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CONSOLIDATED PLAN

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					  Hamilton County
CONSOLIDATED
    PLAN




 Strategic Plan 2004-2008
 Annual Action Plan 2004
Submitted
August 10, 2004




Hamilton County Consolidated Plan
Strategic Plan 2004-2008
Annual Action Plan 2004




Prepared for
Hamilton County
County Commissioners
One Hamilton County Square
Suite 157
Noblesville, IN 46060
http://www.co.hamilton.in.us/


Prepared by
Indiana Association for Community
Economic Development
324 West Morris Street
Suite 104
Indianapolis, IN 46225
Ph: 317-423-1070 Fax: 317-423-1075
www.iaced.org
iaced@iaced.org




                                     2
Hamilton County Board of Commissioners
One Hamilton County Square, Suite 157
Noblesville, IN 46060
PH: 317-776-9719 Fax: 317-776-8454

Christine Altman
Email: cca@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: City of Carmel and Clay Township


Steven C. Dillinger
Email: sld@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: Towns of Fishers and Noblesville, Delaware and Noblesville Townships

Steven A. Holt
Email: sah@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: Adams, Fall Creek, Jackson, Washington, Wayne, and White River
Townships, municipalities of Arcadia, Atlanta, Cicero, Sheridan, and Westfield


Hamilton County Council
One Hamilton County Square, Suite 157
Noblesville, IN 46060
PH: 317-776-8402

Jim Belden
Email: jjb@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: Council member at large

Meredith Carter
Email: mlc1@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: District 1 (Part of Clay Township, 45 Precincts)

Judy Levine
Email: jrl1@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: District 2 (Delaware, Fallcreek and Wayne Townships)

John Hiatt
Email: jah1@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: District 4 (Part of Clay Township (17 Precincts), Adams and
Washington Townships)

Rick McKinney
Email: rfm@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: Council member at large

Jim Wallace
Email: jww@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: Council member at large

Steve Schwartz
Email: sns@co.hamilton.in.us
Represents: District 3 (Noblesville, Jackson and Whiteriver Townships)




                                                                                 3
Table of Contents

Map of Hamilton County—Census 2000 ......................................... 6

Map of Hamilton County—Townships ............................................. 7

Executive Summary......................................................................... 8


I. Introduction
     Purpose of the Consolidated Plan ......................................... .17
     Compliance with Consolidated Plan Regulations…................ 18
     Organization of the Report ..................................................... 18
     Lead and Participating Agencies ............................................ 19
     Citizen Participation Process.................................................. 19
     Relation to other Plans ........................................................... 20
     Acknowledgements ................................................................ 21

II. Hamilton County Community Profile
     Demographic and Economic Profile of Hamilton County ........ 22
     Population Characteristics...................................................... 22
     Income.................................................................................... 25
     Employment ........................................................................... 28
     Transportation ........................................................................ 28

III. Housing and Community Development Needs
      Introduction............................................................................. 29
      Public Forums ........................................................................ 30
      Community Survey ................................................................. 32
      Lead Based Paint Hazards..................................................... 39
      Fair Housing ........................................................................... 40
      Community Development Needs............................................ 41

IV. Housing Market Analysis
     Housing Types ....................................................................... 44
     Housing Supply ......................................................................44
     Housing Condition .................................................................. 45
     Lead Safe Housing................................................................. 46
     Housing Affordability and Needs ............................................ 46
     Barriers to Affordable Housing ............................................... 51


V. Special Needs Populations
    Introduction............................................................................. 53
    Persons with Development Disabilities and
    Physical Disabilities ............................................................... 53
    Persons with Serious and Persistent Mental Illness ............. 53
    Persons Living with HIV/AIDS ................................................ 54

                                                                                                 4
      Persons Experiencing Homelessness .................................... 54
      Special Needs Homeless ....................................................... 55

VI. 2004-2008 Strategic Plan and 2004 Annual Action Plan
    Summary Findings ................................................................. 59
    Five Year Goals...................................................................... 60
    Strategies and Annual Action Plan ......................................... 60
    2004 Annual Allocation Plan................................................... 64
    Institutional Structure.............................................................. 75
    Anti-Poverty Strategy ............................................................. 76
    Obstacles to Meeting Needs .................................................. 76

VII. Monitoring Plan .................................................................... 77

Appendices
A. List of Key Participants............................................................. 82
B. List of Individuals Consulted to Participate in Process ............. 86
C. Consolidated Plan Application and Certifications...................... 92
D. Community Survey Instrument.................................................. 99
E. Citizen Participation Plan ........................................................ 107
F. List of all Individual Housing and Community Development
   Ideas, Public Forums 2004..................................................... 115
G. Summary of Citizen Comments .............................................. 120




                                                                                           5
6
7
Executive Summary
Purpose of the Consolidated Plan
Beginning in FY1995, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
required states and local communities to prepare a Consolidated Plan in order to receive
federal housing and community development funding. The Plan consolidates into a
single document the planning and application requirements for the Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG). Consolidated Plans must be prepared every five
years, with updates required annually. This Plan contains the 2004-2008 strategic plan
and 2004 annual action plan, which represents the inaugural Consolidated Plan for
Hamilton County.

The Consolidated Plan, or Plan, serves four separate but integrated purposes:

    •   It is a community-based planning document for the County;
    •   It is the application to the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development for
        the County’s formula-based Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
        funds;
    •   It describes the strategies the County will follow in carrying out its CDBG
        program for the period October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2008; and
    •   It includes an annual action plan against which performance may be measured.

Lead and Participating Agencies
The Noblesville Housing Authority, serving on behalf of Hamilton County, is the lead
entity responsible for overseeing the development of the Consolidated Plan, and is the
entity responsible for administering the Community Development Block Grant program
covered by the Plan.

The Noblesville Housing Authority, serving on behalf of Hamilton County, retained the
Indiana Association for Community Economic Development, a statewide not-for-profit
association that provides technical assistance to local units of government and other
community entities, to assist in the preparation of the Plan.

A significant effort was made to involve governmental and not-for-profit representatives at
all levels of the planning process. In addition to receiving notice about the public forums
and a community survey, a number of these representatives were invited to serve on the
Consolidated Plan Working Group. Among the entities with which information regarding
the plan was exchanged were local elected officials, service providers, administrators of
public housing authorities and several other key stakeholders. A list of Working Group
Members and their respective affiliations may be found in Appendix A.

Citizen Participation Process
A philosophy of community inclusion guided the entire Consolidated Planning process.
Residents were afforded the opportunity to participate in the development of the Plan in
several ways, including:

    •   Five public forums, which were geographically dispersed throughout the County;

    •   Community survey of 261 residents;

    •   30-day public comment period on the draft Plan; and



                                                                                  8
    •   Two public hearings regarding the draft Plan and recommended allocations.

