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2009-2010 COLLEGE CATALOG The Art Institute of Ohio – Cincinnati A

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2009-2010 COLLEGE CATALOG The Art Institute of Ohio – Cincinnati A Powered By Docstoc
					 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         
                             Introduction     1 
                      Academic Programs       6 
                              Admissions      99 
                        Financial Services    104 
                       Academic Policies      114 
                        Student Conduct       131 
              Faculty & Administration        142 
                                 Calendar     156 
                                    Maps      157 
                                    Index     158 
The Illinois Ins tute of Art

  Mission
  The Illinois Ins tute of Art is an ins tu on of higher educa on offering degree and
  other academic programs in the crea ve and applied arts to a diverse student body.
  The college promotes student learning in a s mula ng environment where students
  can develop their crea vity and acquire the skills and knowledge to pursue their
  chosen careers.



Values
We believe in the posi ve impact of art and design on individuals, industry, and society. Specifically,
  We believe in encouraging crea vity, cri cal thinking, and independent, life-long learning.
  We believe in suppor ng each student, faculty member, and staff member as an ac ve, collabora ve par cipant in the
  educa onal process, respec ng diversity, diverse abili es, backgrounds, interests, and points of view.
  We believe in promo ng an environment that encourages community and professional service.
  We are commi ed to opera ng with integrity and developing personal values, ethical prac ces and social awareness
  within our students.
  We believe that faculty and staff development, sa sfac on, engagement, and responsibility are essen al to produc vity,
  growth, and excellence.
  We believe in a commitment to student success and con nual ins tu onal improvement as well as effec ve manage-
  ment of change.
  We believe that competency based outcomes and assessment of student learning lead to excellence in educa on.
  We believe an atmosphere of excellence prepares graduates for careers, reflects the needs of the business community,
  and fosters personal growth and professional success.
  We are commi ed to environmental sustainability and its applica on in our opera ons, educa on, and our outreach.

Purpose
The purpose of The Illinois Ins tute of Art is to offer programs of instruc on that enable students to develop:
  Knowledge and skills necessary for entry-level employment and career growth;
  Intellectual ability, social awareness and leadership skills that will enhance their poten al for personal and professional
  success; and
  Broader understanding of ethics, culture, history, science, and the arts.




                                                        1 Introduc on
The Illinois Ins tute of Art
Le er from the College President
On behalf of the faculty and staff at The Illinois Ins tute of Art, I am so pleased that you are considering furthering your
educa on at our school. Our students are driven by a passion for their chosen fields and we are proud to provide a career-
focused educa on that can channel those passions into your life’s work.

Whether you yearn to create signature dishes, innova ve designs, fashion-forward trends, cu ng-edge films, anima ons
and games or the next adver sing campaign that gets everyone talking, our talented faculty is ready to nurture your devel-
opment and guide you to your goals.

At The Illinois Ins tute of Art our classes are taught by faculty who are both professionals in their fields and experienced,
enthusias c educators. They apply their real-world experience in the classroom so students have the opportunity to receive
the best possible hands-on educa on they can employ in the workforce.

We cul vate our students’ crea vity from the day you walk into your first class un l the day you walk across the stage in
your cap and gown. Our objec ve is to give you the tools you need to achieve your goals.

We look forward to welcoming you into our school and wish you success in all your endeavors.

Sincerely,

John Balester Jenkins
President
The Illinois Ins tute of Art




The Illinois Ins tute of Art has five loca ons: The main campus Chicago, Illinois; and four branch loca ons in Schaumburg, Il-
linois; Tinley Park, Illinois; Cincinna , Ohio; and Novi, Michigan. Within this catalog, each loca on has a specific designa on:
The Illinois Ins tute of Art–Chicago (ILIC); The Illinois Ins tute of Art–Tinley Park (ILITP); The Illinois Ins tute of Art–Schaum-
burg (ILIS); The Art Ins tute of Michigan (AIMD); and The Art Ins tute of Ohio–Cincinna (AIOHC).




                                                          2 Introduc on
The Illinois Ins tute of Art
Accredita on
 The Illinois Ins tute of Art is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) and a member of the North Central As-
socia on (NCA), 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, Illinois 60604-1413, 1.800.621.7440, www.ncahlc.org.




At the Chicago and Schaumburg campuses, the Interior Design programs leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree are
accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accredita on, www.acredit-id.org, 206 Grandville Avenue, Suite 350, Grand
Rapids, MI, 49503. The Cincinna , Detroit, and Tinley Park programs have not sought this accredita on.

The Culinary Arts Associate of Applied Science programs at Chicago and Cincinna are accredited by The Accredi ng Com-
mission of the American Culinary Federa on Educa on Founda on.

State Licensing

The three Illinois loca ons of The Illinois Ins tute of Art are authorized by the Illinois Board of Higher Educa on, 431 East
Adams, Second Floor, Springfield, IL 62701, 217-782-2551, www.ibhe.state.il.us/default.htm.

The Art Ins tute of Ohio–Cincinna holds a provisional Cer ficate of Authoriza on for its academic degree programs by The
Ohio Board of Regents, 30 East Broad Street, Columbus, OH 43215, 614-466-6000. The provisional accredita on expires on
December 31, 2012.

The Art Ins tute of Ohio–Cincinna is licensed by the Ohio State Board of Career Colleges and Schools, 35 E. Gay Street,
Columbus, OH 43266-0591, 614-466- 2752.

The Art Ins tute of Ohio–Cincinna is regulated by Indiana Commission on Proprietary Educa on (302 W. Washington
Street, Room E201, Indianapolis, IN 46204-27671), telephone 317-232-1320 in state, TOLL FREE 800-227-5695

The Art Ins tute of Michigan is licensed under the laws of the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth.

Consumer Informa on
You can find important consumer informa on at www.ar ns tutes.edu/chicago, www.ar ns tutes.edu/cincinna , www.
ar ns tutes.edu/detroit, www.ar ns tutes.edu/schaumburg, and www.ar ns tutes.edu/ nley-park. For each campus, in-
forma on about school security policies, crime sta s cs, crime logs, fire safety policies, fire sta s cs, and fire log is found by
clicking on the Student Consumer Informa on link, then the Student Services Revealed link, and then the crime report link.

See aiprograms.info for program dura on, tui on, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success,
and other important info.

For informa on about online offerings through The Art Ins tute of Pi sburgh - Online Division, see www.aionline.com.



                                                         3 Introduc on
The Illinois Ins tute of Art
The Illinois Ins tute of Art
The Illinois Ins tute of Art is part of the exci ng history of Chicago. Founded in 1916 as The Commercial Arts School, The
Illinois Ins tute of Art was one of the first applied art and design colleges in the United States. The college school was widely
known in the 1930s as Ray-Vogue School, with professional programs in art, design and fashion. The school was renamed
Ray College of Design in 1981, and joined The Art Ins tutes system of schools in 1995. The Illinois Ins tute of Art offers
Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Applied Science, and Associate of Applied Science
degrees, as well as diploma programs.

Faculty and staff of The Illinois Ins tute of Art are dedicated to providing students the tools and knowledge they need to
pursue their goals. When students arrive at The Illinois Ins tute of Art, they bring their crea ve drive; their “mind to imag-
ine.” Dedicated faculty with industry experience offer students “the skills to create.” Whichever crea ve program students
choose, The Illinois Ins tute of Art strives to provide the knowledge necessary to enter that field. Upon gradua on, our
dedicated Career Services staff work with each eligible student to assist in the employment search. Students’ personal drive
and ambi on complete the mix for academic and professional growth.

Loca ons and Facili es
Chicago Campus
Located in the heart of downtown Chicago, the Chicago campus of The Illinois Ins tute of Art has two facili es located in
central areas just eight blocks apart. One facility is at the Mart Center, connected by skywalk to the world-famous Merchan-
dise Mart. Students a end classes in the heart of Chicago’s design industry center. The Merchandise Mart is the world’s
largest commercial building and wholesale design center, which houses hundreds of elite design showrooms. The campus
loca on provides students with many opportuni es in the design industry through its proximity to design businesses at the
Mart Center and the na onal trade shows and regional markets held throughout the year.
The second facility is the Loop campus loca on at 180 North Wabash, located in the heart of Chicago’s Loop. The loca on
provides easy access to the theater district, “State Street, that great street:” shopping on the Magnificent Mile of Michigan
Avenue, and Millennium Park. The BackStage Bistro, housed within the Loop loca on, is the Chicago campus’s student-
operated restaurant. The restaurant features glass walls through which patrons can see into the kitchens where culinary arts
students prepare and serve food in the restaurant.

Schaumburg Campus
The Schaumburg campus is located in the Village of Schaumburg, 30 miles northwest of Chicago. Whether it’s for a quick
half-day jaunt to the lakefront or for a weekend away, Schaumburg residents have easy access to all of the a rac ons of
downtown Chicago. Schaumburg has grown from a sleepy farm community to become one of the foremost Edge Ci es in
the United States. It boasts a thriving professional community and there are more businesses in the Schaumburg area than
in downtown Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., Dallas or Portland. These businesses combine to contribute more than 190,000
jobs to the Schaumburg region.

Cincinna Campus
The Cincinna Campus, The Art Ins tute of Ohio–Cincinna , was founded in 2004 and is located in the thriving northeast
Cincinna suburbs, just 20 minutes from downtown Cincinna . Known as the Queen City, Cincinna features great natu-
ral beauty with steep hills, wooded suburbs, a picturesque downtown riverfront, and four definite seasons. Awarded by
Fortune magazine as one of the top ten places to live and work, the greater Cincinna area is a three-state, 15-county region
that offers world-class assets in arts and culture, amusements, hospitality, sports and recrea on. Cincinna features all the
ameni es of a large, bustling metropolis while maintaining a friendly, small town atmosphere - a unique balancing act of



                                                         4 Introduc on
The Illinois Ins tute of Art
extraordinary contrasts - but one that makes the region a remarkably flexible loca on filled with a wealth of opportuni es
and op ons.

Michigan campus
The Michigan campus, in the city of Novi, Michigan, was founded in 2007 and is located twenty five minutes NW of down-
town Detroit at the convergence of three major highways: I-696, I-275, and I-96. It is nestled among trees and ponds in a
picturesque suburban se ng with easy access to the greater metropolitan Detroit area. Metro Detroit has blue collar roots
in manufacturing with a paralleling cosmopolitan rebirth occurring. Students can easily explore local history and experience
a vast array of cultures and crea vity in the galleries, theaters and music venues of Downtown Detroit.
The school’s outdoor sculpture garden is unique to Ai Michigan and is designed to promote an apprecia on of form and de-
sign across broad range of media for our students. A view of the many local ar st sculptures can be seen from the campus’s
student run restaurant called The Great Lakes Bistro. Similar to fashion, graphic and interior design projects hanging in the
campus galleries, The Great Lakes Bistro is the place to see aspiring chefs prepare meals and to sample a taste our culinary
students hard work in our instruc onal kitchens.
The faculty, staff and student body at Michigan is as diverse as the local popula on. The campus is proud of the local cul-
tural diversity boas ng that more than 35 businesses based in Japan and at least 14 businesses based in Germany call Novi
“home” in the United States. Mul cultural access, a crea ve community, and a commitment to diversity are all characteris-
 cs of our growing crea ve campus.
The Art Ins tute of Michigan is a des na on school for those seeking an applied educa onal approach to an educa on in
Fashion, Design, Media or the Culinary Arts in SE Michigan.

Tinley Park Campus
The Tinley Park campus is located in the Village of Tinley Park, just a short drive or train ride south from Chicago, which is
one of the most rapidly growing communi es in this Midwest metropolitan area. A walk along Oak Park Avenue, the village’s
main thoroughfare, takes residents by restaurants, shops, and businesses that make up the renovated historic district. One
of the village’s most popular events is the Benches on the Avenue public art project in which handcra ed wooden sea ng
created by local ar sts is placed along Oak Park Avenue for the summer. Students can hop on the train to get to downtown
Chicago or access interstate highways as well as three interna onal airports – Midway, O’Hare, and Gary/Chicago. Recog-
nized by BusinessWeek magazine in 2009 as the best place to raise a family in America, Tinley Park is a mix of the tradi onal
and contemporary for students seeking an educa on in the crea ve and applied arts.




                                                        5 Introduc on
Academic Affairs
Academic Affairs Mission
The mission of the Academic Affairs Department is to prepare undergraduate students for entry-level careers in applied arts
and to provide a learning environment in which they acquire the founda onal skills and broad contextual understanding
that will help them have meaningful, rewarding careers.
Graduates of The Illinois Ins tute of Art should:
    Have wri en and oral skills that enable them to communicate effec vely with prospec ve employers, colleagues,
      clients, and the general public. They will be able to formulate a message in more than one medium.
    Possess crea ve design and problem-solving skills that result in imagina ve, innova ve, professional-level solu ons
      within parameters such as deadlines, audience or customer expecta on and budget.
    Have a thorough understanding of the field they plan to enter, including founda onal elements and principles, techni-
      cal skills, and terminology.
    Have an understanding of connec ons between their lives and the broader world in which they will perform their
      profession, applying observa on, research, reasoning, crea vity, and analysis to global issues through the lens of the
      humani es, arts, natural sciences and social sciences.
    Have developed themselves professionally, a aining a professional demeanor that matches industry standards, an
      understanding of business prac ces, and an understanding of con nuous career development.

General Educa on
Mission and Philosophy
The General Educa on department, in accord with the overall mission of The Illinois Ins tute of Art, is commi ed to provid-
ing students the skills, knowledge and cri cal thinking ability needed for personal and professional development within a
learner-centered, competency-based curriculum that fosters academic and intellectual excellence. The General Educa on
requirements are designed to develop and increase students’ ability to understand people, cultures, and scien fic, philo-
sophical and ar s c discoveries with the goal of developing graduates ready for personal and career challenges.

General Educa on is designed to foster the ability to think independently, use reasoned analysis, understand the methods of
scien fic inquiry, communicate effec vely, explore human behavior and culture, develop an ethical value structure, respect
diversity within a global society and to appreciate and inspire crea ve endeavors. All areas of specializa on require these
general abili es. The breadth and rigor of the general educa on curriculum complements the academic programs and is de-
signed to foster the integra on of knowledge across disciplines. The academic categories comprising the general educa on
curriculum are communica ons, math and computer science, physical and life sciences, humani es and fine arts, and social
and behavioral sciences.

Desired Student Outcomes:
General Educa on is an integral component of every academic program at The Illinois Ins tute of Art. It offers students a
broad knowledge base, competencies, and perspec ves necessary for a produc ve personal and professional life by advanc-
ing the following outcomes:
   Reasoning: to understand forms of logic or ways of thinking.
   Problem Solving: to use reason in a specific context in order to answer a specific ques on. Problem solving may involve
   one or more of the following: defining terms and tasks, organizing and verifying solu ons, explaining or jus fying a posi-
     on.
   Communica on: to construct and exchange messages through verbal and non-verbal symbolic systems such as reading,
   wri ng, speaking, listening, and gesture.
   Connec ons: to iden fy or recognize rela onships within and across discipline-specific forms of thought.




                                                    6 Academic Programs
Academic Affairs
   Representa on: to formulate a message through the use of alterna ve mediums to express or present facts, thoughts,
   ideas, concepts, arguments, values, perspec ves, or opinions.
   Research: to inves gate a topic systema cally, cogently arguing a well-formed hypothesis, and amply ci ng sources of
   informa on

Art Founda ons Courses
Founda ons courses teach students visual communica on skills related to most of the academic programs.

Mission
The primary purpose of the Founda ons program is to provide all students in one of the design programs with a rigorous art
and design founda on, enabling them to advance in their respec ve area of study. These competencies are accomplished in
a studio environment through learner-centered instruc on delivered by qualified faculty to students who are capable of and
commi ed to an ac ve role in learning.

Desired Student Outcomes:
  1. Students develop hand and drawing skills.
  2. Students develop the ability to use basic art materials.
  3. Students apply the elements and principles of design to art composi ons.
  4. Students create work that meets pre-determined parameters.
  5. Students demonstrate a logical approach to problem solving.
  6. Students generate original ideas from outside sources.
  7. Students use art and design vocabulary to analyze and cri que Founda ons artwork, both their own and peer stu-
  dents’.

Transi onal Studies
Transi onal Studies is designed to prepare students for coursework at The Illinois Ins tute of Art. Transi onal Studies faculty
and staff are commi ed to increasing students’ knowledge of basic skills in math, wri ng, and technology with the goal of
preparing them for the challenge of academic life as they become independent learners.
The Illinois Ins tute of Art assesses the reading, wri ng, math and computer skills of entering students to determine if they
could benefit from addi onal assistance. Placement is determined based on transfer credit, ACT or SAT test scores, ACC-
UPLACER (an online placement exam produced by the College Board), and some mes ASSET (a placement exam produced
by ACT).
Transi onal courses are coordinated closely with each campus’s learning center to provide tutoring in math, English and
other subjects, and with the Student Affairs staff to provide academic advising and counseling. Transi onal Studies courses
are non-credit courses to be taken within the first year of study.

Desired Student outcomes:
  Academic Development: Students develop skills necessary for their academic and social integra on into the academic
  environment.
  Wri en Communica on: an ability to develop essays and paragraphs that are logically structured.
  Problem-Solving: basic problem-solving skills that directly relate to their fields of study.
  Computer Literacy: basic computer skills for use in their field of study and general educa on classes.




                                                     7 Academic Programs
Academic Affairs
Study Abroad Program
The Art Ins tutes Study Abroad Program provides students the opportunity to expand and improve their learning through
interna onal study. Students will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and experience to assist them in preparing for
entrance into a global economy. Led by instructors from The Art Ins tutes system of schools, programs vary in length and
may be credit or non-credit bearing. The Program is open to students enrolled in member schools of The Art Ins tutes Study
Abroad Consor um. Students at schools that are not part of the Consor um are not eligible for the Program. Financial aid
may be available for those who qualify.
Past Art Ins tutes schools’ study abroad programs have taken students throughout the world to countries including Aus-
tralia, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, New Zealand, Russia, Spain,
Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and Wales.

Assessment Program
As an ins tu on of higher educa on The Illinois Ins tute of Art is commi ed to excellence in teaching and learning. Reflect-
ing that commitment, The Illinois Ins tute of Art has a formal, ongoing assessment of student learning and achievement.
The Illinois Ins tute of Art collects and analyzes data on the nature and extent of student learning and uses that analysis to
enhance both teaching and learning. Under the guidance and direc on of the Deans of Academic Affairs and the Directors
of Assessment, assessment involves the en re school community—students, faculty, staff, and administra on—in a coordi-
nated effort to use the assessment of learning as a cornerstone for curriculum development and ins tu onal improvement.




Degree Requirements
Requirements for Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Fine Arts Degrees
To receive a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, students must complete a minimum of
180 quarter-credits, including 60 quarter- credits of general educa on. Each General Educa on course is 4 credits, except
for GEN092 Founda on Por olio which is 1 credit. Specified courses may be required for specific programs; adjustments in
distribu on within the 60 credits may be made to reflect specific program needs, as noted in departmental requirements.
Unless otherwise indicated requirements apply to all loca ons.

General Educa on Requirements
1. Communica on (3 courses)
   GEN101 English I
   GEN102 English II
   GEN105 Effec ve Speaking
2. Math and Computer Science (2-3 courses)
   2 mathema cs courses or 8 credit-hours: GEN150-157, GEN250-258 (1 200-level course required at ILIS)
   At ILIC, ILITP, and AIMD, 1 computer course or 4 credit-hours: GEN 107 (for B.S. in Hospitality) or GEN109
3. Physics and Life Sciences (3 courses)
   1 life science course or 4 credit-hours: GEN260-GEN266, GEN276
   1 addi onal 200-level science course or 4 credit-hours: GEN260-GEN286
   1 300-level science course or 4 credit-hours: GEN360-GEN382


                                                     8 Academic Programs
Degree Requirements
4. Humani es and Fine Arts (3 courses)
   1 fine arts course or 4 credit-hours: GEN205-GEN212
   1 addi onal 200-level fine arts/humani es course or 4 credit-hours: GEN205-GEN233
   1 300-level fine arts/humani es course or 4 credit-hours: GEN310-GEN335
5. Social Sciences (2-3 courses)
   1 200-level course or 4 credit hours: GEN241-GEN248
   At ILIS and AIOHC, 1 addi onal 200-level course or 4 credit-hours: GEN241-GEN248
   1 300-level course or 4 credit hours: GEN340-GEN345
6. General Educa on Capstone
   GEN399

In addi on, Founda on Por olio, GEN092, is required at ILIC, ILITP, AIOHC, and AIMD of all entering students with fewer
than 24 hours of transfer credit.

Requirements for Bachelor of Applied Science Degree
To receive a Bachelor of Applied Science degree, students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-credits, including 56
quarter-credits of general educa on.

General Educa on Requirements
1. Communica on (3 courses.)
   GEN101 English I
   GEN102 English II
   GEN105 Effec ve Speaking
2. Math and Computer Science (2 courses)
   1 computer course or 4 credit-hours (ILIC, AIMD, AIOHC)
   1 mathema cs course or 4 credit-hours (2 mathema cs courses at ILIS)
3. Physics and Life Sciences (2 courses)
   1 chemistry course or 4 credit-hours: GEN273
   1 addi onal 200-level science course or 4 credit-hours
4. Humani es and Fine courses (4 courses)
   2 Spanish language courses or 8 credit hours: GEN201 and GEN202
   1 addi onal 200-level fine arts/humani es course or 4 credit-hours: GEN205-GEN233
   1 300-level fine arts/humani es course or 4 credit hours: GEN310-GEN335
5. Social Sciences (2 courses)
   1 economics course or 4 credit-hours
   1 200-level course or 4 credit-hours
6. General Educa on Capstone
   GEN399

In addi on, Founda on Por olio, GEN092, is required at ILIC, ILITP, AIOHC, and AIMD of all entering students with fewer
than 24 hours of transfer credit.




                                                   9 Academic Programs
Degree Requirements
Requirements for Associate of Applied Science Degree
To receive an Associate of Applied Science Degree, students must complete a minimum of 90 quarter-credits with 24
quarter-credits in general educa on.

General Educa on Requirements
1. Communica on (2 courses.)
   GEN101 English I
   GEN105 Effec ve Speaking
2. Math and Computer Science (1 course)
   1 course or 4 hours: GEN109-GEN155
3. Physical and Life Sciences (1 course)
   1 course or 4 hours: GEN260-GEN286
4. Humani es and Fine Arts (1 course)
   1 course or 4 hours: GEN201-GEN233
5. Social Sciences (1 course)
   1 course or 4 hours: GEN241-GEN248

In addi on, Founda on Por olio, GEN092, is required at ILIC, ILITP, AIMD, AIOHC for all entering students with fewer than
24 hours of transfer credit.



Diploma Requirements
Requirements for Diplomas
To receive a diploma, students must complete a between 36 and 55 quarter-credits, depending on the program. Unless
otherwise indicated requirements apply to all loca ons.




                                                   10 Academic Programs
Degree and Diploma Programs
Degree Programs
Adver sing
  Adver sing, B.A., offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Cincinna , Tinley Park

Culinary & Hospitality
   Culinary Management, B.A.S, Offered at Chicago, Michigan, Cincinna , Schaumburg (degree comple on only)
   Culinary Arts, A.A.S., offered at Chicago, Michigan, Cincinna
   Hospitality Management, B.S., A.A.S., offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Michigan

Fashion
   Fashion Design, B.F.A., offered at Chicago, Schaumburg
   Fashion Marke ng & Management, B.A., all campuses
   Fashion Merchandising, A.A.S., all campuses

Visual Communica ons
   Graphic Design, B.F.A., A.A.S., all campuses
   Illustra on & Design, B.F.A., offered at Chicago, Schaumburg

Interior Design
   Interior Design, B.F.A., all campuses; A.A.S., offered at Cincinna , Michigan

Media Arts
  Audio Produc on, B.S., offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, and Michigan
  Digital Filmmaking & Video Produc on, B.F.A., Chicago, Schaumburg, Cincinna ; Video Produc on, A.A.S., offered at
  Cincinna
  Digital Photography, B.F.A., offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Michigan, Tinley Park
  Game Art & Design, B.F.A., offered at Chicago, Schaumburg
  Media Arts & Anima on, B.F.A., all campuses
  Visual Effects & Mo on Graphics, B.F.A., offered at Schaumburg
  Web Design & Interac ve Media, B.F.A., offered at Schaumburg, Michigan, Cincinna ; A.A.S., offered at Michigan, Cincin-
  na , Schaumburg



Diploma Programs
Baking & Pastry, Diploma, offered at Chicago, Cincina , Michigan
Culinary Arts, Diploma, offered at Chicago, Cincina , Michigan
Fashion Retailing, Diploma, offered at Chicago, Cincinna , Michigan, Schaumburg, and Tinley Park
Residen al Planning, Diploma, offered at Schaumburg
Digital Design, Diploma, offered at Schaumburg
Digital Image Management, Diploma, offered at Chicago, Michigan, Schaumburg, Tinley Park
Web Design & Development, Diploma, offered at Cincinna , Michigan, Schaumburg, Tinley Park
Web Design & Interac ve Communica ons, Diploma, offered at Cincinna , Michigan, Schaumburg, Tinley Park



                                                    11 Academic Programs
Adver sing
ADVERTISING, Bachelor of Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Cincinna , Tinley Park

Program Mission
The Adver sing Program prepares graduates for careers in the adver sing profession by providing a founda on in the busi-
ness aspects of adver sing while helping them develop the basic crea ve and technical skills necessary to create and imple-
ment targeted adver sing solu ons that meet professional standards of excellence. Adver sing offers exci ng and demand-
ing careers where professionals are required to be crea ve and to meet strict deadlines.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Technical skills: Graduates will demonstrate basic proficiency with the tools and graphic techniques of the profession to
plan and implement produc on of adver sing media such as print collateral, audio and video spots, and Web-interac ve
materials as well as business so ware related to marke ng and public rela ons.
2. Graphic Design: Graduates will develop concepts as well as analyze and incorporate aesthe cs and layout in the design
process for adver sing campaigns and marke ng communica ons.
3. Marke ng and Adver sing Theory: Graduates will apply industry knowledge and cri cal thinking skills to analyze, de-
velop, and implement effec ve adver sing solu ons that meet professional standards.
4. Problem Solving and Cri cal Thinking: Graduates will demonstrate their knowledge of the interdependence between
adver sing/marke ng objec ves and visual expression and be able to evaluate, cri que, and understand their ideas. They
will be able to use this knowledge to iden fy problems and arrive at innova ve solu ons.
5. Professionalism: Graduates will understand the corporate climate of the adver sing industry; be aware of the range of
career paths and opportuni es in the industry; have mastery of industry standards, professional prac ces and ethics.
6. Communica on: Graduates will be able to ar culate the vision behind their crea ve work and explain and promote their
solu ons to clients and colleagues. They will have basic visual communica on skills related to presen ng products; an ability
to work collabora vely in a corporate environment; and an understanding of marke ng communica on.
7. Context: Graduates will have a broad understanding of the context in which adver sing exists, including history, literature,
cultural varia on, psychology, logic, marke ng, US and interna onal law and regula ons, and new media.

Program Descrip on
The Adver sing Program provides graduates with the skills needed to work in the field of adver sing, art direc on, copy
wri ng and account supervision. A solid art founda on combined with hands-on adver sing curricula prepares students for
entry-level posi ons with adver sing agencies and departments, art studios and departments, marke ng companies and
departments and produc on companies. An adver sing-related internship while in school increases the graduate’s advan-
tage when applying for a posi on.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Arts in Adver sing students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-credits with 60 quarter-
credits in general educa on courses and 120 in their specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher. Also, a student
must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute
of Art. Gradua ng students must pass a required course where a por olio is produced. The por olio must demonstrate
entry-level employment competencies appropriate to the specific degree program. Each student is required to par cipate in
the Senior Por olio Show.




                                                     12 Academic Programs
Adver sing
Course         Title                                                    Prerequisites and Course Sequences                              Credits
Core Courses
ADV106         Fundamentals of Adver sing & Marke ng                                                                                    4
ADV108         Conceptual & Strategic Thinking                                                                                          4
ADV112         Survey of Adver sing                                                                                                     4
ADV228         Storyboards & Scriptwri ng                               ADV108                                                          4
ADV229         Adver sing Design                                        ADV106, ADV108, GD109, GD203                                    4
ADV231         Consumer Behavior                                        ADV112                                                          4
ADV317         Principles of Marke ng Research                          ADV106                                                          4
ADV318         Brand Strategy                                           ADV229                                                          4
ADV323         Account Planning                                         ADV317                                                          4
ADV336         Sales & Persuasive Techniques                            ADV231                                                          4
ADV337         Public Rela ons & Promo ons                              ADV231, ADV336                                                  4
ADV338         Media Planning & Buying                                  ADV323                                                          4
ADV340        Adver sing Copywri ng                                     GEN102, ADV229                                                  4
ADV400        Art Direc on                                              Only by Permission of Academic Director                         4
ADV404        Adver sing Campaigns                                      Only by Permission of Academic Director                         4
ADV406        Advanced Adver sing Campaigns                             Only by Permission of Academic Director                         4
ADV408        Por olio                                                  Only by Permission of Academic Director                         4
ADV409        Adver sing Internship                                     Only by Permission of Academic Director                         4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100        Design Fundamentals                                                                                                       4
ART110        Color Theory                                                                                                              4
DPH242        Image Manipula on                                         ART110; GEN109 at ILIC and AIMD                                 4
GD108         Digital Photography for Designers                         ART110, and DPH242                                              4
GD109         Digital Illustra on                                       ADV106                                                          4
GD110         Introduc on to Typography: Tradi onal                     ART100, and ART110                                              4
GD211         Digital Pre-Press                                         GD203, and DPH242                                               4
GD203         Digital Layout                                            ADV108 for Adver sing majors                                    4
GD404         Professional Development for Graphic Design               Only by Permission of Academic Director                         4
WDIM110       Designing for Mul media Display                                                                                           4
WDIM130       Fundamentals of Interac ve Design                                                                                         4
WDIM230       Fundamentals of Authoring                                                                                                 4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101        English I                                                 GEN095 or placement                                             4
GEN102        English II                                                GEN101                                                          4
GEN105        Effec ve Speaking                                          GEN101 at ILIC                                                  4
              Art History - GEN211 or GEN212                            GEN101, GEN105                                                  4
              GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or             Placement or GEN096                                             4
              Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)            GEN101, GEN105
              Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                   GEN101, GEN105                                                  4
              Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                   GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233                       4
              Mathema cs Elec ve                                        GEN098 or placement                                             4
              Mathema cs Elec ve                                        GEN098 or placement                                             4
              Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                 GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                         4
              Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                 GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                         4
              Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve                 GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286                       4
              Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                          GEN101, GEN105                                                  4
              Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                          GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248                       4
GEN399        General Educa on Capstone                                 All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level courses;   4
                                                                        and at least one course between 310 and 382




                                                               13 Academic Programs
Culinary & Hospitality
CULINARY MANAGEMENT, Bachelor of Applied Science Degree
Offered at Chicago, Michigan, Cincinna . Offered at Schaumburg as a degree comple on program for
students with an appropriate associate degree from another college.

Program Mission
The mission of the Bachelor Degree in Culinary Management is to provide a market-driven, competency-based educa on
that integrates academics and hands-on learning and instruc on. The prac cal culinary skills and management courses in
this program will prepare students for entry-level management posi ons in the food service industry as well as provide a
founda on for the graduate to advance in the culinary management field.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Culinary theory and terminology: Graduates will display proficiency of various culinary procedures and applica ons, will
be able to define and apply appropriate culinary terminology.
2. Cooking: Graduates will be able to produce products according to desired outcomes based on desired quality standards.
3. Cuisines: Graduates will be able to iden fy elements of various cuisines.
4. Finance: Graduates will understand cost factors of food produc on and be able to analyze financial statements for food-
service opera ons, and be able to effect change; bachelor’s graduates will understand financial elements at an advanced
level, including budgets, cost control, property management issues and will be able to use spreadsheets and other so ware.
5. Professional awareness: Graduates will have an understanding of culinary careers and the structure and culture of the
culinary field; they will understand professional and ethical behavior in the workplace.
6. Communica on: Graduates will demonstrate effec ve interpersonal rela ons in a culinary team. In a commercial se ng
they will be able to read customer needs and create a clear menu; at the bachelor’s level, graduates will have at least basic
fluency in Spanish as well as English; oral communica on skills; report-wri ng skills; and managerial skills.
7. Problem-solving: Graduates will be able to iden fy and solve problems related to food prepara on and menu develop-
ment; at the bachelor’s level, graduates will be able to solve problems related to product supply and employee and cus-
tomer rela ons
8. Context: Graduates will understand their profession in rela on to world geography and cultures, legal environment
(sanita on, alcohol service), agriculture, biology (nutri on), physiology (taste, effect of alcohol), chemistry, sustainability,
research, contemporary movements (organic, vegetarian, locavore); at bachelor’s level, business and related math skills.

Program Descrip on
From overseeing food quality, to dealing with customers, to making staffing decisions, a foodservice manager handles
hundreds of varied yet cri cally important tasks every day. The manager’s capabili es and day-to-day performance, and
abili es to make decisions quickly, o en determine the ul mate success or failure of a foodservice opera on. Managers are
involved in teaching, training, and mo va ng staff and handle all forms of human resources issues. They possess excellent
interpersonal and communica on skills, func on as effec ve team leaders, and supervise a culturally diverse staff. Comput-
er proficiency in foodservice opera ons applica ons is an integral part of a manager’s daily func on. Above all, knowledge
of the customer, and customer rela ons skills empower foodservice managers to render be er service, and to cater to the
demands of knowledgeable consumers and employees

Gradua on Requirements
To receive the Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) degree program in Culinary Management students must complete a mini-
mum of 180 quarter credit hours with 56 quarter-credits in general educa on and 124 quarter-credits in the specialty area
with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work
and sa sfy all financial obliga ons with The Illinois Ins tute of Art.

                                                     14 Academic Programs
Culinary & Hospitality
 Requirements for B.A.S. in Culinary Management
 Course        Title                                                        Prerequisites and Course Sequences                     Credits
 Core Courses
CULA100       Concepts & Theory of Culinary Techniques                                                                             3
CULA105       Fundamentals of Classical Techniques                                                                                 5
CULA115       American Regional Cuisine                                                                                            5
CULA123       Sustainable Purchasing and Controlling Costs                                                                         4
CULA125       Introduc on to Baking and Pastry Techniques                                                                          5
CULA200       Garde Manger                                                                                                         6
CULA203       La n Cuisines                                                                                                        3
CULA210       Nutri on                                                                                                             3
CULA212       Asian Cuisine                                                                                                        3
CULA216       Classical European Cuisine                                                                                           3
CULA220       Management by Menu                                                                                                   3
CULA225       A la Carte Restaurant Kitchen                                                                                        3
CULA230       Dining Room Service                                                                                                  3
CULA235       Food & Beverage Opera ons Management                                                                                 4
CULA298       Art Culinaire                                                                                                        3
CULA299       Culinary Associate Capstone                                                                                          3
CUL216        Catering & Event Management                                                                                          4
CUL224        Oenology & Vi culture                                                                                                4
CUL300        Management Externship                                                                                                4
CUL301        History & Culture of Cuisine                                                                                         4
CUL302        Modern Leadership - Food Service                                                                                     4
CUL304        From Farm to Plate                                                                                                   2
CUL305        Global Management and Opera ons in the Hospitality Industry                                                          4
CUL311        Human Resource Management                                                                                            4
CUL312        Innova on and Entrepreneurship                                                                                       4
CUL313        Property Management                                                                                                  3
CUL314        Foodservice Technology and Informa on                                                                                4
CUL317        Foodservice Financial Management                                                                                     4
CUL319        Quality Service Management and Training                                                                              4
CUL323        Senior Project Capstone                                                                                              4
Suppor ng Courses
HM117         Diversity & Ethics in Hospitality                                                                                    4
HM226         Hospitality Sales & Marke ng                                                                                         4
IC202         Management, Supervision & Career Development                  GEN105 for degree students                             4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101        English I                                                     GEN095 or placement                                    4
GEN102        English II                                                    GEN101                                                 4
GEN105        Effec ve Speaking                                              GEN101 at ILIC                                         4
GEN155        Intro to Financial Mathema cs                                 GEN098 or placement                                    4
GEN201        Spanish I                                                     GEN101, GEN105                                         4
GEN202        Spanish II                                                    GEN101, GEN105, GEN201                                 4
GEN241        Economics                                                     GEN101, GEN105                                         4
GEN273        Applied Chemistry                                             GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or placement                    4
              Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                       GEN101, GEN105                                         4
              Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                       GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233              4
              Mathema cs Elec ve                                            GEN098 or placement                                    4
              Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                     GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
              Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                              GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248              4
GEN399        General Educa on Capstone                                     All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level   4
                                                                            courses; and at least one course between 310 and
                                                                            382


                                                           15 Academic Programs
Culinary & Hospitality
CULINARY ARTS, Associate of Applied Science
Offered at Chicago, Michigan, Cincinna

Program Mission
The Culinary Arts Associate of Applied Science Degree program provides students with fundamentals in culinary techniques,
food produc on skills and cri cal thinking skills. Students study the fundamentals of cooking, baking and pastry, as well as
the art of the cold kitchen. Food produc on skills are complimented with basic food service management skills. Graduates
of the program compete for entry-level posi on in the food service industry.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Culinary theory and terminology: Graduates will display proficiency of various culinary procedures and applica ons, will
be able to define and apply appropriate culinary terminology.
2. Cooking: Graduates will be able to produce products according to desired outcomes based on desired quality standards.
3. Cuisines: Graduates will be able to iden fy elements of various cuisines.
4. Finance: Graduates will understand cost factors of food produc on and be able to analyze financial statements for food-
service opera ons, and be able to effect change.
5. Professional awareness: Graduates will have an understanding of culinary careers and the structure and culture of the
culinary field; they will understand professional and ethical behavior in the workplace.
6. Communica on: Graduates will demonstrate effec ve interpersonal rela ons in a culinary team. In a commercial se ng
they will be able to read customer needs and create a clear menu.
7. Problem-solving: Graduates will be able to iden fy and solve problems related to food prepara on and menu develop-
ment
8. Context: Graduates will understand their profession in rela on to world geography and cultures, legal environment
(sanita on, alcohol service), agriculture, biology (nutri on), physiology (taste, effect of alcohol), chemistry, sustainability,
research, contemporary movements (organic, vegetarian, locavore).

Program Descrip on
The Culinary Arts Associate of Applied Science Degree program provides students with fundamentals in culinary techniques,
food produc on skills and cri cal thinking skills. Students will study the fundamentals of cooking, baking and pastry, as well
as the art of the cold kitchen. Food produc on skills are complimented with basic food service management skills. Gradu-
ates of the program compete for entry-level posi ons in the food service industry.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive an Associate of Applied Science degree (A.A.S.) in Culinary Arts students must complete a minimum of 90 quar-
ter-credits with 24 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 66 quarter-credits in the specialty area with a cumula-
 ve GPA of 2.0 or higher. Students must be state-cer fied in sanita on to complete the degree. Also a student must receive
a passing grade or credit for all required course work and sa sfy all financial obliga ons with The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                     16 Academic Programs
Culinary & Hospitality
Requirements for A.A.S. in Culinary Arts
Course                Title                                            Prerequisites and Course Sequences        Credits
Core Courses
CULA100               Concepts & Theory of Culinary Techniques                                                   3
CULA105               Fundamentals of Classical Techniques                                                       5
CULA115               American Regional Cuisine                                                                  5
CULA123               Sustainable Purchasing and Controlling Costs                                               4
CULA125               Introduc on to Baking and Pastry Techniques                                                5
CULA200               Garde Manger                                                                               6
CULA203               La n Cuisines                                                                              3
CULA210               Nutri on                                                                                   3
CULA212               Asian Cuisine                                                                              3
CULA216               Classical European Cuisine                                                                 3
CULA220               Management by Menu                                                                         3
CULA225               A la Carte Restaurant Kitchen                                                              3
CULA230               Dining Room Service                                                                        3
CULA235               Food & Beverage Opera ons Management                                                       4
CUL313                Property Management                                                                        3
CULA298               Art Culinaire                                                                              3
CULA299               Culinary Associate Capstone                                                                3
Suppor ng Courses
IC202                 Management, Supervision & Career Development     GEN105 for degree students                4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101                English I                                        GEN095 or placement                       4
GEN105                Effec ve Speaking                                 GEN101 at ILIC                            4
                      Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve          GEN101, GEN105                            4
                      Mathema cs Elec ve                               GEN098 or placement                       4
                      Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve        GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement   4
                      Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                 GEN101, GEN105                            4




                                                        17 Academic Programs
Culinary & Hospitality
HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT, Bachelor of Science
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Michigan

Program Mission
The mission of the Hospitality Management Bachelor of Science program is to prepare future leaders for entry level man-
agement in the hospitality industry and to provide a quality educa onal environment for students to become learners, to
possess the skills, knowledge, crea vity, and ethics necessary in the rapidly changing, culturally diverse hospitality industry.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Professionalism: Graduates will demonstrate an understanding of the hospitality industry; they will understand profes-
sional and ethical behavior in the workplace.
2. Communica on: Graduates will use wri en and oral communica on to work effec vely with fellow employees, clients,
and customers.
3. Problem Solving and Cri cal Thinking: Graduates will efficiently solve problems in facili es, customer rela ons, person-
nel, procurement, and community rela ons.
4. Management and finance: Graduates will apply management principles effec vely in a variety of workplaces; demon-
strate knowledge of basic accoun ng concepts and principles; iden fy through validated research consumer markets and
customer buying behavior; and implement a quality customer service program and how to integrate con nuous quality
improvements
5. Context: Graduates iden fy the differences in cultural values and percep ons of socio-cultural issues related to hospitality
management and opera ons; explain the industry in rela on to global cultural and economic diversity; ar culate legal issues
related to hospitality management.

Program Descrip on
Hospitality Management blends theore cal and hands-on learning in the areas of management, human resources, ac-
coun ng, food and beverage opera ons and lodging opera ons. Externships are an integral part of the curriculum as they
provide an opportunity for applica on to real world situa ons ul mately culmina ng into a career por olio and entry level
management posi ons in restaurant, catering, hotels and other segments of the hospitality industry. Students also have the
opportunity to focus on special topics related to the hospitality industry via their elec ves.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Hospitality Management, students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-
credits with 60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0
or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work, meet por olio requirements
including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which a por olio is
produced.




                                                      18 Academic Programs
Culinary & Hospitality
 Requirements for B.S. in Hospitality Management
 Course                  Title                                                            Prerequisites and Course Sequences           Credits
 Core Courses
HM113                   Intro to Hospitality Opera ons                                                                                 4
HM117                   Diversity & Ethics in Hospitality                                                                              4
HM124                   Hospitality Law                                                                                                4
HM226                   Hospitality Sales & Marke ng                                                                                   4
HM229                   Training & Development in Hospitality                                                                          4
HM260                   Hospitality Internship                                                                                         4
HM310                   Bar & Beverage Management                                                                                      4
HM313                   Emerging Hospitality Segments                                                                                  4
HM320                   Hospitality Merchandising                                                                                      4
HM349                   Mul -Unit/Chain/Franchise Opera ons                                                                            4
HM440                   Lodging Opera on                                                                                               4
HM442                   Hospitality Accoun ng                                                                                          4
HM444                   Introduc on to Travel &Tourism                                                                                 4
HM448                   Hospitality Capstone                                                                                           4
HM450                   Management Externship                                                                                          4
Suppor ng Courses
CULA105                 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques                                                                           5
 CULA123                 Sustainable Purchasing and Controlling Costs                                                                  4
CULA210                 Nutri on                                                                                                       3
CULA220                 Management by Menu                                                                                             3
CULA235                 Food & Beverage Opera ons Management                                                                           4
CUL216                  Catering & Event Management                                                                                    4
CUL224                  Oenology & Vi culture                                                                                          4
CUL301                  History & Culture of Cuisine                                                                                   4
CUL302                  Modern Leadership - Food Service                                                                               4
CUL304                  From Farm to Plate                                                                                             2
CUL311                  Human Resource Management                                                                                      4
CUL312                  Innova on and Entrepreneurship                                                                                 4
CUL313                  Property Management                                                                                            3
CUL319                  Quality Service Management and Training                                                                        4
CUL442                  Facility Management & Design                                                                                   4
IC202                   Management, Supervision & Career Development                      GEN105 for degree students                   4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101                  English I                                                         GEN095 or placement                          4
GEN102                  English II                                                        GEN101                                       4
GEN105                  Effec ve Speaking                                                  GEN101 at ILIC                               4
                        GEN107 Computers for Culinary (ILIC, AIMD) or                                                                  4
                        Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS)
GEN201                  Spanish I                                                         GEN101, GEN105                               4
GEN202                  Spanish II                                                        GEN101, GEN105, GEN201                       4
GEN241                  Economics                                                         GEN101, GEN105                               4
                        GEN155 Introduc on to Financial Math (ILIC) or GEN250 Topics in                                                4
                        Mathema cs (ILIS)
                        Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                           GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233    4
                        Mathema cs Elec ve                                                GEN098 or placement                          4
                        Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                         GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement      4
                        Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                         GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement      4
                        Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve                         GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286    4
                        Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                                  GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248    4
GEN399                  General Educa on Capstone                                         All required 100-level courses; at least 5   4
                                                                                          200-level courses; and at least one course
                                                                                          between 310 and 382

                                                             19 Academic Programs
Culinary & Hospitality
HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT, Associate of Applied Science
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Michigan

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Professionalism: Graduates will demonstrate an understanding of the hospitality industry; they will understand profes-
sional and ethical behavior in the workplace.
2. Communica on: Graduates will use wri en and oral communica on to work effec vely with fellow employees, clients,
and customers.
3. Problem Solving and Cri cal Thinking: Graduates will efficiently solve problems in facili es, customer rela ons, person-
nel, procurement, and community rela ons.
4. Management and finance: Graduates will apply management principles effec vely in a variety of workplaces; demon-
strate knowledge of basic accoun ng concepts and principles; iden fy through validated research consumer markets and
customer buying behavior; and implement a quality customer service program and how to integrate con nuous quality
improvements
5. Context: Graduates iden fy the differences in cultural values and percep ons of socio-cultural issues related to hospitality
management and opera ons; explain the industry in rela on to global cultural and economic diversity; ar culate legal issues
related to hospitality management.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive an Associate of Applied Science degree in Hospitality Management, students must complete a minimum of 90
quarter-credits with 24 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 66 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA
of 2.0 or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and sa sfy all por olio
requirements including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute
of Art.




                                                    20 Academic Programs
Culinary & Hospitality
 Requirements for A.A.S. in Hospitality Management
 Course                 Title                                             Prerequisites and Course Sequences        Credits
 Core Courses
HM113                  Intro to Hospitality Opera ons                                                               4
HM117                  Diversity & Ethics in Hospitality                                                            4
HM124                  Hospitality Law                                                                              4
HM226                  Hospitality Sales & Marke ng                                                                 4
HM229                  Training & Development in Hospitality                                                        4
HM260                  Hospitality Internship                                                                       4
Suppor ng Courses
CULA105                Fundamentals of Classical Techniques                                                         5
 CULA123                Sustainable Purchasing and Controlling Costs                                                4
CULA210                Nutri on                                                                                     3
CULA220                Management by Menu                                                                           3
CULA235                Food & Beverage Opera ons Management                                                         4
CUL313                 Property Management                                                                          3
CUL216                 Catering & Event Management                                                                  4
CUL302                 Modern Leadership - Food Service                                                             4
CUL315                 Advanced Food & Beverage Cost Control                                                        4
IC202                  Management, Supervision & Career Development       GEN105 for degree students                4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101                 English I                                          GEN095 or placement                       4
GEN105                 Effec ve Speaking                                   GEN101 at ILIC                            4
GEN107                 Computers for Culinary                                                                       4
GEN201                 Spanish I                                          GEN101, GEN105                            4
                       Mathema cs Elec ve                                 GEN098 or placement                       4
                       Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve          GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement   4
                       Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                   GEN101, GEN105                            4




                                                          21 Academic Programs
Fashion
FASHION DESIGN, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg

Program Mission
The Fashion Design Bachelor of Fine Arts program provides students with a strong academic and professional founda on
through both applied coursework and technological applica ons. The market driven curriculum teaches students to u lize
problem solving and cri cal thinking skills, which meet the expressed needs of the fashion industry.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Construc on: Graduates will have knowledge of terminology, principles, and concepts related to construc on, pa ern-
making, draping, and other techniques used to produce garments. They will have an understanding of tex les and other
products necessary to the fashion industry.
2. Technology: Graduates will demonstrate proficiency with tradi onal construc on technology (sewing machines, sergers)
and with computer assisted design so ware for crea ng fabrics, pa erns, and other purposes.
3. Design: Graduates will understand and apply the principles of fashion design. They will be able to design and produce
original garments. They will understand pa ern dra ing principles required for design and pa ern development. They will
be able to represent fashions on croquis and in other ways that follow industry expecta ons and standards.
4. Planning and problem-solving: Graduates will demonstrate an ability to analyze, formulate and implement innova ve
solu ons related to designing and producing garments. They will demonstrate the ability to deal with problems of supply,
the logis cs of large-scale produc on, as well as how do deal with problems in individual fi ngs and how to adapt pa erns
for different fabrics.
5. Communica on: Graduates will demonstrate professional oral, wri en, and visual communica on skills and organiza on-
al skills according to industry expecta ons.
6. Context: Graduates will understand the broader context of their professional knowledge in rela on to fashion, including
design and costume history, laws and regula ons, business prac ces, demographics, social, cultural (ethnic), psychological,
forecas ng, and economic theories and ideas.
7. Professionalism: Graduates will have developed an appropriate professional demeanor, an understanding of the nature
and culture of the fashion industry, an understanding of the language and culture of marke ng, an understanding of pos-
sible careers and career paths, and a clear understanding of professional ethics and standards.

Program Descrip on
The Fashion Design program explores industry prac ces from concept to consumer. Coursework incorporates technical
sketching and fashion illustra on, flat pa ernmaking and draping, computer-aided design, garment construc on and fit,
industry so ware knowledge, and conceptual and cri cal thinking. The curriculum offers exposure to global fashion business
prac ces, product development, entrepreneurship and professional presenta ons.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Fashion Design students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-credits with
60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in their specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher. Also
a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and meet por olio requirements including par-
 cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which a por olio is produced.




                                                   22 Academic Programs
Fashion
Requirements for B.F.A. in Fashion Design
Course     Title                                             Prerequisites and Course Sequences                                      Credits
Core Courses
FD100      Survey of the Fashion Industry                    GEN095 or placement                                                     4
FD121      Fundamentals of Construc on                                                                                               4
FD123      Advanced Construc on                              FD121                                                                   4
FD127      Tex les                                                                                                                   4
FD128      Trends & Concepts in Apparel                      FD100; GEN109 at ILIC                                                   4
FD219      Knitwear                                          FD127; GEN109 at ILIC                                                   4
FD220      Fundamentals of Pa ernmaking                      FD123                                                                   4
FD222      Costume History                                   FD100                                                                   4
FD223      Fashion Sketching & Illustra on                   ART102, FD127                                                           4
FD224      Advanced Pa ernmaking                             FD220                                                                   4
FD226      Technical Drawing & Design                        FD127, FD128, FD223                                                     4
FD228      Research & Sourcing Fundamentals                  FD100, FD220, FD226                                                     4
FD232      Intro to Business & Retailing                                                                                             4
FD233      Draping & Fit Analysis                            FD224                                                                   4
FD301      Computer Pa ernmaking                             FD224, FD228                                                            4
FD303      Concept & Line Development                        FD222, FD224, FD226                                                     4
FD311      Design Special es I                               FD127, FD224, FD228, FD233, FD303                                       4
FD321      Design Special es II                              FD127, FD224, FD228, FD233, FD303                                       4
FD322      Produc on Systems                                 FD232, FD301                                                            4
FD334      Fashion Career Management                         GEN105                                                                  4
FD336      Surface Design                                    FD219, FD303                                                            4
FD404      Senior Collec on Concept & Technical              FD228, FD303, FD321                                                     4
FD406      Digital Tex le Design                             FD219, FD226                                                            4
FD415      Senior Collec on Technical & Produc on            FD321, FD322, FD404                                                     4
FD416      Product Development                               FD228, FD232, FD226                                                     4
FD426      Por olio Prepara on                               FD336, FD404                                                            4
FD427      Internship                                        Permission from Director required. Interna onal students need           4
                                                             signed approval from the Interna onal Student Advisor.
Suppor ng Courses
ART100     Design Fundamentals                                                                                                       4
ART102     Observa onal Drawing                                  ART100, ART110                                                      4
ART110     Color Theory                                                                                                              4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101     English I                                             GEN095 or placement                                                 4
GEN102     English II                                            GEN101                                                              4
GEN105     Effec ve Speaking                                      GEN101 at ILIC                                                      4
           Art History - GEN211 or GEN212                        GEN101, GEN105                                                      4
           GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or         Placement or GEN096                                                 4
           Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)        GEN101, GEN105
           Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve               GEN101, GEN105                                                      4
           Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve               GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233                           4
           Mathema cs Elec ve                                    GEN098 or placement                                                 4
           Mathema cs Elec ve                                    GEN098 or placement                                                 4
           Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve             GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                             4
           Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve             GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                             4
           Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve             GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286                           4
           Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                      GEN101, GEN105                                                      4
           Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                      GEN101, GEN105                                                      4
GEN399     General Educa on Capstone                             All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level courses; and   4
                                                                 at least one course between 310 and 382



                                                            23 Academic Programs
Fashion
FASHION MARKETING & MANAGEMENT, Bachelor of Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Cincinna , Michigan, Tinley Park

Program Mission
The Fashion Marke ng & Management Bachelor of Arts program provides students with a strong academic and professional
founda on through both applied coursework and technological applica ons. The market driven curriculum teaches students
to u lize problem solving and cri cal thinking skills, which meet the expressed needs of the fashion industry.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Industry knowledge: Graduates will accurately use marke ng and management terminology, principles, and concepts to
analyze and meet client needs.
2. Technology: Graduates will demonstrate proficiency with common business computer programs including inventory man-
agement, presenta on, spreadsheet, on-line research, and website so ware.
3. Planning and problem-solving: Graduates will demonstrate the ability to plan and analyze key marke ng and manage-
ment processes, including an ability to analyze, formulate and implement innova ve solu ons.
4. Communica on: Graduates will demonstrate professional oral, wri en, and visual communica on skills and organiza on-
al skills according to industry expecta ons.
5. Context: Graduates will understand the broader context of their professional knowledge in rela on to history, literature,
art, mathema cs, psychology, economics, culture, U.S. and interna onal law and policies.
6. Professionalism: Graduates will have developed an appropriate professional demeanor, an understanding of the nature
and culture of the profession, an understanding of the industry at large, and the graduates’ chosen profession, with a clear
knowledge of professional ethics and standards.

Program Descrip on
The program offers experience across disciplines in business, fashion, and design, covering both so and hard lines. This
cross-func onal focus allows students to expand beyond tradi onal fashion design posi ons and choose among op ons in
manufacturing, design and retailing. The curriculum includes fashion industry trends and manufacturing, general business,
management, opera ons and compliance, retailing, marke ng, adver sing, and design. Students will learn how to effec-
  vely bridge the gap between designers and the retail market. They will be required to both iden fy and an cipate fashion
trends, as well as to develop the decision-making skills needed to insure that the preferred consumer goods are in stock at
the appropriate me.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Arts in Fashion Marke ng & Management students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-
credits with 60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in their specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or
higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and meet por olio requirements
including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which a por olio is
produced.




                                                    24 Academic Programs
Fashion
Requirements for B.A. in Fashion Marke ng & Management
Course                 Title                                              Prerequisites and Course Sequences                     Credits
Core Courses
FM110              Survey of the Fashion Industry                                                                                4
FM120              Intro to Business & Retailing                                                                                 4
FM126              Tex les                                                                                                       4
FM128              Costume History                                        FM110                                                  4
FM130              Principles of Marke ng                                 FM120                                                  4
FM210              Trends & Concepts in Apparel                           FM110, FM128; GEN109 at ILIC                           4
FM212              Consumer Behavior                                      FM130                                                  4
FM220              Visual Techniques & Design                             ART100, ART110                                         4
FM226              Business Wri ng                                        GEN102, FM120; GEN109 at ILIC                          4
FM236              Global Marke ng                                        FM212                                                  4
FM238              Founda ons of Retail Mathema cs                        FM120                                                  4
FM310              Catalog Development                                    FM210, FM212, FM220                                    4
FM312              Retail Buying                                          FM238                                                  4
FM314              Trade Tariff & Resourcing                               FM236                                                  4
FM320              Inventory & Stock Controls                             FM312                                                  4
FM322              Professional Selling                                   FM130, FM238                                           4
FM324              Apparel Evalua on & Produc on                          FM126, FM210                                           4
FM330              Business Management I                                  FM212, FM238                                           4
FM332              Public Rela ons                                        FM210; FM226, FM310                                    4
FM334              Fashion Career Management                              GEN105; FM226, FM310                                   4
FM410              Product Development                                    FM324                                                  4
FM412              Business Management II                                 FM320, FM330                                           4
FM414              Adver sing                                             FM226, FM310                                           4
FM420              Por olio Prepara on I                                  Permission from director required                      4
FM422              Entrepreneurship                                       FM412                                                  4
FM424              Event Planning & Promo on                                                                                     4
FM430              Por olio Prepara on II                                 Permission of director required                        4
FM434              Internship                                             Permission of director required                        4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100             Design Fundamentals                                                                                           4
ART110             Color Theory                                                                                                  4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101             English I                                              GEN095 or placement                                    4
GEN102             English II                                             GEN101                                                 4
GEN105             Effec ve Speaking                                       GEN101 at ILIC                                         4
GEN244             Psychology                                             GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                   GEN157 Introductory Sta s cs or                        GEN098 or placement                                    4
                   GEN257 Applied Sta s cs
                   Art History - GEN211 or GEN212                         GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                   GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or          Placement or GEN096                                    4
                   Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)         GEN101, GEN105
                   Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                   Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                   Mathema cs Elec ve                                     GEN098 or placement                                    4
                   Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve              GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
                   Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve              GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
                   Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve              GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286              4
                   GEN241 Economics, where available, or Social Science   GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248              4
                   300-Level Elec ve
GEN399             General Educa on Capstone                              All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level   4
                                                                          courses; and at least one course between 310 and 382


                                                           25 Academic Programs
Fashion
FASHION MERCHANDISING, Associate of Applied Science
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Michigan, Cincinna , Tinley Park

Program Mission
The Associate of Applied Science in Fashion Merchandising program provides students with an academic and professional
founda on through both applied coursework and technological applica ons. The market-driven curriculum teaches students
to u lize problem-solving and cri cal thinking skills which meet the expressed needs of the fashion industry.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Industry knowledge: Graduates will accurately use marke ng and management terminology, principles, and concepts to
analyze and meet client needs.
2. Technology: Graduates will demonstrate proficiency with common business computer programs including inventory man-
agement, presenta on, spreadsheet, on-line research, and website so ware.
3. Planning and problem-solving: Graduates will demonstrate the ability to plan and analyze key marke ng and manage-
ment processes, including an ability to analyze, formulate and implement innova ve solu ons.
4. Communica on: Graduates will demonstrate professional oral, wri en, and visual communica on skills and organiza on-
al skills according to industry expecta ons.
5. Context: Graduates will understand the broader context of their professional knowledge in rela on to history, literature,
art, mathema cs, psychology, economics, culture, U.S. and interna onal law and policies.
6. Professionalism: Graduates will have developed an appropriate professional demeanor, an understanding of the nature
and culture of the profession, an understanding of the industry at large, and the graduates’ chosen profession, with a clear
knowledge of professional ethics and standards.

Program Descrip on
Fashion Merchandising students prepare to enter the field with instruc on from industry professionals who impart their
knowledge. Through hands-on par cipa on in projects that are crea ve, technical and similar to those students will face in
their chosen fields, the program is built around classroom ac vi es that rely on a philosophy of total personal immersion
in the subject. Students study fashion history, famous designers, tex les and display. Simulated buying sessions, marke ng
seminars and the development of in-house promo onal campaigns enable students to acquire hands-on experience.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive an Associate of Applied Science in Fashion Merchandising students must complete a minimum of 90 quarter-cred-
its with 24 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 66 in their specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher.
Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The
Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                    26 Academic Programs
Fashion
Requirements for A.A.S. in Fashion Merchandising
Course                Title                                                          Prerequisites and Course Sequences        Credits
Core Courses
FM110                 Survey of the Fashion Industry                                                                           4
FM120                 Intro to Business & Retailing                                                                            4
FM126                 Tex les                                                                                                  4
FM128                 Costume History                                                                                          4
FM130                 Principles of Marke ng                                         FM120                                     4
FM210                 Trends & Concepts in Apparel                                   FM110, FM128; GEN109 at ILIC              4
FM212                 Consumer Behavior                                              FM130                                     4
FM220                 Visual Techniques & Design                                     ART100, ART110                            4
FM238                 Founda ons of Retail Mathema cs                                FM120                                     4
FM310                 Catalog Development                                            FM210, FM212, FM220                       4
FM312                 Retail Buying                                                  FM238                                     4
FM320                 Inventory & Stock Controls                                     FM312                                     4
FM324                 Apparel Evalua on & Produc on                                  FM126, FM210                              4
FM424                 Event Planning & Promo on                                                                                4
FM338                 Fashion Marke ng Por olio (AIOHC) or                                                                     2
FM202                 Professional Selling for Merchandising (ILIC, ILIS, AIMD)
Suppor ng Courses
ART100                Design Fundamentals                                                                                      4
ART110                Color Theory                                                                                             4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101                English I                                                      GEN095 or placement                       4
GEN105                Effec ve Speaking                                               GEN101 at ILIC                            4
GEN244                Psychology                                                     GEN101, GEN105                            4
                      GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC) or                        Placement or GEN096                       4
                      Mathema cs 100-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIMD, AIOHC)               Placement or GEN098
                      Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                        GEN101, GEN105                            4
                      Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                      GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement   4




                                                              27 Academic Programs
Visual Communica ons
GRAPHIC DESIGN, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Michigan, Cincinna , Tinley Park

Program Mission
The mission of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program in Graphic Design is to provide students with industry-relevant and
competency-based academic programs built on a solid art and design founda on that will prepare them for entry-level em-
ployment and career advancement in graphic design, adver sing and related fields. We believe that this is possible through
learner-centered instruc on delivered by qualified faculty to students who are capable of and commi ed to an ac ve role in
learning.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Graphic design principles: Students will apply learning outcomes from founda ons courses to graphic design problems.
2. Problem-solving: Students will develop original, professional-level solu ons to graphic design problems based on ap-
propriate research and within specified parameters such as, deadlines, audience, budget, construc on and output consider-
a ons.
3. Technology: Students will use appropriate technology to produce professional examples of their work.
4. Cri cal thinking: Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze and cri que graphic design.
5. Images: Students will generate original images in support of their design work.
6. Professionalism and professional prac ce: Students will develop an understanding of design business prac ces and pro-
fessional expecta ons.
7. Communica on: Students will use visual and verbal communica on to present content and meaning effec vely; they will
possess oral and wri en skills to present concepts to employers, clients, and others; they will possess teamwork, collabora-
  on, and nego a on skills.
8. Context: Students will understand the broader context of their work: social and historical, language, informa on systems,
and finance

Program Descrip on
A Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Graphic Design from The Illinois Ins tute of Art is a significant step toward a career in
graphic design. Students begin by exploring design theories and principles. Further study emphasizes the applica on of
theory in current design problems. Students experiment in different media including print, electronic and three-dimensions.
A final por olio that demonstrates the graduate’s strengths in design completes the Graphic Design degree.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Graphic Design, students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-credits with
60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher. Also a
student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work, meet por olio requirements including par cipa-
  on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course where a por olio is produced.




