Docstoc

Teaching Technology

Document Sample
Teaching Technology Powered By Docstoc
					     3rd Annual TLTR Conference




Conference
  Program

Teaching & Learning
  with
       e
       -Technology

              March 7, 2002
  David Adamany Undergraduate Library



           www.tltr.wayne.edu/techconf2002/
W     elcome to the third annual TLTR Conference, Teaching and Learning with
e-Technology. We appreciate your interest in and support of this important event.
Today’s conference features more than 40 presentations from WSU faculty and staff, repre-
senting almost every school and college. The presenters will showcase their experiments
and proven successes. Conference proposals were peer-reviewed, and the program features
a wide range of presentation types, including traditional presentations, computer demonstra-
tions, poster sessions, participatory dialogues, panel discussions, vendor displays, and
workshops. We also believe that the Teaching and Learning with e-Technology conference
can facilitate and promote the effective use of instructional technologies on our campus
by providing faculty the opportunity to share new ideas, discuss real-life experiences and
explore innovative methods. Many exciting applications of information and communication
technologies are in daily use in teaching and learning here at Wayne State, and today’s
conference will clearly demonstrate this.
The topic for this year’s keynote is The Path to e-Wayne, presented jointly by Jim Johnson,
Vice President for Computing and Information Technology and Charles Bantz, Provost
and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. Conference proceedings will be available
on the Web at http://www.tltr.wayne.edu/techconf2002.html.
A unique and exciting aspect of this annual conference is its campus-wide appeal and sup-
port. Nearly every school, college and division has contributed to the success of this year’s
event, either through funding, in-kind support, or through contribution of speakers and
exhibits. We would like especially to thank our Conference Sponsors who are listed in the
program; we hope you will take a moment to review this list. Another highlight of the con-
ference has become the exhibit area, featuring vendor exhibits, poster sessions and displays
from most every school and college on campus. We hope you will enjoy exploring the
exhibits and visiting with your colleagues.
More information about the TLTR is available in this program and from any of the Round-
table members; you’ll know us by our name badges. We look forward to talking with you
here today, and welcome your attendance at our open, monthly meetings.
Have fun, share your thoughts, and take ideas from here to use in teaching and learning.
We find that comparison between the best traditional ideas and the innovations presented
here can improve both the old and the new. New and imaginative things are happening here
at Wayne State University!




         David R. Bowen                                       Sharon A. Phillips
         Conference Chair                    Teaching, Learning, and Technology Roundtable Chair
                                                      Conference Sponsors
          Academic Affairs, Office of the Provost                                             Provost Charles R. Bantz
          Academic Affairs, Office for Teaching and Learning                                  Director Donna H. Green
          College of Education                                                                Dean Paula Wood
          College of Engineering                                                              Dean Ralph Kummler
          College of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts                                  Dean Linda Moore
          College of Liberal Arts                                                             Dean Lawrence Scaff
          College of Lifelong Learning                                                        Interim Dean Paula Wood
          College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions                                   Dean Beverly Schmoll
          College of Urban, Labor and Metropolitan Affairs                                    Dean Alma Young
          School of Medicine                                                                  Dean John Crissman
          School of Social Work                                                               Dean Phyllis Vroom
          University Library System                                                           Dean Sandra Yee

                 Adobe Systems, Inc.             •   Apple Computer      •     Palm, Inc.     •   Real-Inc     •    Trivantis Software




                                                     Conference Committees
                                         Conference Central Planning Committee
        David Bowen (Conference Chair)                       Paul Beavers                                  Victoria Corriveau
          College of Lifelong Learning                          University Libraries                           Academic Affairs, Office for
                                                                                                               Teaching and Learning

        Karen Crist                                                                                        Sharon Phillips
          BioMedical Communications, School of Medicine                                                        University Libraries

                                                 Review/Proceedings Committee
                      Paul Beavers (Chair)                                                                Emmanuel Ssemakula
                        University Libraries                                                                  College of Engineering

                                                          Program Committee
                      Karen Crist (Chair)                                                                  David Womble
                        BioMedical Communications, School of Medicine                                        School of Medicine


                                                          Exhibit Committee
           David Bowen (Chair)                               Mary Waker                                    Lynne Standley-Ryan
             College of Lifelong Learning                      College of Education                          Computing and Information
                                                                                                             Technology
                                                 Publicity/Registration Committee
                      Sharon Phillips (Chair)                                                             Paul Beavers
                          University Libraries                                                               University Libraries

                                                        Evaluation Committee
       Victoria Corriveau                                    Sharon Phillips                               Robert Berman
          Academic Affairs, Office for                         University Libraries                          College of Science
          Teaching and Learning


                                            Current TLTR Members 2001-2002
Catherine Barrette, College of Liberal Arts                                    Howard Normile, College of Pharmacy & Allied Health Professions
Paul Beavers, University Libraries                                             Sharon Phillips, University Libraries (Chair)
Robert Berman, College of Science                                              Kami Pothukuchi, College of Urban, Labor and Metropolitian Affairs
David Bowen, College of Lifelong Learning                                      Ron Schroeder, College of Science
Margaret O. Brunhofer, School of Social Work                                   Emmanuel Ssemakula, College of Engineering
Victoria Corriveau, Academic Affairs, Office for Teaching and Learning
                                                                               Lynne Stanley-Ryan, Computing & Information Technology
Karen Crist, BioMedical Communications, School of Medicine
                                                                               Robert Stephenson, Science, Biological Sciences
Marie Draper Dykes, Academic Affairs, Office of the Provost
                                                                               Lezlie Hart Stivale, College of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts
Patrick Gossman, Computing and Information Technology
Donna Green, Academic Affairs, Office for Teaching and Learning                Jeff Trzeciak, Univeristy Libraries
Helene Krouse, College of Nursing                                              Mary Waker, College of Education
Christine Miller, School of Business Administration                            Dian Walster, University Libraries
Thomas Moeller, College of Lifelong Learning                                   David Womble, School of Medicine


                                                                                                                                                1
                                       Conference Keynote Address


                                        KEYNOTE SPEAKERS 11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

                              Teaching and Learning with e-Technology
                                            March 7, 2002
                                            Adamany Undergraduate Library




                                    The Path to e-Wayne




                            Charles R. Bantz                                     James W. Johnson
    Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs   Vice President, Computing and Information Technology


        Charles R. Bantz is currently Provost and Senior          James W. Johnson (Jim) is Wayne State University’s
        Vice President for Academic Affairs at Wayne State        Vice President for Computing and Information
        University. He is an accomplished scholar and             Technology. Prior to arriving at Wayne State, Jim
        served as Vice Provost and Department Chair at            was Vice Provost for Information Technology at
        Arizona State University in Tempe. Dr. Bantz,whose        Emory University, where over a ten-year period he
        doctorate is in communication, is committed to            brought that university to the top rank in infor-
        maximizing the research university’s success in           mation technology nationally. Jim Johnson is a
        facilitating learning, generating knowledge, and          member of MERIT Network, Inc’s Board (Wayne
        serving the state.                                        State is a MERIT co-founder) and an active
                                                                  participant in the Governor’s Innovation Forum.




2
                                                          Abstracts
                                             – alphabetical by first presenter last name –

Web-Based Learning Activities in Manufacturing Systems
    Presenters: Muhammad S. Ahmed, Manufacturing Engineering; Nancy L. Baskin, Greenfield Coalition; Gregory L. Tonkay,
    Lehigh University; Emory W. Zimmers, Jr., Lehigh University                                        Paper
This paper will focus on the design and development of multimedia sessions which are computer-based learning activities
designed to teach engineering concepts within a real-world manufacturing context. Traditional engineering education methods
often result in competency gaps between the theoretical and the practical. As a result, traditionally educated engineers may
have difficulty translating their classroom learning into effective manufacturing practice. These competency gaps can be
addressed by introducing experiential learning into the educational methodology.

This paper describes how the learning session is created using a set of digital objects that fulfill a single educational objective.
A session uses these multimedia objects to teach a specific theory, process, or technique within a factory context. For example,
to teach direct time study video images captured from the factory floor can become multimedia objects to be used in a session.
The resulting session requires the student to analyze the environment and conduct time studies by viewing real factory personnel
in work settings.

In the approach described in this paper, joint university/industry projects serve as a source of data and experiences that can
be used to support computer-based learning activities. Real-time interactions with factory personnel that are accomplished
through Web-cam technology and interactive meeting software are often used to capture key objects needed to create a session.
As specific examples of our approach, this paper discusses the development of two multimedia learning sessions—one on
direct time study and one on the use of simulation. It includes the educational plan development, techniques used for creating
multimedia objects, and concludes with a description of the resulting learning sessions.


English Studies in the Computer Classroom
    Presenters: Susan Beckwith, Department of English; Joy Allison Burnett; Heidi L. Eichbauer, Department of English;
    Paul Gelinas, Department of English; Justin Vidovic, Department of English                            Panel
Our panel seeks to demonstrate the various way that English studies is inherently fitted for teaching with technology and
engendering critical awareness of the increased opportunities for, but also demands upon, literacy education that uses of
technology entail. At its core, English studies concerns itself with poetics, the interpretation of texts, and rhetoric, the production
of texts. Whether in a literature or composition classroom, technology serves to highlight literacy as a process because it so
befittingly demonstrates the mutability of language and the intertextuality that exists among texts, between texts, as well as
readers and writers. An integral dynamic of the literate process is the social contexts in which we find ourselves and for which
we rely on language to communicate our thoughts, feelings, and ideas. Listserv and synchronous interchange programs allow
us to create new and imaginative contexts to hold discussions. Today new technologies also highlight that visual imagery and
interaction are mediums of knowledge and expression and mandate that we now provide instruction in visual literacy. While
technology offers opportunities and benefits for English studies, it does not come without glitches. We will conclude with some
practical concerns that arise from teaching English in the computer lab and offer some solutions for effectively overcoming
potential problems that invariably arise with the uses of technology.