Residents were informed of these opportunities in several ways, including:

    •   Brochures explaining the purpose of the Plan and how citizens could contribute,
        including an agenda and dates of the public forums and hearings, were mailed to
        citizens, local government and not-for-profit organizations.

    •   Display ads were run in the non-legal notice section of the Indianapolis Star
        Hamilton County A.M. section and the Noblesville Daily Times.

    •   Informational flyers were posted at the public housing authority, not-for-profit
        organizations and in public buildings encouraging public participation.

    •   Several news articles ran in the Indianapolis Star Hamilton County section, the
        Noblesville Daily Times and the Noblesville Daily Ledger highlighting the purpose
        of the Plan and inviting residents to become involved in the process.

Housing and Community Development Needs
Forum Findings. The responses received from forum participants were developed into
a list of housing and community development issues that were tabulated according to the
following factors: 1) top priority by forum location and 2) an aggregate of all forums by
final priority. A complete list of all individual ideas presented may be located in Appendix
E, Citizen Participation Plan.

Top Three Housing and Community Development Issues, Noblesville Forums: 1) Public
transportation, 2) Health care, 3) Home repair

Top Three Housing and Community Development Issues, Fishers Forum: 1) Sidewalks,
2) Drainage, 3) Public transportation

Top Three Housing and Community Development Issues, Arcadia Forums: 1) Downtown
revitalization, 2) Infrastructure, 3) Fire protection




                                                                                    9
Table 3-3: Final Priority Results by Forum Location


                                                                                                                                   Forum by Location Final Priority

                                                                                                 public transportation

                                                                                                            health care




                                                                        final priority
                                                                                                           home repair




                                                         Noblesville
        Top Housing and Community Development Issue
                                                                                           neighborhood revitalization

                                                                                                   affordable housing

                                                                                                         assisted living
                                                                        final priority     financial literacy education

                                                                                                             sidewalks
                                                         Fishers




                                                                                                               drainage

                                                                                                 public transportation

                                                                                              downtown revitalization

                                                                                                          infrastructure
                                                                        final priority




                                                                                                         fire protection
                                                         Arcadia




                                                                                                      utility assistance

                                                                                         youth programs/youth center

                                                                                                           home repair

                                                                                                          public library

                                                                                                                           0              2         4              6                  8        10        12        14
                                                                                                                                                                       Prority Vote




Top Five Housing and Community Development Issues, Aggregate of all forums: 1)
Public transportation, 2) Downtown revitalization, 3) Infrastructure, 4) Health care, 4)
Home repair

Table 3-4: Final Priority Results by All Forums Combined


                                                                                                                                     All Forums Final Priority


                                                                                           public transportation

                                                                                         downtown revitalization

                                                                                                  infrastructure
  Top Housing and Community Development Issues




                                                                                                     health care

                                                                                                    home repair

                                                                                                      sidewalks

                                                                                                  fire protection
                                                      final priority




                                                                         neighborhood revitalization

                                                                                               utility assistance

                                                                       youth programs/youth center

                                                                                             affordable housing

                                                                                                  assisted living

                                                                                                       drainage

                                                                            financial literacy education

                                                                                                   public library

                                                                                                                    0          2      4       6         8        10          12           14   16   18        20
                                                                                                                                                            Priority Vote




                                                                                                                                                                                                                        10
Community Development Needs

The community survey asked respondents about a range of community development
priorities, including infrastructure, public facilities, public service and economic
development. The survey asked respondents to rank the community development needs
in specific categories in order of how much they are needed in the County (with 1 being
lowest priority and 5 being highest priority).

Public Facility Need. When asked to rank public facility needs, the following three areas
received the highest ratings of being a highest/high priority: 1) Youth Centers (45.5
percent), 2) Child Care Centers (42 percent) and 3) Parks and/or Recreation Facilities
(41.6 percent).
Table 3-26: Public Facility Priorities
Public Facility         Percent rating          Percent rating         Percent rating
Need                    issue highest/high      issue middle           issue low/lowest
                        priority                priority               priority
Centers who serve       33.3                    32.3                   34.8
people with
disabilities
Child care centers      42                      30.7                   27.4
Health facilities       37.8                    31.1                   31.1
Neighborhood            28.3                    36.3                   34.9
facilities
Parking facilities      24.8                    30                     45.2
Parks and/or            41.6                    27.6                   30.8
recreation facilities
Senior centers          29.6                    40.7                   29.2
Youth centers           45.5                    25.8                   28.7


Public Infrastructure. When asked to rank public infrastructure needs, the following
three areas received the highest ratings of being a highest/high priority: 1) Street
Improvements (45.3), 2) Flood Drain Improvements (45 percent), and 3) Sidewalks (40.4
percent).

Table 3-27: Infrastructure Improvement Priorities
Public                  Percent rating         Percent rating        Percent rating
Infrastructure          issue highest/high     issue middle          issue low/lowest
                        priority               priority              priority
Flood drain             45                     21.5                  33.5
improvements
Sidewalks               40.4                   22.5                  37
Street improvements 45.3                       25.2                  29.5
Water/sewer             38                     26.9                  35.1
improvements

Public Service Needs. When asked to rank public service needs, the following three
areas received the highest ratings of being a highest/high priority: 1) Transportation
Services (52.4 percent), 2) Youth Services (47.9 percent), and 3) TIE Employment
Training (40.9 percent) and Child Care Services (40 percent).




                                                                                 11
Table 3-28: Public Service Priorities
Public Service        Percent rating          Percent rating        Percent rating
Needs                 issue highest/high      issue middle          issue low/lowest
                      priority                priority              priority
Child care services   40                      34.6                  25.4
Crime awareness       36.8                    34.9                  28.3
Employment training 40.9                      30.8                  28.3
Health services       34.8                    30.9                  34.3
Lead hazard training 17.4                     29.9                  52.8
Services for people   34                      31.1                  35
with disabilities
Senior services       34.2                    31.7                  34.1
Substance abuse       33.5                    31.5                  35
services
Transportation        52.4                    18.4                  29.3
services
Youth services        47.9                    23.9                  28.3

Economic Development Needs. When asked to rank economic development needs, the
following three areas received the highest ratings of being a highest/high priority: 1)
Commercial Development Leading to Job Creation (48.4 percent), 2) Job Training (41.7
percent), and 3) Small Business Loans (40.2 percent).

Table 3-29: Economic Development Priorities
Economic             Percent rating         Percent rating          Percent rating
Development Need issue highest/high         issue middle            issue low/lowest
                     priority               priority                priority
Commercial           48.4                   18.8                    32.8
development leading
to job creation
Job training         41.7                   27.2                    31.1
Rehabilitation of    37.7                   31.4                    30.9
commercial
buildings
Small business       40.2                   35.7                    24.2
loans
Technical assistance 29.5                   39.6                    31
to for-profits


Strategic Plan and Annual Action Plan

Five Year Goals
Three top level goals were established to guide the Five Year Plan. The goals,
strategies, and actions items are not ranked in order of importance.