                                                    28 Academic Programs
Visual Communica ons
Requirements for B.F.A. in Graphic Design
Course                Title                                                   Prerequisites and Course Sequences                     Credits
Core Courses
GD105                 Survey of Graphic Design                                                                                       4
GD107                 Introduc on to Design Applica ons                                                                              4
GD108                 Digital Photography for Designers                       ART110, and DPH242                                     4
GD109                 Digital Illustra on                                     GD107                                                  4
GD110                 Introduc on to Typography: Tradi onal                   ART100, and ART110                                     4
GD211                 Digital Pre-Press                                       GD203, and DPH242                                      4
GD212                 Typography: Hierarchy                                   GD110                                                  4
GD203                 Digital Layout                                          GD107, GD110 and GD212                                 4
GD204                 History of Graphic Design                               GD302                                                  4
GD207                 Corporate Iden ty                                       GD109, and GD212                                       4
GD300                 Conceptual Imagery                                      GD302                                                  4
GD301                 Package Design                                          GD108, GD211, and GD203                                4
GD302                 Por olio I                                              Only by Permission of Academic Director                4
GD303                 Typography: Expressive & Experimental                   GD212                                                  4
GD304                 Publica on Design                                       GD211, GD300 and GD303                                 4
GD305                 Media Business Law                                      GD207                                                  4
GD401                 Art Direc on                                            Only by Permission of Academic Director                4
GD403                 Por olio II                                             Only by Permission of Academic Director                4
GD404                 Professional Development for Graphic Design             Only by Permission of Academic Director                4
GD405                 Graphic Design Internship                               Only by Permission of Academic Director                4
GD406                 Sustainable Design Issues & Topics                      GD404                                                  4
GD407                 Senior Project                                          Only by Permission of Academic Director                4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100                Design Fundamentals                                                                                            4
ART102                Observa onal Drawing                                    ART100, ART110                                         4
ART110                Color Theory                                                                                                   4
DPH242                Image Manipula on                                       ART110                                                 4
WDIM230               Fundamentals of Authoring                                                                                      4
WDIM110               Designing for Mul media Display                                                                                4
WDIM130               Fundamentals of Interac ve Design                                                                              4
WDIM435               Por olio I                                                                                                     4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101                English I                                               GEN095 or placement                                    4
GEN102                English II                                              GEN101                                                 4
GEN105                Effec ve Speaking                                        GEN101 at ILIC                                         4
                      Art History - GEN211 or GEN212                          GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                      GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or           Placement or GEN096                                    4
                      Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)          GEN101, GEN105
                      Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                 GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                      Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                 GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233              4
                      Mathema cs Elec ve                                      GEN098 or placement                                    4
                      Mathema cs Elec ve                                      GEN098 or placement                                    4
                      Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve               GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
                      Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve               GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
                      Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve               GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286              4
                      Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                        GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                      Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                        GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248              4
GEN399                General Educa on Capstone                               All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level   4
                                                                              courses; and at least one course between 310 and
                                                                              382




                                                            29 Academic Programs
Visual Communica ons
GRAPHIC DESIGN, Associate of Applied Science
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Michigan, Cincinna , Tinley Park

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Graphic design principles: Students will apply learning outcomes from founda ons courses to graphic design problems.
2. Problem-solving: Students will develop original, professional-level solu ons to graphic design problems based on ap-
propriate research and within specified parameters such as, deadlines, audience, budget, construc on and output consider-
a ons.
3. Technology: Students will use appropriate technology to produce professional examples of their work.
4. Cri cal thinking: Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze and cri que graphic design.
5. Images: Students will generate original images in support of their design work.
6. Professionalism and professional prac ce: Students will develop an understanding of design business prac ces and pro-
fessional expecta ons.
7. Communica on: Students will use visual and verbal communica on to present content and meaning effec vely; they will
possess oral and wri en skills to present concepts to employers, clients, and others; they will possess teamwork, collabora-
  on, and nego a on skills.
8. Context: Students will understand the broader context of their work: social and historical, language, informa on systems,
and finance.

Program Descrip on
Study in the Associate of Applkied Science Graphic Design program at The Illinois Ins tute of Art begins with the fundamen-
tals: drawing, perspec ve, color, composi on, typography and adver sing design. Advanced work, introduced gradually, in-
cludes computer graphics, computer illustra on and desktop publishing. The ever-changing world of graphic design includes
some of the most crea ve and challenging fields available to ar sts today. Adver sing, publishing and design are just a few
examples of professions in which graphic designers work.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive an Associate of Applied Science degree in Graphic Design, students must complete a minimum of 90 quarter-
credits with 24 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 66 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or
higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and sa sfy all por olio require-
ments including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                    30 Academic Programs
Visual Communica ons
Requirements for A.A.S. in Graphic Design
Course                Title                                                       Prerequisites and Course Sequences        Credits
Core Courses
GD105                 Survey of Graphic Design                                                                              4
GD107                 Introduc on to Design Applica ons                                                                     4
GD108                 Digital Photography for Designers                           ART110, and DPH242                        4
GD109                 Digital Illustra on                                         GD107                                     4
GD110                 Introduc on to Typography: Tradi onal                       ART100, ART110                            4
GD211                 Digital Pre-Press                                           GD203, DPH242                             4
GD212                 Typography: Hierarchy                                       GD110                                     4
GD203                 Digital Layout                                              GD107, GD110 and GD212                    4
GD207                 Corporate Iden ty                                           GD109, and GD212                          4
GD302                 Por olio I                                                  Only by Permission of Academic Director   4
GD306                 Graphic Design Associate Por olio Final Review                                                        2
Suppor ng Courses
ART100               Design Fundamentals                                                                                    4
ART102               Observa onal Drawing                                         ART100, ART110                            4
ART110               Color Theory                                                                                           4
DPH242               Image Manipula on                                            ART110                                    4
WDIM230              Fundamentals of Authoring                                                                              4
WDIM110              Designing for Mul media Display                                                                        4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101               English I                                                    GEN095 or placement                       4
GEN105               Effec ve Speaking                                             GEN101 at ILIC                            4
                     Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                      GEN101, GEN105                            4
                     Mathema cs Elec ve                                           GEN098 or placement                       4
                     Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement   4
                     Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                             GEN101, GEN105                            4




                                                           31 Academic Programs
Visual Communica ons
ILLUSTRATION & DESIGN, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago and Schaumburg

Program Mission
The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustra on & Design degree program is designed to produce graduates who develop and pro-
duce images for visual communica ons. Students will have the opportunity to apply skills from communica on design and
the fine arts and to develop the crea ve vision necessary for an entry-level career in the industry. Graduates will be able
to integrate communica ons goals and visual messages as part of a crea ve team. The program’s curriculum is designed to
provide a founda on in drawing, pain ng and illustra on techniques for both tradi onal and emerging media, as well as a
working knowledge of graphic design produc on.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Technical Skills: Graduates will be able to manipulate a variety of hand tools and art materials to draw, paint, or otherwise
render an illustra on from concept to finished product. They will be able to prepare illustra ons for display in a variety of
forms including print.
2. Design: Graduates will be able to apply the design elements and principles, concepts, media and layouts to their illustra-
  ons. They will be able to produce illustra ons that demonstrate a concrete ability to communicate a clear and power-
ful idea or message using formal elements. They will cul vate a design process that is solu on driven, flexible, and well
informed.
3. Technology: Graduates will demonstrate the capability to produce layouts, scans, mechanicals, color separa ons, digital
files, and other forms as required by a par cular project.
4. Context: Graduates will be able to examine the broader context of the illustra on field including art and design history,
literature, and the commercial uses of illustra on and how the illustrator func ons in diverse environments.
5. Planning: Graduates will be able to use self-discipline and clear thinking to set professional goals and work on them with-
out outside direc on. They will work efficiently and possess the me management skills to meet deadlines.
6. Professionalism: Graduates will work effec vely as an employee or as an independent contractor, with knowledge of
business prac ces, accoun ng, legal issues, marke ng, and self-promo on.
7. Communica on: Graduates will be able to communicate their crea ve vision clearly using graphic and technological
means. In addi on, they will listen effec vely and communicate clearly in both oral and wri en formats.

Program Descrip on
The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustra on & Design degree program is designed to produce graduates who can develop and
produce illustrated images for both print and media using skills from both graphic design and the fine arts. The program
is designed to focus on the development of drawing, pain ng and basic design skills using tradi onal media and computer
methods. The program concentrates on the analysis of issues and development of concepts for illustrated imagery.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustra on & Design degree program are versed in produc on, pre-press, and lay-
out skills, which are essen al to illustra on and employability. The illustra on program culminates in the student’s develop-
ment of a professional por olio that demonstrates their exper se and poten al for growth.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Illustra on & Design students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter credit
hours with 72 credits in core subject ma er, 60 credit hours in general educa on and 48 credit hours in related courses with
a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and
meet por olio requirements including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required
course in which a por olio is produced and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to the Illinois Ins tute of Art-Chicago.

                                                    32 Academic Programs
Visual Communica ons
Requirements for B.F.A. in Illustra on & Design
Course        Title                                                        Prerequisites and Course Sequences                     Credits
Core Courses
ILD110        Intermediate Drawing                                         ART102, ART111                                         4
ILD120        Fundamentals of Pain ng                                      ART102, ART111                                         4
ILD130        Illustra on                                                  ILD120, GD107                                          4
ILD140        Illustra on & Graphic Design History                                                                                4
ILD150        Intermediate Pain ng                                         ILD120                                                 4
ILD160        Storyboarding for Illustra on                                ILD110, ILD130                                         4
ILD170        Editorial Illustra on                                        ILD160, GD109                                          4
ILD180        Advanced Digital Illustra on                                 ILD160, GD109                                          4
ILD190        Product & License Illustra on                                ILD180, GD211, GD212                                   4
ILD200        Conceptual Illustra on                                       ILD170, ILD180, GD212                                  4
ILD210        Graphic Novel                                                ILD200                                                 4
ILD220        Advanced Pain ng                                             ILD150, ILD160                                         4
ILD230        Advanced Illustra on                                         ILD170, ILD210                                         4
ILD240        The Business of Illustra on                                  ILD 190                                                4
ILD250        Internship                                                   ILD240. Permission of Department Director.             4
                                                                           Interna onal students need signed approval from the
                                                                           Interna onal Student Advisor.
ILD260        Illustra on Studio                                           ILD220, ILD230                                         4
ILD280        Por olio Prepara on                                          ILD230, ILD240                                         4
ILD300        Por olio                                                     ILD260, ILD280                                         4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100        Design Fundamentals                                                                                                 4
ART102        Observa onal Drawing                                         ART100, ART110                                         4
ART110        Color Theory                                                                                                        4
ART111        Life Drawing                                                 ART100, ART110                                         4
DPH242        Image Manipula on                                            ART110                                                 4
GD107         Introduc on to Design Applica ons                                                                                   4
GD109         Digital Illustra on                                          GD107                                                  4
GD110         Introduc on to Typography: Tradi onal                        ART100, and ART110                                     4
GD203         Digital Layout                                               GD107, GD110 and GD212 for Illustra on majors          4
GD211         Digital Pre-Press                                                                                                   4
GD212         Typography: Hierarchy                                        GD110                                                  4
IC402         Career Development                                           GEN105 or permission of instructor                     4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101        English I                                                    GEN095 or placement                                    4
GEN102        English II                                                   GEN101                                                 4
GEN105        Effec ve Speaking                                             GEN101 at ILIC                                         4
GEN155        Intro to Financial Mathema cs                                GEN098 or placement                                    4
GEN211        History of Western Art I                                     GEN101, GEN105                                         4
GEN212        History of Western Art II                                    GEN101, GEN105                                         4
GEN266        Biology and the Human Organism                               GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
GEN109        Computers for the Arts                                       GEN096 or placement                                    4
              Humani es - Literature - GEN327, GEN312, GEN315, or GEN325   GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233              4
              Mathema cs Elec ve                                           GEN098 or placement                                    4
              Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
              Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve                    GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286              4
              Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                             GEN101, GEN105                                         4
              Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                             GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248              4
GEN399        General Educa on Capstone                                    All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level   4
                                                                           courses; and at least one course between 310 and
                                                                           382


                                                        33 Academic Programs
Interior Design
INTERIOR DESIGN, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Michigan, Cincinna , Tinley Park

Program Mission
The Bachelor of Fine Arts Program in Interior Design program combines theore cal, conceptual, and prac cal experiences
that reinforce the rela onship between knowledge and applica on within the interior design profession. Major concentra-
  on courses cul vate a student’s skills and talents to provide graduates with the founda on to become versa le and respon-
sible interior designers in this constantly evolving field; to meet the needs of all who u lize space, whether to live, work,
play, heal, or learn.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Contextual knowledge: Graduates will have a global view and be able to make design decisions rela ve ecological, socio-
economic, and cultural contexts.
2. Design and problem-solving skills: Graduates will be able to implement the design process using cri cal and crea ve
thinking to solve problems appropriate to a client’s needs.
3. Communica on: Graduates will have wri en, oral, and visual communica on skills and will be able to collaborate in
teams.
4. Professionalism: Graduates will demonstrate awareness of industry prac ces and conduct themselves in a professional
manner.
5. Design principles: Graduates will be able to apply historic influences and design principles in order to deliver func onally
and aesthe cally appropriate interior spaces.
6. Knowledge of the field: Graduates will apply specific knowledge of the components of interior environments while con-
sidering the impact of building construc on and systems.
7. Regula ons: Graduates will have the ability to apply building codes, accessibility guidelines, and sustainable prac ces
with considera on given to human factors.

Program Descrip on
Interior Design students are encouraged to develop unique and comprehensive design solu ons; giving considera on to cli-
ent needs, building codes, accessibility guidelines, and sustainability. The sequen al program courses foster u liza on of the
design process. Technical skill-building and studio coursework offer students opportuni es to gain understanding of the ele-
ments and principles of residen al and commercial design, manual and computer-based skills, wri en and oral communica-
  on skills, and be be er informed of industry cer fica on exams and registra on. The program offers a s mula ng learning
environment led by dedicated and professional faculty where commi ed and talented students can develop their crea vity
and acquire the skills and knowledge to pursue a career in interior design.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Interior Design, students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-credits with
60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher. Also, a student must receive a pass-
ing grade or credit for all required course work, meet por olio requirements and sa sfy all financial obliga ons with The
Illinois Ins tute of Art. Gradua ng students must pass a required course where a por olio is produced. The por olio must
demonstrate entry-level employment competencies appropriate to the specific degree program. Each student in required to
par cipate in the Senior Por olio Show.




                                                     34 Academic Programs
Interior Design
Transfer credit
Interior Design students must complete a minimum of 25% of their General Educa on required coursework and 50% of their
core required coursework (Art Founda ons or Interior Design) at the branch loca on specific to where their degree is ul -
mately earned, unless deemed otherwise by the Academic Director of Interior Design. Considera on of transfer of credit in
the core curriculum, whether from a branch loca on, another Art Ins tute schools or another ins tu on, is evaluated with
a por olio review where the Academic Department Director will determine if minimum competencies and standards have
been met.




                                                  35 Academic Programs
Interior Design
Note: Twenty-four hours of requirements vary between Schaumburg and the other three campuses. This in some cases
affects prerequisites and course sequences.

 Requirements for B.F.A. in Interior Design
 Course      Title                                                  Prerequisites and Course Sequences                                     Credits
 Core Courses for All Campuses (76 credit hours of core courses)
 ID130       Architectural Dra ing                                  ART100                                                                 4
 ID135       Presenta on Techniques I                               ART102; follows ID130 at ILIC, AiMD and AiOHC                          4
 ID146       History of Design I                                                                                                           4
 ID177       Tex les, Materials, + Resources                        ID130 for ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD                                            4
 ID179       Elements of Interior Design                            ART100, ID130                                                          4
 ID200       Introduc on to Space Planning                          ID179; follows GEN109 for ILIC, AiMD, and AIOHC                        4
 ID213       Presenta on Techniques II                              ART110, ID135                                                          4
 ID227       Computer-Aided Design I                                ID179; follows GEN109 for ILIC, AiMD, and AIOHC                        4
 ID235       Computer-Aided Design II                               ID200, ID227; follows ID227 for ILIC, AIOHC, and AiMD                  4
 ID236       History of Design II                                   Follows ID146 if possible                                              4
 ID237        Codes + Specifica ons                              ID177, ID179; follows ID227 at ILIC AIOHC and AIMD and follows or          4
                                                                is taken with ID200 if possible
 ID240       Ligh ng                                            ID200                                                                      4
 ID300       Professional Prac ce                               ID200                                                                      4
 ID306       Residen al Environments                            ART224, ID179, ID213, ID235, ID237, ID240                                  4
 ID340       Computer-Aided Design III                          ID213, ID235, ID237, ID240                                                 4
 ID401       Interior Design Internship                         ID300; must be taken during the last three quarters; interna onal          4
                                                                students need signed approval from the interna onal student
                                                                advisor
 ID414       Interior Detailing + Systems                       ID340; ID373 for ILIS; follows ID310, ID315 for ILIC AIOHC and AIMD        4
 ID420       Interior Design Thesis I                           Must be taken during the last three quarters. Follows GEN399 for           4
                                                                ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD; ID237, ID300 for ILIS
 ID425       Por olio Prepara on                                Must be taken during the last quarter or with Academic Director’s          4
                                                                approval.
 Addi onal Courses Required at Chicago, Michigan, and Cincinna Campuses (20 credit hours of courses)
 ID225       Interior Design Communica on                       ART224, GEN109, ID179 for ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD. Follows ID200                 4
 ID310       Construc on Documenta on                         ID235, ID237, ID240                                                          4
 ID315       Interior Objects + Furniture                     ID200, ID213, ID225, ID227                                                   4
 ID382       Interior Design Studio                           ID213, ID225, ID235, ID237, ID240                                            8
             Second Interior Design Elec ve                   Prerequisites vary                                                           4
 Addi onal Courses Required Required at Schaumburg campus (24 credit hours of courses)
 ID275       Kitchen + Bath Design                            ID177, ID213, ID227                                                          4
 ID302       Sustainable Design                               ID213, ID235, ID237, ID240                                                   4
 ID325       Commercial Environments                          ID302                                                                        4
 ID373       Specialty Design                                 ID213, ART224, ID235, ID237, ID240, ID300                                    4
 ID402       History of Design III                            ART224, ID236, ID306                                                         4
 ID421       Interior Design Thesis II                        ID325, ID420                                                                 4
  Elec ve Courses (for ILIS, 1 course chosen from the list below: 4 credit hours; for ILIC, AIOHC, and AIMD, 2 courses chosen from the list below: 8
  credit hours)
 ID376        Advanced Residen al Design                            ID306                                                                  4
 ID383        Advanced Specialty Design                             ID325                                                                  4
 ID391        Advanced Restora on                                   ID146, ID213, ID236, ID237, ID240                                      4
 ID395        Advanced 3-D Digital Design + Presenta on             ID340                                                                  4
 ID397        Advanced Sustainable Design                           ID213, ID237, ID240                                                    4
 ID421        Interior Design Thesis II (required for ILIS)         ID225, ID300 for ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD; ID325, ID420 for ILIS              4




                                                               36 Academic Programs
Interior Design
 Requirements for B.F.A. in Interior Design, con nued


 Suppor ng Courses for All Campuses (16 credit hours on all campuses)
 ART100      Design Fundamentals                                                                                                       4
 ART102      Observa onal Drawing                                 ART100, ART110                                                       4
 ART110      Color Theory                                                                                                              4
 ART224      Form & Space                                         ART100, ART110                                                       4
 General Educa on Courses for All Campuses (60 credit hours on all campuses)
 GEN101      English I                                            GEN095 or placement                                                  4
 GEN102      English II                                           GEN101                                                               4
 GEN105      Effec ve Speaking                                     GEN101 at ILIC                                                       4
             Art History - GEN211 or GEN212                       GEN101, GEN105                                                       4
             GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or        Placement or GEN096                                                  4
             Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)       GEN101, GEN105
             Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve            GEN101, GEN105                                                         4
             Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve            GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233                              4
             Mathema cs Elec ve                                 GEN098 or placement                                                    4
             Mathema cs Elec ve                                 GEN098 or placement                                                    4
             Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve          GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                                4
             Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve          GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                                4
             Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve          GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286                              4
             Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                   GEN101, GEN105                                                         4
             Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                   GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248                              4
 GEN399      General Educa on Capstone                          All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level courses; and at   4
                                                                least one course between 310 and 382

Total credit hours: 76 (core) + 28 (campus-specific plus elec ves) + 16 (suppor ng courses) + 60 (general educa on ) = 180




                                                           37 Academic Programs
Interior Design
INTERIOR DESIGN, Associate of Applied Science
Offered at Cincinna and Michigan

Program Mission
The Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) program in Interior Design provides graduates industry-relevant knowledge and
skills necessary to secure an entry-level posi on in the interior design profession. The program provides graduates with
the founda on to become versa le and socially responsible interior designers in this constantly evolving field, to meet the
needs of all who u lize interior space, whether to live, work, play, heal, or learn.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Contextual knowledge: Graduates will be able to make design decisions rela ve to the needs and wants of the users of
the space with a en on to an interior designer’s social responsibili es.
2. Design and problem-solving skills: Graduates will be able to implement the design process using cri cal and crea ve
thinking skills to solve problems appropriate to a client’s needs.
3. Communica on: Graduates will have wri en, oral, and visual communica on skills and will be able to collaborate in
teams.
4. Professionalism: Graduates will demonstrate awareness of industry prac ces and conduct themselves in a professional
manner.
5. Design principles: Graduates will be able to apply historic influences and design principles in order to deliver func onally
and aesthe cally-appropriate interior spaces.
6. Knowledge of the field: Graduates will apply specific knowledge of the materials and components of interior environ-
ments.
7. Regula ons: Graduates will have the ability to apply building codes, accessibility guidelines, and sustainable prac ces
with considera on given to human factors.



Program Descrip on
Interior design courses are designed to cul vate a student’s competencies and talents. Through their design solu ons and
u liza on of the design process, students are encouraged to consider the needs and wants of the users of the space, build-
ing codes, accessibility guidelines, and sustainability. The program’s founda on lies in the understanding and applica on
of the principles and elements of design. In addi on, students will acquire both hand and computer skills to aid in visually
communica ng their design ideas to all stakeholders. The program offers a s mula ng learning environment led by highly
creden aled, experienced , and dedicated faculty where commi ed and talented students can develop their crea vity and
acquire the skills and knowledge to pursue a career in interior design.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive an Associate of Applied Science degree in Interior Design, students must complete a minimum of 90 quarter-cred-
its with 24 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 66 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher.
Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and sa sfy all por olio requirements
including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                     38 Academic Programs
Interior Design
Requirements for A.A.S. in Interior Design
Course                Title                                                       Prerequisites and Course Sequences              Credits
Core Courses
ID130                 Architectural Dra ing                                       ART100                                          4
ID135                 Presenta on Techniques I                                    ART102; follows ID130 for ILIC, AIOHC, AiMD     4
ID146                 History of Design I                                                                                         4
ID177                 Tex les, Materials, + Resources                             ID130 for ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD                     4
ID179                 Elements of Interior Design                                 ART100, ID130                                   4
ID200                 Introduc on to Space Planning                               ID179                                           4
ID202                 Interior Design Associate Por olio                                                                          2
ID213                 Presenta on Techniques II                                   ART110, ID135                                   4
ID225                 Interior Design Communica on                                ART224, ID179 for ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD. Follows    4
                                                                                  ID200 if possible on all campuses
ID227                  Computer-Aided Design I                                    ID179                                           4
ID236                  History of Design II                                       Follows ID146 if possible                       4
ID237                  Codes + Specifica ons                                       ID177, ID179; follows ID227 at ILIC AIOHC and   4
                                                                                  AIMD and follows or is taken with ID200 if
                                                                                  possible
ID240                Ligh ng                                                      ID200                                           4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100               Design Fundamentals                                                                                          4
ART102               Observa onal Drawing                                         ART100, ART110                                  4
ART110               Color Theory                                                                                                 4
ART224               Form & Space                                                 ART100, ART110                                  4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101               English I                                                    GEN095 or placement                             4
GEN105               Effec ve Speaking                                             GEN101 at ILIC                                  4
                     Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                      GEN101, GEN105                                  4
                     Mathema cs Elec ve                                           GEN098 or placement                             4
                     Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement         4
                     Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                             GEN101, GEN105                                  4




                                                           39 Academic Programs
Media Arts
AUDIO PRODUCTION, Bachelor of Science Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg

Program Mission
The Audio Produc on program is designed to prepare graduates for entry-level careers in the field of audio engineering and
produc on. Through rigorous study of theore cal concepts, industry prac ces, and hands-on produc on techniques, stu-
dents work to develop the technical skills and aesthe c sensibili es needed to become professional engineers, technicians,
producers and business people.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Communica on: Graduates will have wri en, oral, and visual communica on skills needed to communicate ideas to
employers, colleagues, and clients. They will effec vely use technical language appropriate to audio produc on and also be
able to communicate complex concepts to non-professionals.
2. Audio produc on processes: Graduates will be able to produce and assemble the audio elements of a film, including
voice, sound effects, musical score, and automa c dialogue replacement and will have technical proficiency in recording and
edi ng professional audio material. They will be able to conceptualize, plan, execute, and deliver quality music recordings
and post-produc on projects, demonstra ng industry standards and using industry-related tools.
3. Problem Solving: Graduates can efficiently troubleshoot and solve problems typically encountered by audio professionals.
4. Edi ng and Cri cal Thinking: Graduates will demonstrate how edi ng styles, techniques, and approaches affect audience
reac on; they can apply peer and professional cri que as well as self-evalua on to con nuously improve the quality of their
work.
5. Professionalism: Graduates can present and conduct themselves professionally and demonstrate an understanding of
specific career paths, job responsibili es, and industry expecta ons. Graduates can apply the business and economic prin-
ciples and prac ces of the audio industry while maintaining legal and ethical standards.
6. Context: Graduates can explain the scien fic and mathema cal founda ons of acous cs and electronics, the applicability
of audio produc on in a wide range of media, the basic principles of music theory, and the social context in which sound is
produced and interpreted.

Program Descrip on
The tools for recording, edi ng, and delivery of audio are evolving at a rapid pace. Today’s professional audio engineers and
producers must constantly stay abreast of current developments in equipment technology and produc on methods. To do
this, they must have a solid founda on in the basic physics of sound and acous cs as well as skills in equipment opera on,
usage, and design. The Audio Produc on program meets the needs of graduates entering the industry by offering a curricu-
lum that provides students with a solid background in technology, theory and industry prac ces. Prac cal hands-on experi-
ence with recording and live produc on equipment is essen al to being prepared for the contemporary market place.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Audio Produc on, students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-credits
with 60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher.
Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work, meet por olio requirements including
par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which a por olio is produced
and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                    40 Academic Programs
Media Arts
Requirements for B.F.A. in Audio Produc on
Course       Title                                                       Prerequisites and Course Sequences                              Credits
Core Courses
AUD101       Survey of the Music Industry                                                                                                4
AUD120       Fundamentals of Audio                                       GEN109 or concurrent for ILIC                                   4
AUD180       Digital Audio                                               AUD120                                                          4
AUD201       Music Theory                                                AUD101                                                          4
AUD203       Listening and Analysis                                      AUD201                                                          4
AUD210       Audio Technology I                                          AUD120                                                          4
AUD220       Audio Technology II                                         AUD210                                                          4
AUD225       History of Mo on Media & Mass Comm.                         AUD101                                                          4
AUD230       Audio Recording I                                           AUD210                                                          4
AUD240       Audio Recording II                                          AUD230                                                          4
AUD310       Audio Electronics                                           GEN380 or GEN382                                                4
AUD320       MIDI Systems                                                AUD201, AUD220                                                  4
AUD331       Synthesis & Sound Design I                                  AUD320                                                          4
AUD335       Media Business Prac ces & Law                               AUD101, AUD225                                                  4
AUD340       Advanced Recording Techniques I                             AUD240                                                          4
AUD350       Live Sound Reinforcement I                                  AUD240, AUD310                                                  4
AUD395       Media Delivery Systems & Distribu on                        DFV225, DFV365                                                  4
AUD400       Entertainment Marke ng & Management                         AUD225, AUD335                                                  4
AUD401       Live Sound Reinforcement II                                 AUD350                                                          4
AUD412       Senior Project I                                            AUD400, AUD440 or concurrent                                    4
AUD420       Internship                                                  Permission of Academic Director                                 4
AUD422       Senior Project II                                           AUD412                                                          4
AUD431       Synthesis & Sound Design II                                 AUD331                                                          4
AUD440       Advanced Recording Techniques II                            AUD340                                                          4
AUD445       Por olio I                                                  AUD440                                                          4
AUD455       Por olio II                                                 AUD445                                                          4
Suppor ng Courses
DFV101       Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking                           GEN109 at ILIC                                                  4
DFV225       Fundamentals of Edi ng                                                                                                      4
DFV365       Sound Design                                                                                                                4
IC402        Career Development (or equivalent course at ILIS)           GEN105 or permission of instructor                              4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101       English I                                                   GEN095 or placement                                             4
GEN102       English II                                                  GEN101                                                          4
GEN105       Effec ve Speaking                                            GEN101 at ILIC                                                  4
GEN150       Mathema cal Concepts and Connec ons                         GEN098 or placement                                             4
             Algebra - GEN256 College Algebra (ILIC) or GEN250 Topics    GEN150                                                          4
             in Mathema cs (ILIS)
             Acous cs - GEN380 Seminar In Physical Science (ILIS) or     GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286                       4
             GEN382 Acous cs (ILIC)
             Fine Arts - GEN205-GEN212                                   Physics - GEN279 or GEN286                                      4
             Physics - GEN279 Introduc on to College Physics (ILIC) or   GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or placement                             4
             GEN286 Physics With Lab (ILIS)
             GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or               Placement or GEN096                                             4
             Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)              GEN101, GEN105
             Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                     GEN101, GEN105                                                  4
             Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                     GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233                       4
             Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                   GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                         4
             Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                            GEN101, GEN105                                                  4
             Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                            GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248                       4
GEN399       General Educa on Capstone                                   All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level courses;   4
                                                                         and at least one course between 310 and 382

                                                            41 Academic Programs
Media Arts
DIGITAL FILMMAKING & VIDEO PRODUCTION, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Cincinna

Program Mission
The mission of the Digital Filmmaking & Video Produc on program is to prepare students for the next genera on of digital
produc on and delivery who can meet the needs of corporate communica on, television, e-business, and other media
outlets for their exis ng markets. It enables students to create compelling, effec ve, and aesthe cal content to be delivered
on CD, DVD, videotape, broadband Internet, and/or other emerging means of technology, and prepares them for successful
entry-level employment in the field.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Communica on: Graduates will understand the elements of storytelling – how to communicate with an intended audi-
ence, including a refined sense of pacing and cri cal story elements; they will know how to collaborate with and direc ng
all par cipants in a project, including crew, talent, and clients; they will have wri en, oral, and visual communica on skills
needed to communicate ideas to employers, colleagues, and clients.
2. Cinematography and Ligh ng: Graduates will understand the theory, techniques, and terminology of the field; will apply
cinematography and ligh ng as components of the storytelling process.
3. Produc on Processes & Problem-solving: Graduates will be able to conceptualize, pre-produce (loca ons, wardrobe, etc.)
direct and execute successful produc on plans; will be able to iden fy, an cipate and find solu ons to technical, logis cal,
storytelling, and personnel problems.
4. Audio produc on processes: Graduates will be able to produce and assemble the audio elements of a film, including
voice, sound effects, and musical score, automa c dialogue replacement and will have technical proficiency in recording and
edi ng professional audio material.
5. Edi ng and Cri cal Thinking: Graduates will understand how edi ng styles, techniques, and approaches affect the overall
story and audience reac on; will have technical proficiency in non-linear edi ng techniques; will be able to cri que their
own and others’ work and apply their self-cri quing ability to edi ng a work.
6. Graphic Design & Visual Effects: Graduates will be able to produce effec ve mo on graphic and composi ng and anima-
  on projects displaying technical ap tude, aesthe c decision-making and an awareness of intended audience.
7. Context: Graduates will be familiar with a wide range of stories in various genres; film history; aesthe cs; they will have
research skills related to documentary subjects and to ensuring the accuracy of films.
8. Professionalism: Graduates will present and conduct themselves professionally; demonstrate knowledge of the film
industry, including career paths, responsibili es and industry expecta ons; will apply business principles and prac ces while
maintaining legal and ethical standards

Program Descrip on
Students take advantage of well equipped video and audio studios, up-to-date computer labs and a wide range of industry-
proven so ware. Students complete this program with a sophis cated senior project included in their video por olio of
original produc on work. This por olio, essen al to seeking employment in the industry, demonstrates the student’s mas-
tery of design, produc on and communica ons skills.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Digital Filmmaking & Video Produc on, students must complete a minimum
of 180 quarter-credits with 60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in the specialty area with a cumula ve
GPA of 2.0 or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and meet por olio
requirements including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which
a por olio is produced and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.

                                                    42 Academic Programs
Media Arts
Requirements for B.F.A. in Digital Filmmaking & Video Produc on
Course              Title                                                Prerequisites and Course Sequences                     Credits
Core Courses
DFV100              Survey of Film & Video                                                                                      4
DFV101              Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking                    ART100; GEN109 at ILIC                                 4
DFV120              Fundamentals of Audio                                GEN109 at ILIC                                         4
DFV200              Digital Cinematography                               ART100; DFV100, DFV101                                 4
DFV201              Scriptwri ng & Storytelling                          GEN101, DFV100                                         4
DFV220              Studio Produc on                                     DFV100, DFV101, DFV120                                 4
DFV225              Fundamentals of Edi ng                               DFV100, DFV101, DFV120                                 4
DFV230              Fundamentals of Ligh ng                              DFV101, DFV200                                         4
DFV300              Direc ng & Pre-Produc on                             DFV201, DFV220                                         4
DFV302              Media Theory & Cri cism                              DFV101, DFV201                                         4
DFV305              Media Composi ng                                     VFX250, DFV200, DFV225, DFV230                         4
DFV312              Short Form Produc on                                 DFV120, DFV225, DFV300, MAA221                         4
DFV315              Ac ng & Direc ng                                     DFV300                                                 4
DFV320              Produc on Audio                                      DFV120, DFV220                                         4
DFV325              Documentary Produc on                                DFV200, DFV225, DFV230, DFV300                         4
DFV330              Por olio Prepara on I                                DFV300, DFV305, DFV325                                 4
DFV360              Advanced Edi ng                                      DFV225, DFV325                                         4
DFV365              Sound Design                                         Follows DFV120, DFV225, DFV325 for DFV majors          4
DFV407 or         Internship or                                          Permission of Director                                 4
DFV441            Senior Project I                                       DFV315, DFV325, DFV330
DFV430            Por olio Prepara on II                                 DFV360, DFV312, DFV330, VFX350                         4
DFV451            Senior Project II                                      DFV365 and either DFV407 or DFV441                     4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100            Design Fundamentals                                                                                           4
ART110            Color Theory                                                                                                  4
DPH242            Image Manipula on                                      ART110                                                 4
IC402             Career Development (or equivalent course at ILIS)      GEN105 or permission of instructor                     4
MAA221            Storyboarding                                                                                                 4
VFX110            Digital Typography                                     ART100; GEN109 at ILIC and AiMD                        4
VFX250            Fundamentals of Mo on Graphics                         VFX110                                                 4
VFX350            Broadcast Mo on Graphics                               MAA221, VFX250                                         4
WDIM110           Designing for Mul media Display                                                                               4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101            English I                                              GEN095 or placement                                    4
GEN102            English II                                             GEN101                                                 4
GEN105            Effec ve Speaking                                       GEN101 at ILIC                                         4
                  Fine Arts - GEN205-GEN212                              GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                  GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or          Placement or GEN096                                    4
                  Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)         GEN101, GEN105
                  Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                  Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233              4
                  Mathema cs Elec ve                                     GEN098 or placement                                    4
                  Mathema cs Elec ve                                     GEN098 or placement                                    4
                  Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve              GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
                  Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve              GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
                  Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve              GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286              4
                  Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                       GEN101, GEN105                                         4
                  Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                       GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248              4
GEN399            General Educa on Capstone                              All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level   4
                                                                         courses; and at least one course between 310 and 382


                                                           43 Academic Programs
Media Arts
VIDEO PRODUCTION, Associate of Applied Science
Offered at Cincinna

Program Mission
The mission of the Associate of Applied Science program in Video Produc on is to provide students with basic skills related
to digital filmmaking.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Communica on: Graduates will understand the elements of storytelling – how to communicate with an intended audi-
ence; they will have basic wri en, oral, and visual communica on skills.
2. Cinematography and Ligh ng: Graduates will understand the fundamental theory, techniques, and terminology of the
field; will apply cinematography and ligh ng as components of the storytelling process.
3. Edi ng and Cri cal Thinking: Graduates will understand and apply basic edi ng techniques to affect the overall story and
audience reac on.
4. Professionalism: Graduates will present and conduct themselves professionally; demonstrate knowledge of the film
industry, including career paths, responsibili es and industry expecta ons; will apply business principles and prac ces while
maintaining legal and ethical standards

Program Descrip on
Students take advantage of well-equipped video and audio studios, up-to-date computer labs and a wide range of industry-
proven so ware. Students will complete a por olio that demonstrates their knowledge of design, produc on and communi-
ca ons skills.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive an Associate of Applied Science degree (AAS) in Video Produc on students must complete a minimum of 90
quarter-credits with 24 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 66 quarter-credits in the specialty area with a cu-
mula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and sa sfy
all financial obliga ons with The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                    44 Academic Programs
Media Arts
Requirements for A.A.S. in Video Produc on
Course              Title                                                          Prerequisites and Course Sequences        Credits
Core Courses
DFV100              Survey of Film & Video                                                                                   4
DFV101              Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking                              ART100                                    4
DFV120              Fundamentals of Audio                                                                                    4
DFV200              Digital Cinematography                                         ART100; DFV100, DFV101                    4
DFV201              Scriptwri ng & Storytelling                                    GEN101, DFV100                            4
DFV202              Digital Filmmaking Associate Por olio                                                                    2
DFV220              Studio Produc on                                               DFV100, DFV101, DFV120                    4
DFV225              Fundamentals of Edi ng                                         DFV100, DFV101, DFV120                    4
DFV230              Fundamentals of Ligh ng                                        DFV101, DFV200                            4
DFV300              Direc ng & Pre-Produc on                                       MAA221, DFV201, DFV220                    4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100              Design Fundamentals                                                                                      4
ART110              Color Theory                                                                                             4
DPH242              Image Manipula on                                              ART110                                    4
MAA221              Storyboarding                                                                                            4
VFX110              Digital Typography                                             ART100                                    4
VFX250              Fundamentals of Mo on Graphics                                 VFX110                                    4
WDIM110             Designing for Mul media Display                                                                          4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101              English I                                                      GEN095 or placement                       4
GEN105              Effec ve Speaking                                               GEN101 at ILIC                            4
                    Art History - GEN205-GEN212                                    GEN101, GEN105                            4
                    Mathema cs Elec ve                                             GEN098 or placement                       4
                    Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                      GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement   4
                    Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                               GEN101, GEN105                            4




                                                            45 Academic Programs
Media Arts
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Michigan, Tinley Park

Program Mission
The Bachelor of Fine Arts Digital Photography program is designed to prepare graduates who possess the technical skills and
a mature design vision needed to produce compelling imagery. Through rigorous study of the principles of photography and
hands-on produc on techniques, students work to develop the technical skills and aesthe c sensibili es needed to become
professional photographers and business people.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Communica on: Graduates will use wri en, oral, and visual communica on skills to communicate ideas effec vely to
employers, colleagues, and clients. They will be able to communicate complex concepts to non-professionals.
2. Design: Graduates will ar culate and apply the principles of design to create effec ve images.
3. Produc on Processes: Graduates will apply technical skills and use appropriate terminology with respect to photographic
tools, ligh ng techniques, color management, and the storage and electronic presenta on of images.
4. Problem-Solving: Graduates will use problem-solving processes to produce visually compelling imagery reflec ve of their
personal styles and visions.
5. Context: Graduates will ar culate how they place themselves and their work within a historical and cultural context.
6. Professionalism. Graduates will demonstrate the ability to conceptualize, plan and implement marke ng strategies and
a business model reflec ve of industry standards, while demonstra ng personal mo va on and ethical prac ces. They will
present and conduct themselves professionally.

Program Descrip on
The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program in Digital Photography reflects the con nued impact of technology in the pho-
tography industry and the breadth of skills needed by graduates to maintain and increase marketability and success upon
comple on of their degree. Graduates must be able to work as a member of a crea ve team, have excellent communica on
skills, and have good business skills. Addi onally, a graduate of this program must nego ate, sell, coordinate work with
others, operate equipment, use tools, follow direc ons, plan, make decisions, and create spa al visualiza on. Specifically,
this program includes areas such as digital color management, digital asset management, ligh ng, composi on, and image
manipula on; related skills in web and video; business fundamentals; and an internship in the field.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Digital Photography, students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-credits
with 60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher.
Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work, meet por olio requirements including
par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which a por olio is produced
and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                   46 Academic Programs
Media Arts
Requirements for B.F.A. in Digital Photography
Course        Title                                               Prerequisites and Course Sequences                                     Credits
Core Courses
DPH101        History and Survey of Photography                                                                                          4
DPH102        Principles of Photography                                                                                                  4
DPH117        Photographic Design                                 ART100, and DPH102                                                     4
DPH242        Image Manipula on                                   ART110                                                                 4
DPH252        Advanced Image Manipula on                          DPH242                                                                 4
DPH253        Digital Photographic Produc on                      DPH117, and DPH242                                                     4
DPH258        Digital Darkroom                                    DPH252, and DPH253                                                     4
DPH260        Fundamentals of Ligh ng                             DPH253                                                                 4
DPH266        Loca on Photography                                 DPH253, and DPH260                                                     4
DPH267        Editorial Photography                               DPH253, and DPH260                                                     4
DPH315        Advanced Ligh ng                                    DPH260                                                                 4
DPH319        Photographic Studio                                 DPH315                                                                 4
DPH325        Photographic Essay & Visual Narra ve                DPH266, DPH267, and DPH315                                             4
DPH405        The Business of Photography                         GD404                                                                  4
DPH410        Specializa on                                       DPH325                                                                 4
DPH416        Art Direc on                                        Only by Permission of Academic Director                                4
DPH420        Internship                                          Only by Permission of Academic Director                                4
DPH425        Por olio Prepara on                                 Only by Permission of Academic Director                                4
DPH430        Senior Project                                      Only by Permission of Academic Director                                4
Suppor ng Courses
ADV317        Principles of Marke ng Research                                                                                            4
ART100        Design Fundamentals                                                                                                        4
ART102        Observa onal Drawing                                ART100, ART110                                                         4
ART110        Color Theory                                                                                                               4
DFV101        Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking                   ART100; GEN109 at ILIC                                                 4
GD109         Digital Illustra on                                                                                                        4
GD110         Introduc on to Typography: Tradi onal               ART100, and ART110                                                     4
GD211         Digital Pre-Press                                                                                                          4
GD404         Professional Development for Graphic Design         Only by Permission of Academic Director                                4
WDIM110       Designing for Mul media Display                                                                                            4
WDIM230       Fundamentals of Authoring                                                                                                  4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101        English I                                           GEN095 or placement                                                    4
GEN102        English II                                          GEN101                                                                 4
GEN105        Effec ve Speaking                                    GEN101 at ILIC                                                         4
              Art History - GEN211 or GEN212                      GEN101, GEN105                                                         4
              GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or       Placement or GEN096                                                    4
              Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)      GEN101, GEN105
              Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve             GEN101, GEN105                                                         4
              Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve             GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233                              4
              Mathema cs Elec ve                                  GEN098 or placement                                                    4
              Mathema cs Elec ve                                  GEN098 or placement                                                    4
              Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve           GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                                4
              Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve           GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                                4
              Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve           GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286                              4
              Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105                                                         4
              Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                    GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248                              4
GEN399        General Educa on Capstone                           All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level courses; and at   4
                                                                  least one course between 310 and 382



                                                           47 Academic Programs
Media Arts
GAME ART & DESIGN, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg

Program Mission
The mission of the Bachelor of Fine Arts Game Art & Design program is to teach students art founda on skills, 3-D modeling,
low-polygon art, game-level design, digital video and audio, and anima on to help them create and design games. We seek
to produce graduates who are highly skilled visual communicators and who combine ar s c talent with technical com-
petency. The program prepares graduates for careers in the game and other industries such as 2D and 3D ar sts, texture
mappers, and project managers; with experience and advancement some graduates may become game and level designers.
Graduates work as members of development teams to produce digital games, interac ve entertainment, and educa onal
and training so ware products.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Communica on: Graduates will be highly skilled visual communicators, will effec vely collaborate with other ar sts and
designers on a team, will be able to tell a story visually, and will possess wri en and oral skills that enable them to commu-
nicate effec vely with prospec ve employers, colleagues, and clients.
2. Problem Solving: Graduates will possess the crea ve design skills to conceptualize, develop, and evaluate a game; and
problem solving skills that result in game design solu ons, modeling and anima on appropriate for a client and/or target
audience; and will understand the process of project management.
3. Conceptual: Graduates will have the conceptual and drawing skills to create storyboards and design characters, environ-
ments, and other visual elements.
4. Technical: Graduates will understand the elements and principles of image manipula on, 2D and 3D anima on, audio
produc on, programming, and game design including technical skills and terminology.
5. Context: Graduates will understand game art and design in social, cultural, and historical contexts; will have the research
skills needed to develop game elements; will be able to apply mathema cal concepts; the principles of ac ng and staging;
and will possess an ability to apply real world observa ons to anima on.
6. Professional: Graduates will have developed current professional awareness, a high standard of ethics, an ability to work
independently, an understanding of the corporate cultures of the game industry, and a desire for life-long learning and pro-
fessional growth.

Program Descrip on
In pursuing the bachelor’s degree in Game Art & Design, students are encouraged to master tradi onal skills through a
rich variety of fundamental art courses while learning to use 2D and 3D design tools to create characters, backgrounds,
anima ons, and textures used in producing digital games and related interac ve media. In addi on, they acquire a level of
awareness and knowledge of the terminology used in programming and scrip ng to be able to converse intelligently with
programmers. The bachelor’s degree program also provides a unique learning opportunity in the management of projects
and game development teams. An cipated assignments and projects include designing gameplay and back stories; crea ng
characters and related environments; employing 3D modeling and anima on so ware to create game art; employing 2D im-
age so ware to create backgrounds and 3D textures; and applying knowledge of games to evaluate game products.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Game Art & Design, students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-credits
with 60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0 or higher.
Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work, meet por olio requirements including
par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which a por olio is produced
and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.
                                                     48 Academic Programs
Media Arts
Requirements for B.F.A. in Game Art & Design
Course         Title                                               Prerequisites and Course Sequences                              Credits
Core Courses
GAD101          Game Design & Game Play                                                                                            4
GAD211          Interac ve Storytelling                            GAD101                                                          4
GAD233          Background & Character Design                      ART111                                                          4
GAD325         Level Design                                        DPH242                                                          4
GAD335          Game Prototyping                                   GAD325                                                          4
GAD338          Game Modeling & Anima on                           MAA228                                                          4
GAD356          2D Digital Authoring                               MAA224                                                          4
GAD357          Character Modeling & Rigging                       MAA337                                                          4

GAD445         Advanced Game Prototyping                           GAD325                                                          4
GAD448         Character Anima on                                  MAA228                                                          4
GAD455         Team Game Produc on                                 GAD335 or GAD445                                                4
GAD466         Programming for the Ar st                           GAD356                                                          4
GAD467         Interior Spaces & Worlds                            MAA227                                                          4
MAA116         Audio for Games & Anima on                                                                                          4
MAA123         Drawing for Anima on                                ART111                                                          4
MAA217         3D Modeling                                         DPH242                                                          4
MAA221         Storyboarding                                       ART111                                                          4
MAA224         2D Anima on Principles                              ART111                                                          4
MAA227         Materials & Ligh ng                                 MAA217                                                          4
MAA228         3D Anima on                                         MAA217                                                          4
MAA337         Hard Surface & Organic Modeling                     MAA217                                                          4
MAA347         Advanced Ligh ng & Texturing                        MAA227                                                          4
MAA451         Por olio Founda ons                                 4 quarters or less from gradua on                               4
MAA461         Por olio Produc on I                                MAA451 – Second to Last Quarter                                 4
MAA471         Por olio Produc on II                               MAA461 – Last Quarter                                           4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100         Design Fundamentals                                                                                                 4
ART102         Observa onal Drawing                                ART100, ART110                                                  4
ART110         Color Theory                                                                                                        4
ART111         Life Drawing                                        ART100, ART110                                                  4
DPH242         Image Manipula on                                   ART110                                                          4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101         English I                                           GEN095 or placement                                             4
GEN102         English II                                          GEN101                                                          4
GEN105         Effec ve Speaking                                    GEN101 at ILIC                                                  4
               Fine Arts - GEN205-GEN212                           GEN101, GEN105                                                  4
               GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or       Placement or GEN096                                             4
               Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)      GEN101, GEN105
               Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve             GEN101, GEN105                                                  4
               Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve             GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233                       4
               Mathema cs Elec ve                                  GEN098 or placement                                             4
               Mathema cs Elec ve                                  GEN098 or placement                                             4
               Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve           GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                         4
               Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve           GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                         4
               Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve           GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286                       4
               Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105                                                  4
               Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                    GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248                       4
GEN399         General Educa on Capstone                           All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level courses;   4
                                                                   and at least one course between 310 and 382



                                                           49 Academic Programs
Media Arts
MEDIA ARTS & ANIMATION, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Chicago, Schaumburg, Cincinna , Michigan, Tinley Park

Program Mission
The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Media Arts & Anima on program provides graduates with the relevant career skills needed
to obtain and develop careers in the anima on industry. The goal is accomplished through a focused curriculum based on
industry referenced program exit competencies. Instructors who possess industry experience and content exper se as well
as appropriate resources support the curriculum.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Communica on: Graduates will be skilled visual communicators, will effec vely collaborate with other ar sts and design-
ers on a team, will be able to tell a story visually, and will possess wri en and oral skills that enable them to communicate
effec vely with prospec ve employers, colleagues, and clients.
2. Problem Solving: Graduates will possess the crea ve design skills to conceptualize, and develop an anima on; cri quing
skills that lead to evalua on and edi ng; problem-solving skills to resolve unsa sfactory elements of an anima on; gradu-
ates will understand the process of project management.
3. Conceptual: Graduates will have the conceptual and drawing skills to create storyboards and design original characters,
backgrounds, and other visual elements.
4. Technical: Graduates will understand the elements and principles of image manipula on, 2-D and 3-D anima on, audio
produc on, programming, and game design including technical skills and terminology.
5. Context: Graduates will possess an ability to apply real world observa ons to anima on, an understanding of the human
figure; will understand the principles of ac ng and staging; will understand anima on in social, cultural, and historical con-
texts; and will have the research skills needed to develop anima on elements.
6. Professional: Graduates will have developed current professional awareness, a high standard of ethics, an ability to work
independently, an understanding of the corporate culture and business prac ces of the film and anima on industry, and a
desire for life-long learning and professional growth.

Program Descrip on
The Game Art & Design curriculum provides students with a substan al founda on in drawing skills, color theory, design
concepts, audio/video techniques and basic computer applica ons. From this founda on, degree candidates develop
advanced skills in various aspects of computer graphics and anima on. Students explore the various tools used in computer
anima on including opera ng systems, 3-D modeling and anima on so ware, 2-D anima on techniques and desktop video
produc on. These tools and concepts enhance our student’s versa lity and crea vity and enables them to produce a digital
por olio that demonstrates their prac cal and technical abili es to employers.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Media Arts & Anima on, students must complete a minimum of 180 quarter-
credits with 60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of 2.0
or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work, meet por olio requirements
including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which a por olio is
produced and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                    50 Academic Programs
Media Arts
Requirements for B.F.A. in Media Arts & Anima on
Course                  Title                                                       Prerequisites and Course Sequences           Credits
Core Courses
MAA101                  Language of Anima on and Film                                                                            4
MAA116                  Audio for Games & Anima on                                                                               4
MAA123                  Drawing for Anima on                                        ART111                                       4
MAA217                  3D Modeling                                                 DPH242                                       4
MAA221                  Storyboarding                                               ART111                                       4
MAA224                  2D Anima on Principles                                      ART111                                       4
MAA227                  Materials & Ligh ng                                         MAA217                                       4
MAA228                  3D Anima on                                                 MAA 101; MAA217                              4
MAA234                  Digital Ink & Paint                                         MAA224, MAA101                               4
MAA336                  3D Visual Effects & Composi ng                               MAA228                                       4
MAA337                  Hard Surface & Organic Modeling                             MAA217                                       4
MAA338                  Intermediate 3D Anima on                                    MAA228                                       4
MAA344                  2D Anima on                                                 MAA234                                       4
MAA346                  Mo on Graphics                                              MAA234                                       4
MAA347                  Advanced Ligh ng & Texturing                                MAA227                                       4
MAA451                  Por olio Founda ons                                         4 quarters or less from gradua on            4
MAA454                  2D Anima on Studio                                          MAA344                                       4
MAA458                  3D Anima on Studio                                          MAA338                                       4
MAA461                  Por olio Produc on I                                        MAA451 – Second to Last Quarter              4
MAA467                  3D Modeling Studio                                          MAA347                                       4
MAA468                  Team Anima on Produc on                                     MAA338                                       4
MAA471                  Por olio Produc on II                                       MAA461 – Last Quarter                        4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100                  Design Fundamentals                                                                                      4
ART102                  Observa onal Drawing                                        ART100, ART110                               4
ART110                  Color Theory                                                                                             4
ART111                  Life Drawing                                                ART100, ART110                               4
DPH242                  Image Manipula on                                           ART110                                       4
GAD233                  Background & Character Design                               ART111                                       4
GAD357                  Character Modeling & Rigging                                MAA337                                       4
GAD448                  Character Anima on                                          MAA228                                       4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101                  English I                                                   GEN095 or placement                          4
GEN102                  English II                                                  GEN101                                       4
GEN105                  Effec ve Speaking                                            GEN101 at ILIC                               4
                        Art History - GEN211 or GEN212 - or Music - GEN205          GEN101, GEN105                               4
                        GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or               Placement or GEN096                          4
                        Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)              GEN101, GEN105
                        Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                     GEN101, GEN105                               4
                        Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                     GEN102, and one course from GEN205-          4
                                                                                    GEN233
                       Mathema cs Elec ve                                           GEN098 or placement                          4
                       Mathema cs Elec ve                                           GEN098 or placement                          4
                       Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement      4
                       Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement      4
                       Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve                    GEN102, and one course from GEN260-          4
                                                                                    GEN286
                       Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                             GEN101, GEN105                               4
                       Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                             GEN102, and one course from GEN241-          4
                                                                                    GEN248
GEN399                 General Educa on Capstone                                    All required 100-level courses; at least 5   4
                                                                                    200-level courses; and at least one course
                                                                                    between 310 and 382

                                                             51 Academic Programs
Media Arts
VISUAL EFFECTS & MOTION GRAPHICS, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Schaumburg

Program Mission
The mission of the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Effects & Mo on Graphics program is to prepare students to enter the field
of visual effects and mo on graphics.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Communica on: Graduates will understand the elements of effec vely telling a story to an audience; they will be able
to apply principles of visual communica on to their work; they will have skills in interpersonal communica on and conflict
resolu on and work effec vely in teams; they will have oral and wri en presenta on skills appropriate to working with
employers, colleagues, and clients.
2. Graphic Design: Graduates will be able to apply the principles of graphic design, including visual design, mo on and m-
ing skills, and audience and aesthe c considera ons to effec vely create compelling graphic and mo on graphic projects;
will have technical proficiency in mo on graphic crea on.
3. Composi ng: Graduates will understand the principles and terminology of composi ng, including pre-produc on, shoot-
ing, ligh ng and final composi ng in order to create compelling visual projects.
4. Anima on & Visual Effects: Graduates will understand the concepts, techniques, and terminology of anima on and be
able to u lize them in 2D and 3D applica ons; will have an understanding of both prac cal and computer generated visual
effects.
5. Video and Photography: Graduates will be able to conceptualize, plan, execute, and deliver visual elements of a film,
including digital cinematography, audio, s ll digital photography, ligh ng, and edi ng.
6. Audio: Graduates will be able to produce and assemble necessary audio elements, including voice, sound effects and
music and apply them effec vely to mo on graphic and visual projects.

Program Descrip on
The Visual Effects & Mo on Graphics program prepares graduates with the knowledge, skills and a tudes necessary to
enter and maintain a career as a visual effects ar st, digital compositor, or mo on graphics ar st. As a consequence, the
Visual Effects & Mo on Graphics program is a fluid program that is aligned with the current needs of the television and film
industry. The program focuses on 2D and 3D graphics, digital composi ng, effects produc on and mo on graphics for use in
television and film produc on.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Visual Effects & Mo on Graphics, students must complete a minimum of 180
quarter-credits with 60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of
2.0 or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work, meet por olio requirements
including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which a por olio is
produced and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                    52 Academic Programs
Media Arts
Requirements for B.F.A. in Visual Effects & Mo on Graphics
Course                Title                                                        Prerequisites and Course Sequences           Credits
Core Courses
DFV101                Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking                            ART100                                       4
DFV120                Fundamentals of Audio                                                                                     4
DFV225                Fundamentals of Edi ng                                       DFV120                                       4
DFV230                Fundamentals of Ligh ng                                      DFV200                                       4
DFV300                Direc ng & Pre-Produc on                                     MAA221                                       4
DFV305                Media Composi ng                                             VFX250                                       4
DFV320                Produc on Audio                                              DFV120                                       4
VFX110                Digital Typography                                           ART100                                       4
VFX210                Advanced Image Manipula on                                   DPH242                                       4
VFX250                Fundamentals of Mo on Graphics                               VFX110                                       4
VFX307                Visual Effects                                                MAA228                                       4
VFX333                Visual Effects Career Development                                                                          4
VFX350                Broadcast Mo on Graphics                                                                                  4
VFX403                Por olio I                                                   MAA228                                       4
VFX407                Advanced Visual Effects                                       VFX307                                       4
VFX410                Advanced Mo on Graphics                                      MAA228                                       4
VFX415                Por olio II                                                  VFX403                                       4
VFX420                Art Direc on                                                 DFV300                                       4
VFX440                Studio Produc on                                             VFX307                                       4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100                Design Fundamentals                                                                                       4
ART102                Observa onal Drawing                                         ART100, ART110                               4
ART110                Color Theory                                                                                              4
ART111                Life Drawing                                                 ART100, ART110                               4
DPH242                Image Manipula on                                            ART110                                       4
MAA217                3D Modeling                                                  DPH242                                       4
MAA221                Storyboarding                                                ART111                                       4
MAA227                Materials & Ligh ng                                          MAA217                                       4
MAA228                3D Anima on                                                  MAA217                                       4
MAA336                3D Visual Effects & Composi ng                                MAA228                                       4
MAA337                Hard Surface & Organic Modeling                              MAA217                                       4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101                English I                                                    GEN095 or placement                          4
GEN102                English II                                                   GEN101                                       4
GEN105                Effec ve Speaking                                             GEN101 at ILIC                               4
                      Fine Arts - GEN205-GEN212                                    GEN101, GEN105                               4
                      Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                      GEN101, GEN105                               4
                      Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                      GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233    4
                      Mathema cs Elec ve                                           GEN098 or placement                          4
                      Mathema cs Elec ve                                           GEN098 or placement                          4
                      Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement      4
                      Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement      4
                      Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve                    GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286    4
                      Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                             GEN101, GEN105                               4
                      Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                             GEN101, GEN105                               4
                      Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                             GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248    4
GEN399                General Educa on Capstone                                    All required 100-level courses; at least 5   4
                                                                                   200-level courses; and at least one course
                                                                                   between 310 and 382




                                                            53 Academic Programs
Media Arts
WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE MEDIA, Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
Offered at Schaumburg, Michigan, Cincinna

Program Mission
Web Design & Interac ve Media is a user centered design program. Program outcomes are focused on crea vity, design
strategy, and technology solu ons across media pla orms. Program competencies are those related to interface design,
interac vity, visual design, database design, dynamic content design, technology, and informa on design.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Communica on: Graduates will possess visual, wri en, and oral communica on skills that enable them to create web
and media vehicles that effec vely deliver messages to intended audiences; the ability to work effec vely in teams; the
ability to create a coherent storyboard; and the skill to communicate effec vely with prospec ve employers, colleagues, and
clients.
2. Informa on technology: Graduates will have skills in file structure, digital informa on, logical flow char ng, media for-
mats, computer applica ons, programming language abili es, and knowledge of database design.
3. Design: Graduates will apply the principles, technical skills, and terminology of image manipula on and web design.
4. Problem-solving: Graduates will possess the crea ve design skills to conceptualize, develop, and evaluate web pages;
problem solving skills that result in interface designs appropriate for the target audience and sa sfactory to the client; and
will understand the process of project management.
5. Context: Graduates will understand web design in rela on to educa on, commerce, entertainment, and will have devel-
oped knowledge of marke ng, economics, law, and emerging technologies as they relate to media design.
6. Professionalism: Graduates will have developed current professional awareness, a high standard of ethics, an ability to
work independently, and a desire for life-long learning and professional growth.

Program Descrip on
The Bachelor of Fine Arts Web Design & Interac ve Media program prepares students for the field, beginning with a founda-
 on in basic design skills including drawing, perspec ve, composi on and color theory. Coursework con nues with tech-
niques of interac ve systems development using accepted tools of the industry. Graduates have the ar s c and technical
skills to begin careers in entry-level posi ons such as produc on assistant with a mul media company, corporate communi-
ca ons specialist, video or audio assistant, or freelance Web designer. More experienced professionals work in the industry
as interac ve designers, videographers and presenta on authors.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Web Design & Interac ve Media, students must complete a minimum of 180
quarter-credits with 60 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 120 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA of
2.0 or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work, meet por olio requirements
including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show. Gradua ng students must pass a required course in which a por olio is
produced and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                    54 Academic Programs
Media Arts
Requirements for B.F.A. in Web Design & Interac ve Media
Course        Title                                                   Prerequisites and Course Sequences                     Credits
Core Courses
WDIM110       Designing for Mul media Display                                                                                4
WDIM120       Wri ng for Interac ve Media                             ART110                                                 4
WDIM130       Fundamentals of Interac ve Design                       WDIM110                                                4
WDIM160       Web Scrip ng                                            WDIM130                                                4
WDIM210       Project Management                                      WDIM130                                                4
WDIM225       Interac ve Authoring I                                  WDIM110                                                4
WDIM230       Fundamentals of Authoring                               WDIM110                                                4
WDIM260       Web Anima on                                            WDIM230                                                4
WDIM265       Advanced Web Scrip ng                                   WDIM225                                                4
WDIM300       Database Management                                     WDIM225                                                4
WDIM305       E-Learning Design I                                     WDIM225                                                4
WDIM315       Interac ve Authoring II                                 WDIM225                                                4
WDIM320       Interac ve Mo on Graphics                               WDIM265                                                4
WDIM350       Web Marke ng and E-Commerce Law                         WDIM225                                                4
WDIM355       E-Learning Design II                                    WDIM305                                                4
WDIM370       Web Design & Interac ve Media Produc on Team            WDIM305                                                4
WDIM415       E-Commerce Site Design                                  WDIM300                                                4
WDIM435       Por olio I                                              WDIM225                                                4
WDIM480       Por olio II                                             WDIM300, WDIM435                                       4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100        Design Fundamentals                                                                                            4
ART102        Observa onal Drawing                                    ART100, ART110                                         4
ART110        Color Theory                                                                                                   4
DFV100        Survey of Film & Video                                                                                         4
DFV101        Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking                       ART100                                                 4
DFV120        Fundamentals of Audio                                                                                          4
DPH242        Image Manipula on                                       ART110                                                 4
DPH252        Advanced Image Manipula on                              DPH242                                                 4
IC402         Career Development (or equivalent course at ILIS)       GEN105 or permission of instructor                     4
VFX110        Digital Typography                                      ART100                                                 4
VFX250        Fundamentals of Mo on Graphics                          VFX110                                                 4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101        English I                                               GEN095 or placement                                    4
GEN102        English II                                              GEN101                                                 4
GEN105        Effec ve Speaking                                                                                               4
              Fine Arts - GEN205-GEN212                               GEN101, GEN105                                         4
              GEN109 Computers for the Arts (ILIC, AIMD) or           Placement or GEN096                                    4
              Social Science 200-Level Elec ve (ILIS, AIOHC)          GEN101, GEN105
              Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                 GEN101, GEN105                                         4
              Humani es & Fine Arts 300-Level Elec ve                 GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233              4
              Mathema cs Elec ve                                      GEN098 or placement                                    4
              Mathema cs Elec ve                                      GEN098 or placement                                    4
              Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve               GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
              Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve               GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or placement                4
              Physical & Life Science 300-Level Elec ve               GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286              4
              Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                        GEN101, GEN105                                         4
              Social Science 300-Level Elec ve                        GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248              4
GEN399        General Educa on Capstone                               All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level   4
                                                                      courses; and at least one course between 310 and 382




                                                            55 Academic Programs
Media Arts
WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE MEDIA, Associate of Applied Science
Offered at Michigan, Cincinna , Schaumburg

Program Mission
The mission of the Associate of Applied Science program in Web Design & Interac ve Media is to prepare student compe-
tent in interface design, visual design, and web technology.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Communica on: Graduates will possess basic visual, wri en, and oral communica on skills that enable them to create
web vehicles that deliver messages to intended audiences.
2. Informa on technology: Graduates will have skills in file structure, digital informa on, media formats, and computer ap-
plica ons.
3. Design: Graduates will apply the principles, technical skills, and terminology of image manipula on and web design.
4. Problem-solving: Graduates will possess the crea ve design skills to conceptualize and develop web pages; and problem
solving skills that result in interface designs appropriate for the target audience and sa sfactory to the client.
5. Professionalism: Graduates will have developed current professional awareness, a high standard of ethics, an ability to
work independently, and a desire for life-long learning and professional growth.