Using ProQuest Research Library
    Presenter: Veronica Bielat, Purdy/Kresge Library                                                               Poster
The Wayne State University Library System added the ProQuest Research Library online database to its collection of electronic
resources in Fall of 2001. This database has a core list of approximately 770 publications, and over 2,000 publications spread
among fifteen subject-specific modules in arts, business, children, education, general interest, health, humanities, international
studies, law, military, multicultural studies, psychology, sciences, social sciences, women's interests. ProQuest Research Library
allows users to search individual modules, searching across multiple modules or include the ABI/Inform database and the
ProQuest Nursing Journals database in their search.

This poster session will introduce new users to the ProQuest Research Library online database, its journal coverage, full-text
options and effective searching strategies. The poster session will specifically address the special searching features in the
ProQuest Research Library online database, such as image caption searching, and will review the different searching options
available to users.


Web.Edu: A Course on Taking Online Courses
         Presenters: David Bowen, CLL-ISP                                                                          Paper
The Interdisciplinary Studies Program (ISP) will offer a one-credit course on taking online courses, starting in the Winter 2002
semester. This course is GIS 1600, “Web.edu: How Internet Courses Work.” This talk will describe the curriculum, textbook and
other course information, and describe the experiences of the instructor and students in this first offering. In particular, it is the
author’s hypothesis that, while students need a minimum set of Internet skills to take on online course, the principal difference
for students is their increased control and responsibility in an online course.




                                                                                                                                          3
                                                              Abstracts
                                                 – alphabetical by first presenter last name –

    Using Known Learning Factors to Develop Effective Teaching Methods
        Presenters: Margo Bowman, Department of Psychology; Rebecca Treiman, Department of Psychology                   Demonstration
    Psychological research has uncovered factors that influence the acquisition and retention of information. Instructors can take
    advantage of this knowledge when teaching psychology, as well as other topics. Research demonstrates that humans have
    a limited capacity to deal with incoming information. This limitation directly impacts how much information should be presented
    at one time. Research also demonstrates that deeper processing of information during the acquisition stage leads to better
    recall than does shallow processing. Students should thus be encouraged to think about and interact with information as it is
    being presented. Several methods found to encourage deeper processing involve applying the information to oneself and
    using visual imagery. Lectures developed using PowerPoint software can incorporate these learning factors. PowerPoint allows
    information to be presented, demonstrated, and discussed in controlled amounts. Interactive lectures encourage the students
    to evaluate the material at a deep level, leading to increased attention, understanding, and learning. Such lectures also allow
    oral information to be supplemented with visual material. We demonstrate some of the factors that influence learning and reten-
    tion through the interactive lectures that have been developed for the Cognitive Psychology course at Wayne State. Theories
    con-cerning learning will be presented followed by demonstrations showing the effects. Interacting with the material enhances
    the learning experience, leading to better attention and increased retention. Students develop more confidence in their under-
    standing of the subject matter. In general, knowledge of the cognitive factors that influence human learning can enhance
    instruction.


    Enhancing Learning and Career Planning with DISCOVER
        Presenter: Michelle Bruner, Academic Success Center                                                             Demonstration
    This hands-on online demonstration will illustrate how the DISCOVER program can be used to contribute to students’ academic,
    personal and professional development. Given the significant influence of future orientation on motivation and achievement
    for adolescents and young adults, it is imperative that we examine the tools that will help identify individuals’ skills and interests
    so that more purposeful planning can take place before and during the college years. The DISCOVER program is an interactive
    software program that guides users through a series of modules to assess strengths and interests, plan their education and
    learn about specific careers and industries. As a computer-based inventory, its use can provide information key to effective
    career planning and management. DISCOVER will be available for use by conference participants to show its capacity to
    provide self-assessments.


    Courseware, Electronic Reserves and Library Resources:
    A Complete Course-in-a-Box
        Presenters: Bradd Burningham, University Libraries, Purdy/Kresge Library;
        Duryea Callaway, DALNET                                                                                         Demonstration
                                                                                                                       Demonstration
    Connect library resources, including electronic reserves, and courseware to deliver the first truly complete course-in-a-box—
    using existing technology readily available on the Wayne State campus. The intermarriage of Blackboard, Eres (electronic
    reserves) and the vast and ever-increasingly pool of full text research materials available from the library offers faculty the ability
    to do distance teaching at the same time as it offers students the ability to do distance learning. With the addition of taped
    lectures on audio files, a complete virtual classroom is easily available to both students and faculty in a way that it never has
    been before.


    The Choral Trainer: Decision Making Training for Choral Music
         Presenters: Abby Butler, Music Department; Tammé McCowin, Graduate Student,
    Instructional Technology                                                                                            Demonstration
    This project involves the development of an interactive multimedia program designed to help prospective music teachers
    acquire the decision-making skills necessary for success in the choral classroom. The program allows students to practice
    their decision-making skills with guided instruction and feedback while viewing live video and audio clips of actual choral
    rehearsals. Contained on a CD-ROM, the interactive program consists of a tutorial followed by a series of modules targeting
    problems commonly encountered in choral rehearsals. The tutorial is currently under development and will be pilot tested prior
    to creation of the individual practice modules. It is the tutorial that we are proposing for demonstration at the TLTR Conference.
    A more detailed description of the tutorial follows.

    The tutorial consists of three main sections. The first section of the tutorial introduces the basic components of a problem-
    solving routine found to be successful in the choral setting. The second section follows with a step-by-step demonstration of
    the routine illustrated with video clips from a live rehearsal of the WSU Women’s Chorale and supplemented by a voice over
    of the director explaining her decisions. Finally, in the third section, students are given the opportunity to practice their decision-
    making skills. Students will watch a series of video clips featuring a short segment of a live choral rehearsal. The video clips
    will be followed by a series of screen prompts leading the student through the problem-solving sequence introduced in the
    first part of the tutorial. Students will receive feedback on their responses and instructional prompts guiding them through the
    process and reinforcing correct or appropriate decisions. Once students have successfully completed the tutorial they will be
    ready to apply the problem-solving routine to specific rehearsal problems featured in the practice modules.


4
                                                        Abstracts
                                           – alphabetical by first presenter last name –
Music Is Life...Drugs: An Innovative Technology-Driven School-Based
Drug Abuse Prevention Project
    Presenters: Randall Commissaris, Pharmaceutical Sciences; Lisa Berry-Bobovski, Karmanos
    Cancer Institute; Bonita Leavell, Pharmaceutical Sciences                                                  Demonstration
Drug abuse among youth continues to be a challenging problem in American society. The present project uses elements that
youth relate to—popular music, computers, and artistic freedom —to enable youth to teach themselves and others about the
medical hazards and consequences of drug abuse. The primary objectives of this project are to create and implement a
computer-based education and entertainment program in which high school and middle school students create, learn from
and teach each other about the medical hazards and consequences of drug use and abuse. By selecting their own music and
by writing their own anti-drug message, they will have ownership of the project.

Two pilot projects have been completed. In the first project, we worked with three Wayne State University pharmacy students
to create a CD entitled “Music is Life... Drugs - Volume 1.” To create this CD, the students surfed the Internet using Napster
and other music downloading programs for songs referring to drugs and drug use, including alcohol and nicotine. In addition
they searched textbooks, authoritative Web sites (NIDA, NIAAA, etc.), and other sources of information for important and
interesting facts about the various drugs. They wrote brief text pieces and, using commercially available soundboard software,
they created brief digital audio (WAV) files highlighting important aspects of drug abuse. Then, using the soundboard software
again, they cut and pasted pieces of the various songs and interwove their own readings of the facts into a 10-track, 40–45
minute digital audio (WAV) file that can be played on any computer or CD player. For their CD, each track of the CD was devoted
to music and facts relating to a particular drug or drug class.

In the second pilot project, we worked with a group of four high school students to determine whether high school students
would be interested and able to execute this project. The students, from different Detroit-area high schools, worked together
to create the CD (“Music Is Life...Drugs: Volume 2 - The Real Deal...On Drugs”). As a theme, these students elected to create
a student-level “intervention” CD. Each student role-played being addicted to two major drugs of abuse. For each track, a drug-
relevant song was played along with an intervention dialog. The addicted student selected the particular drug-relevant song;
the students wrote the scripts and presented the intervention dialog as a group.

These pilot studies have demonstrated that university undergraduate and high school students can and will work diligently and
enthusiastically to create a drug abuse prevention CD. In creating these CDs the students learned a great deal about the
hazards of specific drugs and drug abuse in general. They also learned a great deal about computer applications, language
arts and cooperation on group projects. It is anticipated that, with appropriate modifications, this “Music is Life...Drugs” CD
concept could be incorporated into many school curricula, with primary supervision provided by school personnel and trained
volunteers.

Finally, if it proves to be the case that drug-related popular music can indeed be used as the medium to encourage increased
knowledge about the medical hazards and consequences of drug use. The program could be expanded to include other topics
that children are inundated with through popular music. Projects focused on “Music is Life....Sex” and “Music is Life....Violence”
are certainly two possibilities.


Using Interactive Web and CD-ROMs in the First Year Medical School Curriculum
    Presenters: William Crossland, Anatomy & Cell Biology; Vishwanath Sardesai, Department of Surgery          Demonstration
We will present two ways in which e-technology is used in the school of medicine for first-year medical students in the basic
science portion of their curriculum. Examples used are from the Medical Histology/Embryology and Clinical Nutrition courses.