    I.      Expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing

    II.     Strengthen the community’s living environment

    III.    Promote community services that increase opportunities for economic self-
            sufficiency




                                                                                 12
Strategies and Annual Action Plan

Goal I. Expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing

A central element to addressing housing needs is expanding the supply of affordable
housing through rehabilitation. Compared to adjacent counties and the balance of the
State, the price of housing in Hamilton County is extremely expensive. Availability of
relatively affordable housing has been decreasing as the County has experienced
significant growth in the past decade. The data on cost-burdened households
demonstrate that an insufficient supply of affordable housing exists. In addition, the
community rated the need for emergency shelter as one of its highest housing priorities.
Citizens of Hamilton County are concerned that their most vulnerable residents, including
the elderly and people that are disabled, are not being served in their home county, but
instead are having to travel to another county to secure shelter whether it be permanent
affordable or temporary housing.

The strategies developed to accomplish Goal I include:

Strategy 1: Improve the Quality of Housing Stock through Rehabilitation and
            Repair

                Long-Term Outcome: Over the course of the Five-Year Plan, it is
                anticipated that 40 homes will be rehabilitated or repaired. Anticipated
                outcomes are that homeowners will realize an increase in property value
                and utility costs will decrease. This outcome is consistent with the 2002
                Hamilton County Housing Needs Assessment.

                Indicators: Increase in homeowner property values, decrease in utility
                costs

                2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will allocate CDBG
                funds to fulfill this priority. Approximately 8 homes will be rehabilitated or
                repaired and funds may also be made available to address emergency
                repairs.

Strategy 2: Explore the Feasibility of Developing an Emergency Shelter

                Long-Term Outcome: By 2008, a strategy will address how emergency
                shelter will be provided to Hamilton County residents in Hamilton County.

                Indicators: Representative from Hamilton County is engaged in the State
                Continuum of Care process; Development Plan is created that includes
                a project concept, feasibility analysis and financing plan.

                2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2004, Hamilton County will convene a
                stakeholders working group with the purpose of exploring the feasibility
                of developing an emergency shelter in Hamilton County.




                                                                                    13
Strategy 3: Develop Partnerships to Promote Single Family Homeownership
            Opportunities for Low- to Moderate-Income Residents

                Long-Term Outcome: Not-for-Profit and For-Profit Affordable Housing
                Developers, in partnership with Hamilton County, access appropriate
                federal, state, local and private funding sources to provide
                homeownership opportunities for LMI residents in Hamilton County.
                In consistency with the 2002 Hamilton County Housing Needs
                Assessment, these activities should focus on acquisition—
                rehabilitation—resale projects to benefit low- and moderate-income
                individuals and families.

                Indicators: Identification of Not-for-Profit and For-Profit Affordable
                Housing Partners, Project Concepts are proposed to the County,
                Financing is Secured for Development.

                2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will consult with
                the Hamilton County Housing Task Force to identify Affordable Housing
                Developers.

Goal II. Strengthen the community’s living environment

The majority of Hamilton County residents enjoys a high standard of living and quality of
life—evidenced by higher than average incomes, home values, and educational levels.
However, there are areas of the community that have not experienced the same levels of
development and growth, which may be resulting in or be the result of declining
infrastructure. In order to attract and encourage vitality to these areas, investments must
be made for improvements in infrastructure, downtown revitalization and historic
preservation.

The strategies developed to accomplish Goal II include:

Strategy 1: Provide Critical Infrastructure Improvements to Sidewalks and Flood Drains

                Long-Term Outcome: By 2008, it is anticipated that 20 sidewalks and 15
                flood drains will be constructed that are vital to both transportation needs
                and a healthy economic impact.

                Indicators: Streetscapes are Improved, Improved Pedestrian Access,
                Percentage of LMI Persons Served.

                2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will allocate CDBG
                funds to fulfill this priority. Approximately 5 sidewalk projects and 5 flood
                drain projects are anticipated.

Strategy 2: Explore the feasibility of enhancing local communities through
            downtown revitalization

                Long-Term Outcome: Incorporate relevant action items and strategies
                from the updated Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, which is
                expected to be completed by January 2005. Update this strategy
                when Comprehensive Plan is complete.

                Indicators: Summary of Comprehensive Plan is included in 2005 Annual
                Action Plan, New Action Items are Proposed that Thoughtfully Consider


                                                                                    14
                Downtown Revitalization Needs of Hamilton County Communities.

                2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will review the
                updated Comprehensive Plan to identify recommendations for
                revitalization.

Strategy 3: Explore the feasibility of enhancing local communities through historic
            preservation

                Long-Term Outcome: Incorporate relevant action items and strategies
                from the updated Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, which is
                expected to be completed by January 2005. Update this strategy
                when Comprehensive Plan is complete.

                Indicators: Summary of Comprehensive Plan is included in 2005 Annual
                Action Plan, New Action Items are Proposed that Thoughtfully Consider
                Historic Preservation Needs of Hamilton County Communities.

                2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will review the
                updated Comprehensive Plan to identify recommendations for
                preservation.

Goal III. Promote community services that increase opportunities for economic
self-sufficiency

Essential community services may be the key for individuals with LMI’s to move up the
economic ladder in Hamilton County. The increasing cost of child care and health care,
along with worries about the lack of youth activities and access to transportation make
this goal a critical area for consideration.

The strategies developed to accomplish Goal III include:

Strategy 1: Provide public service activities that augment and enhance the human
service delivery system of Hamilton County.

                Long-Term Outcome: Develop a diverse network of needed services
                directed toward enhancing the health, safety and overall well-being of
                LMI individuals and persons with special needs, through the provisions
                for creating and expanding quality public and private human service
                programs.

                Indicators: Subrecipients will be required to develop indicators that are
                appropriate measures for their funded applications.

                Action Item: In PY 2004-05, Hamilton County will set aside up to 15% of
                its CDBG allocation to local community service groups who provide
                public service activities that promote self-sufficiency. It is anticipated
                these dollars will be used to fund approximately 4 organizations that
                address the public service priorities as they were determined by public
                forum and community survey participants.

                Hamilton County will award these 4 organizations through a competitive
                process. Once those awards are made, the action item and long-term
                outcome will be updated to reflect how many individuals are expected to
                be served.