Program Descrip on

The Associate of Applied Science program in Web Design & Interac ve Media begins with a founda on in basic design skills
including drawing, perspec ve, composi on, color theory, and image manipula on. Coursework con nues with techniques
of interac ve systems development using accepted tools of the industry. At the end of the program, students complete a
por olio that represents their exper se.

Gradua on Requirements
To receive an Associate of Applied Science degree in Web Design & Interac ve Media, students must complete a minimum
of 90 quarter-credits with 24 quarter-credits in general educa on courses and 66 in the specialty area with a cumula ve GPA
of 2.0 or higher. Also a student must receive a passing grade or credit for all required course work and sa sfy all por olio
requirements including par cipa on in the Senior Por olio Show and sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute
of Art.




                                                   56 Academic Programs
Media Arts
Requirements for A.A.S. in Web Design & Interac ve Media
Course                Title                                                       Prerequisites and Course Sequences   Credits
Core Courses
WDIM110               Designing for Mul media Display                                                                  4
WDIM120               Wri ng for Interac ve Media                                 ART110                               4
WDIM130               Fundamentals of Interac ve Design                           WDIM110                              4
WDIM160               Web Scrip ng                                                WDIM130                              4
WDIM225               Interac ve Authoring I                                      WDIM110                              4
WDIM230               Fundamentals of Authoring                                   WDIM110                              4
WDIM260              Web Anima on                                                 WDIM230                              4
WDIM265              Advanced Web Scrip ng                                        WDIM225                              4
WDIM333              Web Design Associate Por olio Development                                                         2
WDIM435              Por olio I                                                   WDIM225                              4
Suppor ng Courses
ART100               Design Fundamentals                                                                               4
ART102               Observa onal Drawing                                         ART100, ART110                       4
ART110               Color Theory                                                                                      4
DFV101               Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking                            ART100                               4
DPH242               Image Manipula on                                            ART110                               4
DPH252               Advanced Image Manipula on                                   DPH242                               4
VFX110               Digital Typography                                           ART100                               4
General Educa on Courses
GEN101               English I                                                    GEN095 or placement                  4
GEN105               Effec ve Speaking                                                                                  4
                     Humani es & Fine Arts 200-Level Elec ve                      GEN101, GEN105                       4
                     Mathema cs Elec ve                                           GEN098 or placement                  4
                     Physical & Life Science 200-Level Elec ve                    GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098 or        4
                                                                                  placement
                      Social Science 200-Level Elec ve                            GEN101, GEN105                       4




                                                           57 Academic Programs
Diploma Programs
DIPLOMA PROGRAMS

Diploma programs are intended for students with specific career plans that do not require associate or bachelor’s degrees.
Some are designed to provide advanced training for students with par al or completed college degrees; others may be
taken by students with high school diplomas seeking career training. The programs include courses offered to undergradu-
ate students in various departments. Because of the focused nature of these programs, prerequisites may vary from those
listed in course descrip ons.

Addi onal Admissions Criteria for Diploma Programs
Culinary Arts and Baking and Pastry. All students admi ed to the ins tu on are eligible to enroll in Culinary Arts or Baking
& Pastry.
Digital Image Management. This program is intended for students who have career or formal educa onal experience with
digital photography or a related field and who have developed a rudimentary aesthe c sensi vity and cri cal analysis capa-
bility as applied to digital photography. Students may demonstrate their prepara on for the program by submi ng a college
transcript showing relevant courses, by submi ng a por olio, or by wri ng a brief essay (250 words) on an assigned topic
Fashion Retailing. This program is intended for students who have career or formal educa onal experience in fashion retail-
ing or in a related field and who have developed a rudimentary aesthe c sensi vity and cri cal analysis capability as applied
to fashion retailing. Students may demonstrate their prepara on for the program by submi ng a college transcript showing
relevant courses, by submi ng a por olio, or by wri ng a brief essay on an assigned topic.
Web Design & Development. This program is intended for students who have career or formal educa onal experience in
web design and development or in a related field and who have developed a rudimentary aesthe c sensi vity and cri cal
analysis capability as applied to web design and development. Students may demonstrate their prepara on for the program
by submi ng a college transcript showing relevant courses, by submi ng a por olio, or by wri ng a brief essay (250 words)
on an assigned topic.
Web Design & Interac ve Communica ons. This program is intended for students who have career experience designing
and developing web sites. Students will be asked to demonstrate that they have developed skills in Image Manipula on,
Fundamentals of Web Scrip ng, and User-Centered Design. Students may demonstrate skills in these areas through previ-
ous courses, or work experience, or a por olio.
Digital Design and Residen al Design. A prospec ve student interested in these diploma programs must be an adult learner
with an Associates degree or similar art degree and one year of full- me related work experience within the last two years
who seeks to update his/her professional skills. In addi on, a person must be a high school graduate or hold a General Edu-
ca onal Development (GED) Cer ficate. Success in this program is dependent on the student having some prior proficiency
in design so ware.




                                                   58 Academic Programs
Diploma Programs
BAKING & PASTRY, Diploma
Offered at Chicago, Cincinna , Michigan

Mission Statement
The mission of the Baking and Pastry program is to provide an environment for students to become learners who possess
the skills, knowledge, crea vity and ethical values necessary in the rapidly changing, culturally diverse culinary professions.
Overall the intent of the program is to have experienced industry professionals impart their knowledge and technical acu-
men to the students. The approach to educa on relies heavily on actually par cipa ng in projects that are prac cal and
technical in scope. Students will have the opportunity to learn a variety of interna onal and classical pastries and desserts
using basic as well as advanced techniques, which meet industry quality standards.

Program Descrip on
This program provides students with culinary skills combined with a focus on baking and pastry. This combina on skill set
and basic food service management skills will enhance each graduate’s ability to meet the challenges of an increasingly de-
manding and rapidly changing field. Two strengths of the program of study are an emphasis on culinary skills, as well as the
core baking and pastry courses and basic food service management skills.

Program Objec ves
Upon successful comple on of the program, graduates should be able to:
1. Cooking: Prepare standardized recipes using a variety of cooking, baking and pastry techniques as well as appropriate
equipment and tools.
2. Cuisines: Produce various baked goods and a variety of interna onal and classical pastries and desserts using basic as
well as advanced techniques, which meet industry quality standards.
3. Problem-solving: Design, produce, assemble and decorate display and wedding cakes using various finishing methods
which meet industry quality standards.
4. Professional awareness: Seek employment in retail, commercial and ins tu onal food service se ngs in entry-level job
posi ons.

 Course                  Title                                          Prerequisites and Course Sequences               Credits
 Core Courses
 CULA100                 Concepts & Theory of Culinary Techniques                                                        3
 CULA105                 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques                                                            5
 CULA115                 American Regional Cuisine                                                                       5
 CULA123                 Sustainable Purchasing and Controlling Costs                                                    4
 CULA125                 Introduc on to Baking and Pastry Techniques                                                     5
 CULA203                 La n Cuisines                                                                                   3
 CULA210                 Nutri on                                                                                        3
 CULA212                 Asian Cuisine                                                                                   3
 CUL207                  Ar san Breads & Baking Produc on                                                                4
 CUL209                  Advanced Pa sserie & Display Cakes             CULA125                                          6
 CUL236                  European Cakes & Tortes                        CULA125                                          4
 CUL237                  Chocolate, Confec ons & Centerpieces           CULA125                                          6
 Suppor ng Course
 IC202                   Management, Supervision & Career                                                                4
                         Development




                                                         59 Academic Programs
Diploma Programs
CULINARY ARTS, Diploma
Offered at Chicago, Cincinna , Michigan

Mission Statement
The mission of the Culinary Arts program is to provide an environment for students to become learners who possess the
skills, knowledge, crea vity and ethical values necessary in the rapidly changing, culturally diverse culinary professions.
Overall the intent of the program is to have experienced industry professionals impart their knowledge and technical acu-
men to the students. The approach to educa on relies heavily on actually par cipa ng in projects that are prac cal and
technical in scope. Students will have the opportunity to prepare a variety of interna onal recipes u lizing the correct tech-
niques, ingredients and equipment which meet industry quality standards.

Program Descrip on
The Art of Cooking diploma program provides students with fundamentals in culinary techniques, food produc on skills
and cri cal thinking skills. Students will study the fundamentals of cooking, baking and pastry, as well as the art of the cold
kitchen. Food produc on skills are complimented with basic food service management skills. Graduates of the program
compete for entry-level posi on in the food service industry.

Program Objec ves
Upon successful comple on of the program, graduates should be able to:
1. Culinary procedures: Establish and maintain safety and sanita on procedures
2. Cooking: Prepare standardized recipes using a variety of cooking techniques which meet industry quality standards
3. Cuisines: Prepare a variety of interna onal recipes u lizing the correct techniques, ingredients and equipment which
meet industry quality standards
4. Professionalism: Define and ar culate the core values of the culinary professional.
5. Professional awareness: Seek entry-level posi ons in commercial and ins tu onal food service se ngs.

 Course           Title                                                  Prerequisites and Course Sequences   Credits
 Core Courses
 CULA100          Concepts & Theory of Culinary Techniques                                                    3
 CULA105          Fundamentals of Classical Techniques                                                        5
 CULA115          American Regional Cuisine                                                                   5
 CULA123          Sustainable Purchasing and Controlling Costs                                                4
 CULA125          Introduc on to Baking and Pastry Techniques                                                 5
 CULA200          Garde Manger                                                                                6
 CULA203          La n Cuisines                                                                               3
 CULA207          World Cuisines                                                                              2
 CULA210          Nutri on                                                                                    3
 CULA212          Asian Cuisine                                                                               3
 CULA225          A la Carte Restaurant Kitchen                                                               3
 CULA230          Dining Room Service                                                                         3
 CULA235          Food & Beverage Opera ons Management                                                        4
 Suppor ng Course
 IC202            Management, Supervision & Career Development                                                4




                                                        60 Academic Programs
Diploma Programs
FASHION RETAILING, Diploma
Offered at Chicago, Cincinna , Michigan, Schaumburg, and Tinley Park

Mission
The mission of the diploma program in Fashion Retailing is to prepare students to obtain posi ons in the field of fashion
retailing. The program is intended for students who have a background in fashion and are interested in developing retail
management and business skills, or who are preparing for a career in fashion retailing in bou ques, specialty stores, na-
  onal department stores, and discount chains. Students primarily focus on retail sales, management, opera ons, fashion
trends, and promo on.

Program Descrip on
The Fashion Retailing Diploma program teaches students how to use their combined crea ve and business skills to display,
market, and sell fashion merchandise. The well-trained student will be able to effec vely understand and meet the custom-
er’s needs, and ul mately encourage sales. This is accomplished by having a keen awareness to the changing needs of the
consumer, learning how to iden fy and predict new style trends, and by being able to conceptualize and promote fashion
displays and sales campaigns. Individuals in fashion retailing will learn how to evaluate apparel construc on, iden fy appro-
priate characteris cs and uses of different tex les. They will also gain knowledge of consumer behavior, retail opera ons,
visual merchandising, the larger marketplace, and business skills.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Industry knowledge: Graduates will posses retail management and business skills that prepare them for a career in
fashion retailing in bou ques, specialty stores, na onal department stores, and discount chains with focus on retail sales,
management, opera ons, fashion trends, and promo on.
2. Technology: Graduates will demonstrate proficiency with common business computer programs including inventory man-
agement, presenta on, spreadsheet, on-line research, and website so ware.
3. Planning and problem-solving: Graduates will demonstrate the ability to plan and analyze key marke ng and manage-
ment processes, including an ability to analyze, formulate and implement innova ve solu ons.


 Course        Title                                         Prerequisites and Course Sequences                 Credits
 FM110         Survey of the Fashion Industry                                                                   4
 FM120         Intro to Business & Retailing                                                                    4
 FM126         Tex les                                                                                          4
 FM130         Principles of Marke ng                        FM120                                              4
 FM210         Trends & Concepts in Apparel                  FM110                                              4
 FM212         Consumer Behavior                             FM130                                              4
 FM220         Visual Techniques & Design                                                                       4
 FM322         Professional Selling                          FM130                                              4
 FM324         Apparel Evalua on & Produc on                 FM126, FM210                                       4
 FM332         Public Rela ons                               FM210                                              4
 FM410         Product Development                           FM324                                              4
 FM424         Event Planning & Promo on                                                                        4




                                                    61 Academic Programs
  Diploma Programs
RESIDENTIAL DESIGN, Diploma
Offered at Schaumburg

Mission
The mission of the Residen al Planning diploma program is to prepare students to enter the field by providing a founda on
in interior design and decora on including:
  The evolu on of architecture, furniture, and design;
  Space planning to maximize the efficiency of interiors;
  Tex les, materials and resources for residen al space;
  Architectural dra ing to envision, plan, and communicate projects; and
  Principles governing the business of interior design.

Program Descrip on
The Residen al Planning diploma program is designed for students who want to learn the basics of interior design and space
planning as well as the use of fixtures and furnishings. In addi on to these design elements, students will focus on effec ve
communica on and the professional prac ces necessary to succeed in the field. A prospec ve student interested in the
Residen al Planning diploma program must be an adult learner with one year of full- me related work experience within
the last two years who seeks to update his/her professional skills. In addi on, a person must be a high school graduate or
hold a General Educa onal Development (GED) Cer ficate. Success in this program is dependent on the student having
some prior proficiency in design so ware. In the last quarter of the program, students will develop an individualized por o-
lio to help them obtain employment in the field within the residen al interiors industry, such as furniture, fabric, or flooring
showrooms, major department stores, resource room maintenance, and more.

Program Outcomes
1. Knowledge of the field: Graduates will demonstrate the crea ve and technical skills employers in the residen al planning
field require which include:
  Architectural dra ing
  Space planning
  Architectural and furniture history
  Tex les, materials, and resources
  Business principles
2. Professionalism: Graduates will demonstrate the professional skills necessary to seek and obtain employment.
3. Professional awareness: Graduates will be prepared for entry-level employment in their field of study.

 Course        Title                                          Prerequisites and Course Sequences                       Credits
 ART100        Design Fundamentals                                                                                     4
 ID130         Architectural Dra ing                                                                                   4
 ID146         History of Design I                                                                                     4
 ID177         Tex les, Materials, + Resources                                                                         4
 ID179         Elements of Interior Design                    ID130                                                    4
 ID200         Introduc on to Space Planning                  ID179                                                    4
 ID236         History of Design II                                                                                    4
 ID300         Professional Prac ce                           ID200                                                    4
 ID425         Por olio Prepara on                            Must be taken during the last quarter or with Academic   4
                                                              Director’s approval.




                                                    62 Academic Programs
Diploma Programs
DIGITAL DESIGN, Diploma
Offered at Schaumburg

Mission
The mission of the Digital Design diploma program is to prepare students to enter the field by providing a founda on in
digital design including:
  Design fundamentals and typography principles;
  Concept development and digital illustra on;
  Color composites and renderings using digital image manipula on;
  High-quality page layouts and designs;
  Print produc on procedures;
  Produc on of digital print artwork;
  Extensive so ware knowledge on MAC and PC pla orms;
  Digital grid systems; and
  Por olio and presenta on skills.

Program Descrip on
The Digital Design Diploma program provides students the opportunity to gain a founda on in digital layout and design,
concept development, typography, pre-press produc on, photo manipula on, and basic graphic design fundamentals. A
prospec ve student interested in the Digital Design diploma program must be an adult learner with one year of full- me
related work experience within the last two years who seeks to update his/her professional skills. In addi on, a person
must be a high school graduate or hold a General Educa onal Development (GED) Cer ficate. Success in this program is
dependent on the student having some prior proficiency in design so ware. In the last quarter of the program, students will
develop an individualized por olio to help them obtain employment in the field within prin ng companies, digital service
bureaus, and in-house communica ons departments.
Program Outcomes
1. Graphic design principles and skills: Graduates will demonstrate the crea ve and technical skills employers in the digital
design field require. which include:
   a) Design principles
   b) Layout skills
   c) Produc on skills
2. Professionalism: Graduates will demonstrate the professional skills necessary to seek and obtain employment.
3. Professional awareness: Graduates will be prepared to seek entry-level employment in their field of study.

 Course        Title                                    Prerequisites and Course Sequences        Credits
 DPH252        Advanced Image Manipula on                                                         4
 GD109         Digital Illustra on                                                                4
 GD110         Introduc on to Typography: Tradi onal                                              4
 GD203         Digital Layout                           GD110                                     4
 GD211         Digital Pre-Press                        GD203                                     4
 GD212         Typography: Hierarchy                    GD110                                     4
 GD300         Conceptual Imagery                       GD302                                     4
 GD302         Por olio I                               Only by Permission of Academic Director   4
 WDIM110       Designing for Mul media Display                                                    4




                                                       63 Academic Programs
Diploma Programs
DIGITAL IMAGE MANAGEMENT, Diploma
Offered at Chicago, Michigan, Schaumburg, and Tinley Park

Mission
The mission of the diploma program in Digital Image Management is to prepare students to obtain posi ons in their chosen
field and func on as assistants for a professional photographer. Students are primarily focus on the crea on of digital pho-
tographs and videos, the development of websites, publishing electronic images for print and the web and basic business
principles.

Program Descrip on
Students will gain knowledge in the key func ons of digital photography and video; this involves the basics of how to
produce digital photographs and videos that effec vely communicate their ideas, the techniques of digital edi ng, asset
management, and publishing and prin ng of digital files. Students will be taught business principles including how to keep
financial records, market their work, and the basic knowledge of licensing, copyright laws, contracts, and nego a on. Stu-
dent will develop an online por olio that demonstrates their skills learned to effec vely transi on them into the workplace.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Design: Graduates will ar culate and apply the principles of design to create effec ve images. They will be able to create
digital photographs and videos, websites, and electronic images for print and the web and apply basic business principles.
2. Produc on Processes: Graduates will apply technical skills and use appropriate terminology with respect to photographic
tools and electronic presenta on of images.
3. Problem-Solving: Graduates will use problem-solving processes to produce visually compelling imagery reflec ve of their
personal styles and visions.



 Course          Title                                    Prerequisites and Course Sequences                   Credits
 ADV317          Principles of Marke ng Research                                                               4
 DFV101          Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking                                                             4
 DPH102          Principles of Photography                                                                     4
 DPH242          Image Manipula on                                                                             4
 DPH252          Advanced Image Manipula on               DPH242                                               4
 DPH253          Digital Photographic Produc on           DPH242                                               4
 DPH258          Digital Darkroom                         DPH252 and DPH253                                    4
 DPH405          The Business of Photography                                                                   4
 DPH416          Art Direc on                             Only by Permission of Academic Director              4
 GD211           Digital Pre-Press                        DPH242                                               4
 WDIM110         Designing for Mul media Display                                                               4
 WDIM230         Fundamentals of Authoring                                                                     4




                                                     64 Academic Programs
Diploma Programs
WEB DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT, Diploma
Offered at Cincinna , Michigan, Schaumburg, and Tinley Park


Mission
The mission of the diploma Web Design & Development Program is to prepare students to obtain posi ons in their field and
func on as trained professionals. Students are primarily focused on the efficient and effec ve design and development of
Web sites and mobile device applica ons in order to best convey the transmission and sharing of informa on through the
Web.

Program Descrip on
The Web Design & Development diploma program teaches students how to create the look, feel and func onality of World
Wide Web pages for client Web sites. This involves developing a design that effec vely communicates the ideas being pro-
moted by the Web sites, and focusing on the ways in which the Web sites func on for op mum informa on delivery. The
program also focuses on the design and development of mobile device applica ons.

Desired Student Outcomes
1. Informa on technology: Graduates will have skills in file structure, digital informa on, logical flow char ng, media for-
mats, computer applica ons, programming language abili es, and knowledge of database design.
2. Design: Graduates will successfully apply the principles, technical skills, and terminology of image manipula on and web
design. They will apply the efficient and effec ve design and development of Web sites and mobile device applica ons in
order to best convey the transmission and sharing of informa on through the Web.
3. Problem-solving: Graduates will possess the crea ve design skills to conceptualize, develop, and evaluate web pages;
problem solving skills that result in interface designs appropriate for the target audience and sa sfactory to the client; and
will understand the process of project management.

 Course              Title                                     Prerequisites and Course Sequences               Credits
 Core Courses
 WDIM130             Fundamentals of Interac ve Design                                                          4
 WDIM160             Web Scrip ng                              WDIM130                                          4
 WDIM225             Interac ve Authoring I                                                                     4
 WDIM230             Fundamentals of Authoring                                                                  4
 WDIM260             Web Anima on                              WDIM230                                          4
 WDIM265             Advanced Web Scrip ng                     WDIM225                                          4
 WDIM305             E-Learning Design I                       WDIM225                                          4
 WDIM350             Web Marke ng and E-Commerce Law           WDIM225                                          4
 WDIM435             Por olio I                                WDIM225                                          4
 Suppor ng Courses
 DFV101              Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking                                                          4
 DFV120              Fundamentals of Audio                                                                      4
 DPH242              Image Manipula on                                                                          4
 GD212               Typography: Hierarchy                                                                      4




                                                         65 Academic Programs
WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATIONS, Diploma
Offered at Cincinna , Michigan, Schaumburg, and Tinley Park

Program Mission
The mission of the diploma Web Design & Interac ve Communica ons Program is to prepare students to obtain posi ons in
their field and func on as trained professionals. Students are primarily focused on the efficient and effec ve design, devel-
opment and deployment of Web sites and mobile device applica ons in order to best convey the transmission and sharing
of informa on through the Web.
Program Descrip on
The Web Design & Interac ve Communica ons diploma program teaches students how to create the look, feel and func-
  onality of World Wide Web pages for client Web sites with a specific emphasis on professional standards and prac cal
deployment. This course of study extends founda on principles in visual communica ons and interac ve media as related
to dynamic delivery through mul ple channels including mobile technologies. Students will develop abili es in computer
languages, usability principles and informa on architecture in a team oriented environment that prepares them for the pro-
fessional world. Students will also be trained in current web technologies and in project management on assignments that
will enhance their personal por olio.
Desired Student Outcomes
1. Informa on technology: Graduates will have skills in file structure, digital informa on, logical flow char ng, media for-
mats, computer applica ons, programming language abili es, and knowledge of database design.
2. Design: Graduates will successfully apply the principles, technical skills, and terminology of image manipula on and web
design. Graduates will be able to u lize current web technologies and apply the efficient and effec ve design and devel-
opment of Web sites and mobile device applica ons in order to best convey the transmission and sharing of informa on
through the Web.
3. Problem-solving: Graduates will possess the crea ve design skills to conceptualize, develop, and evaluate web pages;
problem solving skills that result in interface designs appropriate for the target audience and sa sfactory to the client; and
will understand the process of project management.
 Course         Title                                          Prerequisites and Course Sequences                 Credits
 DPH242         Image Manipula on                                                                                 4
 MAA346         Mo on Graphics                                                                                    4
 WDIM110        Designing for Mul media Display                                                                   4
 WDIM210        Project Management                                                                                4
 WDIM300        Database Management                                                                               4
 WDIM315        Interac ve Authoring II                                                                           4
 WDIM320        Interac ve Mo on Graphics                                                                         4
 WDIM355        E-Learning Design II                                                                              4
 WDIM370        Web Design & Interac ve Media Produc on Team                                                      4
 WDIM415        E-Commerce Site Design                         WDIM300                                            4
 WDIM435        Por olio I                                                                                        4
 WDIM480        Por olio II                                    WDIM300                                            4


Policies Related to Diploma Programs
Transfer Policies
Students entering diploma programs may be awarded proficiency credit for up to 8 quarter credits. Transfer credit will not
be accepted for diploma programs. All students enrolled in diploma programs will be required to register with their Academ-
ic Advisor in order to ensure appropriate course sequencing and availability. Students who have graduated from a diploma
program will be awarded residency credit for courses that pertain to their new program (with the excep on of por olio
classes). Grades used in the CGPA of the previous program will be applied to the student’s new program CGPA calcula on.



                                                       66 Academic Programs
Diploma Sa sfactory Academic Progress Policy
                                              Milestones (CGPA
                       Evalua on Point                             Required Ac on
                                              and ICR)
                                              < 1.0 and/or
                       End of First Quarter                        Proba on
                                              33.33%
                       End of Second          < 1.0 and/or
                                                                   Dismissal
 Diploma               Quarter                33.33%
                       End of Second          < 1.5 and/or 50% >
                                                                   Proba on
                       Quarter                1.0 and 33.33%
                       End of Fourth
                       Quarter and every      < 2.0 and 66.667%    Dismissal
                       quarter therea er

Gradua on Requirements
To receive a diploma, students must complete between 36 and 55 quarter-credits in the specialty area with a cumula ve
GPA of 2.0 or higher, depending on the program; exact program requirements are listed for each diploma. Gradua ng stu-
dents must sa sfy all financial obliga ons to The Illinois Ins tute of Art.




                                                  67 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
NOTE: Where no prerequisites are listed below, none are required. Prerequisites listed a er courses below must be
sa sfactorily completed by all students before enrolling in the course. Some courses also list “sequences,” which must be
followed by students in specific situa ons (certain programs, degrees, branches) but not others.

ADV106 Fundamentals of Adver sing & Marke ng (4 credits)                ADV231 Consumer Behavior (4 credits)
This course is a basic introduc on to adver sing and the funda-         This course examines the cultural, social, and individual variables
mental concepts and principles of marke ng. Students examine            involved in consumer behavior. It also reviews how they are
various defini ons of adver sing and different methods off mar-            incorporated into buyer decision processes and marke ng prac-
ke ng communica on. Learning about the major events, trends,              ces. (Prerequisite: ADV112)
and influences on adver sing will help the student place current
events in context and help nourish the student’s understanding          ADV317 Principles of Marke ng Research (4 credits)
of the possibili es of various types of adver sing and marke ng         The use of the marke ng research process as a tool for solving
campaigns. The overview of marke ng will help students place            management problems is a focus of this course. The source of
their knowledge in a framework and understand how each com-             data, sampling procedures, ques onnaire design, data collec on,
ponent contributes to the strength and u lity of a marke ng plan.       and analysis will be covered. (Prerequisite: ADV106)
Students will learn to recognize emerging trends and capitalize on
them. Students will also learn how to iden fy the ways in which         ADV318 Brand Strategy (4 credits)
world events and cultural assump ons influence marke ng.                 Although good brands are easy to iden fy, they are hard to
                                                                        create. This course addresses the factors which make a brand
ADV108 Conceptual & Strategic Thinking (4 credits)                      successful, and then approaches the factors—like price pressure,
Exercises in crea ve problem solving strengthen and expand the          fragmented markets and media and prolifera ng compe on—
student’s concept genera on skills. Cri cal analysis, problem           that businesses must control to build a strong, successful brand.
iden fica on, and idea refinement are the focus in producing              (Prerequisite: ADV229)
media content for targeted audiences and intended delivery sys-
tems. Students will learn basic skills that will support their learn-   ADV323 Account Planning (4 credits)
ing throughout the course and help them create a founda on for          Account planning demands a mixture of account services and
nurturing crea vity in their work and lives. They will be given the     research. Stated simply, an account planner frequently takes
tools to help them iden fy and solve problems, formulate objec-         responsibility for ensuring that the client’s needs are met. This
  ves, and create a plan to reach their objec ves.                      usually requires managing communica on between departments
                                                                        in an adver sing agency as well as being the point of contact
ADV112 Survey of Adver sing (4 credits)                                 between an agency and the client. Inside the agency, an account
This course is a basic introduc on to adver sing, its history,          planner helps choose and integrate research and considers pro-
poten al and limita ons. Students examine the role of adver-            posed adver sing decisions from the perspec ve of consumer be-
  sing and different methods of communica on, as well as the             havior. This course helps the student understand these func ons
adver sing spiral, adver sing objec ves, adver sing copy, and           and integrate them into a successful approach to adver sing and
federal regula ons. Students analyze media choices and strate-          adver sing campaigns. Sequence: follows ADV317 for Adver s-
gies, research, target audiences and crea ng campaigns. The             ing Majors.
course will also help the student recognize emerging trends and
capitalize on them.                                                     ADV336 Sales & Persuasive Techniques (4 credits)
                                                                        An understanding of the sales process and the steps to sell a
ADV228 Storyboards & Scriptwri ng (4 credits)                           product or service is essen al to a student who works in any area
This course focuses on applying industry-standard storyboard-           of business. Selling is an essen al skill for the sales func on of a
ing and scrip ng techniques to communicate effec vely for                business, but is also part of the job for many other employees.
various forms of media. Contents to be covered include the              This course focuses on the essen al skills and knowledge one
various purposes and formats of storyboards, the basic terminol-        needs to effect a sale, as well as the ways that the sales pitch can
ogy and concepts used in storyboarding, and the applica on of           be focused to solve customer problems. This course also covers
storyboarding techniques to the crea on of storyboards with or          persuasive communica on techniques in the area of adver sing.
without a wri en script. (Prerequisite: ADV108)                         Areas covered include the fields of logic and psychology. Among
                                                                        the topics to be covered are the framing effect, emo onal hot
ADV229 Adver sing Design (4 credits)                                    bu ons, mass appeal, snob appeal, subliminal messages, and the
This course will further define the role of graphic design in an         band wagon effect. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, emo onal reac-
adver sing context. Students will be introduced to informa-              ons and how to achieve them and the various types of media
 onal and administra ve approaches to the development of                that could be used to achieve the appropriate desired response
adver sing. Campaign strategies, based on media and marke ng            are also covered. (Prerequisite: ADV231)
reali es, will also be defined and applied. (Prerequisite: ADV106,
ADV108, GD109, GD203)




                                                            68 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
ADV337 Public Rela ons & Promo ons (4 credits)                         ence they need to enter the field when they graduate. (Prerequi-
This course examines the historical development of public rela-        site: Only by Permission of Academic Director)
 ons, showing the principles, methods, and means of influencing
public opinion. (Prerequisite: ADV231, ADV336)                         ART100 Design Fundamentals (4 credits)
                                                                       This hands-on course introduces the elements and principles of
ADV338 Media Planning & Buying (4 credits)                             design. Students develop working skills with layout and organiza-
Media as part of a delivery channel for a marke ng message will         on of design elements for a variety of visual effects. The course
be the focus of this course. Topics include media as cri cal to the    emphasis is on design as a means of communica on.
fulfillment of the overall marke ng strategy, cost effec veness,
and alterna ve and new media. (Prerequisite: ADV323)                   ART102 Observa onal Drawing (4 credits)
                                                                       This course explores the process by which three-dimensional
ADV340 Adver sing Copywri ng (4 credits)                               forms and space are transformed into two-dimensional drawings.
Through materials presented in this course, students learn the         The learning sequence progresses from simple forms and skill
techniques to develop effec ve adver sing strategies that under-        levels toward more complex construc ons and composi ons.
lie and enable crea ve execu ons, and to cul vate clear, logical       Emphasis is placed on developing line sensi vity, skill at light and
and crea ve copywri ng skills. (Prerequisite: GEN102, ADV229)          dark modeling, and accurate perspec ve rendering. (Prerequisite:
                                                                       ART100, ART110)
ADV400 Art Direc on (4 credits)
This course will examine the role of the art director in producing     ART110 Color Theory (4 credits)
mul -faceted design projects. Working in teams, students will          This fundamental course provides an introduc on to the prin-
coordinate their crea ve efforts, from concept to finished output.       ciples of color and an explora on of color theory as it relates to
By encouraging a team approach, the course will further enhance        design. Students inves gate color schemes and proper es and
students’ leadership, communica ons and nego a on skills.              their rela onship to composi on in making appropriate design
(Prerequisite: Only by Permission of Academic Director)                decisions. The psychological, cultural and symbolic aspects of
                                                                       color will also be examined in rela onship to visual communica-
ADV404 Adver sing Campaigns (4 credits)                                  on.
Students in the course research, create, and present mixed-media
campaigns. The students learn the fundamentals of conceiving           ART111 Life Drawing (4 credits)
and execu ng an integrated local/regional adver sing campaign          This course explores the fundamentals of drawing the human fig-
that u lizes major adver sing media. (Prerequisite: Only by Per-       ure. Students develop observa on and rendering techniques and
mission of Academic Director)                                          focus on depic ng gesture and mo on, rendering anatomy ac-
                                                                       curately, capturing the essence of movement and form in space,
ADV406 Advanced Adver sing Campaigns (4 credits)                       and crea ng effec ve composi ons. (Prerequisite: ART100,
Students research and develop a fully integrated adver sing/           ART110)
promo onal campaign for a Na onal name brand account in this
course. The student’s senior project documents, supports and           ART224 Form & Space (4 credits)
argues the ra onale and effec veness of the campaign in wri en          Form and space examines the formal understanding and manipu-
form. Students prepare, present and defend a graduate project          la on of the basic organizing principles of the three dimensional
suitable for a professional audience. (Prerequisite: Only by Per-      worlds. Students translate 2-D design principles to solve 3-D de-
mission of Academic Director)                                          sign problems using basic hand tools and readily available materi-
                                                                       als. Form and Space also addresses the manipula on of 3-D space
ADV408 Por olio (4 credits)                                            to manipulate visual experience. (Prerequisite: ART100, ART110)
This course focuses on the comple on of the por olio. The final
por olio should focus on individual strengths. This work should        AUD101 Survey of the Music Industry (4 credits)
reflect uniqueness and an ability to meet demanding industry            Students explore the music industry and its cons tuent sectors,
standards. (Prerequisite: Only by Permission of Academic Direc-        including music performing, recording, promo ng, and record
tor)                                                                   distribu on. Lectures and projects focus on iden fying various ca-
                                                                       reer opportuni es and typical career paths in the music industry
ADV409 Adver sing Internship (4 credits)                               and knowledge and skill sets needed to succeed as an entry level
Through a field internship experience, students will be able to         professional.
apply their skills in a real and prac cal situa on. The main objec-
 ves of the internship are to allow students the opportunity to        AUD120 Fundamentals of Audio (4 credits)
observe and par cipate in the opera on of successful businesses        This course inves gates the principles of digital sound and music
related to their fields of study. The students will gain the experi-    recording. An introduc on to sound includes the study of sound
                                                                       characteris cs, basic acous cs, ergonomics, and basic techniques
                                                                       for field recording. Waveform physics and psychoacous cs are



                                                           69 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
also covered. The role of sound/music in video produc on is ex-       AUD230 Audio Recording I (4 credits)
plained and exemplified. Techniques to integrate digital audio for     This course runs in conjunc on with Audio Technology II. The
Anima on, Video, CDROM, and web applica ons will be explored.         theore cal founda ons presented in Audio Technology II are
Sequence: follows GEN109 or concurrent for ILIC.                      reinforced in this course through prac cal, hands-on applica ons.
                                                                      Students learn the opera onal techniques of basic audio systems
AUD180 Digital Audio (4 credits)                                      with an emphasis on mixdown of prerecorded mul track tapes
This course introduces students to the theories, prac ces, and        and eight-track recording projects. (Prerequisite: AUD210)
tools used in digital audio produc on and techniques of non-
linear digital audio edi ng, focusing on the fundamental theories     AUD240 Audio Recording II (4 credits)
and concepts behind various types of digital audio tools. Through     Students expand and develop the skills learned in Fundamentals
lectures and in-class projects, students develop knowledge and        of Audio Produc on through mul -track recording projects. The
skills needed to operate non-linear audio worksta ons. (Prerequi-     course focuses on recording techniques used in music produc-
site: AUD120)                                                          on. Emphasis is placed on signal flow for basic tracks, mixdown,
                                                                      and overdubs. Other topics include close and distant microphone
AUD201 Music Theory (4 credits)                                       techniques, recording session management, analog tape record-
This course introduces students to the rudiments of music theory.     ers, studio documenta on, signal processing, and moving fader
Students learn to iden fy notes and common scales as well as          automa on systems. (Prerequisite: AUD230)
the nota on of notes, scales and simple rhythms. The concept
and structure of the lead sheet will be introduced. An ear-training   AUD310 Audio Electronics (4 credits)
component will develop the students’ skill in iden fying and          This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts
transcribing simple chords, melodies, and rhythms. (Prerequisite:     of electronics as they relate to audio produc on. Topics include
AUD101)                                                               Ohm’s Law, AC and DC circuits, basic troubleshoo ng for audio
                                                                      equipment, AC line voltage and filtered DC voltage, etc. (Prerequi-
AUD203 Listening and Analysis (4 credits)                             site: GEN380 or GEN382)
This course introduces the student to ear-training and cri cal
listening from the perspec ve of the audio engineer and contem-       AUD320 MIDI Systems (4 credits)
porary produc on techniques. The student will learn to aurally        This course allows students to develop a working theore cal and
analyze and iden fy typical contemporary popular song forms           skills-based knowledge of the mul - mbral synthesizer and the
and the produc on techniques used to create them. (Prerequi-          sequencing environment within the context of the contempo-
site: AUD201)                                                         rary MIDI produc on studio. Both live and studio applica ons
                                                                      are covered, and full use is made of the digital signal processing
AUD210 Audio Technology I (4 credits)                                 resources available within the equipment. (Prerequisite: AUD201,
This course examines the principles of audio signals and the          AUD220)
equipment used to record, process, and distribute audio content.
Students will begin to develop an understanding of signal flow of      AUD331 Synthesis & Sound Design I (4 credits)
audio systems using block diagrams. A survey of audio trans-          This course develops advanced skills using synthesizers and
mission, manipula on, and delivery systems including cables,          samplers. Students study the elements of sound and how they
connectors, basic stereo mixers, microphones, amplifiers, and          apply to simple and complex waveforms, envelopes, LFOs, filters
loudspeakers will be presented. (Prerequisite: AUD120)                and keyboard architecture. Theory and prac ce with sampling
                                                                      and subtrac ve synthesis using so ware and hardware sound
AUD220 Audio Technology II (4 credits)                                sources. (Prerequisite: AUD320)
In this course students con nue to study the principles of audio
signals and the equipment used to record, process, and distribute     AUD335 Media Business Prac ces & Law (4 credits)
audio content. Sound in acous cal form is discussed in rela on to     This course covers the mul ple facets of media business. Topics
studio acous cs. Students expand their understanding of signal        of learning include business plan, produc on budget, business
flow of advanced audio systems by crea ng and reading complex          proposal, business contracts, business ethics, government regula-
block diagrams. Some of the topics studied in depth are: signal        ons, copyright and other business laws, etc. Course materials
processors, dynamic range, distor on, analogue recording, and         are covered through lecture, discussion, research, wri ng, and
SMPTE me code. (Prerequisite: AUD210)                                 presenta on. (Prerequisite: AUD101, AUD225)

AUD225 History of Mo on Media & Mass Comm. (4 credits)                AUD340 Advanced Recording Techniques I (4 credits)
This course presents a survey of major events and development         This course covers the techniques and technology typical to pro-
in the history of mo on media and mass communica on. The              fessional music recording and mixing using advanced large format
survey focuses on the rela onship between technology and              consoles. Topics include: studio procedures and professionalism,
media development and explores the impact mo on media and             SSL Console opera on, advanced signal flow, signal processing,
mass communica on have on society and economy. (Prerequi-             analy cal and cri cal listening skills, close, distant and stereo
site: AUD101)


                                                          70 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
mic techniques for a variety of musical instruments, and basic        Permission from Director required. Interna onal students need
mixdown strategies. (Prerequisite: AUD240)                            signed approval from the Interna onal Student Advisor.)

AUD350 Live Sound Reinforcement I (4 credits)                         AUD422 Senior Project II (4 credits)
This course presents students more sophis cated and complex           This course con nues the two-quarter long comprehensive proj-
situa ons for live sound reinforcement. Through studio se ngs         ect begun in Senior Project I. Students will employ cumula ve
or real world events, students learn to operate large format ana-     skills to produce a significant, sophis cated, mul -track digital
logue and digital mixing consoles and solve signal manipula on        audio work. Projects will be carried out individually or in groups
problems with transformers. Students also learn professional          based on the needs of the class as determined by the instructor.
protocols in live sound reinforcement se ngs. (Prerequisite:          (Prerequisite: AUD412)
AUD240, AUD310)
                                                                      AUD431 Synthesis & Sound Design II (4 credits)
AUD395 Media Delivery Systems & Distribu on (4 credits)               This course will survey both commercially available synthesis
This course addresses the end part of digital filmmaking and           methods and recent developments at audio research ins tutes.
video produc on – delivery and distribu on. Students will study       Students will also survey the current market for hardware and
a variety of delivery methods and systems and determine the           so ware implementa on of various synthesis methods. Analy -
advantages and limita ons of each. They will also examine the         cal listening sessions will expose students to synthesis methods
rela onship between delivery systems and distribu on methods          in various musical contexts. Detailed study of subtrac ve, FM,
and evaluate the rela ve efficiency, cost, and effec veness of           physical modeling and granular synthesis will culminate in original
each. (Prerequisite: DFV225, DFV365)                                  sound design projects. (Prerequisite: AUD331)

AUD400 Entertainment Marke ng & Management (4 credits)                AUD440 Advanced Recording Techniques II (4 credits)
Students explore the various aspects and business prac ces of         This course provides the student a greater understanding of SSL
the entertainment marke ng and management field. Students              consoles and VCA automa on systems. Students use SMPTE
will create a business and promo onal plan and are introduced         Time Code for synchroniza on to a variety of mul track formats,
to concepts such as licensing, copyright exploita on, publishing      use digital audio sampling for sound replacement, and integrate
and other promo onal vehicles. The course also increases the          Pro Tools and MIDI sequencers into the analog studio mixing
students understanding of strategic analysis of the entertainment     environment. Cri cal listening skills and cri cal analysis of master
industry. (Prerequisite: AUD225, AUD335)                              tapes are emphasized. Students par cipate in in-class recording
                                                                      sessions and engineer recording projects during and out of class
AUD401 Live Sound Reinforcement II (4 credits)                        hours, which may be included in their por olio. (Prerequisite:
In this course students learn to set up and operate various audio     AUD340)
equipments for a typical live sound reinforcement. Topics include
reading block diagrams of audio systems, wiring speakers, con-        AUD445 Por olio I (4 credits)
nec ng powers, tes ng and adjus ng microphones, troubleshoot-         In this first por olio course, students will assess personal
ing sound systems, and fine-tune reinforcement effects. (Prereq-        strengths to establish a career goal and decide how to organize
uisite: AUD350)                                                       their audio produc on work in a gradua on por olio. Guided by
                                                                      a faculty or a team of faculty, each student assembles a prelimi-
AUD412 Senior Project I (4 credits)                                   nary por olio and iden fies areas for more work and/or content
This course ini ates a two quarter long comprehensive project         enhancement. (Prerequisite: AUD440)
which will be integral to students’ final por olios. Students
will employ their cumula ve skills to pre-produce a significant,       AUD455 Por olio II (4 credits)
sophis cated, mul -track digital audio work. Commi ee and/            Built on the preliminary collec on of work from Por olio Prepara-
or faculty will approve the project content and type of the audio      on, this course allows each student to determine and design the
work. Projects will be carried out individually or in groups based    final organiza on and presenta on of the gradua on por olio.
on the needs of the class as determined by the instructor. (Pre-      Each student is expected to verbally present the por olio and
requisite: AUD400, AUD440 or concurrent)                              address audience ques ons as a format of defense. (Prerequisite:
                                                                      AUD445)
AUD420 Internship (4 credits)
Through a field internship experience, students will be able to        CULA100 Concepts & Theory of Culinary Techniques (3 credits)
apply their skills in a real and prac cal situa on. The main objec-   The fundamental concepts, theories and techniques involved in
 ves of the internship are to allow students the opportunity to       basic cookery are covered in the course. Through discussions and
observe and par cipate in the opera on of successful businesses       lectures the hows and whys of culinary procedures, techniques,
related to their fields of study. Students will gain the experience    concepts and applica ons are introduced.
they need to enter the field upon gradua on. (Prerequisite:




                                                          71 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
CULA105 Fundamentals of Classical Techniques (5 credits)             CULA130 Culinary Science (3 credits)
During this course students begin to learn founda onal skills and    This class introduces the student to the fundamental principles,
techniques of cooking through lectures, demonstra ons and ap-        ingredient func ons, and methodologies associated with culinary,
plica on. Throughout the course students learn vegetable, grain      baking, and pastry, sciences. This course will introduce the sci-
and starch cookery and primary cooking methods such as saute-        en fic and theore cal components of the baking process. Topics
ing, roas ng, braising and grilling. Students are also introduced    include an overview of various measurement systems, iden fica-
to the classical methods of stock, soup and sauce prepara on.          on of bakeshop equipment, and the use of food science, as it
Emphasis is placed on both knife and kitchen organiza onal skills.   applies to baking and pastry produc on.

CULA115 American Regional Cuisine (5 credits)                        CULA135 Planning & Controlling Costs (4 credits)
This course builds on and reinforces the basic knowledge and skill   This course assists the students in understanding and applica-
development of the beginning culinary classes. Focusing on the        on of the management aspect of planning and controlling food,
prepara on of tradi onal and contemporary American special es        beverage and labor costs within a food service facility.
with an emphasis on protein and sauce produc on. The concepts
of mise en place, plate presenta on, team work and sanita on         CULA200 Garde Manger (6 credits)
are emphasized.                                                      This course teaches the student about methods related cold food
                                                                     prepara on, hors d’oeuvres, display pla ers, charcuterie, and cu-
CULA120 Purchasing and Product ID (3 credits)                        linary centerpieces. Students enhance skills through produc on,
This course introduces the student to the methodologies and          presenta on and service.
tools used to control costs and purchase supplies. This course
helps the student value the purchasing, planning, and control        CULA203 La n Cuisines (3 credits)
processes in the food and beverage industry. Primary focus is        This course reinforces the basic knowledge and skills developed
on supplier selec on, planning, and controlling costs, with an       in preceding culinary classes. During this course, the student
introduc on the study of sustainable products and approaches.        learns to develop an understanding of the authen c flavors and
Topics include planning and controlling costs using budge ng         techniques associated with La n cuisine and culture. The cuisines
techniques, standard cos ng, standardized recipes, performance       of Mexico, South America, and The New World will be empha-
measurements, and food, beverage, and labor cost controls.           sized. Specific focus is placed on u lizing indigenous ingredients
                                                                     and understanding tradi onal flavor profiles.
CULA123 Sustainable Purchasing and Controlling Costs (4 cred-
its)                                                                 CULA207 World Cuisines (2 credits)
This course introduces the student to the methodologies and          This course reinforces the basic knowledge and skills developed
tools used to control costs and purchase supplies. This course       in preceding culinary classes. During this course, the student
helps the student value the purchasing, planning, and control        learns to develop an understanding of the authen c flavors and
processes in the food and beverage industry. Primary focus is        techniques associated with a variety of world cuisines. Empha-
on supplier selec on, planning, and controlling costs, with an       sis is placed on u lizing indigenous ingredients, understanding
introduc on the study of sustainable products and approaches.        tradi onal flavor profiles and the applica on of these cultural
Topics include planning and controlling costs using budge ng         influences in the contemporary kitchen.
techniques, standard cos ng, standardized recipes, performance
measurements, and food, beverage, and labor cost controls. This      CULA210 Nutri on (3 credits)
course is open only to diploma students.                             This course centers on an explana on of the basic principles of
                                                                     nutri on and their rela onship to health. The structure, func-
CULA125 Introduc on to Baking and Pastry Techniques (5                 ons and source nutrients including proteins, carbohydrates, fats,
credits)                                                             vitamins, minerals and water are discussed. Current issues in nu-
This course is a combina on of theory, lecture, demonstra on,        tri on are reviewed including dietary guidelines, energy balance,
and hands-on produc on to provide an introduc on to baking           vitamin supplements and food fads.
and pastry techniques for use in a commercial kitchen. Special
focus is placed on the study of ingredient func ons, product         CULA212 Asian Cuisine (3 credits)
iden fica on, and weights and measures as applied to baking           The student experiences authen c regional Asian cuisines of Ja-
and pastry techniques. Instruc on is provided on the prepara on      pan, China, India, Korea, Thailand, Vietnam and the Spice Islands.
of yeast-raised dough mixing methods, roll-in doughs, pie doughs,    Emphasis is placed on tradi onal ingredients, flavor profiles,
basic cake mixing methods, fillings, icings, pastry cream, and fin-    prepara on and techniques.
ishing techniques. Emphasis is also placed on dessert pla ng and
presenta on. Students must pass a prac cal exam.                     CULA216 Classical European Cuisine (3 credits)
                                                                     Students execute varia ons on classic prepara ons involving
                                                                     crea on of menu concepts, use of classical sauces and delivery of
                                                                     products with a classical haute cuisine menu system.



                                                         72 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
CULA220 Management by Menu (3 credits)                                 ringue torts, souffles, intricate garnishes and tradi onal European
This course provides fundamental principles in menu construc-          cakes. (Culinary Management elec ve)
 on, formula on and analysis techniques. The students study
different menu types, key menu components and apply in-depth            CUL207 Ar san Breads & Baking Produc on (4 credits)
concepts through the crea on and presenta on of a food service         Students are introduced to the fundamental skills, concepts and
concept. (Offered at ILIC, ILIS, and AIMD)                              techniques of ar san bread baking. Special emphasis is placed
                                                                       upon the study of ingredients and their effect on the bread bak-
CULA225 A la Carte Restaurant Kitchen (3 credits)                      ing process. Use of sponges, wild yeast, bigas and poolish are
The students prepare modern and regional American cuisine in           incorporated in making authen c rus c bread.
a public restaurant. Correct applica on of culinary skills, plate
presenta on, organiza on and ming in producing items of both           CUL209 Advanced Pa sserie & Display Cakes (6 credits)
a fixed-price menu and an a la carte menu are stressed. The             This course explores the techniques of plated desserts and the
principles of dining room service and the philosophy of food are       theory behind building edible art for A la Carte service, compe -
further explored and examined in light of today’s understanding          on or banquet func ons. Methods and procedures for produc-
of food and presenta on.                                               ing high quality specialty decorated cakes, as well as the design,
                                                                       assembly, and decora ng of wedding cakes will be introduced.
CULA230 Dining Room Service (3 credits)                                (Prerequisite: CULA125)
Topics covered include the psychology of service, professional
standards of performance for dining room personnel, the fun-           CUL216 Catering & Event Management (4 credits)
damental skills required for service ware handling, the service        This course explores the dynamics of off-premise catering from
sequence, order taking, guest rela ons and the liability and           the nuts and bolts of developing the contract to making the sale
consumer dimensions of alcohol service. The budgetary process          and appropriately cos ng the en re banquet menu. Proper pur-
is introduced, employee scheduling and fundamentals of wine            chasing techniques for food and wine as well as non-food items
selec on and pairing is covered.                                       are studied. Working with the client designing the buffet and
                                                                       pulling out all of the stops in order to make an incredible show.
CULA235 Food & Beverage Opera ons Management (4 credits)               Students work on projects that engage their cri cal thinking skills
This course provides the student with the founda on necessary          while se ng up mock banquet and catering scenarios.
to understand and appreciate the role food and beverages play
within the restaurant and how they interact with one another.          CUL224 Oenology & Vi culture (4 credits)
The study of wine, beer and spirits are presented through lec-         This course is an extensive study of wine and the science of wine
tures and formal wine and beer tas ngs.                                making from the cul va on of the vines to the harvest of the
                                                                       grape and the subsequent chemical and biological components
CULA298 Art Culinaire (3 credits)                                      of wine during crushing, stemming, fermen ng, aging, bo ling,
This course will celebrate the culinary styles, restaurants, restau-   packaging and shipping. Geographical, climac c and cultural im-
rateur and chefs who are in the current industry spotlight. Their      pacts on the types of wines produced are emphasized. Included
style, substance and quality will be discussed and examined.           in this course are tas ngs and pairings of wine with food. Field
During the hands–on produc on aspect of the class, students            trips are used to research technique and witness first-hand the
will have the opportunity to be exposed to specialty produce and       wine making process from local vineyards.
products.
                                                                       CUL236 European Cakes & Tortes (4 credits)
CULA299 Culinary Associate Capstone (3 credits)                        Students will build on competencies previously learned and apply
Through competencies developed with previous related studies           those skills into new products to create more elaborate tortes
course work, students will develop a business plan for a minimum       and cakes using complex finishing methods by applying glazes,
one hundred-seat restaurant. The project will include: Market          using decora ve sponges, and building mul -component cakes.
Analysis and Marke ng Strategy, Opera ng Budget, Sales Projec-         Topics to be covered include comparison of classical and modern
 ons, Opening Inventories, Capital Equipment, Standardized Reci-       prepara ons, classical cakes; glazed, iced, molded, and cream
pes and Cos ng for all standardized recipes, Menu and Facili es        filled cakes, and bombes. (Prerequisite: CULA125)
Design. The course covers the components of a business plan as
well as techniques for developing and presen ng sec ons of the         CUL237 Chocolate, Confec ons & Centerpieces (6 credits)
plan. Business related competencies are reviewed and tutored as        Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts, skills and
necessary for comple on of the project.                                techniques of chocolates and confec ons. Students are intro-
                                                                       duced to the basic techniques used in forming simple center-
CUL200 Advanced Cakes & Classical Torts (4 credits)                    pieces. Lectures and demonstra ons teach chocolate tempering,
Students are introduced to the fundamental skills, concepts and        candy produc on and the rules that apply when crea ng center-
techniques of advanced cakes. Students learn through lecture,          pieces. (Prerequisite: CULA125)
demonstra ons and hands-on technique to make classical me-



                                                           73 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
CUL242 Show Pieces (3 credits)                                          CUL311 Human Resource Management (4 credits)
This class is devoted to compe ons, specialty showpieces,               This course is designed to provide an overview and founda on
crea ve accessories and finishing procedures for pastry. Students        for all facets of the human resource element in the food service
will have the ability to specialize in specific areas of chocolate,      industry. Emphasis will include development of job descrip ons,
sugar, pas llage, nouga ne, assorted garnishes and other serious        recruitment, hiring, training and termina on of employees.
pastry art forms that bring about compe ve results.
                                                                        CUL312 Innova on and Entrepreneurship (4 credits)
CUL300 Management Externship (4 credits)                                This course provides an introductory overview to the knowledge
An externship is a monitored program where students work part-          and skills needed for entrepreneurship. The course offers a
  me in a professional workplace approved by their department,          chance to gain new knowledge and skills about how to iden fy
applying their knowledge, skills and professionalism in a program-      and pursue entrepreneurial opportuni es that can be applied to
related environment. In the culinary management externship              a student’s own interests.
students apply their technical knowledge in a working kitchen.
Students have the opportunity to observe and par cipate in an           CUL313 Property Management (3 credits)
opera on related to their field of study gaining prac cal work           This course introduces the various engineering systems com-
experience prior to gradua on. Culinary Management students             monly associated with the hospitality industry such as HVAC,
focus on kitchen management related du es. (Interna onal                plumbing electrical, emergency systems, waste management,
students need signed approval from the Interna onal Student             water systems and energy management. Emphasis is placed on
Advisor.)                                                               preventa ve maintenance programs, safety regula ons and build-
                                                                        ing requirements.
CUL301 History & Culture of Cuisine (4 credits)
This course examines the major historical and geographical              CUL314 Foodservice Technology and Informa on (4 credits)
developments that affect the evolu on of cultural pa erns such           This class explores the mul tude of programs and processes used
as cooking habits and the use of ingredients through various            in various food service establishments as they apply to improving
cultures.                                                               quality controls, labor and costs. Students also develop their own
                                                                        systems based on the best exis ng systems. Implementa on of
CUL302 Modern Leadership - Food Service (4 credits)                     company-specific so ware programs is used.
This course is an introduc on to leadership roles. It is a study of
organiza onal prac ces, orienta on, community resources and             CUL315 Advanced Food & Beverage Cost Control (4 credits)
facilita on of student success with faculty assistance.                 This class gives the students the working knowledge of finance
                                                                        that is increasingly demanded of all hospitality managers. Easy-
CUL303 Computer So ware for the Food Service Manager (4                 to-understand theories and applica ons show the students how
credits)                                                                to make business decisions and obtain cri cal informa on by ana-
This course incorporates the data from spreadsheets, word-pro-          lyzing financial statements.
cessed documents and specialized food service so ware applica-
 ons into presenta on format. Emphasis is on the prepara on of          CUL317 Foodservice Financial Management (4 credits)
professional documents, formal presenta ons and graphic visuals         This class gives the students the working knowledge of finance
to express and convey informa on and ideas to others.                   that is increasingly demanded of all hospitality managers. Easy-
                                                                        to-understand theories and applica ons show the students how
CUL304 From Farm to Plate (2 credits)                                   to make business decisions and obtain cri cal informa on by ana-
This course focuses both on the farming and fishing industries           lyzing financial statements.
and the distribu on, produc on, growing and harves ng systems
associated with them.                                                   CUL319 Quality Service Management and Training (4 credits)
                                                                        This class will examine the role of service in the food service
CUL305 Global Management and Opera ons in the Hospitality               industry and explore how to give quality customer service.
Industry (4 credits)                                                    Service systems and training programs in quality opera ons will
This course provides students with an introduc on to the dimen-         be examined through the use of case studies and hypothe cal
sions and nature of the interna onal hospitality industry. It is        scenarios. The course will cover employee training and develop-
designed to review the principles of management and to apply            ment from both a strategic and opera onal perspec ve. The class
management theory to the global marketplace. Students examine           will culminate by examining Charlie Tro er’s service standards in
the social, cultural, poli cal and economic environments within         what is o en the best-rated restaurant in the United States.
which interna onal hospitality operators compete for survival
and growth. Topics emphasized include cultural dimensions of            CUL323 Senior Project Capstone (4 credits)
management, interna onal management strategy, interna onal              Through competencies developed with previous related studies
marke ng and interna onal human resource management.                    course work, students will develop a business plan for a minimum




                                                            74 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
one hundred-seat restaurant. The project will include: Market          DFV201 Scriptwri ng & Storytelling (4 credits)
Analysis and Marke ng Strategy, Opera ng Budget, Sales Projec-         This course focuses on the planning, scrip ng and storyboarding
 ons, Opening Inventories, Capital Equipment, Standardized Reci-       for a variety of media produc ons. Narra ve scrip ng techniques
pes and Cos ng for all standardized recipes, Menu and Facili es        are taught. Scripts are developed with an emphasis on charac-
Design. The course covers the components of a business plan as         teriza on, plo ng, target audience, messages and script format.
well as techniques for developing and presen ng sec ons of the         This course addresses the need to communicate in wri ng on the
plan. Business related competencies are reviewed and tutored as        job. A variety of materials must be wri en for business: memos,
necessary for comple on of the project.                                le ers, news summaries, proposals, presenta ons and copy for
                                                                       adver sing or marke ng. Students learn to iden fy the require-
CUL442 Facility Management & Design (4 credits)                        ments of different types of wri ng and to prepare material to
This course provides students with informa on related to hos-          communicate clearly and effec vely. (Prerequisite: GEN101,
pitality facility design and maintenance. Food service layout and      DFV100)
design is related to opera ng issues, new building construc on,
and renova ons. Planning and design of facili es including equip-      DFV202 Digital Filmmaking Associate Por olio (2 credits)
ment, space and func onal rela onships, cost and opera ng effi-          In this course each student assembles a por olio that demon-
ciencies; emphasis on maintenance programs, safety regula ons,         strates conceptual design, cra smanship, and other skills. The
building code requirements and energy conserva on.                     student selects and refines representa ve pieces, showcasing
                                                                       work that reflects a unique style. Par cular emphasis is placed
DFV100 Survey of Film & Video (4 credits)                              on iden fying short and long term professional employment
Students receive an introduc on to the digital filmmaking and           goals and strategies and resources for achieving them.
video produc on industries, the types of career paths avail-
able and the variety of posi ons held. In addi on, students are        DFV220 Studio Produc on (4 credits)
exposed to a historical overview of films and television program-       This course introduces the student to the digital video studio,
ming to obtain a perspec ve of the art form as a whole.                including the studio control room where they conduct a live
                                                                       television program. Students learn to work together in a produc-
DFV101 Introduc on to Digital Filmmaking (4 credits)                     on group, develop their ability to collaborate in a live video
This course introduces students to the fundamental terminol-           produc on, operate professional video cameras, work with actors
ogy, concepts and techniques of crea ng moving images and of           and complete a short television program. (Prerequisite: DFV100,
being a visual storyteller. Instruc on is given in basic opera on of   DFV101, DFV120)
a digital video camera including its set-up and opera on. Using
loca ons, actors, storytelling and other techniques for overall        DFV225 Fundamentals of Edi ng (4 credits)
thema c and visual effect, students create a simple, short digital      This course introduces students to the edi ng of video and
movie. Students demonstrate knowledge of the technical terms           sound. The course covers the process of digital non-linear edi ng
of video produc on and basic video produc on techniques.               using contemporary so ware tools as well as the techniques
Sequence: follows GEN109 at ILIC for B.F.A.; follows ART100 for        employed in the profession of post-produc on edi ng for movies
programs that require it as a suppor ng course.                        and television. Sequence: follows DFV100, DFV101, DFV120 for
                                                                       DFV and VP majors. DFV120 for VFX majors.
DFV120 Fundamentals of Audio (4 credits)
This course inves gates the principles of digital sound and music      DFV230 Fundamentals of Ligh ng (4 credits)
recording. An introduc on to sound includes the study of sound         In this introductory ligh ng class, the student is introduced to
characteris cs, basic acous cs, ergonomics and basic techniques        basic ligh ng concepts and terminology and how they specifi-
for field recording. Waveform physics and psychoacous cs are            cally relate to media produc ons. The student learns to iden fy
also covered. The role of sound and music in video produc on is        and use various types of ligh ng instruments and applica ons.
explained and exemplified. Techniques to integrate digital audio        (Prerequisite: DFV200) Sequence: follows DFV101 for DFV and VP
for anima on, video, CD-ROM and Web applica ons are ex-                majors.
plored. Sequence: follows GEN109 at ILIC for B.F.A.
                                                                       DFV300 Direc ng & Pre-Produc on (4 credits)
DFV200 Digital Cinematography (4 credits)                              This course presents lectures and exercises on advanced pre-
Students learn to use the video camera as a technical and              produc on and produc on techniques, including direc ng
crea ve tool for communica on and art by emphasizing camera            actors, drama c/comedic effect, pre-produc on management
shoo ng aesthe cs, technology and opera on, as well as industry        documenta on, produc on planning documents, loca on issues,
techniques and standards of shot composi on, framing and               crew management, running an efficient produc on and more.
sequencing. Students prac ce interior and exterior produc on           (Prerequisite: MAA221) Sequence: follows DFV201, DFV220 for
techniques, color correc on, shu er speed and aperture se ngs,         DFV majors.
and achieving a “film look” on video. (Prerequisite: ART100)
Sequence: follows DFV100, DFV101 for DFV and VP majors.