Creating and Deploying CourseBuilder Courses
    Presenters: Linda Ellington, Melissa L. Wencel, and Desiree Merriweather, BioMedical Communications        Workshop
Faculty members who teach in classrooms and/or at a distance will find that online courses may be very helpful to both learner
and teacher. How so? Within traditional classroom settings, content placed online may augment the in-class experience, while
allowing for easy access to important information between classes. In a distance education course, an online site may function
as a repository for course information traditionally disseminated wthin the classroom (e.g, syllabus, course packet, readings).

Increasingly, faculty are choosing to develop hybrid courses in which instructor(s) and learner(s) may meet and engage in
meaningful settings that occur both in the classroom and online. Course sites developed for hybrid courses typically become
the de facto nerve center of the course.

Macromedia’s Web authoring software, Dreamweaver is one of the leading Web authoring tools used in the development of
online courses (e-courses). Course designers may increase the functionality and relevance of Dreamweaver by incorporating
CourseBuilder, a free add-on tool that may be deployed through the Extension Manager. The workshop, “Creating and Deploying
CourseBuilder Courses,” will provide participants with a brief overview as to how they may use CourseBuilder for Dreamweaver
in order to build interactivity into their online courses.

The workshop will cover the following areas: introduction to CourseBuilder, Inserting CourseBuilder Interactions, Question Types,
and Special Features.The workshop leader will demonstrate and model the development of a mini-course that will include how
to create Flash buttons, text-entry questions, explore interactions, and multiple-choice questions.

                                                                                                                                     5
                                                              Abstracts
                                                – alphabetical by first presenter last name –

    The Health Sciences Information Tools 2000 Program: Academic Libraries at
    the Forefront of e-Training for Tomorrow’s Health Care Providers
        Presenter: LaVentra Ellis-Danquah, Shiffman Medical Library                                                   Paper
    Undoubtedly, technology has impacted many areas of our lives. Education is not exempt from the ever-evolving world of
    information technology. Universities are at the forefront of patron education and the dissemination of educational technologies.
    Wayne State University and the Library System are not unique in this endeavor. However, Wayne State University is unique in
    its commitment to developing educational programs for those who work and live in our surrounding communities.

    Over five years ago, Wayne State University Shiffman Medical Library, developed an interactive learning program for a neighboring
    high school. The Health Sciences Information Tools 2000 program was developed for the Crockett Technical and Career Center
    High School in Detroit. Crockett specializes in preparing students for medical and healthcare careers. The curriculum is designed
    for students to participate in practicum programs at local healthcare facilities including the Detroit Medical Center, and Wayne
    State University Shiffman Medical Library.

    Shiffman’s practicum program Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, is designed to introduce Crockett students to relative
    educational technologies that will enhance their academic and career success. To date, over two hundred students have
    participated in the Library’s program.


    Building an Online Nursing Course Using Critical Thinking Strategies for
    Beginning Nursing Students
        Presenter: Diane Featherston, College of Nursing                                                              Paper
    This presentation will describe strategies for building critical thinking for an online, introductory nursing course. The course,
    Nur 2000: Conceptual Basis of Professional Nursing is designed to assist the student in conceptualizing professional nursing
    practice. The methodology of nursing practice is introduced and the interaction among theory, research and practice as it relates
    to the discipline and practice of nursing is explored. It is crucial that beginning nursing students are able to start developing
    clinical judgment and critical thinking skills in order to effectively problem solve with patient care issues. Critical thinking is an
    essential component of quality nursing care. In the session, the paper will describe and illustrate varied teaching strategies
    for critical thinking that were developed for this online course: case studies, online asynchronous group activities, and a workshop.
    Case studies provide opportunities for students to develop clinical judgment and critical thinking skills. Online, asynchronous
    group activities using structured questions build collaborative thinking. One face-to-face meeting, midcourse, provides more
    dynamic human interaction. These strategies have applicability to teaching online courses in other fields. An explanation also
    will be provided of how adjunct faculty were incorporated into the course for questioning students online in a way that promotes
    critical thinking ability.


    Researching: Reaching a Variety of Subjects Online
        Presenter: Annette Feravich, Academic Success Center                                                          Demonstration
    Getting research subjects that represent a variety of populations is nearly impossible when conducting research locally. We
    are limited by our immediate population and often that means we are limited to undergraduate students here at WSU. Despite
    the cultural diversity at WSU, participants often do not reflect the population as a whole and research results are often skewed
    to reflect such sampling biases. When conducting research online, results are enhanced automatically and may be generalized
    to the greater population because data from subjects are more apt to represent a variety of ages, cultures and ideologies. Using
    the Remark Web Survey software, this presentation will demonstrate how to set up your Web site for online data collection that
    can reach potential subjects across the country. Participants will also be shown how to import survey results into most spread-
    sheets, databases and statistical software packages. Finally, subjects will participate in discussions that address maintaining
    the integrity of online surveys as well as resources for obtaining online subjects willing to participate in survey process. Whether
    you need data for a pilot study, for your long term research project or simply to get the opinion on how other universities run
    their engineering program, for example, this demonstration will offer you the vehicle by which you can accomplish your goal.


    Interface Design for e-Learning
        Presenter: Marija Franetovic, College of Nursing Dean's Office                                                Demonstration
    Every time you create a Web site or use Web-based materials for teaching you are, in fact, creating an interface. An interface
    is important because it is what students’ first see, and interact with, upon entering your Web course. Browsing, media, metaphors,
    information and usability are important for good interface design in e-learning. Web examples will be presented with reasons
    why they might be categorized into good interface design. A brief discussion will follow addressing questions such as: “Are
    we ready for highly interactive learning environments?” Participants are encouraged to share one Web site with the other
    participants that they think is both well designed and might in some way be beneficial to higher ed e-learning.




6
                                                          Abstracts
                                             – alphabetical by first presenter last name –

Using Computer Discussion Groups to Enhance the Large Lecture Setting
    Presenter: Janet Harden, College of Nursing                                                                     Paper
Research has shown that the exchange of ideas in a discussion format is a more effective way of influencing student thinking
than a traditional lecture format. Large classes can be impersonal and student anonymity easily maintained. In addition, while
research has shown that active learning is more effective for developing skills in application, analysis, and synthesis of content,
discussion is difficult to implement in a large lecture setting.

To facilitate active learning in a group of 117 senior nursing students, computer discussion groups were incorporated. Students
were assigned to a group by the instructor to diversify group membership based on background and life experiences. Case
studies were posted regularly. Each student was required to enter their own thoughts on the topic and later revisit the case
study, read the responses of their colleagues, and then give feedback to someone else within the group. In addition to applying
the content from class to the studies themselves, students were able to see how other students responded. Credit was given
for the assignment only if both responses were made and contained substantive thought. This was intended to encourage
interaction between students, facilitate a better understanding of content and provide feedback to the instructor on student
understanding.

A survey at the end of the course showed that 91% of the students had never previously participated in computer discussion
groups. Ninety-three percent found the use of discussion groups helped them better understand the information discussed in
the lecture. The depth and quality of individual discussion exceeded faculty expectation.


Supporting Online Course Development
    Presenter: Stuart Henry, CLL-ISP;
    Panel drawn from WSU online course development grant team and awardees.                                         Panel
On November 30, 2001, the Interdisciplinary Studies Program (ISP) announced a project that will release faculty to develop
online courses, with the first round of awards scheduled for the Winter, 2002 semester. The objectives of the program are: (1)
increase the number of fully online courses at the University, (2) support, through cross-listing, an online Bachelor’s Degree
available nationwide, and (3) seed online course development by faculty. Since the project is supported by the Omnibus fund,
costs for faculty release come 50% from the faculty home departments, and 50% from the project. Up to eight releases per
semester can be supported. Stuart Henry, ISP Director and the developer of the project, will lead a panel to describe the project
and present its progress and status.


Technology-Enhanced Medical Education
    Presenters: Matthew Jackson, Immunology & Microbiology; A.C. Ganger, CEO, GangerNet                             Demonstration
The Office for Educational Technology Support and Development has addressed the need for computer-based instruction at
the School of Medicine (SOM) by developing course content in digitized format. In addition, our Media Production Department
videotaped and digitized approximately 80 hours of Medical Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Disease lectures that
were distributed to students on CDs. The goal of these initiatives is to provide students with access to course content in accord-
ance with their learning preferences. Ultimately, we hope to transform the classroom environment from a passive to an interactive
learning experience.

To facilitate this transition to interactivity, our current initiative is to provide students with personal digital devices (PDDs) to be
used in the wireless environment of Scott Hall. Instructional equipment support from the Provost’s Office has been pivotal to
the PDD initiative. PDDs provided to medical students preloaded with course content and relevant medical software can be
used for interactive classroom sessions, small group problem-solving exercises, computer-based testing, and faculty evaluation.
A long-range goal of this initiative is to expand the collaborative learning community to include physicians in the Detroit Medical
Center and affiliated teaching hospitals.

This session will demonstrate the application of wireless devices to the interactive learning process. Participants will have an
opportunity to observe the computer-based course content provided to sophomore medical students at the Wayne State Medical
School. Wireless devices will be used to permit audience response to a series of multiple-choice questions. Application of wire-
less technology to interactive learning will become apparent, as the audience response will be used to generate additional
discussion and follow-up questions. This exercise will demonstrate how the use of wireless PDDs can enhance the educational
experience by providing a network interface to foster teacher and student interaction.