                                                                                  15
 2004 Annual Action Plan Allocation
 The Action Items described in the Five Year Strategy consist of the items that will be
 carried out in PY 2004-05. The following table quantifies the overall Action Plan
 Allocation for 2004 in terms of dollar amount. Performance measurements follow in the
 next table.
 Table 8-1: Target Allocations, PY 2004-05

Proposed CDBG Action                        2004-05 Proposed          Percent of Total
Items                                       Allocations               Funding
Goal I, Strategy 1: Improve
the Quality of Housing Stock
through Rehabilitation and
Repair                                                     $187,102                   26%

Goal II, Strategy 1: Provide
Critical Infrastructure
Improvements to Sidewalks
and Flood Drains                                           $295,536                   42%

Goal III, Strategy 1: Provide
Public Service Activities                                   $85,171                   12%

Administration                                             $141,952                   20%

Total CDBG Allocation
Request                                                    $709,761                  100%




                                                                                16
         I. INTRODUCTION
         Purpose of the Consolidated Plan
         Beginning in FY1995, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
         required states and local communities to prepare a Consolidated Plan in order to receive
         federal housing and community development funding. The Plan consolidates into a
         single document the planning and application requirements for the Community
         Development Block Grant (CDBG). Consolidated Plans must be prepared every five
         years, with updates required annually. This Plan contains the 2004-2008 strategic plan
         and 2004 annual action plan, which represents the inaugural Consolidated Plan for
         Hamilton County.

         The Consolidated Plan, or Plan, serves four separate but integrated purposes:
Notes:
             •   It is a community-based planning document for the County;
             •   It is the application to the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development for
                 the County’s formula-based Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
                 funds;
             •   It describes the strategies the County will follow in carrying out its CDBG
                 program for the period October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2008; and
             •   It includes an annual action plan against which performance can be measured.

         The basic goals of the CDBG program (as defined by federal statute) are:

         To Provide Decent Housing:

             •   Assist the homeless to obtain appropriate housing
             •   Assist those threatened with homelessness
             •   Retain the affordable housing stock
             •   Make available permanent housing that is affordable to low-income residents
                 without discrimination
             •   Increase the supply of supportive housing for persons with special needs

         To Provide a Suitable Living Environment:

             •   Improve the safety and livability of neighborhoods
             •   Increase access to quality facilities and services
             •   Reduce isolation of income groups within an area through decentralization of
                 housing opportunities and revitalization of deteriorating neighborhoods
             •   Restore and preserve properties of special value for historic, architectural or
                 aesthetic reasons
             •   Conserve energy resources

         To Expand Economic Opportunity:

             •   Create jobs accessible to low-income persons
             •   Provide access to capital and credit for development activities that promote the
                 long-term economic and social viability of the community
             •   Establish, stabilize and expand small businesses
             •   Empower low-income persons to achieve self-sufficiency to reduce generations
                 of poverty in federally assisted public housing
         IACED                                                                                     17
Compliance with Consolidated Plan Regulations
The Hamilton County 2004-2008 Consolidated Plan was prepared in accordance with
Sections 91.200 through 91.230 of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development’s (HUD) Consolidated Plan regulations.

Organization of the Report
The remainder of the Plan is organized into six sections and seven appendices.

    •   Section II discusses the demographic and economic trends in Hamilton County to
        set the context for the housing and community development needs and
        strategies discussed in later sections.

    •   Section III reports the findings from the public forums and the community survey,
        which are used to determine the County’s housing and community development
        needs.

    •   Section IV reports updated information about the County’s housing market and
        needs, including housing vacancies, unit characteristics, affordability and cost
        burden.

    •   Section V discusses the housing and community development needs of the
        County’s special needs populations. The section gives updated estimates of
        these populations, reports on programs and initiatives to serve them, and
        identifies remaining gaps.

    •   Section VI contains the County’s five year program strategies and FY2004 Action
        Plan.

    •   Section VII describes the Monitoring Plan that will ensure compliance with all
        applicable rules and regulations.

The Appendices include:

A. List of Key Participants

B. List of Individuals Consulted to Participate in Process

C. Consolidated Plan Application and Certifications

D. Community Survey Instrument

E. Citizen Participation Plan

F. List of all Individual Housing and Community Development Ideas, Public Forums 2004

G. Public Comment and Response




IACED                                                                                      18
Lead and Participating Agencies
The Noblesville Housing Authority, serving on behalf of Hamilton County, is the lead
entity responsible for overseeing the development of the Consolidated Plan, and is the
entity responsible for administering the Community Development Block program covered
by the Plan.

The Noblesville Housing Authority, serving on behalf of Hamilton County, retained the
Indiana Association for Community Economic Development, a statewide not-for-profit
association that provides technical assistance to local units of government and other
community entities, to assist in the preparation of the Plan.

A significant effort was made to involve governmental and not-for-profit representatives at
all levels of the planning process. In addition to receiving notice about the public forums
and a community survey, a number of these representatives were invited to serve on the
Consolidated Plan Working Group. Among the entities with which information regarding
the plan was exchanged were local elected officials, service providers, administrators of
public housing authorities and several other key stakeholders. A list of Working Group
Members and their respective affiliations may be found in Appendix A. A list of all those
consulted to be participants in this process may be found in Appendix B.

Citizen Participation Process
A philosophy of community inclusion guided the entire Consolidated Planning process.
Residents were afforded the opportunity to participate in the development of the Plan in
several ways, including:

    •   Five public forums, which were geographically dispersed throughout the County;

    •   Community survey of 261 residents;

    •   30-day public comment period on the draft Plan; and

    •   Two public hearings regarding the draft Plan and recommended allocations

Residents were informed of these opportunities in several ways, including:

    •   Brochures explaining the purpose of the Plan and how citizens could contribute,
        including an agenda and dates of the public forums and hearings, were mailed to
        citizens, local government and not-for-profit organizations.

    •   Display ads were run in the non-legal notice section of the Indianapolis Star
        Hamilton County A.M. section and the Noblesville Daily Times.

    •   Informational flyers were posted at public housing authorities, not-for-profit
        organizations and in public buildings encouraging public participation.

    •   Several news articles ran in the Indianapolis Star Hamilton County section, the
        Noblesville Daily Times and the Noblesville Daily Ledger highlighting the purpose
        of the Plan and inviting residents to become involved in the process.

Additional details regarding public participation are described in the Citizen Participation
Plan, which may be found in Appendix E.



IACED                                                                                      19
Relation to Other Plans
The Consolidated Plan is consistent with, and incorporates the recommendations of, a
number of other local studies and plans. Those include:

Analysis of Services to Adults with Disabilities Who Reside in Hamilton County
(2000). This study was completed by Step Ahead of Hamilton County. Most significantly,
it identified the need for supportive living services. At the time the study was published,
the agency had a supportive living services waiting list of 303 people, representing 133%
of current capacity.

Cicero/Jackson Township Comprehensive Plan (1998). This plan was completed by
the Cicero/Jackson Township Plan Commission. The plan encourages new growth in
vacant or underutilized pockets and discourages spot zoning and incompatible adjacent
land use. Included the Land Use Objective-Maximize the opportunity to provide
adequate housing for all levels of income within the community (especially aged and
young family).

