                                       Number of Customers Served            Average Wait Times



5.2 Utilization of All Modes

The following subsections provide information on ridership of all modes at the MBTA
and on RTA ridership.

5.2.1 Annual Ridership

The chart notes how many people ride the MBTA’s subway, bus, commuter rail, boat
and paratransit services on an annual basis. Specifically, ridership is measured by
“unlinked trips”; meaning a customer who transferred from a bus to the subway would
count as two unlinked trips, one on bus and one on subway.

There are many factors, including the economy, gas prices and quality of service that
impact ridership. In 2009, the regional recession and job losses meant fewer people
were commuting for work, shopping or leisure. In some months where gas prices rose
dramatically, more individuals perceived riding the MBTA as more cost effective than
driving and so ridership increased.




                                                                                                                                           23
                                                           Annual Ridership

                     160,000

                     140,000

                     120,000
  Number of Riders




                     100,000

                      80,000

                      60,000

                      40,000

                      20,000

                           0
                                     2006           2007                 2008           2009             2010
                                                                  Year
                      CR       Bus      Trackless    Heavy Rail          Light Rail   Boat     Private Bus      RIDE



5.2.2 Regional Transit Authority (RTA) Ridership

MassDOT supports the operating assistance and capital investment programs for the
fifteen RTAs, providing over $59 million in operating assistance in 2010. The RTAs work
with the Rail and Transit Division to provide service to 256 communities across the
Commonwealth.

For the most recent reporting year available, the RTAs continued their successful
ridership performance, serving 29.7 million customers in 2009- an increase of 3% over
prior year levels despite a weakening economy. Strong performance at Brockton Area
Transit (BAT), Lowell Regional Transit Authority (LRTA) and Vineyard Transit Authority
(VTA) increased total ridership by 8.7%, 7.0% and 6.9% respectively.

Record high gasoline prices after 2007 attracted new customers to local transit service.
Additionally, an innovative change to the fare structure at the Pioneer Valley Transit
Authority (PVTA) added 2.3 million trips from 2007 to 2008 when a new unlimited ride
day pass was introduced. The new MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA)
began service in 2008, expanding the RTA network into the greater Framingham/Natick
area.




                                                                                                                       24
                                                          RTA Ridership 2005- 2009
                   13,000,000
                   12,000,000
                   11,000,000
                   10,000,000
                    9,000,000
 Number of trips




                    8,000,000
                    7,000,000
                    6,000,000
                    5,000,000
                    4,000,000
                    3,000,000
                    2,000,000
                    1,000,000
                          -




                                                                                                         TA
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                                                                 Regional Transit Authorities
                                                          2005      2006   2007     2008   2009


5.3   Congestion on All Modes –MassDOT is currently putting measures in place to
meet this request and will include performance metrics on this topic in the next
performance management report.

6.0    MassDOT Goal #5: Efficiency
Invest public funds and other resources wisely while fostering economic development.

6.1                   Number of Projects Completed

6.1.1 Aeronautics Grant Expenditures




                                                                                                                                 25
                                                        Amount of Grants Issued
                                   $70,000,000


                                   $60,000,000
   Total Amount of Grants Issued




                                   $50,000,000
                                                                                         State
                                   $40,000,000                                           Local
                                                                                         Federal
                                   $30,000,000


                                   $20,000,000

                                   $10,000,000

                                            $‐
                                                 2006       2007   2008    2009   2010
                                                                    Year


Through the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and MassDOT’s Airport Safety and
Maintenance program, MassDOT’s Aeronautics Division provides funding for airport
capital improvement projects at 37 public-use general aviation airports. This chart notes
the amount of grants issued under these two programs for capital improvement
projects over the past five fiscal years. Aeronautics and the public use airports are able
to use a mix of state (light blue) and local (black) funds to leverage the maximum
amount of federal dollars (dark blue) available. Typically the FAA and MassDOT issues
grants for runway or building safety, compliance and capacity projects first and then use
the remainder for economic development projects such as terminal buildings.

The rate of Aeronautics Grant expenditures is important as it connects to safety and
maintenance projects. For example, in state fiscal year 2007, 33 grants were issued
which was a slight increase from the 28 issued in fiscal year 2006. However, the dollar
value of the projects issued in FY07 was much higher as eight major projects valued at
over one million dollars each was issued. Thirty-one grants were issued in FY09, of
which seventeen were valued at over one million dollars. The number of grants issued
in FY10 declined as a number of proposed projects were unexpectedly delayed for
environmental and other permitting reasons. The amount of grants issued was
therefore reduced.

6.1.2 Highway Projects Completed in the Fiscal Year

From year to year, the number of projects we complete can vary. In a particular year,
MassDOT may construct fewer projects, but the dollar value associated with those
projects could be significantly higher, based on the scope and complexity of the
projects. This chart notes the number of highway related projects that were completed

                                                                                                 26
in each fiscal year. With sustained funding MassDOT can continue to deliver more
projects, creating more jobs, a healthier, safer infrastructure and benefits for all roadway
users. This data does not include completed maintenance projects. The 2006-2009
statistics in the following graph represent projects completed by the former
MassHighway Department only; 2010 statistics indicate MassDOT data for the new
Highway Division.