College of Engineering’s eLearning with GradepointLive
    Presenter: Robert Kakos, College of Engineering                                                                 Demonstration
Wayne State University College of Engineering is providing real-time, Instructor Led Training (ILT) via the Internet. WSU College
of Engineering will exhibit an eLearning technology platform, incorporating broadcast-trained instructors delivering courses
in real-time utilizing exciting multimedia teaching tools, interaction between students, teachersand content, and offer integrated
synchronous and asynchronous eLearning server features.The College of Engineering eLearning solution offers a powerful
technology platform for all campus instructors to deliver an organized lecture and/or class session. The technology includes
a seamless integration of asynchronous and synchronous tools along with a novel teaching method to offer courses online.


                                                                                                                                           7
                                         CONFERENCE
    REGISTRATION (Open All Day)
    8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.                                                                  Atrium

    CONCURRENT SESSIONS I
     9:00 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
    The Choral Trainer: Decision Making Trainer for Choral Music Demonstration             Room 2226
       Presenters: Abby Butler and Tammé McCowin
    Web Access to Archival Resources & the Detroit News Collection Demonstration           Room 2507
       Presenter: Fred Stielow
    Courseware, Electronic Reserves and Library Resources:
     A Complete Course-in-a-Box Demonstration                                              Room 2513
       Presenters: Bradd Burningham and Duryea Callaway
    Community Health Assessment Project Paper                                              Room 3210
       Presenters: Sharon Popp, Cathy Simpson and Lee Kallenbach
    Web.Edu: A Course on Taking Online Courses Paper                                       Room 3304
       Presenter: David Bowen
    Enhancing Learning and Career Planning with DISCOVER Demonstration                     Room 2100
       Presenter: Michelle Bruner

    9:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
    Creating and Deploying CourseBuilder Courses Workshop                                  Lab A
       Presenters: Linda Ellington, Melissa Wencel and Desiree Merriweather
    Easier Grading Through Your Own Online Assessment Workshop                             Lab C
       Presenter: Laura Woodward

    9:00 a.m. - 2:45 p.m.
    e-Lecture Demo [Library System] Demonstration (closed during Keynote Address)          Room 2305
       Presenter: Jeff Trzeciak

    CONCURRENT SESSIONS II
    10:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
    Rolling Out an Information Clearinghouse Web Site:
    Lessons from Year 1 of a FIPSE Project Demonstration                                   Room 2226
       Presenters: William Warters and Winfred Robinson
    The Health Sciences Information Tools 2000 Program: Academic Libraries at the
     Forefront of e-Training for Tomorrow’s Health Care Providers Paper                    Room 2507
       Presenter: LaVentra Ellis-Danquah
    Interface Design for e-Learning Demonstration                                          Room 2513
       Presenter: Marija Franetovic
    Music Is Life...Drugs: An Innovative Technology-Driven School-Based
     Drug Abuse Prevention Project Demonstration                                           Room 3210
       Presenters: Randall Commissaris, Lisa Berry-Bobovski and Bonita Leavell
    Researching: Reaching a Variety of Subjects Online Demonstration                       Room 3304
       Presenter: Annette Feravich
    Implementing Blackboard Successfully in an Introductory Course Demonstration           Room 2100
       Presenters: Nikka Kensel and Liza Lagman Sperl

    KEYNOTE ADDRESS
    11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.                                                                Bernath Aud.
       The Path to e-Wayne
         Keynote Speakers: Charles R. Bantz
                                  Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs
          Keynote Speakers: James W. Johnson
                                  Vice President, Computing and Information Technology

    EXHIBITS
    11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
    FACULTY EXHIBITS                                                                       Atrium
       Using ProQuest Research Library Poster
          Presenter: Veronica Bielat
    SCHOOL/COLLEGE and VENDOR EXHIBITS (see insert for details)                            Atrium

    BREAK (Lunch for preregistrants available in student lounge)
    12:00 noon - 1:00 p.m.




8
                                             SCHEDULE
CONCURRENT SESSIONS III
 1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Using Computer Discussion Groups to Enhance the Large Lecture Setting Paper                               Room 2507
   Presenter: Janet Harden
Using Teaching Technology to Reach an Aging Student Population Paper                                      Room 2513
   Presenter: Laura Woodward
Supporting Online Course Development Panel                                                                Room 3304
   Presenter: Stuart Henry
   [Panel drawn from WSU online course development grant team and awardees.]

1:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Technology-Enhanced Medical Education Demonstration                                                       Bernath Aud.
   Presenters: Matthew Jackson and A.C. Ganger
English Studies in the Computer Classroom Panel                                                           Room 3210
   Presenters: Susan Beckwith, Joy Allison Burnett, Heidi L. Eichbauer, Paul Gelinas and Justin Vidovic
How to Create Your Poster Session in PowerPoint Workshop                                                  Lab A
   Presenters: Mary Myrand and Tiffany Hood
Creating and Deploying PowerPoint Presentation Microsoft Media Services Tutorial                          Lab C
   Presenter: Thomas Moeller
Determining Learning Styles Using Online Inventories Workshop                                             Room 2100
   Presenters: Nikka Kensel and Annette Feravich

CONCURRENT SESSIONS IV
 2:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Metal Forming Online Instructional Resources Paper                                                        Room 2226
   Presenters: Diane Schuch Miller and Taylan Altan
Web-Based Learning Activities in Manufacturing Systems Paper                                              Room 2507
   Presenters: Muhammad Ahmed, Nancy L. Baskin, Gregory L. Tonkay,
   and Emory W. Zimmers, Jr.
An International Comparative Study of Library and Information Science
 Distance Learning in Africa and the United States Paper                                                  Room 2513
   Presenter: Vanessa Middleton
Using Interactive Web and CD-ROMs in the First
 Year Medical School Curriculum Demonstration                                                             Room 3304
   Presenters: William Crossland and Vishwanath Sardesai

BREAK (Refreshments available in student lounge)
 2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.             JOIN US FOR A RAFFLE AT 2:50 p.m. IN THE ATRIUM
                                    MUST BE PRESENT TO WIN

CONCURRENT SESSIONS V
 3:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
College of Engineering’s eLearning with GradepointLive Demonstration                                      Bernath Aud.
   Presenter: Robert Kakos
Technology Mediated Learning Experience for Part-Time MBA Students
  Participating in a Global Team Project Paper                                                            Room 2226
   Presenters: Willie McKether and Christine Miller (via audioconference from Munich, Germany)
Using Known Learning Factors to Develop Effective Teaching Methods Demonstration                          Room 2507
   Presenters: Margo Bowman and Rebecca Treiman
High Tech with Low Tech: Integrating Electronic Technology
  in a Large Lecture Class in Astronomy Paper                                                             Room 2513
   Presenter: Paul Karchin
Building an Online Nursing Course Using Critical Thinking Strategies for
 Beginning Nursing Students Paper                                                                         Room 3210
   Presenter: Diane Featherston
Relationship Building in the Online Classroom: Effective Strategies for Success Paper                     Room 3304
   Presenters: Peggy Reganis and Hollie Petit
Creating an Online Design Studio: A Web-Assisted Urban Design Workshop Paper                              Lab A
   Presenter: Kami Pothukuchi
Web-Based Teaching Tools for Computer-Assisted Neurosurgery for
 Residents and Fellows of Stereotactic and Radio Neurosurgery Demonstration                               Lab C
   Presenters: Lucia Zamorano, Laura Hernandez and Qinghang Li




                                                                                                                         9
                                                                       Abstracts
                                                       – alphabetical by first presenter last name –
     The eLearning technology is built completely in Java using Voice-Over-IP for live audio broadcast, a rich collection of modern
     computer technology for desktop sharing, interactive real-time white board, live chat, and two-way phone connectivity.
     Furthermore, the application records the entire teaching session digitally for retrieval at a later time and date.

     Research reveals that students achieve similarly high learning levels through ILT via the Internet with the proper combination
     of interaction and organization. College of Engineering will demonstrate this technology and its features in the modern day
     classroom. Our goal will be to showcase different applications of this technology for personal learning plans, lecture hall, class
     projects, material review, guest speaking engagements, online tutoring, teaching assistant support, workshops, research
     collaboration, supplemental instruction, and much, more...

     Specific features of the eLearning platform that will be demonstrated include:

     •   Contact references,     •   Synchronized Calendars     •   Central Built-in-eMail                  • Central Built-in-Threaded Discussions
     •   Central Built-in-Chat   •   Live Audio Broadcast       •   Web-Browser Synchronization             • Real-time Question Prompts
     •   Question Library        •   Document Sharing           •   Full-Duplex Voice-Over-IP Communication
     •   Virtual Classrooms      •   Interactive White Boards   •   Desk-top Sharing                        • And much more….

     Come join the College of Engineering as they demonstrate the new eLearning platform and how your school, college, and
     faculty will benefit by offering their expertise to the world.


     High Tech with Low Tech: Integrating Electronic Technology
     in a Large Lecture Class in Astronomy
          Presenter: Paul Karchin, Physics and Astronomy                                                          Paper
     Demonstration
     In preparing to teach a large (enrollment 170) introductory course in astronomy, I faced many decisions about the use of
     computer technology. Full scope Web services were available from Saunders, the publisher of the course text, from the Michigan
     State Lecture Online system leased to the WSU Physics Department and from the WSU supported Blackboard System. I com-
     pare the features of these systems and describe my basis for choosing Blackboard.

     Further decisions concerned which Web-based features to use. I considered announcements, content, assessment, discussion
     groups and administration. I will describe which features I chose and why.

     The extent of computer use in the presentation of lectures was a major consideration since all of the class hours (4 per week)
     are in a large lecture room. For reasons I’ll discuss, I did not use PowerPoint style presentations, but I did make use of a com-
     puter to display photographs and figures. I chose in favor of some decidedly low-tech elements. I delivered the lectures using
     an overhead projector, writing on the transparencies during the lecture. A major student activity during class was insitu discussion
     groups of two or three students. About ten minutes of group discussion and note taking were followed by a full class discussion.