Fishers Strategic Plan (1997). The Strategic Plan for the Town of Fishers included the
following Action Strategy, “Wisely use development tools to control the quality of
development in Fishers.” One goal was to seek a balance between single family and
multifamily housing in the community. Residential areas are to provide healthy
surroundings for family life.

Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan (1990). The Comprehensive Plan was
completed in 1990, but has been amended often by the Hamilton County Plan
Commission. The Housing Policy Statement reflects an appreciation for the need to
support a variety of community concerns: Community Planning and Development
Policies and Objectives. Policy 1-Land Use Development. It shall be the policy of the
Hamilton County Planning, Zoning and Subdivision process to provide opportunities for
community growth and development resulting in a quality of life framework of affordable
and diverse housing, shopping, job opportunities, and reasonable aesthetics. Another,
more comprehensive update is expected in January 2005.

Hamilton County Housing Needs Assessment (2002). This study was prepared for the
Hamilton County Housing Task Force by Gibson & Associates, LLC. The document
assists the community in understanding its current housing market, identifies needs and
outlines goals to address those opportunities.

Noblesville Affordable Housing Study (1994). This study was completed by the
Community Action Agency of Greater Indianapolis for the City of Noblesville. The study
found that affordable housing development is driven by reasonably priced land and
access to sanitary sewers. In-fill construction is not practical in the community due to
growth patterns. Rehabilitation of single family homes usually does not end up as
affordable because of increasing property values. The study recommended designing a
rehab skills training program with a rehab subsidy for new homeowners or owner-
occupied rehab with subsidy.

Noblesville Comprehensive Plan (1995). An overarching goal for people in the
community is to become “A compassionate and diverse people striving for community
and family excellence.” Subgoals include reducing the number of families at risk and
supporting human diversity in housing, education, business and government.




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Self-Sufficiency Assessment and Action Plan (1998). This plan was completed by the
Hamilton County Local Planning Council. It included an analysis of affordable housing as
one component needing to be addressed in order to move TANF families to self-
sufficiency. Identified barriers include perceptions (NIMBYism), lack of affordable
housing for local firefighters and police officers, land costs, etc. Suggestions include the
formation of a coordination and oversight committee, conducting an education campaign,
developing support for local housing providers, and developing senior and transitional
housing.

To Live and Work in Hamilton County, Indiana (1998). This document was published
by the Hamilton County Leadership Academy Affordable Housing Committee. The
document is defined as a white paper designed to “provide a snapshot of the County’s
housing situation by analyzing statistical and anecdotal information from a variety of
sources.” The mission was “to see if it was feasible for employees to live and work in
Hamilton County.” It examines factors such as socioeconomic impacts, effects on
transportation systems and businesses, and growth and tax rate prospects.

Acknowledgments
Every resident involved with this process has made a valuable contribution and merits
special recognition. A list of everyone who attended a public forum, Working Group and
a Resident Focus Group is available in Appendix A. Appreciation is also extended to the
261 anonymous residents who filled out a community survey.




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         II. HAMILTON COUNTY COMMUNITY PROFILE
         Demographic and Economic Profile
         of Hamilton County

         This section discusses the demographic and economic characteristics in Hamilton
         County, including recent trends in population, income and employment growth; an
         economic outlook and forecast for the next five to ten years; and the implications of such
         trends on the County’s housing and community development activities. This section
         partially fulfill the requirements of Section 91.205 of the Local Government Consolidated
         Plan Regulations.


         Population Characteristics
Notes:
         Overall Growth. The Census reported that in 2002 the population of Hamilton County
         was 206,270, making it eligible for the first time to receive a direct entitlement of CDBG.
         Hamilton County has the 5th highest county population in the state. In comparison, it was
         ranked the 12th highest in 1990. The population is projected to reach 298,642 by 2010.
         Hamilton County represents the fastest growing county in Indiana, with a population
         increase of 67.7% since 1990. In comparison, the State of Indiana, experienced a
         population increase of 9.7% during the same period.

         Table 2-1: Population of Hamilton County Cities and Towns
         City/Town                       Census 2002 Population         Percent of County
                                                                        Population
         Arcadia                       1,766                            .9%
         Atlanta                       791                              .4%
         Carmel                        40,878                           19.9%
         Cicero                        4,303                            2.1%
         Fishers                       44,441                           21.6%
         Noblesville                   31,869                           15.5%
         Sheridan                      2,628                            1.3%
         Westfield                     10,511                           5.1%
         Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

         Age. The median age in Hamilton County is 34.1, compared with the State median of
         35.2. According to the Census, 45% of all households include persons less than 18
         years of age. Hamilton County has experienced a 70 percent increase in families with
         children.

         There have also been significant increases in the number of senior citizens. Even though
         the percentage of the population age 65 or older has decreased slightly, the actual
         number of people in this age group has increased from 9,000 to 14,500 (representing an
         increase of 62%). The aging population in Hamilton County more than doubled between
         1960 and 1990. The fastest growing age segment in Indiana is people 75 or older.
         Census data estimate that 12.4% of Indiana’s total population is 65 or older. Hamilton
         County will most likely be affected by this increase. Elderly people on fixed incomes often
         require subsidized housing, assisted living facilities, or possible in-home services.




         IACED                                                                                   22
Table 2-2: Age Distribution of Hamilton County
Age Group                      Census 2000 Population           Percent of County
                                                                Population
Preschool (0-4)              16,578                             9.1%
School Age (5 –17)           39,683                             21.7%
Adult (18-64)                112,820                            61.7%
Older (65 plus)              13,659                             7.5%
Median Age                   34.1
Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

Race and ethnicity. Population data by race and ethnicity is useful in projecting future
housing and community development needs because these categories are generally
correlated with income and household characteristics, which may influence housing
demand. In 2000, 94.4 percent of residents in the County classified their race as white.
The next largest race classification of race was Asian at 2.4 percent. Other races made
up less than 4 percent of the County’s total population.

As is true in the rest of the state and region, Hamilton County is gradually becoming more
diverse, even though actual numbers remain relatively small. Hamilton County has the
fourth largest Asian population in the state and the eleventh largest Hispanic/Latino
population. The Hispanic/Latino population increased by almost 300 percent between
1990 and 2000. Similarly, the African American population increased by 314 percent
during the same time period.

Table 2-3: Hamilton County Population by Race and Ethnicity, 1990 and 2000
 Race/Ethnicity    Percent        1990       2000 Census Percent of 2000
                   Change       Census                          Population
                    from
                    1990-
                    2000
African             314%           678           2,806              1.5%
American or
Black
American Indian      88%           163            307               .2%
or Alaska
Native
Asian               259%         1,240           4,451              2.4%
Hispanic (all       291%           745           2,911              1.6%
races)
White                59%        108,214         172,475            94.4%
Some other          640%           143           1,058              .6%
race alone
Population of        Not      Not Counted        1,643              .9%
two or more       Available
races
Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

Identifying concentrations of racial and ethnic minorities is useful in developing priorities
for allocating investment on a geographical basis. For the purpose of this Consolidated
Plan, an area of minority concentration is a census tract in which the population of any
racial or ethnic group exceeds 50 percent of the total population of that tract. The highest
minority concentrations are for African Americans/Blacks (CT1108.01, 3.4 percent),
American Indiana or Alaska Native (CT1106, .5 percent), Asian (tie CT1109.01 &
CT1110.01, 5.2 percent), Hispanic (CT1104, 3.0 percent).




