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Contractor Emergency Response Guidelines

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Contractor Emergency Response Guidelines Powered By Docstoc
					Developing An Emergency
     Response Plan
   Alan Miller President of The
      National Safety Council

Recently said…

“Preparedness must become part of our culture
and part of every public gathering ,” he said. “For
example, every facility where the public gathers –
including public facilities, businesses and
entertainment venues – should have a plan in
place to properly direct its employees, visitors and
customers how to respond to an emergency and
evacuate the premises, if necessary.
 St. Louis Produce Market

“Preparing for a crisis is like buying
insurance. You hope you never need it, but
when and if you do, It could very well save
your hide.”
       After
Many Communities began to…
    Reassess their level of
  preparedness
       As market operators we
      need to make sure we can
      respond to emergency
      situations at our sites.
  MARKETS…
…are places where
 100’s and 1000’s of
 people congregate
MARKETS…

   … are also
   often places
   crowded with
   vehicles of
   many
   different
   kinds and
   states of
   repair
      ALL RUSHING TO GET
           NOWHERE




WITHOUT A PLAN A SIMPLE SITUATION
       CAN TURN INTO CHAOS !
Even Parking Lot Markets
  Need To Have A Plan
      Let’s Get Started

Start by thinking about your
 site and it’s     unique
 challenges
     Involve Professionals
 POLICE
 FIREFIGHTERS
 AMBULANCE
 AS WELL AS STAFF, VENDORS, ON SITE
 SECURITY, TENANTS, BOARD, DEC ETC.
…based on the available resources and the
 peculiarities of the site:
        BRAINSTORM
What Kinds of Emergencies Are Most Likely?
At many markets …
 Truck chemical orahazardousterrorism
         fires from leaking waste
 Unfortunately violence or gas tank
Spill of
 is something we have to consider
 maybe the greatest threat
  Other situations include:
Fire
Sustained power loss
Severe weather (tornadoes, high winds, snow, ice,
frozen or broken pipes)
Civil disturbance
Chemical spills
Train derailment
Bomb threats
Fatal or serious accidents
Workplace suicide
 Criminal acts such as robberies, assaults, hostage
situations etc.
             Response
How you plan to respond to situations can be
 the difference between life and death.
      An effective response plan should
      outline the basic preparedness steps
      needed to handle emergencies at your
      site. Although emergency response
      plans cannot be all-inclusive they
      should provide appropriate guidance
      on what to do in an emergency.
EVERY PLAN IS DIFFERENT…
       - layout
       - security on site?
       - emergency response
             interval
       - accessibility of site
              St. Louis Produce
                   market…
    …Developed a checklist for key personnel.
Responsibilities of Supervisor-in-Charge
During and after a crisis, the Supervisor in Charge ensures that the following
steps are taken:
Contact Market Manager.
Clarence Hughes: Cell: 960-9455 Home: 636-940-1444
Provide accurate information concerning incident.
Consult with Maintenance and /or Security officer as appropriate
Close section of Market where incident occurred if appropriate.
Provide appropriate intervention for traumatized/injured employees,
Assist in normal return to operations
             St. Louis Produce
                  market…
    …Developed a checklist for key personnel.
Responsibilities of Market Manager
Coordinates all crisis response activities.
Contacts Officers, Board of Directors and initiates notification of
shareholders, employees, and tenants. Phone lists are on pages 8 & 9.)
Works directly with police, fire department and/or other federal, state,
and local authorities. (Emergency numbers are on page 7.)
Assesses and identifies facility and environmental needs.
Determines resources needed to handle the crisis and obtains support.
Coordinate repairs and clean up with appropriate staff,
Establishes who and what will be done
Manages the information flow to employees, board of directors
shareholders, and tenants.
             It’s Critical…
…to outline roles and make sure everyone
 knows what specific actions to take. As well
 as a list of what needs to be done
 immediately!
  Key Contact Numbers
Having them readily available is vital!

      Include:
               -Emergency services including
               utilities
               -contractors
               -staff and tenants
               -vendors
      EMERGENCY SERVICES
EMERGENCY                             911
MARKET MANAGER               cell     960-9455
                             office   621-4383
MARKET SECURITY                       621-9255
POLICE DEPARTMENT    - 5TH DISTRICT 444-2500
POLICE DEPARTMENT – 4TH DISTRICT      444-5441
FIRE DEPARTMENT                       533-3406
CARDINAL GLENNON POISON               1-800-366-8888
TOXIC CHEMICALS OR OIL SPILLS         1-800-424-8802
SNOW REMOVAL –BILL-KO, INC            965-0515
SEWER –MSD                            768-6260
WATER -CITY OF ST. LOUIS              771-2255//4880
GAS—LACLEDE GAS CO                    621—6960
      EMERGENCY SERVICES
UNION ELECTRIC                    342-1000
TELEPHONE-SW BELL                 1-571-1400
HOSPITALS
      BARNES JEWISH HOSPITAL      747-3000
      CHRISTIAN HOSPITAL NE       653-5000
      ST. MARY’S HEALTH CTR       768-8360
BOILER SYSTEM-SCHNEIDER SERVICE 994-7875
HEATING & COOLING- SCHNEIDER SER 994-7875
PLUMBING/WATER-JR PLUMBING        849-1009
STORM SEWER-ABLE INDUSTRIES       863-8755
ROOFER-BILL SPECK                 846-6527
      EMERGENCY SERVICES
PEST CONTROL-ORKIN                  343-7113
DOOR CURTAINS-MASSEY EQUIPMENT 621-0972
WELDING-MKT REPAIR                  220-5040
FENCE/GATES-KENNEDY FENCE521-0936
GENERAL CONTRACTOR-PAT KELLEY       280-1854
                  Plans
Include a plan to evacuate patrons and staff.
     Our plan is aimed at safely clearing
     a 9 acre site which on a Saturday
     may contain 1,000 cars and trucks
     as well as 8,000 shoppers and 500
     employees at any one time.
          CITY OF ROCHESTER
           PUBLIC MARKET
HISTORY
The September 11th disaster heightened sensitivity to security at municipal
   facilities. The Rochester Public Market has unique security challenges due
   to the nature of its function, design, history, and large attendance.

