Student Handbook - UAB Neuroscience by wuxiangyu

VIEWS: 109 PAGES: 77

									           The front cover artwork was created by
                     David Sweatt, Ph.D.
    Professor and Chair, UAB Department of Neurobiology




The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB)
       Neuroscience Graduate Program
      SHEL 120C / 1825 University Blvd
         Birmingham AL 35294-2182
               TEL 205.934.7034
         Email neuroscience@uab.edu
WELCOME


Welcome to the University of Alabama at Birmingham and to the Neuroscience
Graduate Program.      You are entering the exciting and challenging world of
neuroscience, which encompasses a vast array of interests – neurodegenerative
diseases, aging, visual system processing, glial physiology, synaptic plasticity,
memory processing, glioma biology, etc. As you move through this year, you will
decide what area you want to focus your research in, making yourself ready to
transfer into a permanent lab for your Ph.D. thesis work. We will talk frequently as
you make decisions to find a rotation lab, your permanent lab, and as you go
through your Ph.D. training.

This is an exciting time for our students who entered the Program last year, in Fall
2006, as we embark on the journey of a cohesive neuroscience track at UAB. As you
follow the new Neuroscience Graduate Program curriculum, rather than a
departmental graduate program, you will find yourselves becoming an integral part
of the UAB neuroscience community. You will discover new bonds with your fellow
students while adhering to the Program’s common qualifying exam and, eventually,
final defense guidelines with the help of your mentor and me. You represent a new
chapter in graduate training here at UAB. Do not hesitate to contact me to discuss
anything and to ask any questions. We are on this journey together, and it will be an
exiting time!

We are glad you are here!




Lori McMahon, Ph.D.
Neuroscience Graduate Program Director




As you move through our graduate program, you may have many questions and/or
need help with a number of things. Please feel free to contact me – email, phone or
stop by – any time throughout your graduate career. If I don’t know the answer, I’ll
find it for you.




Patricia Matthews
Neuroscience Graduate Program Manager



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CONTACTS


Graduate Program Director   Lori McMahon, Ph.D.
                            Associate Professor
                            UAB Dept of Physiology & Biophysics
                            MCLM 964 / 1918 University Blvd
                            Birmingham, AL 35294-0005

                            TEL: 205.934.3523
                            FAX: 205.975.9028
                            Email: mcmahon@uab.edu



Graduate Program Manager    Patricia Matthews
                            120C Shelby Building
                            1825 University Boulevard
                            Birmingham, AL 35294-2182
                            TEL: 205.934.7034
                            FAX: 205.996.6749
                            Email: pm1@uab.edu


Website Address             http://www.neuroscience.uab.edu/



UAB Graduate School         Hill University Center, Room 511
                            1400 University Boulevard
                            Birmingham, AL 35294-1150

                            TEL: 205.934.8227




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                                        TABLE OF CONTENTS


General Information for All Students ................................................................. 1

General Information for First Year Students ....................................................... 6
   Laboratory Rotations ................................................................................. 9
   Notes on Poster Session, Lab Rotations, and Time Off....................................10
   UAB Organizations and Opportunities ..........................................................11

Required Courses
   First Year Students ...................................................................................16
   Second Year Students ...............................................................................17

How to Register for Classes Via the Web...........................................................20

Information for Advanced Students
    General Information .................................................................................21
    General Graduate School Philosophy for Awarding the PhD .............................22
    Specific Graduate School Policies for Awarding the PhD..................................26
    Graduate School Deadlines ........................................................................29
    Post 1st Year Requirements ........................................................................31
    Theses and Dissertations ...........................................................................32
    Publishing Your Dissertation.......................................................................33
    Copyright Law and Your Dissertation ...........................................................34
    FAQ........................................................................................................36

General Academic Policies for All Students
   Guidelines for Graduate Assistantships at UAB ..............................................40
   Grievance Policy.......................................................................................43
   Academic Misconduct Policy and Procedure ..................................................45
   Personnel Misconduct................................................................................46
   Ethics .....................................................................................................47

Faculty Listing ..............................................................................................51

Student Listing
   First Year Students ...................................................................................59
   Current Students (Second Year and Above)..................................................60

APPENDIX
   NEUR 711-713, Principles of Cellular Neuroscience – Syllabus
   NGP Rotation Line Up Sheet
   NGP Lab Rotation Evaluation Form
   NGP Student Evaluation of Lab Rotation Form




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GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS

Students cannot be employed while a graduate student. The only “exception” will be
if you participate in clinical trials, clinical patient re-enactment, and the like. You
must get permission from the Program Director and your mentor BEFORE accepting
such a position.

General Requirements for Ph.D.
      Students are required to successfully complete 2 electives prior to their last
      semester.
      Registration for, attendance at, and one presentation per course during the
      Neuroscience Student Summer Seminar Series (NEUR 782) is required each
      year.
      A biostatistics course is required. At this time, a particular stats course is not
      recommended. Work with your mentor on choosing the stats course that
      works best for you.
      All students must successfully complete an ethics course. This is taken during
      the summer semester of the student’s first year (PHY 792 with Dr. Dale
      Benos).
      Students must register for a journal club AND a seminar of their choosing
      (with advice by their mentor) each semester until graduation.
      Two first-authored papers accepted to an appropriate journal are required
      unless the student’s committee recommends/approves differently.
      Students must be registered for a minimum of 9 hours during the Fall
      semester, 9 hours during the Spring semester, and 9 hours during the
      Summer semester each year.
      18 credit hours of dissertation research are required before graduation. This
      means you must have a minimum of two semesters between the semester of
      your Qualifying Exam and your final defense semester.
      You must be registered for at least 3 credit hours during the semester in
      which you plan to graduate.

Thesis Committee
       Students are expected to have their thesis committee in place as soon as
       possible after beginning their second year.
       Committee members are chosen with the guidance of your mentor.
       Thesis committee must be comprised of 5 faculty members, including your
       mentor. Two of the members must be outside your area of specification. Dr
       McMahon should be included as an ex-officio member of your committee.
       Committee meetings are required every six months unless stated otherwise
       by the Program Director.

Qualifying Exam (QE)
       The QE will take place between October and March of your third year.

General Notes
      As a graduate student trainee during your first year, taxes will not be taken
      from your check. You stipend is considered an award and is not taxed. You
      will not receive a W-2 form.
      During your second and subsequent years, you may or may not be taxed,
      depending on what source your mentor uses to pay your stipend. If you are
      given a fellowship, you will be exempt from state and local taxes, no W-2
      form will be issued, but you will be required to pay your quarterly estimated


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      federal taxes. Students being paid with an assistantship will be taxed and will
      be issued a W-2 form. Check with your mentor and department home’s
      financial office to determine your status.




WHAT TO EXPECT IN YOUR GRADUATE CAREER

Summary of Steps Toward the Doctoral Degree
Note: Please use these explanations as general guidelines.

 1.   Admission to doctoral program – This occurred when you were admitted
      into the Neuroscience Graduate Program.

 2.   Selection of faculty advisor - When you select your mentor, you must be
      admitted into the mentor’s associated graduate program.

3.    Maintenance of good standing - Students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 or
      better in required course work. Failure to do so may result in dismissal from
      the program pending appeal to the CMP Graduate Program Committee.

      1-C Rule: Students who receive a grade of a "C" or lower in any required
      course will be required to repeat the appropriate course. Failure to earn a
      grade of a "B" or above in this second attempt can result in dismissal from
      the Program pending an appeal to the Program’s Graduate Committee.

      2-C Rule: If a student receives two “C” grades or lower in required courses
      during the same academic year, the student is subject to dismissal from the
      program pending an appeal to the Program’s Graduate Committee.

4.    Appointment of graduate study committee - During the second year, the
      student should assemble his/her dissertation committee. The role of this
      committee is two-fold. First, the committee is to assist the student with
      his/her thesis project with regard to direction and execution. Second, the
      committee is to evaluate the student’s progress throughout the completion of
      the qualifying exam and thesis defense. The committee will consist of a
      minimum of five faculty members to include three ‘internal’ Program faculty
      (at least two must be primary faculty) and two ‘external’ faculty (at least
      one external member should be neither a primary nor secondary Program
      faculty appointment); the Departmental Chair and Graduate Program Director
      are ex-officio members of all thesis committees. Because it is the
      responsibility of the Graduate Program Director to attend all student
      thesis committee meetings, the student / mentor must notify the
      Director of each meeting. The student’s committee is required to meet
      formally with the student every 9-12 months and submit a written report
      summarizing the deliberations of that meeting to the Graduate Program
      Director with a copy to the student and her/his committee members. After 4
      years in the program, the Committee will meet every 6 months until the Ph.D.
      dissertation work is completed.

5.    Passing of comprehensive examination and admission to candidacy -
      Following completion of required courses, each student must take a qualifying
      exam subject to review by the student’s thesis committee. This exam entails


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     a written dissertation proposal and an oral defense of this proposal.
     Throughout the organization of the thesis proposal-qualifying exam, the
     amount of direction the student receives is at the discretion of the mentor
     and the thesis committee members.

     The thesis proposal should be 10-15 pages in length and written in an NRSA-
     style format (i.e. Abstract, Specific Aims, Background and Significance,
     Preliminary Data, and Research Design).

     A draft of the proposal should then be handed out to each committee member
     for his/her review; it is expected that the written proposal will be reviewed by
     the committee members within two weeks of having received the proposal. It
     is the responsibility of the thesis committee members to notify the student
     and/or mentor if the written proposal is unacceptable. Upon approval of the
     written proposal by each committee member, the student may then schedule
     the oral defense of the proposal before the department.

     Following the oral defense of the thesis proposal, the committee may
     recommend corrections to the written proposal; it is anticipated that the
     student would complete the corrections to the proposal within a month of the
     defense.

     Upon successful completion of both the written proposal and oral defense, the
     student may apply for candidacy. It is recommended that no more than 2
     months elapse between initial submission of the written proposal to the
     committee and application for candidacy; if more than two months elapses,
     the student may have to re-defend the proposal.

     Upon entering candidacy, each student must enroll in Doctoral Level
     Dissertation Research. Completion of 30 credit hours (i.e., 2 semesters @ 15
     hrs each) of Doctoral Level Dissertation is required prior to the thesis defense.

8.   Application for degree – The student must submit the application for
     degree form to the Graduate School at the beginning of the semester in which
     she/he expects to defend. Check the Graduate School’s calendar before
     scheduling your defense (http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=25091) to
     make sure you are familiar with the deadlines and can graduate in the
     semester you want.

9.   Final defense – no later than 30 days before expected graduation; check the
     Graduate School calendar for deadlines.

     Sample Graduation Checklist:
     • Graduate School mandated deadlines for getting paperwork in before,
       during, and after your defense. (Note: scroll down that page for the Plan
       I deadlines.) Website: http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=25091.

     •   Complete the Application for Degree. Make an appointment to meet with
         your Graduate Program Director to get this completed. Must be done at
         the very beginning of the semester in which you plan to defend.

     •   Read     the     Graduate    School's    Dissertation          Guide      at
         http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=52166.


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      •   Students must schedule their public defense to take place immediately
          before their private defense.

      •   Contact each committee member, plus the Program Director and
          Department Chair, before setting the date for your defenses.

      •   When the date/time is set, contact Patricia Matthews so that she can a)
          make flyers, b) notify the UAB Reporter, and c) reserve the conference
          room for you. Information needed when contacting the Program
          Manager: title of your dissertation, date/time you want, names of your
          committee members.

      •   12 BUSINESS days BEFORE your defense do the following:

              Complete the Dissertation Approval Form. This is a link to the website
          where you complete an online request for the approval forms. 24 hours
          after the submission (weekdays only), you can go by the Graduate School
          office (HUC 511) and pick up your forms.

             Provide each committee member, the Program Director, the
          Department Chair AND the Graduate Program Office with a copy of your
          thesis.

10.   After your defense -
      NOTE: If you plan to leave Birmingham immediately following graduation,
      before your dissertation is complete and sent to be bound (which is highly
      discouraged): The Grad School insists you appoint someone as a go-between
      for you, someone who can go to the Grad School, pick up the paper, send it
      to you, etc. – someone to be your eyes/feet/hands. In other words, the Grad
      School will not mail out waiting-to-be-corrected papers to you and will not
      conduct business with you via mail.

      The corrected copy of your dissertation, containing the committee's
      changes and/or corrections, must be turned into the Graduate School
      within 10 business days following the public defense.


      Dissertation Preparation Guide
      (http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=52166). This link will take you to the
      Graduate School’s website for dissertation preparation information.


      If you use animals in your research: The Institutional Animal Care and
      Use Committee (IACUC) and the Institutional Review Board for Human Use
      (IRB) review all UAB research involving animals and human subjects,
      respectively. Before beginning the research project, students should
      consult the IACUC or IRB office to determine whether approval is necessary
      from either of these review boards. If approval is necessary, documentation
      of review by the IACUC or IRB must be provided before the student can be
      admitted to candidacy and must be included in the dissertation.




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      Guidelines for submitting animal use protocols and electronic forms are
      available by contacting the IACUC office (934-7692) or by visiting the IACUC
      web site (http://www.uab.edu/iacuc).


      Human subjects are defined as not only living persons, but also human
      tissue, blood samples, pathologic or diagnostic specimens, study of medical
      records, observation of public behavior, and all questionnaires. Further
      information and deadlines are available by contacting the IRB office (934-
      3789) or visiting the IRB web site (http://www.uab.edu/irb). You will need
      an approval letter from IRB, if you use "human subjects" in your dissertation.

_______________________

UAB holidays for 2007-2008 (current as of 7/31/07):
• Sept 3 – Labor Day
• Nov 22 and 23 – Thanksgiving
• Dec 25 – Christmas Day
• Jan 1 – New Year’s Day
• Jan 21 – Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday
• May 26 – Memorial Day
• Jul 4 – Independence Day

Spring Break for graduate students is usually the week after the undergraduate
spring break (March 17-21, 2008).




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ESPECIALLY FOR FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

A Student’s Responsibility Regarding Lab Rotations and Finding a Mentor
Students are admitted into the program based on their academic record and
potential for success in this graduate program. Once admitted, it is the student’s
responsibility to show initiative in accomplishing the tasks involved in successful
completion of graduate school and the awarding of a PhD. Some specific things
students should know:
       The student is responsible for securing her/his lab rotations through contact
       with funded neuroscience faculty whose research is of particular interest to
       the student.
       There are three rotations. These rotations are stepping stones to finding a
       permanent mentor and lab home, which is one reason you rotate in labs
       whose mentor is funded and in a position to take on a graduate student full-
       time from second year to graduation.
       Students are expected to secure their own permanent mentor and be
       prepared to join the mentor’s lab on 1 July 2008. Should a student be
       unprepared to do this, it may be possible to perform a fourth rotation, but
       only after meeting with Dr McMahon and getting her permission.
       Failure to secure a lab rotation will result in termination from the program.
       Failure to secure a permanent mentor and lab home prior to 1 July 2008 will
       result in termination from the program.

BEYOND THE 1ST YEAR

Beginning with the entering class of Fall 2006, Neuroscience Graduate Program
(NGP) students will remain part of the Neuroscience Graduate Program throughout
their graduate career. Students will find a permanent mentor and will join the
mentor’s lab as of August 1. The PhD will be awarded from the mentor’s primary
appointment department (except in special circumstances), since the NGP does not
grant degrees. Your curriculum requirements are regulated by the NGP, as is your
common Qualifying Exam and your final defense. The number of electives are
specified by the NGP, while the actual courses are decided on with the advice from
your mentor. You will not follow the guidelines of the graduate program that is
housed in the department of your mentor. For example, a student who chooses a
mentor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics does not follow the
requirements for the Cellular and Molecular Physiology Graduate Program students.
With the input and guidance of the Neuroscience Graduate Program Director and
his/her mentor, the student follows the NGP curriculum all the way through to
graduation.

Much of what happens in the 2nd year and beyond will depend on your first year.
Selecting the right dissertation mentor/advisor to fit your interests will be a very
important decision. One of the advantages of having the lab rotations is to help you
discover what research areas are of greatest interest to you. We expect that
students will have selected a mentor/advisor by the end of Spring term of their first
year. It is important that the student explore all options before selecting a final
area. In this exploration, the student should discuss their ideas with the director and
appropriate faculty so that a mutually agreeable arrangement can be made. Once a
selection of dissertation mentor is made, the student will immediately join that
mentor’s lab. To make this transition, the appropriate form needs to be completed.
Copies of this approval form will be made for the student’s file, the new department,



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and for the student. Patricia Matthews will provide this form and will work with the
new department to insure that all proper documentation has been delivered and that
there is no lapse in fellowship/assistantship stipend. In rare cases, a student may be
unprepared to make a selection after completing his/her three lab rotations. A
student in this position MUST make an appointment to meet with the program
director before the end of the third rotation.