                                                           75 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
DFV302 Media Theory & Cri cism (4 credits)                               ve projects showcasing their personal styles and demonstra ng
In this course, students explore the different theories and ap-          overall conceptual skill and technical mastery. Students compile
proaches to media and their impact on society and culture so            the first 50% of their por olio materials to be fully completed in
as to inform and enrich their own work. (Prerequisite: DFV101,          DFV430. (Prerequisite: DFV300, DFV305, DFV325)
DFV201)
                                                                        DFV360 Advanced Edi ng (4 credits)
DFV305 Media Composi ng (4 credits)                                     Focusing on advanced edi ng systems and methods, this course
Focused on concepts and techniques of composi ng and integra-           enables students to process audio and video elements in media
 on, this course enables students to assemble digital video and         content and organize the content for total effect and final deliv-
graphical elements to achieve an overall design and prepare             ery. Students apply a comprehensive set of cri cal and evalua ve
the final product for delivery. Students learn to shoot subjects         skills to make sound judgment calls and sophis cated edi ng
against a green or blue screen and apply post-produc on effects          decisions. (Prerequisite: DFV225, DFV325)
to the layered composite digital video materials to create a short
video. (Prerequisite: VFX250) Sequence: follows DFV200, DFV225,         DFV365 Sound Design (4 credits)
DFV230) for DFV majors.                                                 This course addresses the design of a sound track for a short
                                                                        digital film or video. Students learn how to design an appropriate
DFV312 Short Form Produc on (4 credits)                                 sound track for a specific produc on according to its rela on with
Students learn to capture a live performance event and turn             the final product including issues rela ng to dialog acquisi on,
it into a short video composi on. Using one or more cameras,            field recording, mul -track edi ng, sound effects, foley, ADR and
students learn to capture a live event and apply post-produc on         audio post-produc on. Students learn about the audio produc-
techniques to create a short piece with a thema c composi on.            on industry and how it relates to digital filmmaking and video
Students learn the produc on management skills to organize              produc on. Sequence: follows DFV120, DFV225, DFV325 for DFV
a crew, schedule a produc on and u lize appropriate produc-             majors
  on management methods and documenta on. (Prerequisite:
DFV120, DFV225, DFV300)                                                 DFV407 Internship (4 credits)
                                                                        Through a field internship experience, students are able to apply
DFV315 Ac ng & Direc ng (4 credits)                                     their skills in a real and prac cal situa on. The main objec ves of
This course exposes students to the role and responsibili es of a       the internship are to allow students the opportunity to observe
director in helping actors bring their characters to life. Ac ng fun-   and par cipate in the opera on of successful businesses related
damentals are studied through classroom exercises, assignments,         to their fields of study. Students gain the experience they need to
observa ons and cri ques. In addi on, this course helps students        enter the field upon gradua on. (Prerequisite: Permission from
understand the process of reading a script, conceiving a vision         Director required. Interna onal students need signed approval
and communica ng it to cast members to enhance performance.             from the Interna onal Student Advisor.)
(Prerequisite: DFV300)
                                                                        DFV430 Por olio Prepara on II (4 credits)
DFV320 Produc on Audio (4 credits)                                      A design por olio are assembled and refined in prepara on for
This course introduces students to the equipment, techniques,           use in seeking industry employment. Students select representa-
protocols, and procedures used in on-site recording for film and           ve projects showcasing their personal styles and demonstra ng
television. Topics include power requirements and electrical            overall conceptual skill and technical mastery. A video por o-
noise, acous c isola on, loca on mixing, audio post-produc on           lio on DVD or VHS tape is supplemented by a print por olio
tools and processes, field and post synchroniza on, sampling             documen ng the design and produc on process. (Prerequisite:
sounds and environments, microphone placement, wireless mi-             DFV360, DFV312, DFV330, VFX350)
crophones, and communica on and audio processing in the field.
(Prerequisite: DFV120) Sequence: follows DFV220 for DFV major.          DFV441 Senior Project I (4 credits)
                                                                        This course presents lectures on contemporary trends and ad-
DFV325 Documentary Produc on (4 credits)                                vanced skills in digital filmmaking and video produc on tech-
Working alone or in produc on teams, students conceptual-               nique. Students create a complete pre-produc on plan for a short
ize, design and execute a digital produc on of a non-fic onal            digital film produc on. (Prerequisite: DFV315, DFV325, DFV330)
documentary video on a chosen topic for a targeted audience.
Students shoot interviews, gather suppor ng video footage,              DFV451 Senior Project II (4 credits)
record audio and subsequently edit the footage into a completed         The student applies advanced crea ve and produc on skills to
final piece. (Prerequisite: DFV200, DFV225, DFV230, DFV300)              shoot and edit an original short digital film produc on employing
                                                                        the skills learned throughout the program. (Prerequisite: DFV365
DFV330 Por olio Prepara on I (4 credits)                                and either DFV407 or DFV441)
A design por olio is assembled and refined in prepara on for
use in seeking industry employment. Students select representa-



                                                            76 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
DPH101 History and Survey of Photography (4 credits)                   and use various types of ligh ng instruments and applica ons.
This course provides a framework for cri cally considering             (Prerequisite: DPH253)
significant photographers and their work. Students are expected
to describe, interpret, and evaluate the origins, stylis c changes,    DPH266 Loca on Photography (4 credits)
and ar s c innova ons in the history of photography from the           This course explores the special needs of loca on photography,
19th Century through contemporary mes.                                 including both the technical and logis cal aspects of loca on
                                                                       work. Students are challenged with a variety of assignments
DPH102 Principles of Photography (4 credits)                           related to fashion, portraiture, product, stock, and architectural
In this founda on course, students examine the essen al tools,         photography. (Prerequisite: DPH253, DPH260)
materials, and techniques of photography. The student learns to
use the camera, film processing, composi on, print finishing, and        DPH267 Editorial Photography (4 credits)
basic darkroom prin ng. The student is challenged to inves gate        Students produce assignments related to photojournalism, loca-
the photographic medium and consider its role in image making.          on, and editorial photography. Emphasis is placed on digital
                                                                       technologies and formal assignment presenta on. The class is de-
DPH117 Photographic Design (4 credits)                                 voted to subject research and crea ve photography in both fine
In this course, students experience primary design elements of         art and commercial applica ons. (Prerequisite: DPH253, DPH260)
visual communica on as they apply to the photograph. Topics
include image composi on, color theory, ligh ng theory and the         DPH315 Advanced Ligh ng (4 credits)
art of the cri que. (Prerequisite: ART100, DPH102)                     This course expands on the Fundamentals of Ligh ng, with an
                                                                       emphasis on ligh ng for products and people in both the studio
DPH242 Image Manipula on (4 credits)                                   and on loca on. The necessary and correct u liza on of electron-
Using drawing and composi on abili es, students explore raster-        ic flash and ligh ng tools in the studio and on loca on is covered.
based so ware. Composi ng, edi ng, scanning and retouching             Emphasis is placed on the imagina ve applica on of ligh ng
are an integral part of the course. Digital cameras and basic          technique and style. (Prerequisite: DPH260)
photographic techniques are introduced. (Prerequisite: ART110)
Sequence: follows DPH102 for Digital Photography majors;               DPH319 Photographic Studio (4 credits)
GEN109 at ILIC and AIMD.                                               Students develop the ability to solve problems of visual commu-
                                                                       nica on through assignments designed to challenge their skills
DPH252 Advanced Image Manipula on (4 credits)                          in ligh ng, camera opera on, and commercial interpreta on. All
This course is designed to further enhance the skills acquired         aspects of studio photography are discussed from lenses to light-
in previous image manipula on and technology-based classes.            ing and people to products. (Prerequisite: DPH315)
Emphasis is placed on advanced applica ons and the appropri-
ate selec on of variables for the required task. Students study        DPH325 Photographic Essay & Visual Narra ve (4 credits)
the possibili es and constraints of image transport and display        This course addresses photography as a narra ve or illustra ve
over the Internet. Interface design is studied in an applica on –      medium used in support of the text content of publica ons.
oriented approach. (Prerequisite: DPH242)                              Students are required to produce their own rendi ons of picture
                                                                       stories, illustra ons, magazine covers, and page layouts for all
DPH253 Digital Photographic Produc on (4 credits)                      types of print media. (Prerequisite: DPH266, DPH267,DPH315)
In this introduc on to digital photo produc on, students become
acquainted with the concepts, hardware, and so ware related            DPH405 The Business of Photography (4 credits)
to digital image acquisi on, manipula on, and output, including        This course reviews considera ons faced by photographers when
scanning, masking, layering, retouching, and prin ng. (Prerequi-       establishing and managing a studio opera on. Topics include
site: DPH117, DPH242)                                                  recruitment, appraisal, and delega on to a studio staff; nego-
                                                                        a ng with clients and talent; and the management of large
DPH258 Digital Darkroom (4 credits)                                    produc ons. Students must use business management so ware
Emphasis is placed on those digital techniques that correspond         to es mate costs for photographic work and manage a studio
to tradi onal darkroom processes. The course addresses issues          budget. (Prerequisite: GD404)
related to color theory, resolu on, contrast and density controls
and the produc on of photo quality digital prints from scanned         DPH410 Specializa on (4 credits)
film and direct digital captures. (Prerequisite: DPH252, DPH253)        In this course, the student elects to specialize in one or more of
                                                                       the major fields of photography, including photographic illustra-
DPH260 Fundamentals of Ligh ng (4 credits)                               on, industrial, editorial, photojournalism, landscape/ nature,
In this introductory ligh ng class, the student is introduced to       commercial and portraiture. Advanced applica on, marke ng
basic ligh ng concepts and terminology and how they specifi-            and prepara on of por olio for employment are stressed. This
cally relate to media produc ons. The student learns to iden fy        is considered to be the most important sec on of the overall
                                                                       por olio requirements. (Prerequisite: DPH325)



                                                           77 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
DPH416 Art Direc on (4 credits)                                       FD127 Tex les (4 credits)
The role of the art director is examined through a team environ-      This course explores natural and manufactured fibers, their pro-
ment. Leadership, communica on and nego a on skills are an            duc on, uses, characteris cs, and proper es. Content includes
intricate part of the team design projects. Professional quality      discussion of yarns, fabrics, finishes, design methods, aesthe c
por olio examples are the outcome of the projects by coordinat-       applica ons and ordering specifica ons.
ing crea ve efforts from concept to finished product. (Prerequi-
site: Only by Permission of Academic Director)                        FD128 Trends & Concepts in Apparel (4 credits)
                                                                      A comprehensive study of trend forecas ng, demographics and
DPH420 Internship (4 credits)                                         social issues that affect fashion and related industries. (Prerequi-
Through a field internship experience, students are able to apply      site: FD100) Sequence: follows GEN109 at ILIC.
acquired subject ma er and career/professional skills in a real
and prac cal situa on. The main objec ves of the internship           FD219 Knitwear (4 credits)
are to allow students the opportunity to observe and par cipate       Techniques of knitwear and produc on are stressed, with an
in the opera on of successful business related to their fields of      emphasis on developing kni ng specifica ons. CAD so ware is
study. Students \ gain the experience they need to enter the          introduced. (Prerequisite: FD127) Sequence: follows GEN109 at
field when they graduate. (Prerequisite: Permission from Director      ILIC.
required. Interna onal students need signed approval from the
Interna onal Student Advisor.)                                        FD220 Fundamentals of Pa ernmaking (4 credits)
                                                                      This is a laboratory course in which students analyze garment
DPH425 Por olio Prepara on (4 credits)                                designs and apply basic flat pa ern techniques. (Prerequisite:
This course prepares students for job interviews by helping them      FD123)
compile a por olio. Students demonstrate their conceptual de-
sign, cra smanship, and other skills as they assemble and refine       FD222 Costume History (4 credits)
their por olio pieces. Each student selects representa ve pieces,     This course covers historic, na onal, and cultural themes in cos-
showcasing work that reflects a unique style. Par cular emphasis       tume and fashion from ancient to modern mes. (Prerequisite:
is placed on iden fying short and long term professional employ-      FD100)
ment goals, as well as related strategies and resources. (Prerequi-
site: Only by Permission of Academic Director)                        FD223 Fashion Sketching & Illustra on (4 credits)
                                                                      Students further explore techniques of fashion illustra on for
DPH430 Senior Project (4 credits)                                     design communica on. (Prerequisite: ART102, FD127)
This course focuses on the comple on of the por olio and en-
ables students to begin their career search. The student should       FD224 Advanced Pa ernmaking (4 credits)
come into this course with work for the por olio and determine        Students analyze methods of garment manufacturing, includ-
the quality of the work so those enhancements can be made.            ing advanced pa ernmaking and grading processes. Students
The student completes a professional resume and begins the job        develop produc on pa erns and specifica ons suitable for manu-
search. (Prerequisite: Only by Permission of Academic Director)       facturing. (Prerequisite: FD220)

FD100 Survey of the Fashion Industry (4 credits)                      FD226 Technical Drawing & Design (4 credits)
Students are given an overview of the fashion industry, including     Students study CAD design so ware as used in garment and
design, produc on and marke ng of women’s, men’s, and chil-           tex le produc on. Students develop their own printed tex le
dren’s fashions, from the development of fibers and fabrics to the     designs on the computer. (Prerequisite: FD127, FD128, FD223)
strategies of fashion merchandisers and retailers. (Prerequisite:
GEN095 or placement)                                                  FD228 Research & Sourcing Fundamentals (4 credits)
                                                                      In this laboratory class, students analyze construc on standards
FD121 Fundamentals of Construc on (4 credits)                         and techniques used in the ready-to-wear market. Research
Students demonstrate a working knowledge of s tches, altera-          serves as the founda on for developing skills in garment speci-
 ons, seams, zippers and basic construc on methods of garment         fica ons, assembly and finishing. (Prerequisite: FD100, FD220,
making in a laboratory se ng.                                         FD226)

FD123 Advanced Construc on (4 credits)                                FD232 Intro to Business & Retailing (4 credits)
Further explora on of construc on techniques in a laboratory          This course provides an overview of the business and retail
se ng. Students use custom pa erns to produce prfessional             environment. It examines and addresses basic terminology and
looking garments. (Prerequisite: FD121)                               concepts related to business trends, tradi onal and non-store
                                                                      retailing, opera ons and planning.




                                                          78 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
FD233 Draping & Fit Analysis (4 credits)                               FD406 Digital Tex le Design (4 credits)
This course is an introduc on to the technique of draping.             Students learn about the use of CAD design so ware to de-
Students are exposed to the proper method of 3-D pa ernmak-            velop tex les for manufacturers. Complete boards, catalogs and
ing, allowing for accurate expression of the design concept.           swatches are developed in this laboratory class. (Prerequisite:
Propor on, line, grain and fit are analyzed in this laboratory class.   FD219, FD226)
(Prerequisite: FD224)
                                                                       FD415 Senior Collec on Technical & Produc on (4 credits)
FD301 Computer Pa ernmaking (4 credits)                                This course provides students with the opportunity to implement
In this class, students learn use of pa ernmaking systems and          their own apparel line. Students construct a collec on using
skills in CAD. Students engineer pa erns on the computer from          industry standards, determine an accurate cost for the produc-
original designs in a laboratory se ng. (Prerequisite: FD224,            on of the collec on and present the collec on from muslin to
FD228)                                                                 comple on. (Prerequisite: FD321, FD322, FD404)

FD303 Concept & Line Development (4 credits)                           FD416 Product Development (4 credits)
Specialty design areas are explored through research, analysis         Students take products from concept to marketplace researching
and forecas ng. Advanced design skills are applied through hand        trim and fabric markets and analyzing trends for development
rendering skills. Includes the produc on of concept boards for         of private label merchandise. Prototypes are developed, and
finished por olio work. (Prerequisite: FD222, FD224, FD226)             manufacturing and budgetary issues are analyzed. (Prerequisite:
                                                                       FD228, FD232, FD226)
FD311 Design Special es I (4 credits)
In a laboratory se ng, students design and construct apparel for       FD426 Por olio Prepara on (4 credits)
the women’s market. All specialty areas are analyzed. (Prerequi-       Formal por olios are assembled to represent the student’s
site: (Prerequisite: FD127, FD224, FD228, FD233, FD303)                special skills and interests developed throughout the program.
                                                                       (Prerequisite: FD404, FD336)
FD321 Design Special es II (4 credits)
Students design and construct apparel for the men’s and                FD427 Internship (4 credits)
children’s markets. Problem solving skills are used to develop         Ins tute staff members coordinate the internship program with
product prototypes. (Prerequisite: FD127, FD224, FD228, FD233,         upper-level students to work part- me with coopera ng employ-
FD303)                                                                 ers. Available to qualified students who obtain approval from the
                                                                       Academic Department Director. Students are required to keep
FD322 Produc on Systems (4 credits)                                    a log, communicate weekly with faculty members and maintain
Students further explore manufacturing systems with the applica-       a endance requirements. (Prerequisite: Permission from Director
 on of program industry specific CAD so ware. Produc on grade           required. Interna onal students need signed approval from the
rules and markers are created for various garments. (Prerequisite:     Interna onal Student Advisor.)
FD232, FD301)
                                                                       FM110 Survey of the Fashion Industry (4 credits)
FD334 Fashion Career Management (4 credits)                            In this class, students are given an overview of the fashion
Prepares students to conduct a job search in their chosen field         industry including design, produc on and marke ng of women’s,
students examine career paths, assess their experience and ex-         men’s, and children’s fashions from the development of fibers
ploring methods to further develop their skills and marketability.     and fabrics to the strategies of fashion merchandisers and retail-
Students gain prac cal experience by wri ng business correspon-        ers.
dence and by interviewing. Students develop interview skills and
prepare for an internship in the industry. (Prerequisite: GEN105)      FM120 Intro to Business & Retailing (4 credits)
                                                                       This course provides an overview of the business and retail
FD336 Surface Design (4 credits)                                       environment. It examines and addresses basic terminology and
The study of tex le design as related to the garment, tex le           concepts related to business trends, tradi onal and non-store
and home furnishing industry. In this laboratory class, students       retailing, opera ons and planning.
develop and implement designs using a variety of dyeing and
prin ng techniques. Students are introduced to CAD so ware.            FM126 Tex les (4 credits)
(Prerequisite: FD219, FD303)                                           This course explores natural and manufactured fibers, their
                                                                       produc on, uses and characteris cs. Content includes discussion
FD404 Senior Collec on Concept & Technical (4 credits)                 of yarns, fabrics, finishes, design methods, aesthe c applica ons
This course gives students the opportunity to develop and imple-       and ordering specifica ons.
ment their own apparel from concept to pa ernmaking. (Prereq-
uisite: FD228, FD303, FD321)




                                                           79 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
FM128 Costume History (4 credits)                                    FM238 Founda ons of Retail Mathema cs (4 credits)
This course covers historic, na onal and cultural themes in          This course provides an understanding of the various finan-
costume and fashion from ancient to modern mes. Sequence:            cial tools used by retailers to evaluate performance. Students
follows FM110 for B.A. students.                                     calculate, analyze and interpret financial concepts associated
                                                                     with accoun ng from a merchandising perspec ve. (Prerequisite:
FM130 Principles of Marke ng (4 credits)                             FM120)
This course examines the basic principles of marke ng, integrat-
ing the concepts of consumer mo va on with modern marke ng           FM310 Catalog Development (4 credits)
strategizing and planning. Students inves gate the importance        With a concentra on in catalog development students also
marke ng plays in the success of modern business. (Prerequisite:     explore other forms of non-store retailing such as electronic re-
FM120)                                                               tailing, direct mail, mul -level marke ng, telemarke ng and the
                                                                     Internet. (Prerequisite: FM210, FM212, FM220)
FM202 Fashion Marke ng Por olio (2 credits)
In this course each student assembles a por olio that demon-         FM312 Retail Buying (4 credits)
strates conceptual design, cra smanship, and other skills. The       This course provides a founda on for the study of retail buy-
student selects and refines representa ve pieces, showcasing          ing. Theories are analyzed through the study of merchandise
work that reflects a unique style. Par cular emphasis is placed       classifica ons and the calcula on of open-to-buys. (Prerequisite:
on iden fying short and long term professional employment            FM238)
goals and strategies and resources for achieving them.
                                                                     FM314 Trade Tariff & Resourcing (4 credits)
FM210 Trends & Concepts in Apparel (4 credits)                       Students examine basic policies of import/export trade regula-
This course is a comprehensive study of trend forecas ng,              ons, tariff laws and the enforcement of quotas. Current world
demographics and social issues that affect fashion and related        trade disputes and United States import/export policies are
industries. (Prerequisite: FM110, FM128) Sequence: follows           studied from the perspec ve of the manufacturer and retailer.
GEN109 at ILIC.                                                      (Prerequisite: FM236)

FM212 Consumer Behavior (4 credits)                                  FM320 Inventory & Stock Controls (4 credits)
Students examine the basic concepts of consumer behavior             This advanced course in the study of stock control and managing
including theory and measurement, primary considera ons in           open-to-buys provides a prac cum in buying and u lizing com-
marke ng and adver sing prac ces. Strategies to study and influ-      puter spreadsheets for data analysis. (Prerequisite: FM312)
ence the behavior of the consumer are included. (Prerequisite:
FM130)                                                               FM322 Professional Selling (4 credits)
                                                                     This course focuses on the applica on of professional selling and
FM220 Visual Techniques & Design (4 credits)                         sales management techniques to real-life situa ons. The empha-
This survey course explores crea ve and technical approaches to      sis is placed on selling products and services outside of the retail
window and interior store displays. Students work in a laboratory    store arena. (Prerequisite: FM130, FM238)
se ng crea ng three-dimensional displays as they familiarize
themselves with standard and innova ve techniques. (Prerequi-        FM324 Apparel Evalua on & Produc on (4 credits)
site: ART100, ART110)                                                In this laboratory class students analyze construc on standards
                                                                     and techniques used in the ready-to-wear market. Research
FM226 Business Wri ng (4 credits)                                    serves as the founda on for developing skills in garment speci-
This course addresses the need to communicate in wri ng for a        fica ons, assembly and finishing. CAD so ware introduced.
professional environment. A variety of materials must be writ-       (Prerequisite: FM126, FM210)
ten for a business: memos, le ers, news summaries, proposals,
presenta ons and copy for adver sing or marke ng. Students           FM330 Business Management I (4 credits)
learn to iden fy the requirements of different types of wri ng        Addresses fundamental theories of business management with
and to prepare materials to communicate clearly and effec vely.       a focus on business ethics, law, communica on and leadership
(Prerequisite: GEN102, FM120) Sequence: follows GEN109 at ILIC.      skills. (Prerequisite: FM212, FM238)

FM236 Global Marke ng (4 credits)                                    FM332 Public Rela ons (4 credits)
This course is a prac cum in cultural understanding and appre-       This is an advanced course in marke ng that focuses on the
cia on of interna onal business prac ces. Students consider          advantages and opportuni es of crea ve partnering. Students
the importance of cultural self-awareness as well as verbal and      draw on competencies of earlier classes to develop innova ve,
non-verbal communica ons in cross cultural business se ngs.          coopera ve marke ng strategies and programs. (Prerequisite:
(Prerequisite: FM212)                                                FM210) Sequence: follows FM226, FM310 for FMM majors.




                                                         80 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
FM334 Fashion Career Management (4 credits)                            FM430 Por olio Prepara on II (4 credits)
Prepares students to conduct a job search in their chosen field         In this laboratory class students design and prepare a market-
students examine career paths, assess their experience and ex-         able por olio and promo onal pieces. Upon comple on of this
ploring methods to further develop their skills and marketability.     course students will have generated a por olio that is consistent
Students gain prac cal experience by wri ng business correspon-        with their career goals and which represents their specific skills
dence and by interviewing. Students develop interview skills and       and interest to prospec ve employers. (Note: This class may not
prepare for an internship in the industry. (Prerequisite: GEN105)      be taken prior to the second to last quarter of study. Permission
Sequence: follows FM226, FM310.                                        from Director required.) (Prerequisite: Permission of director
                                                                       required)
FM338 Professional Selling for Merchandising (2 credits)
This course focuses on verbal and non-verbal techniques used to        FM434 Internship (4 credits)
present and sell merchandise to consumers and suppliers, and           An internship is a monitored program where students work
provides a founda on for developing and sustaining customer            part- me in a professional workplace approved by their depart-
rela onships, while delivering the value solu ons customers/buy-       ment applying their knowledge, skills, and professionalism in a
ers need and want.                                                     program-related environment. School staff members coordinate
                                                                       the program with upper-level students. Available to qualified
FM410 Product Development (4 credits)                                  students who obtain approval from the Academic Department Di-
Students take products from concept to marketplace researching         rector. Students are required to keep a log, communicate weekly
trim and fabric markets and analyzing trends for development           with faculty members and maintain a endance requirements.
of private label merchandise. Prototypes are developed and             (Permission from Director required. Interna onal students need
manufacturing and budgetary issues are analyzed. CAD so ware           signed approval from the Interna onal Student Advisor.) (Prereq-
u lized. (Prerequisite: FM324)                                         uisite: Permission from Director required. Interna onal students
                                                                       need signed approval from the Interna onal Student Advisor.)
FM412 Business Management II (4 credits)
Introduces students to basic business accoun ng and finance             GAD101 Game Design & Game Play (4 credits)
principles to prepare students to make effec ve business deci-          A well-designed game is an integra on of ar s c and techno-
sions. (Prerequisite: FM320, FM330)                                    logical components that must have a clearly defined goal, set of
                                                                       game criteria and rules for game play. Students learn the funda-
FM414 Adver sing (4 credits)                                           mentals of what makes a game enjoyable, playable, challenging,
This course focuses on the role of adver sing and public rela ons      and marketable by crea ng a game document. (Prerequisite:
in the dissemina on and promo on of apparel and accessory              None)
products, as well as the crea on of brand name and label recog-
ni on, image and special product features. (Prerequisite: FM226,       GAD211 Interac ve Storytelling (4 credits)
FM310)                                                                 This course focuses on the aspects of interac ve and mul -
                                                                       threaded storytelling. Narra ve scrip ng techniques are also be
FM420 Por olio Prepara on I (4 credits)                                taught. Scripts are developed with an emphasis on character-
Students design and prepare a marketable por olio and promo-           iza on, plo ng, target audience, messages and script format.
 onal pieces. Upon comple on of this course, students will have        (Prerequisite: GAD101)
generated a por olio that is consistent with their goals and that
represents their specific skills and interest in prospec ve employ-     GAD233 Background & Character Design (4 credits)
ers. (Prerequisite: Permission from director required)                 This course focuses on the fundamentals of background layout
                                                                       with an emphasis on perspec ve, composi on, design basics,
FM422 Entrepreneurship (4 credits)                                     staging, mood, texture and ligh ng. Students also learn the
Students explore innova on and rapid change as they relate to          basics of using props as background and foreground design ele-
the entrepreneur. Issues regarding financial, behavioral, organi-       ments. (Prerequisite: ART111)
za onal and marke ng challenges facing emerging enterprises
are discussed. Students create a business plan for the start-up        GAD325 Level Design (4 credits)
of a new fashion-related company, product or service. Special          Using learned concepts from the game design and game play
emphasis is placed on the disciplines of planning that are vital to    course, students analyze and extract level design needs. Students
individual success. (Prerequisite: FM412)                              begin the process of determining the basic design elements and
                                                                       assets necessary to create a level. (Prerequisite: DPH242)
FM424 Event Planning & Promo on (4 credits)
Students develop an understanding of retail special events requir-     GAD335 Game Prototyping (4 credits)
ing the planning and implementa on of an actual event.                 In this course, students perform as members of a pre-determined
                                                                       team to create a game level within an exis ng engine. Students




                                                           81 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
implement a pre-exis ng design determined by the teacher to          GAD467 Interior Spaces & Worlds (4 credits)
create the game environment. (Prerequisite: GAD325)                  Most levels of popular games are designed as building interiors
                                                                     and contain characteris cs common to interior design layouts.
GAD338 Game Modeling & Anima on (4 credits)                          This course provides the opportunity for students to create
Real me 3D anima on requires a thorough understanding and            architectural interiors represen ng houses, buildings, and en re
ability to create scenes and characters in such a way as to mini-    worlds in which to place anima on and game characters. (Prereq-
mize the me it takes for a computer to redraw the scene as it        uisite: MAA227)
moves in a game. Students learn level detail crea on techniques
using industry-standard 3D modeling so ware and computers.           GD105 Survey of Graphic Design (4 credits)
(Prerequisite: MAA228)                                               An introduc on to the history, principles, elements and vocabu-
                                                                     lary of graphic design. Methods are explored to help iden fy
GAD356 2D Digital Authoring (4 credits)                              design objec ves and improve graphic communica on skills,
This course incorporates various media elements into a demon-        while exposing students to the process of graphic design through
stra ve work. It explores and integrates elements of video, audio,   exercises, projects, wri en assignments and cri ques.
anima on, user interface design, gaming, CD/DVD authoring, and
web page authoring to produce effec ve final products. Students        GD107 Introduc on to Design Applica ons (4 credits)
learn the func ons of flowchar ng, linking, branching and the         This course is designed to provide an introduc on to the industry-
basic principles of interac vi es between ac on and response.        related graphic so ware applica ons currently used in the design
Effec ve design aesthe cs and usability are be integrated across      professions. Students are introduced to basic skills and technical
mul ple interac ve media pla orms. (Prerequisite: MAA224)            devices for electronic produc on of visual communica on. The
                                                                     three areas of concentra on are digital illustra on, image/photo-
GAD357 Character Modeling & Rigging (4 credits)                      graphic manipula on, and page layout.
This course covers advanced modeling techniques used for
building a 3 dimensional character. Students explore techniques      GD108 Digital Photography for Designers (4 credits)
of character modeling to include various approaches to figure         This course introduces students to the fundamental terminol-
construc on. (Prerequisite: MAA337)                                  ogy, concepts, and techniques of digital image acquisi on, image
                                                                     archiving, manipula on, and output. This course focuses on
GAD445 Advanced Game Prototyping (4 credits)                         the principles of using color, composi on, ligh ng, and other
In this course, students perform as members of a pre-determined      techniques for overall thema c and visual effects of photographic
team to create a game level within an exis ng engine. Students       images. (Prerequisite: ART110, and DPH242)
con nue to develop a project that began in the Game Prototyp-
ing class by a different team of students. Final is the complete      GD109 Digital Illustra on (4 credits)
delivery of the project through a presenta on and use of market-     This course advances the students understanding of the com-
ing materials. (Prerequisite: GAD325)                                puter as an ar st tool. Building on previous courses in drawing,
                                                                     concept development and introductory computer aided design;
GAD448 Character Anima on (4 credits)                                students are asked to generate a number of expressive solu ons
This course is the culmina on of all modeling and anima on           that address specific illustra ve problems, both technical and cre-
courses. Students create work based on understanding of model-       a ve. As part of this course, students are given the opportunity
ing, anima on and rigging. (Prerequisite: MAA228)                    to develop their digital illustra on skills by exploring numerous
                                                                     tools and techniques to obtain desired results. Sequence: follows
GAD455 Team Game Produc on (4 credits)                               GD107 for Graphic Design and Illustra ons majors; ADV106 for
Students either select or accept a specific role on the produc on     Adver sing majors.
team and, ac ng in a mely and professional capacity, ensure
that the game project is completed. Students create and refine        GD110 Introduc on to Typography: Tradi onal (4 credits)
the game produc on document, level designs, basic 2D art and         This course is an introduc on of le ering skills and the history
3D models to be combined into a playable Game Demo. (Prereq-         and founda on of le erforms. The placement of display and
uisite: GAD335 or GAD445)                                            text type in a forma ed space, and the rela onship between
                                                                     the appearance and readability of le erforms, are also studied.
GAD466 Programming for the Ar st (4 credits)                         Students work in a tradi onal context of hand-rendering type
This course introduces basic scrip ng to extend the capabili es of   and also be introduced to contemporary typese ng technology.
the ar st working in media applica ons. Students are introduced      (Prerequisite: ART100, and ART110)
to data structures, constructs, classes, and high level scrip ng
languages. A func onal applica on rela ng to their field of study     GD203 Digital Layout (4 credits)
is produced u lizing a scrip ng language. (Prerequisite: GAD356)     This course explores various means of indica ng, placing and
                                                                     manipula ng visual elements in page design, systema cally
                                                                     developing strong and crea ve layout solu ons by means of a



                                                         82 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
cumula ve, conceptual design process. The ability to effec vely         on methods, marke ng objec ves and budgetary constraints.
integrate photographs, illustra ons, and display and text type        (Prerequisite: GD108, GD211, and GD203)
are developed using page composi on so ware. (Prerequisite:
GD107, GD110 and GD212; or ADV108 for Adver sing majors)              GD302 Por olio I (4 credits)
                                                                      This course prepares students for the transi on to the profession-
GD204 History of Graphic Design (4 credits)                           al world. This course prepares students for the industry by help-
Examines the places, people, events; historical and cultural          ing them compile a por olio. Students demonstrate their con-
factors; and technological innova ons that have influenced the         ceptual, design, cra smanship, and other skills as they assemble
development of graphic design as prac ced in the 21st Century.        and refine their por olio projects. Working individually with an
(Prerequisite: GD302)                                                 instructor, each student selects representa ve projects showcas-
                                                                      ing work that reflects a unique style and developing them further
GD207 Corporate Iden ty (4 credits)                                   as needed. Par cular emphasis is placed on iden fying short- and
The role of communica on design in crea ng comprehensive              long-term professional employment goals, industry and profes-
corporate iden ty systems is the focus of this course. An analysis    sional related resources and por olio development strategies.
of corporate objec ves and prac cal applica ons are the basis for     (Prerequisite: Only by Permission of Academic Director)
developing a structured corporate iden ty system, including logo
design, color, symbols, and branding. Other business collateral       GD303 Typography: Expressive & Experimental (4 credits)
may also apply (sta onery, business cards, signage and packaging      Emphasis is placed on the expressive poten al of typography.
vehicles). Students study and analyze effec ve Corporate Iden ty       How the form of the wri en le er affects meaning is studied
systems through case studies. Project solu ons require innova ve      experimentally. The emphasis is on design elements from the
thinking and alterna ve design approaches with crea ve, intense       perspec ve of history, psychology, and ar s c interpreta on
use of otherwise tradi onal media output. (Prerequisite: GD109,       executed with digital tools. (Prerequisite: GD212)
and GD212)
                                                                      GD304 Publica on Design (4 credits)
GD211 Digital Pre-Press (4 credits)                                   Publica on design is a mainstay in the study of graphic design.
Students complete mul ple-page electronic pre-press documents         This class focuses on crea ng an advanced publica on using
that include scanned and edited images, object-defined graphics        hierarchy, grid, page sequence and spreads. The publica on is
and text through the integra on of a variety of file types. The        typographically-oriented using a combina on of images, color
place of electronic page make-up in modern print produc on            and texture as well as a typographical rela onship to the subject
is studied. Sequence: follows GD203, and DPH242 for Graphic           of the publica on. (Prerequisite: GD211, GD300 and GD303)
Design majors.
                                                                      GD305 Media Business Law (4 credits)
GD212 Typography: Hierarchy (4 credits)                               The role of communica on design in crea ng comprehensive
This course is a con nua on of the study of tradi onal typog-         corporate iden ty systems is the focus of this course. An analysis
raphy. Exercises and projects focus on the hierarchical quali es      of corporate objec ves and prac cal applica ons is the basis for
of typography. The development of marketable, original, and           developing a structured corporate iden ty system, including logo
crea ve problem solving solu ons are also examined with an            design, color, symbols, and branding. Other business collateral
emphasis on crea ve techniques. Industry standard so ware are         may also apply (sta onery, business cards, signage and packaging
used in the development of digital typography and hierarchal          vehicles). Students study and analyze effec ve Corporate Iden ty
skills. (Prerequisite: GD110)                                         systems through case studies. Project solu ons will require inno-
                                                                      va ve thinking and alterna ve design approaches with crea ve,
GD300 Conceptual Imagery (4 credits)                                  intense use of otherwise tradi onal media output. (Prerequisite:
This course concentrates on image concepts, content, symbolism,       GD207)
and narra ve poten al for advanced por olio applica ons and
provoca ve expression. Students develop the techniques and            GD306 Graphic Design Associate Por olio Final Review (2 cred-
abili es to create personal, conceptual, and experimental imag-       its)
ery to enhance design projects while increasing their flexibility as   In this course each student assembles a por olio that demon-
an ar st and designer. Issues of style, consistency, content, and     strates conceptual design, cra smanship, and other skills. The
presenta on help students develop a wider range of communica-         student selects and refines representa ve pieces, showcasing
 on resources. (Prerequisite: GD302)                                  work that reflects a unique style. Par cular emphasis is placed
                                                                      on iden fying short and long term professional employment
GD301 Package Design (4 credits)                                      goals and strategies and resources for achieving them.
Explora on of the design process in package design and the chal-
lenges of adap ng 2D designs to 3D forms, both simple and com-        GD401 Art Direc on (4 credits)
plex. Projects explore materials, structure, aesthe cs, produc-       This course examines the role of the art director in produc-
                                                                      ing mul -faceted design projects. Working in teams, students



                                                          83 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
coordinate their crea ve efforts, from concept to finished output.     the visual arts and the role of the ar st in society. Students are
By encouraging a team approach, the course further enhances          exposed to prac cal informa on and skills necessary for academ-
students’ leadership, communica ons and nego a on skills.            ic survival and success as a student and an ar st.
(Prerequisite: Only by Permission of Academic Director)
                                                                     GEN095 English Fundamentals (4 credits)
GD403 Por olio II (4 credits)                                        This transi onal studies course builds an adequate founda on
This course aims to prepare students for entry-level employment      for GE101 English I. Emphasis is placed on fundamental grammar
within the industry by assis ng them with the development and        and wri en communica on skills as well as essen als of wri ng
presenta on of a graphic design por olio that reflects the stated     paragraphs and short essays.
exit competencies. Graphic Designers present por olios of their
work to prospec ve employers and clients to showcase their           GEN096 Essen als Of Computer Applica ons (0 credits)
conceptual, technical and business abili es. Working with the in-    This transi onal course introduces students to the basic opera-
structor, students compile an entry-level por olio to prepare for      on of computer hardware on both Mac and PC pla orms. File
their job search. All gradua ng students are required to present     management and storage, basic word processing, Power Point,
their final por olio to employers at the Student Por olio Show.       and spreadsheets are explored. The use of scanners, printers,
(Prerequisite: Only by Permission of Academic Director)              external drives, and other equipment are examined. Students are
                                                                     introduced to the Internet as a research and networking tool.
GD404 Professional Development for Graphic Design (4 credits)
This course prepares students for the business environment and       GEN097 Mathema cs Fundamentals I (4 credits)
the transi on into an applied arts program. It emphasizes the        This course is the first of two transi onal studies math courses.
concepts of professionalism and an overall understanding of          This course strengthens the numerical, algebra, and geometry
self-marke ng in the field. Professional development tools are        skills necessary for success in the students’ educa onal programs
presented including resume and cover le er wri ng, network-          and build a founda on for the college-level mathema cs and
ing and interviewing skills. (Prerequisite: Only by Permission of    science courses. This course includes computa onal skills with
Academic Director)                                                   real numbers, simplifying algebraic expressions, and solving
                                                                     linear equa ons with applica ons. Geometric concepts may be
GD405 Graphic Design Internship (4 credits)                          introduced.
An internship is a monitored program where students work
part- me in a professional workplace approved by their depart-       GEN098 Mathema cs Fundamentals II (4 credits)
ment, applying their knowledge, skills and professionalism in a      This course is the second of two transi onal studies math cours-
program-related environment. The internship allows the student       es. This course strengthens the numerical, algebra, and geometry
an opportunity to observe and par cipate in the opera on of          skills necessary for success in the students’ educa onal programs
an industry-related organiza on and produce work that meets          and build a founda on for the college-level mathema cs and
professional requirements. (Prerequisite: Only by Permission of      science courses. Topics include simplifying algebraic expres-
Academic Director)                                                   sions, solving equa ons, construc ng and interpre ng graphs,
                                                                     and analyzing func ons. Topics from geometry may be explored.
GD406 Sustainable Design Issues & Topics (4 credits)                 Concepts are presented as models of real-life situa ons used in
This course addresses the fundamental issues of sustainable          problem solving. (Prerequisite: GEN097 or placement)
design and introduce a broad range of frameworks and concepts
for tackling the fundamental changes that are required in how a      GEN101 English I (4 credits)
company approaches design and manufacturing. Drawing from            This course introduces students to the research process and to
a wide range of sources and case studies, we will discuss the key    college-level wri ng as a process of developing and suppor ng a
issues framing sustainable design, how it can be ini ated in an      thesis in an organized essay. It emphasizes the use of a variety of
organiza on, and how it impacts on choices of product planning,      rhetorical modes, appropriate dic on and language, reading and
produc on partners, brand and marke ng. (Prerequisite: GD404)        responding to the wri ng of others and observing the conven-
                                                                      ons of Standard English including spelling, punctua on, gram-
GD407 Senior Project (4 credits)                                     mar, ci ng sources and preparing a bibliography. (Prerequisite:
Students will develop an independent project. Developing a           GEN095 or placement)
long-term assignment and extending the skills learned in previous
studio classes are emphasized. (Prerequisite: Only by Permission     GEN102 English II (4 credits)
of Academic Director)                                                This course builds upon the founda on developed in English I
                                                                     with an emphasis on literary language and the interpreta on of
GEN092 Founda on Por olio (1 credits)                                a variety of texts. Students gain addi onal experience in reading,
This course is designed to help students develop academic suc-       thinking, and wri ng cri cally. It further develops the methods of
cess skills in tandem with a great apprecia on and awareness of      research and documenta on conven ons; students select, evalu-




                                                         84 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
ate, and integrate a variety of sources to support a thesis in an      scrip ve sta s cs. (Prerequisite: GEN098 or placement) (Offered
organized research essay. (Prerequisite: GEN101)                       at ILIC, AIMD, and AIOHC)

GEN105 Effec ve Speaking (4 credits)                                    GEN157 Introductory Sta s cs (4 credits)
This course teaches oral communica on skills with emphasis on          Sta s cs introduces students to the study of descrip ve and
both theory and prac ce. Students are taught how to conduct            inferen al sta s cs. Topics include the collec on, presenta on
responsible research, compose coherent messages adapted to             and analysis of data and the sta s cal theories used to make
a specific audience and situa on, and to develop and polish             predic ons. Simulated and real-life research data will be used,
their presenta on skills. Students also develop cri cal thinking       and students will explore crea ve presenta ons of sta s cal in-
and listening skills, as well as ethical communica on behaviors.       forma on. (Prerequisite: GEN098 or placement) (Offered at ILIC,
Sequence: follows GEN101 at ILIC.                                      AIMD, and AIOHC)

GEN107 Computers for Culinary (4 credits)                              GEN201 Spanish I (4 credits)
This course acquaints and prepares students in the use of com-         The first of two courses introduces students to the Spanish
puter related knowledge and skills necessary for a culinary career.    language through wri en materials and oral exercises. Students
Covered are word processing, spreadsheets, file management,             explore the fundamentals of grammar and begin to develop the
Web search skills and opera on of peripheral equipment such            listening and speaking skills necessary for conversa on. Students
as a printer, scanner and storages devices. In addi on, students       are also introduced to the interrela onship of language and
learn fundamental concepts and associated vocabulary. All proj-        culture. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105)
ects are tailored to the needs of the culinary industry.
                                                                       GEN202 Spanish II (4 credits)
GEN109 Computers for the Arts (4 credits)                              Spanish II builds on the knowledge gained from Spanish I. Stu-
Students are introduced to advanced computer knowledge and             dents con nue to study grammar with an emphasis on vocabu-
skills with emphasis on various so ware applica ons. Students          lary acquisi on and the extension of their conversa onal skills.
develop their visual communica on and representa on skills             Students converse in and write Spanish regularly expanding their
using so ware as a tool. (Prerequisite: GEN096 or placement)           apprecia on for the interrela onship of language and culture.
(Offered at ILIC and AIMD)                                              (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105, GEN201)

GEN150 Mathema cal Concepts and Connec ons (4 credits)                 GEN205 Music Apprecia on (4 credits)
This course emphasizes the development of the student’s ability        Introduc on to representa ve music masterpieces through
to reason mathema cally and solve problems in se ngs the               percep ve listening. Emphasis on the elements of music, various
college graduate may encounter in personal and professional            musical forms and periods, and great composers and performers.
endeavors. Topics include three or more of the following: logic,       (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105) (Offered at ILIC and ILIS)
number theory, the math of finance, set theory, mathema cal
modeling, diverse geometric disciplines and the arts. (Prerequi-       GEN211 History of Western Art I (4 credits)
site: GEN098 or placement)                                             This course explores the historical development of the visual
                                                                       arts (pain ng, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and architecture)
GEN153 Geometry in Art & Nature (4 credits)                            in Western society beginning with Prehistoric Art through the
Students learn about geometric shapes and structures and               Renaissance, approximatley 15,000 B.C. to 1600 C.E. It focuses on
how to analyze their characteris cs and rela onships. Students         major poli cal, religious and cultural themes and examines works
compare and classify two- and three-dimensional shapes and             of art as expressions of the ideas and beliefs of ar sts within their
analyze their characteris cs and proper es through a variety of        cultural and social contexts. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105)
visual representa ons, including construc ons and coordinate
representa ons. This class also provides students an opportunity       GEN212 History of Western Art II (4 credits)
to explore geometric ideas within the natural world and within         This course explores the historical development of the visual arts
their major fields of study. (Prerequisite: GEN098 or placement)        (pain ng, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and architecture) in
(Offered at ILIC, AIMD, and AIOHC)                                      Western society beginning with the Renaissance and ending with
                                                                       the Post-Modern Period. It focuses on major poli cal, religious
GEN155 Intro to Financial Mathema cs (4 credits)                       and cultural themes and examines works of art as expressions
The course develops three main areas of applied mathemat-              of the ideas and beliefs of ar sts within their cultural and social
ics. The first part examines simple financial applica ons such as        contexts. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105) (Offered at ILIC, ILIS,
compounding and discoun ng. The second part develops the               and AIOHC)
most commonly used technique for op miza on. The third part
introduces students to the basic no ons and applica ons of de-




                                                           85 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
GEN223 United States History I (4 credits)                             GEN241 Economics (4 credits)
This course provides a historical account of the main ideas and        This course provides insights into forces that shape today’s
events that have shaped today’s society from their beginnings          economy, including major types of economic resources and the
in colonial mes through the end of the reconstruc on period.           mechanisms affec ng their distribu on. Students examine the
It traces the course of social, poli cal, economic, intellectual,      theory and prac ce of open economies and how open economies
and cultural events in the United States as they created today’s       are influenced by poli cal and strategic interests. Students also
unique and diverse society. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105) (Of-        consider cri cal socio-economic issues such as unemployment,
fered at ILIC, ILIS, and AIOHC)                                        welfare and the na onal debt. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105)

GEN225 United States History II (4 credits)                            GEN244 Psychology (4 credits)
This course provides a historical account of the main ideas and        This course introduces students to psychological principles,
events that have shaped today’s society from the end of the            theories and methods of scien fically studying human behavior.
Reconstruc on period to the present. It traces the course of           Major topics include: sensa on and percep on, consciousness,
social, poli cal, economic, intellectual, and cultural events in the   memory, mo va on, intelligence, personality, mental disorders,
United States as they created today’s unique and diverse society.      and psychotherapy. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105)
(Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105) (Offered at ILIC, ILIS, and AIOHC)
                                                                       GEN247 Sociology (4 credits)
GEN228 Philosophy & Ethics (4 credits)                                 This course explores the concepts and theories necessary for a
This course explores fundamental ques ons of human life                systema c understanding of social worlds. Topics include con-
through the study of philosophy. Topics include philosophical          sidering sociology as science, the nature of large and small-scale
theories about free will, the nature of reality, the nature and        groups, social interac ons, ideologies, conformity and social devi-
possibility of knowledge, and the nature of human existence. This      ance, and/or social stra fica on. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105)
course also examines philosophical approaches to discovering
and applying ethical principles that guide individual and group        GEN248 Anthropology (4 credits)
behavior. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105) (Offered at ILIC, ILIS,        Students learn about culture and ethnographic research and writ-
and AIMD)                                                              ing. Combining study in the classroom and fieldwork, students
                                                                       choose a cultural scene to inves gate, iden fy informants, con-
GEN230 Survey of Western Civiliza on I: Before 1600s (4 cred-          duct interviews and write an ethnographical study. (Prerequisite:
its)                                                                   GEN101, GEN105) (Offered at ILIC, ILIS, and AIOHC)
This course provides a historical account of the development of
the fundamental ideas and events that shaped western civiliza-         GEN250 Topics In Mathema cs (4 credits)
  on from their beginnings in the ancient world through the early      This course helps build on students’ previous math experience
modern period. It traces the course of social, poli cal, economic,     to explore more advanced topics. (Prerequisite: One 100-level
intellectual, and cultural developments in western socie es as         mathema cs course) (Offered at ILIS)
they shaped a uniquely “western” outlook on the world. (Prereq-
uisite: GEN101, GEN105) (Offered at ILIS and AIOHC)                     GEN253 Mathema cal Models In Art and Nature (4 credits)
                                                                       This course focuses on mathema cal reasoning by examining re-
GEN231 Survey of Western Civiliza on II: 1600s to Present (4           la onships between mathema cs and the arts, architecture, and
credits)                                                               nature. This course is designed to enable students to make these
This course provides a historical account of the fundamental           connec ons and to generate enthusiasm for mathema cs in a
ideas and events that shaped modern western civiliza on. It            crea ve manner. Topics will be selected from fractal geometry,
traces the course of social, poli cal, economic, intellectual, and     symmetry, lings and tessella ons, the golden ra o, the Fibonacci
cultural developments in Western socie es as they shaped the           sequence, and the logarithmic spiral. (Prerequisite: One 100-level
world today. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105) (Offered at ILIS and        mathema cs course) (Offered at ILIS)
AIOHC)
                                                                       GEN256 College Algebra (4 credits)
GEN233 Non-Western Civiliza on (4 credits)                             This course develops the student’s ability to reason abstractly,
This course explores major trends and events in the non-Western        emphasizing mathema cal/logical skills and techniques for ana-
world star ng with the ancient Far East but focusing on the            lyzing and solving problems. Topics include exponen al, logarith-
phenomenon of globaliza on. Throughout the twen eth century            mic, and trigonometric func ons and equa ons. Special a en on
na onal and regional economies, poli es and cultures became            will be given to the intricate connec on between mathema cs
increasingly interrelated. This course helps students understand       and the arts. (Prerequisite: GEN150) (Offered at ILIC)
the economic, poli cal and cultural transforma ons of the global
society in which they live. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105) (Of-
fered at ILIC)




                                                           86 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
GEN257 Applied Sta s cs (4 credits)                                  popula on, pollu on, and solid waste management. There is
This course instructs students in the study of descrip ve and        also an explora on of cu ng-edge environmental technologies
inferen al sta s cs. Topics include hypothesis tes ng, experi-       such as green design, hydrogen economics and urban ecology.
mental design, collec on, presenta on, and analysis of data, and     (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or placement) (Offered
the sta s cal theories used to make predic ons. Simulated and        at ILIC and AIOHC)
real-life data are used to learn these concepts. Students apply
this knowledge to design and conduct a sta s cal study which         GEN277 Chemistry & Society (4 credits)
includes research, analysis of their data, a wri en report, and      Examines the influence of chemistry on society through the study
presenta on of their results. (Prerequisite: One 100-level math-     of contemporary issues such as health and environment. Armed
ema cs course) (Offered at ILIS)                                      with a basic knowledge of chemistry, this course allows the
                                                                     student to explore and understand special topics in biochemistry
GEN260 Environmental Biology (4 credits)                             and organic chemistry as they pertain to everyday life. (Prereq-
This course examines ecological principles in rela on to environ-    uisite: GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or placement) (Offered at ILIC
mental problems. Emphasis is on current environmental issues         and AIOHC)
and possible solu ons and courses of ac on. (Prerequisite:
GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or placement) (Offered at ILIS)                GEN279 Introduc on to College Physics (4 credits)
                                                                     This course is an algebra-based explora on of basic principles and
GEN264 Biological Design (4 credits)                                 laws of classical mechanics and electromagne sm. Through the
Examines aspects of scien fic inquiry through selected concepts       scien fic method, students develop an understanding of concepts
of general biological study including organiza on, heredity,         and ideas necessary to explain everyday phenomena. Students
energy, evolu on, ecology and human popula on concerns. Bio-         explore connec ons between physics and other disciplines. (Pre-
logical issues with personal and social implica ons are introduced   requisite: GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or placement) (Offered at
to enable students to make informed decisions about selected         ILIC, AIMD, and AIOHC)
biological issues. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or
placement) (Offered at ILIC and AIOHC)                                GEN282 Physics & Society (4 credits)
                                                                     Physics and Society introduces the methods and concepts of
GEN266 Biology and the Human Organism (4 credits)                    physics with an emphasis on topics selected from mechanics,
Explores the biological, anatomical and physiological complexi es    heat, acous cs and waves, lights and op cs, and modern physics.
of the human organism. Connec ons are made between human             The rela onship of physics to scien fic and non-scien fic dis-
biology and its relevance to society and the individual. Concepts    ciplines is explored from a historical, social, cultural and philo-
include principles of body structure, interac on and integra-        sophical perspec ve. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or
  on, control, mo on and metabolism as they pertain to hered-        placement) (Offered at ILIC and AIOHC)
ity, growth and development. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105,
GEN098 or placement) (Offered at ILIC, AIMD, and AIOHC)               GEN286 Physics With Lab (4 credits)
                                                                     This course includes a brief review of mechanics. Topics are
GEN273 Applied Chemistry (4 credits)                                 selected from fluid mechanics, electromagne sm, and modern
Explores scien fic research methods and principles of chemistry       physics. Connec ons between physics and other disciplines are
as they apply to our everyday world. Students study thermal,         explored. This course includes both a lecture and laboratory
microwave and other forces and how these forces affect proteins,      sec on. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or placement)
nutrients, carbohydrates and fat. Students work in teams to con-     (Offered at ILIS)
duct laboratory experiments and write reports that analyze their
experimental results. Lab coat or chef’s jacket required. (Prereq-   GEN310 Seminar In Fine Arts (4 credits)
uisite: GEN101, GEN105, GEN098 or placement) (Offered at ILIC,        This course provides students with the opportunity to build on
AIMD, and AIOHC)                                                     their previous fine arts experience to explore more advanced
                                                                     topics. (Prerequisite: GEN102, and either GEN211 or GEN212)
GEN275 Intro to College Chemistry (4 credits)                        (Offered at ILIS and AIOHC)
This course introduces students to the fundamental principles
and theories of general chemistry with an emphasis on atomic         GEN312 Trends in Contemporary Art (4 credits)
theory. Nomenclature, thermochemistry, chemical kine cs, equi-       Students in this course will par cipate in in-depth inves ga ons
librium, inter- and intramolecular forces are among the fields of     of major trends in the fine and commercial arts from around
chemistry studied. (Prerequisite: GEN101, GEN105, and GEN098         1920 through today. By way of lectures, discussions, readings,
or placement) (Offered at ILIC, AIMD, and AIOHC)                      and wri en assignments, students will endeavor to understand
                                                                     some of the difficult issues explored in modern and postmodern
GEN276 Environmental Science (4 credits)                             visual culture, and will a empt to contextualize their own ar s c
Examines the rela onships between urban socioeconomic prob-          prac ce in rela onship to those issues. (Prerequisite: GEN102,
lems and environmental concerns such as resource consump on,         and either GEN211 or GEN212) (Offered at ILIC)



                                                         87 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
GEN315 Beyond Western Art (4 credits)                                  think and how we live. (Prerequisite: GEN102, and one course
This survey in the visual arts examines major canonical works          from GEN205-GEN233) (Offered at ILIC)
from Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Oceania and pre-Columbian
American civiliza ons. An in-depth approach u lizing cultural,         GEN335 20th Century World History (4 credits)
religious and poli cal systems will be employed to be er under-        This course explores major trends and events in the twen eth-
stand the non-western visual arts within their proper contexts.        century world focusing on the phenomenon of globaliza on.
The course requires readings from secondary sources and a term         Throughout the twen eth century na onal and regional econo-
paper due at the end of the quarter. (Prerequisite: GEN102, and        mies, poli es and cultures became increasingly interrelated. This
either GEN211 or GEN212) (Offered at ILIC)                              course helps students understand the economic, poli cal and
                                                                       cultural transforma ons of the global society in which they live.
GEN325 World Literature (4 credits)                                    (Prerequisite: GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233)
This course emphasizes the study of the literary, cultural, and        (Offered at ILIC)
human significance of selected works of the Western and non-
Western literary tradi ons. Students explore issues of aesthe cs,      GEN340 Social Psychology (4 credits)
cultural context, and crea ve expression within literary forms,        This course examines the ways that people think, feel and behave
including fic on, poetry, and drama. (Prerequisite: GEN 102, and        in social situa ons. It involves understanding how people influ-
one course from GEN205-GEN233) (Offered at ILIC, AIMD, and              ence others and how they are influenced by others around them.
AIOHC)                                                                 Connec ons between social contexts and individual behavior are
                                                                       studied in rela on to the following topics: social cogni on and
GEN327 Genres in Literature (4 credits)                                percep on, the development of “self,” conformity and deviance,
Emphasizes the reading and anyalysis of short stories and/or           a tude forma on and change, interpersonal a rac on, group
novels and related texts. This course focuses on a special genre of    interac on, altruism, aggression, and collec ve behavior. (Prereq-
fic on and the themes, structural pa erns and historical impact         uisite: GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248) (Offered
of the genre. Students research historical, philosophical, religious   at ILIC, ILIS, and AIOHC)
and cultural informa on to help increase their understanding and
apprecia on of the works. Students will also further develop their     GEN344 Group Dynamics (4 credits)
cri cal thinking and wri ng skills through required course work.       This class explores the scien fic study of social groups and pro-
(Prerequisite: GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233)              vides students opportuni es for experien al learning. Students
(Offered at ILIC)                                                       learn about the dynamics of working in groups, par cularly the
                                                                       group as a force for socializa on. Students interact in various
GEN329 Seminar in Humani es (4 credits)                                groups to explore the dynamics of individual and group behavior,
This course examines ar s c developments in the use, func on           small and large group organiza on and leadership. (Prerequisite:
and style of various texts and media through a range of historical     GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248) (Offered at ILIC
contexts. This course emphasizes issues of aesthe cs, cultural         and AIOHC)
context and crea ve expression. A variety of media including
literature, film and other visual arts is explored. (Prerequisite:      GEN345 Seminar In Social Sciences (4 credits)
GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233) (Offered at ILIC             This course examines social interac ons in human rela onships
and ILIS)                                                              focusing on the applica on of theory and research. Students
                                                                       explore and analyze social rela onships and apply theore cal
GEN331 Seminar in Western Civiliza on from Ancient Origins             concepts to analyze in various contexts. (Prerequisite: GEN102,
through the Renaissance (4 credits)                                    and one course from GEN241-GEN248) (Offered at ILIS)
This course explores the evolu on of the ideas that shaped
western civiliza on from their beginnings in the ancient Near East     GEN347 Topics in Human Rela ons (4 credits)
to early modern Europe. Through the study of primary sources –         Topics in Human Rela ons examines social interac ons in human
the record le by people who lived history – students will explore      rela onships focusing on the applica on of theory and research.
the interac on between how we think and how we live. (Prereq-          Students explore and analyze social rela onships and apply
uisite: GEN102, and one course from GEN205-GEN233) (Offered             theore cal concepts to analyze in various contexts, including but
at ILIC)                                                               not limited to culture, gender, religion and media. (Prerequisite:
                                                                       GEN102, and one course from GEN241-GEN248) (Offered at ILIC,
GEN333 Seminar in Western Civiliza on from the Renaissance to          AIMD, and AIOHC)
World War II (4 credits)
This course explores the evolu on of ideas that shape the              GEN360 Seminar In Life Science (4 credits)
modern world from the revolu on in scien fic thought in early           This course provides students with the opportunity to build on
modern Europe through the Second World War. Through the                their previous science experience to explore more advanced top-
study of primary sources – the record le by people who lived           ics. Topics are chosen from important or current events as they
history – students will explore the interac on between how we          develop in the fields of biological and environmental sciences.



                                                          88 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
Students are exposed to in depth analysis of the subjects, includ-      laws, employer/employee rela onships, and specific applica ons
ing biological processes and how they are affected. (Prerequisite:       to as they relate to the lodging, food and beverage, mee ng,
GEN102, and one course from GEN260-GEN286) (Offered at ILIS)             conven on, and exposi on management industries.

GEN365 Ethical Issues in Science (4 credits)                            HM226 Hospitality Sales & Marke ng (4 credits)
In this research-based course students apply basic ethical prin-        This course addresses the fundamental concepts and principles
ciples to analysis of current societal concerns and controversies       of sales and marke ng within the hospitality industry. Emphasis
in science. They learn about ethical dilemmas and how they arise        will be placed on adver sing, sales promo on, merchandising,
from recent research. (Prerequisite: GEN102, and one course             market research, public rela ons, and marke ng plan develop-
from GEN260-GEN286) (Offered at ILIC)                                    ment. Students will gain insight into industry specific market
                                                                        demographics and segmenta ons.
GEN380 Seminar In Physical Science (4 credits)
This course provides students with the opportunity to build on          HM229 Training & Development in Hospitality (4 credits)
their previous science experience to explore more advanced              This class examines the role of service in the hospitality industry.
topics. (Prerequisite: GEN102, and one course from GEN260-              Students will gain experience and insight into the training and
GEN286) (Offered at ILIS)                                                management func ons of a variety of hospitality opera ons.
                                                                        Emphasis will be placed on the development, design, and imple-
GEN382 Acous cs (4 credits)                                             menta on of quality customer service based training programs.
This course examines the physical behavior of sound indoors and         In addi on, students will analyze industry specific case studies.
outdoors. Topics include human hearing and the principles of psy-
choacous cs, sound propaga on, transmission, reflec on, diffrac-          HM260 Hospitality Internship (4 credits)
 on, diffusion, noise reduc on, basic studio and room acous cs,          An externship is a monitored program where students work
and sound isola on. Concepts will be presented through lectures         part- me in a professional workplace approved by their depart-
and case studies. (Prerequisite: GEN102, and GEN256, GEN279)            ment, applying their knowledge, skills and professionalism in a
(Offered at ILIC)                                                        program-related environment. In the hospitality management
                                                                        externship, students apply their technical knowledge in a working
GEN399 General Educa on Capstone (4 credits)                            hospitality opera on. Students have the opportunity to observe
This course bridges the general educa on and major programs.            and par cipate in an opera on related to their field of study
Students apply knowledge and skills developed in general educa-         gaining prac cal work experience prior to gradua on. Hospital-
  on courses to the inves ga on of topics relevant to their majors.     ity Management students focus on management related du es.
Students engage in research, wri ng, discussions, and presenta-         Students work in a supervised and structured industry facility to
  ons. (Required of all bachelors degree students.) (Prerequisite:      gain prac cal management work experience. Internship requires
All required 100-level courses; at least 5 200-level courses; and at    a signed learning agreement between both the student and
least one course between 310 and 382)                                   employer prior to internship. The student must work a minimum
                                                                        of 132 hours to be eligible for course comple on.
HM113 Intro to Hospitality Opera ons (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with a general over-        HM310 Bar & Beverage Management (4 credits)
view of the hospitality industry. Throughout the course, students       This class will explore the role of the management of beverage
will develop a basic understanding of the size and scope of the         services in bars, clubs, casinos, restaurants, resorts and hotels.
hospitality industry with a specific emphasis on food and bever-         Par cular a en on will be given to the management of people in
age and lodging opera ons. In addi on, students will explore            this fast-paced se ng, and the inherent liability associated with
many related topics, such as historical perspec ve and current          alcoholic beverage service. A module on the increasing popular-
market trends, as introduced by today’s industry leaders.               ity of coffee and tea service will be presented, with a poten al
                                                                        career focus on this rapidly growing market.
HM117 Diversity & Ethics in Hospitality (4 credits)
This course focuses on many of the current issues associated             HM313 Emerging Hospitality Segments (4 credits)
with of ethics and diversity in today’s hospitality industry. Topics     The con nued growth of the hospitality industry has brought
include decision making, problem solving, and effec ve organi-            with it significant changes to the face of the industry both in new
za onal communica on. Students are asked to assess their own             segments and the expansion of other segments. This course will
behaviors and beliefs, while learning to develop strategies for          focus a en on on the management of new hospitality segments
building successful teams within hospitality organiza ons.               and trends including, e-rooms, new variety resorts, spor ng
                                                                         venues, and entertainment and theater based segments. Ad-
HM124 Hospitality Law (4 credits)                                        di onally, this course will review the management and marke ng
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of hospital-         of wellness center/re rement community opera ons, corporate
ity law, as applicable to negligence, obliga on and liability. Topics    and industrial feeding, club management, and casino and cruise
include an introduc on to contract, licensing, and franchising           line segments.