     The responses of the students to the methods of the course will be described. Some conclusions will be drawn about what
     did, and did not, work well and changes I would make in the future.


     Implementing Blackboard Successfully in an Introductory Course
           Presenters: Nikka Kensel, Academic Success Center; Liza Lagman Sperl, Academic Advising                   Demonstration
           Demonstration
     Blackboard is an innovative online tool that is easy to learn and convenient for both the instructor and the student. Because
     it is a Web-based, Blackboard can be accessed from any computer platform at any time. Blackboard was helpful in creating
     a virtual community for our commuter students, many of whom can feel disconnected from their fellow students due to lack of
     communication. Two neophyte Blackboard users successfully implemented Blackboard into a mandatory seven-week freshman
     research seminar, UGE 1000. In this presentation we will discuss how we used the instructor features to our advantage and
     utilized the student features to enhance student learning, foster discussion, and encourage group interaction in preparation
     for a debate assignment. We will also discuss the students’ reaction to the addition of Blackboard to the course and our own
     evaluation and suggestions for future use.


     Determining Learning Styles Using Online Inventories
           Presenters: Nikka Kensel and Annette Feravich, Academic Success Center                                               Workshop
     Demonstration
     Students learn in many unique ways, utilizing different senses for in-taking information, and interacting in certain ways with their
     instructors’ teaching styles. Understanding the different types of learning styles can lead to richer lesson plans and better
     comprehension and retention of class material. Participants will take a free, Internet-based Learning Styles Test online which
     will identify their specific learning style. The presenters will provide explanations of the different learning styles that can aid in
     a better understanding of students’ diverse learning needs. In addition, the workshop will offer suggestions on how to enrich
     teaching and delivery methods so that students can learn the material in a variety of ways. Because many learning style
     assessments and inventories are free and online, students can take these on their own or as part of a course. With knowledge
     of their own style, students can be empowered to take a more active role in the course.



10
                                                           Abstracts
                                             – alphabetical by first presenter last name –

Technology Mediated Learning Experience for Part-Time MBA Students
Participating in a Global Team Project
    Presenters: Willie McKether, Department of Anthropology; Christine Miller, School of Business                   Paper
    (via audio conference from Munich, Germany)
Many universities face the challenge of providing opportunities for international experience to part-time and non-traditional
students. This proposal is for presentation describing one approach to meeting this challenge. The topic of this workshop is
the introduction of international experience to non-traditional students using two-way interactive television (ITV) and Web
conferencing programs. We will introduce the topic by presenting a new course developed from a successful pilot project
conducted at Wayne State University’s School of Business in the Winter 2000 semester. Initially offered as a directed study, the
project involved two teams of MBA students: six students from Wayne State University and six from the Technical University of
Munich (TUM). These students participated in a business simulation conducted through tele-video conferencing and Web-
based communication tools. The project has evolved into a course, Global Perspectives in Management, that is being offered
in Winter 2002.

Development of the business scenarios for the simulation exercise was a cooperative effort by faculty from the School of Business
at WSU and faculty from TUM. The scenarios focus on a variety of themes including strategic alliances, joint ventures, cross-
cultural negotiation, new business formation and transnational mergers. The objective of the exercise is to simulate a “real world”
situation in which students are required to perform assigned tasks and interact with their counter-parts from another country.
This approach, referred to as “experiential learning,” puts students into roles that they would be expected to assume in an
actual work environment.

Following the model of the pilot project, the course is designed to allow for a high level of student participation. For the simulation
exercise, students are given the scenario and task that they will address as a team. During this phase of the course, faculty
members are in the role of mentors who provide coaching and direction to the teams. A volunteer “industry consultant” is
available to the teams to provide feedback as the “negotiations” progressed.

At the completion of the exercise, the teams will reassemble to conduct an “after action review” of their experiences. Business
issues emphasized in the project—strategic alliance development, program management, team building, cross-cultural
communication, and negotiation—will be discussed and theory on these topics will be introduced. The use and evaluation of
different technologies will be a key component of the course. Finally, WSU School of Business faculty will lead the students on
a ten-day study tour to Germany over spring break, and the students will meet with their counterparts at TUM.

There were many valuable lessons learned from the project including the faculty role as “coach” of a student-directed project,
selection of literature, and incorporating mentors (“industry consultants”) from the business community. Faculty must also make
contacts within foreign universities, understand the formation and development of a “transnational virtual team,” and the
availability, compatibility and acceptance of various technologies as teaching and learning tools. We find that the instructors’
roles shift more toward that of designer, facilitator, technology coordinator, and coach. The presenters are currently formalizing
the curriculum for a course based on this pilot project, and welcome the opportunity for discussion. Sharing “lessons learned,”
successes and problems encountered will provide an opportunity for participants to contribute their thoughts and experiences.
A template for evaluating the participants’ institutions capabilities to engage in similar projects will be distributed to workshop
participants in order to allow them to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses for a similar experience as well as, to assess
their “readiness” and develop a checklist for launching such projects.

This presentation will demonstrate how technology can be used as a vehicle to bring students from different countries together
for specific projects and exercises. Although the project involved MBA students from Wayne State University School of Business
and students from the Technical University of Munich, the format could be modified to accommodate student teams from
anywhere in the world. Workshop participants will be able to understand how similar “international virtual teams” could be
developed and supported at their respective institutions.


An International Comparative Study of Library and Information Science
Distance Learning in Africa and the United States
      Presenter: Vanessa Middleton, University Libraries                                                          Paper
Demonstration
There are two essential areas that determine the success of distance education. First, providing optimal access to a wide variety
of library resources. Second, effectively integrating technology into distance learning. Distance education programs pose a
new opportunity for faculty, administrators, and librarians to develop partnerships and form networks.The future of distance
learning has many implications for libraries. Therefore, the libraries will be required to support and increasingly maintain a pro-
active role in the planning, implementing and developing of distance learning initiatives. Accreditation agencies are scrutinizing
library collections to ensure that distance learners have access to resources required for academic success. The library impacts
a variety of service components that impact the level of service of the distance learner. Therefore, the library must be an integral
part of the service model within the distance learning community.

Distance Learning has and continues to significantly impact delivery, access, and outcomes of education. Distance learners
and developers are empowered with flexibility, creativity and innovation. However, the challenges associated with achieving
the correct balance of innovation and maintaining the traditional educational experience still exists. In addition, achieving
equitable outcomes for on-campus learners and distance learners must be addressed. This study seeks to examine the role
of libraries in distance learning initiatives throughout various universities. A comparative analysis of the libraries’ role in distance
learning initiatives in Africa and The United States was conducted. How does the role of libraries differ in distance education

                                                                                                                                           11
                                                                   Abstracts
                                                     – alphabetical by first presenter last name –
     within Africa and The United States? A Web-based electronic questionnaire was developed and distributed to academic libraries
     with distance learning activities in Africa and The United States. The study yields data on the general comparative characteristics
     of technology and library support services utilized in distance learning. Other areas of focus include:

               •How are services delivered to students?
               •What role technology access and availability has upon the method in which distance education is delivered to students?
               •The role of libraries in providing support services to distance learners.

     The study reveals that libraries are involved in distance education in varying degrees both in Africa and The United States.
     Libraries are actively involved in providing support services and direct services to distance learning initiatives. Distance learning
     raises educational standards, and enhances the effectiveness of library service. In addition, distance learning allows academic
     institutions to determine an optimal and equitable means of effective education and delivery


     Creating and Deploying PowerPoint Presentation Microsoft Media Services
         Presenter: Thomas Moeller, Interdisciplinary Studies Program                                                           Tutorial
     Microsoft Media Services, a form of streaming media, offers instructors the ability to bring an added dimension to instruction
     on the World Wide Web. The technology allows for the delivery of both video and sound across the Internet to students using
     dial-up connections. Next, Microsoft Media Services allows instructors to leverage their current PowerPoint presentations, by
     adding voice-overs to their current presentation and deploying those presentations on the Web pages. Finally, it allows instructors
     to combine PowerPoint presentations with external links to other Web pages.

     The presentation introduces the different of types of content that can be streamed over the Internet, including the different types
     of files associated with Microsoft Media Services, and procedures for the creation and deployment of streaming media using
     Microsoft Media Services. First, the participant will learn the three types of data that can be streamed over the Internet using
     Microsoft Media Services, including streaming PowerPoint presentations, sound and video. Second, the participant will learn
     about the two types of Media Services files (.asf and .asx) and the benefits of using each. Third, the session will discuss the
     preparation of the materials for streaming with an emphasis on preparing PowerPoint presentations for distribution using Microsoft
     Media Services. Also, the participant will create a streaming PowerPoint presentation using a previously created PowerPoint
     presentation. Fourth, participants will how to embed links into streaming media, to supplement media. Fifthly, the session will
     demonstrate how to deploy the streaming media using Microsoft FrontPage for Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator.


     How to Create Your Poster Session in PowerPoint
         Presenters: Mary Myrand and Tiffany Hood, BioMedical Communications                                                    Workshop
     This workshop is a must-attend training session for those individuals who are creating Poster Sessions (i.e. faculty, researchers and students.)
     The goal here is to demonstrate to the participant how easy it is to use PowerPoint to create their abstract posters. Using
     PowerPoint makes it easy to digitally arrange all of their content and allow them the freedom of placing the whole poster together
     on one sheet. Using PowerPoint is a strong tool to use for this process. It has graphing and table capabilities built right into
     the software. In having this information all inclusive, it allows each person the feasibility to print a one-sheet poster that can
     be rolled and transported to any location. You will learn how to: change the page setup; apply a color scheme; insert text and/or
     import it from Word documents; change the color and size of text; create graphs and tables; insert pictures; add color bars
     and lines

     What draws people in to look at a poster? Yes, the content is important, but usually people are intrigued to approach posters
     that have stunning graphics and colors. Making the appeal of your poster stronger by adding aesthetic elements and emphasizing
     areas are a good start. This session will give the participant tips on what makes a poster attractive and approachable. What
     about choosing color schemes? Color schemes already tried and tested are part of the PowerPoint software. We can show
     you how to use them.