Key characteristics include:
    C Three major gateways with continuous flow of all types of vehicles
    C Hundreds of vehicles, of all types, parked throughout the site
    C A continuous flow of pedestrians entering the site via four pedestrian
       entrances
    C Thousands of shoppers carrying a variety of packages
    C Thousands of containers (boxes, crates, barrels, and bags) throughout
       the site
Those characteristics do not allow for effective prevention measures for
   terrorist actions; therefore, this plan focuses on effective ways to respond
   to any large scale emergencies at the site.
             CITY OF ROCHESTER
               PUBLIC MARKET
PARTNERS

The following offices have participated in the
development of this plan, and will be responsible
for its continuous improvement and
implementation:
   C       Department of Parks, Recreation, and
    Human
     Services
   C       Fire Department
   C       Police Department
EMERGENCY EVACUATION PROCEDURE
Lead market staff person(s), or back-up, will use the following
   procedure when an large scale emergency is identified at the
   Market.

1) ASSESS the nature and scope of emergency. It is a large-scale
   emergency if any of the following situations have been identified.
   In all cases use judgment.
          <                There is a large explosion
          <       A serious accident has occurred with multiple
                  victims and there is potential danger to the public
          <       Firearm(s) being discharged
          <       A package/container is suspected to contain a bomb
          <       There is a fire that is not under control
          <       There is a chemical spill with fire or fumes
          <       A market structure has collapsed or is about to
                  collapse
          <       Any Incident has occurred, or is about to occur, that
                  places lives, property, or the environment at risk
2) CALL 911 to request assistance with the emergency.
EMERGENCY EVACUATION PROCEDURE
3) BROADCAST the attached evacuation script over the market public
   address system. This should be done simultaneously with the call
   to 911 to expedite evacuation of the market.

4) DIRECT public to exits. Distribute bullhorns to market staff to
   facilitate communications with the public. Assign staff to the
   following key areas of the market indicated on the attached map to
   ensure effective guidance for the public: A Shed, C Shed, Winter
   Shed, Pennsylvania Ave. Gate, Union St. Gate, Railroad St. Gate.

5) TRANSFER management of evacuation to RPD officials upon their
    arrival at the market. The City’s Incident Command System (ICS)
    will be implemented. The goal of the ICS is the protection of life,
    property, and the environment.

6) SUPPORT the City’s ICS. Provide information about the incident,
    market facilities, and materials at the market. Provide full access
    to market facilities.
   PUBLIC MARKET
 EVACUATION SCRIPT
ATTENTION! THIS IS AN EMERGENCY

ALL SHOPPERS MUST IMMEDIATELY LEAVE THE PUBLIC
  MARKET THROUGH THE NEAREST EXIT GATEWAY.

PLEASE REMAIN CALM.

YOU SHOULD NOT TRY TO RETURN TO YOUR VEHICLE UNTIL
  DIRECTED BY OFFICIALS ON SITE.

VENDORS AND PUBLIC MARKET PERSONNEL WILL HELP TO
  DIRECT YOU TO THE NEAREST EXIT GATEWAY.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION.
                <<<<<REPEAT>>>>>>
        Keep On Rolling…
Your role is not over when the
 emergency personnel arrive:

       -Documentation of an
       incident may save your
       organization
       thousands of dollars
       LATER!
Final thoughts

1. Training, training,
training



2.Review plan at least
annually with staff and
emergency personnel.
   Final thoughts

3. Keep the plan simple
        Final Thoughts


4. Have multiple copies of the
  plan readily available
Also think about how you will handle
 media contacts. The St. Louis plan has
 specific guidelines:
MEDIA RESPONSE WHEN CRISIS OCCURS
When a crisis occurs, it is important that an accurate and consistent message is
conveyed. Inconsistent messaging may result in rumors, inaccurate
information, and speculation that may cause unnecessary worry for employees,
their families, and the general public.
Reporters will and do call anyone they can get information from. They could
contact you directly. If media should contact you, it is important that you
follow these guidelines:
Do not make a statement or provide any information to the media. All
Information should be channeled through the Market Manager at 960-9455 or
621-4383.
Ask what information is being requested. Get specifics.
Take notes if possible of your conversation
Advise the reporter that the Market Manager will return the telephone call as
Quickly as possible.
Contact the Market Manager at 960-9455 or 621-4383 immediately.
                Remember
The initial response to a crisis is critical. What
  occurs during the first hour or two provides the
  best opportunity for control of the situation and
  the internal and external precipitations of the
  market. The success of handling an incident is
  dependent on the actions taken immediately after
  the incident occurs. Over reaction should be
  favored as the initial response. Implementing
  plans before the severity of the incident is
  confirmed of the incident is confirmed may
  prevent the situation from spiraling out of control.
             Other Resources:
-National Safety Council
-FEMA
-OHSA
-Dept. of Homeland Security
-Local Office of Emergency Response
Designed By:

    Cassie Price
    productions
    (585)436-0959

				
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