                                                            89 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
HM320 Hospitality Merchandising (4 credits)                            HM448 Hospitality Capstone (4 credits)
The common denominator in hospitality food service merchan-            Through competencies developed with previous related studies
dising ac vi es is achieving value and acceptance from our             course work, students will develop a business plan for a minimum
customers. A variety of hospitality segments con nue to become         one hundred-seat restaurant. The project will include: Market
more compe ve increasing the importance of developing                  Analysis and Marke ng Strategy, Opera ng Budget, Sales Projec-
merchandising techniques to provide for customer needs. This            ons, Opening Inventories, Capital Equipment, Standardized Reci-
course reviews the concepts and principle of food merchandising        pes and Cos ng for all standardized recipes, Menu and Facili es
in various segment se ngs. The art form of food merchandising          Design. The course covers the components of a business plan as
is explored along with the science of merchandising which pres-        well as techniques for developing and presen ng sec ons of the
ents the various needed to evaluate the results of the merchan-        plan. Business related competencies are reviewed and tutored as
dising effort. In addi on the course iden fies the rela onships          necessary for comple on of the project.
between sales, pricing and profit.
                                                                       HM450 Management Externship (4 credits)
HM349 Mul -Unit/Chain/Franchise Opera ons (4 credits)                  Through the management externship experience, students apply
This class will discuss the rela onship of the individual property     their technical knowledge, managerial skills and professionalism
to the parent organiza on. A discussion of small chain vs. large       within a hospitality opera on. Students have the opportunity to
chain, local, regional, na onal and interna onal organiza ons          observe and par cipate in a hospitality opera on related to their
will provide the student with a global perspec ve on corporate         field of study, gaining prac cal work experience prior to gradua-
hospitality opera ons. The role of the franchise organiza on will       on.
be explored, and the place of the property manager as owner’s
representa ve in a franchise loca on. Several different franchise       IC202 Management, Supervision & Career Development (4
models will be presented, as well as a discussion of the cost/ben-     credits)
efit rela onship of a franchise vs. independent property.               This is a mul faceted course that focuses on managing people
                                                                       from the hospitality supervisor’s viewpoint, and developing job
HM440 Lodging Opera on (4 credits)                                     search skills. The management emphasis is on techniques for
This course will represent an overview of the various types of         increasing produc vity, controlling labor costs, me manage-
lodging opera ons in the industry. The guest cycle will be exam-       ment, and managing change. It also stresses effec ve commu-
ined, as well as the role of front office opera ons. The house-          nica on and explains the responsibili es of a supervisor in the
keeping and building maintenance func ons will be discussed in         food service industry. Students develop techniques and strategies
detail, and students will be expected to produce a management          for marke ng themselves in their chosen fields. Emphasis will be
flowchart and detail the inter-rela onship of the various depart-       placed on students assessing their marketable skills, developing a
ments in a lodging opera on.                                           network of contacts, genera ng interviews, wri ng a cover le er
                                                                       and resume, preparing for their employment interview, present-
HM442 Hospitality Accoun ng (4 credits)                                ing a professional appearance, and interview follow-up (Prerequi-
This class will build on the knowledge gained in the accoun ng         site: GEN105 for degree students)
principles class, with a focus on the unique requirements of the
hospitality opera on. Forecas ng, budge ng and adherence               IC402 Career Development (4 credits)
modules will be included, as well as an in-depth examina on of         Career Development prepares students to conduct a job search
the profit arid loss statement as a management tool. The POS and        in their chosen field students examine career paths, assess their
property management so ware interface will be included, with           experience and exploring methods to further develop their skills
discussions on the cost of inventory, inventory procedures and         and marketability. Students will gain prac cal experience by writ-
proper food and variable cos ng prac ces. A sec on on hospi-           ing business correspondence and by interviewing. (Prerequisite:
tality finance will explore the purchase, sale and capitaliza on        GEN105 or permission of instructor) (Offered at ILIC, ILITP, AIMD,
requirements of sample proper es in the industry.                      and AIOHC)

HM444 Introduc on to Travel &Tourism (4 credits)                       ID130 Architectural Dra ing (4 credits)
This class will provide an overview of the na onal and interna-        In this beginning studio course, students examine the language,
 onal travel market. The evolving role of travel agents will be        tools, and techniques of manual dra ing and subsequently learn
discussed, as well as the emergence of the internet as a planning      to communicate relevant informa on through architectural draw-
tool. The importance of tourism to the world economy will be dis-      ings. Students are introduced to the interior designer’s role in
cussed, with a considera on of the effect of terrorism on world         producing construc on documents. (Prerequisite: ART100)
markets. The airline, cruise, rail and automobile industries will be
examined, correla ng their influence on the hospitality industry.       ID135 Presenta on Techniques I (4 credits)
                                                                       In this beginning studio course, students are introduced to the
                                                                       basic principles of manual perspec ve drawing. The focus is on
                                                                       the use of various perspec ve drawing methods as means to



                                                           90 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
communicate the spa al envelope with an introduc on to basic          ID225 Interior Design Communica on (4 credits)
rendering and other presenta on techniques. (Prerequisite:            In this course, students develop techniques and methods of
ART102) Sequence: follows ID130 for ILIC, AIMD, AIOHC.                formal presenta on which u lize visual, verbal and wri en com-
                                                                      munica on skills. These skills help them to communicate, excite,
ID146 History of Design I (4 credits)                                 educate and persuade clients and others about their design
This lecture course covers the evolu on of architecture, furniture,   concepts. (Prerequisite: ART224, ID179 for ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD)
and design from the ancient world through the mid-nineteenth          Sequence: follows GEN109 at ILIC and AIMD. Follows ID200 if
century. Discussions of how these eras were influenced by the          possible on all campuses.. (Offered at ILIC, AIMD, AIOHC)
cultural, poli cal, social, and economic condi ons of the mes
are central to this course.                                           ID227 Computer-Aided Design I (4 credits)
                                                                      This course introduces how to use computer-aided design (CAD)
ID177 Tex les, Materials, + Resources (4 credits)                     so ware as a method to communicate two-dimensional construc-
This course examines product informa on, specifica ons, and re-          on drawings. (Prerequisite: ID179) Sequence: follows GEN109
sources available to interior designers. Content includes product     for B.F.A. students at ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD.
proper es, industry quality control, installa on methods, ap-
plica ons, and quan ty calcula ons of various interior materials.     ID235 Computer-Aided Design II (4 credits)
Concepts in sustainability are introduced. (Prerequisite: ID130 for   This course expands on how to use computer-aided design so -
ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD)                                                    ware as a method to communicate two-dimensional construc-
                                                                       on drawings while introducing techniques in three-dimensional
ID179 Elements of Interior Design (4 credits)                         digital graphic presenta on. (Prerequisite: ID200, ID227)
In this introductory studio course, students study the applica on
of the elements and principles of design in residen al spaces to      ID236 History of Design II (4 credits)
create aesthe c solu ons. Lessons in ergonomics, space planning,      This lecture course covers the evolu on of architecture, furniture,
and human factors introduce the skills needed to make func onal       and design in England from the Tudor period and the American
design decisions. Students are introduced to the responsibili es      and Interna onal styles through the 20th century. Discussions of
of the interior design professional. (Prerequisite: ART100, ID130)    how these eras were influenced by the cultural, poli cal, social,
                                                                      and economic condi ons of the mes are central to this course.
ID200 Introduc on to Space Planning (4 credits)                       Sequence: Follows ID146 if possible.
This course explores the programming and schema c phases of
the design process and the issues relevant to preliminary space       ID237 Codes + Specifica ons (4 credits)
planning with an emphasis on human factors and their impact           This lecture and studio course covers code informa on and speci-
on design. Students develop skills and judgement in organizing        fica ons concerning life safety, barrier-free, and universal design
spaces and traffic pa erns within a commercial design project           as applied in both residen al and commercial spaces. (Prereq-
and in the ability to graphically represent their ideas through       uisite: ID177, ID179) Sequence: follows ID227 for ILIC, AIOHC,
conceptual drawings and other suppor ng graphic materials.            AIMD. Follows or taken with ID200 if possible.
(Prerequisite: ID179) Sequence for B.F.A. degree: follows GEN109
for ILIC and AIMD.                                                    ID240 Ligh ng (4 credits)
                                                                      This course is an introduc on to ar ficial and natural ligh ng
ID202 Interior Design Associate Por olio (2 credits)                  used in interior spaces. Problem-solving analysis of user needs
In this course each student assembles a por olio that demon-          is discussed to determine the appropriate ligh ng of spaces.
strates conceptual design, cra smanship, and other skills. The        Various lamps and luminaires; and their applica on consider-
student selects and refines representa ve pieces, showcasing           a on of comfort, task, color, and code are discussed. Calcula on
work that reflects a unique style. Par cular emphasis is placed        methods as they relate to the design and specifica on process
on iden fying short and long term professional employment             are explained. Project assignments also incorporate energy man-
goals and strategies and resources for achieving them. (Offered        agement and sustainable ligh ng design. (Prerequisite: ID200)
at AIMD, AIOHC)                                                       Sequence: follows ID227 for ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD.

ID213 Presenta on Techniques II (4 credits)                           ID275 Kitchen + Bath Design (4 credits)
This course expands on methods of graphically communica ng            This course challenges students to use planning requirements to
interior space and design solu ons. Advanced applica ons of           create universal and accessible designs. Construc on, electrical,
various rendering techniques using mixed media are explored.          and basic plumbing are taught with emphasis on these applica-
(Prerequisite: ART110, ID135)                                          ons within residen al kitchens and baths. Industry relevant no-
                                                                      menclature and product informa on are used to create technical
                                                                      documents and custom aesthe c solu ons. (Prerequisite: ID177,
                                                                      ID213, ID227) (Offered at ILIS)




                                                          91 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
ID300 Professional Prac ce (4 credits)                               specifying corporate furnishings, finishes and materials. (Prereq-
This course is an introduc on to the business procedures and         uisite: ID302) (Offered at ILIS)
documents that are typically used in residen al and commercial
design firms. Contracts, bidding, ethics and client/designer/trade    ID340 Computer-Aided Design III (4 credits)
rela onships are included within lessons of business administra-     Students successfully comple ng this course will be able to use
  on and project management. The course reinforces cri cal life      Computer-Aided Design so ware to assist them in three-dimen-
skills while examining interviewing techniques, resume wri ng,       sional project development. Students will gain a comprehensive
state registra on and licensing, the Na onal Council for Interior    understanding of the integra on of computer technology into the
Design Qualifica on (NCIDQ) exam, and relevant professional           design process and an introduc on to Building Informa on Mod-
organiza ons. This class must be taken prior to internship. (Pre-    eling (BIM) technology. (Prerequisite: ID213, ID235, ID237, ID240)
requisite: ID200)
                                                                     ID373 Specialty Design (4 credits)
ID302 Sustainable Design (4 credits)                                 This senior level studio course covers the physical and psychologi-
This studio course focuses on environmental issues concern-          cal factors that impact hospitality environments. Students are
ing interior designers and the construc on industry. Students        expected to graphically demonstrate original and viable solu ons.
par cipate in discussions on green design topics and learn about     Research on human factors, codes, and ligh ng are combined
resources for improving indoor air quality and more responsible      with product mix and mul -sensory aspects of design to influence
design choices. Following LEED (Leadership in Energy and Envi-       perceived value to the customer. (Prerequisite: ID213, ART224,
ronmental Design analysis, a final project implements sustainable     ID235, ID237, ID240, ID300) (Offered at ILIS)
design methods technically and crea vely. (Prerequisite: ID213,
ID235, ID237, ID240) (Offered at ILIS)                                ID376 Advanced Residen al Design (4 credits)
                                                                     This senior elec ve studio covers the total process of residen al
ID306 Residen al Environments (4 credits)                            design from concept development through two- and three-
This studio course explores various types of residen al dwellings    dimensional presenta ons. Building codes, covenants, and
as they relate to different inhabitants. Project work applies the     restric ons create the guidelines for solu ons; while knowledge
programming and design development phases of the residen al          of sustainable prac ces, residen al business prac ce, construc-
design process to include informa on gathering, needs analysis,       on methods, materials and custom interior architectural details
concept and spa al development, and FF&E selec ons based             are applied. (Prerequisite: ID306) (Offered at ILIS)
on research and suitability. (Prerequisite: ART224, ID179, ID213,
ID235, ID237, ID240)                                                 ID382 Interior Design Studio (8 credits)
                                                                     This eight credit senior studio course allows students to explore
ID310 Construc on Documenta on (4 credits)                           the total design process in a larger scope, and more complex
This advanced architectural drawing course covers the coordina-      project pgoram. Students reinforce cri cal competencies such as
  on needed to complete a full set of construc on documents          synthesis of problem iden fica on, research, programming, sche-
using CAD as the primary drawing tool. Emphasis is placed on         ma c design, design development and construc on documents.
interac on with engineers and other consultants as well as the       (Prerequisite: ID213, ID225, ID235, ID237, ID240) (Offered at ILIC,
level of detail needed for an en re working document package.        AIMD, AIOHC)
A team project further enhances leadership, communica on and
nego a on skills. (Prerequisite: ID235, ID237, ID240) (Offered at     ID383 Advanced Specialty Design (4 credits)
ILIC, AIMD, AIOHC)                                                   Hotel style, classifica on, and themes are examined for making
                                                                     appropriate design decisions as course content centers on the
ID315 Interior Objects + Furniture (4 credits)                       interrela onships between the elements of three-dimensional
This studio course explores the rela onships between material        space planning, material/furnishing selec ons, contract specifica-
and form with a hands-on approach to designing and fabrica ng          on, and detailing within hospitality environments. Presenta ons
objects and furniture. (Prerequisite: ID200, ID213, ID225, ID227)    are developed to reflect current industry standards for client
(Offered at ILIC, AIMD, AIOHC)                                        presenta ons and sale center displays. (Prerequisite: ID325) (Of-
                                                                     fered at ILIS)
ID325 Commercial Environments (4 credits)
In this advanced course, the design of an upscale, global, cor-      ID391 Advanced Restora on (4 credits)
porate interior reflects the comprehensive synthesis of problem       This elec ve studio course gives students an opportunity to
iden fica on, research, programming, preliminary design, design       explore the historical references of an exis ng space and design a
development, and construc on documents. Problem solving              viable solu on for the current me. (Prerequisite: ID146, ID213,
centers on the crea ve and technical aspects involved in the         ID236, ID237, ID240) (Offered at AIMD, AIOHC, ILIC)
universal design of commercial environments including space
planning with code compliance, way-finding techniques, and




                                                         92 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
ID395 Advanced 3-D Digital Design + Presenta on (4 credits)           ID421 Interior Design Thesis II (4 credits)
This elec ve course focuses on the advanced study of the use of       In this senior-level studio course, students develop a viable and
CAD with modeling systems for the purpose of interior design          visual solu on for the project typically researched in ID420.
presenta ons. Studio projects transform CAD floor plans and            Solu ons incorporate environmentally sound, cost effec ve,
models into 3-D so ware programs; adding ligh ng and materials        and responsible design methods to influence an audience using
to create photo-realis c renderings. (Prerequisite: ID340)            crea ve delivery methods. (Prerequisite: ID225, ID300 for ILIC,
                                                                      AIOHC, AIMD; ID325, ID420 for ILIS)
ID397 Advanced Sustainable Design (4 credits)
This senior elec ve course expands on the environmental issues        ID425 Por olio Prepara on (4 credits)
concerning interior designers and the building industry. Students     This studio for pending graduates provides an opportunity to
are exposed to discussions on “green design” topics including         enhance and refine several completed projects to best represent
environmentally responsible materials, recyclability and re-use       a broad range of skills and knowledge. Students apply graphic
and indoor air-quality and implement this knowledge in a studio       design skills to define an original brand in printed and digital
design project. (Prerequisite: ID213, ID237, ID240) (Offered at        formats for distribu on and interviewing purposes. (Prerequisite:
AIMD, AIOHC, ILIC)                                                    Must be taken during the last quarter or with Academic Director’s
                                                                      approval.)
ID401 Interior Design Internship (4 credits)
Internship is a monitored program for senior-level students to        ILD110 Intermediate Drawing (4 credits)
work part- me within the interior design industry. Field experi-      Con nuing to develop the various drawing skills from the drawing
ence is an opportunity for students to apply and advance their        courses, students will focus on depic ng gesture and mo on,
knowledge, skills and professionalism under the supervision of a      capturing essence of movement and form in space, and crea ng
qualfied mentor. (Prerequisite: ID300; must be taken during the        composi ons based on the four basic ligh ng situa ons. (Prereq-
last three quarters; interna onal students need signed approval       uisite: ART102, ART111)
from the interna onal student advisor)
                                                                      ILD120 Fundamentals of Pain ng (4 credits)
ID402 History of Design III (4 credits)                               In this introductory course to pain ng students will learn to
This studio presents an in-depth study of the architecture and        make the transi on from drawing to pain ng with an emphasis
furniture developments of several major non-western cultures.         on watercolor, acrylic washes and combining wet and dry media.
Religious, philosophical, and social beliefs and customs are em-      Students learn about the use of paint media to represent form,
phasized while construc on methods, building materials, mo fs,        value, and color. They explore a variety of pain ng techniques
fabrics, and decora ve arts are explored. Students work within        such as but not limited to watercolor, acrylic washes, dry brush,
teams to present their research on Middle Eastern, Asian, African,    glazing and mixing wet and dry media. (Prerequisite: ART102,
Mesoamerican, and North American cultures. Projects include           ART111)
the development of furniture and accessory designs created
through the fusion of world styles. (Prerequisite: ART224, ID236,     ILD130 Illustra on (4 credits)
ID306) (Offered at ILIS)                                               This course is an introduc on to the philosophy behind illustra-
                                                                        on and its use in the industry. Assignments will focus on black
ID414 Interior Detailing + Systems (4 credits)                        and white and color techniques, using contrast, values, composi-
This senior level studio is a study of the materials and fabrica on     on and func on. (Prerequisite: ILD120, GD107)
techniques used in the design and construc on of interiors and
how these details are communicated three-dimensionally and            ILD140 Illustra on & Graphic Design History (4 credits)
in construc on documents. Content includes interior construc-         This course will examine the influences of societal trends,
  on detailing of ceilings, walls, flooring, and millwork. Project     historical events, technological developments and the fine
solu ons will consider the integra on of building technology such     arts on contemporary graphic design, illustra on, typographic
as mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and other relevant systems.      developments, photography and fashionable design trends in
(Prerequisite: ID340; ID373 for ILIS) Sequence: follows ID310,        general. Through lectures, supplied visual examples, independent
ID315 for ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD.                                          research and design assignments the student will gain insight into
                                                                      a variety of major design influences.
ID420 Interior Design Thesis I (4 credits)
In this senior-level course, students use cri cal thinking skills     ILD150 Intermediate Pain ng (4 credits)
through research, wri ng, discussion, and problem-solving.            This course builds on skills developed in ILD120, with an empha-
Emphasis is on the iden fica on of a design problem that could         sis on pain ng the human form, using light, and expanding the
be be er met through more responsible design. Students choose         repertoire of techniques. (Prerequisite: ILD120)
a research topic with instructor approval. (Prerequisite: Must be
taken during the last three quarters.) Sequence: follows GEN399
for ILIC, AIOHC, AIMD; ID237, ID300 for ILIS.



                                                          93 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
ILD160 Storyboarding for Illustra on (4 credits)                       solu ons to conceptual editorial and adver sing concepts as the
With a focus on applying industry-standard storyboarding and           designer and illustrator. (Prerequisite: ILD170, ILD210)
scrip ng techniques to media produc on, students explore
various purposes and formats of storyboards, the basic terminol-       ILD240 The Business of Illustra on (4 credits)
ogy and concepts used in storyboarding, and the applica on of          Students formulate their career goals and develop a self-promo-
storyboarding techniques to the crea on of storyboards with or           on and marke ng plan, exploring the pros & cons of self-promo-
without a wri en script. (Prerequisite: ILD110, ILD130)                  on and representa on. (Prerequisite: ILD 190)

ILD170 Editorial Illustra on (4 credits)                               ILD250 Internship (4 credits)
In this course, students translate text into visual images and con-    This monitored program gives upper-level students the oppor-
cepts and apply illustra ve solu ons to design formats and page        tunity to work part- me with coopera ng employers. Students
layouts. Students use research and personal references, along          are required to keep a log, communicate weekly with faculty, and
with an explora on of appropriate media, imagery, and style, to        maintain a endance requirements. Available to qualified stu-
support the interpreta on of the author’s message. (Prerequisite:      dents who obtain approval from the department chair. (Prereq-
ILD160, GD109)                                                         uisite: ILD240. Permission of Department Director. Interna onal
                                                                       students need signed approval from the Interna onal Student
ILD180 Advanced Digital Illustra on (4 credits)                        Advisor.)
Using digital media, students develop an individual illustra on
style. They create illustra ve solu ons using computer technol-        ILD260 Illustra on Studio (4 credits)
ogy, develop a marketable illustra on style, study current illustra-   Students create illustra ons using tradi onal media and develop
  on trends, evaluate technical and aesthe c needs of illustra-        a marketable illustra on style. Topics include evalua ng technical
  ons, and jus fy illustra ve solu ons to problems. (Prerequisite:     and aesthe c needs of illustra ons, jus fying illustra on solu-
ILD160, GD109)                                                           ons to problems, and studying current illustra on trends within
                                                                       the industry. (Prerequisite: ILD220, ILD230)
ILD190 Product & License Illustra on (4 credits)
Students will research, design, and execute illustra ons applied       ILD280 Por olio Prepara on (4 credits)
to manufactured, marketable, and licensed products. They will          Students assess their personal strengths to establish career goals,
develop surface illustra ons for 3-D forms, evaluate appropriate       explore strategies for conduc ng an effec ve job search and
produc on technology, and jus fy decisions based on marke ng           decide how to organize their illustra on and design work in a pre-
criteria. (Prerequisite: ILD180, GD211, GD212)                         gradua on por olio. Guided by a faculty member or a team of
                                                                       faculty members, each student assembles a preliminary por olio
ILD200 Conceptual Illustra on (4 credits)                              and iden fies areas for more work or content enhancement.
Students research current evolving cultures, both domes c and          Interviewing, networking, self-promo on, business e que e, and
interna onal, in this course. They then apply these images to cre-     presenta on skills. (Prerequisite: ILD230, ILD240)
ate original illustra ons in the genre of fantasy, humor, cartoons,
and editorial commentary, developing crea ve original concepts         ILD300 Por olio (4 credits)
in a variety of styles. (Prerequisite: ILD170, ILD180, GD212)          In prepara on for job interviews, students refine and present
                                                                       their illustra on & design por olios. They iden fy career paths
ILD210 Graphic Novel (4 credits)                                       and roles in the illustra on industry, focus on marke ng them-
This course examines visual development of narra ve as it relates      selves to intended employers, and assess personal strengths and
to storytelling. Students will explore methods of illustra on          weaknesses. Students also complete a professional resume and
related to contemporary graphic novels, zines, and book illustra-      begin the job search. This course must be taken in the final quar-
  on. (Prerequisite: ILD200)                                           ter of the bachelor’s degree program. Students need approval
                                                                       of the faculty commi ee responsible for reviewing por olio pro-
ILD220 Advanced Pain ng (4 credits)                                    posals in the quarter before the por olio course is to be taken.
This course con nues to develop pain ng skills and further             (Prerequisite: ILD260, ILD280)
explores various pain ng media and techniques. Students are en-
couraged to begin developing an individual style for illustra on.      MAA101 Language of Anima on and Film (4 credits)
(Prerequisite: ILD150, ILD160)                                         Fundamentals of animated cinematography addressed through
                                                                       a historical survey. Course will consider trends and genres of
ILD230 Advanced Illustra on (4 credits)                                animated film in a variety of media.
This course will emphasize the importance of concept and
originality of ideas in contemporary illustra on. Students will        MAA116 Audio for Games & Anima on (4 credits)
further advance illustra on skills to include technical and original   This course is a conceptual introduc on to audio produc on
                                                                       techniques for games & anima on. Students will learn to digi ze




                                                           94 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
sound and apply it for audio enhancement of their anima ons.           so bodies, dynamics and expressions to create several scenes.
Students will also learn how to produce appropriate audio effects       (Prerequisite: MAA228)
and transi on in computer anima on.
                                                                       MAA337 Hard Surface & Organic Modeling (4 credits)
MAA123 Drawing for Anima on (4 credits)                                This course covers advanced modeling techniques used for build-
Building on knowledge from preceding drawing courses, students         ing organic and hard surface objects and environments. (Prereq-
will develop their drawing skills in the context of professional       uisite: MAA217)
media arts and anima on applica ons as well as their figure
sculp ng skills. This course will place emphasis on advanced           MAA338 Intermediate 3D Anima on (4 credits)
drawing techniques and strengthening skills through real world         Using 3D anima on so ware, students further explore character
observa on. (Prerequisite: ART111)                                     anima on techniques using bone systems and inverse kinema cs,
                                                                       as well as con nuing to refine their ligh ng, camera, and ming
MAA217 3D Modeling (4 credits)                                         techniques. (Prerequisite: MAA228)
Through cri cal analysis, the student will apply basic design
principles to the solu on of visual problems using elements of         MAA344 2D Anima on (4 credits)
3D design. The student will conceptualize 3D coordinate systems,       Students will apply basic anima on principles to produce a se-
construct 3D models, and apply them to geometric construc on.          quence. Emphasis will be placed on ming and performance. Use
(Prerequisite: DPH242)                                                 of a capture device, pencil tests, inking and other 2D anima on
                                                                       skills will be explored. (Prerequisite: MAA234)
MAA221 Storyboarding (4 credits)
This course focuses on applying industry-standard storyboarding        MAA346 Mo on Graphics (4 credits)
and scrip ng techniques to anima on. Contents to be covered in-        This course is an introduc on to the use of tling in the theatrical
clude the various purposes and formats of storyboards, the basic       and broadcast graphics. Techniques for design and implementa-
terminology and concepts used in storyboarding, and the applica-        on will be covered. Students will produce tle sequences and
  on of storyboarding techniques to the crea on of storyboards         montages integra ng image manipula on applica ons and other
with or without a wri en script. Sequence: follows ART111 for          image processing support. (Prerequisite: MAA234)
GAD and MAA majors.
                                                                       MAA347 Advanced Ligh ng & Texturing (4 credits)
MAA224 2D Anima on Principles (4 credits)                              In this course students will con nue to develop ligh ng and tex-
Students will study ming and weight through a series of projects       turing skills. (Prerequisite: MAA227)
designed to demonstrate the principles of anima on. Issues such
as keyframing, in-betweening, and cycling will be addressed.           MAA451 Por olio Founda ons (4 credits)
(Prerequisite: ART111)                                                 In this course, students begin produc on of their digital port-
                                                                       folio and explore career development concepts. Through class
MAA227 Materials & Ligh ng (4 credits)                                 ac vi es, students organize their work to reflect and enhance
In this class students will be introduced to materials, textures and   their individual strengths in computer anima on. (Prerequisite: 4
ligh ng strategies to add detail and realism to objects without        quarters or less from gradua on)
adding complexity to the model. Students will simulate real world
surfaces and textures. (Prerequisite: MAA217)                          MAA454 2D Anima on Studio (4 credits)
                                                                       Students work with team members on actual anima on jobs from
MAA228 3D Anima on (4 credits)                                         the field, or create a completed anima on that demonstrates
Students are introduced to basic 3D anima on techniques. Topics        storytelling techniques. (Prerequisite: MAA344)
to be covered include hierarchical linking, keyframing, func on
curves, animated modifiers, basic morphing, animated cam-               MAA458 3D Anima on Studio (4 credits)
eras, and an introduc on to character anima on. (Prerequisite:         Students will use advanced anima on techniques to create,
MAA217) Sequence: follows MAA101 for MAA majors.                       design, produce and edit a fully realized concept. (Prerequisite:
                                                                       MAA338)
MAA234 Digital Ink & Paint (4 credits)
This is course is an introduc on to the computer as an ink and         MAA461 Por olio Produc on I (4 credits)
paint media for anima on. Basics of scanning, clean up, ink            This course will focus on the refinement of previous work into a
and paint, and camera will be explored. (Prerequisite: MAA224,         comprehensive collec on representa ve of Media Arts & Anima-
MAA101)                                                                  on skills. Emphasis will be on development, design, cra sman-
                                                                       ship and presenta on. This course begins the process of examin-
MAA336 3D Visual Effects & Composi ng (4 credits)                       ing the student’s strengths and building upon them to produce
Effects anima on takes students through the basics of making            a marketable por olio. (Prerequisite: MAA451 – Second to Last
special effects. Students will be using such tools as par cles,         Quarter)



                                                           95 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
MAA467 3D Modeling Studio (4 credits)                                technology and methods by which elements can be seamlessly
Students will con nue to refine their modeling skills as they plan    blended together within the frame. (Prerequisite: MAA228)
and develop a summa ve modeling project of their choice, u liz-
ing high-level modeling, texturing, and ligh ng techniques that      VFX333 Visual Effects Career Development (4 credits)
demonstrates the skill and proficiency expected of entry-level        This course prepares students for the business environment and
modelers within the anima on industry. (Prerequisite: MAA347)        the transi on into a career in visual effects. It emphasizes the
                                                                     concepts of professionalism and an overall understanding of
MAA468 Team Anima on Produc on (4 credits)                           self-marke ng in the field. Professional development tools are
In this course students will work in a studio environment and        presented including resume and cover le er wri ng, networking
will focus on the produc on and post produc on of an animated        and interviewing skills.
short (Prerequisite: MAA338)
                                                                     VFX350 Broadcast Mo on Graphics (4 credits)
MAA471 Por olio Produc on II (4 credits)                             In this course students study intermediate concepts of mo on
This course focuses on the comple on of a student’s por olio         and broadcast graphics. Topics include learning to generate and
and enables the student to begin their career search. Students       crea vely manipulate text, audio, s ll images and video, and
will present work for the por olio and will review and determine     rendering the final composite to video for a variety of media.
the quality of the work and make any enhancements necessary.         (Prerequisite: MAA221, VFX250) Sequence: follows VFX201 for
The student will also complete several targeted, professional        VFX majors.
resumes and an extensive job search. (Prerequisite: MAA461 –
Last Quarter)                                                        VFX403 Por olio I (4 credits)
                                                                     This course con nues the refinement of the students’ digital
VFX110 Digital Typography (4 credits)                                por olio. Students will focus on mee ng digital por olio re-
This course studies the construc on, func on, terminology and        quirements, showcasing their individual strengths and areas of
applica on of typography as an element of design for various         specializa on. Students apply me management, technical and
forms of s ll and moving media communica ons such as print,          ar s c skills to complete final video and por olio requirements.
interac ve design and mo on graphics. The course surveys the         (Prerequisite: MAA228)
history of le erforms, anatomy and classifica ons of type and
clarifica ons of screen and bitmap fonts. Effec ve use of type         VFX407 Advanced Visual Effects (4 credits)
in layout of various forms of electronic display is emphasized.      This course explores various methods of composi ng concepts
Exercises and projects are designed to develop skills in u lizing    to enhance and expand produc vity. Specific anima on features
type as a communica on tool for print, interac ve and mo on          and func ons of the given so ware are discussed and applied
graphics media. Examples of typography used as a design tool for     to the produc on of short 3D anima on projects. Emphasis is
various media are emphasized. (Prerequisite: ART100) Sequence:       placed on crea ng CG environments and integra ng elements
follows GEN109 for bachelor’s program at ILIC and AIMD.              into live ac on. U liza on of mo on capture data, data clean up,
                                                                     data a achment are included. (Prerequisite: VFX307)
VFX210 Advanced Image Manipula on (4 credits)
This course is designed to further enhance the skills acquired       VFX410 Advanced Mo on Graphics (4 credits)
in previous image manipula on and technology-based classes.          This course exposes students to the disciplines used in finalizing a
Emphasis is placed on advanced applica ons and the appropriate       video or anima on project using composi ng so ware. The class
selec on of variables for the required task. Students will study     reinforces composi ng concepts, techniques, and vocabulary that
the possibili es and constraints of image transport and display      students have learned in previous classes. More sophis cated
over the Internet. Interface design is studied in an applica on-     tools and techniques are introduced. (Prerequisite: MAA228)
oriented approach. (Prerequisite: DPH242) (Offered at ILIS)
                                                                     VFX415 Por olio II (4 credits)
VFX250 Fundamentals of Mo on Graphics (4 credits)                    Por olios are refined and completed in this final class. In addi-
In this course students study the basic concepts of mo on graph-       on, the students apply advanced visual effects and broadcast
ics. Topics include learning to generate and crea vely manipulate    graphics skills and techniques to a specialized subject area, to be
text, audio, s ll images and video, and rendering the final com-      included in the digital por olio. (Prerequisite: VFX403)
posite to video for a variety of media. (Prerequisite: VFX110)
                                                                     VFX420 Art Direc on (4 credits)
VFX307 Visual Effects (4 credits)                                     This course explores various techniques used to create profes-
This course introduces students to the various methods of            sional storyboard and produc on design. Marker rendering,
matching the mo on shot on a live ac on plate and applying           pencil, pen and ink techniques are used as well as construc on
that mo on to a digital element. 2D and 3D tracking methods          of miniatures to help in produc on design and camera blocking.
are introduced. The course also introduces students to morphing      (Prerequisite: DDFV300)




                                                         96 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
VFX440 Studio Produc on (4 credits)                                  Mul ple page websites with high levels of interac vity and con-
This course focuses on broadcast studio opera on, live produc-       tent are created. (Prerequisite: WDIM110)
 on, studio management, ligh ng, crew, and sound. Students will
also explore the theore cal basis of the electronics behind the      WDIM230 Fundamentals of Authoring (4 credits)
equipment needed for studio produc on. Students will produce         Students acquire skills within an industry standard authoring en-
their own studio mul -camera program. (Prerequisite: VFX307)         vironment tro create highly interac ve websites using anima on
                                                                     techniques. Sequence: follows WDIM110 for WDIM majors.
WDIM110 Designing for Mul media Display (4 credits)
This course focuses on the crea on of textual content for differ-     WDIM260 Web Anima on (4 credits)
ent display formats of mul media. Students study the character-      This is an advanced course that applies mo on graphics as an
is cs of crea ng text for webpages, mobile devices, and other        integrated interac ve solu on. Students script interac on,
display media. Students also learn to conduct effec ve research       sequencing, and mo on for interac ve projects created for the
for media wri ng projects.                                           web. (Prerequisite: WDIM230)

WDIM120 Wri ng for Interac ve Media (4 credits)                      WDIM265 Advanced Web Scrip ng (4 credits)
This course focuses on the planning, scrip ng, and storyboard-       Students acquire the skills to develop, design, and produce web
ing for a variety of media produc ons. Students learn unique         pages of advanced quality. (Prerequisite: WDIM225)
characteris cs and techniques of media wri ng and apply them
to interac ve media produc on purposes. Students also learn to       WDIM300 Database Management (4 credits)
conduct effec ve research for media wri ng projects. (Prerequi-       This course focuses on how to design, write and implement stand
site: ART110)                                                        alone databases using popular database management systems.
                                                                     Students become familiar with the differences between data-
WDIM130 Fundamentals of Interac ve Design (4 credits)                bases and data base management systems. Students learn the
This course introduces students to the history, trends, terminol-    advantages of rela onal structures over flat file formats as well
ogy, and concepts in the field of interac ve design. Through          as how to construct queries, forms, reports and macros. Students
materials presented in the course, students become familiar          plan, design and build databases and also learn some of the tools
with the roles and responsibili es of people working in the field ,   used in the design process. (Prerequisite: WDIM225)
professional organiza ons, and significant organiza ons. Students
are also introduced to the basic concepts and tools for develop-     WDIM305 E-Learning Design I (4 credits)
ing interac ve media applica ons. Sequence: follows WDIM110          This course introduces students to the principles of instruc onal
for WDIM majors.                                                     design as applied to e-learning. The course introduces different
                                                                     op ons for authoring tools, principles of effec ve design, instruc-
WDIM160 Web Scrip ng (4 credits)                                       onal analysis, and produc on of e-learning materials. Working
Students develop, refine, and enhance programming skills as           in teams, students take responsibility for specific assignments.
they apply to the World Wide Web. The appropriate skills needed      Students design, build, evaluate, and revise instruc onal applica-
to design, develop, and produce prac cal applica ons with a            ons using industry standard authoring systems. (Prerequisite:
specific scrip ng or programming language are stressed. Students      WDIM225)
gain experience developing applica ons using HTML and other
languages. Integra on of applica on so ware is emphasized.           WDIM315 Interac ve Authoring II (4 credits)
(Prerequisite: WDIM130)                                              This course serves to provide prac cal experience with the
                                                                     design, development, and evalua on of effec ve interac ve web
WDIM210 Project Management (4 credits)                               content. Focus is on incorpora ng high-end interac vity into web
This course provides students with experiences in managing           design in order to provide an exchange of informa on between
web devleopment projects. Students will develop melines, job         client and server. Specific applica ons vary. Students design
descrip ons, priority lists, and all facets of introductory proj-    and develop a website to sell a product or service, build a brand
ect management. Projects may be individual or team based.            image, and/or provide informa on to a consumer. (Prerequisite:
Emphasis is placed on communica on and business goals, media         WDIM225)
and delivery pla orm. Students develop an interface prototype
alterna ve that meets the goals of the project. (Prerequisite:       WDIM320 Interac ve Mo on Graphics (4 credits)
WDIM130)                                                             This course serves to provide prac cal experience with the de-
                                                                     sign, development, and evalua on of effec ve content for device
WDIM225 Interac ve Authoring I (4 credits)                           display. Using industry standard so ware and equipment, inter-
Students acquire the skills to develop, design, and produce web      ac ve digital content is created for delivery to mul ple pla orms.
pages of advanced quality. Students con nue to build on previ-       (Prerequisite: WDIM265)
ous knowledge of html, css, JavaScript and use of Dreamweaver.




                                                         97 Academic Programs
Course Descrip ons
WDIM333 Web Design Associate Por olio Development (2                   WDIM480 Por olio II (4 credits)
credits)                                                               Students refine and complete their por olios in this final class. In
In this course each student assembles a por olio that demon-           addi on, students apply advanced interac ve media and web de-
strates conceptual design, cra smanship, and other skills. The         sign skills and produc on techniques to a specialized subject area
student selects and refines representa ve pieces, showcasing            to be included in their digital por olio. (Prerequisite: WDIM300,
work that reflects a unique style. Par cular emphasis is placed         WDIM435)
on iden fying short and long term professional employment
goals and strategies and resources for achieving them.

WDIM350 Web Marke ng and E-Commerce Law (4 credits)
This course addresses the fundamental concepts and principles of
marke ng and E-Commerce. The overview of marke ng provided
here helps students place their knowledge in a framework and
understand how each component contributes to the strength and
u lity of a marke ng plan. The course also focuses on an analysis
of current laws affec ng the interac ve media field, including
copyright law, trademark law, the law of libel and slander, right of
publicity and the right of privacy, misappropria on, unfair com-
pe on, moral rights, and trade disparagement. (Prerequisite:
WDIM225)

WDIM355 E-Learning Design II (4 credits)
Students build on previous competencies to create advanced
learning presenta ons for educa on. Elements of authoring, de-
sign, instruc onal analysis, and produc on of e-learning materials
are reinforced and expanded upon. Students design, build, evalu-
ate, and revise advanced instruc onal applica ons using industry
standard authoring systems. (Prerequisite: WDIM305)

WDIM370 Web Design & Interac ve Media Produc on Team (4
credits)
This course focuses on total project management process from
concept to comple on, including employee me management,
budget management and task sequencing. Working with a team
is also introduced as prepara on for hierarchies and group dy-
namics of the workplace and advanced project classes. (Prerequi-
site: WDIM305)

WDIM415 E-Commerce Site Design (4 credits)
This course introduces characteris cs that dis nguish E-Com-
merce from tradi onal retail venues. Students explore design
elements, support so ware, and robust network setup to pro-
mote successful on-line wholesale and retail sales. (Prerequisite:
WDIM300)

WDIM435 Por olio I (4 credits)
A design por olio will be assembled and refined in prepara on
for the job interview. Each student will select representa ve
projects showcasing work that represents a unique style and
demonstrates overall conceptual abili es. A digital por olio
for the internet is supplemented by print work in a por olio to
demonstrate all mul media capabili es. (Sequence: WDIM225
for WDIM majors)




                                                           98 Academic Programs
Admissions
NOTE: Admissions processes are the same at each campus unless otherwise indicated.
Requirements
To be considered for admission to The Illinois Ins tute of Art, a candidate must be a high school graduate or hold a General
Educa onal Development (GED) Cer ficate. A member of Admissions will personally interview each prospec ve student. It
is strongly recommended that the interview take place on campus. However, in circumstances where distance is a factor, the
interview may be conducted on the telephone or via the internet. The purposes of the preadmissions interviews are to

       Explore the prospec ve student’s background and interests as they relate to the programs offered at the ins tu on.
       Assist prospec ve students to iden fy the appropriate area of study consistent with their background and interests.
       Provide informa on concerning curriculum offerings and support services available at the College.
       Assist in assessing whether the prospec ve student has a reasonable chance of successfully comple ng the appropri-
         ate program of study.
If it is determined that a mutually beneficial situa on exists, the prospec ve student will have the opportunity to complete
an applica on for admission to the school.

Scores on na onal exams such as the SAT or ACT exam may be considered for admission, but are not required. All applicants
for admission will be required to submit an essay of 300 words (bachelor degree candidates) or 150 word (associate degree
and diploma candidates) describing what the student expects to accomplish while studying at The Illinois Ins tute of Art.

All applicants of the Game Art & Design Bachelor of Fine Arts and the Audio Produc on Bachelor of Science programs are
required to provide verifica on of a minimum 2.5 Grade Point Average (GPA). Applicants must submit an official high school
or college transcript. Game Art & Design and Media Arts & Anima on applicants are required to submit a por olio.

Proof of high school gradua on or equivalence is required for final admission to the school. A student will not be permi ed
to con nue to their second quarter of instruc on without an official transcript showing high school gradua on, GED scores
or an official copy of his/her high school diploma. Students eligible for financial aid will not receive financial assistance un l
documenta on of high school comple on is provided. An applicant who holds a bachelor’s or associate’s degree may submit
proof of that degree as evidence of sa sfying the high school comple on requirement. High school applicants who have not
yet graduated should submit a par al transcript that indicates their expected gradua on date in order to be evaluated for
early condi onal acceptance.

Individuals with por olios or previous educa on are evaluated during the admission process for poten al advanced place-
ment.

The Illinois Ins tute of Art is commi ed to nondiscrimina on and equal opportunity in admissions, employment, programs,
and ac vi es in accordance with Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educa on Amendments on
1972, Sec on 504 of the Rehabilita on Act of 1973, and The Americans with Disabili es Act. The College does not discrimi-
nate on the basis of age, religion, race, creed, color, na onal origin, ancestry, sex, sexual orienta on or disability or any
other characteris c protected by state, local or federal law. Applicants requiring addi onal educa onal or tui on assistance
will be referred to appropriate government agencies or other special educa onal ins tu ons equipped to handle such situa-
 ons. For informa on, please contact the Senior Director of Admissions.

The College reserves the right to request any addi onal informa on necessary to evaluate an applicant’s poten al for aca-
demic success.

Admissions requirements for Diploma Programs
A prospec ve student interested in the Web Design Diploma program must be an adult learner with an Associates degree in




                                                        99 Admissions
Admissions
Graphic Design for the Web Design program or similar art degree and one year of full- me related work experience within
the last two years who seeks to update his/her professional skills. In addi on, a person must be a high school graduate or
hold a General Educa onal Development (GED) Cer ficate. Success in this program is dependent on the student having
some prior proficiency in design so ware.

Applica on Procedures
An applica on for admission must be completed and signed by the applicant and parent or guardian (if applicable), and
submi ed to the College with a $50.00 applica on fee. The applicant then has five days from the me of applica on to sub-
mit an essay to the College. An administra ve fee of $100.00 is due within 10 days a er the applica on is submi ed. Most
applicants pay both fees with the ini al applica on. (In accordance with Ohio law, the total for The Art Ins tute of Ohio is
limited to $125.00.) An applicant (as well as the parent or guardian if applicable) will sign an enrollment agreement at the
  me of applica on. Applica ons are reviewed by the Admissions Commi ee. The purpose of the admissions process is to
determine the applicant’s ability to achieve future academic success based on past academic records and also to determine
if the program of study chosen by the applicant is appropriate based on the applicant’s stated career goals. The minimum
grade point average (GPA) requirement for all programs is 2.0, with the excep on of Game Art & Design and Audio Pro-
duc on, which have a required minimum GPA of 2.5. Addi onally, applicants to the Game Art & Design and Media Arts &
Anima on programs must submit an entrance por olio that includes a minimum of 10 illustra ons. The por olio must meet
the entrance standards determined by the Game Art & Design and Media Arts & Anima on programs. The Admissions Com-
mi ee reviews applicants who do not meet the GPA and/or por olio requirements and may request addi onal informa on
or require that the applicant meet with the Academic Director in the chosen program of study in order to make an accurate
assessment of the applicant’s poten al for success in the program.

A visit to the College is not a condi on for submi ng the applica on for admission or enrollment agreement. However,
prospec ve students are strongly encouraged to visit the college. Arrangements for an interview and tour of the school may
be made by contac ng the Admissions Office.

Assessment and Placement
The Illinois Ins tute of Art assesses the reading, wri ng, math, and computer skills of entering students to determine if the
student could benefit from addi onal assistance in math, English, or computer literacy skills. Placement is determined based
on transfer credit, ACT or SAT test scores, the ASSET placement exam produced by ACT, Accuplacer online placement exam
produced by The College Board, or Computer Literacy assessment. Applicants who are awarded transfer credit in English and
math are exempt from placement tes ng.

Students pursuing a bachelor’s degree may be required to take one transi onal course in English, a transi onal course in
computer literacy, and/or up to two transi onal courses in math. Students pursuing an associate degree may be required
to take one transi onal course in English, a transi onal course in computer literacy, and/or one transi onal course in math.
Transi onal studies courses are non-credit courses designed to enhance the student’s opportunity to succeed academically
and typically are taken within the first year of study.


 Accepted Test Scores
 ACCUPLACER:
 Reading                                   80
 Sentence Skills                           75
 Arithme c                                 70
 Computer Literacy associate degrees 40%, bachelor’s degrees 80%




                                                         100 Admissions
Admissions
 ASSET:
 Reading                                 40
 Wri ng                                  40
 Numerical Skills                        40

 SAT:
 Essay (applicable for test taken a er   07
 May 2005)
 Wri ng/Reading                          460
 Mathema cs                              500

 ACT:
 English/Reading                         19
 Mathema cs                              22

Acceptance no fica on
The College will no fy the applicant, in wri ng, of his or her acceptance. In the event the student is not accepted, the
administra ve fees, if submi ed, will be refunded. An applicant has the right to appeal the decision of the Admissions Com-
mi ee. For informa on please contact the Senior Director of Admissions.

Orienta on
Orienta on at the college assists all new students in making the transi on from their previous environment to The Illinois
Ins tute of Art. Each quarter the orienta on program provides new students with informa on about the campus, their
academic program, and services offered by the College; as well as giving them an opportunity to meet the faculty, staff, and
other students. Students will be advised of the me and date of orienta on.

Mid-Quarter Starts
The Illinois Ins tute of Art offers mid-quarter starts each year. This accelerated five and a half week program allows new and
readmi ed students the opportunity to take two accelerated on-campus or online courses prior to star ng full me during
one of the four main class starts.

Readmissions Procedures
Any student who has le the College for any me period must complete the reentry process in order to be readmi ed to
the school. To begin the process, the student must meet with the Associate Director of Readmissions. The student’s record
will be reviewed for academic progress and financial obliga ons. If the former student is in good academic and financial
standing, the Associate Director of Readmissions will begin the re-entry process. Re-entry students also have the opportu-
nity to start mid-quarter which is a program that will allow con nuing students who have withdrawn from school to return
mid-session and not have to wait for the quarter to begin.

Interna onal Admissions Policy
All interna onal (nonimmigrant) applicants to The Illinois Ins tute of Art must meet the same admissions standards as all
other students (please refer to Admissions Requirements for all students).

English Language Proficiency Policy
All applicants to The Illinois Ins tute of Art whose first language is not English must demonstrate competence in the English
language. Demonstra on that English is an applicant’s “first” language can be sa sfied if the applicant submits a diploma
from secondary school (or above) in a system in which English is the official language of instruc on. If English is not the ap-




                                                       101 Admissions
Admissions
plicant’s “first” language, the applicant will need to meet the minimum English Language Proficiency standard through sub-
mission of an official minimum score on the wri en Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or its TOEFL Internet (iBT)
equivalent. A TOEFL score of 480 on the wri en TOEFL or 55 on the TOEFL Internet (iBT) is required for diploma programs.
A minimum score of 500 on the wri en TOEFL or 61 on the TOEFL Internet (iBT) is required for all associate and bachelor’s
level degree programs. Applicants should contact the Admissions Office to determine other examina ons for which official
scores, equivalent to TOEFL, are acceptable as an alterna ve to TOEFL.

The above stated English language proficiency requirements are effec ve November 1, 2004.

Admissions Requirements for Nonimmigrant Students
Applicants seeking to enroll in valid student nonimmigrant status must submit each of the following items:

     A completed and signed Applica on for Admission Form, including required essay;
     A completed and signed Enrollment Agreement;
     Original or official copies of all educa onal transcripts (high school and, if applicable, university level academic re-
       cords) and diplomas. These educa onal transcripts and diplomas must be prepared in English or include a complete
       and official English transla on;
    Official creden al evalua on of non-American educa onal creden als, if applicable. Please note that official creden-
         al evalua ons must be prepared and submi ed by a member organiza on of the Na onal Associa on of Creden al
       Evalua on Services (NACEF); see www.macef.org.
    Proof of English language proficiency (see English language proficiency policy);
    A completed and signed Sponsor’s Statement of Financial Support; (This statement is not required if the student is
       self-sponsored);
    Official Financial Statements. Financial statements (typically provided by a bank) must verify sufficient funds to cover
       the cost of the educa onal program as well as all living expenses;
    A U.S. $50 non-refundable administra ve fee and a U.S. $100 refundable tui on deposit;
    A photocopy of the student’s passport to provide proof of birth date and ci zenship (students outside the United
       States who have not yet acquired a passport will need to submit a copy of their birth cer ficate);
    For all nonimmigrant applicants residing in the United States at the me of applica on: a photocopy of the visa page
       contained within the student’s passport as well as a photocopy of the student’s I/94 arrival departure record (both
       sides);
    For all nonimmigrant applicants residing in the United States at the me of applica on in either F, M or J non-immi-
       grant classifica on: wri en confirma on of nonimmigrant status at previous school a ended before transferring to
       The Illinois Ins tute of Art;
    Proof of Health Insurance. Students who do not possess health insurance upon applying to The Illinois Ins tute of Art
       must be prepared to purchase health insurance through an approved provider upon commencement of studies;
If an applicant seeking to enroll in valid student nonimmigrant status is transferring from a college or university in the United
States, the Interna onal Student Transfer Clearance Form is also required. If the applicant is accepted, he/ she will be sent
addi onal informa on regarding the student visa applica on process. The Illinois Ins tute of Art is authorized under federal
law to admit nonimmigrant students.



Special Programs
The College offers special programs each summer for high school educators. Contact the Admissions Office for further infor-
ma on.




                                                        102 Admissions
Admissions
Summer Studio Program
A 5 day program in Adver sing, Audio Produc on, Culinary Arts, Digital Filmmaking & Video Produc on, Fashion Design,
Fashion Marke ng & Management, Game Art & Design, Graphic Design, Hospitality Management, Illustra on & Design, In-
terior Design, Media Arts & Anima on, Digital Photography, Visual Effects & Mo on Graphics, and Web Design & Interac ve
Media, depending on programs offered on the local campus, is offered each summer to students entering the 10th, 11th,
and 12th grades. For more informa on, contact the Admissions Office.




                                                    103 Admissions
Administra ve & Financial Services
Digital Bookshelf and eBooks
The Illinois Ins tute of Art is in the process of enhancing the learning experience by conver ng tradi onal textbooks to
electronic media. Thus, eventually most courses will have a digital resource fee associated with them. This mandatory fee
is a flat rate per course and allows students access to an Electronic Library and HTML versions of textbook(s), and in some
cases, other electronic media, which is integrated into the course. Students are responsible for reading the Digital Bookshelf
and eBook User’s Manual which describes the media, access to the materials and your rights and responsibili es related to
Digital Bookshelf.

Students retaking a course are charged only once for the digital resources fee associated with the same course because
students have access to the digital resources materials for five years. Provided the digital resources for the retaken course
s ll uses the same digital books, students do not purchase addi onal textbook(s) for these courses. On average the price of
the digital resource fee is less than the retail price of the textbook(s) for each course, with the added benefits of no shipping
charges and immediate access to the materials. When you register for a course, the course registra on will display whether
there is a digital resource fee or whether paper textbooks are required for each par cular course.

Book Process
Students in need of purchasing books for their classes will need to sign an authoriza on form either approving or not ap-
proving the use of excess Title IV funds, if applicable, to cover the cost of books and supplies. If the purchase of books and
supplies should exceed the amount of the student’s credit balance a er all aid pays in, the remaining amount due will be
posted to the student’s account and the student will be responsible for making alterna ve payment arrangements.

 Students who do not authorize and who have excess Title IV funding due to receiving funds from a Pell Grant will receive
the lesser amount of either the amount of their Pell Grant excess or their full credit balance amount, for the term in ques-
  on, within seven days of the start of the term. Students who do not authorize and who are receiving excess Title IV funds
but do not have a Pell Grant will receive a s pend within the later of the term begin date or 14 days of the date of their
credit balance on their ledger card.

Refund Policy
Refund Policy Prior to Matricula on
An applicant may cancel enrollment in person or in wri ng before the beginning of classes. An applicant not reques ng can-
cella on before the scheduled star ng date indicated on the Enrollment Agreement is considered a student.

   1. The Illinois Ins tute of Art will no fy the student in wri ng of acceptance or rejec on. In the event that a student is
   not accepted by The Illinois Ins tute of Art, all tui on, fees, and other charges are refunded.
   2. The applicant may cancel this contract and receive a full refund of all monies paid to date if cancella on is made in
   wri ng to the Director of Admissions and mailed or delivered to The Illinois Ins tute of Art at the address stated herein
   within six (6) business days a er the Enrollment Agreement is accepted.
   3. An applicant reques ng cancella on more than six (6) days a er the Enrollment Agreement is accepted prior to the
   beginning of class receives a refund of all monies paid, less the $50.00 applica on fee and $100.00 registra on fee for a
   total of $150.00. In accordance with Ohio law, the total for The Art Ins tute of Ohio is limited to $125.00.
   4. All tui on and fee monies paid by an applicant are refunded, if requested, within three (3) business days a er the first
   tour of The Illinois Ins tute of Art and inspec on of equipment or if requested within three (3) business days of a en-
   dance at the regularly scheduled orienta on program for the star ng quarter, whichever is sooner.
   5. Refunds are made within thirty (30) calendar days a er the applicant’s/student’s request or within thirty (30) calendar
   days a er the first scheduled class day.




                                                  104 Financial Services
Administra ve & Financial Services
   6. Applicants who postpone star ng school a er the original start date noted on the Enrollment Agreement are required
   to reapply and are subject to the tui on, fees and other condi ons on the revised Enrollment Agreement.

Refund Policy a er Matricula on, All quarters
In the event of withdrawal by a student or termina on by The Illinois Ins tute of Art during any quarter of study:

   1. Prepaid tui on and fees for any period beyond the current quarter are refunded in full.
   2. A student may voluntarily withdraw from The Illinois Ins tute of Art by no fying the Office of the Registrar in person
   or in wri ng. Wri en no ce of cancella on takes place on the date the le er of cancella on is postmarked or, in cases
   where the no ce is hand carried, it shall occur on the date that the no ce is delivered to the school. The Illinois Ins tute
   of Art shall pay the refund within thirty (30) calendar days of that date. Refunds shall be paid directly to the student
   unless payment to the lender or other en ty is required by the terms of the student’s financial plan in which the college
   par cipates. The termina on date is the date of no ce indicated above. If the student has given no wri en no ce, The
   Illinois Ins tute of Art determines the date of withdrawal from within fi een (15) school days a er the last date of a en-
   dance and pays the refund within thirty (30) calendar days of making that determina on.
   3. For a student on a wri en leave of absence who fails to arrive for class following conclusion of leave, refunds are made
   within thirty (30) days from the first scheduled class day.
   4. A separate lease agreement and refund policy exist for a student who leases housing accommoda ons arranged by
   The Illinois Ins tute of Art. The Illinois Ins tute of Art reserves the right to apply any student payment or any refund due
   to a student to any student financial account that is in arrears.
   5. Each academic quarter is eleven (11) weeks in dura on. The calcula on of refunds is based upon the last day of a en-
   dance within the quarter. Any por on of a day’s a endance is considered a full day of a endance for refund purposes.
   6. Refunds are subject to state and federal guidelines and may be adjusted accordingly at any me. When changes are
   made, students are no fied.
   7. Policy specific to The Art Ins tute of Ohio–Cincinna (AIOHC): If AIOHC cancels or changes a course or program of
   study in such a way that a student who had started the program or course is unable to complete it, AIOHC will refund all
   monies paid for the course or program within thirty (30) days.
   8. Refund Policy for Online Course Withdrawal: Students who withdraw from a Session I or Session II online course a er
   the Schedule Adjustment period, are treated the same way as if they withdrew from a residen al class. Session II classes
   begin the day a er the Session I classes end and run five weeks. The ending date of the second session may not coincide
   with the ending date of the on-ground classes.

Mid-quarter Sessions
   1. Refund Policy A er Matricula on, All Quarters: This academic quarter is approximately 5 weeks in dura on.
   2. Adjustments of the Tui on and Fee Charges: Ins tu onal Policy: In accordance with school policy, the school earns
   tui on and fees for the mid-quarter as follows:
          Week One 25% Week Two 50% Week Three 75% A er Week Three 100%
   3. Kit Return Policy: Students who leave school during the first three weeks of the mid-quarter session may return the
   star ng kit or individual components of the star ng kit within 10 days of the last date of a endance of the mid-quarter.
   4. Informa on in the catalog or student handbook will apply except for the following changes: Schedule Adjustment
   period is two days from the start of the mid-quarter session. If dropping or adding one or more classes, financial aid eligi-
   bility may change. Please see a Financial Aid Officer before dropping or adding a class.
   5. Return of Title IV Funds: The return of Title IV Calcula on as described in the Enrollment Agreement for the mid-quar-
   ter session applies using the mid-quarter start and end dates.


General Refund Policy
                                                     105 Financial Services
Administra ve & Financial Services
Return of Federal Title IV Aid
A percentage of Federal Title IV Aid is returned if withdrawal is during the first 60% of the quarter. The amount returned
is based on the percentage of days remaining in the quarter. The school determines the calendar days completed in the
quarter divided by the total number of calendar days in the quarter. If the amount is less than or equal to 60%, that percent
of the Federal Title IV Aid received is the amount that can be retained. The difference is returned to the Federal Title IV Aid
program from which funds were received in this order: Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Subsidized Stafford Loan, Perkins Loan,
PLUS Loan, Pell Grant and SEOG.

If Federal Title IV Aid funds have been given to the student and if the student withdraws during the first 60% of the quarter,
the student may need to return some of those funds. If the student needs to return funds, the school will no fy the student
regarding how much is owed, and how it is to be returned.

Adjustment of Charges
In accordance with school policy, if a student withdraws from school, the school will earn tui on and fees as follows, based
on the week in which the student withdraws:
   Day 1 – $50
   Day 2 and 3 – $300
   Day 4 through Week 4 – 20%
   Weeks 5 and 6 – 70%
   A er Week 6 – 100%
The Illinois Ins tute of Art first calculates how much needs to be returned under the federal return of Title IV Aid Policy. The
amount will then be subtracted from the amount that was paid for the quarter of withdrawal to get the adjustment amount
paid. The Illinois Ins tute of Art calculates how much of the charges can be retained based on the school policy. The amount
that can be retained will be subtracted from the adjusted amount paid. If there is addi onal money to be refunded from
Federal Title IV funds, the refund will be made to the student, or with the student’s wri en authoriza on, to Federal Loans
from which funds were received, in this order: Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Subsidized Stafford Loan, Perkins Loan, PLUS
Loan. If there is an addi onal credit balance remaining a er the Federal refund is made, under school policy, refunds will
be made in this order, to programs from which funds were received: Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Subsidized Stafford Loan,
Perkins Loan, PLUS Loan, other loans, other aid (if required), and student.

If kits, components of the kit, books, or supplies, are returned to the bookstore in re-salable condi on within 21 days of
withdrawal, a credit will be given. All refunds and return of funds will be made within 30 days of the date that the student
no fies the school of the withdrawal. Examples of the calcula ons for this policy are available in the Student Accoun ng
office.

Adjustment of Charges - The Art Ins tute of Ohio–Cincinna

In accordance with school policy, if a student withdraws from school, the school will earn tui on and fees as follows, based
on the week in which the student withdraws:
                    Week One                      25% of tui   on and fees
                    Week Two                      50% of tui   on and fees
                    Week Three                    75% of tui   on and fees
                    A er Week Three              100% of tui   on and fees

Refund Policy for Indiana Residents at The Art Ins tute of Ohio–Cincinna
Sec. 6.5. (a) The post-secondary proprietary educa onal ins tu on shall pay a refund to the student in the amount calculat-




                                                  106 Financial Services
Administra ve & Financial Services
ed under the refund policy specified in this sec on or as otherwise approved by the commission. The ins tu on must make
the proper refund no later than thirty-one (31) days of the student’s request for cancella on or withdrawal.

(b) The following refund policy applies to each resident post-secondary proprietary educa onal ins tu on, except as noted
in sec on 4.5 of this rule:

  (1) A student is en tled to a full refund if one (1) or more of the following criteria are met:
      (A) The student cancels the enrollment agreement or enrollment applica on within six (6) business days a er signing.
      (B) The student does not meet the post-secondary proprietary educa onal ins tu on’s minimum admission require-
      ments.
      (C) The student’s enrollment was procured as a result of a misrepresenta on in the wri en materials u lized by the
      post-secondary proprietary educa onal ins tu on.
      (D) If the student has not visited the post-secondary educa onal ins tu on prior to enrollment, and, upon touring the
      ins tu on or a ending the regularly scheduled orienta on/classes, the student withdrew from the program within
      three (3) days.
  (2) A student withdrawing from an instruc onal program, a er star ng the instruc onal program at a post-secondary
  proprietary ins tu on and a ending one (1) week or less, is en tled to a refund of ninety percent (90%) of the cost of the
  financial obliga on, less an applica on/enrollment fee of ten percent (10%) of the total tui on, not to exceed one hun-
  dred dollars ($100).
  (3) A student withdrawing from an instruc onal program, a er a ending more than one (1) week but equal to or less
  than twenty-five percent (25%) of the dura on of the instruc onal program, is en tled to a refund of seventy-five percent
  (75%) of the cost of the financial obliga on, less an applica on/enrollment fee of ten percent (10%) of the total tui on,
  not to exceed one hundred dollars ($100).
  (5) A student withdrawing from an instruc onal program, a er a ending more than fi y percent (50%) but equal to or
  less than sixty percent (60%) of the dura on of the instruc onal program, is en tled to a refund of forty percent (40%)
  of the cost of the financial obliga on, less an applica on/enrollment fee of ten percent (10%) of the total tui on, not to
  exceed one hundred dollars ($100).
  (6) A student withdrawing from an ins tu onal program, a er a ending more than sixty percent (60%) of the dura on of
  the instruc onal program, is not en tled to a refund.


Scholarships
The Illinois Ins tute of Art is dedicated to the success of students pursuing crea ve careers. Talented individuals from across
the United States and interna onally are sought to complement the student popula on. To support this commitment, The
Illinois Ins tute of Art offered the following scholarships with a total approximate value of $1,000,000 for the 2009-2010
school year. The actual amount of scholarships awarded can vary at the sole discre on of The Illinois Ins tute of Art.

The Illinois Ins tute of Art Merit Scholarship
The Merit Scholarship Program provides scholarships to students who show evidence of merit and the mo va on to com-
plete the program but who are unable to enter classes without addi onal financial assistance. Eligibility is based on merit
and financial need. Students must be in good financial standing with the school to par cipate. Scholarship proceeds may be
applied to tui on, housing or supply costs. Awards range from $300 to $500.