Once you have selected a dissertation mentor, you will then be admitted into that lab
to complete your remaining doctoral training, following the NGP guidelines for
graduation.

_______________________________


SETTING UP YOUR DIRECT DEPOSIT

To set   up direct deposit information:
   1.    Go to http://www.uab.edu/adminsystems/
   2.    Click on Oracle HR & Finance
   3.    Under Administrative Systems Status, click on the link “You may log into the
         application here”
    4.   Enter your Blazer ID (which is the id you chose MINUS the @uab.edu) and
         password
    5.   Click on I Agree
    6.   Click on UAB Self Service Applications
    7.   Click on Manage Direct Deposit Account

This is where you enter the pertinent information.



ONLINE “COURSES” YOU MUST COMPLETE AFTER 23 JULY 2007
         If not completed by 7 September 2007, paycheck may be affected.

•   HIPAA – Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
    http://www.hipaa.uab.edu/
    Complete the online course and bring proof of completion to Patricia Matthews


•   Research Code of Conduct
    http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=63288
    Complete the online “course” and bring proof of completion to Patricia Matthews


•   Diversity Awareness Education, Part I
    http://www.uab.edu/equityanddiversity/
    Part I of diversity training is done online, after you create your BlazerID.
    Part II takes place in a classroom. You can sign up for this part online at
    the URL above.




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                                www.parking.uab.edu

    Parking & Transportation Services is pleased to announce that employees and
students can now RENEW OR PURCHASE parking permits on-line, as well as pay
citations, add addresses, car information, etc. Parking permits will be mailed to your
                                    home address.
                 Note: Please allow 5 - 7 business days for delivery of permits purchased on-line




                                                                                                    11
LABORATORY ROTATIONS - SPECIFICS

Neuroscience laboratory rotations provide entering students with valuable laboratory
experience during their first year. Students must complete 3 lab rotations, each
lasting approximately 10 weeks, before formally selecting a mentor and being ready
to join your thesis lab by July 1. Students are only allowed to rotate in the lab of a
Neuroscience faculty member You can find an updated list on the website, and a list
of eligible faculty will be provided to you. Each rotation will allow students to be
exposed to various types of research being conducted in his/her potential areas of
interest. It is the student’s responsibility to secure a rotation; however, if you need
assistance, please contact Dr. McMahon.

The beginning and ending dates for Neuroscience lab rotations are as follows:

          Rotation 1:     September 4, 2007 – November 14, 2007
             Poster Session: November 16, 11am-1pm, SHEL 105

          Rotation 2:     November 19, 2007 – February 8, 2008
             Poster Session: February 12, 11am-1pm, SHEL 105

          Rotation 3:     February 13, 2008 – April 25, 2008
             Poster Session: April 29, 11am-1pm, SHEL 105


Students are encouraged to talk with any Neuroscience faculty members whose
research interests match your own; however, formal commitments can only be made
for the dates of the rotations specified above. This will insure that the student will
have the opportunity to make informed decisions about each rotation. Your rotations
must be scheduled with faculty who have funding.

As students meet with faculty and secure rotations, students are expected to use a
Rotation Line-Up sheet, whereby a faculty person commits to a certain rotation (I, II,
or III) and signs the line-up sheet to signify that commitment. This is done at the
beginning of the Fall semester.

Note: A faculty member can mentor a student’s rotation ONLY if that student works
in her/his lab, not the lab of another faculty member.

---Important--- When you have a commitment from a faculty member to do a
rotation, make a formal appointment to meet with the rotation mentor to discuss
his/her expectations during this rotation. You will take a Lab Rotation Evaluation
Form with you to this meeting. Each of you will sign and date the form at the end of
the meeting. Bring this form back to Ms. Matthews. When your lab rotation is
nearing completion, make another appointment to meet with your mentor for an exit
interview and take the evaluation form back with you. After this meeting, both you
and your mentor must sign and date the form again. Return the form to Ms.
Matthews to be placed in your permanent file.

Students are responsible for securing their own rotations and permanent lab. In rare
instances, a student may be granted permission to do a fourth rotation, but this can
only be done with the Director’s permission. If you fail to find a permanent lab with a
funded mentor before July 1, 2008, you will be dismissed from the Program.


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NOTES ON POSTER SESSIONS, LAB ROTATIONS, AND TIME OFF

Poster Session – At the end of each lab rotation, the Program will sponsor a poster
session. Students must participate by creating a poster presentation of his/her lab
project/research done during rotation --- i.e. During the November 16 poster
session, you will have a poster depicting the project you worked on during your first
lab rotation.

Poster Printing - The IBS Graduate Program offers a poster printing service. Posters
need to be submitted for printing at least two business days in advance of when
they are needed, and it is strongly suggest you allow additional time prior to large
conferences. Posters are printed on a first-come, first-served basis.

To get a poster printed:
1. Complete and submit the poster request form (found at www.ibs.uab.edu).
2. Drop off your request form (print from website), poster file (on CD or flash
drive), and payment requisition (get this internal requisition from Patricia
Matthews) in SHEL 120 with Randy Seay between 8:00-3:30, Monday-Friday, and at
least two business days in advance of when you need it. When you drop off your
poster, leave enough time to review your poster as it appears on our monitor. If no
one is available or if he is away from his desk when you stop by, use the sign-up
sheet and someone will contact you.
3. You will be contacted when the poster is ready for pick up. Rubber bands are
provided; poster tubes are not.
4. The cost to the Program is only $25/poster ($35/poster if using colored
background).

Lab Rotations - During your lab rotations, you are expected to spend at least 20
hours per week in the lab working on your assigned rotation project. Students are
expected to work in their assigned lab whenever their project demands. This is not
always an 8-5 job.

Time Off - Students must check with their mentor regarding holidays and vacation
leave, as students may sometimes have to come in on holidays.

Vacation time is at the discretion of the rotation mentor AND the program
director. Approval must be obtained from both.

In general, graduate assistants are expected to be available in the periods
between academic terms. Graduate assistants are entitled to the following
short-term leaves:

       a minimum of 15 calendar days (one-half month) paid leave of
       absence (vacation) per calendar year,

       15 calendar days (one-half month) paid sick leave of absence per
       calendar year, and

       parental leave of absence (with pay) of 30 consecutive days per
       calendar year upon the birth or adoption of a child. Either or both
       parents are eligible for parental leave.



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These leaves (vacation, sick, parental) do not accrue. All leaves require approval
by the graduate program director and the mentor and may be extended, if
necessary, with the permission of the graduate program director. Program policies
regarding leaves of absence must apply equitably to all and are used when a student
has a legitimate cause of being away from the program for an extended period of
time. Students do not receive a stipend during a leave of absence.

UAB holidays for 2007-2008 (current as of 7/31/07):
• Sept 3 – Labor Day
• Nov 22 and 23 – Thanksgiving
• Dec 25 – Christmas Day
• Jan 1 – New Year’s Day
• Jan 21 – Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday
• May 26 – Memorial Day
• Jul 4 – Independence Day

Spring Break for graduate students is usually the week after the undergraduate
spring break (March 17-21, 2008).




UAB ORGANIZATIONS & OPPORTUNITIES

Industry Roundtable
http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=47488

The UAB Industry Roundtable is a student-initiated and student-run informal
discussion group open to all graduate students and postdocs. It is sponsored by the
UAB Graduate School and UAB Graduate Student Association.

The Industry Roundtable hosts a monthly seminar highlighting careers for scientists
outside academia. Students and postdocs may also register for our annual Career
Development Workshop. This is a two-day workshop that includes speakers from
nonacademic sectors including biotech companies, pharmaceutical companies, patent
law, and government agencies as well as from academia including UAB and local
small colleges.

For more information, contact Brett Pickett (bpickett@uab.edu) or Tara Edmonds
(edmondst@uab.edu).



Graduate Student Research Days
http://main.uab.edu/sites/gradschool/101327/

Graduate Student Research Days are an annual competition in which graduate
students present their original research in an open forum. Deadlines for 2007
Graduate Student Research Days are:

Deadline for abstracts                   February 1, 2008
Graduate Student Research Days           February 28 and 29, 2008
Awards Luncheon                          March 7, 2008



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The competition is held in the Hill University Center’s (HUC) Great Hall, which is
located across the courtyard from the bookstore. Times will be announced.

Although rules may change (check the website), here were the rules for last year’s
competition:

   1. The competition is open to all degree-seeking UAB graduate students.
       Students must be enrolled during the semester in which the competition is
       held.
   2. The presentations are oral (no posters). Computers (pre-loaded with the
       presentations) and LCD projectors will be provided by the Graduate School.
   3. The research project must represent research pursued at UAB in the academic
       year 2005-2006.
   4. The student must follow principles of responsible conduct to research.
   5. Students must use the abstract form available via the link on the sidebar and
       must submit the abstract electronically.
   6. Each entrant is required to submit a typed abstract of no more than 250
       words in length describing the research project. Abstracts are due no later
       than 5:00 p.m. on February 1, 2008. It is essential that the abstract embody
       the points listed in #11 below.
   7. The abstract form must be filled out completely and returned with the
       abstract.
   8. Any PowerPoint presentation (PC compatible) that will be used in the
       competition must be brought to the Graduate School no later than
       Wednesday, March 1, by 5:00 p.m. You will not be allowed to bring a disk, cd,
       flash drive, or or any storage media into the competition or change your
       PowerPoint presentation the day of the competition.
   9. Where multiple people are involved, the student must acknowledge them in
       the presentation using the presentation media chosen (PowerPoint or
       overheads).
   10. The presentation—although not judged specifically on presentation skills—
       must be unified, coherent, and delivered according to appropriate standards
       for formal public address.
   11. The presentation will be judged on the following criteria:
       --- Creativity (if applicable): Originality in subject, research question(s),
       approach , analysis, and interpretation
       --- Approach: Thesis statement, problem statement and scope, research
       plan, ties to related and future work
       --- Thoroughness: Completeness, including experimental replication and
       evidence-supported conclusions
       --- Skill: Student skill, type and level of supervision, use of equipment
       --- Clarity: Precision of purpose, procedures, and conclusions; orderly
       presentation of data, results, and conclusions; answers to oral questions
       --- Abstract: Adequacy, clarity, conciseness
   12. Each participant will be limited to 12 minutes for presentation, with 3
       additional minutes for questions. Timekeepers will enforce both of these time
       limits strictly.
   13. The research project must be under the direction of a member of the UAB
       graduate faculty.
   14. Submission of an abstract implies that any required IRB or IACUC approval is
       complete.




                                                                                 15
Graduate Student Association
http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=58612

UAB graduate students are represented by the Graduate Student Association (GSA),
which works closely with the Graduate School and other offices of the university
administration in formulating policy and meeting student needs.

The GSA provides many services for graduate students such as funds for graduate
student travel to academic meetings, thesis and dissertation photocopying, and
interlibrary loans. The GSA also sponsors a variety of activities for graduate
students.

The GSA office is located in Room 440C of the Hill University Center. Applications are
turned into the Graduate School Office 511 HUC (telephone: 934-8227).

All graduate students are automatically members of the GSA, and the GSA Senate is
composed of student representatives from graduate programs. Interested students
should contact any GSA officer if they would like to become a GSA Senator.

If you have any questions regarding GSA, please contact Mick Edmonds at
edmonds1@uab.edu.

Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences
http://www.uab.edu/lister/
The Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences, established in 1945, is the largest
biomedical library in Alabama and one of the leading such libraries in the South. It
serves as a resource library in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine for the
Southeast/Atlantic Region. Its collections span 7 centuries of knowledge, from
10,000 volumes of rare historical books to over 2,600 current journals and the latest
interactive laser disks. Books, bound journals, microforms, and other medial total
approximately 325,000 volumes relating to medicine, dentistry, nursing, optometry,
allied health sciences, public health, and the basic biomedical sciences.

The library offers accommodations for reading, studying, and viewing audiovisuals.
Other services offered include information services, interlibrary loans, photocopying,
orientations, remote access to online journals, pdf downloads, online computer
searches by librarians, and on-campus document delivery by fax or on foot. IBM and
Macintosh computers are located in the library’s microcomputer laboratory for work
processing, spreadsheets, and graphics. The library operates The Learning Center,
an area with state-of-the-art interactive workstations for the creation and use of
computer-assisted instructional programs; an electronic classroom for teaching;
database searching; Internet classes; electronically wired study carrels for use by
individuals; and other electronic access.

The staff offers frequent classes on information retrieval and management, access to
the Internet, and searching techniques for numerous online and CD-ROM databases.

Hours:        Monday – Friday open at 7:30 am
              Monday – Thursday close at 11:00 pm; Friday – close at 7:00 pm
              Saturday – 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
              Sunday – 2:30 – 11:00 pm




                                                                                   16
Mervyn H. Sterne Library
http://www.mhsl.uab.edu/
The Mervyn H. Sterne Library houses a collection of more than 950,000 items
selected to support current teaching and research at UAB. In addition to books and
more than 2,500 periodicals, the collection consists of microforms and other print
and nonprint materials. Access to the collection and other information resources is
provided through an online public access catalog system. Users may access the
system from the library or remotely. Study areas and photocopying machines are
located throughout the library. More than 100 lockable study carrels are available
for use by faculty and graduate students involved in writing projects.

Reference services are provided by subject specialist librarians and at information
desks staffed to assist patrons in identifying and locating materials. Reference
service also includes computerized database searching. Through the use of OCLC,
the national bibliographic utility, the staff can locate, and in may cases borrow,
materials from libraries across the country. The User Services Department, through
its automated circulation system, tacks materials continuously and can determine the
location or status of a book on request. The reserve desk circulates high-use
materials identified by classroom instructors.

STUDENT HEALTH

Neuroscience students are required to have health insurance. Students may choose
to be covered by VIVA UAB or provide their own private insurance. If the student
elects to be covered by their private insurance, verification of comparable coverage
must be on file with the UAB Student Health Office. The program will pay only for
single coverage VIVA UAB health insurance. Spouse and children are separate and
are to be paid for by the graduate student. For additional information regarding
health insurance and policy, please contact:

       Ms. Mindy Robbins
       UAB Student Health Services
       Room 221, Community Health Services Building
       933 South 19th Street
       TEL: 205.996.2985
       Email: minrob@uab.edu


What should you do if you get sick?

If it is a non-emergency, phone or go directly to the UAB Student Health Services
Office at the address listed above. The hours of the clinic are Monday – Thursday
from 8:00 am-5:00 pm (last patient is taken at 4:00 pm); Friday from 8:00 am –
4:30 pm. It is advisable to call in advance for an appointment because this keeps
your waiting time to a minimum. Appointed patients will be taken before drop-in
patients, unless the drop-in patient is of an emergency nature. There is physician on
call 24 hours a day. If you have any emergency after regular clinic hours, please call
the Page Operator at 934.3411 and ask for the Student Health physician on call.




                                                                                   17
MAIL

You can receive mail in the Program Manager’s office:

% Patricia Matthews
Neuroscience Graduate Program
Shelby Building, Room 120C
1825 University Boulevard
Birmingham, AL 35294-2182

If mail is received for you, you will be sent an email to come pick it up.

UAB ESCORT SERVICE

UAB Escort Service is an after-dark service provide upon request to students and
employees on the UAB campus. Designated white telephones are located in 12
classroom buildings for your convenience or you may reach the UAB Escort Service
by calling 934-8772 from any phone. A UAB escort will meet you and accompany
you to your on-campus destination either on foot or in a marked vehicle.




                                                                             18
REQUIRED COURSES

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS:

FALL SEMESTER 2007 – 18 Credit Hours

NEUR 704 - Intro to Neurobiology (Dauphin Island Course)
CALL NUMBER 50825                                              4 credit hours
Course begins with orientation in WORB 1st floor conference room on Monday, July
23rd, at 1pm. Students leave for Dauphin Island on July 24 and return on August 11.