6.2    Percentage of Projects Completed Early or On-Time

6.2.1 Highway Project On-Time/Early Completion

On-time/early project completion is a measure of MassDOT’s ability to manage
construction projects and hold contractors accountable for schedule adherence. On-
time/early completion reduces impacts to the public and provides more rapid delivery of
measurable infrastructure and travel improvements. MassDOT monitors internal and
external causes for delays. Examples of potential delays include changes in conditions,
unforeseen utilities, design omissions, and weather related delays.

The 2006-2009 statistics in the following graph indicate MassHighway data, 2010
statistics indicate MassDOT data.




                                                                                         27
Since 2008 MassDOT has focused on eliminating delays in highway and bridge
construction through a combination of careful project review during the design stage,
improved communications with municipalities and utilities, a more robust public process
and improved project scheduling to complete projects prior to the winter construction
shutdown. As shown in the graph, MassDOT has made tremendous progress in
improving on time performance. Completion rates are up by 175% from 2008 levels.
For fiscal year 2011 and beyond, MassDOT’s goal is to have 80% of all Highway capital
improvement projects completed on time.

6.2.2 Highway Project Average Time of Consultant Procurement

One of the first steps in the project delivery process is the procurement of design
services to prepare construction plans, specifications and cost estimates. This chart
shows the average duration of the consultant contract procurement process for design
projects, beginning with the approval of contract need, selection of a consultant firm
and issuance of a notice to proceed (NTP) for the design work.




                                                                                    28
Since the implementation of streamlining projects in 2007 to reduce the time to procure,
the trend has been positive. MassDOT’s goal is to sustain an average of six months for
the procurement of consultants. This will be achieved by using a variety of strategies,
including training on new procedures, eliminating duplicative procedures, improving
oversight and tracking of procurement schedules. From 2007 to 2008, the average time
to procure a design contract dropped by 39%. The 2009 average time increased largely
from the huge volume of projects made possible through additional federal stimulus
and state bond funds for construction projects. In 2010, MassDOT was able to refocus
efforts to reduce the average to 6.2 months, which is still slightly above the goal of 6
months.

6.2.3 Highway Project Bidding and Construction

Over the past four fiscal years, MassDOT has reduced the timeline for highway and
bridge construction projects. One way MassDOT measures the success of the highway
and bridge construction program is by the time it takes to move a designed, funded
project from the advertisement phase (also called the bidding phase) to notice to
proceed (authorization for a contractor to start construction). This is a key measure of
design quality and effective program management. It also means MassDOT is creating
jobs and supporting economic development.

The 2006-2009 statistics in the following graph represtent projects completed by the
former MassHighway Department only; 2010 statistics indicate MassDOT data for the
new Highway Division.




                                                                                     29
MassDOT reduced the time between contract advertisement and construction start date
from 422 days to 217 days in 2008, a 48% decrease. Since 2008, the time was further
reduced to 111 days in 2010, an additional 48% decrease. This reduction is more
impressive when placed within the context of MassDOT’s annual road and bridge
construction program that increased from $515M in 2007 to more than $1 billion in
2010, a 46% increase in construction expenditures.

6.3   Percentage of Projects Completed Under Budget or On-Budget

6.3.1 Highway Project Under/On-Budget Completion

In fiscal year 2010, MassDOT expended more than $1 billion on 375 highway and
bridge construction projects. Ensuring on-budget completion of projects is a core value
of MassDOT and an important factor in restoring the public’s confidence in the state
transportation system. In 2010, 51% of all highway capital projects funded from federal
and state bond funds were completed on/under budget. Through extensive project
and internal controls, MassDOT monitors project timelines, schedules and performance
in an effort to reduce or mitigate the number of projects that go over budget. Some of
the projects currently in the construction phase were designed before these procedures
were implemented in 2008. The trend for on budget completion should continue to
move higher as more projects are designed using these controls.

The 2006-2009 statistics in the following graph represent projects completed by the
former MassHighway Department only; 2010 statistics indicate MassDOT data for the
new Highway Division.




                                                                                    30
6.4   Percentage of Projects Advertised Early or On-Time

6.4.1 Annual Highway STIP Compared to Advertisement

The Commonwealth’s State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) is a federally-
mandated compilation of priority roadway, bridge, transit, and intermodal projects as
agreed to by the Commonwealth's ten Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs)
and the three non-MPOs. The STIP is a four year planning document, providing an
annual “roadmap” of projects that are in the pipeline for funding, construction and
completion. The STIP is used to anticipate how much federal highway, federal transit
and Commonwealth bond proceeds will be spent in a fiscal year. MassDOT’s goal is to
advertise 80% of the current year’s road and bridge projects.

In the graph below, 2006-2009 statistics indicate MassHighway data and 2010 statistics
indicate MassDOT data.