The Illinois Ins tute of Art–Chicago Scholarship Compe            on
High school seniors may compete for six half-tui on scholarships offered annually by Chicago campus of The Illinois Ins tute
of Art. Awards are based on ability and commitment to a career in fashion design or marke ng, interior design, adver sing,
graphic design, visual communica ons, media arts & anima on, game art & design, and digital filmmaking & video produc-
 on. Contact the Admissions department for more informa on and an entry form. The ILIC Scholarship compe on is a

                                                     107 Financial Services
Administra ve & Financial Services
half-tui on scholarship.

The Illinois Ins tute of Art–Chicago Presiden al Scholarship
The Presiden al Scholarship program provides scholarships to students who show evidence of merit. Eligibility is based on
the student’s GPA from previous educa on–either high school or college. Student must have a GPA of 3.2 from previous
ins tu on. The Presiden al scholarship is 500 per quarter.



The Art Ins tutes and Americans For the Arts Poster Design Compe               on
This compe on is for students who are ready to challenge themselves to create a poster that brings to life the message
“Life Is Be er With Art In It.” You need to be a high school senior planning to study graphic design (or a qualifying student
interested in another program) to qualify for this compe on. Local first place winners advance to the na onal compe -
  on. Na onal scholarships are awarded in addi on to local scholarships. The na onal winner receives a full-tui on scholar-
ship.

Na onal Art Honor Society Scholarship
High school seniors who also belong to the Na onal Art Honor Society may apply for the Art Ins tutes Na onal Art Honor
Society Scholarship. Na onal first-place winners will be awarded a non-renewable $10,000 tui on scholarship to one of the
Art Ins tutes. A non-renewable $7,500 tui on scholarship for second place and a non-renewable $5,000 tui on scholarship
for third place will also be awarded.

The Scholas c Art and Wri ng Awards
Scholas cs Art and Wri ng Awards are provided on a first-come, first-served basis. To receive informa on about this scholar-
ship, visit the Scholas c website at www.scholas c.com/artandwri ng or call 212-343-6100. Four $10,000 scholarships will
be awarded by the Art Ins tutes to the Scholas c Na onal Award Receipients on a first-come, first-served basis.

The Art Ins tutes Passion For Fashion Compe           on
This compe on is your opportunity to earn a scholarship in the Fashion Design and Fashion Marke ng & Management pro-
gram. This comple on is right for you even if you love fashion but you are not a designer. The grand prize winners receive
a full-tui on scholarship to a end one of The Art Ins tutes programs in Fashion Design or Fashion Marke ng & Merchan-
dising. In addi on, the grand prize winner receives a VIP trip to Fashion Week in New York City and a $500 shopping spree,
par cipated in a meet and greet at Seventeen’s New York City offices and lunched with a Seventeen style pro. Second place
winners in the Fashion Design and Fashion Marke ng & Merchandising and Fashion Retail Management each earn a $5,000
tui on scholarship. The third place winners in the aforemen oned categories each earn a $4,000 tui on scholarship.

The Art Ins tutes Best Teen Chef Compe          on
Compete against students for the prized tle of Best Teen Chef 2011. Your skills in the kitchen could earn you a scholarship
in one of our Culinary Arts Program.

Prostart® (Advance Placement Credits)
Students who complete the ProStart® program with a C average or above and a cer ficate of comple on may receive
advance placement credit. Advance Placement rewards students for their skills, saving them me and money.Students may
receive up to 12 academic credits (valued at over $5,000) for any combina on of the following programs:

Safety and Sanita on with ServSafe® Food Safety cer ficate;Elec ve; Externship; Management, Supervision, and Career De-
velopment; Culinary Nutri on. (Some restric ons apply for approval of Culinary Nutri on credits; see local school for details.
Upon review by the Art Ins tute of Ohio – Cincinna Culinary Academic Director and Dean of Academic Affairs, addi onal
credits may be ar culated to ProStart® students on a case-by-case basis



                                                 108 Financial Services
Administra ve & Financial Services
Prostart® Invita onal
First-place winner of the Na onal ProStart® Invita onal Compe on and Management Compe on will be awarded a
tui on scholarship. Applicants must be enrolled in a ProStart® program to be eligible for the compe on. For more informa-
 on, phone 800/765-2122 or visit the ProStart® website at h p://nraef.org/prostart. Winners of the invita onal may contact
the Senior Marke ng Coordinator in the EDMC High School Department at 800-275-2440 for scholarship details. Na onal
first-place winners will be awarded a non-renewable $10,000 tui on scholarship to one of The Interna onal Culinary Schools
at the Art Ins tutes. A non-renewable $7,500 tui on scholarship for second place and a non-renewable $5,000 tui on schol-
arship for third place will also be awarded.

Prostart® State Scholarships
This award goes to the first place winner in the ProStart® state-level Culinary Compe on. the scholarship is renewable for
up to five years. The winner of the State of Ohio contest may contact the Senior Marke ng Coordinator in the EDMC High
School Department at 800-275-2440 for more informa on and scholarship details.

C-Cap Careers through Culinary Arts Programs
Students enrolled in a C-CAP program may compete for a full-tui on scholarship. For more informa on, speak to the C-CAP
Director at your high school, visit www.ccapinc.org, or call 212-974-7111. The full-tui on scholarship may be used for either
a two-year or four-year program at one of The Interna onal Culinary Schools at The Art Ins tutes.

Evelyn Keedy Memorial Scholarship
The $30,000 Evelyn Keedy Memorial Scholarship is awarded each year to a worthy high school senior who has enrolled at
one of the eligible Art Ins tute Schools.

Skills USA Championship
Students who are members of Skills USA may compete in local, state, and na onal championships. Various scholarships are
awarded to na onal-level winners, ranging from $2,500 to $20,000. Informa on about the Skills USA Championships may
be obtained from the local chapter. Each Art Ins tutes loca on has a limited number of scholarships. For more informa on,
visit www.skillsusa.org

The Imagine American Scholarship
The Imagine America Founda on helps provide scholarships for high school students. Gradua ng high school seniors who
meet the recommended guidelines are eligible to receive a $1,000 tui on discount that can be used at career colleges par-
 cipa ng in the Imagine America Scholarship Program throughout the na on. The program runs annually and has a Decem-
ber 31 deadline. See www.imagine-america.org for more informa on.

The Ohio Associa on Legisla ve Scholarship Program AIOHC
High school seniors may compete for six scholarships offered annually by the Art Ins tute of Ohio – Cincinna . Awards are
based on ability and commitment to a career in Fashion Marke ng & Management, Interior Design, Graphic Design, Web
Design & Interac ve Media and Digital Filmmaking & Video Produc on. Contact the Admissions department for more infor-
ma on and an entry form. The amount of this award is $2,500 for associate degree students and $5,000 for bachelor degree
students.

The Educa on Founda on Scholarship
The Educa on Founda on was established in 2000 to offer scholarship support to students interested in con nuing their
educa on in one of the postsecondary, career-focused schools in the EDMC system. the number and amount of the awards
can vary depending on the funds available. Scholarship applica ons are considered every quarter. Awards are made based
on academic performance and poten al, as well as financial need. Educa onal Founda on scholarships range from $500 up
to $2,500.



                                                    109 Financial Services
Administra ve & Financial Services
Ohio War Orphans Scholarship Program
The Ohio War Orphans Scholarship Program awards tui on assistance to the children of deceased or severely disabled Ohio
veterans who served in the armed forces during a period of declared war or conflict. To receive War Orphans Scholarship
benefits, a student must an Ohio resident, be enrolled for full- me undergraduate study, and be under the age of 25. Schol-
arship benefits cover a por on of tui on and general fees at eligible private colleges and universi es. Apply through the
Ohio Board of Regents/State Grants and Scholarships Department.

Military Grant - Ohio
Ac ve Duty, Ac ve and Drilling members of the Reserve and Na onal Guard and Spouses of Ac ve Duty Military Person-
nel:

The Art Ins tute of Ohio–Cincinna offers a special military tui on grant of 10% to eligible Ac ve Duty, Ac ve and Drilling
members of the Reserve and Na onal Guard and spouses of Ac ve Duty military personnel.

Fees:

The enrollment fee and the applica on fee are waived for Ac ve Duty and Ac ve and Drilling members of the Reserve and
Na onal Guard. The applica on fee is waived for all veterans who qualify for government military educa on financial aid
and spouses of Ac ve Duty military personnel.

Other Scholarships
Scholarships will be awarded only to individuals who have been admi ed to The Illinois Ins tute of Art. In the event educa-
  on is terminated either by the student or the college, the scholarship becomes null and void. The scholarship is not re-
deemable for cash and may not be used to finance op onal programs sponsored by The Illinois Ins tute of Art. The scholar-
ship covers tui on only and may not be applied against fees, housing, living expenses, or program supplies, and may not be
transferred between affiliate schools of The Art Ins tutes.

The Family Tui on Assistance Plan is also available for those who qualify. This scholarship is available when two or more
family members are enrolled concurrently. Only full- me dependant students may be eligible. Scholarships cover tui on
only unless otherwise noted. They do not cover books, supplies or miscellaneous fees. Students a ending The Illinois Ins -
tute of Art on scholarships must maintain at least a 2.5 cumula ve grade point average in order to retain eligibility.

The Art Ins tutes system of schools, of which The Illinois Ins tute of Art is a member, also offers scholarships to winners
of various na onal compe ons. Winners are selected by commi ees of ar sts and professionals who are independent of
The Art Ins tutes system. These na onal scholarships include the following: One full-tui on scholarship is awarded annu-
ally through the Na onal Art Educa on Associa on (NAEA), and one full-tui on Scholas c Arts Scholarship is granted. Two
full-tui on scholarships are awarded annually through the na onal commercial art compe on of the Voca onal Industrial
Clubs of America (VICA). One full-tui on Fashion Marke ng scholarship is awarded annually at the Distribu ve Educa on
Clubs of America (DECA) Career Development Conference. The recipients of these scholarships may enroll at any one of
The Art Ins tutes system of schools, which includes The Illinois Ins tute of Art as well as loca ons in Arlington, VA; Atlanta,
GA; Boston, MA; Burnaby, BC; Charlo e, NC; Dallas, TX; Denver, CO; Fort Lauderdale, FL; Houston, TX; Las Vegas, NV; Los
Angeles, CA; Los Angeles-Orange County, CA; Miami, FL; Minneapolis, MN; New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; phoenix, AZ;
Pi sburgh, PA; Portland, OR; San Diego, CA; San Francisco, CA; Schaumburg, IL and Sea le, WA; Tampa, FL; Toronto, ON;
Vancouver, BC; and York, PA.

Non payment of charges
Non-payment of tui on, housing, fees and/or other charges due to The Illinois Ins tute of Art results in addi onal collec on
costs, collec on agency costs and legal costs. In addi on, The Illinois Ins tute of Art reserves the right to report failure to



                                                  110 Financial Services
Administra ve & Financial Services
pay amounts owed to one or more na onal credit bureau organiza ons. Your academic transcript will not be released un l
all debts to The Illinois Ins tute of Art are paid in full.

Financial Planning
Financial Services is the business hub of the ins tu on. It provides a variety of student and management services. Within
this department are the following services and offices:

Student Financial Services
The Student Financial Services Department assists students and their families in developing a financial plan to budget for
educa onal expenses. Student financial aid officers help students and parents complete the federal and state applica-
  ons for grants and loans applicable to the student’s circumstances. Once the student’s eligibility for financial aid has been
determined, a financial aid officer helps the student develop a plan for mee ng educa onal expenses. Extended payment
plans may be available to ease the burden of college costs. Individual payment op ons allow students and their families to
spread some costs over a longer period in monthly or quarterly installments. Financial Aid planning services are available to
students and their families for consulta on throughout the year.

Sa sfactory Academic Progress
The Illinois Ins tute of Art is approved as an eligible Title IV funding ins tu on. All students who receive federal or state-
sponsored financial assistance must maintain sa sfactory academic progress for financial assistance eligibility. Students
receiving any form of financial aid are required to meet standards for academic progress and a endance. Proof of such
progress on a periodic basis is verified prior to any disbursements of financial aid. Failure to make sa sfactory academic
progress or sa sfactory a endance requirements may result in the termina on or reduc on of financial aid.

Suspension and Reinstatement of Financial Assistance, All Programs
Students who are suspended from a program of study or terminated from The Illinois Ins tute of Art are ineligible for finan-
cial assistance un l they regain admission and comply with sa sfactory academic progress requirements.

Financial Assistance Appeal
Students who are denied or suspended from financial assistance may file an appeal under appropriate federal and state
guidelines with The Illinois Ins tute of Art Student Financial Assistance Review Commi ee.

Federal Student Financial Aid
The purpose of federal student financial aid programs is to provide eligible students with an opportunity to obtain a college
educa on. Central to the purpose of financial aid is the belief that students and their families, to the extent possible, have
the primary responsibility to pay for the student’s college educa on. Financial aid is made available to assist eligible stu-
dents when family resources are not sufficient to meet college costs. All students seeking financial assistance are required
to complete the Free Applica on for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is the first step in the financial aid process. The
answers provided on the form are entered into a formula approved by the U.S. Department of Educa on and the results,
called the Expected Family Contribu on (EFC) are used to measure the family’s financial strength. Students are encouraged
to seek financial aid. Students and families should not rely solely on these funds to support themselves throughout the
academic year.

The Student Financial Services department is responsible for accurate documenta on and valida on of financial informa-
 on. In addi on to explaining financial aid programs and financial aid financing plans, the department also determines stu-
dent eligibility before financial aid is distributed by the Accoun ng Department. It is the student’s responsibility to comply
with all requests for informa on in a mely fashion to con nue receiving financial aid. Federal financial aid is awarded on a
fiscal year basis beginning July 1 and ending June 30. Students must complete a new FAFSA each year.




                                                      111 Financial Services
Administra ve & Financial Services
Federal Financial Aid Programs
The Illinois Ins tute of Art par cipates in the following programs:

Federal Pell Grant
To be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant, students must have a financial need, make applica on, prove U.S. ci zenship or
permanent resident status, be able to show gradua on from high school or its equivalency, not owe a refund on a federal
grant nor be in default on a federal loan, and maintain sa sfactory academic progress in school. They also must have need
according to a federal formula.

Federal Supplemental Educa onal Opportunity Grants
Federal Supplemental Educa onal Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are for students who demonstrate excep onal financial need
(with priority given to Pell Grant recipients). FSEOG does not have to be repaid, but there is a limited amount of funds avail-
able.

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan/Federal Unsubsidized Stafford loan
The Federal Stafford Loan is a fixed-rate low interest loan available to students through the Direct Lending program. To be
eligible, the student must be a ci zen or permanent resident alien of the United States and meet other eligibility require-
ments. Subsidized Stafford loans are need based, and the government pays the interest on these loans while students are in
school, during a six-month grace period immediately preceding repayment, and during authorized deferment. Unsubsidized
Stafford loans are not need based. The student is responsible for all of the interest that accrues on the loan, including while
the student is in school.

Parent PLUS loan
The federally sponsored Parent PLUS loan is a low interest fixed-rate loan for parents of undergraduate, dependent stu-
dents. With a Parent PLUS loan, families can fund the en re cost of a child’s educa on (less other financial aid). Flexible
repayment op ons are available and repayment can be postponed for up to 60 months including while the dependent child
is in school.

Federal Work-Study
Through the Federal Work-Study program, students have the opportunity to meet part of their expenses by working part
  me on or off campus. A limited number of assignments are available with priority given to students with the greatest need.
Our Student Financial Services department has more details. The maximum students can earn through this program is the
amount of their unmet need (the difference between expenses and all their resources). For a more complete descrip on
of federal aid programs, please ask for The Art Ins tutes Complete Guide to Financial Aid or go to www.FederalStudentAid.
ed.gov. State of Illinois Financial Aid Programs at The Illinois Ins tute of Art is an Illinois Student Assistance Commission
(ISAC) approved Illinois program. The Illinois Ins tute of Art par cipates in the following programs:

MAP Grant
Students a ending The Illinois Ins tute of Art who are considered to be Illinois residents are eligible to apply for MAP (Mon-
etary Award Program) grants from the State of Illinois. To apply for the grant, students must complete a FAFSA. Awards are
given based on financial need. The awards are provided by the Illinois Student Assistance Commission. Deadlines vary from
year to year depending on funding levels. Students are encouraged to file their FAFSA early for all state funded programs.

Silas Purnell Illinois Incen ve for Access (IIA) Program
If a student is an Illinois resident and the informa on provided on the Free Applica on for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) re-
sults in a calculated zero expected family contribu on as a college freshman, that student may be eligible to receive the Silas
Purnell Illinois Incen ve for Access (IIA) Program grant for up to $500.




                                                  112 Financial Services
Administra ve & Financial Services
Merit recogni on Scholarship (MrS) Program
Students who ranked in the top five percent in high school at the end of the third semester before gradua on, or scored
among the top five percent of scores in the ACT, SAT, or Prairie State Achievement Exam, may be eligible to receive a $1,000
Merit Recogni on Scholarship (MRS). This scholarship can be used to help pay for tui on, fees or other educa onal expens-
es at any approved Illinois ins tu on or one of the na on’s four approved Military Service Academies.



Accoun ng Department
At the me of the ini al enrollment, the student develops an es mated financial plan demonstra ng the ability to meet
all the expenses involved in the educa on process (tui on, fees, supplies, costs of living, etc). The Accoun ng Department
maintains student billing and payment records.

The student or parents/guardians (where applicable) receive payment no ces as outlined on their es mated financial plan.
The payments are due on or before the date noted on the financial plan. All payments must be current prior to registra on
and entry for the following quarter.




                                                    113 Financial Services
Academic Policies
Assessment of Student Learning                                   work, internships, studio work, and other academic work
As an ins tu on of higher educa on The Illinois Ins tute         leading to the award of credit hours.
of Art is commi ed to excellence in teaching and learn-          Full- me: Enrolled in 12-16 credit hours or more in an aca-
ing. Reflec ng that commitment, The Illinois Ins tute of          demic quarter. Half- me: Enrolled in 8 credit hours in an
Art has a formal, ongoing assessment of student learning         academic quarter. Less than half- me: Enrolled in 4 credit
and achievement. The Illinois Ins tute of Art collects and       hours in an academic quarter. Full-load - degree programs:
analyzes data on the nature and extent of student learn-         Full- me course load schedule for a par cular program
ing and uses that analysis to enhance both teaching and          averages 16 credits. Academic Year: Three eleven-week
learning. Under the guidance and direc on of the Vice            quarters in which the student is enrolled.
President or Dean of Academic Affairs and the Director of
Assessment, assessment involves the en re school com-            Academic Year
munity—students, faculty, staff, and administra on—in a           First-Year Student: Students who have accumulated up to
coordinated effort to use the assessment of learning as a         36 credits OR have been granted up to 36 transfer credits
cornerstone for curriculum development and ins tu onal           Second-Year Student: Students who have accumulated 36-
improvement.                                                     95 credits
The college is commi ed to increasing students’ knowl-           Third-Year Student: Students who have accumulated 96-
edge of basic skills in math, wri ng, and technology with        143 credits
the goal of preparing them for the challenge of academic         Fourth-Year Student: Students who have accumulated 144
life as they become independent learners.                        or more credits
The Illinois Ins tute of Art assesses the reading, wri ng,       Measurements in credit hours or the lis ng of credits for
math and computer skills of entering students to deter-          courses is not intended to imply transferability into college
mine if they could benefit from addi onal assistance.             programs at other post-secondary ins tu ons.
Placement is determined based on transfer credit, ACT or
SAT test scores and ASSET placement exam produced by             Grade Reports
ACT or ACCUPLACER online placement exam produced by              The student is issued an online final grade report at the
the College Board.                                               end of each academic quarter of study for all courses
                                                                 completed during that par cular quarter. Approximately
The Illinois Ins tute of Art maintains academic policies to
                                                                 mid-quarter, each student receives mid-term evalua ons.
ensure a quality educa onal process and to provide mean-
                                                                 This is a process that is designed to help each student un-
ingful measurements of student academic progress.
                                                                 derstand strengths and weaknesses within each course. As
                                                                 a result, the student can focus on those areas of perfor-
Quarter Credit Hour Defini on                                     mance that need more development. Further, the student
A quarter credit hour is an amount of work represented in        can request individual tutoring or support service from the
intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of            instructors or departments as needed.
student achievement that is an ins tu onally established
                                                                 The Illinois Ins tute of Art is concerned with each student’s
equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:
                                                                 overall professional development. The mid-term evalua on
(1) One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruc on           is based on academic, career objec ve and competency
and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work          development. Each student should take every opportunity
each week for 10-12 weeks, or the equivalent amount of           to consult with their instructors and Academic Department
work over a different amount of me; or                            Director to ensure maximum academic and professional
(2) At least an equivalent amount of work as required in         development.
paragraph (1) of this defini on for other academic ac vi-
  es as established by the ins tu on including laboratory



                                                    114 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
Academic Transcripts                                             more (of courses which are not transi onal studies) and
The Registrar’s office coordinates transcript requests. A          meet the following criteria may receive the corresponding
wri en request with signature is required to release an          designa on:
academic transcript. There is a $10.00 administra ve fee
per transcript requested. Release of transcripts is subject       Term GPA         Honors Designa on
to good financial standing. A minimum of 2-3 business days         4.0              President’s Honor Roll
processing me is usually required.                                3.7-3.9          Dean’s Honor Roll
                                                                  3.5-3.6          Honor Roll
Undergraduate Sa sfactory Academic Progress (SAP)
Policy                                                           Honor Designa on at Gradua on – Students who achieve
Effec ve SU11                                                     a CGPA of 3.5 or be er are designated as Honor Gradu-
 The Sa sfactory Academic Progress Policy ensures that all       ates. Transi onal studies classes are not considered when
students are maintaining sa sfactory academic progress           evalua ng Honors Designa ons.
towards successful comple on of their academic programs.
The evalua on points and milestones contained in the             Milestones and Evalua on Points for Sa sfactory
policy are meant to iden fy problems for which ac ons            Academic Progress
of early interven on and/or remedia on can be taken.
Most cri cal to this policy is a student’s ability to enroll     Compliance with SAP is reviewed every quarter for Cer fi-
in and complete courses on a consistent and successful           cate, Diploma, and Degree Programs. A student who starts
manner. This ability is measured in three ways: cumula ve        or re-enters at a MID session will have that session count
grade-point-average (CGPA); and incremental comple on            as an en re quarter for SAP purposes.
rate (ICR) within a maximum me frame (MTF). Failure
to complete courses successfully for any reason may                Cer ficate/   Evalua on        Mile-        Required Ac-
                                                                   Diploma      Point            stones        on
nega vely affect sa sfactory academic progress. Failing                                           (CGPA
courses or withdrawing from courses could result in the                                          and ICR)

loss of Financial aid and Academic termina on. In order                         End of First     < 1.0 and/   Warning
                                                                                Quarter          or 33.33%
for a student to graduate, the minimum requirements are
                                                                                                              Warning (if
a CGPA of 2.0, 66.67% ICR, and comple on of the program                         End of Sec-      < 1.5 and/   1st me)/
in no more than 150% of total program credits.                                  ond Quarter      or 50.00%    Dismissal (if on
                                                                                                              Warning)
 Periods of a endance when a student does not receive
                                                                                End of Third                  Warning (if 1st
Title IV aid are included in determining Sa sfactory                                             < 2.0 and
                                                                                Quarter And                    me)/
                                                                                                 66.67%
Academic Progress. Periods of Non-A endance are not                             every quarter                 Dismissal (if on
                                                                                therea er                     Warning)
included in determining SAP. While the term Academic
                                                                                Anything in                   Dismissal
Warning/Financial Aid Warning and Academic Proba on/                            excess of
Financial Aid Proba on are used, the status applies to all                      150% MTF

students whether receiving aid or not.
                                                                                End of First     < 1.0 and/   Warning
Criteria for Honors Designa on                                                  Quarter          or 33.33%
 To promote academic excellence and to recognize                                                              Warning (if
exemplary academic achievement, the following Honors               Degree       End of Sec-      < 1.0 and/   1st me)/
                                                                                ond Quarter      or 33.33%    Dismissal (if on
Designa ons will be issued on a term basis and upon                                                           Warning)
gradua on.                                                                                                    Warning (if 1st
                                                                                                 < 1.25 and
                                                                                End of Third                   me)/
                                                                                                 50%
                                                                                Quarter                       Dismissal (if on
Term Honors Designa on (at the comple on of a quar-                                                           Warning)
ter) – Students who enroll for and complete 12 credits or


                                                    115 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
                                            Warning (if 1st       Degree Programs:
                End of the     < 1.50 and    me)/                  At the end of the first quarter, students must achieve a
                Fourth and     50%          Dismissal (if on
                Fi h Quarter                                      minimum CGPA of 1.0 and an ICR of 33.33% (transi onal
                                            Warning)
                End of Sixth                                      study courses do not impact GPA or ICR so they are exempt
                                            Warning (if 1st
                Quarter*       < 2.0 and     me)/                 from the calcula on). Anything below these milestones
                And every      66.67%       Dismissal (if on
                quarter                                           will result in Academic Warning/Financial Aid Warning for
                                            Warning)
                therea er                                         one quarter. If a student has only a empted transi onal
                Anything in                                       studies the student is considered to be making SAP unless
                excess of                   Dismissal
                150% MTF                                          the student a empts and does not successfully complete
                                                                  the same transi onal study course three mes.
Cer ficate and Diploma Programs:                                    At the end of the second quarter, students must achieve a
 1.    At the end of the first quarter, students must              minimum CGPA of 1.0 and an ICR of 33.33% for all courses
achieve a minimum CGPA of 1.0 and an ICR of 33.33%.               that are not transi onal studies. Anything below these
Anything below these milestones will result in Academic           milestones will result in Academic Warning/Financial Aid
Warning/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter.                    Warning for one quarter if the student had not been on
 2. At the end of the second quarter, students must at-           Academic Warning/Financial Aid Warning in the previous
tain a minimum CGPA of 1.5 and an ICR of 50%. Anything            term. However, if the student was on Academic Warning/
below these milestones will result in Academic Warning/           Financial Aid Warning in the previous term, the student
Financial Aid Warning for one quarter unless the student          will be dismissed. If a student has only a empted transi-
was on Academic Warning/Financial Aid Warning in the                onal studies the student is considered to be making SAP
previous term. If the student was on Academic Warning/            unless the student a empts and does not successfully
Financial Aid Warning in the previous term, the student           complete the same transi onal study course three mes.
will be dismissed.                                                 At the end of the third quarter, students must a ain a
 3.    At the end of the third quarter, and every quarter         minimum CGPA of 1.25 and an ICR of 50 %. Anything
therea er, students must a ain a minimum CGPA of 2.0              below these milestones will result in Academic Warning/
and an ICR of 66.67%. Anything below these milestones             Financial Aid Warning for one quarter unless the student
will result in Academic Warning/Financial Aid Warning for         was on Academic Warning/Financial Aid Warning in the
one quarter unless the student was on Academic Warning/           previous term. If the student was on Academic Warning
Financial Aid Warning in the previous term. If the student        / Financial Aid Warning in the previous term they would
was on Academic Warning / Financial Aid Warning in the            be dismissed. If a student has only a empted transi onal
previous term they would be dismissed.                            studies the student is considered to be making SAP unless
 4.    Students may not a empt more than 150% of the              the student a empts and does not successfully complete
credits in their programs; anything in excess of 150% of the      the same transi onal study course three mes.
credits will result in dismissal.
                                                                   At the end of the fourth and at the end of the fi h quarter,
 5.    Students should note that if they are on Academic
                                                                  students must have a CGPA of at least 1.5, and an ICR
Warning/Financial Aid Warning, it will be very difficult to
                                                                  above 50%, Anything below these milestones will result in
meet the minimum requirements of the next evalua on
                                                                  Academic Warning/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter
point. Students should consult with their academic advisor
                                                                  unless the student was on Academic Warning/Financial
concerning the exact requirements.
                                                                  Aid Warning in the previous term. If the student was on
 6.    Students a ending cer ficate or diploma programs
                                                                  Academic Warning / Financial Aid Warning in the previous
may take transi onal study courses.
                                                                  term they would be dismissed.
 Please note that dismissals can be appealed. Please see
the Appeal Process below.                                          Students should note that if they are on Academic Warn-
                                                                  ing/Financial Aid Warning, it could be very difficult to meet



                                                     116 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
the minimum requirements of the next measuring point.              Appeal Process for Academic Probation/
Students should consult with their academic advisor con-           Financial Aid Probation
cerning the exact requirements.
                                                                   The process to appeal allows the student to request the
 At the end of the sixth quarter and therea er, students
                                                                   opportunity to appeal a dismissal in wri ng; the reason for
must accomplish a minimum CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of
                                                                   the appeal must be the result of mi ga ng circumstances;
66.67%. Anything below these milestones will result in
                                                                   and documenta on suppor ng a claim of mi ga ng
Academic Warning/Financial Aid Warning for one quarter
                                                                   circumstances must be provided and retained. The result
unless the student was on Academic Warning/Financial
                                                                   of the appeal (appeal granted or appeal denied) must be
Aid Warning in the previous term. If the student was on
                                                                   provided to the student and catalogued in the Student In-
Academic Warning / Financial Aid Warning in the previous
                                                                   forma on System as well as the student’s academic file. As
term they would be dismissed.
                                                                   part of the appeal the student must document in wri ng
 Students may not a empt more than 150% of the credits             why he or she did not meet SAP and what in the student’s
in their programs; anything in excess of 150% of the credits       situa on has changed that will allow he or she to meet SAP
will result in dismissal.                                          according to a wri en academic plan.
 Transi onal Studies Courses are based on the results of            If the student’s appeal (see appeal policy below) is
the academic placement test. Like any course, students             granted, he or she will be placed on Academic Proba-
must successfully complete such courses in order to prog-            on/Financial Aid Proba on for one or two quarters. For
ress in the program. Transi onal Studies Course credits do         students in a cer ficate/diploma program they will only
not count towards the total number of credits for gradu-           have one quarter of Academic/Financial Proba on due to
a on nor do they count in the CGPA or ICR; however,                the shorter length of the program. For associates degree
they do count in determining the maximum me frame in               or higher programs, if the student and the ins tu on
terms of credits a empted and credits earned. Transi onal          agrees to a two-term Academic/Financial Aid Proba on
Studies/Remedial courses do have credit hours assigned to          the student must agree with and sign a wri en academic
them for enrollment and tui on charging purposes. Tran-            plan developed and approved by the ins tu on which
si onal Studies Courses may be individually a empted no            documents that he or she will be required to a ain CGPA
more than three mes. Failing or withdrawing from a tran-           and ICR milestones by the next evalua on point (term) but
si onal studies course three mes will result in dismissal.         they must be mee ng SAP at the end of the second term.
 Students on Academic Warning/Financial Aid Warning are            A student not mee ng the condi ons of their plan at the
considered to be making progress towards mee ng SAP                end of the first quarter will be dismissed. If the student is
and if otherwise eligible, can be eligible for Financial aid.      mee ng their academic plan at the end of the first term,
 The grades, gpa and cumula ve data for all courses a              they will stay on Academic/Financial Aid Proba on. Stu-
student a empted at the ins tu on as well as courses suc-          dent are eligible to receive Title IV aid while on Academic
cessfully transferred in from prior postsecondary educa on         Proba on/Financial Aid Proba on if he or she is other-
are available on the student portal for their review. There        wise eligible. Failure to meet the minimum CGPA and ICR
is also an indica on if a student is on Academic Warning/          milestones following the Academic Proba on/Financial Aid
Financial Aid Warning or Academic Proba on/Financial Aid           Proba on period(s) will result in a permanent dismissal.
Proba on or is terminated.                                          If a student appeals and is denied the appeal, he or she
                                                                   must remain out of school un l one year a er the quarter
                                                                   in which the appeal was denied. The student may then
                                                                   request an addi onal appeal for reinstatement, but would
                                                                   have to demonstrate academic accomplishments or chang-
                                                                   es that show a degree of college readiness that reliably




                                                      117 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
predict success. A er being out of school, the applicant          modated to ensure that the student will be able to meet
will have to meet the appeal requirements as stated in the        sa sfactory academic progress will suffice as proof of mi -
first paragraph including describing why the student failed        ga ng circumstances as well as a student’s ability to meet
to meet sa sfactory academic progress before and what             sa sfactory academic progress with accommoda ons from
has changed to ensure that he or she will be able to meet         the ins tu on.
sa sfactory academic progress if re-admi ed. Should the            Students are NOT allowed to appeal dismissals for violat-
student have his or her appeal denied a second me, the            ing the 150% comple on rate.
student will be permanently dismissed from the Ins tute.
                                                                   A student who a empts but does not pass the same
 Following is a comprehensive list of events that indicate        remedial course three mes is dismissed and there is not
there may be a Mi ga ng Circumstance which has nega-              a right to appeal the termina on. Students dismissed for
  vely impacted academic progress:                                failing the transi onal courses three mes may reapply
                                                                  for reinstatement once these courses and the college level
   Death of an immediate family member                          equivalents are completed and are submi ed on an official
   Student illness requiring hospitaliza on (this in-           accredited ins tu ons transcript as part of the reinstate-
     cludes mental health issues)                                 ment appeal.
   Illness of an immediate family member where the
     student is a primary caretaker
   Illness of an immediate family member where the              The Metrics of SAP
     family member is the primary financial support                Academic Grading System
   Abusive rela onships                                         The grading system incorporates le er grades, equivalent
   Divorce proceedings                                          numeric values and le er codes as follows:
   Previously undocumented disability
   Work-related transfer during the term                         Le er Grade        Quality Points
   Change in work schedule during the term                       A                  4.0
   Natural disaster                                              A-                 3.7
   Family emergency                                              B+                 3.4**
   Financial hardship such as foreclosure or evic on             B                  3.0
   Loss of transporta on where there are no alterna ve           B-                 2.7
     means of transporta on                                        C+                 2.4**
   Documenta on from the School Counselor and/or a
                                                                   C                  2.0
     Professional Counselor
                                                                   C-                 1.7
                                                                   D+                 1.4**
The Dean of Academic Affairs or Vice President of Academ-
ic Affairs is responsible for determining the appropriate-          D                  1.0

ness of the mi ga ng circumstance in regards to severity,          F                  0.0*
  meliness, and the student’s ability to avoid the circum-
stance. Student life issues and making the transi on to           *F does compute in GPA and CGPA and does count as
college are not considered mi ga ng circumstances under           credit a empted.
this policy.                                                      **Note: The Art Ins tute of York u lizes .3 instead of .4
                                                                  for quality points for plus grades in a legacy program.
Documenta on from the SAP program or professional
counselor should not breach the student/counselor rela-
 onship and should remain confiden al. A memorandum
or le er on school or organiza onal le erhead indica ng
a counselor’s opinion that student issues may be accom-



                                                     118 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
Other Grade Codes worth Zero Quality Points:                         by the end of the second week of the following term. The
                                                                     grade ‘I’ indicates Incomplete and is calculated as if it is an
 CR = Credit                                                         ‘F’ un l it is changed to another grade and the course will
                      Credits Earned/TR grade does not affect
 through examina-     ICR/CGPA.                                      be included as course credits a empted, but not earned.
  on
                      Affects ICR/MTF/CGPA( Computes as an            Students may also retake classes in which they received
 I = Incomplete       F)
                      Affects ICR/MTF/CGPA( Computes as an
                                                                     a passing grade in order to improve their CGPA but can
 S = Suspension       F)                                             retake a course passed only one addi onal me. Credits
                      Does not affect ICR/CGPA This grade             from all repeated courses are included as credits a empt-
 NP = Not passing/    designa on is u lized to indicate that a
 Fail                 student did not acceptably complete a          ed.
                      non credited course
 P = Proficiency
 Credit by Exam or    Does not Affect ICR/MTF/CGPA                    Changed Grade
 Por olio                                                             When a final course grade has been established and
                      This grade designa on is u lized to
                      indicate that a student acceptably com-        recorded in the student record, the grade may not be
 PA = Pass            pleted a non credited course. Does not         changed without approval by both the Academic Depart-
                      affect ICR/MTF/CGPA.
                      This grade designa on is u lized to            ment Director and either the Dean of Academic Affairs or
 SP or SA = Sa s-     indicate that a student acceptably com-        Vice President of Academic Affairs. Only the final grade
 factory/Pass         pleted a non credited course. Does not
                      affect ICR/MTF/CGPA.                            (not the original grade/code) will be computed in the
 T = Termina on       Affects ICR/MTF/CGPA (Computes as an            grade point average. The final grade is the one that counts
 from course          F)
                                                                     in the calcula on.
                      Grade designa on u lize for transfer
 TR = External        credits. This does not affect CGPA. They
 Transfer Credit      do impact ICR and MTF.                         Calcula ons
                      Indicates that a student unsuccessfully         The Art Ins tute measures and records academic perfor-
 U = Unsa sfac-       completed a non-credited course. Does
 tory                 not affect ICR/MTF/CGPA.                        mance by compu ng the Grade Point Average (GPA) and
                      Commonly used when waiving a reme-             Cumula ve Grade Point Average (CGPA) for each student,
 WV = Waiver          dial courses and does not affect ICR/
                      MTF/CGPA                                       using the le er grades, four-point scale and credit-hour
 WX = Course was                                                     values. GPA is the average of grade points a student earns
                      Self-explanatory and does not affect ICR/
 registered for but   MTF/CGPA                                       during one quarter. CGPA is the cumula ve average of all
 never a ended
                                                                     grade points a student has earned over all quarters at The
Students receive grades at the end of each quarter includ-           Art Ins tute.
ing midquarter. The grade report contains both the grade
point average for the quarter (GPA) and cumula ve grade              Here is an example of how GPA and CGPA are computed:
point average (CGPA) for the program. When a course is re-           Imagine that a student is taking a total of two courses dur-
peated a er failure, the grade earned upon repea ng the              ing one quarter. One course has a four credit hours value
class replaces the original grade in determining the grade           and the student earns an A. The second course has a three
point average, though the failing grade will s ll appear on          credit hour value and the student earns a B. Remember,
the transcript.                                                      each le er grade carries a grade point value. Grade point
                                                                     values are mul plied by credit hours.
Repea ng Courses                                                      In this example:
 Grades earned in repeated courses will replace grades               A = 4 grade points x 4 credit hours = 16 grade points
of ‘F’, ‘W’, or ‘WF’. Course credits with grades of ‘F’,’W’, or      earned
‘WF’ are included in the maximum me frame (MTF) and                  B = 3 grade points x 3 credit hours = 9 grade points earned
incremental comple on rate (ICR) requirements as credits              To compute the GPA, divide the total number of grade
a empted but not earned. Students with incomplete                    points earned for the quarter by the total number of credit
grades will receive an ‘F’ if a grade change is not submi ed         hours earned for the quarter.



                                                        119 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
 In this example:                                                       the student’s CGPA.
 16 grade points + 9 grade points = 25 total grade points                Students wishing to transfer from one Art Ins tute to
25 grade points earned divided by 7 total hours earned =                another may do so only if they are in good standing at the
student’s GPA for the quarter, 3.57, which is rounded to                sending school. If the student is transferring to a different
3.6.                                                                    ins tu on (as defined by the Department of Educa on),
 A student’s CGPA is computed in the same way by dividing               then he or she is treated as a student transferring in from
the student’s total grade points earned from all quarters/              an unaffiliated ins tu on. Any student dismissed for viola-
semester at The Art Ins tute by the student’s total credit                on sa sfactory academic progress cannot transfer or be
hours earned from all quarters at The Art Ins tute. (The                considered a New student (if they had a break in enroll-
CGPA is calculated by rounding up to the nearest tenth                  ment) at another Art Ins tute un l he or she has been
if the last digit is 5 or greater. It is rounded down to the            granted an appeal at the original school and is deemed to
nearest tenth of the last digit if the last digit is less than 5.       be making sa sfactory academic progress.
Example: 1.95 = 2.0, 1.94 = 1.90)
 Incremental comple on rate is determined as follows                    Changes in Program
(remedial credits do not count in this calcula on):
                                                                        Students are allowed only one change of program and
  (EARNED CREDITS at the ins tu on + TRANSFER CREDIT Accepted )         must be making sa sfactory academic progress at the me
  (ATTEMPTED CREDITS at the ins tu on + Transfer Credits Accepted)      a request is made to change programs.
                                                                         Courses taken in one program that is applicable to the
The 150% MTF is determined as follows:                                  second program will be transferred with the applicable
                                                                        grade. If the student has taken a course more than once,
TOTAL CREDITS NEEDED TO GRADUATE FROM THE PRO-                          only the grades transferred to that new program will apply
GRAM x 1.5 = TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS ALLOWED TO                         to the second program. All grades earned in the original
ATTEMPT.                                                                program that apply to the new program will count towards
                                                                        the CGPA. For ICR and 150% purposes only, those courses
STUDENT STATUS CHANGES AND SAP                                          transferred will apply to the second program will be con-
                                                                        sidered.
Transfer Students                                                        In the formulas below, the “CHANGE OF MAJOR” adjust-
 Transfer credits from other post-secondary ins tu ons are              ment factor would be those credits from the previous ma-
calculated in the maximum me frame allowable credits                    jor that we will NOT count in the student’s current major.
and incremental comple on rate requirements. There-                      Incremental comple on rate is determined as follows
fore, the maximum number of a empted credits for a                      (remedial credits do not count in this calcula on):
student with transfer credit is s ll one and one-half mes
the number of credits required to complete a program for                 (EARNED CREDITS in the New Program + TRANSFER CREDIT ACCEPTED)
gradua on.                                                              minus CHANGE OF MAJOR ADJUSTMENT FACTOR FOR EARNED CREDITS)
 Example: if a student transfers in 36 credits to a program              (ATTEMPTED CREDITS in the New Program + Transfer Hours Accepted)
consis ng of 180 credits, the calcula on would be 180 X                 minus CHANGE OF MAJOR ADJUSTMENT FACTOR FOR EARNED CREDITS
1.5 = 270 credits. Therefore, the 36 transfer credits would
be considered a empted and earned so only 234 more                      The 150% MTF is determined as follows:
credits could be a empted.
 Grades for credits transferred in from any post-secondary              TOTAL CREDITS NEEDED in the PROGRAM TO GRADUATE
ins tu on (including an Art Ins tute) will be recorded as                mes 1.5 = MTF.
“TR” in the Student Informa on System and will not affect




                                                           120 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
Second Degree                                                    Student Iden fica on Cards
                                                                 The student is required to retain a Photo ID card that is
When a student has graduated from The Art Ins tute in            used for various purposes for the dura on of the program:
one program, then subsequently begins work in a different         for checking out library books and resource materials at
program, grades used in the CGPA of the previous program         the college Library
will not be applied to the student’s new program CGPA            for checking out training equipment (see “Property of The
calcula on. The grades will be recorded as TR.                   Illinois Ins tute of Art ”)
                                                                 for checking in and out of the computer labs
                                                                 for security iden fica on
Schedules and Registra on
Quarterly Student Registra on Procedures                         On some campuses, student ID cards must be updated
The con nuing enrollment registra on for in-school               with a s cker each quarter in order to be valid.
students takes place during the fi h through 12th week of
each academic quarter. Appropriate no ces regarding the          Course Cut-off date
registra on period are posted in advance. Much course,           All students must be cleared to sit in class by the first
instructor and classroom scheduling takes place in the           day of the second week of the quarter. If the student is
short period between registra on and the start of classes.       not cleared for class prior to the course cut-off date, the
Therefore, it is very important that every student register      student is not allowed to start the quarter. Students must
on me. Students who register late are subject to delays in       a end each class by the first scheduled class mee ng of
the scheduling process and to course selec on on a space         the second week of the quarter in order to a end that
available basis.                                                 class for that quarter.


Program and A endance Status Change                              Schedule Adjustment Period
Once enrolled, a student is assumed to be in con nuous           Any course that is added or dropped from the student’s
enrollment and a endance, and to be making sa sfac-              schedule must be processed by the Registrar’s Office prior
tory progress un l gradua on. The student who alters             to the end of the Schedule Adjustment period. Students
this academic progression in any manner is considered to         dropping a course during the Schedule Adjustment period
be making a “status change” which requires approval or           are not charged for the course. Students who have at-
understanding in advance of the changes.                         tended classes during the Schedule Adjustment period and
The basic status changes include:                                withdraw completely from school are charged a percent-
 a change from one program of study to another pro-            age of their tui on based on the last day of a endance.
    gram of study (termed “internal transfer”)                   The Schedule Adjustment period is printed on the back of
 a change of a endance schedules (from part- me to             the students’ schedules. The Schedule Adjustment period
    full- me class a endance, evening to day a endance           is the first Monday of the quarter through the first day of
    or vice-versa)                                               week two. A er Schedule Adjustment a student is charged
 a withdrawal, suspension or termina on of studies             for all registered classes.
 a course change, addi on or dele on
 transferring from one Art Ins tute to another Art Ins -       Class Schedules
    tute (termed “external transfer”)                            The student’s class schedule is available on or before
                                                                 the first day of class each quarter. The Illinois Ins tute
Students should no fy the college of address changes and
                                                                 of Art reserves the right to make any schedule changes
changes in emergency informa on. Students who wish to
                                                                 to courses, room assignments, session assignments and
request an academic or registra on status change as noted
above must refer to the Registrar’s Office for procedural
details.


                                                    121 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
student reassignment, as deemed appropriate by the Vice           Absence Categories
President or Dean of Academic Affairs.                             Full Absence: A full day of absence is defined as being
                                                                  absent for the total number of hours classes are scheduled
Class Size                                                        each day for the program in which the student is enrolled.
The maximum number of students in a class is 30 for stu-          Absences are recorded from the first day of the quarter
dios or labs and 50 for lecture. Typically the average class      regardless of the reason for absence.
size is smaller. In the fall 2009 quarter, the average class
                                                                  Par al Absence: A student who arrives late or leaves class
size was 20 students. While there is no minimum class size,
                                                                  early is charged in fi een-minute increments of absentee-
a class for which fewer than 12 students are registered
                                                                  ism. This absence accumulates toward absenteeism on a
may be cancelled. This is not only to make the best use of
                                                                  student’s quarterly record.
instruc onal resources, but to foster adequate dialogue
and academic exchange between class par cipants.                  Consecu ve Absenteeism: A student absent fourteen
                                                                  consecu ve calendar days without no fying the Registrar
Class Assignments and Projects                                    is considered withdrawn from the program.
There is considerable emphasis placed on simulated work
situa ons and comple on dates. Class me is set aside for          A endance Policy
comple ng the projects. Students should spend addi onal           Absenteeism in a course may result in a endance with-
  me outside the class hours as necessary for mee ng the          drawal in that class. An example would be that 32%
established project submission deadlines. In the profes-          absenteeism would equal 11 hours of absenteeism in a
sional world, there are rarely any acceptable excuses for         three-hour week course, 14 hours in a four-hour week
missing project deadlines. It is extremely important that         course, 17.5 hours in a five-hour week course and 21 hours
students learn and exhibit professional discipline. Students      of absenteeism in a six-hour week course. For culinary
should plan their schedules with an understanding that            students, all lab classes are limited to 10% absenteeism
they will need to spend a significant amount of me on              and all lecture classes are limited to 20% absenteeism. This
work outside class.                                               equals six hours for a three-hour-per-week course and 18
                                                                  hours for an 18-hour-per-week course.
A endance Policies and Procedures                                 This missed me includes accumulated me marked as
The college is required by federal, state and accredita on        “tardy” from class as well as total absences from classes,
regula ons to maintain and enforce an a endance policy.           as well as any classes missed during the Schedule Adjust-
Par cipa on in classroom ac vi es is vital to a student’s         ment period. Students maybe withdrawn from the class
successful comple on of each course and is an important           and receive a ‘W’ and must repeat the course with a pass-
facet of each student’s professional development. The             ing grade. A student who receives a endance withdrawals
school’s A endance Policy has been designed to reflect the         in all classes will be suspended from school. A endance
demanding nature of the professional fields. The student           withdrawal accompanied by an unsa sfactory SAPP or ICR
is expected to a end all classes as scheduled, to be on           status may also result in dismissal.
  me and to remain in the classes for their full dura on.
It is recognized that a student may be absent from class          A endance Withdrawal Appeal Procedure
due to a serious illness or family emergency. There are no        A student may appeal an a endance withdrawal. Appeals
excused absences. Arrangements to complete make-up                must be submi ed to the Vice President or Dean of Aca-
work for missed classes must be made with each individual         demic Affairs in wri ng within three school days a er the
instructor. Charges for tui on, housing, kits, transporta on      no ce of dismissal is sent.
and all other fees are non-refundable charges regardless of
circumstances.




                                                     122 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
Transfer Credit                                                   by a statement from the college or university that the
Before Matricula on                                               ‘P’ or ‘S’ is equivalent to a grade of ‘C’ or be er.
 To receive transfer credit for courses taken before          The scope of the coursework must be comparable to
   entering The Illinois Ins tute of Art or for achieve-          a course taught at The Illinois Ins tute of Art to be
   ment on AP and CLEP examina ons, students must                 considered for transfer of credit. Transfer credit is not
   submit official sealed transcripts, preferably prior to          accepted for Por olio Prepara on and Project Manage-
   the start of classes but no later than the fi h week of         ment.
   the student’s first quarter at The Illinois Ins tute of       For General Educa on courses, a course must be com-
   Art. Transfer credit requested a er the fi h week of            parable to a course at The Illinois Ins tute of Art
   the student’s first quarter are reviewed only under           Because both General Educa on requirements and
   excep onal circumstances and may only be accepted              program requirements of The Illinois Ins tute of Art
   with the approval of the Vice President or Dean of             may vary significantly from the student’s previous
   Academic Affairs. Computer Literacy proficiency exams            ins tu on(s), the gran ng of transfer credit does not
   and por olio reviews for credit must be completed by           necessarily result in an earlier gradua on date.
   the end of the first week of enrollment.
 Course descrip ons from the college or university           Advanced Placement, Transfer and Profi-
   catalog may be requested by the Academic Depart-            ciency Credit
   ment Director if ques ons arise. The catalog year must      Students applying to The Illinois Ins tute of Art may be
   correspond with the date when the course was taken.
                                                               eligible to receive advanced standing credit in the follow-
   (e.g. if an English course was taken from a college in
                                                               ing ways:
   1983, the course descrip on from that college’s 1983
                                                                Earning college credit at other accredited post-second-
   catalog must accompany the transfer of credit request).
                                                                   ary ins tu ons.
 Only college-level courses (100 level or equivalent)
                                                                Taking the Advanced Placement Program (AP) course
   taken at an accredited ins tu on of higher educa on
                                                                   and score 3, 4 or 5 on the AP exam.
   are considered for transfer. No remedial courses or ESL
                                                                Successfully comple ng coursework included in ar cu-
   (90 level or equivalent) will be considered.
                                                                   la on agreements that have been established between
 For technology-based courses or for courses where
                                                                   The Illinois Ins tute of Art and their high schools.
   content may change over periods of me courses taken
                                                                Comple ng the requirements of a Transfer Agreement
   more than 5 years prior to the request for transfer are
                                                                   established between The Illinois Ins tute of Art and the
   not considered.
                                                                   postsecondary ins tu on they a ended prior to com-
 Students transferring from another Art Ins tutes
                                                                   ing to this ins tu on.
   school must complete at least 25% of their required
                                                                Comple ng the College Level Examina on Program
   coursework at The Illinois Ins tute of Art.
                                                                   (CLEP) and earning a score or 50 or higher equivalent
 Students transferring credits from any other colleges
                                                                   to courses offered by The Illinois Ins tute of Art.
   must complete at least 25% of their required course-
                                                                Presen ng evidence of life experience obtained in the
   work at The Illinois Ins tute of Art. This means stu-
                                                                   workplace or through other means, as demonstrated
   dents may not transfer in more than 135 credits in a
                                                                   through a por olio of their work and addi onal sup-
   bachelor degree program or 68 credits in an associate
                                                                   por ng documenta on. This applica on needs to be
   degree program.
                                                                   done either before matricula on or within the first four
 Only courses with grades of ‘C’ or be er are considered
                                                                   quarters a er matricula on.
   for transfer. Only courses taken for a grade are con-
                                                                Receiving a grade of 80% or higher on the Computer
   sidered for transfer of credit. One excep on: Pass and
                                                                   Literacy Proficiency Exam.
   Sa sfactory grades are only considered if accompanied




                                                  123 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
A er Matricula on                                                  course content, grades, accredita on and licensing.
Transfer credit a er matricula on must be completed prior
                                                                   The goal of The Illinois Ins tute of Art is to help you to
to the student’s final term of study. Credits from other in-
                                                                   prepare for entry-level employment in your chosen field
s tu ons taken a er matricula on at The Illinois Ins tute
                                                                   of study. The value of degree programs like those offered
of Art are accepted under the following agreement:
                                                                   by The Illinois Ins tute of Art is their deliberate focus on
 The student must be enrolled in a full- me status at
                                                                   marketable skills. The credits earned are not intended as a
    the school during the same quarter in which a course is
                                                                   stepping stone for transfer to another ins tu on. For this
    taken outside the school.
                                                                   reason, it is unlikely that the academic credits you earn at
 The student must have approval from the Vice Presi-
                                                                   The Illinois Ins tute of Art will transfer to another school.
    dent or Dean of Academic Affairs PRIOR to taking a
    course.                                                        Programs offered by one school within The Art Ins tutes
 One course per quarter maximum is allowed.                      system may be similar to but not iden cal to programs
 The course must be passed with a grade of ‘C’ or bet-           offered at another school within the system. This is due to
    ter.                                                           differences imposed by state law, use of different instruc-
 The grade will not be factored into the CGPA. The stu-            onal models, and local employer needs. Therefore, if
    dent’s record will reflect a “TR” grade.                        you decide to transfer to another school within The Art
 Credit will be awarded for the course when documen-             Ins tutes system, not all of the credits you earn at The Il-
    ta on is produced that the course was successfully             linois Ins tute of Art may be transferable into that school’s
    completed.                                                     program.
 Courses must be taken as they pertain to the normal             If you are considering transferring to either another Art
     me sequence within the student’s department.                  Ins tutes system school or an unaffiliated school, it is your
 Concurrent enrollment course taken during the last              responsibility to determine whether that school will accept
    quarter of enrollment will in all probability delay gradu-     your Illinois Ins tute of Art credits. We encourage you to
    a on by one quarter.                                           make this determina on as early as possible. The Illinois
                                                                   Ins tute of Art does not imply, promise, or guarantee
Internal Transfer (Change of Program)                              transferability of its credits to any other ins tu on.
A student who wants to transfer from one program of
study to another within The Illinois Ins tute of Art must:
 Have approval from the Academic Department Direc-               Procedure to Inspect Educa on Records
    tor of both the department they are leaving and the            The Family Educa onal Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as
    department they are entering.                                  amended (FERPA) sets out requirements designed to afford
 Have no failing grade in the courses they are transfer-         students certain rights with respect to their educa on re-
    ring.                                                          cords. In addi on, it puts limits on what informa on The Il-
 Have a 2.0 CGPA in the courses they are transferring.           linois Ins tute of Art may disclose to third par es; without
 Never have transferred before.                                  receiving prior wri en consent from the student.
                                                                   Students have the right under FERPA to inspect and review
Credit Transferability Statement                                   their educa on records. A student who wishes to inspect
Informa on about the College’s accredi on and state                and review their records should submit a wri en request
licensing is located on page 3 of this catalog. However, the       to the Vice President or Dean of Academic Affairs or the
fact that a school is licensed and accredited is not neces-        Director of Administra ve and Financial Services. The
sarily an indica on that credits earned at that school will        request should iden fy as precisely as possible the records
be accepted by another school. In the U.S. higher educa-           the student wishes to inspect. If the requested records are
  on system, transferability of credit is determined by the        subject to inspec on and review by the student, arrange-
receiving ins tu on taking into account such factors as



                                                      124 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
ments for access are made within a reasonable period of           A person employed by or under contract to the school
  me but in no case more than 45 days a er the request              to perform specific tasks, such as an auditor, consul-
was made. The student will be no fied of the me and                  tant, or a orney, a person on the Board of Trustees, or
place where the records may be inspected. The school may            a student serving on an official commi ee or assis ng
require the presence of a school official during the inspec-          another school official.
  on and review of a student’s records.                           Any school official who needs informa on about a
Certain limita ons exist on a student’s right to inspect and        student in the course of performing instruc onal,
review their own educa on records. Those limita ons                 supervisory,
include, for example, the following: (i) financial informa-        To certain officials of the United States Department
  on submi ed by parents; (ii) confiden al le ers and                of Educa on, the Comptroller General of the United
recommenda ons placed in their files prior to January 1,             States, the
1975; (iii) confiden al le ers and recommenda ons placed           To the A orney General of the United States and state
in their files a er January 1, 1975 to which the student             and local educa onal authori es in connec on with
has waived the right to inspect and review and that are             state or federally supported educa onal programs.
related to the student’s admission, applica on for employ-        In connec on with the student’s request for, or receipt
ment or job placement or receipt of honors. In addi on,             of, financial aid necessary to determine the eligibility,
the term “educa on record” does not include certain types           amounts or condi ons of financial aid, or to enforce
of records such as, records of instruc onal, supervisory,           the terms and condi ons of the aid.
administra ve, and certain educa onal personnel who               To organiza ons conduc ng certain studies for or on
are in the sole possession of the maker thereof, and are            behalf of the school.
not accessible or revealed to any other individual except a       To accredi ng commissions or state licensing or regula-
subs tute. When a record contains personally iden fiable             tory bodies to carry out their func ons.
informa on about more than one student, the student               To parents of a dependent student, as defined in Sec-
may inspect and review only the informa on that relates               on 152 of the Internal Revenue Code.
to him/her personally.                                            To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued sub-
                                                                    poena.
Disclosure of Educa onal Records                                  To appropriate par es in health or safety emergencies.
The Illinois Ins tute of Art generally does not permit            To officials of another school, which a student seeks or
disclosure of personally iden fiable informa on from the             intends to enroll.
records of a student without prior wri en consent of the          To an alleged vic m of a crime of violence or a non-
student. Personally iden fiable informa on is disclosed              forcible sexual offense, the final results of the disci-
(some items are mandatory, some discre onary) from the              plinary proceedings conducted by the school against
records of a student without that student’s prior wri en            the alleged perpetrator of that crime or offense with
consent to the following individuals or ins tu ons or in the        respect to that crime or offense.
following circumstances:                                          To any person – not just the vic m of a crime of vio-
                                                                    lence or non-forcible sexual offense – the final results
 To the Illinois Ins tute of Art officials who have been            of the disciplinary proceedings described above but
   determined by the school to have legi mate educa-                only if the school has determined that a student is
     onal interests in the records. A school official is:             the perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible
 A person employed by the school or its corporate                 sexual offense, and with respect to the allega on made
   parent in an administra ve, supervisory, academic, or            against him or her, the student has commi ed a viola-
   research or support staff posi on. This includes, but is            on of the ins tu on’s rules or policies. (The school, in
   not limited to human resources and accoun ng staff                such instances, may only disclose the name of the per-
   for purposes of the tui on reimbursement plan; or                petrator–not the name of any other student, including



                                                    125 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
   a vic m or witness–without the prior wri en consent             Telephone number (local)
   of the other student(s)).                                       Date and place of birth
 To a parent regarding the student’s viola on of any             Program of study
   federal, state or local law or of any rules or policy of        Par cipa on in officially recognized ac vi es
   the school governing the use or possession of alcohol           Dates of a endance
   or a controlled substance if the school determines that         Degrees and cer ficates awarded
   the student has commi ed a disciplinary viola on with           Most recent previously a ended school
   respect to that use or possession, and the student is           Photograph of the student, if available
   under 21 at the me of the disclosure to the parent.             Enrollment status (i.e., enrolled, con nuing, f future
                                                                     enrolled student, reentry, leave of absence, etc.)
Directory informa on (see Sec on IV below).                        Student honors and awards received.
Student Recrui ng Informa on as requested by the U.S.              The height and weight of athle c team members
Military. Student recrui ng informa on includes ONLY:
name, address, telephone lis ng, age or date of birth, class      No ce of these categories and of the right of an individual
level, academic major, place of birth, degrees received and       in a endance at The Illinois Ins tute of Art to request that
most recent educa onal ins tu on a ended. It does not             directory informa on be kept confiden al is given to the
include and The Illinois Ins tute of Art will not provide:        student annually. Students may request nondisclosure of
social security numbers, race, ethnicity, na onality, GPA,        student directory informa on by specifying nondisclo-
grades, low performing student lists, religious affilia on,         sure, in wri ng, to the Office of the Registrar of the local
students with loans in default, veteran’s status, students        campus. Failure to request nondisclosure of directory
no longer enrolled. Students who opt out of the directory         informa on results in rou ne disclosure of one or more of
also opt out of student recrui ng informa on.                     the above-designated categories of personally iden fiable
                                                                  directory informa on.
Record of Requests for Disclosure
Except with respect to those requests made by the student         Correc on of educa onal records
themselves, those disclosures made with the wri en                Students have the right under FERPA to ask to have records
consent of the student, or to requests by or disclosures to       corrected which they believe are inaccurate, misleading or
The Illinois Ins tute of Art officials with legi mate educa-        in viola on of their privacy rights. The procedures for the
  onal interests and disclosures of directory informa on or       correc on of records:
other excep ons described in the applicable regula ons,              1. A student must ask the Director of Administra ve
The Illinois Ins tute of Art will maintain a record indicat-         and Financial Services or the Vice President or Dean of
ing the par es who have requested or obtained personally             Academic Affairs to amend a record. The student should
iden fiable informa on from a student’s educa on records              iden fy the part of the record requested to be changed
and the legi mate interests those par es had in reques ng            and specify why it is believed to be inaccurate, mislead-
or obtaining the informa on. This record may be inspected            ing or in viola on of the student’s Privacy rights.
by the student.                                                      2. The Illinois Ins tute of Art may either amend the
                                                                     record or decide not to amend the record. If it decides
Directory Informa on                                                 not to amend the record, it no fies the student of its
The Illinois Ins tute of Art designates the following infor-         decision and advises the student of the right to a hear-
ma on as directory informa on. Directory informa on is               ing to challenge the informa on believed to be inaccu-
personally iden fiable informa on which may be disclosed              rate, misleading, or in viola on of the student’s Privacy
without the student’s consent:                                       rights.
 Student’s name                                                    3. Upon request, The Illinois Ins tute of Art will ar-
 Local address, email and Web site                                 range for a hearing and no fy the student reasonably



                                                     126 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
  in advance of the date, place, and me of the hearing.              400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.
  The hearing is conducted by an individual who does not             Washington, DC 20202-4605
  have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing.
  That individual may be an official of The Illinois Ins tute       Discipline Policies and Procedures
  of Art. The student is afforded a forum for the opportu-         The Illinois Ins tute of Art recognizes its students as re-
  nity to present evidence relevant to the issues raised in       sponsible and dedicated men and women who are prepar-
  the original request to amend the student’s educa on            ing for career employment. An integral part of their career
  records. The student may be assisted by other people,           and professional development is the expecta on that they
  including an a orney.                                           conduct themselves during the educa onal process in the
  4. The Illinois Ins tute of Art prepares a wri en decision      same manner as is expected in an employment situa on.
  based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing.          The Illinois Ins tute of Art reserves the right to suspend or
  The decision includes a summary of the evidence, and            to terminate any student who displays conduct detrimental
  the reasons for the decision.                                   to the educa onal environment or to the well-being of fel-
  5. If, as a result of the hearing, The Illinois Ins tute of     low students, faculty, staff members and guests within The
  Art decides that the informa on is inaccurate, mislead-         Illinois Ins tute of Art or at any school-sponsored ac vity
  ing, or otherwise in viola on of the privacy rights of the      or facility. This includes viola ons of the following:
  student, it (a) amends the record accordingly; and (b)           Academic Honesty Policy
  informs the student of the amendment in wri ng.                  Student Conduct Policy
  6. If, as a result of the hearing, The Illinois Ins tute of      Drug-free Workplace and Campus
  Art decides that the informa on in the educa on record
  is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in viola-           Student Disciplinary Review Process
    on of the privacy rights of the student, it informs the       Any member of The Illinois Ins tute of Art community
  student of the right to place a statement in the record         i.e., faculty, staff, student, may file a complaint against any
  commen ng on the contested informa on in the record             student for misconduct or for otherwise being in viola-
  or sta ng why he or she disagrees with the decision of            on of The Illinois Ins tute of Art policies. All complaints
  the school.                                                     against individuals who violate The Illinois Ins tute of Art
  7. If a statement is placed in the educa on records             Discipline Polices should be submi ed in wri ng to the ap-
  of a student under paragraph six above, The Illinois            propriate administrator as follows:
  Ins tute of Art will: maintain the statement with the            Academic Honesty Policy viola ons should be submit-
  contested part of the record for as long as the record               ted in wri ng to the Vice President or Dean of Academ-
  is maintained; and disclose the statement whenever it                ic Affairs in the office of Academic Affairs.
  discloses the por on of the record to which the state-           Student Conduct Policy viola ons should be submi ed
  ment relates.                                                        in wri ng to the Dean of Student Affairs in the Student
                                                                       Affairs office.
Student Right to File a Complaint                                  Drug-free Workplace and Campus viola ons should be
A student has the right to file a complaint with the United             submi ed in wri ng to the Dean of Student Affairs in
States Department of Educa on concerning alleged failures              the Student Affairs office.
byte Illinois Ins tute of Art to comply with the require-
ments of FERPA. The name and address of the governmen-            Academic Honesty
tal office that administers FERPA is:                               All students who copy or otherwise plagiarize the work of
                                                                  another or who otherwise display conduct detrimental to
  Family Policy Compliance Office                                   their own academic progress are subject to disciplinary
  United States Department of Educa on                            ac on. All complaints against students regarding viola ons




                                                     127 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
of the Academic Honesty Policy should be submi ed to               during separate 24 hour periods. All assignments must be
the Vice President or Dean of Academic Affairs in wri ng.           submi ed by 1:00 a.m. (Pacific Standard Time) on the due
The Academic Department Director may convene an Aca-               date. Students taking online courses for the first me may
demic Disciplinary Panel to review statements and review           be required to complete online orienta on prior to the
relevant materials from the faculty and student(s) named           start of classes.
in the pe on. The Panel is comprised of an Academic De-
                                                                   Student par cipa on is required in addi on to submi ng
partment Director and the faculty member. The panel rec-
                                                                   formal assignments for the course. Log-ins are monitored,
ommends a course of ac on to the Vice President or Dean
                                                                   and students enrolled in online courses must adhere to
of Academic Affairs and sends a wri en copy of its recom-
                                                                   strict academic and a endance policies to remain in good
menda on to the student. Possible findings include, but
                                                                   standing.
are not limited to, no fault, placing a warning in a student’s
file, assigning a failing grade for a course or assignment,         The Illinois Ins tute of Art charges the same tui on for
recommending a term of proba on, suspension or termi-              online courses as it charges for on-ground courses. In addi-
na on. The student has the right to appeal the finding to            on, a $100.00 fee is charged for each online course taken
the Vice President or Dean of Academic Affairs within five           to cover administra ve and technical support for students.
(5) days of the no fica on. The Vice President or Dean of           Requirements for Par cipa on in Online Courses
Academic Affairs has the final authority to accept, reject or
amend the recommenda on of the panel.                              Any student interested in enrolling in online courses must
                                                                   meet with their Academic Advisor to determine if he/
                                                                   she is a good candidate for online coursework. The Online
Online                                                             Advocate reviews the student’s comfort level in an online
The Illinois Ins tute of Art offers selected online courses
                                                                   environment, the amount of me the student is avail-
through a consor um agreement with The Art Ins tute of
                                                                   able during the week, and the technology available to the
Pi sburgh - Online Division. Online classes are 5.5 or 11
                                                                   student. Candidates for online courses must be in good
weeks in length and have the same course and exit compe-
                                                                   academic standing and possess effec ve me manage-
tencies as the on ground version of the equivalent course.
                                                                   ment, problem-solving, and cri cal thinking skills, as well
Online courses are delivered in an asynchronous, web-
                                                                   as strong wri en communica on abili es.
based format so that students may be ac ve in an online
classroom at any me, from any computer that provides               The College’s Academic Advisor will be able to make the
internet access.                                                   most appropriate recommenda ons about course types
                                                                   and course loads. In order to par cipate in online classes,
The Illinois Ins tute of Art carefully reviews all course
                                                                   students must have computer hardware and so ware
descrip ons, course outcomes and course syllabi for online
                                                                   equivalent to the specifica ons indicated by The Illinois
courses to ensure that the courses offered through The Art
                                                                   Ins tute of Art.
Ins tute of Pi sburgh - Online Division have the same level
of academic integrity as the equivalent on-campus course            The Illinois Ins tute of Art regularly evaluates the online
offered at The Illinois Ins tute of Art.                            hardware and so ware class requirements to ensure that
                                                                   students taking courses through The Art Ins tute of Pi s-
Online courses are designed to take advantage of tech-
                                                                   burgh - Online Division are u lizing technology in parity
nology, making the learning environment more efficient,
                                                                   with students taking the equivalent courses on campus.
and maximizing relevance to the student’s prior learn-
                                                                   Prior to registra on each quarter, students are expected
ing and experiences. As in tradi onal on campus classes,
                                                                   to review the online courses offered that quarter. The
students are expected to complete all work and submit as-
                                                                   technology requirements specified for each course are
signments within the me periods given by the instructor
                                                                   available on the virtual campus Web site, www.aionline.
as listed on the course syllabus. Students in online courses
                                                                   edu/catalog
are required to log into the course at least four of seven
days per class week, with each of the four log-ins occurring

                                                      128 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
Registra on for Online Courses                                    If a student encounters a technical problem there is a toll
Students register for online courses during the regular           free e-College support line available 24 hours a day, 7 days
registra on period at The Illinois Ins tute of Art. Students      a week. Students may also request assistance from the
may register themselves for on campus classes, but may            Art Ins tute Online directly through their web site or by
only be registered for an online class by mee ng with their       working with The Illinois Ins tute of Art Online Advocate.
Academic Advisor. Online courses are offered in one or             Online course specific tutoring and so ware tutorials are
two sessions within the academic quarter calendar. The            offered free of charge through e-College and are available
first 5.5 week session begins at the same me the on-               to all students taking an online course via links from their
ground coursework begins at the College and runs for 38           online home pages.
days (through the Wednesday of week six of an academic
quarter). The second 5.5 week session begins 38 days prior        Textbooks
to the end of the quarter (Thursday of week six) and ends         All online courses require textbooks. The textbooks for on-
on the same day as the quarter for the College. The 11            line courses may be found in the course descrip ons area
week sessions begins and ends the same me as the on               located at The Art Ins tute of Pi sburgh - Online Division
ground coursework begins and ends. Students may only be           catalog home page, www.aionline.edu/catalog. The Art
registered for online classes during the regular registra on      Ins tute of Pi sburgh - Online Division’s textbook provider
period, regardless of how many online classes they take or        is MBS Direct. They provide 48-hour delivery for most
which sessions they wish to take them in. The same add/           textbooks. Textbooks can be purchased online or over the
drop policy and meframe is followed for both online and           phone via a toll free number using a credit card.
on-ground courses.
                                                                  Equipment
Registra on is considered to be confirmed when the
                                                                  Prior to registra on, students are provided with a list of
mandatory online academic orienta on exam has been
                                                                  the hardware and so ware required for the online courses
successfully completed. (See below.) Any student who fails
                                                                  they are considering taking. The technology requirements
to complete the online student orienta on by the ap-
                                                                  specified for each course are available on The Art Ins tute
propriate deadline will be removed from all online classes
                                                                  of Pi sburgh - Online Division virtual campus Web site,
prior to the start of the academic quarter.
                                                                  www.aionline.edu/catalog. Students may purchase their
Students who are registered only for online classes and           own equipment using an outside vendor, or use The Art In-
drop that class or classes will be considered dropped from        s tute of Pi sburgh - Online Division technology partners
school and must go through the reentry process for rein-          which may be found at The Art Ins tute of Pi sburgh - On-
statement.                                                        line Division’s home page, www.aionline.edu/campus. Stu-
                                                                  dents are not required to purchase or lease any equipment
Academic and So ware Orienta on                                   through The Illinois Ins tute of Art or The Art Ins tute of
All students taking online courses are required to success-       Pi sburgh - Online Division. Students are welcome to u -
fully complete an academic orienta on to the online class-        lize The Illinois Ins tute of Art computer labs and facili es
room prior to the beginning of their course(s). This orienta-     (including the ACE for on-campus tutoring) to successfully
  on reviews the expecta ons, policies, and procedures            complete their online classes.
associated with taking courses online. The orienta on
must be completed prior to the start of classes - please          Faculty
see the College’s Online Advocate/Academic Advisor for            Faculty who teach online courses at The Art Ins tute of
deadlines. It is impera ve that students are ready to begin       Pi sburgh - Online Division possess the same subject
working on the class at the start of the academic quarter;        ma er creden als and experience requirements as faculty
students will not have me to get orientated once the class        who teach the equivalent on-campus course at The Illinois
is underway.                                                      Ins tute of Art. In addi on, all faculty who teach online



                                                     129 Academic Policies
Academic Policies
are required to successfully complete a six-week online
training course. In most cases, faculty who teach online
courses teach comparable courses on-ground within The
Art Ins tutes system.