NEUR 711 – Principles of Cellular Neuroscience, Module I    5 credit hours
CALL NUMBER 54246 (first 3 blocks of IBS 700)
Instructor: Patel
Course meets M-F, 8am-10am / BMR2 1st floor conference room

NEUR 712 - Principles of Cellular Neuroscience, Module II
CALL NUMBER 54247 (block 4 of IBS 700 + other lectures)     2 credit hours
Instructors: Theibert and Pozzo-Miller
Course meets M-F, 8am-10am / BMR2 for block 4, SHEL 105 for other section

NEUR 713 - Principles of Cellular Neuroscience, Module III     3 credit hours
CALL NUMBER 54245
Instructors: Theibert and Pozzo-Miller
Course meets M-F, 8am-10am / SHEL 105

NEUR 714 - Principles of Cellular Neuroscience, Module IV      3 credit hours
CALL NUMBER 54249
Instructor: McMahon
Course meets Fridays, 2:30pm-4:30pm / SHEL 105

NEUR 715 - Lab Rotation I                                      1 credit hour
CALL NUMBER 51410
Instructor: Your Rotation Mentor


SPRING SEMESTER 2008 – 12 Credit Hours

NEUR 710 - Integrative Neuroscience (Jan-Feb)                  3 credit hours
Instructor: Gamlin

NEUR 716 - Lab Rotation II                                     2 credit hours
Instructor: Your Rotation Mentor

NEUR 720 - Developmental Neuroscience (Mar)                    3 credit hours
Instructor: Keyser

NEUR 781 - Seminar 2: Current Topics in Neuroscience           1 credit hour
Instructor: McMahon

NBL – Disease of the Nervous System                            3 credit hours
Instructor: Sontheimer



                                                                                19
SUMMER SEMESTER 2008 – 9 Credit Hours

NEUR 717 – Lab Rotation III                                       5 credit hours
Instructor: Your Rotation Mentor

NEUR 782 – Student Summer Seminar Series                          1 credit hour
Instructor: McMahon

PHY 792 – Ethics in Publication                                   3 credit hours
Instructor: Benos



SECOND YEAR STUDENTS:

General Requirements for Ph.D.
      Students are required to successfully complete 2 electives prior to their last
      semester.
      Registration for the Student Summer Seminar Series (NEUR 782) is required
      for each student each summer semester. Participation includes attendance,
      completion of an evaluation form for each speaker, and the presentation of a
      20 minute PowerPoint talk and 10 minute Q-A session. Students will present
      once each summer. First year students are excluded from presenting.
      Students must register for and attend a seminar series of their choosing (with
      advice from their mentor) each semester until graduation.
      A biostatistics course is required. At this time, a particular stats course is not
      recommended. Work with your mentor on choosing the stats course that
      works best for you.
      All students must successfully complete an ethics course. This is taken during
      the summer semester of the student’s first year (PHY 792 with Dr. Dale
      Benos).
      Students must register for a journal club of their choosing (with advice from
      their mentor) each semester until graduation.
      Two first-authored papers accepted to an appropriate journal are required
      unless the student’s committee recommends/approves differently.
      Students must be registered for a minimum of 9 hours during the Fall
      semester, 9 hours during the Spring semester, and 9 hours during the
      Summer semester each year.
      18 credit hours of dissertation research are required before graduation. This
      means you must have a minimum of two semesters between the semester of
      your Qualifying Exam and your final defense semester.
      You must be registered for at least 3 credit hours during the semester in
      which you plan to graduate.


FALL SEMESTER 2007 – 9 Credit Hours

NEUR 714 - Principles of Cellular Neuroscience, Module IV   3 credit hours
CALL NUMBER 54249
Instructor: McMahon / Course meets Fridays, 2:30pm-4:30pm / SHEL 105
Second year students will pick up the course 7 weeks in




                                                                                     20
NEUR 778 – Nondissertation Research Hours
CALL NUMBER - TBA
Number of credit hours depends on other courses; use correct number of
nondissertation research hours to bring your total credit hours up to 9

A journal club course of your choosing                               1 credit hour

ELECTIVES TO CHOOSE FROM ON ADVICE FROM YOUR MENTOR:
Biomedical Engineering
51017 - BME 601 – Biomedical Engineering Seminar, Friday, 1pm, Dobbins, 1 hr
54065 - BME 697 – Journal Club in Neuroimaging, Monday, 3pm, Akella, 1 hr

Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
50039 - BMG 726 – Seminar, Monday, 4pm, Higgins, 1hr
51276 - BMG 773 – Journal Club in Stem Cell Biology, TBA, Ryan, 1 hr
51586 - BMG 774 – Journal Club in Cell Signaling, TBA, Thompson, 1 hr
50567 – BMG 791 – Journal Club in Gene Therapy, TBA, Strong, 1 hr
50574 – BMG 795 – Journal Club in Molecular Biology, TBA, Higgins, 1 hr
51287 – BMG 796 – Journal Club in Adv Euk Mole Biol, TBA, Townes, 1 hr

Biostatistics
52877 – BST 600 – Biostats for Public Health, Friday, 1pm, Barnette, 4 hrs

Biology
51713 – BY 655 – Biometry, Thursday, 12:30, Angus, 3 hrs

Cell Biology
50557 – CB     712   –   Developmental Biology, TBA, Miller, 1 hr
50565 – CB     713   –   Growth Factors, TBA, Gillespie, 1 hr
50573 – CB     714   –   Calcium Signaling, TBA, Chatham, 1 hr
50578 – CB     715   –   Biology of Pathogenic Eukaryot, TBA, Rayner, 1 hr
50582 – CB     716   –   Mol Basis Signaling Vervs Sys, TBA, TBA, 1 hr
52590 – CB     722   –   Vascular Biology Journal Club, TBA, Wyss, 1 hr
52584 – CB     747   –   Cell Biology Seminar, TBA, Yoder, 1 hr
52587 – CB     788   –   Mol Mechanisms of Neurodegener, TBA, Lesort, 1 hr

Cellular and Molecular Biology
50021 – CMB 712 – Methods and Logic, ?, 5pm, Klug, 1 hr

Medical Genetics
52857 – MGE 700          – Advanced Human Genetics, Thursday, 2pm, Bullard, 3 hrs
54449 – MGE 750          – Chromosome Struc, Func, Dynamic, Wednesday, 4pm, Mikhail, 2
hrs
52891 – MGE 780          – Medical Genetics Seminar, Friday, 12noon, Robin, 1 hr
52890 – MGE 785          – Medical Genetics Journal Club, Wednesday, 1pm, Wood, 1 hr

Microbiology
52620 – MIC    724   –    Virology Journal Club, TBA, Lefkowitz, 1 hr
50569 – MIC    737   –    Mucosal Immunology Journal Club, TBA, Moldoveanu, 1 hr
52513 – MIC    772   –    Bact Pathogenesis Journal Club, TBA, Cartee, 1 hr
52511 – MIC    796   –    Neuroimmunology Journal Club, TBA, Barnum, 1 hr
52512 – MIC    797   –    Cell/Mol Immunology Journal Club, TBA, Burrows, 1 hr




                                                                                       21
Neurobiology
50555 – NBL 703 –   Neurobiology Seminar Series, Thursday, 1pm, Dobrunz, 1 hr
50566 - NBL 778 -   Autism/Dev Dis Journal Club, TBA, Dixon, 1 hr
50570 – NBL 779 –   Journal Club Topics, TBA, Hablitz, 1 hr
50572 – NBL 784 –   Ion Channel Neurobiology Journal Club, TBA, Lester, 1 hr
50595 – NBL 795 –   Synaptic Plasticity Journal Club, TBA, Dobrunz, 1 hr
50597 – NBL 786 –   Signal Transduction Journal Club, TBA, Brenner, 1 hr
50601 – NBL 787 –   Neurodegenerative Dis Journal Club, TBA, Johnson, 1 hr
50605 – NBL 788 –   Biol of Glial Cells Journal Club, TBA, Sontheimer, 1 hr
50612 – NBL 789 –   Neurobiology Journal Club, TBA, Pozzo-Miller, 1 hr
54545 – NBL 720 –   Biophysics of Membrane Excitability, TBA, Lester/Benos, 3 hrs

Pathology
54071 – PAT 700 – Biology of Bone Disease, Thursday, 10am, TBA, 3 hrs
54077 – PAT 794 – Comparative Medicine Seminar, Wednesday, TBA, Lorenz, 1 hr
54078 – PAT 795 – Bone/Cart/Bio/Dis Journal Club, TBA, TBA, 1 hr

Toxicology
52662 – TOX 795 – Advanced Toxicology Seminar, TBA, Lamartiniere, 1 hr

Vision Science
52936 – VIS 671 – Interm Orientation/Mobil Sem, TBA, Moses, 3 hrs
54438 – VIS 727 – Sys Neuroscience Journal Club, TBA, Gawne, 1 hr


SPRING SEMESTER 2008 – 9 Credit Hours

NEUR 778 – Nondissertation Research Hours
Number of credit hours depends on other courses; use correct number of
nondissertation research hours to bring your total credit hours up to 9

A journal club course of your choosing                          1 credit hour

Elective(s)


SUMMER SEMESTER 2008 – 9 Credit Hours

NEUR 778 – Nondissertation Research Hours
Number of credit hours depends on other courses; use correct number of
nondissertation research hours to bring your total credit hours up to 9

A journal club course of your choosing                          1 credit hour

NEUR 782 – Student Summer Seminar Series                        1 credit hour
Instructor: McMahon

Elective(s)




                                                                                    22
HOW TO REGISTER FOR CLASSES VIA THE WEB

Registration announcement emails are sent out approximately 2 weeks prior to the
registration date. YOU MUST REGISTER FOR YOUR CLASSES ON TIME. IF YOU
KNOW THAT YOU WILL BE AWAY DURING THE CLASS REGISTRATION
PERIOD, CONTACT THE GRADUATE PROGRAM OFFICE PRIOR TO YOUR
LEAVING SO THAT APPROPRIATE ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE.

Students may register by telephone or on-line. To register by phone, call 5-9600
from on-campus or 930-0087 from off-campus. You will then need to enter your
social security number and your personal identification number (PIN) (the first time
you register it will be set to your birthday, the first two digits are the month and the
second two digits the day).

To register on-line:

Go to https://blazernet.uab.edu/cp/home/displaylogin and enter your Blazer ID and
password. Once in, click on the Student Resources tab. Scroll down until you see
Registration Status. Click on Add and Drop Classes and follow along.

The official confirmation of your course schedule will then be sent to your address
within two weeks.

It is required that you register for the set number of hours each semester.


IMPORTANT NOTE: If registration is on time, you will be exempt from paying FICA
taxes; however, if registration is late, FICA taxes will be deducted from your
paycheck. In addition, late registration results in a loss of tuition rebate from the
department to your mentor. Late registration cannot be done online or by phone –
only in person. If you have an unjustified reason for registering late and/or must be
reinstated into the school, you will be responsible for the fees; the department will
only pay the normal tuition and fees.



During the first year, tuition and fees will be paid from the Program Manager’s
Office; thereafter, they will be paid from the mentor’s department. You are not
required to bring a copy of your course schedule to Ms. Matthews. She will check
online to make sure you have registered properly and will notify you if corrections
are needed.


FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
FOR FALL SEMESTER 2007 ONLY --- PRINT A COPY OF YOUR TUITION BILL FROM
BANNER AND BRING IT TO PATRICIA MATTHEWS IN SHEL 120C SO SHE CAN PAY
YOUR TUITION.




                                                                                      23
INFORMATION FOR ADVANCED STUDENTS

FORMING A COMMITTEE

Students are encouraged to begin thinking about their thesis committee at the
beginning of their second year, when they secure a permanent lab home. The thesis
committee, formed with the assistance of the mentor, plays a key role in guiding the
student toward a successful graduate career.

There are five members of the thesis committee, two of whom must be outside of
the student’s research specification. The Neuroscience Graduate Program Director is
an ex-officio member of the committee.

Students are expected to have a committee meeting every 6 months unless told
otherwise by the Program Director, Dr. McMahon.

The thesis committee is expected to be in place at the end of the student’s second
year. When the potential members have been contacted and secured, contact the
Neuroscience Graduate Program Manager to initiate the proper forms.


QUALIFYING EXAM (QE)

Qualifying Exam is scheduled after a student has 1) completed all the required first
and second year coursework, 2) completed a minimum of 48 credit hours, 16 of
which must be in nondissertation research hours, and 3) received the go-ahead from
his/her committee. This is set to take place between October and March during a
student’s third year.


AFTER ENTERING CANDIDACY

Students must:
1) complete at least 30 hours of dissertation research
2) complete all program requirements for graduation before setting the final defense
date with approval from committee members


FINAL DEFENSE

Once the thesis committee approves the student to proceed with his/her scheduling
of the final defense, the student must poll all committee members and find a
mutually agreeable date and time. Contact the Program Manager to get flyers made
and to assist with securing a location for your public and private defense.

The student must schedule the public defense first with the private defense
immediately afterwards. Should these dates be difference for any reason, know that
the Graduate School uses the date of the private defense as the date on which to
judge which semester the student is awarded the PhD; the Graduate Program looks
at the public defense date.




                                                                                  24
GRADUATION INFORMATION FROM THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

GENERAL GRADUATE SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY FOR AWARDING
OF PhD DEGREE

Policy 1: General Statement
The doctoral degree is granted in recognition of (1) scholarly proficiency and (2)
distinctive achievement in a specific field of an academic discipline. The first
component is demonstrated by successful completion of advanced coursework (of
both a didactic and an unstructured nature) and by adequate performance on the
comprehensive examination. Traditionally, the student demonstrates the second
component by independently performing original research, which is presented in the
form of a dissertation, publicly defended before the university community. In certain
doctoral programs, the dissertation may take the form of a major project
undertaking, which, although not of a traditional research nature, presents the
results of independent study.

The Graduate School also recognizes professional doctorates awarded in preparation
for the autonomous practice of a profession. Professional doctorates are accredited
programs of study designed to prepare students for the delivery of clinical services.
Students in professional doctorate programs must demonstrate competence in
clinical practice and scholarship but ate not required to conduct and defend original
independent research. In lieu of a dissertation, students in programs designated as
professional doctorates are required to demonstrate that they are capable of
evaluating existing research, applying it to their professional practice, and expanding
the body of knowledge on which their professional practice is based. This
requirement is met by the design and conduct of a research or scholarly project
submitted in writing and presented formally before the members of the program."

Policy 2: Faculty Advisor
Immediately after a degree-seeking student enters the UAB Graduate School, a
member of the faculty of the graduate program to which the student has been
admitted should be assigned to serve as the student's advisor. This assignment may
be a temporary arrangement. The student and the advisor should confer about the
initial courses and any special work to be taken on the basis of the student's
previous experience and the requirements of the graduate program.

Policy 3: Graduate Study Committee
As soon as possible, a graduate study committee should be formed to guide the
student in a program of courses, seminars, and independent study, designed to meet
the student's needs and satisfy program and Graduate School requirements. This
committee should consist of at least five graduate faculty members, two of whom
should be from outside the student's graduate specialization and each of whom
should be able to bring some relevant insight and expertise to guide the student.
Recommendations for graduate study committee membership are submitted by the
advisor and the student to the program director, who subsequently submits these
recommendations to the Graduate School Dean. Graduate study committee
appointments are made by the Graduate School Dean, who is an ex officio member
of all graduate study committees.




                                                                                    25
Policy 4: Registration Requirements
Because the doctoral degree is earned on the basis of satisfactory completion of the
comprehensive examination and the dissertation, the Graduate School does not
specify any minimum number of courses or semester hours that must be completed
for award of the degree. Courses taken at other institutions and in other degree
programs may be used to satisfy program requirements upon approval of the
graduate study committee and the graduate program director. Doctoral students are
expected to be registered for credit each regular term.

Policy 5: Residence Requirement
The usual minimal period in which the doctoral degree can be earned is three
academic years of full-time study, or longer if the student has periods of part-time
enrollment. The nature of doctoral study requires the closest contact between the
student and the faculty of the graduate program, and the individual investigation or
other special work leading to the dissertation must be done directly under the
guidance and supervision of a full member of the UAB graduate faculty. Therefore,
Ph.D. students should be in residence (enrolled) for three full semesters each year
including summers during a three year period or collectively a minimum of nine
semesters if the student has to take a leave or stop out during the course of their
Ph.D. education.

Policy 6: Foreign Language or Other Special Tool of Research
In consultation with the faculty, the director of each graduate program will specify
any additional requirements, such as a reading knowledge of a foreign language or a
working knowledge of statistics, which are considered essential to mastery of the
academic discipline. Such requirements become conditions for the completion of the
degree.

Policy 7: Comprehensive Examination
The scholarly proficiency of a doctoral student in the chosen field of study must be
evaluated by comprehensive examination. The conduct of these examinations is the
responsibility of the graduate program in which the student is enrolled and may
consist of individual examinations in several appropriate areas or of a single
combined examination. Where both written and oral examinations are given, the
written should precede the oral, so that there is an opportunity for the student to
clarify any misunderstanding of the written questions.
Students must be registered for at least three semester hours of graduate work
during the term in which the comprehensive examination is taken.

Policy 8: Admission to Candidacy
When the student has passed the comprehensive examination, has satisfied any
program requirements for foreign language proficiency or special tool of research,
and has presented to the graduate study committee an acceptable proposal for
research or special study, the committee will recommend to the Graduate School
Dean that the student be admitted to candidacy. A student must be in good
academic standing to be admitted to candidacy. Admission to candidacy must take
place at least two regular terms before the expected completion of the doctoral
program.