IACED                                                                                      23
          Table 2-4: Racial and Ethnic Population by Census Tract
Race/Ethnicity   1101   1102.01   1102.02   1103   1104   1105.02   1105.03   1105.04   1106   1107   1108.01   1108.02   1108.03   1109.01   1109.02   1110.01   1110.03   1110.04   1110.05   1110.06   1111.01   1111.02
African         .4%   .5%      .2%       .3%       1.1%   .9%       .7%       .7%       2.3%   1.2%   3.4%      1.7%      3.1%      1.3%      1.1%      1.7%      .6%       1.9%      1.8%      .9%       1.7%      2.3%
American or
Black
American        .1%   .4%      0%        .3%       .3%    .09%      .2%       .2%       .5%    .4%    .2%       .1%       .1%       .06%      .1%       .1%       .1%       .06%      .3%       .07%      .2%       .1%
Indian or
Alaska Native
Asian           .08% .2%       .4%       .6%       1.8%   1.0%      .9%       .8%       .8%    .3%    2.4%      2.8%      3.2%      5.2%      3.7%      5.2%      1.8%      3.0%      3.8%      2.4%      4.1%      3.8%
Hispanic (all   .6%   1.2%     1.1%      .9%       3.0%   1.0%      1.4%      1.0%      1.6%   2.7%   1.4%      2.6%      1.7%      1.6%      1.6%      1.0%      .8%       1.4%      2.2%      1.7%      1.5%      1.6%
races)
           Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census




                                                                                                                                                                                                                    1
Household Composition. An understanding of the composition of the County’s
households, including single parents, couples without children, single individual, and
elderly, is necessary to address the County’s housing needs. According to Census
figures, there are 65,933 households in Hamilton County, ranking 7th in the state. In
comparison, there were only 38,834 households in the County in 1990. There are 50,849
family households (77 percent), including 44,507 married couple households. The
majority of married couples do not have children (51.7 percent), which is consistent with
national trends. There are 5,834 single parent households, with the majority of those
consisting of a female householder (72 percent). An average of 2.75 people lives in each
household, down slightly from 2.78 in 1990. In 1990 there were 914 people living in
group facilities (dorms, prisons, nursing homes, long-term facilities, etc.). This figure has
increased 77 percent to 1,617 in 2000.

Income
Median Income. Hamilton County ranks first in Indiana in both per capita and median
family income. The per capita income in 1999 was $40,435 for the county and $26,157
for the state. In 2000, the median household income in Hamilton County was $71,206
and $41,567 for the state, or a 58 percent difference. The latest area median income for
a family of four is also published by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development, which includes Hamilton County in the Indianapolis MSA. HUD derives the
categories of very low–income and low-income from the County’s Area Median Income,
thus defining what households are eligible to benefit from HUD’s programs. These
income levels are displayed in the table below.

Table 2-5: HUD Area Median Income (Indianapolis MSA—Hamilton County)
Income      1           2          3         4          5         6          7            8
Level       Person      Person     Person    Person     Person    Person     Person       Person
Area        $44,900     $53,300    $57,700   $64,100    $69,200   $74,400    $79,500      $84,600
Median
Income
(AMI)
Very Low    $22,450     $25,650    $28,850   $32,050    $34,600   $37,200    $39,750      $42,300
Income
Low         $35,900     $41,000    $46,150   $51,300    $55,400   $59,500    $63,600      $67,700
Income
 Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Overall Hamilton County is considered to be the most affluent community in the state, yet
some economic discrepancies do exist in individual cities and towns.

Table 2-6: 1999 Cities and Towns Median Income
City/Town                                  1999 Median Income
Arcadia                                    $44,063
Atlanta                                    $43,036
Cicero                                     $52,561
Fishers                                    $75,638
Noblesville                                $61,455
Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

The 2000 Census data provided information on household income by race and ethnicity.
This information is summarized in the following table. While the minority groups of African
American and Asian American individuals averaged about $3,000 more than the median
family income; however, other minority groups did not fair as well.




IACED                                                                                     25
Table 2-7: Median Family Income and Discrepancies by Race and Ethnicity

Race/Ethnicity           Number of        Median Family    Median Income Amt.
                         Families         Income           Above/Below County Median
All Races                51,174           $80,239
African American or      654              $83,596          + $3,357
Black
American Indian or      128               $66,250          - $13,989
Alaska Native
Asian                   1,157             $83,992          + $3,753
Hispanic (all races)    671               $66,146          - $14,093
White                   48,566            $80,296          + $57
Some other race alone 271                 $54,653          - $25,586
Population of two or    398               $65,357          - $14,882
more races
Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

Poverty. Hamilton County is fortunate to have experienced significant economic
prosperity; however, poverty still exists in the community. Hamilton County has the
state’s lowest poverty rate at 2.9%, which represents 5,300 individuals. There are 388
female headed households with related children under 18 that are living in poverty in
Hamilton County. There was an average of 173 families in 2002 who received income
support through the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program. This
number represents .4 percent of all families who receive TANF in Indiana. Hamilton
County residents receiving Food Stamp benefits numbered 1,940 in 2002, representing
.5 percent of Indiana’s recipients. In addition, 3,119 students received free and reduced
fee school lunch, representing .9 percent of Indiana’s recipients.

Table 2-8: 1999 Cities and Towns Poverty Status
City/Town                     Number of People in               Percent of People in
                              Poverty                           Poverty
Arcadia                       176                               10.5%
Atlanta                       50                                7.0%
Cicero                        69                                1.7%
Fishers                       27                                3.2%
Noblesville                   1,527                             5.4%
Westfield                     420                               4.0%
Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

In addition to highlighting the cities and towns with the highest poverty rates, it is
important to consider smaller geographic locations of need. Census Tract 1106 has a
poverty rate of 13.3 percent. For children under 18 years, the poverty rate increases to
24.3 percent in CT1106. Census Tract 1107 has a poverty rate of 11.2 percent. For
children under 18 years, the poverty rate increases to 14.4 in CT1107.

Also of importance is the examination of whether any particular racial or ethnic groups
experience a disproportionately greater need in comparison to the needs of other groups
in relationship to poverty. HUD defines ‘disproportionate’ as 10 percentage points higher
than the percentage of persons in the category as a whole. Based on Census data, there
are no racial or ethnic families that are disproportionately represented in the poverty
category. The highest percentage of families living in poverty of any racial or ethnic
group are Asians at 6 percent.