                                                                                    31
The percentage of projects advertised as programmed on the STIP is an important
measure of the success of the project development and estimating process. This
measure is a demonstration of MassDOT’s ability to fulfill it’s commitments to the public,
and the efforts being implemented to improve this percentage reflect MassDOT’s
increased emphasis on providing exceptional customer service. Since 2007 MassDOT
has streamlined the entire project development process, implementing improved
coordination between all project stakeholders to ensure comprehensive designs and
eliminate advertising delays. The drop in the 2010 percentage is reflective of an increase
in the number of projects advertised due to increases in funding from ARRA and ABP.

6.4.2 Trended Ads

Project advertisements are another critical milestone in project development. An
advertisement is the notification to contractors that a project has been designed, funded
and is available for construction bids. Contractors then begin a project review process
that culminates with a bid or price quote to complete the work.            Year over year
performance in meeting advertisement schedules signifies that MassDOT is developing
well designed projects and our capital investment plan is fiscally constrained and
balanced. To the extent that actual advertisements do not meet targets, it means that
the design process is delayed or funding constraints materialized. Additionally,
advertisements should be released over all four quarters of the fiscal year to ensure a
balanced and competitive bidding environment. For all of these reasons, trended ads
are an important indicator of MassDOT’s highway construction programs performance.




                                                                                       32
                                             Trended Ads
      700                                                                                                     653


      600
                                                                                                                    524

      500
                                                                                                  412
      400                                                                                               358


      300                                                                                   270
                            243                             248

      200                                             155                   167
                                                                                  136 138
                                  94
      100                              44        49
             27   25                                              23   34
                       0                    10
      -
                       Q1                        Q2                         Q3                          Q4

                       FFY 2006         FFY 2007            FFY 2008        FFY 2009         FFY 2010


6.5       On-Time Performance on All Modes

6.5.1 MBTA On-Time Performance

On-time performance shows how well our service follows our schedules. For each type
of service, MBTA measures on-time performance differently to reflect the way the
customer experiences it. Subway customers walk to the subway platform at any time,
expecting trains to run frequently. For this reason, subway (Red, Blue, Green, and
Orange) compares the scheduled frequency of service to the actual frequency; in all
cases trains must leave the first station within 150% of the scheduled interval between
them. So for example, if a Blue Line train is scheduled to leave Wonderland four minutes
after the previous train was scheduled to leave, but it actually leaves closer to six
minutes after the previous train, then the train is late.

o         The MBTA strives to have an on-time performance rate of 95% on the Red Line.
          Recently, the on- time performance for the Red Line has averaged 94.8%.
          Fluctuations in Red Line performance were minimized by efforts to improve track
          infrastructure to reduce speed restrictions, scheduled changes and other
          maintenance improvements.

o         The MBTA strives to have an on-time performance goal of 95% on the Orange
          Line. Recently, the on time performance for the Orange Line has averaged
          96.1%. Orange Line performance was consistent since September 2009, owing
          to good train maintenance, track maintenance and signal upgrades. The line


                                                                                                                          33
               experiences only the occasional dip in performance, most recently in July 2010,
               when operational procedures transitioned to the single person train operation.

o              The MBTA strives to have an on-time performance goal of 95% on the Blue Line.
               Recently, the on- time performance for the Blue Line has averaged 94.8%. The
               Blue Line’s on-time performance has been steady with lower numbers recorded
               this past summer. Part of this is actually due to problems with the catenary wire
               between Orient Heights and Wonderland. Other delays were caused by track
               problems, which required implementation of speed restriction

o              The MBTA strives to have an on-time performance goal of 95% on the Commuter
               Rail. Recently, the on time performance for the Commuter Rail has averaged
               86.1%. Small problems such as unusual track conditions have an impact. Track
               improvement projects will reduce speed restrictions. More recent delays are due
               to slippery rail (a seasonal problem in the fall); speed restrictions and other
               mechanical failures.

o              On- time performance for buses is impacted by road traffic and illegal parking in
               bus stops. A smaller cause is vehicle maintenance issue, where a vehicle is taken
               out of service for repair.

The following series of graphs highlight on time performance for commuter rail and
subways.


                                    On- Time Performance by Mode
              100.0%
              98.0%
              96.0%
              94.0%
              92.0%
    Percent




              90.0%
              88.0%
              86.0%
              84.0%
              82.0%
              80.0%
                       Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun       Jul   Aug Sep Oct Nov
                       '09 '09 '09 '09 '10 '10 '10 '10 '10 '10       '10   '10 '10 '10 '10
                                                      Month
                                  Red        Orange       Blue        Commuter Rail




                                                                                             34
7.0 Conclusion

MassDOT will continue to use Performance Management as a tool to ensure the
organizational goals are being met in an effective and efficient manner. In an effort to
ensure transparency and enhance accountability for outcomes and deliverables, the
agency will communicate all performance results to MassDOT employees, to customers
and to external stakeholders.

MassDOT hopes this document will provide a starting point for open and frank
discussions in both internal and external forums on how the agency can improve or
maintain excellent performance throughout the organization. MassDOT welcomes any
feedback on the results that are presented in this report.




                                                                                     35
8.0 Appendix A - MassDOT’s Strategic Plan




                                            36
37

				
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