Admission to candidacy is an important step forward in the student's pursuit of the
doctorate. By this step, the graduate committee indicates its confidence that the
student is capable of completing the proposed research project and the doctoral


                                                                                 26
program. Since the committee meeting at which candidacy is discussed is so
important, it should be scheduled through the Graduate School to allow the dean to
attend.

Policy 9: Application for Degree
Each candidate for a doctoral degree must signify the intention to complete the
requirements by a particular graduation date by submitting a completed Application
for Degree Form. Because this form is used to check requirements, order the
diploma, and enter the student on the commencement program, it must be received
in the Graduate School Records Office no later than 3 weeks into the expected
semester of graduation. Students must be registered for at least 3 semester
hours of graduate work in the semester they plan to graduate.

Policy 10: Dissertation
The results of the candidate's individual inquiry must be presented in a written
dissertation comprising a genuine contribution to knowledge in the particular
academic field. The document should also demonstrate the candidate's acquaintance
with the literature of the field and the proper selection and execution of research
methodology. The physical form of the dissertation must comply with the regulations
stated in the booklet, Theses and Dissertations: A Guide to Preparation, which is
published by the Graduate School.

The Graduate School has the responsibility for ensuring that the final version of the
dissertation meets the standards required of a permanent published document. Thus,
after the student successfully passes the final examination and no later than 2 weeks
(10 business days) before your final defense, submit the on-line request for your
approval forms. (Approval forms cannot be completed before the Graduate School
has received your application for degree). Fill out this form carefully. Be certain to
list the correct graduate program name (which often differs from the academic
department name). If there have been changes to your committee, these changes
must be entered on the Change of Committee Form before your approval forms can
be completed. You will be notified via e-mail when your forms are ready to be picked
up in the Graduate School office (HUC 511). Check your printed approval forms
carefully for accuracy. Your name, the names of your committee members, your
program name, and the title of your thesis/dissertation must precisely match your
official UAB records.

As soon as possible after your defense, complete any changes or corrections to your
manuscript that were requested by your committee and obtain signatures of all
committee members and your program director in blue or black ink on all three
copies of your approval form.

No later than 10 business days following your public defense, submit one corrected
copy of your finished manuscript on paper or as a PDF file (see Publishing Your
Thesis or Dissertation and Editing), your signed approval forms and all additional
applicable form to Jan Baird in the Graduate School (HUC 511) for review. If you are
reprinting a published article, you must also submit permission to reprint from the
copyright holder. You do not need to make an appointment. You will be notified when
the document review is completed (usually within 2-3 days of submission).Your
manuscript will be reviewed for adherence to format requirements and for
consistency in style throughout the document.




                                                                                   27
The Graduate School will have the two copies of the final version of the dissertation
bound and will place the bound copies in the appropriate UAB library.

Policy 11: Final Examination
The final examination should take the form of a presentation and defense of the
dissertation, followed by an examination of the candidate's comprehensive
knowledge of the field. This examination must be scheduled through the Graduate
School to allow attendance of the dean. The meeting must be open to all interested
parties, should be publicized on the UAB campus and must take place at least 30
days before the expected date of graduation. Candidates must be registered for at
least three semester hours of graduate work during the term in which the final
examination is taken.

If in the opinion of more than one member of the dissertation committee, the
student has failed the final, oral examination, there is no consensus to pass. The
chair of the committee shall advise the student that the dissertation fails to meet the
requirements of the Graduate School. The chair shall notify the student in writing
about the reason(s) for failure. If the students resubmits or submits a new
dissertation for consideration by the Graduate School at least two members of the
new examining committee shall be drawn from the original committee. If the
modified or new dissertation fails to meet the requirements of the Graduate School,
the student shall be dismissed from the Graduate School.

Students who fail to submit a completed dissertation within one quarter following the
final examination will be charged a degree completion fee each quarter. After two
quarters students are required to schedule another meeting of the supervisory
committee. Exceptions to the policy must be approved in advance of the deadline by
the program director or graduate dean.

Policy 12: Recommendation for Degree
The candidate will be recommended for the doctoral degree to the Graduate School
Dean by the graduate study committee and the graduate program director. This
recommendation must be received no later than 20 days before the end of the term
in which the candidate is expected to complete all degree requirements. Candidates
must be in good academic standing to graduate, with no temporary grades (I or N)
for courses required for degree on their transcripts.

Policy 13: Award of Degree
Upon approval by the Graduate School Dean and payment of any outstanding
financial obligations to the university, the student will receive the degree from the
president of the university.




                                                                                    28
SPECIFIC GRADUATE SCHOOL POLICES
FOR AWARDING THE PHD

Taken from http://main.uab.edu/sites/gradschool/students/current/theses/98877/

Completing your graduate degree requires completing all paperwork before the
semester deadlines.

Program requirements vary. It is your responsibility to consult the graduate
catalog and meet with your advisor to ensure that you have completed the
requirements of your program. Questions about Graduate School requirements not
satisfactorily answered on the web site should be addressed to the Graduate School
(934-8227)

Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Doctoral students must submit
this form before the first day of classes at least two semesters before the semester
of intended graduation and be enrolled in research hours during those two
semesters. (If you pre-register, this form must be completed before that date.)
Master's students must submit this form before the first day of classes at least one
semester before the semester of intended graduation and be enrolled in research
hours during that semester. Admission to candidacy must be submitted and
approved by the Graduate School before you can register for research hours (699 or
799). The graduate study committee must be appointed and approved by the
Graduate School dean.

IRB and IACUC Approval. If the research involves human or animal subjects,
approval from IRB or IACUC must be documented before admission to candidacy can
be approved and must be kept current until the research is completed. The student's
name must appear on all IRB Approval Forms. For more information regarding IRB
(human subjects) requirements, visit http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=30246.
For more information regarding IACUC (animal subjects) requirements, visit
http://main.uab.edu/internal/show.asp?durki=34597.

Application for Degree form. This form must be submitted to the Graduate School
by the end of the 3rd week of classes in the semester of intended
graduation. There is a $50 fee that is charged to your student account. This form is
your official notification to the Graduate School that you intend to complete
graduation requirements that semester. The process of clearing your records for
graduation begins with the receipt of this application. At that time, your diploma is
ordered. Note: This application does not carry over into the following semester.
Students who do not complete graduation requirements as expected must reapply
for the following semester and must register for course hours in that semester. The
new application for degree form (approved at the departmental level and submitted
to the Graduate School) must be submitted by the posted deadline for that
semester. Your records must be checked again, and a new diploma will be ordered.
The reorder fee is $25 and will be charged to your student account. (Approval forms
cannot be completed until this Application for Degree has been submitted to the
Graduate School.)




                                                                                  29
The following requirements and procedures apply only to students who are
completing a thesis or dissertation (Plan 1)

Final, public defense. Some programs hold private and public defense meetings;
however, the Graduate School is concerned only with the public defense, which must
be held no later than 30 days before the date of graduation. An earlier defense
date is strongly recommended in order to allow time for completing the final
requirements before graduation (i.e., format approval and submission of final
document to the Graduate School. Set the date and time of your final defense well in
advance and at a time when all committee members can attend. Determine from
your committee members how far in advance of your defense date they require a
completed        copy      of       your       manuscript         for       review.

Submit official notification of defense date, time, and location to the UAB Reporter.
This can be done on line at www.uab.edu/reporter. Items must be submitted by
noon on Monday of the week before publication.

Thesis or dissertation approval forms. No later than 2 weeks (10 business
days) before your final defense, submit the on-line request for your approval
forms. (Approval forms cannot be completed before the Graduate School has
received your application for degree). Fill out this form carefully. Be certain to list the
correct graduate program name (which often differs from the academic
department name). If there have been changes to your committee, these changes
must be entered on the Change of Committee Form before your approval forms can
be completed. You will be notified via e-mail when your forms are ready to be picked
up in the Graduate School office (HUC 511). Check your printed approval forms
carefully for accuracy. Your name, the names of your committee members, your
program name, and the title of your thesis/dissertation must precisely match your
official UAB records.

As soon as possible after your defense, complete any changes or corrections
to your manuscript that were requested by your committee and obtain
signatures of all committee members and your program director in blue or black ink
on all three copies of your approval form.

No later than 10 business days following your public defense, submit one
corrected copy of your finished manuscript on paper or as a PDF file (see Publishing
Your Thesis or Dissertation and Editing), your signed approval forms and all
additional applicable form to Jan Baird in the Graduate School (HUC 511) for review.
If you are reprinting a published article, you must also submit permission to reprint
from the copyright holder. You do not need to make an appointment. You will be
notified when the document review is completed (usually within 2-3 days of
submission).Your manuscript will be reviewed for adherence to format requirements
and for consistency in style throughout the document.

Clear all outstanding debts with the Student Accounting Office.




                                                                                        30
After your document has been approved by the Graduate School

Electronic submission

Submit a PDF file of your completed, committee approved document to the Graduate
School on a good quality CD. The $60 ProQuest/UMI microform fee applies to all
dissertations submitted to UAB. Copyright fees and access fees are optional.
Students who submit electronically may order personal bound copies through Sterne
Library.

Paper submission

Have copies made for binding. Two bound copies are required for placement in UAB
libraries. You may order as many additional copies as you like. The cost for having
those copies bound is separate from the copying costs ($25 per bound copy).

To avoid errors in your final bound document, check each page of each copy to
ensure that all pages are present, have been copied correctly, and are in the correct
order. Turn any reversed caption pages to face the accompanying illustration(s).
Submit your bindery-ready copies to the Graduate School. The binding process is
usually completed approximately 4-5 months after the date of graduation. When the
bound copies are delivered to UAB, the Graduate School will deliver the library copies
to the appropriate library and will contact you or the person you designate to pick up
your personal copies. You are responsible for ensuring that all bound copies of your
document are picked up in the Graduate School office within 30 days of notification.

Note: Students who leave the Birmingham area before the approval process
is complete are STILL responsible for ensuring that their own requirements
are met before semester deadlines.

Degree is officially conferred when the final copy or copies of your document
have been cleared by the Graduate School office and when all records have been
cleared. Grades are not cleared until the end of exams in the semester in which you
graduate. Until this process has been completed, the Graduate School cannot offer
assurance to a third party (such as a prospective employer) that you have fully
completed the degree. Once the degree has been officially awarded, degree
verification    can      be    obtained      through      Student    Clearinghouse
(www.studentclearinghouse.org). Official transcripts can be requested through the
UAB Registrar’s Office (934-822 or www.students.uab.edu\transcripts)

Here are additional sources of information about graduation requirements:

   •   Graduate Catalog http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=98842
   •   UAB Format Manual for Theses and Dissertations
       http://main.uab.edu/sites/gradschool/students/current/theses/
   •   Requirements for the Doctoral Degree
       http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=95303




                                                                                   31
Graduate School Deadlines

The following dates are subject to change. Check this schedule each semester for
any changes to the posted dates. Also check with your department. Some programs
have earlier deadline dates for the application for degree.

SEMESTER        DIPLOMA        DEADLINE FOR       LAST DAY      GRADUATE
                DATE           APPLICATION        FOR FINAL     SCHOOL FORMAT
                               FOR DEGREE         DEFENSE       ACCEPTANCE
Summer 2007      August 11     June 8             July 6        No later than 10
                                                                days following the
                                                                public defense
Fall 2007       December       September 7        November      No later than 10
                15                                2             days following the
                                                                public defense
Spring 2008      May 3         January 25         March 28      No later than 10
                                                                days following the
                                                                public defense
Summer 2008      August 9      June 6             July 7        No later than 10
                                                                days following the
                                                                public defense
Fall 2008       December       September 5        November      No later than 10
                13                                7             days following the
                                                                public defense
Spring 2009      May 9         January 30         March 27      No later than 10
                                                                days following the
                                                                public defense
Summer 2009      August 8      June 5             July 6        No later than 10
                                                                days following the
                                                                public defense

*Request for Approval Forms must be submitted online no later than 10
days before your public defense date.

**It is your responsibility to submit your completed thesis or dissertation to
the Graduate School for review no later than 2 weeks (10 working days)
after your public defense. You do not need an appointment. Leave your
completed manuscript and all required forms (included in the packet with
your approval forms) with Jan Baird, HUC 511. Failure to meet this deadline
may result in delayed graduation. You will be notified when your manuscript
has been reviewed (usually within 2 – 3 days).

It is the student's responsibility to see that the above deadlines are met.
Students cannot be cleared for graduation until all paperwork has been processed, all
grades have been finalized, and all applicable fees have been paid: binding, copying,
and if applicable, microfilming and copyrighting.

Note: Failure to meet these deadlines will require the filing of a "NEW" Application
for Degree Form (reorder) and registration for course hours for the following
semester. The new application for degree form (approved at the departmental level



                                                                                  32
and submitted to the Graduate School) must be submitted by the deadline posted
above.

The above dates are subject to change. Check with the Graduate School, 511
Hill University Center, or call 934-8234 if you have any questions
concerning graduation.




                                                                           33
POST-1ST YEAR REQUIREMENTS

Student Seminars in the Summer

All students who are in or have gone through the Neuroscience Graduate Program
are required to enroll each Summer Semester for NEUR 782 – Student Seminars (1
credit hour) until the semester before graduation. In this course, students are
required to present one seminar during the semester and to attend all other
seminars presented by the other students.


Mentoring

All students are expected to mentor an incoming student each year, if asked by
Patricia Matthews, throughout his/her graduate career. A mentor’s job is to contact
the assigned student via email or phone, answer any questions the student may
have, help the student find housing (i.e., show them around the city, suggest
places), meet the student when he/she arrives in Birmingham and familiarize the
student with the area (grocery shopping, stores, entertainment, etc.). Mentoring is a
great help to the new student, and it looks very impressive on the mentor’s CV.

Keep in Touch

Students are required to maintain contact with the Neuroscience program manager
(Patricia Matthews). Although you will become part of a particular department, you
are still on the Neuroscience Graduate Program track. The program maintains a
database on each student and any personal information changes (address, phone,
email), publications, presentations, committee meetings, QE, etc. are included in this
database. The program also maintains contact after the student has completed
his/her PhD degree. This information is important for maintaining grants, invitation
as future speakers, committee members, etc.

E-mail

Each student is required to maintain an email account. UAB or a service provider of
choice can provide the email account. Please notify the Neuroscience program
manager of any email address changes. Email is the preferred method of contact by
faculty and program administration. Students are encouraged to check their email
daily, as announcements, meetings, and class information/changes can be posted
frequently.




                                                                                   34
Theses and Dissertations
In the fall of 2006, the Graduate School and the UAB libraries successfully introduced
a pilot project for the electronic submission of theses and dissertations. During the
spring and summer semesters of 2007, students may continue to choose either
paper or electronic submission; however, beginning in the fall of 2007, all theses and
dissertations will be submitted electronically.

An Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETD) is simply the digital (electronic)
representation of your thesis or dissertation. It is the same as its paper counterpart
in content and organization, and it meets the formatting requirements described in
the       Format        Manual         for       Theses        and       Dissertations
(http://www.uab.edu/graduate/theses_dissertation/FormatManual.pdf). If you have
written your theses or dissertation on a computer by using a word processing
program, you have already created an ETD.

Advantages of Electronic Submission

   •   Rather than printing your document over and over as you make changes and
       progress through the various stages of review, you will be able to simply
       make corrections to the electronic file, convert the final version to a PDF file,
       and submit that file to the Graduate School on a CD. (Members of your
       committee may still prefer paper copies for their review process.)
   •   You may include additional information (e.g., data or multimedia files) that
       might not be possible or appropriate to incorporate into a paper document.
   •   You will not need to pay to have copies made.
   •   You will not need to pay for having your manuscript bound.
   •   Whereas paper copies spend months waiting to be bound and distributed,
       your electronic document can be available much more quickly and, if you so
       choose, to a much wider audience.

It is important to recognize the distinction between electronic submission
and electronic publication.

Electronic submission means simply that, rather than printing your document and
submitting paper copies to the Graduate School to be bound, you will submit your
final document to the Graduate School as a PDF file on a CD. Committee members
may still, if they choose, require a paper copy for their part of review process.

Electronic publication is a separate issue and refers to the ways in which your
document, even those submitted on paper, will be made available to others. This
issue requires further consideration. See below for a discussion of publication and
copyright issues.