IACED                                                                                  26
  Table 2-9: Familial Poverty Status by Race and Ethnicity
  Race/Ethnicity      Number of        Number of      Percentage of         Disproportionate
                      Families         Families in    Families in           Representation
                                       Poverty        Poverty
  All Races           51,174           1,022          2%
  African American 654                 8              1%                    NO
  or Black
  American Indian     128              0              0%                    NO
  or Alaska Native
  Asian               1,157            64             6%                    NO
  Hispanic (all       671              17             3%                    NO
  races)
  White               48,566           931            2%                    NO
  Some other race     271              10             4%                    NO
  alone
  Population of two 398                9              2%                    NO
  or more races
  Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

  Self-Sufficiency Standard. In 2002, the Indiana Coalition on Housing and Homeless
  Issues (ICHHI) commissioned a study to examine how much income is needed for
  different family types to adequately meet basic needs—without public or private
  assistance. This income level is called the self-sufficiency standard. The standard is
  determined by taking into account the costs of housing, child care, food, transportation,
  health care and miscellaneous expenses for several family types, as well as any tax
  credits a family might receive. The study is based on geographical costs for all of
  Indiana’s ninety-two counties. Examples of five family types are provided in the table
  below. Additional information on other family types may be accessed at www.ichhi.org.

  Table 2-10: The Self-Sufficiency Standard for Indianapolis, IN MSA, 2002—Hamilton
  County
Monthly Costs      Adult        Adult + infant   Adult +        Adult +      2 Adults + infant
                                                 preschooler    schoolage    preschooler
                                                                teenager
Housing            489          588              588            588          588
Child Care         0            553              561            293          1115
Food               178          261              270            442          504
Transportation     208          214              214            214          410
Health Care        78           167              167            199          213
Miscellaneous      95           178              180            174          283
Taxes              215          396              405            255          657
Earned Income      0            -17              -12            -175         0
Tax Credit(-)
Child Care Tax     0            -42              -42            -175         0
Credit(-)
Child Tax Credit   0            -50              -50            -100         -100
(-)
Self-Sufficiency   $7.18        $12.77           $12.96         $10.47       $10.20 per adult
Wage—HOURLY

Self-Sufficiency   $1,264       $2,248           $2,281         $1,843       $3,590
Wage—
MONTHLY

Self-Sufficiency   $15,169      $26,972          $27,376        $22,114      $43,075
Wage—
ANNUALLY

  Source: 2002 Self-Sufficiency Standard

  IACED                                                                                    27
Employment
The average wage per job in Hamilton County in 2002 was $37,702, representing an
increase of more than 55 percent since 1990. In 2002, there were 111,780 in the labor
force compared with 60,550 in 1990. Hamilton County’s unemployment rate has
consistently run about 2 percent less than the state rate, representing the lowest rate
among Indiana’s ninety-two counties. In February 2004, the unemployment rate in
Hamilton County was 2.6 percent compared to 5.1 percent for the state. The employment
base is 99.2 percent non-agricultural. Major occupation groups include administrative
support, executive managerial, and sales. County trends favor executive, professional
specialty, technicians, and sales. Major employers (more than 1,000 employees) include
Conseco, Inc., Sallie Mae, Marsh Supermarkets, Thomson Consumer Electronics,
Charles Schwab & Co., and Resort Condominiums International. Although only
accounting for 4 percent of occupations, the sectors of accommodations/food services
and arts/entertainment/recreation represent significantly lower wages than other sectors.
The average annual wage for these two sectors is below $20,000. This income level
would make it nearly impossible for the food service industry employees to live in the
county in which they work.


Transportation
The Census reports that 55,035 residents commute out of Hamilton County to Marion
County and surrounding areas. At the same time, 24,371 people commute into Hamilton
County to work. Due to high levels of growth, present and future traffic demands on all
arteries are significant. Major transportation improvements are in various phases of
planning and development. Utilization of public transportation or carpools has been
limited, although there is significant grassroots interest in a demand-response transit
system. Public transportation was repeatedly mentioned as a top priority in all public
forums and the community survey.

Hamilton County Senior Services provides limited service to the elderly and people with
disabilities. In addition, Janus Developmental Services provides public transportation to
individuals in Hamilton County, with special priority placed on people with disabilities.
The need for public transportation and specialized transportation services for young
people, low-income people, the elderly, people with disabilities, employers, and the
working poor has been a topic of discussion for several years among numerous
stakeholders in the community. A recent study completed by the Step Ahead of Hamilton
County, Inc., Analysis of Services to Adults with Disabilities Who Reside in Hamilton
County (2000), identified the shortage of transportation services as the greatest unmet
need among seniors and the disabled.

The transportation link to self-sufficiency, the workforce and business community, basic
skills, and environmental sustainability was also reviewed in the United Way of Central
Indiana study, The Community Assessment: An Assessment of Human Service Assets
and Needs in Central Indiana (1998).




IACED                                                                                  28
         III. Housing and Community Development
         Needs
         Introduction
         This section satisfies the requirements of the Sections 91.205, 91.210 and 91.215 of the
         Local Government’s Consolidated Plan Regulations. This section discusses the County’s
         housing and community development conditions and needs, as identified by residents
         through the community survey, public forums, and public comments. A more
         comprehensive market analysis for the County and a discussion of the challenges of
         housing special needs groups are found in the Housing Market Analysis and Special
         Needs sections of the report.

         Background on primary data sources. The quantitative and qualitative housing and
         community development priorities were obtained from public forums and a community
Notes:   survey.

         In early June 2004, 2,300 community surveys were distributed to local government
         leaders, providers of community services and residents. A total of 261 surveys were
         returned, representing all cities and towns located in Hamilton County.

         Table 3-1: City or town of persons returning community survey1
         City/Town of Respondent Number of Persons                   Percent of Persons
                                        Responding                   Responding
         Arcadia                        8                            3.1%
         Atlanta                        7                            2.7%
         Cicero                         26                           10.2%
         Carmel                         23                           9.0%
         Fishers                        72                           28.1%
         Noblesville                    100                          39.1%
         Sheridan                       3                            1.2%
         Westfield                      17                           6.6%

         In mid-June 2004, 40 residents and representatives from key stakeholders attended
         public forums to discuss and prioritize the housing and community development needs in
         their communities. A series of exercises were designed to allow for individual, small
         group and large group participation.