     The workshop will include handouts, which will walk the participant straight through the steps from page setup to inserting all
     elements needed. Once you master this process, you can take this to your classrooms and demonstrate to your students how
     easy it is to prepare their own abstracts.


     Community Health Assessment Project
         Presenters: Sharon Popp and Cathy Simpson, Family Medicine; Lee Kallenbach, Community Medicine                         Paper
     Presentation Abstract: The URL for a data based file consisting of demographic data arranged by zip code was provided to
     second year medical students in the Preventive Medicine and Public Health Course. Students access the URL and use the data
     to complete a community health assessment for the zip code of a physician’s office that they have visited for the Introduction
     to the Patient Course in Year 1. The demographic data are then used to identify variables that increase disease occurrence.
     Based on their analysis, students propose public health interventions. This is a low technology exercise that only requires
     computer access. By completing this exercise, students become familiar with Internet databases that may assist in their future
     practice of medicine.




12
                                                         Abstracts
                                           – alphabetical by first presenter last name –

Creating an Online Design Studio: A Web-Assisted Urban Design Workshop
    Presenter: Kami Pothukuchi, Geography & Urban Planning (CULMA)                                               Paper
This paper explores the benefits and limits of a Web-assisted course model to teach an urban design workshop in the graduate
degree program in urban planning. It discusses the use of the Web to extend the classroom beyond traditional boundaries,
communicate visual material between the instructor and the students and among students in a more accessible way, and allow
participants to share project materials with team-mates and the instructor. Despite some continuing limitations of a virtual studio,
students made significant use, especially of the visual materials, and external links


Relationship Building in the Online Classroom: Effective Strategies for Success
    Presenter: Peggy Reganis and Hollie Petit, Communication                                                     Paper
Relational developmental strategies are essential for students to realize their full potential. But within the online environment,
how does the instructor and student build relationships with and among those individuals they may never meet face-to-face?
We believe that encouraging disclosure of some personal information within the initial class session serves as an effective
foundation to begin interpersonal relationships within the group. Further, by encouraging some casual conversation throughout
the course of the semester, students will feel a greater sense of commitment to the course, as well as a higher degree of
fulfillment.


Metal Forming Online Instructional Resources
    Presenters: Diane Schuch Miller, Lead Instructional Designer Greenfield Coalition; Taylan Altan, Engineering Research
    Center for Net Shape Manufacturing, Ohio State University                                               Paper
As a result of global competition, the training of engineers who will plan and supervise the design and execution of metal forming
and manufacturing operations becomes increasingly important. In addition to conventional training techniques such as seminars,
conferences and classroom lectures, it is now possible to use CD or Internet-based interactive, multimedia technology for
distance learning. Process modeling, where a metal forming operation is simulated in the computer using mathematical methods,
offers unique opportunities for interactive distance learning for understanding the relationships between the process variables
in metal forming operations. This is best accomplished by investigating “what if” situations, where simulations offer a virtual
manufacturing environment that allows learners to examine how different parameters affect the forming process and the
manufactured product. Thus, process modeling and multimedia techniques together delivered via the WWW, offer a very powerful
method for distance learning and continuous education. This paper summarizes the courses on metal forming technology, jointly
under development by Greenfield Coalition and the ERC/NSM of the Ohio State University. These courses are intended for use
in the classroom and college environments, as well as for training of engineers in industrial companies.


Web Access to Archival Resources & the Detroit News Collection
    Presenter: Fred Stielow, Walter P. Reuther Library of Labor & Urban Affairs                                 Demonstration
With over 95,000,000 pages and 2,000,000 photographs, the Walter Reuther Library is a world-class research facility. The
Reuther is also engaged in a variety of efforts to extend its services through the World Wide Web. This PowerPoint demonstration
focuses on techniques invented at the Reuther to convert traditional print resources into hypertext documents—HTML—Encoded
Archival Finding Aids. The presentation will examine the implications of HEFAs for researchers and the emergence of the parallel
EAD (Encoded Archival Descriptor) standard under SGML. It will also demonstrate some of the 800,000 images from the Detroit
News Collection, which we are striving to put online.


Rolling Out an Information Clearinghouse Web Site:
Lessons from Year 1 of a FIPSE Project
    Presenter: William Warters, CULMA; Winfred Robinson, Campus Conflict Resolution Resources Project           Demonstration
This session will demonstrate the range of tools and information available on the new Campus Conflict Resolution Resources
Web site (www.campus-adr.org). The Wayne State based project is a FIPSE-funded clearinghouse designed to support
constructive conflict management on college and university campuses. The site is designed to resemble a college campus,
using familiar metaphors to deliver content to a broad and dispersed audience. We faced many unexpected challenges along
the way to launching the site, and would like to share and discuss some of these challenges.




                                                                                                                                       13
                                                             Abstracts
                                                – alphabetical by first presenter last name –

     Using Teaching Technology to Reach an Aging Student Population
         Presenter: Laura Woodward, Academic Success Center
         [Co-author: Jeannette Woodward, M.L.S. Director]                                                           Paper
     University classrooms have been designed for youthful students. However, with longer life spans, older students are becoming
     increasingly common on campus. Although universities have embraced the concept of lifelong learning, changes in the learning
     environment are necessary to assist older students to have truly successful experiences. Computer skills are essential to be
     a successful student in almost any discipline. Although frequently intimidated by technology, seniors are very interested in
     increasing their computer acumen. However, they need experiences designed to address the unique problems they experience.

     Seniors with disabling conditions will find that computers can meet their accessibility needs. For example, accessibility options
     can make a computer screen easier to read than traditional media, scanners and speech synthesizer programs assist seniors
     with vision impairments, and special adjustments can be made to keyboards to make them more comfortable for arthritic hands.

     However, learning basic computer skills can be a difficult and frustrating process because of physical limitations people face
     as they age. For example, bifocals may make it difficult to focus on both a computer screen and the board at the front, poor
     eye-hand coordination and arthritis may make it difficult to use a mouse, and computer motor noise may make it difficult for
     seniors to hear the instructor.

     Technology can interfere with successful learning experiences for older adults. However, this paper will discuss ways to overcome
     technological obstacles and propose techniques for using technology to support the learning experience for older adults.


     Easier Grading Through Your Own Online Assessment
         Presenter: Laura Woodward, Academic Success Center                                                         Workshop
     Online assessment is a cost-effective way to give students immediate and specific feedback regarding their understanding of
     course material. In grading-heavy classes, it can be a welcome relief to instructors who want to offer their students practice,
     but do not have the hours each week to devote to hand-scoring homework.

     Participants will gain experience in the logistics involved in creating an assessment by using Blackboard: a free, academic,
     online Web-hosting service. Participants will learn how to build up a database of questions, mark the correct answer, and
     provide the student with feedback to improve their understanding of the material. Participants will also learn how to adjust the
     site to automatically add grades to the online grade book.

     Although this assessment technique has numerous strengths, it can be time-consuming to initiate. After learning the basics of
     making their own assessments, participants will learn some of the best places to look for existing assessments in their own
     disciplines.

     Finally, a general discussion will follow, regarding some of the challenges of online assessment. Participants will be encouraged
     to share their experiences and suggestions for using this technique. For example, test security is an ongoing concern for online
     assessment administrators. Participants will be encouraged to discuss how they have dealt with this and other limitations in
     their own creative ways.



     Web-Based Teaching Tools for Computer-Assisted Neurosurgery for Residents
     and Fellows of Stereotactic and Radio Neurosurgery
         Presenters: Lucia Zamorano, Laura Hernandez, Abhilash Pandya and Qinghang Li, Department
         of Neurological Surgery                                                                                    Demonstration
     The Wayne State University Library System added the ProQuest Research Library online database to its collection of electronic
     resources in Fall of 2001. This database has a core list of approximately 770 publications, and over 2,000 publications spread
     among fifteen subject-specific modules in arts, business, children, education, general interest, health, humanities, international
     studies, law, military, multicultural studies, psychology, sciences, social sciences, women's interests. ProQuest Research Library
     allows users to search individual modules, searching across multiple modules or include the ABI/Inform database and the
     ProQuest Nursing Journals database in their search.

     This session will introduce new users to the ProQuest Research Library online database, its journal coverage, full-text options
     and effective searching strategies. The session will specifically address the special searching features in the ProQuest Research
     Library online database, such as image caption searching, and will review the different searching options available to users.