Format Manual for Theses and Dissertations
http://www.uab.edu/graduate/theses_dissertation/FormatManual.pdf
Quick Guide to APA Reference
http://www.uab.edu/graduate/theses_dissertation/APAQuickGuide.pdf




                                                                                     35
Publishing Your Dissertation
All doctoral students submitting a dissertation to the UAB Graduate School, whether
on paper or as an electronic document, must sign an agreement with ProQuest/UMI
Dissertation Publishing, the firm that has acted as the repository and distributor for
the majority of dissertations written in the United States for more than sixty years.
For more than a decade, ProQuest/UMI has also provided on line access to this
database. It is important that you read and understand the ramifications of the
Proquest/UMI agreement, the UAB Publication Agreement, and any other publishing
agreement that you may be asked to sign. To make informed decisions, you, your
faculty advisor, and your committee should be aware of the publication practices in
your field of study, particularly if you have previously published or plan to publish
any part of your research in a journal or book.

The ProQuest/UMI Publication Agreement

A copy of each UAB dissertation is sent to ProQuest/UMI, where a digital copy is
stored both in the ProQuest/UMI archives and in the Library of Congress. Any
researcher can locate your document through a subject, author, or keyword search,
read your abstract, and preview the first 24 pages of your dissertation. In addition,
unless you specifically indicate otherwise in the publication agreement you will be
required to sign, your document may also be purchased by anyone as a download or
as a bound copy. ProQuest/UMI pays you royalties on those sales at the rate of 10%
for any year in which this amount accrues to $10 or more.

ProQuest/UMI also provides free access to the full text of UAB dissertations when
they    are    accessed   by    any     computer    with  a    UAB    IP   address.
(http://il.proquest.com/products_umi/dissertations/) This level of accessibility has
numerous advantages for both the student and the university; however, immediate
open access is not appropriate for all students. See Advantages of Open Access and
Prior Publication Issues below and read the ProQuest booklet, Publishing Your
Graduate Work with UMI Dissertation Publishing very carefully before signing this
agreement (pages 3 and 4 of the booklet, plus page 5 if ProQuest/UMI is handling
your copyright).

Submission Requirements

Submission of dissertations to ProQuest/UMI for inclusion in this repository for
current research is required by most American universities, including UAB.

Electronic submission

If you choose to submit your document to the Graduate School electronically,
however, access to your work will be increased significantly. Theses will be
accessible through the UAB library web site and other search engines. Read the UAB
publication agreement carefully and consult with your committee about your options.
(See Advantages of Open Access and Prior Publication Issues below.)




                                                                                   36
Advantages of Open Access

Before theses and dissertations were available electronically, only those that were
later published in a journal or book were readily available outside the university in
which they were written. As a result, much valuable research went unnoticed and
was often unnecessarily repeated. Open access to theses and dissertations results in
a wider dissemination of information. Students and universities around the world can
easily, quickly, and inexpensively share knowledge. Research can advance more
effectively; also the visibility, usage, and impact of your own findings increase, as
does your access to the findings of others. The more widely available your research,
the more other researchers are likely to give credit to you in their own publications,
and the more your own visibility is increased.

Prior Publication Issues

Publishers of some professional journals (e.g., Elsevier) have made the decision that
dissertations that are available on line, even those with world-wide availability, do
not qualify as prior publication and therefore do not deter later publication. However,
other publishers (e.g., the American Physiological Society) have reached the
opposite conclusion.

Disclosing potential intellectual property in dissertations published on line may also
preclude patent rights in some areas of the world. If you have patent concerns or
concerns that the electronic posting of your dissertation might prevent later
acceptance of your research to professional journals or book publishers, it is your
responsibility to consult with your committee and with possible future publishers to
make an informed decision. The University of Cincinnati maintains an Academic
Journal Policy Database (http://www.etd.uc.edu/journal) that may help you discover
a particular journal’s policies. In addition, most professional journals publish
Instructions to Authors on their web site where many specifically address this issue.
Others, however, do not. Many journals state that their policy is to deal with each
submission on a case-by-case basis. In order to clarify the policies of a particular
journal, you may need to contact that publisher.

(Updated: 01/10/07)

Copyright Law and Your Dissertation
Copyright law affects you in two ways: It governs the way in which you are allowed
to use another person’s published works to support your own writing, and it
determines how another person may use yours.

Use of previously published material

In academia it is generally accepted that “fair use” allows writers to use small
portions of copyrighted material if the original meaning or intent is not distorted in
any way and if credit is given to the source from which material was taken. Writers
may not, however, use substantial portions of text (e.g., several pages) or tables,
figures, photographs, or other illustrative material without the written permission
of the copyright holder, who is usually the publisher of a journal or book.

Copyright law as it applies to the Internet is uncertain at best. To be safe, assume



                                                                                    37
that, unless the work has a specific statement indicating that the item is in public
domain, it is under copyright protection and that you may not use it without written
permission.

If you include material for which you have received written permission to use, (even
if it is your own previously published article [i.e., a reprint]), that permission must
be submitted to the Graduate School along with your finished document; in addition,
a statement that the material is “used by permission” must appear in your thesis or
dissertation (see the UAB Format Manual for specific wording).

Copyrighting your own work

U.S. copyright law provides automatic copyright protection for written work from the
time at which it is fixed in a tangible form for the first time. The advantage of
officially registering (and paying for) your copyright is that registration establishes a
public record of your copyright claim. A copyright page may be included in your
thesis or dissertation whether or not you register for copyright protection. However,
in the event that you later wish to initiate a copyright infringement suit, this official
registration is required. You may initiate copyright procedures at the time of
submission to the Graduate School, or you may copyright your dissertation at any
time in the future. If you copyright your dissertation, a copyright page should be
added to your dissertation.

ProQuest/UMI, the company that publishes the online database Dissertation
Abstracts will also handle the copyright procedure if you wish. The cost is $65 and is
paid at the time that you pay your microform fee (or you may file your own
copyright application through the U.S. Copyright Office: http://www.copyright.gov/).
The $65 fee to ProQuest/UMI includes copyright registration plus completion of
requisite forms and applications and the creation of the deposit copy of your
dissertation.

If you are reprinting articles which have previously been published or that you wish
to publish later, the publishing company owns (or will own) the copyright. Therefore,
preprint/reprint theses and dissertations should not be copyrighted.

Forms to complete:

       Survey of Earned Doctorates --
   http://www.uab.edu/graduate/apply/acrobat/sed04_05.pdf

       Hooding form to be completed 1 month before graduation –
    http://www.uab.edu/graduate/commencement.pdf

       Author's permission for use of article in dissertation –
    http://www.uab.edu/graduate/apply/coauthor.txt




                                                                                      38
Frequently Asked Questions

Does the Graduate School provide help writing the thesis/dissertation?
Yes. Each semester, the Graduate School, through the Professional Development
Program offers a variable-credit-hour course, GRD 704 Specialized Instruction, in
which a student works individually with an instructor on any stage of the
thesis/dissertation writing process. The Professional Development Program also
offers each semester a free 2-hour seminar Staying Afloat While Writing a Thesis or
Dissertation to help students understand the thesis/dissertation process.

Does     the    Graduate        School   provide    help    with     formatting     my
thesis/dissertation?
Individual formatting help      is not provided. This booklet provides most of the
information necessary for        meeting the formatting requirements and contains
formatting tips for Microsoft   Word users.

May I submit my thesis/dissertation to the Graduate School electronically?
Yes. As of Fall 2007, this is the only method of submission.

May I mail in my manuscript for the format review?
No. The formatting review must be done in person and must be done no later than
10 days following your final defense.

If I have left the Birmingham area, can I mail my thesis/dissertation in for
review and for the editing process?
After the initial format check (which must be done in person), you may send your
manuscript to The Graduate School via FedEx, UPS or U.S Express. However, the
Graduate School will not return the thesis/dissertation to you by mail. Your
representative must retrieve it from the Graduate School office.

If I have left the Birmingham area, how can I handle my binding and other
fees?
It is necessary to take care of all fees before leaving the area.

Can I have a friend or other representative turn in my thesis/dissertation
for me?
Yes. After the format check, you may designate someone to turn in preliminary
and/or final copies of your thesis/dissertation. However, it is your responsibility, not
the Graduate School and not your agent, to make certain that the thesis/dissertation
process has been successfully completed and that all deadlines are met. You will be
asked to sign a form officially designating your agent.

Does the graduate school get my approval form signatures for me?
No. It is your responsibility to obtain the signatures of each committee member and
your program director. Check carefully to ensure that all information is entered
correctly. The Graduate School Dean’s signature and the date of official approval will
be entered by the Graduate School once you have submitted your final copies.

Am I required to copyright my thesis or dissertation?
Official copyright is not required. Registration establishes a public record of your
copyright claim. For an additional fee of $45 you may obtain copyright on your work
at the same time as you submit it for editing. Master’s theses are not usually
copyrighted. However, if you do choose to copyright your theses, it must also be


                                                                                     39
digitized (at an additional fee of $60). Dissertations must be digitized. Any document
that is copyrighted must also have a copyright page.

What would cause my manuscript to be rejected?
If you have not met the requirements or if you have arrived without the necessary
documents, your manuscript will be rejected without being fully reviewed. You will
need to make another appointment when those requirements have been met. All this
must take place before the deadline posted for your graduating semester.

Where do I get my final copies printed?
You may have your thesis/dissertation copied at the Copy Center on the first floor in
Hill University Center or you may choose an off campus copier. A $75.00 voucher,
provided by the GSA, is available in the Graduate School office to offset copying
expenses if you use the Copy Center at UAB.

Can I use color images in my manuscript?
Yes. You may use black and white images during the editing process of your
thesis/dissertation. Once the manuscript has been approved, you may insert the
color images.

Do my final copies have to be printed on a special paper?
The two library copies must be printed on white 20-24 lb. weight, acid-free, 8 ½ x
11, watermarked paper. Other copies may be on standard white paper.

Where do I turn in my final copies once they have been printed?
All copies must be returned to the Graduate School.

How much are the binding fees?
Binding is $25.00 for each bound copy (two are required). Digitizing (required for all
doctoral dissertations but not for master’s theses) is $60.00. Copyright (not
required) it is an additional $45.

Should I order my personal bound copies at the same time as the library
copies?
Yes. Orders for multiple bound copies of your thesis or dissertation should be placed
through the Graduate School at the same time you order your required two library
copies.

Where do I get the binding fee invoice?
The binding fee invoice is available in the Graduate School. It is to be taken to
Student Accounting on the 3rd floor of Hill Center for payment and the receipt
returned to the Graduate School.

Will my final copies be checked for errors?
The two copies to be bound for the library will be checked. However, any additional
copies that you have requested to be bound will not be checked. If an error is found
in the two library copies (e.g., pagination problems, margins, or missing pages), you
must correct the problem before the final copies will be accepted.

Do I have to have the final copies turned in to the Graduate School before
the graduation ceremony?
No. If you meet the deadline for approval copy submission, you can participate in the
graduation ceremony.


                                                                                   40
How long will it take for my final copies to be bound?
The binding process is usually completed approximately two to three months after
graduation. You will be notified when the bound copies are ready to be picked up.

Will the Graduate School mail my bound copies to me?
No. You are responsible for retrieving your bound copies. The Graduate School
delivers the two library copies to the appropriate libraries and notifies you that your
copies have arrived.

When do I get my diploma, and when will my degree be noted on my
transcripts?
Your diploma, along with a copy of an unofficial transcript, will be mailed to you
approximately 10 days after all requirements for graduation have been met. Your
official transcript will also be updated at that time. Please ensure that the Graduate
School has your current address for diploma delivery.




                                                                                    41
GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR ALL STUDENTS




                                             42
            GUIDELINES FOR GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AT UAB

Adapted from the Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools publication, “A Model
Policy for Graduate Assistantship Administration,” by C.W. Minkel and M. P. Richards,
1987. The term “Graduate Assistantship” as used here is intended to apply to
graduate research assistants, teaching assistants, and fellows.

 Background1
Programs of graduate study are designed to transform the individual from student to
professional scholar or practitioner. Graduate assistantships2 are designed to provide
intellectual guidance and financial support for promotion of the student's education.
When a graduate assistantship is well conceived and executed, it serves as an
ideal instrument to help facilitate the desired transformation. The primary goal of an
assistantship is, then, to facilitate progress toward the graduate degree. The
graduate assistant is a student functioning in an apprenticeship role which
contributes to the student’s own professional development.

As a student, the graduate assistant is expected to perform well academically to
retain the assistantship. He or she is to be trained, counseled, and evaluated
regularly by a graduate faculty mentor so as to develop professional skills
in teaching and/or research. The graduate assistant is expected to meet specific
obligations in these areas as outlined in the letter of appointment. The contribution
made by the graduate assistant supports the teaching and/or research mission of the
university. The responsibilities of the graduate assistant may be greater than those
required of other students, but the opportunities for professional development are
also greater. Any work obligations of the assistant are incident to the assistant’s
education.

Eligibility
To be eligible for an assistantship, a student should be admitted to a graduate
program as a full-time, degree-seeking student. The assistant must be enrolled
during the period of the assistantship. He or she should have achieved, and should
continue to maintain, good standing. Students found to have engaged in academic or
nonacademic misconduct are ineligible for appointment and will have their
appointments terminated.

Appointment Procedures
Appointment of graduate assistants should be made and monitored by the Program
Director, Department Chair, and the Dean of the School where the appointment is
made. Because the terms of individual awards may vary from department to
department, and even within a single department, it is the responsibility of the
Program Director and/or Department Chair to make the offer of appointment in an
official letter. In cases where the funding is being provided from an entity outside the
Department (e.g., the Graduate School), the terms of the assistantship will be
communicated to the Program Director so that these terms can be spelled out in the
official letter of appointment. In the case of the Graduate School Assistantship,
regular and direct communication should occur between the Program Director and
the Graduate School Dean regarding the student's progress. When teaching is
involved, the prospective assistant may be required to demonstrate proficiency in
spoken and written English before appointment. Each graduate student who receives
an assistantship must receive a letter of appointment, signed by the Program
Director and/or Department Chair, that clearly spells out the terms of the
assistantship.


                                                                                     43
These terms should include, but not be limited to, the following issues:
      Title of appointment, time commitment, and length of appointment
      Conditions and timing for reappointment
      Stipend level and whether or not fees, health insurance, and tuition will be
      paid
      Course load, if teaching is involved
      Description of duties, if applicable
      Expectation regarding whether or not the assistant may take on employment
      Expectations regarding time commitments and responsibilities between terms
      Name and position of supervisor How the student assistant is to be evaluated
      Resources to be provided (e.g., equipment, supplies, office space, travel
      funds)
      Deadline for acceptance of the assistantship offer

Term of the Assistantship
Each assistantship should be made for a maximum period of one year. Assistantships
generally begin with the academic calendar year. Reappointment is possible but the
terms of reappointment are variable, determined by policies of the program.

Responsibilities of the Graduate Assistant
A fundamental responsibility of the graduate assistant is to work closely with the
faculty supervisor in carrying out research or teaching activities, while at the same
time making good progress toward the completion of the degree program. If the
student’s assistantship responsibilities and academic program are properly
coordinated, these responsibilities will be compatible. The assistant should articulate
his or her goals early in the term of appointment and work with the supervisor to
achieve them. The graduate assistant is obligated at all times to maintain high
ethical standards in academic and nonacademic activities, and to report violations of
these to the faculty supervisor. The graduate assistant should keep well informed of
departmental, school, and institutional regulations, and follow them consistently. If
problems arise in the assistantship assignments, the graduate assistant should seek
help first from the faculty supervisor. If problems cannot be resolved, the student
should consult the Program Director.

In general, graduate assistants are expected to be available in the periods
between academic terms. Graduate assistants are entitled to the following
short-term leaves:

       a minimum of 15 calendar days (one-half month) paid leave of
       absence (vacation) per calendar year,

       15 calendar days (one-half month) paid sick leave of absence per
       calendar year, and

       parental leave of absence (with pay) of 30 consecutive days per
       calendar year upon the birth or adoption of a child. Either or both
       parents are eligible for parental leave.

These leaves (vacation, sick, parental) do not accrue. All leaves require
notification of and approval by the mentor or graduate program director and
may be extended, if necessary, with the permission of the graduate program
director. Program policies regarding leaves of absence must apply equitably to all


                                                                                    44
full time students in good standing in the program. With the agreement of the
mentor and graduate program director, extended, unpaid, non-emergency absences
from campus for periods up to a month may be approved. Extended absences
(without pay) for non-academic purposes should be limited. Students should consult
the Graduate School Policies and Procedures concerning leaves of absence. In
emergencies, graduate assistants should inform their mentors or program directors
as soon as possible about the need for a leave of absence.


Privileges
Graduate assistants should be assigned space and equipment sufficient to carry out
their assignments effectively. Normally this would include a desk, chair, file space,
a mail box, and office and lab supplies, where needed. Where possible, graduate
assistants should be provided secretarial assistance or computer access when they
are preparing materials related to their assignments.