                                                   130 Academic Policies
Student Affairs
At The Illinois Ins tute of Art, the goal of the Student              maintaining legal status
Affairs Department is to answer the needs of the student               travel authoriza ons
whether it is for their well-being, their development as              employment benefits
a member of the community or through the educa onal                   informa on on school transfers
process of becoming a life long learner.
                                                                 The advisor also offers a variety of student ac vi es that
The primary func on of Student Affairs is to assist students
                                                                 encourage social interac on, student development, and
in comple ng the educa onal program of study by provid-
                                                                 cultural adjustment. The Interna onal Advisor will meet
ing a variety of services and ac vi es that enhance and
                                                                 with all of the new students during their first week to assist
support the academic experience. The services include
                                                                 them with life and study skills, health and safety precau-
academic advising, counseling, disability services, hous-
                                                                  ons, as well as personal and academic issues.
ing assistance, and student life programming. The extra-
curricular and co-curricular ac vi es and events offered
by the department are an integral and significant part of         On-Line Academic Advising
                                                                 All of the Academic Advisors serves as advocates for
the educa on process and the student’s experience at the
                                                                 students wishing to par cipate in alternate pla orms of
College.
                                                                 educa on. The online program enhances the academic
                                                                 experience by elimina ng the restric ons of me and
Academic Advising Services
                                                                 geographic loca on. The Advisors also serves as advocates
The Academic Advisors provide students with informa-
                                                                 and liaison staff for those students who are not physically
 on to assist them in making academic decisions and in
                                                                 present on the campus.
developing an academic plan for successful comple on of
program requirements and u liza on of the full range of
school resources.                                                Counseling Services
                                                                 The Illinois Ins tute of Art recognizes that preparing for a
Students are strongly encouraged to meet with their
                                                                 professional career is a challenging process which involves
Academic Advisor to discuss progress in their program,
                                                                 personal growth and development. The Student Sup-
and obtain current course prerequisites. This is a cri cal
                                                                 port and Disabili es Coordinator helps students with the
component of the registra on process in order to ensure
                                                                 transi on to college life, serves as a resource for students
appropriate course sequencing and course selec on for
                                                                 dealing with personal issues that impact their academic
the upcoming quarter.
                                                                 development and supports them as they make their way to
                                                                 gradua on.
Interna onal Student Advising
Students come from countries all over the world to a end         The college provides confiden al short-term counsel-
The Illinois Ins tute of Art. Student Affairs is the key con-     ing, crisis interven on, and community referral services
tact point for all of our interna onal students. The depart-     through the Wellness Corpora on Student Assistance
ment provides a variety of support services and enrich-          Program (SAP), for a wide range of concerns, including re-
ment ac vi es to help meet the needs of the interna onal         la onship issues, family problems, loneliness, depression,
community at the College.                                        and alcohol or drug abuse. Services are available 24 hours
                                                                 a day, 7 days a week. The Counseling office also offers pro-
Student Affairs assist students who come to The Illinois          grams on mental health, substance abuse and public safety
Ins tute of Art by having a designated school official,            quarter, as well as small discussion groups.
Interna onal Student Advisor, who provides support and
assistance regarding Department of Homeland Security             Disabili es Services
and procedures for nonimmigrant students such as:                The Illinois Ins tute of Art provides accommoda ons to
   obtaining and renewing visas                                qualified students with disabili es. The Disability Services




                                                     131 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
office assists qualified students with disabili es in acquir-      Student Services: Jeanne Flanagan, Dean of Student Af-
ing reasonable and appropriate accommoda ons and in             fairs, Room 504, 847-585-4551, jflanagan@aii.edu
suppor ng equal access to services, programs and ac vi-
  es at The Illinois Ins tute of Art.                           RESIDENCE LIFE & HOUSING
Students who seek reasonable accommoda ons should
no fy the Disabili es Services Coordinator (see below)
                                                                College-Sponsored Housing
of their specific limita ons and, if known, their specific
                                                                College-sponsored housing, which is available at the
requested accommoda ons. Students will be asked to
                                                                Chicago, Cincinna , Michigan, and Schaumburg campuses,
supply medical documenta on of the need for accommo-
                                                                serves the student by facilita ng a learning environment
da on. Classroom accommoda ons are not retroac ve,
                                                                that provides accommoda ons that are clean, congenial,
but are effec ve only upon the student sharing approved
                                                                comfortable, and convenient. The goal of the Residence
accommoda ons with the instructor. Therefore, students
                                                                Life & Housing program at The Illinois Ins tute of Art is
are encouraged to request accommoda ons as early as
                                                                to provide a living environment that is conducive to a
feasible with the Disability Services Coordinator to al-
                                                                student’s academic success and personal growth. The dedi-
low for me to gather necessary documenta on. If you
                                                                cated staff is commi ed to suppor ng and challenging stu-
have a concern or complaint in this regard, please contact
                                                                dents through community building ini a ves, leadership
the person responsible for Student Services (see below).
                                                                opportuni es, and accountability to community standards.
Complaints will be handled in accordance with the school’s
                                                                The goal of each staff member is to assist in developing an
Internal Grievance Procedure for Complaints of Discrimina-
                                                                environment which is encouraging, comfortable, accep ng,
  on and Harassment.
                                                                as well as conducive to the educa onal pursuit of each
                                                                resident.
Chicago and Tinley Park
Disabili es: Dr. Suzanna Flores, Mart Campus, sflores@aii.
edu                                                             Independent Housing
Student Services: Be y Kourasis, Dean of Student Affairs,        The Housing Office at the Chicago, Cincinna , Michigan,
Mart Campus, bkourasis@aii.edu                                  and Schaumburg campuses maintains a limited lis ng
                                                                of apartments within commu ng distance. Independent
Cincinna                                                        apartments are not inspected or approved by The Illinois
Disabili es: Bonnie Byrne, Dean of Student Affairs, room         Ins tute of Art. All arrangements are made between the
468, 513-833-2403, bbyrne@aii.edu                               student and the landlord.
Student Services: Bonnie Byrne, Dean of Student Affairs,
room 468, 513-833-2403, bbyrne@aii.edu                          STUDENT LIFE
Detroit
                                                                Student Life
Disabili es: Barb Murphy, Dean of Student Affairs, Ex-
                                                                Student Life is an important aspect of a student’s me at
ecu ve suite, 1st Floor, 28175 Cabot Dr., 248-675-3836,
                                                                The Illinois Ins tute of Art. The Student Affairs Depart-
bamurphy@aii.edu
                                                                ment encourages student involvement in campus life and
Student Services: Barb Murphy, Dean of Student Affairs,
                                                                promotes each student’s personal and professional growth
Execu ve suite, 1st Floor, 28175 Cabot Dr., 248-675-3836,
                                                                while a ending the College. Students will find opportuni-
bamurphy@aii.edu
                                                                 es throughout each quarter; including socials in the stu-
                                                                dent lounge, opportuni es to network with peers, faculty,
Schaumburg
                                                                and staff, diversity programming, leadership development
Disabili es: Larry Disch, Student Support/Disabili es Coor-
                                                                workshops, trips to area a rac ons, and more. These
dinator, Room 2E, 847-585-4541, ldisch@aii.edu



                                                    132 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
events are designed to promote networking among stu-
dents of diverse backgrounds and interests and to create a        Orienta on
suppor ve community within our school.                            Orienta on has always been an effort to facilitate the
The Student Affairs Department also promotes co-cur-               student’s transi on to The Illinois Ins tute of Art. This
ricular programming on campus. Through compe ons,                 event provides students an introduc on to the academic
hos ng ar sts on campus, and promo ng social awareness            environment, extracurricular life, and residence life and
events; the department provides students an opportunity           campus surroundings.
to explore different cultures, examine their social iden ty,       Each quarter, the orienta on program provides new stu-
and develop an awareness of the impact they can have on           dents with informa on about the facili es, their academic
their community.                                                  program, and services offered by the College, as well as
                                                                  giving them an opportunity to meet the faculty, staff, and
The Illinois Ins tute of Art also believes in providing stu-
                                                                  other students.
dents with opportuni es to support lifelong learning. The
Student Affairs department supports this belief by offering
                                                                  Study Trips
opportuni es for students to develop an awareness and
                                                                  The Illinois Ins tute of Art offers students different op-
understanding of diversity issues, examine their individual
                                                                  portuni es to travel abroad and enhance their personal
strengths and talents, and understand how social responsi-
                                                                  and professional experiences. Through both short and
bility can affect the environment.
                                                                  long term travel opportuni es, students can expand their
Through the many opportuni es for students to take an             horizons by exploring different countries, immersing
ac ve role in their educa on, the College hopes that the          themselves in unique cultures, mee ng new people, and
unique experiences offered at The Illinois Ins tute of Art         recognizing the impact their art can have on society.
will help students develop leadership skills, engage in cri -
                                                                  The Art Ins tutes Study Abroad Program provides students
cal thinking, experience diversity, embrace the importance
                                                                  the opportunity to gain knowledge and experience that
of community service and become a leader in their com-
                                                                  will assist them in preparing for success in a global econ-
munity and profession.
                                                                  omy. Led by instructors from The Art Ins tutes system of
                                                                  schools, programs vary in length and may be credit or non-
Student Organiza ons & Clubs
                                                                  credit bearing. The Program is open to students enrolled
There are many opportuni es for career-related ac vi es,
                                                                  in member schools of The Art Ins tutes Study Abroad
leadership opportuni es, and social interac on through
                                                                  Consor um. Students at schools that are not part of the
clubs and organiza ons. The various student organiza-
                                                                  Consor um are not eligible for the Program. Financial aid
  ons at The Illinois Ins tute of Art offer opportuni es for
                                                                  may be available for those who qualify.
students to take an ac ve part in their educa on. From
professional organiza ons, to skill building groups, to
                                                                  Student Lounge
groups where students with similar interests can gather;
                                                                  The Student Lounges and vending areas are available on
these student-run organiza ons add a vibrant energy and
                                                                  each campus and provide a comfortable, convenient gath-
opportunity for personal growth and add to the sense
                                                                  ering place for students.
of community at the College. Students ac ve in Student
Organiza ons will discover a network of peers they can
                                                                  Campus Store
connect with, learn leadership skills they can u lize long
                                                                  The Illinois Ins tute of Art Campus Store is a source of sup-
a er gradua on, hone their ability to work within a group,
                                                                  ply kits, art supplies and computer so ware. The Campus
and make the most of the skills there are learning within
                                                                  Store also provides a variety of school logo wear and gi s.
the classrooms




                                                      133 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
                                                                 ies, while some do not. But whether it is required or not,
MyAiCampus                                                       an internship is an excellent opportunity to put the skills
My AiCampus.com is The Art Ins tutes Student Portal.             learned in class into ac on and can add value to a resume.
This important tool for students of The Art Ins tutes            Career Services has an extensive database of industry
system of schools offers 24/7 online access to the cam-           contacts to help students find an internship that fits their
pus-specific informa on they need the most, including             needs. Career Services also gives students ps and tools
announcements, events, online registra on, access to             to guide them through the process. An internship can be a
student account, and a host of other great features.             tremendous learning experience that can be helpful when
                                                                 applying for an entry-level posi on in the field. Students
                                                                 are encouraged to meet with Career Services to discuss
CAREER SERVICES                                                  the steps necessary to pursue that first experience in the
The Career Services Department at The Illinois Ins tute of       industry.
Art prides itself on assis ng students and newly graduated
students to find appropriate jobs for all stages of the edu-      Graduate Assistance
ca onal process. This includes assis ng eligible students to     Once students are ready to graduate, it is me to search
pursue part- me jobs while in school, industry part- me          for full- me entry-level industry posi ons. If students have
jobs and internships later in the educa onal process, and        taken advantage of industry speakers and events spon-
entry-level industry related posi ons upon gradua on. In         sored by Career Services, joined trade industry student
addi on, the department offers instruc on on job search           groups and a ended professional organiza onal mee ngs,
strategies, resume wri ng, interviewing and networking.          they have already started the networking process. Gradu-
The staff of the Career Services department increases             ates work closely with the Career Services staff to match
employer awareness of our students and graduates’ capa-          their skills to the needs of prospec ve employers. Each
bili es through membership in professional organiza ons,         program has an advisor that provides a personalized, com-
a endance at trade shows, and on-site visits to businesses.      prehensive service tailored to the needs of the graduate.
Most importantly the staff develops and cul vates rela-           With the help of Career Services, students’ resumes are re-
  onships with employers allowing them to stay on top of         viewed, interviewing skills are honed, and the interviewing
industry trends. Addi onally, Career Services invites em-        process begins. As part of the gradua on ritual, a por olio
ployers to speak on campus, a end the quarterly Por olio         show is held that provides the graduates an opportunity to
Show, hosts job fairs, and schedules on-site interviews.         show their work to many poten al employers.. Although,
                                                                 The Illinois Ins tute of Art does not guarantee employ-
Part-Time Employment and Internship Support                      ment or any par cular level of compensa on following
If students need extra money to make ends meet, Career           gradua on, the Career Services staff works hard to cul -
Services is here to help. Career Services has a network          vate employment opportuni es for graduates and match
of local companies that depend on students as part- me           job leads with qualified candidates. Graduates who confine
workers. These companies a end school-sponsored part-            employment considera ons to one geographical area may
  me job fairs and recruit the talented students of The          limit employment opportuni es available to them.
Illinois Ins tute of Art every quarter.. As students near
gradua on, Career Services can assist in finding industry         Alumni Services
part- me work and/or internship opportuni es in their            The Illinois Ins tute of Art encourages alumni to maintain
field of study. Career Services can help students get that        contact with the school through alumni events, gallery
first taste of the industry through business contacts and         showings, exhibi ons, and mailings. More informa on
matching skills with employer needs. Some programs               about alumni benefits and services can be found on The
require an internship as a component of students’ stud-          Art Ins tutes alumni Web site: www.alumniconnec ons.
                                                                 com/ar ns tutes.



                                                     134 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
                                                                The College is required to no fy the federal government of
                                                                any drug convic on within ten days of receiving no fica-
GENERAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES                                   on from the student or otherwise receiving actual no ce
                                                                of such convic on. A student who is so convicted will be
Student Conduct Policy                                          subject to termina on and/or the loss of any approved
The Illinois Ins tute of Art recognizes its students as re-     federal or state student aid.
sponsible and dedicated men and women who are prepar-           We fully support the federal government’s ini a ve to
ing for career employment. An integral part of their career     encourage the maintenance of a drug-free environment.
and professional development is the expecta on that they        We ask all of the student’s coopera on in suppor ng this
conduct themselves during the educa on process in the           policy. The complete Alcohol and Drug Policy can be found
same manner as will be expected in all employment situa-        in the Student Handbook/Planner or on MyAiCampus.com.
  ons.
The College reserves the right to suspend or to terminate       Campus Security Policy
any student who displays conduct detrimental to the             The Illinois Ins tute of Art faculty, staff and administra on
educa onal environment or to the wellbeing of fellow stu-       are concerned that every student enjoys a safe secure stay
dents, faculty/staff members, and guests within The Illinois     with the college. Crime awareness and campus security
Ins tute of Art any sponsored ac vi es, or facili es.           are ma ers for which every student must take personal
Students who copy or otherwise plagiarize the artwork           responsibility. The Illinois Ins tute of Art Student Conduct
assignment projects of others or who otherwise display          Codes strictly prohibits the possession of weapons and the
conduct detrimental to their own or others academic             unlawful use of alcohol, controlled substances, and drugs
progress are also subject to disciplinary ac on. The above      on the campus or in off-campus housing. Viola on of these
behaviors violate The Illinois Ins tute of Art Student Con-     rules or criminal acts of any kind may result in prompt
duct Policy but this is not an exhaus ve list. The complete     disciplinary ac on including expulsion.
Student Conduct Policy can be found in the annual Student       The Illinois Ins tute of Art Campus Security Policy is
Handbook/ Planner and on MyAiCampus.com.                        distributed to every student and employee. It discusses,
                                                                among other topics, the importance of prompt report-
Alcohol and Drug Policy                                         ing of crimes to school officials and local police; campus
In accordance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988,         security procedures aimed at encouraging students and
The Illinois Ins tute of Art is commi ed, as a recipient        employees to be responsible for their own security and the
of federal aid funds for students, to provide a drug-free       security of others; counseling and other assistance avail-
workplace. The unlawful manufacture, distribu on, dis-          able from The Illinois Ins tute of Art to any student who
pensa on, possession or use of a controlled substance is        may be the vic m of a crime; and sta s cs on selected
prohibited in the workplace. Students in viola on of this       crimes that The Illinois Ins tute of Art maintains pursuant
prohibi on are subject to appropriate personnel ac on, up       to the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act. Stu-
to and including termina on.                                    dents can find Crime Report and Crime sta s cs for The
The Illinois Ins tute of Art has established a drug-free        Illinois Ins tute of Art in the annual Student Handbook/
awareness program available to all students. This program       Planner or on MyAiCampus.com. These data are publicly
provides informa on about the dangers of drug abuse, our        available on the web as described on page 3 of this catalog
policy of maintaining a drug-free environment, available        (Consumer Informa on).
drug counseling, and rehabilita on programs and the pen-
al es which may be imposed on students for drug abuse           Repor ng Criminal Ac vity
viola ons occurring at the College or in school sponsored       Any student, employee, faculty or staff member who is
housing.                                                        vic m of or witness to criminal ac vity or other emergency



                                                    135 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
should report the ac vity immediately to the nearest               This policy is applicable to all students and members of a
faculty or staff member, who, in turn, no fies the college           student club or organiza on at The Illinois Ins tute of Art.
President or Execu ve Commi ee member and the police.              Every student and member of a student club or organiza-
                                                                     on is responsible for complying with this policy.
Any observer of a sexual assault crime should no fy
security and the college President or Execu ve Commit-             Individuals and student clubs that force, require or endorse
tee member immediately. Sexual assault includes but is             viola ons are held directly responsible through the col-
not limited to rape, forced sodomy, forced oral copula-            lege’s student conduct process and if appropriate, through
  on, rape by a foreign object, sexual ba ery or threat of         local authori es, which may pursue criminal ac on.
sexual assault. It is cri cal that the rights of the vic m are     Students who wish to make a complaint under this policy
protected so that they are the one to call authori es to           should contact the Dean of Student Affairs. The negligence
accurately report the facts of the crime. The police arrive        or consent of a student or any assump on of risk by the
to review the crime, take a descrip on of the a acker,             student is not a defense to an ac on brought pursuant
and ensure that the vic m and escort are transported to            to this policy. Student club ac vi es or programs must
a medical facility. Confiden ality is required in order to          not interfere with the rights and ac vi es of others and
protect all par es involved.                                       should always reflect the best interests of the members of
Any inquiries from newspapers, employees, parents or               the organiza on it represents and the college community
other students are immediately forwarded to the college            as a whole. In all cases of alleged viola ons of this policy,
President to avoid misrepresenta on of the facts and               faculty and staff advisors and the na onal/interna onal
breach of confiden ality. Efforts are made by the college            headquarters, if applicable, of any organiza on will be
staff or faculty to help the vic m deal with any academic           no fied.
difficul es resul ng from the crime. Should a student,
faculty or staff member be accused of a crime, appropriate          Sexual Harassment Policy
disciplinary ac on is taken un l a formal inves ga on is           The Illinois Ins tute of Art is commi ed to providing
completed. The vic m is informed of any further disciplin-         workplaces and learning environments that are free from
ary ac on or appeal. Preven on is the best tool for sexual         harassment on the basis of any protected classifica on in-
assault. All staff, faculty and students should be aware of         cluding, but not limited to race, sex, gender, color, religion,
self-defense techniques and what sexual assault means.             sexual orienta on, age, na onal origin, disability, medical
                                                                   condi on, marital status, veteran status or on any other
An -hazing Policy                                                  basis protected by law. Such conduct is unprofessional, un-
Hazing involving The Illinois Ins tute of Art students or stu-     produc ve, illegal, and generally considered bad for busi-
dent groups is strictly prohibited. Hazing is defined as any        ness. Consequently, all conduct of this nature is expressly
ac on or situa on that recklessly or inten onally endan-           prohibited, regardless of whether it violates any law.
gers the mental or physical health or safety of a student
for the purpose of ini a on or admission into or affilia on          Defini on of sexual harassment
with any club or organiza on opera ng under the sanc on            Sexual harassment consists of unwelcome sexual advances,
of an ins tu on of higher educa on.                                requests for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical con-
                                                                   duct of a sexual nature where:
For purposes of this defini on, any ac vity as described in
                                                                      Submission to such conduct is an explicit implicit term
this defini on that the ini a on or admission into an af-
                                                                        or condi on of a person’s status in a course, program
filia on with a club or organiza on is directly or indirectly
                                                                        or ac vity or in admission, or in an academic decision;
condi oned shall be presumed to be a “forced” ac vity,
                                                                      Submission to or rejec on of such conduct is used as
the willingness of an individual to par cipate in such ac v-
                                                                        a basis for an academic decision; or
ity notwithstanding.




                                                       136 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
   Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreason-            College has not adequately addressed the complaint or
     ably interfering with an individual’s work or academic        concern, the student may submit a wri en complaint to:
     performance or crea ng an in mida ng, hos le, or
     offensive work or educa onal environment.                        Illinois        The Deputy Director
                                                                     residents:      Board of Higher Educa on-State of Illinois
Examples of sexual harassment include, but are not limited                           4 West Old Capitol
                                                                                     Plaza Room 500 Springfield, IL 62701
to: unwanted sexual advances; demands for sexual favors
in exchange for favorable treatment; verbal abuse of a               Ohio            Execu ve Director
sexual nature; graphic commentary about an individual’s              residents:      State Board of Career Colleges and Schools
                                                                                     35 E. Gay Street
body, sexual prowess, or sexual deficiencies; leering;                                Columbus, Ohio 43266-0591
whistling; touching; pinching; assault; coerced sexual acts;                         (877)275-4219
sugges ve, insul ng or obscene comments or gestures;                 Indiana         Execu ve Director
stalking; and displaying sexually sugges ble objects or              residents:      Indiana Commission on Proprietary Educa on
                                                                                     302 West Washington Street, Room 201
pictures. The Illinois Ins tute of Art prohibits all conduct                         Indianapolis, Indiana 46204
of this nature whether or not such conduct violates any                              (800)227-5695 or 317/232-1320
applicable laws.
                                                                     Michigan        Department of Energy, Labor & Economic
                                                                     residents:      Growth
Other Forms of Harassment                                                            P.O. Box 30004
                                                                                     Lansing, MI 4890
Verbal abuse, insul ng comments and gestures, and other                              Phone: 517-373-1820
                                                                                     Fax: 517-373-2129
harassing conduct are also forbidden under this policy
when directed at an individual because of his or her race,           Any students:   The Higher Learning Commission
color, sex, sexual orienta on, familial status, age, religion,                       230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
                                                                                     Chicago, IL 60604
ethnic origin, or disability. It is the responsibility of each
employee and each student to conduct him or herself in a
professional manner at all mes and to refrain from such            For procedures and informa on on how to file a complaint
harassment.                                                        please view the following website: www.ncahlc.org
                                                                   The school’s Arbitra on Policy contains addi onal informa-
                                                                     on regarding disputes or claims. The Arbitra on Policy
GENERAL STUDENT COMPLAINT                                          follows.

PROCEDURES                                                         Arbitra on Policy
If a student has a complaint or concern regarding any
                                                                   Every student and The Illinois Ins tute of A agrees that
aspect of The Illinois Ins tute of Art, the student should
                                                                   any dispute or claim between the student and The Illinois
first see his/her Academic Director. If the issue raised has
                                                                   Ins tute of Art (or any company affiliated with The Illinois
not been resolved in a sa sfactory manner, the student is
                                                                   Ins tute of Art, or any of its officers, directors, trustees,
directed to the Dean of Academic Affairs. If the concern
                                                                   employees or agents) arising out of or rela ng to a stu-
or complaint is s ll not adequately resolved, the student
                                                                   dent’s enrollment or a endance at The Illinois Ins tute of
may prepare a detailed wri en statement about the com-
                                                                   Art whether such dispute arises before, during, or a er the
plaint or concern, including all relevant issues that would
                                                                   student’s a endance and whether the dispute is based on
be helpful in best presen ng this concern (including the
                                                                   contract, tort, statute, or otherwise, shall be, at the stu-
names and tles of individuals involved, if any) and send or
                                                                   dent’s or The Illinois Ins tute of Art’s elec on, submi ed
give the statement to the President’s Office.
                                                                   to and resolved by individual binding arbitra on pursuant
If the student has exhausted the above procedure and has
                                                                   to the terms described herein. This policy, however, is not
s ll not received a sa sfactory response or feels that the




                                                       137 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
intended to modify a student’s right, if any, to file a griev-     in which the student resides. Upon a student’s wri en
ance with any state educa onal licensing agency.                  request, The Illinois Ins tute of Art will pay the filing fees
If a student decides to ini ate arbitra on, the student           charged by the arbitra on administrator, up to a maximum
may select either, JAMS or the Na onal Arbitra on Forum           of $3,500 per claim. Each party will bear the expense of its
(“NAF”) to serve as the arbitra on administrator pursu-           own a orneys, experts and witnesses, regardless of which
ant to its rules of procedure. If The Illinois Ins tute of Art    party prevails, unless applicable law gives a right to recover
intends to ini ate arbitra on, it will no fy the student in       any of those fees from the other party. If the arbitrator
wri ng by regular mail at the student’s latest address on         determines that any claim or defense is frivolous or wrong-
file with The Illinois Ins tute of Art, and the student will       fully intended to oppress the other party, the arbitrator
have 20 days from the date of the le er to select one of          may award sanc ons in the form of fees and expenses rea-
these organiza ons as the administrator. If the student fails     sonably incurred by the other party (including arbitra on
to select an administrator within that 20day period, The          administra on fees, arbitrators’ fees, and a orney, expert
Illinois Ins tute of Art will select one.                         and witness fees), to the extent such fees and expenses
The Illinois Ins tute of Art agrees that it will not elect to     could be imposed under Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of
arbitrate any undividable claim of less than the relevant         Civil Procedure.
jurisdic onal threshold that a student may bring in small         The Federal Arbitra on Act (FAA), 9 U.S.C. §§ 1, et seq.,
claims court (or in a similar court of limited jurisdic on        shall govern this arbitra on provision. This arbitra on
subject to expedited procedures). If that claim is trans-         provision shall survive the termina on of a student’s
ferred or appealed to a different court, however, or if a          rela onship with The Illinois Ins tute of Art. If a student
student’s claim exceeds than the relevant jurisdic onal           has a ques on about the arbitra on administrator men-
threshold The Illinois Ins tute of Art reserves the right to        oned above, the student can contact them as follows:
elect arbitra on and, if it does so, each student agrees that     JAMS, 45 Broadway, 28th Floor, New York, NY, 10006,
the ma er will be resolved by binding arbitra on pursuant         HYPERLINK “h p://www.jamsadr.com” www.jamsadr.com,
to the terms of this Sec on.                                      8003525267; Na onal Arbitra on Forum, P.O. Box 50191,
IF EITHER A STUDENT OR The Illinois Ins tute of Art               Minneapolis, MN, 55405, www.arbforum.com, 800-474-
CHOOSES ARBITRATION, NEITHER PARTY WILL HAVE THE                  2371.
RIGHT TO A JURY TRIAL, TO ENGAGE IN DISCOVERY, EXCEPT
AS PROVIDED IN THE APPLICABLE ARBITRATION RULES,
OR OTHERWISE TO LITIGATE THE DISPUTE OR CLAIM IN                  MISCELLANEOUS POLICIES
ANY COURT (OTHER THAN IN SMALL CLAIMS OR SIMILAR                  College Policies to Comply with the Higher Educa on Op-
COURT, AS SET FORTH IN THE PRECEDING PARAGRAPH, OR                portunity Act of 2008
IN AN ACTION TO ENFORCE THE ARBITRATOR’S AWARD).
FURTHER, A STUDENT WILL NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO PAR-                The unauthorized distribu on of copyrighted material, in-
TICIPATE AS A REPRESENTATIVE OR MEMBER OF ANY CLASS               cluding unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing, may subject
OF CLAIMANTS PERTAINING TO ANY CLAIM SUBJECT TO                   students and individuals to civil and criminal liabili es. Al-
ARBITRATION. THE ARBITRATOR’S DECISION WILL BE FINAL              most all of the music, movies, television shows, so ware,
AND BINDING. OTHER RIGHTS THAT A STUDENT OR The                   games and images found on the Internet are protected by
Illinois Ins tute of Art WOULD HAVE IN COURT ALSO MAY             federal copyright law. The owner of the copyright in these
NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ARBITRATION.                                  works has the right to control their distribu on, modifica-
The arbitrator shall have no authority to arbitrate claims          on, reproduc on, public display and public performance.
on a class ac on basis, and claims brought by or against          It is generally illegal therefore to use file sharing networks
a student may not be joined or consolidated with claims           to download and share copyrighted works without the
brought by or against any other person. Any arbitra on
hearing shall take place in the federal judicial district



                                                      138 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
copyright owner’s permission unless “fair use” or another           STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE FOR INTERNAL COM-
exemp on under copyright law applies.                               PLAINTS OF DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT
                                                                    Students who believe they have been subjected to dis-
Fair use under the federal Copyright Act allows the use             crimina on or harassment in viola on of this policy should
without permission of copyrighted material for the pur-             follow the procedure outlined below. This complaint
pose of cri cism, comment, news repor ng or teaching                procedure is intended to provide a fair, prompt and reliable
under certain limited circumstances. There is no blanket            determina on about whether The Illinois Ins tute of Art
excep on from liability for students or employees of                non discrimina on policy has been violated.
educa onal ins tu ons, however, and whether the use of              1. Complainants are encouraged to file a complaint as
copyrighted material without permission falls within “fair          soon as possible a er an alleged incident of discrimina on
use” or one of the other excep ons in the Act depends on            has occurred. Any student who chooses to file a discrimi-
a very detailed, case-by-case analysis of various factors.          na on complaint should do so for non-academic ma ers
Students should be aware that sharing music, videos, so -           or for academic ma ers with the person listed below. The
ware and other copyrighted materials is very likely not to          complaint should be presented in wri ng and it should
be considered a ‘fair use” and therefore may be a viola on          describe the alleged incident(s) and any correc ve ac on
of the law.                                                         sought. The complaint should be signed by the complain-
                                                                    ant.
A viola on of the ins tu on’s policy for use of its informa-        2. The person listed below will inves gate the allega-
  on technology system can result in termina on of net-               ons. Both the complainant and the accused will have
work access for the student and/or other disciplinary ac-           the opportunity to meet and discuss the allega ons with
  on including removal of the student from the ins tu on.           the inves gator and may offer any witnesses in support of
Moreover, there are severe civil and criminal penal es              their posi on to the inves gator during the course of the
for copyright infringement under federal law. A copyright           inves ga on. A student may be accompanied during in-
owner is en tled to recover actual damages and profits               ves ga on mee ngs and discussions by one person (family
resul ng from an infringement, but also may recover statu-          member, friend, etc.) who can act as an observer, provide
tory damages ranging from $750 to $30,000 per work for              emo onal support, and/or assist the student in under-
a non-willful infringement and up to $150,000 for a willful         standing and coopera ng in the inves ga on. The ob-
infringement, even if there is no proof of actual damages,          server may not be an a orney, unless otherwise required
in addi on to court costs and reasonable a orneys’ fees.            by local law. The inves gator may prohibit from a ending
The government also can file criminal charges that can               or remove any person who disrupts the inves ga on in the
result in fines and imprisonment.                                    inves gator’s sole discre on.
                                                                    3. The student who made the complaint and the accused
The College’s policies in regard to copyright infringement          shall be informed promptly in wri ng when the inves ga-
via the Internet prohibit the illegal downloading or unau-            on is completed, no later than 45 calendar days from the
thorized distribu on of copyrighted materials using the             date the complaint was filed. The student who made the
ins tu on’s informa on technology system. The College’s             complaint shall be informed if there were findings made
policies prohibit use of the College computer network to            that the policy was or was not violated and of ac ons tak-
engage in illegal copying or distribu on of copyrighted             en to resolve the complaint, if any, that are directly related
works such as by unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing              to him/her, such as an order that the accused not contact
(i.e., the sharing of copyrighted works, typically in digital or    the student who made the complaint. In accordance with
electronic files, without permission.                                school policies protec ng individuals’ privacy, the student
                                                                    who made the complaint may generally be no fied that
                                                                    the ma er has been referred for disciplinary ac on, but
                                                                    shall not be informed of the details of the recommended
                                                                    disciplinary ac on without the consent of the accused.


                                                        139 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
4. The decision of the person listed below may be ap-            Sign up for personalized e-mail no fica on at www.Emer-
pealed by pe oning the President’s Office of The Illinois          gencyClosings.com or register your contact informa on on
Ins tute of Art. The wri en appeal must be made within           Alert Find, the college’s emergency no fica on system. In
twenty calendar days of receipt of the determina on le er        Schaumburg, students may also monitor local media: TV
from the [insert tle of staff person for non-academic mat-        channels 2, 5, 7, 9, Fox, and CLTV or radio channels, WGN
ters] or [insert tle of staff person for academic ma ers].        720 and WBBM 780.
The President, or his designee, will render a wri en deci-       In Cincinna , call the College’s Weather/Emergency Condi-
sion on the appeal within thirty calendar days from receipt        ons Hot Line at 513-833-2498 or monitor local broadcast
of the appeal. The President’s decision shall be final.           media: Channel 5 WLWT (www.wlwt.com); Channel 9
5. Ma ers involving general student complaints will be ad-       WCPO (www.wcpo.com); Chanel 12 WKRC (www.wkrc.
dressed according to the Student Complaint Procedures, a         com); Channel 19 = WXIX (www.fox19.com); radio 700
copy of which can be found in the Student Handbook.              AM; or WLW (www.700wlw.com); Please keep in mind
For more informa on about your rights under the federal          to ensure the word OHIO is in the name and not The Art
laws prohibi ng discrimina on, please contact the Office           Ins tute of Cincinna , which is a different school. Students
for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Educa on or visit     who have opted in to our text messaging no fica on sys-
the website at h p://www.ed.gov/ocr.                             tem can check their mobile phones for a text message.
Chicago and Tinley Park
                                                                 In Michigan, 24-Hour Informa on about Emergency Clos-
Academic ma ers: Ken Hogue, Human Resources Manager,
                                                                 ing can be accessed at media.myfoxdetroit.com/weather/
Mart Campus, 312-777-8645, khogue@aii.edu
                                                                 school_closings.htm or by calling the school’s main num-
Non-academic ma ers: Ken Hogue, Human Resources
                                                                 ber at 248-675-3800 for closing recorded messages.
Manager, Mart Campus, 312-777-8645, khogue@aii.edu

Cincinna                                                         Guest/Visitors
Academic ma ers: Dr. Kenneth Spencer, Dean of Academic           Students, faculty, and staff members are allowed to bring
Affairs, 513-833-2468, kespencer@aii.edu                          visitors to The Illinois Ins tute of Art provided that the
Non-academic ma ers: Bonnie Byrne, Dean of Student Af-           student, faculty or staff member escorts the visitor at all
fairs, 513-833-2403, bbyrne@aii.edu                                mes while on school property. Guests/Visitors are NOT
                                                                 allowed in classrooms, the library, computer labs or other
Detroit                                                          workspaces without direct and prior consent of the Dean
Academic ma ers: Marc Sherrod, Dean of Academic Af-              of Academic Affairs.
fairs, Suite 120, 28125 Cabot Drive Building, 248-675-3817,
msherrod@aii.edu                                                 All guests must sign in and be issued a visitor’s badge (a
Non-academic ma ers: Karen Zuliani, 248-675-3841                 driver’s license or other id must be le as security for the
                                                                 visitor’s badge).
Schaumburg                                                       Faculty and staff members who expect guest speakers or
Academic ma ers: Dr. Robert L. Brown, Dean of Academic           other visitors must no fy the Front Desk in advance so the
Affairs, 847-585-4535, rbrown@aii.edu                             Recep onist can properly greet and appropriately direct
Non-academic ma ers: Geri Tapling, Human Resources,              the guests/visitors.
847-585-4529, gtapling@aii.edu
                                                                 Telephone Usage
School Closing Informa on                                        The Illinois Ins tute of Art cannot operate a telephone
In Chicago, Schaumburg, and Tinley Park, 24-hour informa-        message service for students. Only in the case of a genuine
  on about emergency closing can be accessed in the fol-         emergency is a message taken for a student.
lowing ways: Online: www.EmergencyClosings.com E-mail:



                                                     140 Student Conduct
Student Affairs
Appropriate A re                                                 Smoking
Students are requested to dress appropriately for their          The Illinois Ins tute of Art is a smoke-free environment,
profession while a ending The Illinois Ins tute of Art.          and all faculty and staff strictly enforce this restric on.

Property Rights                                                  Illness or Injury
The Illinois Ins tute of Art is not responsible for the          In the event of illness or injury to a student on school
personal property of the students (e.g. books, supplies,         premises or at a sponsored func on of The Illinois Ins tute
equipment, and clothing). The student should put their           of Art, the student may request to be transported to a local
name and number on all items of value. Equipment serial          hospital emergency room or doctor for examina on and
numbers should be recorded and kept in a safe place.             treatment if necessary. The student should review personal
Students should review their personal property/homeown-          or family insurance policies to determine whether appro-
ers insurance and automobile comprehensive insurance             priate coverage exists.
policies to determine whether valuable equipment (such
as cameras) would be covered in the event of the or loss.        Student Liability
                                                                 Physical injury or other medical problems, including loss or
Property of The Illinois Ins tute of Art                         damage to personal property resul ng from fire, the , or
The student is responsible for any The Illinois Ins tute         other causes, are not the responsibility of The Illinois In-
of Art’s books or equipment used or checked out and is           s tute of Art. The college recommends that students carry
responsible for the cost of repair or replacement of such        personal insurance.
items in the event they are damaged or lost.

Exhibi on of Student Work
Student artwork is important to The Illinois Ins tute of Art
and The Art Ins tutes system of schools. It is of great ben-
efit in teaching other students and in demonstra ng the
nature and value of the programs. Artwork is used by ad-
missions representa ves to show prospec ve students and
counselors what students have achieved. Student artwork
is also a basic part of the catalog and other publica ons
and exhibi ons illustra ng the programs at the school. The
Illinois Ins tute of Art reserves the right to make use of
the artwork of its students for such purposes, with student
permission. The Illinois Ins tute of Art also reserves the
right to select artwork that is appropriate to a given cir-
cumstance and may choose not to display work that might
be viewed as objec onable by some audiences. The Illinois
Ins tute of Art is not responsible for loss or damage of
student property including artwork or tapes.

Rights to Artwork
The school reserves the right to use samples of student
work and photographs, video or film of students.




                                                     141 Student Conduct
Faculty & Administra on
FACULTY                                  Ka e Crain                            Jacob Banstra                         J. Geoff Felsenthal, CEC, CHE
                                         Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-       Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna          Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Adver sing                               burg Campus                           Campus                                Campus
                                         M.A., Columbia College                B.A., Michigan State University       A.S., California Culinary Academy
John Becker                              B.S., Illinois State University       A.A. , Western Culinary Ins tute
Full- me Professor, Schaumburg                                                                                       Mike Geiger
Campus                                   Nathan Edwards                        Eric Bell                             Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Ph.D., Union Ins tute                    Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-       Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago      Campus
                                         burg Campus                           Campus                                B.A., University of Michigan-
Tom Conley                               M.Music, Northern Illinois Univer-    M.B.A., Indiana University            Dearborn
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-          sity                                  B.A., Purdue University               A.S., Schoolcra College
burg Campus                              B. Music, University of Wisconsin
M.B.A, University of Chicago                                                   Geraldine Bielefeld                   Joel Gi ens
B.A., Columbia College                   Teri A. Grossheim                     Full- me Senior Instructor, Cincin-   Full- me Instructor, Cincinna
                                         Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago      na Campus                             Campus
Herbert H. Grout                         Campus                                B.S., University of Houston           B.A., Johnson & Wales University
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago         M.S., Indiana University, India-      A.A., The Culinary Ins tute of        A.S., Johnson & Wales University
Campus                                   napolis                               America
M.Comm., Southern Illinois Uni-          B.M., University of Wisconsin,                                              Freeman Gunnel
versity                                  Oshkosh                               Deborah A. Bosco, CHE                 Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
B.A., Southern Illinois University                                             Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-    Campus
                                         Bre M. Masteller                      cago Campus                           B.S., Michigan State University
Elisa Hillock                            Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago       M.B.A., Argosy University             A.A.S., Schoolcra College
Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-         Campus                                B.A., Kendall College
burg Campus                              M.A., State University of New York,   A.A.S., Kendall College               John Hagerman
M.F.A., University of Illinois-Chicago   Buffalo                                                                      Full- me Instructor, Cincinna
                                         B.A., State University of New York,   Massimo Bosco                         Campus
Andrew Sobol                             Buffalo                                Part- me Associate Professor,         B.P.S., Culinary Ins tute of America
Part- me Faculty Member, Schaum-                                               Chicago Campus                        A.O.S., Culinary Ins tute of America
burg Campus                              Sco L. NielsenSco                     M.A., Webster University
M.F.A., Northern Illinois University     Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago       B.A., Kendall College                 Ramon Herrera
B.F.A., Northern Illinois University     Campus                                A.A.S., Kendall College               Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit
                                         M.F.A., Yale University                                                     Campus
Susan A. Wrzesinski                      B.A., University of California, San   Julie L. Brown                        M.A., Easter Michigan University
Full- me Master Instructor, Chicago      Diego                                 Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago       B. A.S., Siena Heights University
Campus                                                                         Campus
M.Ed., University of Illinois                                                  B.A., Northern Illinois University    Ellio Hilton
B.A., Saint Xavier University            Culinary Arts                                                               Full- me Instructor, Cincinna
                                                                               Greg Campbell                         Campus
                                         Emma Afshin                           Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit      M.B.A., Waynesburg University
Audio Produc on                          Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago       Campus                                B.S., Youngstown State University
                                         Campus                                A.O.S., The Culinary Ins tute of      A.A.S., Butler County Community
Andrew R. Alton                          B.S., Lexington College, Chicago      America                               College
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago          A.A.S., Le Cordon Bleu, Chicago
Campus                                                                         Laura Cervi                           Michael D. Howe, CEC, CHE
M.M.Ed., Vandercook College of           Leslie R. Andrews                     Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit       Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Music                                    Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago       Campus                                Campus
B.M., Berklee College of Music           Campus                                M.S., Central Michigan University     M.B.A., Argosy University
                                         M.S., Roosevelt University            B.S., Wayne State University          B.S., Johnson & Wales University
Michael Anderson                         B.A., DePaul University                                                     A.S., Johnson & Wales University
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-                                                Robert D. Childers, CEC, CHE
burg Campus                              Dave Balla                            Full- me Master Instructor, Chicago   Christopher D. Kaminski, CEC
M.S., Northern Illinois University       Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit      Campus                                Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
B.S., Northern Illinois University       Campus                                B.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art        Campus
                                         B.S., Eastern Michigan University     A.A.S., Cooking & Hospitality Ins -   A.A.S., Washburne Trade School
Ryan Black                               A.S., Eastern Michigan University     tute of Chicago
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-                                                                                      Colleen M. Karsted
burg Campus                              Luci Banker                           Carolyn Culver                        Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
M.A., University of Michigan             Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit       Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit      Campus
B.F.A., University of Michigan           Campus                                Campus                                B.A., Kendall College
                                         Ph.D., Capella University             M.S., Madonna University              A.A., Kendall College
Regina M. Charles-Williams               M.S.A., Central Michigan University   B.A., Michigan State University
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago          B.A., Michigan State University       A.S., Oakland Community College       Isidore S. Kharasch
Campus                                   A.A.S., Oakland University                                                  Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
M.A., Ohio University                                                          Dave Daniot                           Campus
B.S., Ohio University                                                          Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit      M.S., Manfred Steinfeld School of
                                                                               Campus                                Hospitality & Tourism Mgmt.
                                                                               B.A.S., Art Ins tute Online           B.A., Kendall College
                                                                                                                     A.A., Culinary Ins tute of America



                                                               142 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Stephanie M. Konkol                      A.A., Cooking & Hospitality Ins tute   Rob Sierota                             Caroline C. Wang
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago          of Chicago                             Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit        Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                                                                          Campus                                  Campus
B.A., Northern Illinois University       William Nicklosovich                   A.A.S., Schoolcra College               B.S., University of Illinois
                                         Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit                                                A.O.S., Culinary Ins tute of America
Sarah Koob                               Campus                                 Thomas E. Smiley
Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna                                                    Full- me Assistant Professor, Chi-      Amelia E. Wolf
Campus                                   Michael A. Paladines                   cago Campus                             Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
A.O.S., The Culinary Ins tute of         Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       M.B.A., Drexel University               Campus
America                                  Campus                                 B.S., James Madison University          B.A., Rollins College, Winter Park,
                                                                                A.S., Johnson & Wales University        Florida
David Koshizawa                          Kate Pa erson
Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit         Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna           Greg Stange                             John Zenk
Campus                                   Campus                                 Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit         Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna
B.S., Michigan State University          B.F.A., University of Florida          Campus                                  Campus
A.S., Schoolcra College                                                         A.A.S., The Art Ins tute of Colorado    A.A.B., Cincinna State
                                         Anthony Picino
Maria H. Kostas                          Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit       J. Mark Stanley
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago          Campus                                 Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Digital Filmmaking & Video Pro-
Campus                                   A.S., Pennsylvania Ins tute of         Campus                                  duc on
M.A., Na onal Louis University           Culinary Arts                          B.S., Loyola University
                                                                                                                        Sco Culmen
Jeanne L. Kraus                          Nicholaus R. Rajski                    Greg Stroker                            Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago         Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago       Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit         burg Campus
Campus                                   Campus                                 Campus                                  M.F.A., Art Ins tute of Chicago
B.S., Southern Illinois University       B.A.S., Illinois Ins tute of Art,      B.S., Michigan State University         B.F.A., Webster University
                                         Chicago                                A.A.S., Schoolcra College
John P. Laloganes                        A.A.S., Cooking Hospitality Ins tute                                           Shannon Farney
Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago         of Chicago                             Elizabeth L. Sweeney                    Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna
Campus                                                                          Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Campus
B.S., University of Wisconsin - Stout    Paul Resetar                           Campus                                  M.F.A., Savannah College of Art and
                                         Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna           B.S., University of Nebraska, Lincoln   Design
Andrew Lehmann                           Campus                                                                         B.A., Kenyon College
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit          M.S., Central Michigan University      Bill Thompson
Campus                                   B.S., Penn State University            Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit        Richard Fiore
B.A., Augustana College                                                         Campus                                  Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-
A.A., Schoolcra College                  Seth D. Rickard                        B.S., Grand Valley State University     burg Campus
                                         Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       A.S., Oakland Community College         M.A., Columbia College
Bruce Lilley                             Campus                                                                         B.A., Northeastern Illinois Univ.
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit          M.Ed., American Intercon nental        Linda J. Trakselis
Campus                                   University                             Part- me Assistant Professor, Chi-      Adam M. Gould
B.S., Johnson And Wales University       B.A., Michigan State University        cago Campus                             Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
A.S., Johnson And Wales University                                              M.S.Ed., Northern Illinois University   Campus
                                         Michael Riley                          B.S.Ed., Northern Illinois University   M.F.A., Savannah College of Art and
Dene a Lyons                             Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago                                               Design
Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit         Campus                                 Sabre T. Tyler                          B.A., University of Michigan
Campus                                   B.B.A., Western Illinois University    Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
B.F.S., Johnson & Wales University       A.O.S., Cooking & Hospitality Ins -    Campus                                  Chaslav S. Krs ch
A.S., Johnson & Wales University         tute of Chicago                        B.S., Illinois Ins tute of Art - Chi-   Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
                                                                                cago                                    Campus
Mark P. Maasen                           Michael Schafer                        A.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art - Chi-   B.A., Southern Illinois University
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago          Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit        cago
Campus                                   Campus                                                                         Dean Lemon
B.A., Eastern Michigan University        J.D., University of Detroit            Richard L. Valente                      Full- me Instructor, Cincinna
                                         B.A., University of California-Santa   Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Campus
Jim Moschini                             Barbara                                Campus                                  M.S., Clarion University
Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit                                                M.A., Roosevelt University              B.A., University of Southern Cali-
Campus                                   Peachy Seiden                          B.A., Michigan State University         fornia
M.P.H., University of Illinois Medical   Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna
Center                                   Campus                                 Judy Walsh                              Katharine J. Mahalic
B.A., University of Illinois – Chicago   M.S., Rush University                  Full- me Senior Instructor, Cincin-     Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
A.S., Oakland Community College          B.S., Loyola University                na Campus                               Campus
                                                                                B.S., Johnson and Wales University      M.F.A., Columbia College, Chicago
Elissa Narow                             Maria Selas                            A.A.S., Johnson and Wales Univer-       B.A., Michigan State University
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago          Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago       sity
Campus                                   Campus
B.S., John M. Olin School of Busi-       B.A., University of Illinois, Urbana
ness, Washington University




                                                               143 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Jennifer A. Moore                       Photography                          Nicole Boury                            Alice J. Maranto
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago                                             Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                                  Ben Colman                           Campus                                  Campus
M.A., Governors State College, IL       Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit      B.A., University of Wisconsin- Madi-    B.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of
B.A., Governors State College, IL       Campus                               son                                     Chicago
A.S., Moraine Valley                    M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art     B.S., University of Wisconsin- Madi-
                                        B.S., University of Michigan         son                                     Nina M. McGowan
Jeffrey Nielsen                                                               A.A.S., Fashion Ins tute of             Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna            Andrew Doak                          Technology                              Campus
Campus                                  Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit                                              B.A., Ray College of Design
M.A., Eastern New Mexico Uni-           Campus                               Alisa Caron                             B.A., University of Illinois
versity                                 M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art     Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
M.A., Eastern New Mexico Uni-           B.A., Sewanee                        Campus                                  Aubrie J. Meyer
versity                                                                      B.F.A., University of Illinois          Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
B.A., University of Minnesota           John Foj k                           A.A.S., Fashion Ins tute of             Campus
                                        Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-      Technology                              B.S., North Texas State University
Steven A. Ordower                       burg Campus
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         M.A., Aus n Presbyterian Seminary    Veronica D. Chin                        Zoya Nudelman
Campus                                  B.A., University of Texas            Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
M.A., Columbia College, Chicago                                              Campus                                  Campus
B.A., University of Wisconsin           Margaret P. Gentleman                M.S., University of Wisconsin           M.F.A., Ellis College of New York
                                        Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago     B.F.A., Stephens College                Ins tute of Technology
Danielle Paz                            Campus                                                                       B.F.A., Columbus College of Art &
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         M.F.A., Art Ins tute of San Fran-    Constance W. Collins                    Design
Campus                                  cisco                                Full- me Master Instructor, Chicago
M.F.A., University of Chicago           B.F.A., Columbia College             Campus                                  Mary A. Opalk
B.F.A., Savannah College of Art &                                            B.A., Indiana University                Full- me Senior Instructor, Chicago
Design                                  Nicole A. Grangruth                                                          Campus
                                        Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago     Debra L. Duggan                         M.F.A., University of Cincinna
Andrew Roche                            Campus                               Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         B.A., Mount Mary College
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-         M.F.A., Columbia College             Campus                                  B.F.A., Bowling Green State
burg Campus                             B.A., St. Olaf College               B.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of   University
M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute-                                          Chicago
Chicago                                 Manol Gueorguiev                                                             Hildegard Fischchen O’Shea
BFA, University of Iowa                 Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-      Catherine Eisler                        Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
                                        burg Campus                          Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Campus
Dick Rockwell                           M.A., University of Chicago          Campus                                  B.A., Universitaet des Landes
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit         B.S., University of Illinois         B.F.A., Minneapolis College of Art &    Hessen
Campus                                                                       Design
M.A., Wayne State University            Samantha A. VanDeman                                                         Jeanne M. O enweller
B.A., Oakland University                Adjunct Faculty Member, Tinley       Yoshiko Fredisdorf                      Full- me Assistant Professor,
                                        Park Campus                          Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Chicago Campus
David R. Schmudde                       M.F.A., Art Ins tute of Boston at    Campus                                  M.B.A., Dominican University
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Lesley University                    A.A.S., Bunka Fashion College,          M.S., Drexel University
Campus                                  B.F.A., Columbia College - Chicago   Tokyo                                   B.F.A., Minneapolis College of Art &
M.M., Northwestern University                                                                                        Design
B.A., University of Northern Iowa       Sarah Zimmer                         Veronica Gutman
                                        Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit      Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Priya Pandey
Jeremy Schulz                           Campus                               Campus                                  Part- me Assistant Professor,
Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-                                             M.F.A., Academy of Art, San Francis-    Chicago Campus
burg Campus                                                                  co                                      M.S., University of Bombay
M.A., Northern Illinois University      Fashion Design                       B.F.A., Parsons School of Design        B.S., University of Bombay
B.F.A., Northern Illinois University
                                        Patricia M. Beernink                 Susan Holton                            Nancy E. Plummer
Bruce Scivally                          Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago      Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Campus                               Campus                                  Campus
Campus                                  B.S., Iowa State University          B.A., St. John’s College                M.S., Roosevelt University
B.A., University of Southern Califor-                                        A.A., American Academy of Art           B.S., Miami University, Ohio
nia, Los Angeles                        Brandon K. Blackshear
                                        Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago     Jacqueline Y. Johnson                   Sharon K. Shoji
Emily Ullrich                           Campus                               Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Adjunct Faculty Member, Cincinna        M.S., Florida State University       Campus                                  Campus
Campus                                  B.A., Florida State University       A.A., Ray College of Design             B.J., University of Missouri - Colum-
                                                                                                                     bia
Michael N.J. Wright                                                                                                  B.S., University of Missouri - Colum-
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago                                                                                      bia
Campus