14
                                     Address Directory of Presenters
Muhammad S. Ahmed, Research Associate                             Heidi L. Eichbauer, Associate Professor
Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering                 English, College of Liberal Arts
4815 4th Street                                                   51 W. Warren
313-577-4396                                                      313-577-8164
sohail@mie.eng.wayne.edu                                          ac1218@wayne.edu
Taylan Altan, Professor                                           Linda Ellington, Instructional Technology Designer
Engineering Research Center for Net Shape Manufacturing           BioMedical Communications, School of Medicine
Ohio State University, 339 Baker Systems/                         540 W. Canfield, Room 1339
1971 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210-1271                         313-577-9831
614-292-5063                                                      lellingt@med.wayne.edu
altan.1@osu.edu                                                   LaVentra Ellis-Danquah, Librarian I
Nancy L. Baskin, Sr. System Integrator                            University Libraries
Greenfield Coalition/Focus: Hope                                  4325 Brush Street, Shiffman Medical Library
1400 Oakman Blvd., Detroit, MI 48238-2881                         313-577-9083
313-494-4468                                                      laventra@wayne.edu
baskinn@focushope.edu                                             Diane Featherston, Clinical Instructor
Susan Beckwith, Graduate Teaching Assistant                       Adult Health Administration, College of Nursing
English, College of Liberal Arts                                  5557 Cass Avenue, Cohn Bldg., Room 311
51 W. Warren                                                      313-577-6510
313-577-8164                                                      defeather@aol.com
ab5900@wayne.edu                                                  Annette Feravich, Graduate Student Assistant
Lisa Berry-Bobovski, M.S.                                         Academic Success Center
Karmanos Cancer Institute                                         2100 David Adamany Undergraduate Library
18831 W. 12 MI Rd., Lathrup Village, MI 48076-2558                313-577-9506
248-443-5800 ext. 4621                                            aferavich@wayne.edu
BerryL@karmanos.org                                               Marija Franetovic, Instructional Technology Designer
                                                                  Dean’s Office, College of Nursing
Veronica Bielat, Librarian I                                      201 Cohn Building
University Libraries                                              313-577-4779
115 Purdy/Kresge Library                                          ah2271@wayne.edu
313-577-4217
ag6887@wayne.edu                                                  A.C. Ganger, CEO
                                                                  GangerNet
David Bowen, Associate Professor                                  528 S. State St., Suite 531, Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Interdisciplinary Studies Program, College of Lifelong Learning   877-214-7072
2311 Academic/Administrative Bldg.                                info@ganger.net
313-577-1498
d.r.bowen@wayne.edu                                               Paul Gelinas, Graduate Teaching Assistant
                                                                  English, College of Liberal Arts
Margo Bowman, Graduate Teaching Assistant                         51 W. Warren
Department of Psychology, College of Science                      313-577-8164
71 W. Warren                                                      af0948@wayne.edu
313-577-3334
mbowman@sun.science.wayne.edu                                     Janet Harden, Director, Academic
                                                                  Dean’s Office, College of Nursing
Michelle Bruner, UNIV-CNSL II                                     10 Cohn Building
Academic Success Center                                           313-577-3341
2100 David Adamany Undergraduate Library                          jharden@wayne.edu
313-577-2356
mbruner@wayne.edu                                                 Stuart Henry, Associate Dean
                                                                  Interdisciplinary Studies Program, College of Lifelong Learning
Joy Allison Burnett, Graduate Teaching Assistant                  2406 Academic/Administrative Bldg.
English, College of Liberal Arts                                  313-577-6566
51 W. Warren                                                      ah2195@wayne.edu
313-577-8164
burnett@wayne.edu                                                 Laura Hernandez, M.D.
                                                                  Department of Neurological Surgery, School of Medicine
Bradd Burningham, Librarian II                                    4160 John R., Detroit, MI 48201
University Libraries                                              313-966-0392
134 Purdy/Kresge Library
313-577-0714                                                      Tiffany Hood, Graphic Designer
ae7965@wayne.edu                                                  BioMedical Commuications, School of Medicine
                                                                  1367 Scott Hall
Abby Butler, Assistant Professor                                  313-577-9829
Department of Music, College of Fine, Performing                  thood@med.wayne.edu
and Communication Arts
4841 Old Main                                                     Matthew Jackson, Associate Professor
313-577-2673                                                      Department of Immunology and Microbiology,
abgal@earthlink.net                                               School of Medicine
                                                                  7374 Scott Hall
Duryea Callaway, Librarian III                                    313-577-1299
University Libraries                                              mpjacks@med.wayne.edu
DALNET (Detroit Area Library Network)
3100 David Adamany Undergraduate Library                          Robert Kakos, Sr. Systems Administrator
313-577-9056                                                      Dean’s Office, College of Engineering
aa4353@wayne.edu                                                  1150 Engineering
                                                                  313-577-1812
Randall Commissaris, Associate Professor                          robert@eng.wayne.edu
Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy and
Allied Health Professions                                         Lee Kallenbach, Ph.D.
525 Shapero Hall                                                  Community Medicine, School of Medicine
313-577-0813                                                      9D UHC
rlc@wizard.pharm.wayne.edu                                        313-577-6679
                                                                  ae5198@wayne.edu
William Crossland, Associate Professor
Anatomy & Cell Biology, School of Medicine                        Paul Karchin, Professor
8326 Scott Hall                                                   Physics and Astronomy, College of Science
313-577-1059                                                      343 Physics Research Building
wcrossla@med.wayne.edu                                            313-577-5424
                                                                  karchin@physics.wayne.edu
                                                                                                                                    15
                                             Address Directory of Presenters
     Nikka Kensel, UNIV-CNSL II                                        Winfred Robinson, Research Assistant
     Academic Success Center                                           Campus Conflict Resolution Resources Project
     2100 David Adamany Undergraduate Library                          3146 Faculty/Administrative Bldg.
     313-577-9182                                                      313-577-4343
     nikka.hellman@.wayne.edu                                          aa5487@wayne.edu
     Bonita Leavell, M.S.                                              Vishwanath Sardesai, Associate Professor
     Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy and                  Surgery, School of Medicine
     Allied Health Professions                                         60 UHC
     714 Shapero Hall                                                  313-577-5316
     313-577-0817                                                      vsardesa@med.wayne.edu
     bonitaleavel@hotmail.com                                          Diane Schuch Miller, Lead Instructional Designer
     Li Qinghang, M.D., Ph.D., Resident Assistant                      Greenfield Coalition/Focus: Hope
     Department of Neurological Surgery, School of Medicine            1400 Oakman Blvd., Detroit, MI 48238-2881
     4160 John R, Suite 930                                            313-494-4597
     313-745-8393                                                      schmild@focushope.edu
     qinghang@neurosurgery.wayne.edu                                   Cathy Simpson, M.D.
     Tammé McCowin, Graduate Student                                   Family Medicine, School of Medicine
     Instructional Technology, College of Education                    101 E. Alexandrine
     313-577-8986                                                      313-577-5205
     ai0835@wayne.edu                                                  csimpson@med.wayne.edu
     Willie McKether, Asst Director, Douglas A. Fraser Center          Liza Lagman Sperl, Academic Advisor
     Department of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts               Academic Advising/WSU
     253 Walter Reuther Library                                        2 E. Helen Newberry Joy
     313-993-4320                                                      313-577-1066
     ac4025@wayne.edu                                                  liza.lagman@wayne.edu
     Desiree Merriweather Applications Specialist                      Fred Stielow, Academic Director
     BioMedical Communications, School of Medicine                     Walter P. Reuther Library of Labor & Urban Affairs
     540 W. Canfield, Room 1339                                        313-577-4024
     313-577-8927                                                      ai6050@wayne.edu
     dmerriwe@med.wayne.edu                                            Gregory L. Tonkay, Associate Professor
     Vanessa Middleton Librarian II                                     Lehigh University Partner w/Greenfield Coalition/Focus: Hope
     University Libraries                                              1400 Oakman Blvd., Detroit, MI 48238-2881
     153 Purdy/Kresge Library                                          610-758-4040
     313-577-5947                                                      glt0@lehigh.edu
     ah4674@wayne.edu                                                  Rebecca Treiman, Professor
     Christine Miller, Lecturer                                        Department of Psychology, College of Science
     Management, School of Business Administration                     262 Psychology
     103 Prentis Bldg.                                                 313-577-2852
     313-577-9211                                                      rtreiman@sun.science.wayne.edu
     ae0225@wayne.edu                                                  Justin Vidovic, Graduate Teaching Assistant
     Thomas Moeller, Lecturer                                          English, College of Liberal Arts
     Interdisciplinary Studies Program, College of Lifelong Learning   51 W. Warren
     2204 Academic/Administrative Building                             313-577-2544
     313-577-6589                                                      justvid@yahoo.com
     t.moeller@wayne.edu                                               William Warters, Research Associate
     Mary Myrand, Supervisor                                           Dean’s Office, College of Urban, Labor & Metropolitan Affairs
     BioMedical Commuications, School of Medicine                      3255 Faculty/Administration Bldg.
     1367 Scott Hall                                                   313-993-7482
      313-577-1484                                                     w.warters@wayne.edu
      mmyrand@med.wayne.edu                                            Melissa Lara Wencel, Multimedia Specialist
     Abhilash Pandya, M.S.                                             BioMedical Communications, School of Medicine
     Department of Neurological Surgery, School of Medicine            540 W. Canfield, Room 1339
     930 Professional Plaz                                             313-577-9755
     313-966-0342                                                      mlara@med.wayne.edu
     af8262@wayne.edu                                                   Laura Woodward, Graduate Student Assistant
     Hollie Petit, Graduate Teaching Assistant                         Academic Success Center
     Commuication, College of Fine, Performing                         2100 David Adamany Undergraduate Library
     and Commuication Arts                                             313-577-3165
     585 Manoogian                                                     woodwardlaura@hotmail.com
     313-577-2943                                                      Jeannette Woodward, M.L.S., Director
     holliedp@msn.com                                                  Vista Grande Public Library
     Sharon Popp, Assistant Professor-Clinical                         7 Avenida Vista Grande B7-#192. Sante Fe, NM 87508
     Family Medicine, School of Medicine                               505-466-7323
     101 E. Alexandrine                                                Jwoodward1@aol.com
     313-577-1425                                                      Lucia Zamorano, M.D.
     spopp@med.wayne.edu                                               Department of Neurological Surgery, School of Medicine
     Kami Pothukuchi, Assistant Professor                              4160 John R., Suite 930, Detroit, MI 48201
     Geography and Urban Planning,                                     313-966-0342
     College of Urban, Labor and Metropolitan Affairs                  lzamorano@aol.com
     225 State Hall                                                    Emory W. Zimmers, Jr., Professor
     313-577-4296                                                      Lehigh University Partner w/ Greenfield Coalition/Focus: Hope
     k.pothukuchi@wayne.edu                                            1400 Oakman Blvd., Detroit, MI 48238-2881
     Peggy Reganis, Graduate Teaching Assistant                        610-758-4034
     Communication, College of Fine, Performing                        ewz0@lehigh.edu
     and Communication Arts
     585 Manoogian
     313-577-2947
     af8151@wayne.edu



16
At Wayne State University Teaching, Learning, and Tech-
nology Roundtable’s (TLTR’s) third annual conference,
Teaching and Learning with e-Technology, more than
50 WSU faculty are presenting their accomplishments in
teaching with technology in over 30 concurrent sessions.
Colleges and schools are displaying overviews of their
instructional technology projects, and vendors are exhibit-
ing recent technologies.