Evaluation
Goals should be worked out with the faculty mentor early in the academic year. Each
graduate assistant should receive a formal evaluation from his or her faculty
supervisor once each year. Excellence should be noted in an assistant’s
record, as should inadequacies in performance. Ongoing informal evaluation should
precede more formal measures. The results of formal evaluations will be entered into
the assistant's departmental record, including evidence that the student has
reviewed the evaluation.


Reappointment
Priority for reappointment is determined by the graduate program but should be
given to those graduate assistants making good progress toward completion of the
degree and performing well in their assistantship duties. Criteria for reappointment
should be announced in advance of reapplication and should generally include:

       maintenance of good standing and satisfactory progress toward the degree
       assessment of performance during the annual review
       length of time on the assistantship
       length of time in the degree program




1
  Prepared by the Advisory Committee to the Graduate Council. Questions
concerning this document should be addressed to the Graduate School.
2
  Note: Each graduate assistant should be provided with a copy of this document
detailing the rights and responsibilities of the graduate assistant.
 Revised 3/01.


                                                                                  45
GRIEVANCE POLICY

Although rare, disagreements can arise that may affect a student's progress
towards the completion of the degree. The parties involved in such a dispute
should make a good faith effort to discuss and resolve the disagreement. The
following guidelines may be helpful.

Step 1. Identify the problem; clearly define what happened and what you
perceive is needed to resolve the issue.

Step 2. Approach the other person or group involved with the dispute one-
on-one. Set up a mutually agreeable time to talk; listen and ask to be
listened to; use "I" statements when speaking; avoid assigning blame or
leveling accusations.

Step 3. If these steps do not culminate in a resolution, the parties involved
with the dispute should agree to approach an impartial third party, a
mediator, who will respect confidentiality and with whom the situation can
be discussed. The Program Director will suggest such a third party if asked.
The mediator may be able to help the parties involved reach a resolution.

Step 4. If no resolution is found then you may submit the disagreement to
the Graduate Program for arbitration. Please follow these procedures:

   a) Each party in the dispute should submit a written description of the
   disagreement to the Program Director and the Chair. Please include a
   description of the actions taken to resolve the dispute to date and the
   name of the mediator who was involved.

   b) The Graduate Program Director will review the written documents. This
   group will make a determination as to whether or not the disagreement is
   Program-related and thus appropriate for arbitration at the Program level.

   c) If the dispute is found to be Program-related, the Graduate Program
   Director, together with the Graduate Program Committee, will act as an
   arbitrator. If the dispute involves the Program Director, Associate Director
   or any member of the Program Committee, then that individual will be
   excused from the deliberations. The Committee may request additional
   information from the parties involved. The Program Director and the
   Admissions and Advisory Committee will meet to discuss the problem
   within 14 calendar days following receipt of the written document or
   following the receipt of any additional materials. In the event that a
   quorum of the Committee is not available within this time period, the
   Committee will meet as soon thereafter as a quorum can be gathered. The
   Committee may also ask the parties in the dispute to appear before the
   committee to provide additional information.

   d) The result of the Committee's deliberations will be communicated in
   writing to the parties involved in the dispute within seven (7) calendar
   days after the meeting.



                                                                                  46
Step 5. To Chair for final review of arbitration before proceeding to Appeals
Board.

If a party involved in the dispute is not satisfied with the outcome of the
arbitration process, an appeal may be submitted to the Graduate School
Appeals Board. Please see the Graduate Student Handbook for specific
information about the appeals process.




                                                                                47
ACADMIC MISCONDUCT POLICY AND PROCEDURE

All faculty and students have a responsibility to report suspected research
misconduct to the appropriate parties. According to the Office of Research Integrity
(http://www.ori.hhs.gov/documents/FR_Doc_05-9643.shtml,          p.37),  RESEARCH
MISCONDUCT “means fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing,
performing, or reviewing research or in reporting research results.

   a. Fabrication is making up data or results and recording or reporting them.
   b. Falsification is manipulating research materials, equipment, or processes, or
      changing or omitting data or results such that the research is not accurately
      represented in the research record.
   c. Plagiarism is the appropriation of another person’s ideas, processes, results,
      or words without giving appropriate credit.
   d. Research misconduct does not include honest error or differences of opinion.”

If academic misconduct is suspected for a graduate student, the accusing party (be
they faculty, staff, or another student) is to inform the Director of Graduate Studies
and supply copies of any relevant material pertaining to the accusation. The
Director of Graduate Studies will prepare a letter for the accused student that
summarizes the accusations and asks for an explanation in a non-accusatory
fashion. If the Director of Graduate Studies deems the student’s explanation
unacceptable, and if it appears that serious, unethical conduct has taken place, the
matter is referred to the departmental Graduate Committee (with the exclusion of
the graduate student member) for consideration. After deliberation, a decision is
made either to exonerate the student, or to impose sanctions up to and including
expulsion. If sanctions are imposed, the decision has to be approved by the
Department Chair. The graduate student has the right of appeal with the
opportunity to present his/her position to the departmental Graduate Committee.
Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible.

If the infraction is less severe, the Director of Graduate Studies counsels the
graduate student and instructs the student in the accepted ethical practices of
science.

Regardless of the severity of the infraction, the Director of Graduate Studies must
provide a written summary of all actions surrounding the allegations. If sanctions
are imposed, the graduate student has the right to appeal. If the appeal to the
Graduate Committee is not satisfactory, the graduate student may appeal to the
Graduate School itself, according to the Graduate School Policies and Procedures
(http://www.uab.edu/graduate/polproc.htm). In this case, copies of all the
departmental proceedings with documentation will be forwarded to the Graduate
Dean, who in turn will maintain records of all subsequent proceedings. According
to the Policies and Procedures of the Graduate School, “the decision of the Graduate
Appeals Board is final.” Moreover, academic misconduct that involves potential
criminal activities will be referred to the appropriate offices within the institution.
Students and faculty should be familiar with the university’s policies on scientific
misconduct, especially as they apply to research and courses.

If the department chair or program director is the instructor who charges the
student with academic misconduct, then a senior faculty member from the
department, appointed by the Program’s Graduate Committee, will review the
charge and take appropriate actions as described above.



                                                                                    48
PERSONNEL MISCONDUCT

MEMORANDUM

DATE:           June 29, 2005

TO:              Deans, Chairs, and Directors

FROM:           Eli I. Capilouto, DMD, MPH, ScD
                Provost

                Richard B. Marchase, PhD
                Vice President for Research

We are taking this opportunity to ensure that your faculty and staff are aware of the
proper procedures for reporting concerns about practices or personnel conduct at
UAB.


   • For most cases, reports should follow the “chain of command”. The
      immediate supervisor should be first notified unless the problem involves
      that individual, in which case the next highest supervisor should be notified.
      Any situation that endangers personnel safety should be reported directly to
      UAB Police, Occupational Health and Safety (934-2487), Facilities, or others
      as appropriate with subsequent notification of a supervisor.

   • Scientific misconduct, defined as “fabrication, falsification, plagiarism, or
      other practices which seriously deviate from those that are commonly
      accepted within the scientific community for proposing, conducting, or
      reporting research” should be reported to the Vice President for Research,
      who serves as the UAB Scientific Integrity Officer. UAB’s Policy Concerning
      the Maintenance of High Ethical Standards in Research and Other Scholarly
      Activities can be found at http://www.iss.uab.edu/Pol/HiEthicsMtab.pdf and
      provides information about the ethical standards expected of UAB faculty and
      staff.

   • Concerns about research or research administration can also be reported
      directly to the UAB Office of Research Compliance
      http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=55742 or through the hotline
      maintained by this office. Anonymous reports are accepted.

   • Problems related to personnel issues should be reported through the
      supervisory chain of command unless it is more appropriate to go directly to
      Human Resource Management Relations 934-4701.

Additional information can be found in the handbooks:
---- You and UAB: Handbook for Administrative Professional and Support
Personnel
(http://www.hrm.uab.edu/you_uabhandbook/You%20and%20UAB%202005-05-
09sm.pdf)
---- Faculty Handbook and Policies
(http://www.uab.edu/images/provost/APUP/Handbook.pdf).



                                                                                  49
UAB Policy Concerning the Maintenance of High Ethical Standards in
Research and Other Scholarly Activities

This policy has been adapted from a statement on “The Maintenance of High Ethical
Standards in the Conduct of Research” published by the Executive Council of the
Association of American Medical Colleges and has been revised to be in compliance
with the Public Health Service final rule entitled “Responsibilities of Awardee and
Applicant Institutions for Dealing With and Reporting Possible Misconduct in
Science.”    It incorporates recommendations of the UAB Faculty Policies and
Procedures Committee and the UAB Faculty Senate.


A. Introduction

The principles that govern scientific research and scholarship have long been
established and have been applied by faculties and administrators for the discovery
of new knowledge needed by mankind. The maintenance of high ethical standards
in research based on these principles is a central and critical responsibility of
faculties and administrators of academic institutions. Validity and accuracy in the
collecting and reporting of data are intrinsically essential to the scientific process;
dishonesty in these endeavors runs counter to the very nature of research, that is,
the pursuit of truth. The responsibility of the academic community to the public is
acknowledged. The maintenance of public trust in this pursuit is vital. In short, it
is in the best interest of the public and of academic institutions to prevent
misconduct in research and to deal effectively and responsibly with instances in
which misconduct is suspected.


B. Policy Statement

1.     UAB shall accept as faculty members only those individuals whose career
activities clearly demonstrate the highest ethical standards. To this end, the
credentials of all potential faculty are to be thoroughly examined by the appropriate
department/unit heads or their respective in order to verify the claimed
accomplishments of the candidate. The appropriate department/unit heads or their
representatives shall seek further confirmation of the candidate’s accomplishments
during the normal procedures of personal interview and letters from references.
Proof of faculty credentials shall be maintained by the appropriate dean or
department head.

2.     Faculty members who are in supervisory positions with regard to colleagues,
fellows, technicians, and students are expected to work closely with those
individuals to provide them with appropriate guidance and counsel to the end that
those individuals continue to maintain the highest professional and ethical
standards.

3.    The faculty is encouraged to increase student and staff awareness of the
importance of maintaining high ethical standards in research and to discuss issues
related to research ethics in formal courses, in seminars, and by other informal
means.

4.    Research results should be supported by verifiable evidence. Faculty and
staff should maintain sufficient written records or other documentation of their


                                                                                    50
studies. It is the responsibility of department/unit heads, division directors, and
experienced investigators to develop among junior colleagues and students the
necessary respect for careful recording and preservation of primary data.

5.    The faculty is encouraged to engage in free discussion of results, to share
data and techniques, and to avoid secrecy in the conduct of original investigations.
It should be remembered that independent confirmation of results is important in
direct proportion to the potential significance of the results in question and may be
crucial to the establishment of new concepts.

6.    Faculty members are responsible for the quality of all reports based on their
own efforts or on the collaborative work of students, technicians, or colleagues,
especially those which bear the faculty member’s name. The term “reports” as
used here includes, but is not limited to, manuscripts submitted for publication and
abstracts submitted for presentation at meetings. The same standards of scientific
integrity apply to abstracts as to full-length publications. Abstracts or other reports
of preliminary findings should indicate clearly that the findings are preliminary. No
faculty member shall allow his or her name to be used on any report containing
results for which that faculty member cannot assume full professional and ethical
responsibility.

7.    Any UAB employee (including, but not limited to, regular and adjunct faculty,
fellows, technicians, and student employees) or any UAB student who has reason to
suspect any other employee or student of misconduct with regard to the conducting
or reporting of research has the responsibility of following up these suspicions in
accordance with the procedures outlined below. For purposes of this policy,
“misconduct” means fabrication, falsification, plagiarism, or other practices, which
seriously deviate from those that are commonly accepted within the scientific
community for proposing, conducting, or reporting research. It does not include
honest error or honest differences in interpretations or judgments of data.
Intentionally withholding information relevant to the investigation of an alleged case
of misconduct, intentionally pressuring others to do so, or bringing malicious
charges against another individual shall itself be considered misconduct. Also, any
act of interference, retaliation, or coercion by an UAB employee against a student or
employee for using this policy is prohibited and is itself a violation of this policy.


C. Procedures To Be Followed

The “Scientific Misconduct Allegation Review Checklist” is to be used in conjunction
with the procedures in this section and is available at www.iss.uab.edu.

It is the responsibility of student employees, trainees, fellows, faculty members,
staff members, or other employees who become aware of misconduct in research
and other scholarly activities to report such misconduct to one of the following: (a)
their department/unit head, (b) the dean of the school in which their
department/unit is located, or (c) the UAB Scientific Integrity Officer. In the case of
graduate students or of trainees at any level, such evidence also may be reported
to the dean of the Graduate School.

The individual receiving such evidence of misconduct must immediately report such
evidence and the allegation of misconduct to the UAB Scientific Integrity Office, the
department/unit head and the dean of the unit in which the alleged misconduct


                                                                                    51
occurred, and the provost. If the UAB Scientific Integrity Officer determines that
the allegation warrants initiation of the inquiry process, the inquiry shall be initiated
immediately, and the office of counsel shall be informed.
Allegations of this nature are very serious matters, and all parties involved should
take measures to assure that the oppositions and reputations of all individuals
named in such allegations and all individuals who in good faith report apparent
misconduct are protected. Details of the charge, the name of the accused, the
identity of the individual brings suspected fraud, and all other information about the
case shall be kept confidential as far as possible, capable with investigating the
case. Revealing confidential information to those not involved in the investigation
shall itself be considered misconduct.

Because UAB is interested in protecting the health and safety of research subjects,
students, staff, and faculty and because UAB is responsible for protecting sponsored
research funds and for ensuring that those funds are spent of the purposed for
which they are give, if the situation warrants it, interim administrative action may
be used prior to conclusion of either the inquiry or the investigation to provide for
the protection of individuals and funds in accordance with existing UAB policy. Such
action includes, but is not limited to, administrative suspension; re-assignment of
student(s); involvement of the Institutional Review Board, the Institutional Animal
Car and Use Committee, and the Office of Internal Audit-UAB; or notification of
external sponsors when required by federal regulations.


D. Initial Inquiry

For purposes of this policy, “inquiry” means information gathering and initial fact
finding to determine whether an allegation or apparent instance of scientific
misconduct warrants an investigation.

1.     The department/unit head or dean shall investigate immediately the charges
through an inquiry process, including an interview with the suspected individual.
The person conducting the inquiry shall ensure that individuals with the necessary
and appropriate expertise are consulted concerning technical aspects of the
activities in question. At least one of those individuals must be form outside the
suspected individual’s department. The record of the inquiry shall document the
review of relevant evidence.

The department/unit head or dean conducting the inquiry shall keep the UAB
Scientific Integrity Officer informed and may request assistance from the UAB
Scientific Integrity Officer. The UAB Scientific Integrity Officer shall keep the Office
of Counsel informed during the inquiry process, and the Office of Counsel shall
provide advice concerning procedural matters. In order to ensure that a real or
apparent conflict of interest does not exist, the UAB Scientific Integrity Officer shall
review the selection of persons to be involved in the inquiry. If it is determined
that a conflict of interest exists, the UAB Scientific Integrity Officer is responsible
for designating who will be involved in the inquiry.

If UAB plans to terminate an inquiry for any reason prior to completion of the
normal progression of such an inquiry, the UAB Scientific Integrity Officer shall
notify the federal Office of Research Integrity and shall include in that notification a
description of the reasons for termination of the inquiry.




                                                                                      52
UAB will make every effort to complete the inquiry within 60 days of its initiation. If
the inquiry extends beyond 60 days, the reasons for the extension will be
documented by the UAB Scientific Integrity Officer and will be retained with the
record of the inquiry.

The written report of the inquiry shall state what evidence was reviewed, shall
indicate the relevant expertise of the persons reviewing he evidence, shall
summarize the relevant interviews, and shall include the conclusions of the inquiry.
The individual(s) against whom the allegation was made shall be given a copy of
the inquiry report and shall have an opportunity to make written comment
regarding the report. This report, including a conclusion as to whether there is
reasonable cause to believe that misconduct has occurred, shall be forwarded to the
provost (with a copy to the UAB Scientific Integrity Officer) through the appropriate
dean who should make whatever comment or recommendation is deemed
warranted.

2.    The Provost, with the advice and counsel of the UAB Scientific Integrity
Officer and others as appropriate, shall decide whether to close the mater or to
appoint an Investigating Committee. If findings from the inquiry provide sufficient
basis for conduction an investigation, the investigation must e started within 30
days of completion of the inquiry. The written report of the inquiry will be made
available to the Investigating Committee.

3.     If the Provost determines that it is not necessary to undertake an
investigation, the Provost will report to the President the reasons for this decision
and the findings of the inquiry. The report will be maintained in a secure manner
for at least 3 years by the Office of the UAB Scientific Integrity Officer.