                                                             144 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Heather L. Silecchia                    Harry Derderian                           Karen L. Krantz                         Elizabeth Robbins
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit           Full- me Associate Professor,           Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Campus                                  Campus                                    Chicago Campus                          Campus
B.S., Michigan State University         M.B.A., Western New England               M.B.A., DePaul University               M.A., Michigan State University
A.A., Fashion Ins tute of Technol-      College                                   B.S., University of Wisconsin           B.A., The University of Michigan -
ogy                                     B.S., Boston University                                                           Dearborn
                                                                                  Mary Ann Lorenz
Pamela A. Vanderlinde                   Susan J. Dihu                             Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Rebecca Robinson
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago          Campus                                  Full- me Instructor, Cincinna
Campus                                  Campus                                    B.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art - Chi-   Campus
B.S., Purdue University                 M.B.A., Dominican University              cago                                    M.Des., University of Cincinna
                                        B.A., University of Illinois at Chicago                                           B.S., Ohio State University
William T. Walton                                                                 Lawrence D. Mages
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         Valen na Dimitrieski                      Full- me Assistant Professor,           Daniel M. Robison
Campus                                  Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit          Chicago Campus                          Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
                                        Campus                                    M.B.A., University of Phoenix           Campus
Erick G. Wilcox                         M.A., Wayne State University              B.A., University of Arizona             M.B.A., DePaul University
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         B.S., Wayne State University                                                      B.S.C., DePaul University
Campus                                                                            Chris ne Mardegan
B.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of   Sarah Eichhorn                            Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Stephanie A. Schuller
Chicago                                 Adjunct Faculty Member,                   Campus                                  Full- me Associate Professor,
                                        Schaumburg Campus                         B.A., Interna onal Academy of           Chicago Campus
                                        M.F.A., Florida State University          Merchandising & Design                  M.B.A., Argosy University
Fashion Marke ng & Management           B.F.A., Intl Academy of Design &                                                  B.A., Interna onal Academy of
                                        Tech                                      Holly Mosher                            Merchandising & Design
Barbara Altwerger                                                                 Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit         Stella Estrella                           Campus                                  Ma hew Schwartz
Campus                                  Adjunct Faculty Member,                   M.S., Eastern Michigan University       Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
M.A., Wayne State University            Schaumburg Campus                         B.S., Eastern Michigan University       Campus
B.S., Wayne State University            M.B.A./M.G.G., University of                                                      M.B.A., University of Phoenix
                                        Phoenix                                   Shireen Musa                            B.B.A., Northwood University
Stefani Bay                             B.A., Dominican University                Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Full- me Associate Professor,                                                     Campus                                  Harvey R. Shoemack
Chicago Campus                          Phyllis A. Greensley                      M.B.A., Saint Peter’s College, New      Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
M.A., Roosevelt University              Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago          Jersey                                  Campus
B.A., Bradley University                Campus                                    B.S., State University of New York      B.S., Ohio University
                                        B.S., Northern Illinois University        - FIT
Devon Byrne                                                                                                               Peter J. Sigiols
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Anne Forman                               Richard Petrizzi                        Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                                  Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago          Full- me Associate Professor,           Campus
M.S., Loyola University                 Campus                                    Chicago Campus                          M.B.A., Loyola University, Chicago
B.A., Lake Forest College               M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of     M.B.A., Lake Forest Graduate            J.D., John Marshall Law School
                                        Chicago                                   School of Management                    B.B.A., Loyola University, Chicago
Brian Caperton                          B.A., University of Pennsylvania          B.S., University of Illinois
Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna                                                                                              Mark Stephens
Campus                                  Sandra Henderson Williams                 Joi Pra                                 Adjunct Faculty Member,
M.B.A., Northern Kentucky               Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago          Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         Schaumburg Campus
University                              Campus                                    Campus                                  M.B.A., Stuart Graduate University
B.B.A., Thomas More College             M.B.A., Argosy University                 M.B.A., Ross School of Business,        B.S.E.E., Northwestern University
                                        B.S., University of Illinois              University of Michigan
Linda Clark                                                                       B.A., University of Virginia            Deanna Stepp
Full- me Associate Professor,           Nupur Jain                                                                        Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Cincinna Campus                         Full- me Faculty Member,                  Charles Richardson                      Campus
M.B.A., University of Phoenix           Schaumburg Campus                         Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna            M.B.A., The University of Phoenix
B.A., Avere College                     M. Design, University of Cincinna         Campus                                  M.B.A., The University of Phoenix
                                        B.A., Hindu College, Delhi University     M.B.A., Indiana University              B.S., The University of Phoenix
James Day                               Assoc., South Delhi Polytechni India      B.S., Central State University          B.S., The University of Phoenix
Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna
Campus                                  Nancy K. Jensen                           John Riester                            Ashley L. Swint
M.B.A., Northern Kentucky               Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago          Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna            Part- me Faculty Member, Tinley
University                              Campus                                    Campus                                  Park Campus
B.F.A., University of Kansas            B.F.A., University of Illinois            M.B.A., Shippensburg University         M.B.A., Argosy University
                                                                                  B.S.., Shippensburg University          B.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art - Chi-
Maria Demetriades                       Mary Kramer-Storey                                                                cago
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit
Campus                                  Campus
B.A., The Illinois Ins tute of          M.A., Wayne State University
Art-Chicago                             B.F.A., Wayne State University




                                                              145 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Fern Szymborski                         Zachary J. Buchner                       Jill Jepsen                             Nancy L. Rosenheim
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago         Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit         Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                                  Campus                                   Campus                                  Campus
M.A., DePaul University                 M.F.A., Northwestern University          M.F.A., Western Michigan Univer-        M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute
B.A., DePaul University                 B.F.A., Bowling Green State              sity                                    of Chicago
A.A., Harold Washington College         University                               B.A., Hope College                      B.F.A., School of Visual Arts

Tammy Tavassoli                         Ellen Campbell                           Janet Leszczynski                       Cynthia Sarris
Part- me Faculty Member,                Part- me Assistant Professor,            Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-      Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit
Schaumburg Campus                       Chicago Campus                           cago Campus                             Campus
M.B.A., American Intercon nental        M.F.A., University of Chicago            M.F.A., Northern Illinois University    M.F.A., Eastern Michigan University
B.S., Northern Illinois                 B.F.A., Rhode Island School of           M.A., Northern Illinois University      B.A.E., Eastern Michigan University
                                        Design                                   B.A., Rosary College                    B.F.A., Eastern Michigan University
Anne Tobe
Full- me Instructor, Cincinna           Christopher Cannon                       Jonathan D. Lozano                      Stephanie Sarris
Campus                                  Adjunct Faculty Member,                  Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit
M.S., South Dakota State University     Schaumburg Campus                        Campus                                  Campus
B.S., Bowling Green State University    M.F.A., Northern Illinois University     M.F.A., University of Illinois - Chi-   M.F.A., Cranbook Academy of Art
                                        B.F.A., Wayne State Universit            cago                                    B.F.A., University of Michigan
Laren Topor                                                                      B.F.A., University of Houston
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit         Elizabeth Chevalier                                                              Neva I. Sills
Campus                                  Full- me Associate Professor,            Michael E. Manthey                      Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
M.S., Eastern Michigan University       Schaumburg Campus                        Full- me Assistant Professor, Chi-      Campus
B.S., Michigan State University         M.F.A., University of Illinois-Chicago   cago Campus                             M.F.A., University of Iowa
                                        B.F.A., Moore College of Art/Design      M.F.A., University of Wisconsin         B.F.A., University of Wisconsin-
Katherine A. Trainer                                                             B.S., University of Wisconsin           Madison
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Helena Craules
Campus                                  Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago          Eddwin Meyers                           Casey L. Smallwood
M.B.A., Argosy University               Campus                                   Part- me Professor, Chicago             Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
B.A., Ohio State University             M.F.A., Michigan State University        Campus                                  Campus
                                        B.A., University of Texas, Browns-       M.F.A., Southern Illinois University    M.F.A., University of Chicago
Jeanne M. Tyler                         ville                                    B.A., Southern Illinois University      B.F.A., Missouri State University
Full- me Associate Professor,                                                    A.S., Rock Valley College
Chicago Campus                          Melinda D. Day                                                                   Joyce M. Speechley
M.F.A., Indiana University              Adjunct Faculty Member, Tinley           John Opera                              Adjunct Faculty Member, Tinley
B.A., Iowa State University             Park Campus                              Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         Park Campus
                                        M.S.Ed, Indiana University               Campus                                  M.A., Governors State University
Marcela Watkins                         B.S., Bowling Green State University     M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute      B.F.A., Northern Illinois University
Adjunct Faculty Member,                                                          of Chicago
Schaumburg Campus                       Brian Ferriby                            B.F.A., State University of New York    Valerie I. Taglieri
B.A., Marymount University              Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit                                                 Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
                                        Campus                                   Jason T. Pallas                         Campus
                                        M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art         Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         M.F.A., Columbia College, Chicago
Founda ons                                                                       Campus                                  B.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of
                                        Gary Fox                                 M.F.A., University of Chicago           Chicago
Christopher D. Arnold                   Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-         B.A., Rice University
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        burg Campus                                                                      Joseph Turner
Campus                                  M.S., Illinois State University          Amanda Parker                           Part- me Assistant Professor, Scha-
M.F.A., Savannah College of Art and     B.S., Illinois State University          Full- me Assistant Professor, Cin-      umburg Campus
Design                                                                           cinna Campus                            M.F.A., Northern Illinois University
B.F.A., University of Missouri,         Gary N. Gordon                           M.F.A., University of Cincinna          B.F.A., Ohio University
Columbia                                Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-       B.F.A., University of Dayton
                                        cago Campus                                                                      Vassilen Vasevski
Eric C. Ashcro                          M.F.A., University of Chicago            Alyson I. Pouls                         Part- me Assistant Professor, Chi-
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         B.F.A., Indiana University Northwest     Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago        cago Campus
Campus                                                                           Campus                                  M.F.A., Academy of Fine Arts, Sofia
M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of   Mark Hanavan                             M.A., University of the Arts, Phila-    A.S., Indiana-Purdue University
Chicago                                 Full- me Assistant Professor, Cin-       delphia
B.F.A., University of Montana           cinna Campus                             B.F.A., University of the Arts,
                                        M.F.A., University of Cincinna           Philadelphia                            Game Art & Design
Chris ne A. Boos                        B.F.A., University of Cincinna
Full- me Professor, Chicago                                                      Reid Radcliffe                           Jiba Anderson
Campus                                  Travis Jensen                            Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna            Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-
M.F.A., University of Chicago           Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-      Campus                                  umburg Campus
B.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of   umburg Campus                            M.F.A., University of Cincinna          M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute-
Chicago                                 M.F.A., Northern Illinois                B.F.A., Art Academy of Cincinna         Chicago
B.S., Iowa State University             B.F.A., Northern Illinois University                                             B.F.A., University of Michigan
                                        A.A., Kishwauskee Community
                                        College



                                                              146 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Alex Damarjian                        Bridget B. Gannon                      Cynthia Kerby                           Sonal Patel
Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago      Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       Full- me Professor, Chicago             Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
Campus                                Campus                                 Campus                                  burg Campus
M.A., Columbia College                M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute     M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute      M.A.M.S., University of Illinois-
B.A., Columbia College                of Chicago                             of Chicago                              Chicago
                                      B.F.A., Virginia Commonwealth          B.F.A., Center for Crea ve Studies,     B.S., University of Illinois-Chicago
Brian Kerr                            University                             College of Art & Design                 Assoc., American Academy of Art-
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-                                                                                      Chicago
burg Campus                           Michelle Garrelts                      Timothy King
M.F.A., Miami Intl University         Full- me Assistant Professor, Scha-    Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-         Donald J. Pollack
B.F.A., Ill Ins tute of Art-Schaum-   umburg Campus                          burg Campus                             Part- me Professor, Chicago
burg                                  B.F.A., Ill Ins tute of Art-Schaum-    M.F.A., Northern Illinois               Campus
                                      burg                                   M.A., University of Tulsa               M.F.A., Ohio State University
Ed Kerr                                                                      B.F.A., Kansas City Art Ins tute        B.F.A., University of Illinois
Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-   Charles E. Gniech
umburg Campus                         Full- me Professor, Chicago            Roberta C. Kozuch                       Karen Puleo
M.A., Argosy University               Campus                                 Full- me Professor, Chicago             Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
B.A., North Park                      M.F.A., Northern Illinois University   Campus                                  burg Campus
                                      B.F.A., Northern Illinois University   M.S., Ins tute of Design, Illinois      M.A., University of Vermont
                                                                             Ins tute of Technology                  B.A., DePaul University
Graphic Design                        Stuart Grais                           B.A., Northeastern Illinois Univer-
                                      Part- me Faculty Member, Schaum-       sity                                    Ann Rintz
Joseph Abiera                         burg Campus                                                                    Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
Part- me Faculty Member, Schaum-      M.S., DePaul University                Michael Lang                            burg Campus
burg Campus                           M.F.A., The School of the Art Ins -    Full- me Instructor, Cincinna           M.F.A., Northern Illinois University
M.E.D., American Intercon nental      tute of Chicago                        Campus                                  M.A., Northern Illinois University
B.S., Illinois State University                                              M.S., College of New Rochelle           B.F.A., Northern Illinois University
                                      Daniel Hanners                         B.A., Ohio Dominican University
Elizabeth Borrowman                   Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-                                               Michael Sarnacki
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-       burg Campus                            Amy Lipinski                            Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
burg Campus                           M.A., Northern Illinois                Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-         Campus
M.F.A., Northwestern University       B.F.A., Ill Ins tute of Art-Schaum-    burg Campus                             M.A., Wayne State University
B.F.A., Kansas City Art Ins tute      burg                                   M.A., North Central                     M.A., Western Michigan University
                                                                             B.A., Purdue University                 B.A., Western Michigan University
Janice Braverman                      William Haun
Full- me Instructor, Cincinna         Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-        Charles Mar n                           Lisa Selvia
Campus                                burg Campus                            Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna            Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna
M.F.A., The Ohio State University     M.F.A., Northern Illinois University   Campus                                  Campus
B.S., University of Cincinna          B.F.A., Northern Illinois University   M.F.A., University of Cincinna          M.F.A., Goddard College
                                                                             B.F.A., College of Mt. St. Joseph       B.S., University of Kentucky
Tom Collins                           Michael Heliker                        AAS, Ohio Visual Art Ins tute
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit       Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-                                                Michael P. Shaneyfelt
Campus                                burg Campus                            Ken Michalik                            Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
M.A., Michigan State University       M.S., DePaul University                Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit        Campus
B.A., Michigan State University       B.F.A., Northern Illinois University   Campus                                  B.S., Grand Valley State University
                                                                             M.A., Eastern Michigan University
Richard Eyman                         Nancy Hoffman                           B.A., Bowling Green State Univer-       Michael Shellabarger
Full- me Instructor, Cincinna         Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit       sity                                    Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit
Campus                                Campus                                                                         Campus
M.F.A., University of Cincinna        M.A., Syracuse University              Anna Mycek-Wodecki                      M.A., Northwestern University
B.F.A., Columbus College of Arts &    B.A., College for Crea ve Studies      Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-         B.A., Central Michigan University
Design                                                                       burg Campus
                                      Chris Huang                            M.A., Academy of Fine Arts-Warsaw       Jiwon Son
Daniel Falco                          Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-                                                Full- me Professor, Chicago
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-       burg Campus                            Julie Nauman-Mikulski                   Campus
burg Campus                           M.S., Pra Ins tute                     Adjunct Faculty Member, Tinley          M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute
M.F.A., Northern Illinois             B.F.A., Na onal Taiwan Normal          Park Campus                             of Chicago
B.F.A., University of Iowa            Univ.                                  M.F.A., University of Chicago           B.S., Ohio State University
                                                                             B.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of
Jayne Fox                             Gregory Johnson                        Chicago                                 Jacalin Subrinsky
Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-      Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna           B.A., Iowa State University             Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
burg Campus                           Campus                                                                         Campus
M.A., DePaul University               M.A., Morehead State University                                                B.A., Columbia College, Chicago
B.F.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art-     B.A., Morehead State University
Schaumburg                                                                                                           Aneta Urbanska
                                                                                                                     Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
                                                                                                                     burg Campus
                                                                                                                     M.S., DePaul University
                                                                                                                     B.A., Ill. Ins tute of Art-Chicago



                                                            147 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Kimberly K. Viviano                    Amer Awwad                               Kenan Caymaz                           Elias A. Demetriades
Part- me Associate Professor,          Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago         Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-       Part- me Professor, Chicago
Chicago Campus                         Campus                                   burg Campus                            Campus
M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute     Masters, University of Pennsylvania      M.S., Old Dominion University          Ph.D., Illinois Ins tute of Technol-
of Chicago                             B.Sc., York University                   B.S., Buffalo State College             ogy
B.F.A., Kendall College of Art &                                                                                       M.B.A., IMD, Lausanne
Design, MI                             Kimberly J. Baker                        Claudia Chaalan                        B.S., Salem State College
                                       Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-       Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Shannan Wheaton                        cago Campus                              Campus                                 Sandor Demkovich
Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna           M.A., Eastern Michigan University        M.A., Wayne State University           Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                                 B.A., Eastern Michigan University        B.A., Wayne State University           Campus
M.A., University of Missouri                                                                                           M.S., Purdue University
B.A., Western Kentucky University      Jamal Bari                               Orinna M. Clark                        B.S., Purdue University
                                       Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago         Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-
Connie Wolfe                           Campus                                   cago Campus                            Tina Devereaux
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-        M.Sc., Southern Illinois University,     M.S., M.A.T., University of South      Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit
burg Campus                            Carbondale                               Carolina                               Campus
M.F.A., Northern Illinois University   M.S., University of Pakistan             B.S., Long Island University           M.A., Wayne State University
B.A., University of Wisconsin          M.Sc., University of Karachi,            A.S., State University of New York     B.A., Wayne State University
                                       Pakistan                                 Delhi
Christopher T. Wood                    B.Sc., University of Karachi, Pakistan                                          Arlene M. Dewey
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago                                                Fawn Clark-Peterson                    Adjunct Faculty Member, Tinley
Campus                                 Terry Barkley                            Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-        Park Campus
M.F.A., Northern Illinois University   Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit          burg Campus                            M.A., Governors State University
B.F.A., University of Dayton           Campus                                   M.F.A., Northern Illinois University   B.A., Governors State University
                                       M.A., Central Michigan University        B.A., Winona State University          A.A., Prairie State College

General Educa on                       Erik Bean                                Joseph Clemente                        Eileen Dziadosz
                                       Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit          Full- me Assistant Professor, Cin-     Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Yacob B. Abdi                          Campus                                   cinna Campus                           Campus
Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-     M.A., Michigan State University          M.A., Marque e University              M.S., Butler University
cago Campus                                                                     B.A., Marque e University              B.A., University of Michigan
M.S., University of Chicago            George Besset
B.S., Addis Ababa University           Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-          Cheryl Clough-Burneson                 Debra J. Erickson
A.A.S., Parkland College               burg Campus                              Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-       Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
                                       M.E., Olivet Nazarene University         burg Campus                            Campus
Frank Acton                            B.A., St. Xavier University              M.A., Governors State University       Ph.D., Ethics
Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-                                             B.A., Purdue University                M.C.S., Theology
umburg Campus                          Jeremy E. Biles                          A.A., Moraine Valley Community         B.A., Philosophy
M.A., Adler Ins tute of Chicago        Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
B.A., Western Illinois University      Campus                                   Be y D. Constance                      Roberta Fabiani
                                       Ph.D., University of Chicago             Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Aamir Ahmad                            M.A., University of Chicago              Campus                                 Campus
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit        B.A., Capital University                 M.A.T., Na onal-Louis University       M.A., Queens University of Char-
Campus                                                                          B.A., Na onal-Louis University         lo e
Ph.D., Aligarh Muslim University       Anne Bowers                                                                     B.A., Alverno College
M.S., Aligarh Muslim University        Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit          Sonia Cristoltean
B.S., Aligarh Muslim University        Campus                                   Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-        Carina G. Farrero
                                       Ph. D., University of Toledo             burg Campus                            Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Eduart Aliko                           M.A., Eastern Michigan                   M.S., Babes Bolyai University          Campus
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit                                                 B.S., Babes Bolyai University          M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute
Campus                                 Meredith L. Canali                                                              of Chicago
M.A., University of Tirana             Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago          Pamela Cumpton                         B.A., University of California,
B.S., University of Tirana             Campus                                   Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-    Berkley
                                       M.A., DePaul University                  umburg Campus
Cheryl S. Alton                        B.S., University of Illinois-Chicago     M.A., University of Minnesota          Moira Fearncombe
Adjunct Faculty Member, Tinley                                                  B.A., Northwestern University          Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-
Park Campus                            Jack Carollo                                                                    umburg Campus
M.S.Ed., Purdue University             Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-         Marina DeLong                          M.Ed., Wayne State University
M.A., Purdue University                burg Campus                              Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-        B.S., Wayne State University
B.A., Northern Illinois University     M.A., Northeastern University            burg Campus
                                       B.S., Loyola University                  M.S., Moscow University                Anne E. Flanagan
Tina Apter                                                                      B.S., Moscow University                Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-        Patrick R. Casey                                                                Campus
burg Campus                            Full- me Assistant Professor, Chi-                                              Ph.D., University of Illinois - Chicago
M.A., DePaul University                cago Campus                                                                     M.A., University of Illinois - Chicago
B.S., University of Illinois/Cham-     M.A., Arizona State University                                                  B.A., Indiana University
paign                                  J.D., Illinois Ins tute of Technology
                                       B.A., Arizona State University



                                                             148 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Kenya N. Floyd                      Ben A. Harshman                           Kathleen D. Keeble                   Vladimir Lepe c
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago     Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-        Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago     Full- me Assistant Professor, Chi-
Campus                              cago Campus                               Campus                               cago Campus
M.B.A., Loyola University           Ph.D., University of Illinois - Chicago   M.S., University of Wisconsin,       Ph.D., University of Illinois
B.A., DePaul University             M.A., Ohio State University               Milwaukee                            M.S., University of Illinois
B.A., School of the Art Ins tute    B.A., Ohio State University               B.A., University of Wisconsin,       M.S., University of Zagreb
                                                                              Milwaukee                            B.S., University of Zagreb
Carolyn Ford                        Jennifer Hart
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit     Part- me Faculty Member, Schaum-          Glenn Kent                           Keith Levick
Campus                              burg Campus                               Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna         Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Ph.D., Wayne State University       M.A., Northern Illinois                   Campus                               Campus
M.A., Wayne State University        B.A., Northern Illinois University        Ph.D., University of Cincinna        Ph.D., Wayne State University
                                                                              M.A., University of Cincinna         M.A., Wayne State University
Karen Foster                        Amy S. Hasapis                            B.A., University of Louisville       B.S., Wayne State University
Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna        Full- me Assistant Professor, Chi-
Campus                              cago Campus                               Jean-Luc Kiehm                       Terri M. Magdongon
Doctoral, University of Saskatch-   M.A., Central Michigan University         Full- me Instructor, Cincinna        Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
ewan                                B.A.A., Central Michigan University       Campus                               Campus
Ph.D., University of Kentucky                                                 M.S., University of Brussels         M.A., University of Michigan
M.A., Purdue University             Doug Hinrichs                             B.S., University of Brussels         B.A., University of the Philippines
B.A., Portland State University     Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
                                    Campus                                    Peter E. King                        Candace Manns
Shahyad Ghoncheh                    M.A., University of Illinois - Chicago    Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago      Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit
Part- me Associate Professor,       B.F.A., Nothern Illinois University       Campus                               Campus
Chicago Campus                                                                M.S., Wilkes College                 M.A., University of Michigan
Ed.D., Argosy University            Chris ne Hutchins                         M.S., Michigan Tech University       B.S., Univeristy of Tennessee
M.A., Roosevelt University          Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit          B.S., Michigan Tech University
B.A., Roosevelt University          Campus                                                                         Janine M. Ma s
                                    M.A., Svannah College of Art and          George Kolibar                       Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Kris n Gogolen                      Design                                    Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit     Campus
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit     B.A., Eastern Michigan University         Campus                               M.A., University of Illinois-Chicago
Campus                                                                        M.A., English                        B.A., University of Illinois
M.S., Oakland University            Leonard S. Iglesias                       B.A., Oakland University
                                    Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago                                                Chuck R. McConnell
Jorge Gomez                         Campus                                    Jennifer Koop                        Full- me Assistant Professor, Chi-
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit     M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute        Full- me Instructor, Cincinna        cago Campus
Campus                              of Chicago                                Campus                               Ph.D., Sussex College
M.A., Wayne State University        B.A., California Polytechnic State        M.A., Northern Kentucky University   M.A., Ball State University
B.A., Wayne State University        University                                M.F.A., University of Kentucky       B.S., Indiana Ins tute of Technology
                                                                              B.A., University of Kentucky
Robert Gramillano                   Danyell Jones-Muhammad                                                         Jason C. McGraw
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago    Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-           Diane Kos ck                         Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                              burg Campus                               Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-      Campus
M.B.A., DePaul University           B.A., DePaul University                   burg Campus                          M.S., Mississippi State University
B.S., Na onal-Louis University                                                M.A., Northern Illinois University   B.S., Eastern Illinois University
                                    Gurcharan S. Kaeley                       B.A., St. Xavier College
Uwe Grosse                          Full- me Professor, Chicago                                                    Marcia McMahon
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit     Campus                                    Margaret Kurtzweil                   Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
Campus                              Ph.D., University of Papau New            Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit      burg Campus
M.A., Eastern Michigan University   Guinea                                    Campus                               M.A., University of Phoenix
                                    M.Ed., University of Nairobi              M.A., Eastern Michigan University    B.A., Northwestern University
Laine Gurley                        M.A., Punjab University, India            B.A., Bowling Green State Univer-
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-     B.A., Punjab University                   sity                                 Tracy L. Meyer
burg Campus                                                                                                        Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-
Ph.D., Cornell University           Hanley Kanar                              Patricia LaFonte                     cago Campus
M.S., Tu s University               Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-           Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago     M.S., University of Illinois
B.A., Rutgers University            burg Campus                               Campus                               B.S., University of Illinois
                                    M.A. , University of Iowa                 M.A., Chicago State University
Ma hew R. Gusick                    B.A., University of Michigan              B.A., Chicago State University       Tara Mikhalyeva
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago                                                                                    Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-
Campus                              Deborah Karavites-Uhl                     Karen E. Leick                       umburg Campus
B.Arch., DePaul University          Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-           Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago      M.S., Illinois State University
M.A., Depaul University             burg Campus                               Campus                               B.A., Elmhurst College
                                    M.Ed., Benedic ne University              Ph.D., Northwestern University       B.S., Elmhurst College
                                    M.S., Governor’s State University         B.A., Washington University
                                    B.S., Elmhurst College




                                                          149 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Hope Miller                            Janet Romans                            Frank G. Smith                           Natalie Warren
Full- me Instructor, Cincinna          Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit         Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago         Part- me Associate Professor, Scha-
Campus                                 Campus                                  Campus                                   umburg Campus
M.A., Agnes Sco College                M.A., Eastern Michigan University       M.A., University of Memphis              Ph.D., University of Oregon
M.A., University of Utah               B.S., Eastern Michigan University       B.S., Southern Illinois University       M.A., University of Oregon
B.A., Yale University                                                                                                   B.A., University of California
                                       Angela M. Ross                          Cara A. Smulevitz
Ageliki D. Mitropoulos                 Part- me Assistant Professor, Chi-      Full- me Assistant Professor, Chi-       Julie M. Wayland
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       cago Campus                             cago Campus                              Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                                 M.B.A., University of Phoenix           M.A., School of the Art Ins tute of      Campus
M.A., Dominican University             B.A., Mundelein College of Loyola       Chicago                                  M.A., Loyola University
B.S., DePaul University                University                              B.A., University of Illinois             M.A., DePaul University
                                                                                                                        M.L.S., Dominican University
Meldrick Mpagi                         Michael Rush                            Erik Sprowls                             B.A., St. Ambrose University
Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna           Part- me Assistant Professor, Chi-      Full- me Instructor, Cincinna
Campus                                 cago Campus                             Campus                                   Felicia Webb
M.S., Wright State University          M.A., Governors State University        M.A., California University of           Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
B.S., Ohio University                  B.S., Bradley University                Pennsylvania                             burg Campus
                                                                               B.A., California University of Penn-     M.A., University of Ill at Springfield
Laurie M. Mucha                        John Salmen                             sylvania                                 B.A., Milikan University
Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-     Part- me Assistant Professor, Scha-
cago Campus                            umburg Campus                           Steven Stama s                           Amy Wheeler
M.A., Northeastern Illinois Uni-       D.V.M., University of Illinois/Urbana   Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-          Full- me Instructor, Cincinna
versity                                B.S., University of Illinois/Urbana     burg Campus                              Campus
B.A., Western Illinois University                                              M.A., DePaul University                  M.S., Eastern Kentucky University
                                       Cynthia Schneider                       B.A., University of Illinois             B.S., Morehead State University
Tracy Nearing                          Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit        burg Campus                             Jeffrey Stewart                           Deborah L. Wilson
Campus                                 M.A., Governors State University        Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna             Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
M.S., Eastern Michigan University      B.A., Governors State University        Campus                                   Campus
                                                                               M.B.A., Xavier University                M.S., DePaul University
David J. Pederson                      Kris n Schrock                          B.A., O erbein College                   B.S., University of Illinois - Chicago
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago        Full- me Instructor, Cincinna
Campus                                 Campus                                  Frank Sullivan                           Dan Wiseman
Ph.D., Evangelische Theologische       M.F.A., Purdue University               Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-       Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
Faculteit, Belgium                     B.A., Wi enberg University              cago Campus                              burg Campus
M.Div., Trinity University                                                     M.A., Roosevelt University               M.S., Indiana University
B.A., Wheaton College                  JoElla Eaglin Siuda                     M.A., DePaul University                  B.S., Purdue University
                                       Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-      A.B., Marque e University
Joseph E. Pionke                       cago Campus                                                                      Jennifer Yuen
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       M.S., University of Illinois            Jenai C. Talbert                         Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-
Campus                                 B.S., Elmhurst College                  Adjunct Faculty Member, Tinley           umburg Campus
Ed.D., Argosy University               A.S., College of DuPage                 Park Campus                              M.S., Old Dominion University
M.S., Lewis University                                                         M.A., Governors State University         B.S., Rockhurst University
B.S., Calumet College of St. Joseph,   Eleanor Slesicki                        B.A., Governors State University
Whi ng, Indiana                        Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-     A.A., Kennedy-King College
A.A., Lincoln College                  umburg Campus                                                                    Hospitality Management
                                       M.A., Loyola University                 Kenneth To en
Paul J. Priest                         B.S., Northern Illinois University      Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna             Timothy D. Dillon
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago                                               Campus                                   Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                                 Susan B. Slocum                         M.A., Kent State University              Campus
M.A., Oakland University               Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        B.A., Bob Jones University               M.S., Roosevelt University
B.A., Oakland University               Campus                                                                           B.A., Marque e University
                                       M.A., University of Chicago             Georgia Velisaris
Joseph N. Raab                         B.A., Oberlin College                   Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago         Brian S. Lesson
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago                                                Campus                                   Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                                 Brian E. Smith                          M.S., Illinois Ins tute of Technology    Campus
M.A., Northern Illinois University     Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        B.A., North Central College              M.S., Roosevelt University
B.S., Bradley University               Campus                                                                           B.S., Buffalo State College
                                       M.A., University of Chicago             Nancy S. Wajler
Mica J. Racine                         M.A., University of Memphis             Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       B.A., University of Arkansas            Campus                                   Interior Design
Campus                                                                         M.A., DePaul University
M.F.A., Columbia College, Chicago      Bridget Smith                           B.A., University of Illinois - Chicago   Maris Bernard
B.A., Sioux Falls College              Part- me Faculty Member, Detroit                                                 Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna
                                       Campus                                                                           Campus
                                       M.A., University of Michigan                                                     B.S., University of Cincinna
                                       B.S., Grand Valley State University




                                                             150 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Angela J. Bertucci                      Joan M. Jackson                         Nancy Milstein                        Heidi B. Thornton
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-      Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit       Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
Campus                                  cago Campus                             Campus                                Campus
B.A., Harrington Ins tute of Interior   M.Arch., University of Illinois -       M.A., Lawrence Technological          J.D., University of Michigan Law
Design                                  Chicago                                 University                            School
                                        B.S., Ohio State University             B.S., Lawrence Technological          B.F.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art
Gerald P. Brennan                                                               University                            B.A., University of Michigan
Full- me Instructor, Chicago            Susan Jackson
Campus                                  Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna            Stacey Newcomer                       Ronald J. Zawila
B.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of   Campus                                  Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna          Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
Chicago                                 B.S., Miami University                  Campus                                Campus
                                                                                M.S., Indiana Wesleyan University     Ph.D., University of Toronto
Paula Breunig                           Atul Karkhanis                          B.S., Ball State University           B.F.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art,
Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-         Part- me Faculty Member, Schaum-                                              Chicago
burg Campus                             burg Campus                             Suzann Nordstrom                      B.A., Loras College
B.A., Ohio State                        M.Arch., University of Illinois         Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-
                                        B. Arch., University of Bombay          umburg Campus
Diane Caldwell                                                                  M.A.T., Columbia College              Media Arts and Anima on
Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna            Robert J. Kempa                         B.F.A., Ill Ins tute of Art-Schaum-
Campus                                  Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        burg                                  Aiman H. Akhtar
B.A., Michigan State University         Campus                                                                        Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
                                        B.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute of   Diana Pisone                          Campus
Michael Campbell                        Chicago                                 Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago      B.A., School of the Art Ins tute of
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit                                                 Campus                                Chicago
Campus                                  Chris ne Kennedy                        B.A., Michigan State University
M.Arch., The University of Michigan     Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit                                               Andrew S. Baron
M.B.A., University of Colorado          Campus                                  Claren A. Poppo                       Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
B.A., University of Colorado            M.A., University of Michigan            Adjunct Faculty Member, Tinley        Campus
                                        B.F.A, University of Michigan           Park Campus                           M.A., University of Southern
Ferdinand R. Dimailig                                                           M.F.A., Columbia College - Chicago    California
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Duk J. Kim                              B.S., Indiana University              B.A., University of Michigan
Campus                                  Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
B.Arch., University of Illinois -       Campus                                  Shereen Puthenpurackal                Thomas Brierton
Chicago                                 M.Arch., University of Michigan         Full- me Senior Instructor, Cincin-   Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-
                                        B.S., University of Illinois            na Campus                             burg Campus
Eve M. Fineman, IIDA                                                            M.Des., University of Cincinna        M.A., Southern Illinois
Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-      Diane Kitchell                          M.Arch., School of Planning and       B.A., Southern Illinois
cago Campus                             Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-     Architecture
M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute      umburg Campus                           B.Arch., University of Kerala         George H. Eastman
of Chicago                              M.B.A., Argosy University                                                     Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
B.A., Washington University in St.      B.A., Harrington Ins tute of Int.       Keyvan Rafii                           Campus
Louis                                   Design                                  Part- me Faculty Member, Schaum-      B.S., Ins tute of Design, Illinois
                                        A.A., Harrington Ins tute of Int.       burg Campus                           Ins tute of Technology
Francois Geneve                         Design                                  Ph.D., University of Illinois
Part- me Assistant Professor, Chi-                                              M Arch, University of Illinois/Ur-    Ma Fuller
cago Campus                             Roberto Lama                            bana                                  Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna
M.F.A., University of Illinois - Chi-   Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-        B.S., University of Illinois/Urbana   Campus
cago                                    burg Campus                             AM(Art History), University of Il-    M.A., Case Western Reserve
B.A., Ecole Na onale des Arts Ap-       M.A., University of Buenos Aries        linois/Urbana                         University
plique et des Me ers d’Art                                                                                            B.F.A., Cleveland Ins tute of Art
                                        Jody Luna                               Erinn Rooks
Lisa A. Godsey                          Part- me Faculty Member, Schaum-        Full- me Faculty Member, Detroit      Kip Gire
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago         burg Campus                             Campus                                Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-
Campus                                  M.Arch., Illinois Ins tute of Tech-     M.A., Lawrence Technological          burg Campus
B.S., University of Wisconsin,          nology                                  University                            B.F.A., Illinois Ins tute of Technol-
Madison                                 B. Arch., University of Miami           B.S., Lawrence Technological          ogy
                                                                                University                            Assoc., Full Sail
Mary Grether                            John R. Manfredy
Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-        Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Chris na A. Sapienza                  Deborah A. Glasco
burg Campus                             Campus                                  Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago       Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago
M.Arch., Illinois Ins tute of Tech-     B.A., University of Notre Dame          Campus                                Campus
nology                                                                          B.A., Purdue University               M.F.A., Northwestern University
B.S., Illinois State University         Chase Melendez                                                                B.F.A., Northern Illinois University
                                        Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna
Peter James Harlan                      Campus                                                                        Daniel Hampson
Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago        M.F.A., University of Cincinna                                                Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-
Campus                                  B.S., San Diego State University                                              burg Campus
B.S., North Dakota University                                                                                         M.A., DePaul University
B.A., North Dakota University                                                                                         B.A., University of Illinois



                                                              151 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Laura Herman                               Bruno A. Surdo                          Cynthia R. Butler                      Gordon Bauer
Adjunct Instructor, Cincinna               Full- me Associate Professor, Chi-      Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Campus                                     cago Campus                             Campus                                 Campus
M.F.A., University of Cincinna             Fine Arts Studies, Atelier Lack, Min-   Ed.D., Na onal-Louis University        M.Ed., Wayne State University
B.F.A., Bowling Green State Uni-           neapolis                                M.A., Na onal-Louis University         B.S., Ferris State University
versity                                    Fine Arts Studies, American Acad-       B.S., Na onal-Louis University
                                           emy of Art, Chicago                     A.A.S., Triton College                 Todd Boatman
Victoria N. Hrody                          Fine Arts Studies, Liceo Ar s co,                                              Full- me Assistant Professor, Scha-
Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago           Bari, Italy                             Renee Lus g                            umburg Campus
Campus                                     Fine Arts Studies, Studio Cecil-        Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       M.F.A., Northern Illinois University
B.F.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art -         Graves, Florence, Italy                 Campus                                 B.F.A., Northern Illinois University
Chicago                                                                            M.A., Northern Illinois University
A.A., Triton College                       Susan D. Taaffe                          B.A., Roosevelt University             Laura E. Eastman
                                           Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago                                                Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Richard Hyde                               Campus                                  Nichelle Manuel                        Campus
Full- me Professor, Schaumburg             M.F.A., Ohio State University           Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       M.A., DePaul University
Campus                                     B.F.A., Ohio State University           Campus                                 B.F.A., Interna onal Academy of
M.F.A., Northern Illinois                                                          M.A., Roosevelt University             Design & Technology
B.F.A., Northern Illinois                  Maurice K. Ware                         B.S., Chicago State University
                                           Adjunct Faculty Member, Tinley                                                 Leah Fra o
Christen Johannesson                       Park Campus                             Lindsey P. Novak                       Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-           M.Ed., University of Phoenix            Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       burg Campus
burg Campus                                B.F.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art -      Campus                                 M.A., Savannah College of Art &
B.A., Southern Illinois                    Chicago                                 B.A., Northwestern University          Design
                                                                                                                          B.F.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art-
Ya Lu Lin                                                                          Stephen R. Perrine                     Schaumburg
Full- me Assistant Professor, Chi-         Transi onal Studies                     Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago
cago Campus                                                                        Campus                                 Rachel Fujita
M.F.A., University of Illinois - Chi-      John R. Baker                           M.A., University of Arizona            Part- me Instructor, Cincinna
cago                                       Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        B.A., Southern Illinois University     Campus
B.F.A., University of Illinois - Chicago   Campus                                                                         M.F.A., School of Visual Art
                                           M.A., Xavier University, Cincinna                                              B.A., Fordham University
Patrick McDonnell                          B.A., Arizona State University          Visual Effects & Mo on Graphics
Full- me Professor, Schaumburg                                                                                            Peter Infelise
Campus                                     Rebecca J. Barliant                     Nancy Bechtol                          Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-
M.F.A., Illinois State University          Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        Part- me Professor, Chicago            burg Campus
M.S., Illinois State University            Campus                                  Campus                                 M.F.A., Academy of Art University
                                           B.S., Loyola University, Chicago        M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute     B.F.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art-
Michael S. Nickelson                                                               of Chicago                             Schaumburg
Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago           Joseph F. Baugher                       M.Ed., Loyola University, Chicago
Campus                                     Part- me Assistant Professor, Chi-      B.A., Roosevelt University             Mary Joseph-Mar n
B.A., Southern Illinois University         cago Campus                                                                    Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
A.A., College of DuPage                    Ph.D., Brown University                 Siena B. Esposito                      Campus
                                           B.A., Ge ysburg College                 Full- me Master Instructor, Chicago
Suruchi Pahwa                                                                      Campus                                 Debra Lawton
Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago           Lilia Benenson                          B.F.A., Michigan State University      Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Campus                                     Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago                                               Campus
M.F.A., Rochester Ins tute of              Campus                                  David B. Opie
Technology                                 M.A., Kalinin State University, Tver,   Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago       Jia Liu
B.Arch., Kamla Reheja Vidyanidhi           Russia                                  Campus                                 Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit
Ins tute of Architecture, Mumbai           B.A., Kalinin State University, Tver,   M.F.A., School of Visual Arts          Campus
                                           Russia                                  B.F.A., Rhode Island School of
Jared Rosa                                                                         Design                                 Terry Lunn
Full- me Faculty Member, Schaum-           James T. Berg                                                                  Full- me Associate Professor, Scha-
burg Campus                                Full- me Assistant Professor, Chi-                                             umburg Campus
B.F.A., Ill Ins tute of Art-Schaum-        cago Campus                             Web Design & Interac ve Media          Masters, Birmingham University
burg                                       M.A., DePaul University
                                           B.A., University of Iowa                Caroline A. Anderson                   H. Anthony Moy
Marc A. Soehl                                                                      Full- me Professor, Chicago            Full- me Faculty Member, Chicago
Adjunct Faculty Member, Chicago            Lannie M. Burton                        Campus                                 Campus
Campus                                     Part- me Faculty Member, Chicago        M.F.A., Ohio University                M.B.A., Loyola University, Chicago
M.F.A., Academy of Art University,         Campus                                  B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College        B.S., University of Illinois
San Francisco                              M.A., Na onal-Louis University
B.F.A., Illinois Ins tute of Art -         B.A., Roosevelt University              Mark Baldridge                         Joshua Niemiera
Chicago                                                                            Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-        Adjunct Faculty Member, Schaum-
                                                                                   burg Campus                            burg Campus
                                                                                   M.F.A., School of the Art Ins tute-    M.A., Columbia College
                                                                                   Chicago                                B.A., Columbia College
                                                                                   B.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln



                                                                 152 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Jeffrey Ross                           Accoun ng                            Enrollment Processors                  Associate Dean of Student Affairs/
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit       Director of Accoun ng                   Mary Mecker                         Director of Housing
Campus                                    Diosa L. Collado                    Jeremias M. Santos                      Valarie J. Rand
                                      Director of Administra ve and           Sandra Saunders                     Residence Life Coordinator
Hui Yang                              Financial Services                   Lead Recep onist                           Andrew E. Tobin
Adjunct Faculty Member, Detroit           Robert C. Smetak                    Deborah L. Abdelnabi                Director of Academic Advising
Campus                                Execu ve Assistant to the DAFS       Mailroom Coordinators                      Valencia M. Funches
M.F.A., Eastern Michigan University       Sharita L. Mar n-Lester             Jacklyn N. San ago                  Academic Advisors
B.A., The Art Ins tute of Nanjing     General Accountant                      Eric Washington                         Brandi S. Aiken-McRae
(Nanjing P.R. China)                      Rosio Morales                    Mailroom Supervisor                        Patricia E. Berryhill
                                          Sarina E. Payne                     Erwin Hernandez                         Maja Cole
                                      Student Accountant                   Recep onists                               Rachel E. Sherron
ADMINISTRATION                            Denischia C. Denischia C.           Vanessa V. Campos                       Maisie A. Yang
                                          Molly G. Shanahan                   Tia L. Moore                        Assistant Manager - Supply Store
President                                 Sinourn Sourn                                                               Sequi a M. Jones
    John B. Jenkins                       Shamonda N. Swain                Career Services                        Director of Student Development
Vice President of Academic Affairs                                          Director of Career Services                Adam T. Patricoski
    Vesna Grbovic                     Admissions                               Patricia A. Giller                 Senior Academic Advisor
College Director of Planning and      VP / Senior Director of Admissions   Assistant Director - Career Services       Megan A. Fanouth-Nguessan
Assessment                                Janis K. Anton                       Heather E. VanRiper                Student Support and Disabili es
    James Borland                     Directors of Admissions              Senior Career Services Advisors        Coordinator
                                          Jennifer L. Mar n                    Kelly Dobbins                          Suzana E. Flores
Chicago Campus                            Paul J. Matylonek                    Michael A. Johnson                 Supply Store Manager
                                      Admissions Assistant                 Career Services Advisors                   Ricardo A. Olave
General Administra on                     Cynthia Lehner                       Carlos Baldizon - Mar ni
Execu ve Assistant to the Campus      Associate Directors of Admissions        Katelyn A. Doyle                   Student Financial Services
President                                 Jerome M. Bradley                    Eric J. Rampson                    Director of Student Financial
   Allison R. Santos                      Paul A. Brown                        Kelli L. Weber                     Services
President                                 Theodore McClain                 Student Employment Advisors                Paula E. Price
   John B. Jenkins                        Megan M. Rajski                      Julia T. Hinrichs                  Associate Directors of Student
                                      Assistant Directors of Admissions        Erin M. McGrady                    Financial Services
Academic Affairs                           Jay Abdelal                                                                 Charles W. Munro
Vice President of Academic Affairs         Regina Allen                     Culinary                                   Vanita F. Ware
    Vesna Grbovic                         Raul Andrade                     Dishwasher                                 Cassandra Weaver
Associate Deans of Academic               Gina Block                           Fernando Alvarez                   Administra ve Assistant
Affairs                                    LaMar G. Crane                   Storeroom Manager                          Sharon L. Hughes
    Marlene Atkins                        Maria D. Daniels                     Eddie W. Holloway                  Financial Aid Officers
    Karen M. Janko                        Jill Dolter                                                                 George J. Antonopoulos
Academic Department Directors             Rachel Foote                     Human Resources                            Paige E. Butler
    Mark E. Facklam, Culinary Arts,       Hilary S. Gabel                  Human Resources Manager                    Kenn C. De Gracia
   Hospitality Management                 Lidija Gjorgjievska                Kenneth Hogue                            Sarah C. Donohue
    Deann C. Grossi, General Educa-       Tyron L. Harris                  Human Resources Coordinator                Nicole Farr
     on                                   Katherine C. Hays                  Mary Jane. Lukas                         Jason M. Gray
    Jason K. Hopkins, Game Art &          Bri any L. Heinz                 Human Resources Generalist                 Audrey L. Guthrie
   Design, Media Arts and Anima-          Margaret A. Heinzeroth             Rae L. Rushford                          Donyale Hamilton
     on                                   Adrienne Holler                                                             Chris Harris
    Jodie L. Lawrence, Art Founda-        Linda F. Jouzai s                Library                                    Ginger L. Hood
     ons, Illustra on & Design            Barry Keefe                      Library Director                           Zenia S. Johnson
    Melissa J. McAtee, Interior           Brennen M. Keefe                     Juliet S. Teipel                       Aneta Klapa
   Design                                 Elizabeth B. Kerndt              Library Technical Assistant                Kuo S. Lai
    Sco M. Perry, Audio Produc-           Obioma I. Li le                      Sean M. McCarthy                       Ka na Lionikis
     on, Digital Filmmaking, Video        Steven Monson                    Reference Librarian                        Andrew Mirviss
   Produc on                              Elizabeth A. Morrison                Alice Maggio                           Lise e N. Morga
    Victoria H. Sinon, Fashion De-        John M. O’Leary                                                             Jason O’Higgins
   sign                                   Mallory Paulus                   Registrar                                  Javier E. Pacheco
Administra ve Assistant                   Mark W. Perry                    Registrar                                  Jeremy M. Pifer
    Melissa A. Reeves                     Breyen D. Phemister                 LaVondra L. Lacey                       Michael L. Smith
Assistant Director                        Andrea Res vo                    Assistant Registrar                        Mandy Walker
    Alisa L. Sa ler, Culinary Arts,       Mildred San ago                     Yvonne L. Thigpen                   Loan Coordinator
Hospitality Management                    John J. Smith                    Associate Registrar                        Eileen E. Eiden
Director of Assessment                    Erin E. Vordtriede                  Cassandra L. Layer                  Senior Financial Aid Officers
    James Borland                         Thomas S. Weishaar                                                          Douglas G. Jones
Director of Faculty Development       Assistant Directors of Readmis-      Student Affairs                             Crystal Larry
    Laura A. Majcin                   sions                                Dean of Student Affairs
Execu ve Assistant                        Michael A. Donohue                  Be y Kourasis                       Technology
    Karina D. Vari                        Ricardo Tolliver                                                        Campus IT Manager
Transfer Credit Coordinator                                                                                          Terence J. Hahn Jr.
    Kris ne D. Cesario-Price




                                                          153 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
IT Desktop Analyst                        Michelle L. Gillinger                 Rachael J. Hepburn-Jebsen          Assistant Directors of Admissions
    Michael H. Clothier                   David Grant                           Nicole M. Kirchner                    Cur s Fields
IT Media Services - Analyst               Shari L. Lee                                                                Tim Florinki
    John A. Marco                         Dianna L. Mamas                    Technical Services                       Fayelese Horn
IT Support Analyst                        Gordon W. Neufang                  Coordinator of IT Media Services         Chris na Ishigami
    Ryan A. Dolan                         James R. O’Dell                       Douglas D. Baines                     Jeffrey Jeung
Senior IT Desktop Analysts                Bryan W. Smith                     Supervisor of IT Technology Sup-         Mary Kelley
    Eric S. Dixon                         Valerie Van Herse                  port                                     Dan Leahu
    Nicole Pitsavas                       Marc T. Weber                         Russell E. Willmann                   Amy Muzingo
    Daniel A. Thompson                 Admissions Coordinators                                                        Neha Patel
                                          Ronald Jackson Jr                  Detroit Campus                           Shantal Pryor
Cincinna Campus                           Jessica L. Madison                                                          Kyle Redwine
                                          Erin M. Wiegand                    General Administra on                    Faye Rousos
General Administra on                  Admissions Coordinator - Associate    President                                Dionne Senawi
Campus President                       Manager                                  Ted Blashak                           Sco Sinkula
   Robin J. Krout                         Janice A. Li lejohn                Administra ve Assistant                  Shannon Sto
Execu ve Assistant - Campus            Enrollment Processors                    Judy Poppenger                        Kelly Sweeney
President                                 Nina M. Monfreda                                                            Leila Tamimi
   Chris na C. Jacobs                     Nina M. Monfreda                   Academic Affairs                          Malisa Thimes
                                       Mailroom Supervisor                   Dean of Academic Affairs                  Be e Williams
Academic Affairs                           Lena L. Turner                          Marc Sherrod                     Enrollment Processor
Dean of Academic Affairs                Readmissions - Assistant Director     Academic Department Directors            Jeanita Bright
    Kenneth M. Spencer                    Jamie E. Nelis                          Maria Aguerri, Fashion Market-   Inquiry Processor/Mailroom Sprvsr
Execu ve Assistant to Dean of          Recep onist                               ing and Management                   Cathie Moschini
Academic Affairs                           Mary C. Blaylock                        Elizabeth Fomin, Graphic De-
    Darla J. Conley                    Recep onist - Evening (Part-Time)         sign, Web Design, Adver sing      Financial Aid
Academic Department Director              Be y Bradford                           Steve Simpson, Culinary          Financial Aid Officers
    Mark D. Harris, Media                                                         Mitch VanOchten, General             Alvin Audish
    Julie G. Hengle, Fashion Market-   Career Services                           Educa on                              Whitney Hall
   ing and Assessment                  Director of Career Services           Librarian                                 Jenna Houghton
    Anne e M. Lawrence, Interior           Juliane R. Pelfrey                     Lindsey Duvall                       Debbie Kelly
   Design and Founda ons               Career Services Advisor               Assistant Librarian                       Taryn Solomon
    Tungesh N. Mohan, Digital Film-        La Tonya M. McKenzie                   Janel Mills                          Takeesha Tanona
   making and Anima on                                                       Assistant Registrar                       Tou Vang
    Ryan T. Miller, Culinary Pro-      Human Resources                            Lauren Ford
   grams                               Director of Human Resources           Registrar                             Human Resources
    Darla J. Silverman, General            Kris ne M. Mick                        Beth Gierada                     Human Resources Manager
   Educa on                            Library                               Storeroom Manager                       Karen Zuliani
Assistant to Registrar                 Director of Library                        Cynthia Horne
    Jennifer Wallace                       Susan K. Wilkins                                                        Recep on
Registrar                              Assistant Librarian                   Accoun ng                             Recep onist - Academic
    Jamie B. Godsey                        Amanda C. Hazenfield               Director of Administra ve & Finan-       Sarah Sullivan
Storeroom Manager                                                            cial Services                         Recep onist - Admissions
    Adrienne D. Larson                 Student Affairs                            Lisa McClain                         Jade Chung
                                       Dean of Student Affairs                Director of Student Financial
Accoun ng                                  Bonnie Byrne                      Services                              Security
Director of Administra ve and          Director of Resident Life & Housing       Sandra Ki le                      Security Guard
Financial Services                         Kathleen A. Bates                 Director of Accoun ng                    Lloyd Woolfolk
    Norman W. Beasley                  Resident Life Coordinator                 Jaime White
Accoun ng - Supervisor                     David L. Gaines                   Student Accoun ng Advisor             Student Affairs and Career Services
    Casey L. Linebrink                 Academic Advisors                         Doloris Garry                     Dean of Student Affairs and Career
Accountant - Student                       Danielle D. Boal                                                        Services
    Renata M. Boea                         Robert D. Orlemann                Admissions                               Barb Murphy
                                       Supply Store Manager                  Admissions Coordinators               Resident Life Coordinator
Admissions                                 David P. Clemens                      Caranne Fields                       Audrey Sabourin
Senior Director of Admissions                                                    Bailey Jordan                     Academic Advisors
    Thomas J. Drennen Jr               Student Financial Services                Jessica Kerr                         Stacey Tarpley
Director of Admissions                 Director of Student Financial             Marybeth Romero                   Career Services Advisor
    Angela J. Myerly                   Services                              Senior Director of Admissions            Michelle Trevino
Associate Directors of Admissions          Angela D. Davis-Haynes                Turner Berg                       Supply Store Manager
    Debra Brewer                       Associate Director of Student         Directors of Admissions                  Eric Pie
    Joanne M. Dellefield                Financial Services                        Lynne Mills
    Alicia R. Speed                        Denise M. Schmid                      Dave Molnar                       Technology
Assistant Directors of Admissions      Financial Aid Officer                   Assistant Director of Re-Admis-       Media Services Analyst
    Nicole Bara eri                        Rossanna M. Chris an              sions                                    Michael Levy
    Neil A. Baugh                          Lindsay A. Cordell                    Lindy Hancock                     Technology Services Supervisor
    Paula L. Berger                        Stephanie Devakumar                                                        Dave Wertheimer
    John D. Fout                           Monique M. Gilliam




                                                            154 Faculty & Administra on
Faculty & Administra on
Schaumburg Campus                     Associate Director of Re-Admissions   Administra ve Assistant to Stu-         Christopher S. Koudelka
                                         Amy Schweitzer                     dent Affairs                             Emily Masini
General Administra on                 CPD Specialist                            Carissa Pasternak                   Rob Mrozek
President                                Bradley Koyak                      Director of Residence Life & Hous-      Adam Stob
   David Ray                          Enrollment Processor                  ing                                  Enrollment Processor
Execu ve Assistant to President          Brooke Althaus                         Jodie Filpus                        Fernando Galvez-Rossner
   Laura Robillard                    Mailroom Assistant                    Senior Academic Advisor              Recep onist
                                         Nidia Melendez                         Jill Sauer                          Courtney N. Jackson
Academic Affairs                       Mailroom Supervisor                   Academic Advisors
Dean of Academic Affairs                  Diane Cascio                           Susan Kehrer                     Student Affairs and Career Services
    Robert Brown                      Recep onist (Day)                         Joyce Parisi                     Associate Director of Student
Administra ve Assistant to Aca-          Michele Lebeau                     Disabili es Service Coordinator      Services
demic Affairs                          Recep onist (Evening)                     Larry Disch                         Bobby Seto
    Karen Krantz                         Tracy Rowley                       Residence Life Coordinator           Addi onal Informa on
Academic Department Director                                                    Ann Tommerdahl
    Tristan Beache, Audio Produc-     Career Services                       Student Development Coordinator      Board of Trustees
 on                                   Career Services Advisor                   Kerrie Lynn                      The following individuals serve on
    Larry Bowman, Media Arts &            Sarah Highstone                                                        the Board of Trustees, the govern-
Anima on and Game Art & Design            Erin Wells                        Student Financial Services           ing body of The Illinois Ins tute
    Mary Cain, Interior Design        Director of Career Services           Director of Student Financial        of Art:
    Evelyn Hopkins, Graphic Design,       Jenny Mleko                       Services                             Mr. Thomas Kube
Founda ons, Adver sing, and           Senior Career Services Advisor            Joseph Payne                     Execu ve Director, Kube and
Digital Photography                       Heidi Nolta                       Associate Director of Student        Company
    Ted Long, Web Design, Digital     Student Employment Advisor            Financial Services
Filmmaking, and Visual Effects             Danielle Sa ler                       Terry Leppellere                 Dr. Louis Bender
    Andrea Marcinkus, Fashion                                                   Jenny Madsen                     Professor Emeritus
    Janeane Weprin, General Educa-    Facili es Maintenance                 Financial Aid Officers                 Florida State University
 on & ACE                             Campus Aide                               Sade Carpenter
Director of Ar cula on                    Abu Khairuddin                        Kelly Herda                      Mr. Yorgo Koutsogiorgas
    Judy Dunne                        Facili es Manager                         Nicole Ilagan                    Co-founder and Partner, Go Roma
Faculty Development Director              Preston Yelvington                    Kris n McGonigal                 Italian Kitchen
    Kathleen Gorski                   Maintenance Supervisor                    Tiffany Pauldon
                                          Roger Torres                          Chris na Riggs                   Mr. Hal Griffith
Accoun ng                             Maintenance Technician                    Tomieka Spain                    Academic Affairs Consultant
Director of Administra ve & Finan-        Donald Cox                            Melissa Weiss                    Educa on Management LLC
cial Services                         PT Campus Aide
    Jane Spektor                          Jerome Such                       Supply Store                         Ms. Rebecca H. Sladack
Senior Accoun ng Analyst                                                    Supply Store Manager                 Assistant Vice President, Marke ng
    Vicki Coon                        Human Resources                          Karen Smith                       Opera ons
Student Accountants                   Director of Human Resources                                                Educa on Management LLC
    Olga Kushniryuk                       Geri Tapling                      Technology Services
    Purvin Thakkar                    Human Resources Coordinator           Campus Technology Manager            Company Ownership
Student Accoun ng Supervisor              Victor Reyes                         Richard Stolcpart
    Natalya Fishkin                                                         Senior Desktop Analyst               The Illinois Ins tute of Art, Inc., is a
                                      Library Services                         Ernesto Enriquez                  wholly owned subsidiary of The Art
Admissions                            Director of Library Services          Tech Service Supervisor              Ins tutes Interna onal LLC, which
Senior Director of Admissions             Richard Wilson                       Jim Baker                         through two intermediary limited
    Jamie Carson                      Library Assistant                                                          liability companies is a subsidiary of
Administra ve Assistant to Admis-         Jon Schechinger                   Tinley Park Campus                   Educa on Management Corpora-
sions                                                                                                              on, based at 210 Sixth Avenue,
    Sarah Bartelt                     Media Services                        General Administra on                33rd Floor, Pi sburgh, Pennsylvania
Associate Directors of Admissions     Media Services Supervisor             Campus Director                      15222.
    Chris na Caras                      Steve Madunic                          Donna L. Gray
    Margene Shullaw
Assistant Directors of Admissions     Registrar                             Academic Affairs
    Amy Breitkreutz                   Registrar                             Associate Dean of Academic Affairs
    Susan Carlson                        Sara Delonis                          Michael Robinson
    Maggie Edwards                    Associate Registrar
    Aila Fathimulla                      Karla Medina                       Accoun ng
    Michael Frawley                   Assistant Registrar                   Financial Aid Officer
    Chad Heyse                           Kris na Kim                            Helen C. Haynes-Vinson
    Eric Mehmen                       Transfer Credit Coordinator
    Michael Mejia                        Amanda Scalia                      Admissions
    Michael Pizzimen                                                        Senior Director of Admissions
    Allison Poloni                    Student Affairs                           Elizabeth M. Vasquez
    Jennifer Saltouros                Dean of Student Affairs                Assistant Directors of Admissions
    Stephanie Song                       Jeanne Flanagan                       Michael J. Chapman
    Julie Spencer                                                              Michelle Harbin




                                                           155 Faculty & Administra on
Academic Calendar
                  2011-2012 Academic Calendar
Summer Quarter
Independence Day                Monday, July 4, 2011
First Day Summer Quarter        Monday, July 11, 2011
Summer Mid-Term Start           Thursday, August 18, 2011
Labor Day                       Monday, September 5, 2011
Last Day of Summer Quarter      Saturday, September 24, 2011
Fall Quarter
First Day Fall Quarter          Monday, October 3, 2011
Fall Mid-Term Start             Thursday, November 10, 2011
Day Before Thanksgiving         Wednesday, November 23, 2011
Thanksgiving Day                Thursday, November 24, 2011
Day A er Thanksgiving           Friday, November 25, 2011
NO SATURDAY CLASSES             Saturday, November 26, 2011
NO SUNDAY CLASSES               Sunday, November 27, 2010
Last Day Fall Quarter           Saturday, December 17, 2011
December Holiday                Friday, December 23, 2011
Christmas                       Monday, December 26, 2011
New Years Day                   Friday, December 30, 2011
Winter Quarter
First Day Winter Quarter        Monday, January 9, 2012
Mar n Luther King Day           Monday, January 16, 2012
Winter Mid-Term Start           Thursday, February 16, 2012
President’s Day                 Friday, February 24, 2012
Last Day Winter Quarter         Saturday, March 24, 2012
Spring Quarter
First Day Spring Quarter        Monday, April 2, 2012
Good Friday                     Friday, April 6, 2012
NO SATURDAY CLASSES             Saturday, April 7, 2011
NO SUNDAY CLASSES               Sunday, April 8, 2010
Spring Mid-Term Start           Thursday, May 10, 2012
Memorial Day                    Monday, May 28, 2012
Last Day Spring Quarter         Saturday, June 16, 2012




                                        156 Calendar
                                                            Maps




Chicago Campus                          Schaumburg Campus




      Michigan Campus
                                   Cincinna Campus




Tinley Park Campus




                        157 Maps
Index
                                       Culinary Arts 16                       Le er from the president 2
                                       Culinary Management 14                 Maps 157
Academic Advising 131
                                       Degrees                                Media Arts & Anima on 50
Academic Affairs Mission 6                 Programs 11, 12–57                  Mission, values, & purpose 4
Academic Grading System 118               Requirements 8                      Online Educa on 128
Academic Honesty 127                   Digital Bookshelf and eBooks 104       Orienta on 101
Academic Performance Measures 119      Digital Filmmaking & Video Produc-     Part-Time Employment and Internship
Academic Policies 114                           on 42                                Support 134
Academic Transcripts 115               Digital Photography 46                 Program and A endance Status
Acceptance no fica on 101               Diplomas                                      Change 121
Accoun ng Department 113                  Programs 11, 58–67
                                                                              Readmissions Procedures 101
Accredita on 3                            Requirements 10
                                                                              Refund Policy 104
Administra on 153                      Disabili es Services 131
                                                                              Registra on Procedures 121
Admissions 99                          Discipline Policies and Procedures
                                                                              Repor ng Criminal Ac vity 135
Admissions Requirements 99                     127
                                                                              Resident Life & Housing 132
Adver sing 12                          Disclosure of Educa onal Records 125
                                                                              Sa sfactory Academic Progress 111
Advising Services 131                  eBooks 104
                                                                              Schedule Adjustment Period 121
Alcohol and Drug Policy 135            Educa onal Records 125
                                                                              Schedules and Registra on 121
Alumni Services 134                    Employment Assistance 134
                                                                              Scholarships 107
Appeal Process for Academic Proba-     English Language Proficiency Policy
                                                                              School Closing Informa on 140
         on/Financial Aid Proba on             101
                                                                              Sexual Harassment Policy 136
       117                             Exhibi on of Student Work 141
                                                                              Smoking 141
Applica on Procedures 100              Faculty 142
                                                                              Student Affairs 131
Appropriate A re 141                   Family Educa on Rights and Privacy
                                                                              Student Conduct Policy 135
Arbitra on Policy 137                          Act 130
                                                                              Student Iden fica on Cards 121
Art Founda ons 7                       Fashion Design 22
                                                                              Student Lounge 133
Assessment and Placement 100           Fashion Marke ng & Merchandising
                                                                              Student Organiza ons & Clubs 133
Assessment of Student Learning 114             24
                                                                              Student Registra on Procedures 121
A endance Policies and Procedures      Fashion Merchandising 26
                                                                              Study Trips 133
       122                             Federal Financial Aid Programs 112
                                                                              Transfer Credit 123
Audio Produc on 40                     Financial Assistance Appeal 111
                                                                              Transi onal Studies 7
Board of Trustees 155                  Financial Planning 111
                                                                              Undergraduate Sa sfactory Academic
Campus Security Policy 135             Financial Services 104
                                                                                     Progress Policy (SAP) 115
Campus Store 133                       Game Art & Design 48
                                                                              Video Produc on 44
Career Services 134                    General Educa on 6
                                                                              Visual Effects & Mo on Graphics 52
Change of Program 124                  Grade Point Calcula on 119
                                                                              Web Design & Interac ve Media 54
Class Schedules 121                    Grade Reports 114
Class Size 122                         Graduate Assistance 134
Company Ownership 155                  Graphic Design 28
Complaint Procedures 137               Hospitality Management 18
Correc on of educa onal records 126    Housing 132
Counseling Services 131                Illustra on & Design 32
Course Descrip ons 68                  Interior Design 34
Credit Transferability Statement 124   Interna onal Admissions Policy 101




                                                    158 Index

				
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