All conference presentations are located in the David Adamany
Undergraduate Library. A map of the library is provided here,
indicating rooms of presentations. Refer to the Conference
Schedule (pp. 8–9) for a listing of presenters and locations.

                                                                                N




                                                   Acknowledgements
                               The following people have contributed generously of their time and energy to
                               help make the conference a success. Our apologies for any names we missed.

          Laura Barnard, Office for Teaching and Learning                    Latrisha Jackson, Office for Teaching and Learning
          Alan Bartlett, Media Services, University Libraries                Adriene Lim, University Libraries
          Rachelle Dorsey, Office for Teaching and Learning                  Phil Malczynski, WSU Student Center
          Bruce Drobot, Media Services, University Libraries                 Jason Maul, Media Services, University Libraries
          Matt Decker, Computer Support Team, University Libraries           Shawn McCann, Media Services, University Libraries
          Dick Dunbar, Media Services, University Libraries                  Matt Mustonen, Computer Support Team, University Libraries
          Rod Fiori, Computer Support Team, University Libraries             J.J. Ryan, Computer Support Team, University Libraries
          Daniel Gamlin, Media Services, UGL                                 Dan Tower, Media Services, University Libraries
          Ann Glaspie, Office for Teaching and Learning                      James Wurm, Computer Support Team, University Libraries
          Mary Beth Lock, Access Desk, UGL                                   Angela Zollicoffer, Office for Teaching and Learning
                                                                                                    Day-at-a-Glance
                                                                                                  3rd Annual TLTR Conference
                                                                                                  3rd Annual TLTR Conference
                                                                      Teaching & Learning
                                                                        with
                                                                             -Technology      e       March 7, 2002
                                                                                                  David Adamany Undergraduate Library
                                                                   Full conference details at http://www.tltr.wayne.edu/techconf2002/
                                      Bernath                OTL                                                           Community          Bernath Seminar             Lab A              Lab C                MLC                   ASC
LOCATIONS           Atrium           Auditorium           Room 2226             Room 2507             Room 2513            Room 3210            Room 3304               Room 1140          Room 3150           Room 2305             Room 2100
  8:00 - 9:00                                                                                                                                                                                                  e-Lecture Demo
                                                                                                                                                                                                               e-Lecture Demo
                REGISTRATION
 AM              (Open all day)                                               R E F R E S H M E N T S                                              (available in student lounge)                               [Library System]
                                                                                                                                                                                                               [Library System]
                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Trzeciak
  9:00 - 9:45                                          The Choral Trainer: Web Access to        Courseware,        Community Health Web.edu: A Course                                                                              Enhancing Learning
                                                       Decision Making... Archival Resource Electronic Reserves Assessment Project on Taking Online                                                                                and Career Planning
                                                             Butler            Stielow      & Library Resources...     Popp             Courses                          Creating and     Easier Grading
                                                                                                                                                                          Deploying        Through Your                              with DISCOVER
                                                                                                 Burningham                              Bowen                                                                                            Bruner
                                                                                                                                                                        CourseBuilder       Own Online
                                                         Rolling Out an       The Health Sciences                            Music is                                      Courses         Assessment
 10:00 -10:45                                                                                     Interface Design for                           Researching:                                Woodward                               Implementing
                                                          Information          Information Tools                           Life...Drugs:      Reaching a Variety           Ellington
                                                                                                       e-Learning                                                                                                                    Blackboard
                                                        Clearinghouse...        2000 Program...         Franetovic        An Innovative...    of Subjects Online                                                                   Successfully in...
                                                            Warters              Ellis-Danquah                             Commissaris             Feravich                                                                            Kensel
 11:00 -11:45   Faculty Poster     Keynote Speakers:                                                                                                                                                            e-Lecture Demo
                                      Charles Bantz,                                                                                                                                                                 closed
                  Sessions            WSU Provost                                                                                                                                                                (11:00 - 11:45)
                                     James Johnson,                                                                                                                                                                  during
                                       WSU C&IT                                                                                                                                                                 Keynote Address
                Vendor Exhibits
 12:00 - 1:00
 PM             School / College                                              B R E A K                     (lunch for preregistrants available in student lounge)
                   Exhibits
  1:00 - 1:45                                                                  Using Computer    Using Teaching                               Supporting Online
                                                                              Discussion Groups  Technology to                                    Course                                   Creating and
                                                                               to Enhance the.. Reach an Aging...                               Development                                 Deploying                                Determining
                                     Technology-                                                                         English Studies in        Henry                How to Create                                               Learning Styles
                                                                                    Harden         Woodward                the Computer                               Your Poster Session   PowerPoint
                                   Enhanced Medical                                                                                                                                        Presentation                              Using Online
                                      Education                                                                              Classroom                                   in PowerPoint                                                Inventories
  2:00 - 2:45                                            Metal Forming            Web-Based          An International         Beckwith         Using Interactive             Myrand       Microsoft Media
                                       Jackson         Online Instructional        Learning         Comparative Study                         Web and CD-ROMs                                Services                                   Kensel
                                                           Resources              Activities...      of Library and...                         in the First Year...                           Moeller
                                                          Schuch Miller             Ahmed                Middleton                                  Crossland
  2:45 - 3:15
                                                                              B R E A K                     (refreshments available in student lounge)
  3:15 - 4:00                         College of         Technology        Using Known        High Tech with Low Building an Online      Relational     Creating an Online                   Web-Based
                                     Engineering’s     Mediated Learning Learning Factors to Tech: Integrating    Nursing Course Development in the Design Studio: A                      Teaching Tools for
                                     eLearning ...       Experience...   Develop Effective...    Electronic...    Using Critical... Online Classroom... Web-Assisted...                      Computer...
                                        Kakos              McKether           Bowman                Karchin         Featherston           Reganis           Pothukuchi                        Zamorano
 Presentations listed with first presenter’s last name and partial title; for more information look up abstract by presenter’s last name.
                                       Exhibitors
                 Exhibition area will be open 11 a.m. - 1 p.m in the UGL Atrium
                        Some exhibitors may be available 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.




                           Faculty Exhibitors
                             Using ProQuest Research Library
                      Exhibit Contact: Veronica Bielat, Purdy/Kresge Library


                 School/College Exhibitors
                                     School of Business
                                  Exhibit Contact: Rose Estioco
                         Computing and Information Technology
                             Exhibit Contact: Mary Jean Fitzgibbons
                                    College of Education
                                  Exhibit Contact: Mary Waker
                                 College of Engineering (3)
                                Exhibit Contact: Robert Kakos
                              Exhibit Contact: Mohamad Hassoun
                                  Exhibit Contact: David Reic
                College of Fine, Performing, and Communication Arts
                               Exhibit Contact: Lezlie Hart Stivale
                                   College of Liberal Arts
                                  Exhibit Contact: Dallas Kenny

                                   School of Medicine (2)
                                  Exhibit Contact: Amie Dozier
                                  Exhibit Contact: Mary Myrand
                                College of Lifelong Learning
                                  Exhibit Contact: David Bowen
                 College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions
                                Exhibit Contact: Steven Siconolfi
                                      College of Science
                                   Exhibit Contact: David Njus
                                    School of Social Work
                                Exhibit Contact: Marilynn G. Knall
                                     University Libraries
                                 Exhibit Contact: Sharon Phillips
                   College of Urban, Labor and Metropolitan Affairs
                                 Exhibit Contact: William Warters

                                   Wayne State University
                                  Exhibit Contact: Doug Freed



                                       Vendors
Adobe Systems, Inc.                     Apple Computer                            New Horizons
                             Real-InTrivantis Software
           Exhibitors Floor Map
                               Bernath Auditorium




                          1
         Extended
                      2        8              12           17
   Study
                 3
                               9              13           18       “Windows
Center                                                                on the
                                                                       Arts”
             4                10              14           19        STAGE




                              11              15           20
                 5

                      6                       16           21


                          7
                              YOU ARE HERE

           LOCATION       DISPLAY/PRESENTER
                  1       Poster Session: Using ProQuest Research Library
                  2       Computing & Information Technology
                  3       College of Engineering
                  4       College of Engineering
                  5       College of Engineering
                  6       College of Urban, Labor and Metropolitan Affairs
                  7       Apple Computer
                  8       School of Business
                  9       College of Liberal Arts
                 10       School of Medicine
                 11       School of Medicine
                 12       College of Lifelong Learning
                 13       College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions
                 14       College of Science
                 15       School of Social Work
                 16       New Horizons
                 17       College of Education
                 18       College of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts
                 19       University Libraries
                 20       Trivantis Software
                 21       Nomad Technologies

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Teaching Technology document sample