E. Investigation

For purposes of this policy, “investigation” means the formal examination and
evaluation by a committee of all relevant facts to determine if scientific misconduct
has occurred.

1.     The investigation Committee is appointed by the Provost and will elect its own
chairperson. Members of the Committee shall consist of at least three tenured
faculty members who have the expertise to deal with technical aspects of the
activities in question. At least two of these faculty members must be from outside
the suspected individual’s department. The Provost shall take precautions not to
appoint any committee member who has a real or apparent conflict of interest with
the outcome of the investigation.

The chairperson shall conduct meetings of the Investigating Committee as
frequently as required in order to determine whether or not the activities in
question do indeed constitute misconduct. All such meetings and the deliberations
thereof shall be held in confidence to protect the affected individual or individuals.
Those accused of misconduct shall be given a written summary of the charges and
supporting evidence and shall be afforded an opportunity to appear before the
Committee to comment on allegations. The accused may be represented by
counsel. The Office of Counsel shall be kept informed of the investigation process
and shall advise the Investigating Committee concerning procedural matters.




                                                                                    53
FACULTY LISTING

Frank R. Amthor, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychology
-Neural information processing
Email: amthorfr@uab.edu
TEL: 934-2694

Karlene K. Ball, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychology
-Cognitive impairment and aging
Email: kball@uab.edu
TEL: 934-2610

Scott R. Barnum, Ph.D.
Dept of Microbiology
-Role of complement in CNS diseases
Email: sbarnum@uab.edu
TEL: 934-4972

Dale J. Benos, Ph.D.
Dept of Physiology and Biophysics
-Ion channels
Email: benos@uab.edu
TEL: 934-6220

Etty N. (Tika) Benveniste, Ph.D.
Dept of Cell Biology
-Bidirectional communication between the immune and nervous systems
Email: tika@uab.edu
TEL: 9347667

Mark O. Bevensee, Ph.D.
Dept of Physiology and Biophysics
-Acid-based transport and pH regulation in the nervous system
Email: tr7o7de@uab.edu
TEL: 975-9084

Mary Hagan Boggiano, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychology
-Neural control of feeding
Email: boggiano@uab.edu
TEL: 934-3850

Michael Brenner, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
-Molecular neurobiology
Email: michaelb@uab.edu
TEL: 934-1011




                                                                      54
Steven L. Carroll, M.D., Ph.D.
Dept of Neuropathology
-Neuregulins in nervous system regeneration and neoplasia
Email: scarroll@uab.edu
TEL: 934-9828

Yiu-Fai Chen, Ph.D.
Dept of Medicine, Div of Cardiovascular Disease
-Molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension
Email: yfchen@uab.edu
TEL: 934-2580

James E. Cox, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychology
-Physiological psychology, obesity
Email: jecox@uab.edu
TEL: 934-3850

Christine Curcio, Ph.D.
Dept of Ophthalmology
-Anatomy of human retina, aging
Email: curcio@uab.edu
TEL: 325-8632

Peter J. Detloff, Ph.D.
Dept of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
-Mouse models of human genetic disorders
Email: detloff@uab.edu
TEL: 975-8157

Allan C. Dobbins, Ph.D.
Dept of Biomedical Engineering
-Space and form in vision, fMRI
Email: adobbins@uab.edu
TEL: 934-8492

Lynn Dobrunz, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
-Synaptic transmission, presynaptic properties of single synapses
Email: dobrunz@uab.edu
TEL: 934-7923

Paul D. R. Gamlin, Ph.D.
Dept of Vision Sciences
-Eye movements, central visual processing, fMRI
Email: pgamlin@uab.edu
TEL: 934-0322

Timothy J. Gawne, Ph.D.
Dept of Vision Sciences
-Central vision processing, fMRI
Email: tgawne@uab.edu
TEL: 934-5495


                                                                    55
Vithal K. Ghanta, Ph.D.
Dept of Biology
-Tumor immunology, immune system and aging, CNS and immune system
interactions
Email: vghanta@uab.edu
TEL: 934-4482

G. Yancey Gillespie, Ph.D.
Dept of Surgery, Div of Neurosurgery
-Molecular and cellular biology of malignant gila
Email: yancey@uab.edu
TEL: 975-0438

Candece Gladson, M.D.
Dept of Pathology
-Mechanisms involved in malignant astrocytoma cell migration, invasion and
proliferation
Email: gladson@uab.edu
TEL: 975-7847

Maurizio Grimaldi, M.D., Ph.D.
Pharmacologist / Southern Research Institute
-understand brain cell physiology and how it relates to models of brain disease, and
to design possible therapeutic agents that can reverse changes induced by
pathologic condition
Email: Grimaldi@sri.org
TEL: 581-2269

John J. Hablitz, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
-Cellular mechanisms of neurotransmission
Email: jhablitz@uab.edu
TEL: 934-0742

Lindy E. Harrell, M.D.
Dept of Neurology
-Alzheimer's, aging, behavioral neurology
Email: lharrell@uab.edu
TEL: 934-3847

E. Eugenie Hartmann, Ph.D.
School of Optometry
-Early identification of vision problems in preschool children
Email: EEHartmann@uab.edu
TEL: 934-6756

Richard Jope, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychiatry, Div of Behavioral Neurobiology
-Neuronal signaling systems: mechanisms and abnormalities in neuronal disorders
Email: jope@uab.edu
TEL: 934-7023




                                                                                   56
Robert Kesterson, Ph.D.
Dept of Medicine, Div of Genomics
-Defining neural pathways in CNS that regulate feeding
Email: kesterso@uab.edu
TEL: 934-7206

Kent T. Keyser, Ph.D.
Dept of Vision Sciences
-Neurotransmitters and receptors
Email: ktkeyser@uab.edu
TEL: 975-7225

Peter King, M.D.
Dept of Neurology
--mechanisms of growth factor mRNA stabilization in cancer
Email: pking@uab.edu
TEL: 975-8116

Bruce Korf, M.D., Ph.D.
Dept of Genetics
-Neurofibromatosis Type 1
Email: bkorf@uab.edu.
TEL: 934-9411

Timothy W. Kraft, Ph.D.
Dept of Vision Sciences
-Retinal photoreceptors and color vision
Email: twkraft@uab.edu
TEL: 975-2885

Mathieu Lesort, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychiatry, Div of Behavioral Neurobiology
Email: mlesort@uab.edu
TEL: 934-2465

Robin A. J. Lester, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
-Nicotinic receptors in the CNS
Email: nicotine@uab.edu
TEL: 934-4483

Ling Li, Ph.D.
Dept of Medicine
Email: lili@uab.edu
TEL: 934-4070

Xiaohua Li, M.D., Ph.D.
Dept of Psychiatry, Div of Behavioral Neurobiology
-Psychopharmacology and molecular pathophysiology of mood disorders
Email: xili@uab.edu
TEL: 934-5151




                                                                      57
Yuqing Li, M.D., Ph.D.
Dept of Neurology
--Pathophysiology and experimental therapeutics of dystonia. Molecular and cellular
mechanism of learning and synaptic plasticity
Email: yli@uab.edu
TEL: 996-6299


Michael S. Loop, Ph.D.
Dept of Vision Sciences
-Human and animal psychophysics, color vision
Email: loop@uab.edu
TEL: 934-6751


Richard B. Marchase, Ph.D.
Office of the Vice President of Research
-Glucose metabolism and cytoplasmic glycosylation
Email: marchase@uab.edu
TEL: 934-1294

Guillermo Marques, Ph.D.
Dept of Cell Biology
-Developmental and adult synaptic plasticity, regulation of gene expression during
nervous system development, cell signaling and signal transduction by the TGF-
ß/BMP pathway in neurons.
Email: gmarques@uab.edu
TEL: 975-8851

Lori L. McMahon, Ph.D.
Dept of Physiology and Biophysics
-Hippocampal neurophysiology and plasticity
Email: mcmahon@uab.edu
TEL: 934-3523

James Meador-Woodruff, M.D.
Dept of Psychiatry
Email: jimmw@uab.edu
TEL: 996-6171


Ludwine Messiaen, Ph.D.
Dept of Medicine, Div of Clinical Genetics
-Neurofibromatosis Type 1
Email: lmessiae@uab.edu
TEL: 996-2915


Anthony P. Nicholas, M.D., Ph.D.
Dept of Neurology
-Movement disorders
Email: nicholas@uab.edu
TEL: 975-8509


                                                                                     58
Thomas T. Norton, Ph.D.
Dept of Vision Sciences
-Regulation of ocular development
Email: tnorton@uab.edu
TEL: 934-6742


Suzanne Oparil, M.D.
Dept of Medicine, Div of Cardiovascular Disease
-Pathophysiology of high blood pressure
Email: soparil@uab.edu
TEL: 934-2580


Cynthia Owsley, Ph.D.
Dept of Ophthalmology
-Visual psychophysics, aging
Email: owsley@uab.edu
TEL: 325-8635


Alan K. Percy, M.D.
Dept of Pediatrics, Div of Neurology
-Inherited degenerative diseases, Rett Syndrome, neonatal neurology
Email: apercy@uab.edu
TEL: 934-1055

Steven J. Pittler, Ph.D.
Dept of Vision Sciences
-Photoreceptor function in health and disease
Email: pittler@uab.edu
TEL: 934-6744

Lucas Pozzo-Miller, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
-Calcium signaling, synaptic plasticity, neurotrophic factors
Email: lucaspm@uab.edu
TEL: 975-4659


Alan Randich, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychology
-Experimental psychology
Email: arandich@uab.edu
TEL: 934-3850


Kevin Roth, M.D., Ph.D.
Dept of Pathology
Director, Comprehensive Neuroscience Center
-Regulation of neuronal apoptosis
Email: karoth@uab.edu
TEL: 934-5802


                                                                      59
Gavin Rumbaugh, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
--signaling pathways that are triggered by activation of NMDA receptors following
vesicular release of glutamate from synaptic terminals
Email: grumbaugh@nrc.uab.edu
TEL: 996-6412

Michael E. Sloane, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychology
-Visual perception, psychophysics
Email: sloane@uab.edu
TEL: 934-8733

Harald Sontheimer, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
-Role of neuroglia in brain function
Email: Sontheimer@uab.edu
TEL: 975-5805

David G. Standaert, M.D., Ph.D.
Dept of Neurology
Email: dstandaert@uab.edu

J. David Sweatt, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
-Signal transduction mechanisms in learning and memory
Email: dsweatt@uab.edu
TEL: 975-5196

Elizabeth S. Sztul, Ph.D.
Dept of Cell Biology
-Membrane traffic, protein degredation
Email: esztul@uab.edu
TEL: 934-1465

Edward Taub, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychology
-Biofeedback
Email: etaub@uab.edu
TEL: 934-2471

Anne B. Theibert, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
-Role of phosphoinositides in developmental neurobiology
Email: theibert@uab.edu
TEL: 934-7278

Donald B. Twieg, Ph.D.
Dept of Biomedical Engineering
-MRI technique development for function brain imaging
Email: twieg@uab.edu
TEL: 934-8794



                                                                                    60
Jacques Wadiche, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
--synaptic transmission and glutamate transporters
Email: jwadiche@uab.edu
TEL: 996-6413

Linda Wadiche, Ph.D.
Dept of Neurobiology
--function of adult generated neurons
Email: lwadiche@uab.edu
TEL: 996-6414

Shu Zhen Wang, Ph.D.
Dept of Ophthalmology
-Molecular mechanisms of early neural development
Email: szwang@uab.edu
TEL: 325-8617

Qin Wang, M.D., Ph.D.
Dept of Physiology & Biophysics
--regulation of GPCR cellular responses and in vivo functions
Email: qinwang@uab.edu
TEL: 996-5099

Ray Watts, M.D.
Dept of Neurology
Email: rlwatts@uab.edu
TEL: 934-0683

Rosalyn E. Weller, Ph.D.
Dept of Psychology
-Neuroanatomy of the visual system, fMRI
Email: reweller@uab.edu
TEL: 934-3850

J. Michael Wyss, Ph.D.
Dept of Cell Biology
-Control of the autonomic nervous system
Email: jmwyss@uab.edu
TEL: 934-6086

Jianhua Zhang, Ph.D.
Dept of Pathology
--cell and molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration
Email: zhanja@uab.edu
TEL: 996-5153




                                                                61
STUDENTS

First Year Students

CHRIS AURA
BA, Psychology (2005) -- Minnesota State University, Mankato
NIH Post-Baccalaureate Intramural Research Fellowship (2005-2007)
Email: cjaura@uab.edu



SHARDAY EWELL
BS, Biology (2007) -- Norfolk State University
Email: sewell@uab.edu



CRISTIN GAVIN
BA, Philosophy (2006) -- Birmingham Southern College
BA, Biology (2006) -- Birmingham Southern College
Email: cfgavin@uab.edu



GUYLA JOHNSON
BS, Chemistry (1999) -– Jackson State University
MS, Chemistry (2004) – Indiana University Purdue
Email: johnsguy@hotmail.com


REED PEAVY
BS, Biochemistry (2007) -- University of Houston
Email: trpeavy@uab.edu



JAY SHROPSHIRE
BA, Psychology (2000) -- University of Miami
BS, Biology (2003) -- University of Kentucky
Email: jshrop@uab.edu



PHILIP WEBBER
BS, Biology (2006) -- University of Georgia
Email: philbop@uab.edu




                                                                    62
Current Students

Kate Kosmac
Entered 2006
BS, Biology (2006) – University of Pennsylvania at Johnstown
Mentor: William J. Britt, M.D., Pediatrics


Jason Lowery
Entered 2006
BS, Biology (2006) – Morgan State University, Baltimore MD
Mentor: Elizabeth Sztul, Ph.D., Cell Biology




Przemyslaw (Mack) Nowak
Entered 2006
MS, Computer Science (2002) – Technical University of Lodz, Poland
Mentors:
Timothy Gawne, Ph.D., Vision Science
Frank Amthor, Ph.D., Psychology




Violetta Pivtorayko
Entered 2006
BS, (2006) – University of Pittsburgh, PA
Mentor: Kevin Roth, M.D., Ph.D., Pathology, Comprehensive Neuroscience Center




Ming-Chi Tsai
Entered 2006
BS (2000) – National Chengchi University, Taiwan
MSc (2005) – University College London, UK
Mentor: Jacques Wadiche, Ph.D., Neurobiology




Lindsey Vedder
Entered 2006
BS, Biology (2006) – SUNY, Buffalo NY
Mentor: Lori McMahon, Ph.D., Physiology & Biophysics


Abigail Polter
Entered 2005
BA, Microbiology
Ohio Wesleyan College
Mentor: Xiaohua Li, Ph.D., Neurobiology
Qualifying Exam: Spring 2006



                                                                                63
Kevin Schultz
Entered 2005
BS, Molecular Biology and Computer Science
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Mentor: Claudio Busettini, Ph.D., Vision Science
Qualifying Exam: 2007




Cristy Tower
Entered 2005
BS, Biology
University of Montevallo
Mentor: Elizabeth Sztul, Ph.D., Cell Biology




Alexander Zotov
MS Student
Entered 2005
BS, Computer Science
Jacksonville State University
Mentor: Allan Dobbins, Ph.D., Biomedical Engineering




Robert Mans
Entered 2005
BS, Neurobiological Sciences
University of Florida
Mentor: Ling Li, Ph.D., Neurobiology
Qualifying Exam: Spring 2006




Joshua Anderson
Entered 2004
BS, Psychology
Tarleton State University
Mentor: Candece Gladson, M.D., Pathology




Brandi Baker
Entered 2004
BS, Neurobiological Sciences
University of Florida
Mentor: Tika Benveniste, Ph.D., Cell Biology




                                                       64
Glen Rubin
Entered 2004
BA, Social Studies
SUNY Purchase College
Mentor: Timothy Kraft, Ph.D., Vision Science
Qualifying Exam: 2006



Emily Spencer
Entered 2004
BA, Spanish and Psychology
University of California, Davis
Mentor: Ludwine Messaien, Ph.D., Genetics



Tae-Yeon Eom
Entered 2003
MS, Molecular Biology
Dankook University
Mentor: Richard Jope, Ph.D., Cell Biology
Qualifying Exam: 12 May 2006



Laxmikanth Kankipati
Entered 2003
MS, Public Health
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Mentors: Paul Gamlin, Ph.D., Donald Twieg, Ph.D., Vision Science
Qualifying Exam: 2005



Rachel Penton
Entered 2003
BS, Biology
University of Alabama at Huntsville
Mentor: Robin Lester, Ph.D., Neurobiology
Qualifying Exam: Spring 2005



Christi Perkins
Entered 2003
BS, Biology
Samford University
Mentor: Edward Taub, Ph.D., Behavioral Neuroscience



David McDougal
Entered 2002
BS, Zoology and Psychology
Louisiana State University
Mentor: Paul Gamlin, Ph.D., Vision Science
Qualifying Exam: 2004

                                                                   65
Ryan Splittgerber
Entered 2002
BS, Psychology
Wayne State University
Mentor: Kent Keyser, Ph.D., Vision Science
Qualifying Exam: 2005




Nathan Styles
Entered 2002
BS, Chemical Engineering
Auburn University
Mentor: Charles Falany, Ph.D., Pharmacology & Toxicology




                                                           66
 Principles of Cellular Neuroscience
     Course Director: Dr. Lucas Pozzo-Miller
         Co-Director: Dr. Anne Theibert

             2007 Fall Semester
 Tuesday August 21 – Wednesday December 19

               Monday – Friday
             8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
   Module I Exam on Monday October 8, 2007
  Module II Exam on Friday November 2, 2007
Module III Exam on Wednesday December 19, 2007

        Shelby Building, Room 105
            Recommended Textbook:
  Principles of Neural Science, 4th Edition, 2000
           Kandel, Schwartz & Jessell
                  (McGraw Hill)




                                                    67
Module I: Genes and Molecules of the Nervous System
IBS-700 Blocks 1 thru 3 /// Module coordinator: Theibert
Monday through Friday, August 22 through October 11 – 5 credit hours
 TEXTS: Voet & Voet, Biochemistry, 3rd Ed.; Alberts, Bray, Lewis, Raff, Roberts,
           and Watson, Molecular Biology of The Cell, 4th Ed.

      BLOCK 1: CELL AND PROTEIN BIOCHEMISTRY (HEAD: BARNES)
      8/22            Introduction to cells                   Patel           V-1/2; 3-49
      8/22            Amino acid chemistry                    Patel           V4; 63-78
      8/23            Primary structure of proteins           Barnes          V-7; 162-175
      8/23            Primary structure of proteins           Barnes          V-7; 162-175
      8/24            Secondary structure of proteins         DeLucas         V-8; 219-240
      8/24            Secondary structure of proteins         DeLucas         V-8; 219-240
      8/27            Purification of proteins                Kim             V-6; 127-154
      8/27            Purification of proteins                Kim             V-6; 127-154
      8/28            Allosteric Regulation of Proteins       Patel           V-9; 215-246
      8/28            Allosteric Regulation of Proteins       Patel           V-9; 215-246
      8/29            Principles of Thermodynamics            Lancaster       V-3; 42-51
      8/29            Principles of Thermodynamics            Lancaster       V-3; 42-51
      8/30            Three dimensional structure of proteins DeLucas         V-9; 276-315
      8/30            Three dimensional structure of proteins DeLucas         V-9; 276-315
      8/31            Three dimensional structure of proteins Deivanayagam    V-8; 240-271
      8/31            Three dimensional structure of proteins Deivanayagam    V-8; 240-271

      BLOCK 2: METABOLISM (HEAD: S. BALLINGER)
      9/3           NO CLASS- LABOR DAY
      9/4           Enzymes – Michaelis-Menten derivation      Patel          V-13; 472-482
      9/4           Enzymes – Michaelis-Menten derivation      Patel          V-13; 472-482
      9/5           Carbohydrate chemistry                     Hel            V-10; 251-274
      9/5           Carbohydrate chemistry                     Hel            V-10; 251-274
      9/6           Glycolysis                                 Hel            V-16; 443-479
      9/6           Glycolysis                                 Hel            V-16; 443-479
      9/7           Citric acid cycle                          S. Ballinger   V-21; 765-794
      9/7           Citric acid cycle                          S. Ballinger   V-21; 765-794
      9/10          Oxidative phosphorylation                  Doeller        V-22; 797-840
      9/10          Oxidative phosphorylation                  Doeller        V-22; 797-840
      9/11          Applied Bioenergetics                      Darley-Usmar   V-20; 563-595
      9/11          Applied Bioenergetics                      Darley-Usmar   V-20; 563-595
      9/12          Enzymes – Inhibition                       Patel          V-14; 482-493
      9/12          Enzymes – Inhibition                       Patel          V-14; 482-493
      9/13          Amino acid metabolism                      C. Ballinger   V-24; 727-776
      9/13          Amino acid metabolism                      C. Ballinger   V-24; 727-776
      9/14          Glycogenolysis                             Landar         V-18; 626-654
      9/14          Gluconeogenesis/Pentose Phos. pathway      Landar         V-23; 599-606; 617-624
      9/17          Enzymes – Reaction mechanisms              Patel          V-14; 371-406
      9/17          Enzymes – Problem Solving                  Patel
      9/18          Study Day
      9/19          Exam 1                                     Staff

      BLOCK 3: MOLECULAR GENETICS (HEAD: FENG)
      9/20          Purine and pyrimidine metabolism           El Kouni       V-28; 1069-1104
      9/20          Purine and pyrimidine metabolism           El Kouni       V-28; 1069-1104
      9/21          Nucleic acid chemistry                     Ponnazhagen    V-5; 80-82; V-6; 155-160
      9/21          Nucleic acid chemistry                     Ponnazhagen    V-29; 1105-1133
      9/24          cDNA cloning                               Feng           V-7; 175-181
      9/24          Eukaryotic chromosome structure            Feng           V-34; 1422-1445
      9/25          Eukaryotic transcription                   Feng           A-7; 413-435
      9/25          Eukaryotic transcription                   Feng           A-7; 435-465, A6; 299-310
      9/26          DNA replication                            Feng           V-30; 1136-1172
      9/26          DNA replication                            Feng           V-30; 1136-1172
      9/27          DNA recombination                          Feng           V-30; 1173-1214
      9/27          DNA recombination                          Feng           V-30; 1173-1214
      9/28          Bacterial genetics                         Dybvig         V-1; 19-27; V-5; 82-84
      9/28          Bacterial genetics                         Dybvig         V-30: 1184-1203
      10/1          Bacteriophages and gene transfer           Dybvig         V-33, 1390-1407
      10/1          Prokaryotic gene expression                Dybvig         V-31; 1216-1283
      10/2          Control of gene expression                 Dickinson      A-6; 310-315
      10/2          Control of gene expression                 Dickinson      A-7; 375-413
      10/3          Control of gene expression                 Dickinson      A-6; 315-335
      10/3          Control of gene expression                 Dickinson      A-6; 315-335

                                                                                                          68
10/4    RNA processing and catalysis       Wan        A-7; 435-452
10/4    RNA processing and catalysis       Wan        A-15; 839-842
10/5    Translation – the genetic code     J. Smith   V-32; 1285-1341
10/5    Translation – ribosomes            J. Smith   V-32; 1285-1341
10/8    Translation – tRNA                 J. Smith   V-32; 1309-1342
10/8    Translation – initiation factors   J. Smith   V-32; 1309-1342
10/9    Control of translation             J. Smith   V-32; 1342-1370
10/9    Protein degradation                J. Smith   V-32; 1342-1370
10/10   Study Day
10/11   Exam 2                             Staff




                                                                        69
Module II: Cell Biology of the Nervous System
IBS-700 Block 4
Module coordinator: Theibert
Mon through Friday
Mon October 12 through Fri Nov 2 – 2 credit hours

BLOCK 4: MEMBRANES AND ORGANELLES (HEAD: KIRK)
10/12 Lipid anatomy and function                  Wood            V-12;    382-394
10/12 Lipid metabolism                            Wood            V-12;    382-394
10/15 Membrane structure and function             Benos           A-10;    583-616
10/15 Membrane structure and function             Benos           A-10;    583-616
10/16 Diffusion and transport                     Benos           A-11;    615-634
10/16 Diffusion and transport                     Benos           A-11;    615-634
10/17 Lipid metabolism                            Wood            V-25;    909-984
10/17 Lipid metabolism                            Wood            V-25;    909-98410/16
10/18 Compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells    Kirk            A-12;    659-669
10/18 Transport of molecules in organelles        Kirk            A-12;    669-689
10/19 Endoplasmic reticulum: initiating secretion Kirk            A-12;    689-709
10/19 Endoplasmic reticulum: glycosylation        Kirk            A-13;    726-739



1. Neuronal vesicular trafficking: Theibert                                     Mon Oct 22
2. Protein turnover, lysosome and proteosomes: Wilson                           Tue Oct 23
3. Neuronal and glial cell cycle and apoptosis: Zhang                           Wed Oct 24
4. Extracellular matrix, cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions: Marques        Thu Oct 25
5. Neuronal and glial cytoskeleton: Theibert                                    Fri Oct 26
6. Introduction to signaling in neurons and glia: Theibert                      Mon Oct 29
7. Epigenetics: Tollefsbol                                                      Tue Oct 30

                      Mon Oct 29 and Tue Oct 30:          CNC Symposium

9. Review session                                                               Wed Oct 31
10. Study day                                                                   Thu Nov 1
11. Exam Module II                                                              Fri Nov 2




                                                                                          70
                    Mon Nov 5 thru Wed Nov 7:         SfN Annual Meeting

Module III: Membrane Biophysics, Synaptic Transmission, Integration and Plasticity
Module coordinator: Pozzo-Miller
Monday through Thursday
Mon November 12 through Wed December 19 – 3 credit hours

1. Membrane permeability; diffusion: Benos                              Mon Nov 12
2. Facilitated diffusion; Nernst, GHK: Benos                            Mon Nov 12
3. Passive membrane properties: L Wadiche                               Tue Nov 13
4. Intro to action potential, nerve conduction: L Wadiche               Tue Nov 13
5. Voltage-gated ion channels: L Wadiche                                Wed Nov 14
6. Molecular mechanism of action potential: Pozzo-Miller                Wed Nov 14
7. Firing properties: L Wadiche                                         Thu Nov 15
8. Neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis: Pozzo-Miller                              Thu Nov 15
9. Computer simulation of action potentials: Pozzo-Miller               Mon Nov 19
10. Neurotransmitter synthesis and storage: Brenner                     Tue Nov 20
11. Neurotransmitter release I: Pozzo-Miller                            Tue Nov 20
12. Neurotransmitter release II: J Wadiche                              Wed Nov 21
13. Synaptic function: J Wadiche                                        Wed Nov 21

                              Thu Nov 22: Thanksgiving break

14. Quantal neurotransmitter release simulations: Lester                Mon Nov 26
15. Neurotransmitter receptors: Dobrunz                                 Tue Nov 27
16. Neuronal GPCRs: Wang                                                Wed Nov 28
17. Concepts in neuropharmacology: McMahon                              Thu Nov 29
18. Synaptic integration: Hablitz                                       Mon Dec 3
19. Neurotransmitter clearance and uptake; transporters: J Wadiche      Mon Dec 3
20. The tri-partite synapse: new glial roles: Parpura                   Tue Dec 4
21. Short- and long-term synaptic plasticity: Dobrunz                   Wed Dec 5
22. Synapse-to-nucleus signaling in synaptic plasticity: Theibert       Thu Dec 6
23. Learning & memory: Sweatt                                           Mon Dec 10
24. Sensory neurobiology: phototransduction: Kraft                      Tue Dec 11
25. Motor neurobiology: upper and lower motor neuron function: Floyd    Wed Dec 12
26. Newborn neurons in adult CNS: L Wadiche                             Thu Dec 13

                               Review Module III Mon Dec 17
                               Study Day         Tue Dec 18
                               Exam Module III Wed Dec 19




                                                                                     71
Module IV: Discussion of Classical and Contemporary Research Articles
Module coordinator: McMahon
Rotating weekly faculty with advanced grad student TAs
Friday Journal Club-style
Fri August 24 through December 14 – 3 credit hours

1. Introduction to course. Neurocytology: Pozzo-Miller                  Fri Aug 24
2. Structure and function of glial cells: Sontheimer                    Fri Aug 31

                          Fri Oct 19: Module-I (IBS-700) lecture
                               Fri Oct 26: Module-II lecture
                                Fri Nov 2: Module-II Exam
                              Fri Nov 23: Thanksgiving break

                     Fri October 5: Review session for Exam Module I
                            Monday October 8: Exam Module I

                     Wed Oct 31: Review session for Exam Module II
                                 Thu Nov 1: Study day
                               Fri Nov 2: Exam Module II

                  Mon December 17: Review session for Exam Module III
                               Tue Dec 18: Study day
                          Wed December 19: Exam Module III




                                                                                     72
                         ROTATION LINE-UP FOR 2007-2008

STUDENT NAME:


LAB ROTATION I                                                       SEP 4 – NOV 14, 2007
                                                                 POSTER SESSION – NOV 16

Mentor’s Name: ____________________________________________________________

Department: ______________________________________________________________

I agree to accept this student into my lab for a rotation during the dates listed above and
will assist this student in preparation of a poster for the poster session on November 16.

Mentor’s Signature _________________________________________________________




LAB ROTATION II                                           NOV 19 – FEB 8, 2007
                                                      POSTER SESSION – FEB 12
Mentor’s Name: ____________________________________________________________

Department: ______________________________________________________________

I agree to accept this student into my lab for a rotation during the dates listed above and
will assist this student in preparation of a poster for the poster session on February 12.

Mentor’s Signature _________________________________________________________




LAB ROTATION III                                         FEB 13 – APR 25, 2007
                                                     POSTER SESSION – APR 29
Mentor’s Name: ____________________________________________________________

Department: ______________________________________________________________

I agree to accept this student into my lab for a rotation during the dates listed above and
will assist this student in preparation of a poster for the poster session on April 29.

Mentor’s Signature _________________________________________________________
              NEUROSCIENCE GRADUATE PROGRAM -- LAB ROTATION EVALUATION FORM

Student Name: ___________________________________________________________________________

Mentor: _________________________________________________________________________________

This rotation is for          Sept 4 – Nov 14, 2007      Nov 19 ‘07 – Feb 8, 2008            Feb 13 – Apr 25, 2008
  with poster session              Nov 16, 2007               Feb 12, 2008                        Apr 29, 2008

MENTOR: In the space provided below, please describe briefly the research goals for this rotation.

________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________
After the rotation is complete, MENTOR PLEASE NOTE: It is critical for the student’s development as a
scientist that you be as honest and objective as possible in this evaluation. Please evaluate the student in each
category as follows:         Excellent (1), Good (2), Average (3), Poor (4), Not Applicable (N/A)

Spends adequate time in the laboratory to accomplish research goals                                    _____

Understands laboratory problems and procedures                                                         _____

Performs laboratory skills with a reasonable level of proficiency                                      _____

Observes safe laboratory practices                                                                     _____

Keeps adequate laboratory records                                                                      _____

Ability to evaluate experimental results                                                               _____

Receptiveness to suggestions and critical comments                                                     _____

Capacity for self expression and communication                                                         _____

Ability to get along with co-workers                                                                   _____

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________
Please use back of this form, if more space is needed.

If adequate space and funding are available, would you be willing to accept this
student into your laboratory? (Yes/No)                                                                 _____

(Note that a recommended grade of C or less requires comments explaining area(s) of deficiency)
Recommended grade on poster session: (A, B, C, or F)                                                   _____

Recommended final grade: (A, B, C, or F)                                                               _____

Please sign in this column when you first review this list       Please sign in this column when the evaluation is
with the student at the beginning of the rotation.               complete, and the student has reviewed it.

___________________________________________                      _________________________________________
Signature of Graduate Student / Date                             Signature of Rotation Mentor / Date

___________________________________________                      _________________________________________
Signature of Rotation Mentor / Date                              Signature of Graduate Student / Date
                  STUDENT EVALUATION FORM FOR NEUROSCIENCE LAB ROTATIONS



Student Name: ___________________________________________________________________________


Mentor: _________________________________________________________________________________


This rotation is for          Sept 4-Nov 14 2007         Nov 19 2007 – Feb 8 2008      Feb 13-Apr 25, 2008


This evaluation should be completed at the end of your laboratory rotation. Please provide feedback on your
overall experience and quality of the laboratory rotation. Be as honest as possible. Once you have completed
this evaluation, turn it in to Patricia Matthews. No mentor will see this evaluation until after grades have been
posted for this rotation.

Use the following scale:          Excellent (1), Good (2), Average (3), Poor (4), Not Applicable (N/A)

Explanation of the scientific basis of the rotation                                                 ______

Opportunity to discuss broader scientific areas related to your project                             ______

Opportunity to discuss technical aspects of your project                                            ______

Overall quality of the learning experience during your rotation                                     ______

I would recommend a rotation in this lab to other students                                          ______


Additional Comments

________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________
Please use back of this form, if more space is needed.



Student’s signature:          _____________________________________________________________________

Date:     ____________________________

								
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