         Table 3-2: Number of Participants attending Public Forums
         Public Forum Location/Time                   Number of Participants
         Fishers, June 18, 2004; 3:00-5:00            8
         Noblesville, June 22, 2004: 3:00-5:00        11
         Noblesville, June 22, 2004; 6:00-8:00        4
         Arcadia, June 25, 2004; 3:00-5:00            16
         Arcadia, June 25, 2004; 6:00-8:00            1
         Total                                        40




         1
           The analysis of the community survey only includes the cities and towns that have
         chosen to participate in the Hamilton County Consolidated Plan. Carmel and Sheridan
         have chosen not to participate. As such, those survey responses will not be included in
         the prioritizing of housing and community development activities.
         IACED                                                                                   29
Public Forums
To gather public input into the Consolidated Planning process, four public forums were
scheduled for mid-June, 2004. The forums were regionally distributed with two in both
the northern and southern portions of the County. An additional forum was scheduled
after the request was received to host one forum in Fishers. In total there were five
forums: Arcadia (two forums), Fishers (one forum) and Noblesville (two forums). At each
location, excluding Fishers, residents had the opportunity to attend a forum from either
3:00-5:00pm or 6:00-8:00pm. All sites were accessible to persons with disabilities.

The primary purpose of the forums was to provide Hamilton County residents the
opportunity to voice their ideas regarding the greatest needs in their communities. A
secondary purpose was to explain the Consolidated Plan and the Community
Development Block Grant. More than 1,500 brochures and numerous informational flyers
were distributed to residents and organizations throughout the County to announce the
forums.

Forum Process. The forums began with a brief introduction of the Consolidated Plan,
CDBG, definitions of low and moderate income persons, and an explanation of CDBG
eligible activities. Forum participants were then asked to brainstorm about the most
urgent housing and community development needs in Hamilton County. Once the
individual lists were created, forum participants were then asked to join a small group
were ideas could be discussed and clarified. The small group then compiled all the
individual ideas and each individual was asked to rank their top five priorities. The small
group then tallied all the top five ideas and compiled a priority list for their small group.
All the small groups were then asked to reconvene into one large group where
participants had one final opportunity to identify their community’s top housing and
community development priorities.

Forum Findings. The responses received from forum participants were developed into
a list of housing and community development issues that were tabulated according to the
following factors: 1) top priority by forum location and 2) an aggregate of all forums by
final priority. A complete list of all individual ideas present may be located in Appendix E,
Citizen Participation Plan.

Top Three Housing and Community Development Issues, Noblesville Forums: 1) Public
transportation, 2) Health care, 3) Home repair

Top Three Housing and Community Development Issues, Fishers Forum: 1) Sidewalks,
2) Drainage, 3) Public transportation

Top Three Housing and Community Development Issues, Arcadia Forums: 1) Downtown
revitalization, 2) Infrastructure, 3) Fire protection




IACED                                                                                      30
Table 3-3: Final Priority Results by Forum Location


                                                                                                                                             Forum by Location Final Priority

                                                                                                             public transportation

                                                                                                                         health care




                                                                                  final priority
                                                                                                                       home repair


                                                                  Noblesville
             Top Housing and Community Development Issue                                              neighborhood revitalization

                                                                                                               affordable housing

                                                                                                                     assisted living

                                                                                                      financial literacy education
                                                                                  final priority




                                                                                                                          sidewalks
                                                                  Fishers




                                                                                                                              drainage

                                                                                                             public transportation

                                                                                                          downtown revitalization

                                                                                                                      infrastructure
                                                                                  final priority




                                                                                                                     fire protection
                                                                  Arcadia




                                                                                                                  utility assistance

                                                                                                    youth programs/youth center

                                                                                                                       home repair

                                                                                                                       public library

                                                                                                                                         0         2               4                   6                  8        10        12   14
                                                                                                                                                                                           Prority Vote




Top Five Housing and Community Development Issues, Aggregate of all forums: 1)
Public transportation, 2) Downtown revitalization, 3) Infrastructure, 4) Health care, 4)
Home repair

Table 3-4: Final Priority Results by All Forums Combined


                                                                                                                                             All Forums Final Priority


                                                                                                     public transportation

                                                                                                   downtown revitalization

                                                                                                            infrastructure
  Top Housing and Community Development Issues




                                                                                                               health care

                                                                                                              home repair

                                                                                                                sidewalks

                                                                                                            fire protection
                                                           final priority




                                                                                 neighborhood revitalization

                                                                                                         utility assistance

                                                                                youth programs/youth center

                                                                                                       affordable housing

                                                                                                            assisted living

                                                                                                                 drainage

                                                                                  financial literacy education

                                                                                                             public library

                                                                                                                              0          2    4        6       8            10             12       14        16   18   20
                                                                                                                                                                       Priority Vote




IACED                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  31
Community Survey
In June 2004, approximately 2,300 surveys were distributed to local government officials,
community providers and residents. The surveys asked respondents a number of
questions about housing and community development needs, including fair housing
accessibility. A copy of the survey is located in Appendix D. A total of 261 surveys were
returned, for a response rate of 11 percent.

Demographics of survey respondents. Surveys were received from all of Hamilton
County’s cities and towns. Table 3-5 shows the distribution of the cities and towns from
which surveys were received.

Table 3-5: Distribution of Respondents by City/Town


    Distribution of Respondents by
               City/Town

   Arcadia 3.12%

    Atlanta .73%

     Cicero         10.16%

    Carmel          8.98%

    Fishers                     28.12%

 Noblesville                         39.06%

  Sheridan 17%

  Westfield        6.64%



               0           20      40     60   80   100



Housing Inventory and Quality. Respondents were asked a number of questions about
the supply and condition of the housing in their communities. As shown in Table 3-6,
71.6 percent of respondents strongly agreed/agreed there is enough housing in their
community to meet their needs. In Table 3-7, it is demonstrated that respondents felt
less strongly about having enough rental units; 56.8 strongly agreed/agreed that there
are enough rental units to meet demand.

Table 3-6: There are Enough
Homeowner Units in My                                          Enough homeowner units in my
Community to Meet the Demand                                           community
                                                          40



                                                          30



                                                          20               37.7
                                                                  33.9


                                                          10
                                                                                             14
                                                                                   11.7

                                                                                                     2.7
                                                           0
                                                                 Strongly Agree   Neutral Disagree Strongly
                                                                  Agree                            Disagree




IACED                                                                                                         32
                  Table 3-7: There are Enough
                  Rental Units in My Community to                Enough rental units in my
                  Meet the Demand                                     community
                                                            30

                                                            25

                                                            20

                                                            15     29      27.8
                                                                                   21.6
                                                            10
                                                                                            13.7
                                                             5
                                                                                                     7.8

                                                             0
                                                                 Strongly Agree   Neutral Disagree Strongly
                                                                  Agree                            Disagree



Respondents were asked if the housing stock in their community was in good condition. The
overwhelming majority (77.2 percent) of respondents strongly agreed/agreed that Hamilton
County’s housing stock is in good condition.

Table 3-8: Housing Stock in Community is in Good Condition


  Housing stock in community is in
          good condition
60

50

40

30             56.7

20

 10     20.5
                        15.7
                                 5.9
 0                                        1.2
      Strongly Agree   Neutral Disagree Strongly
       Agree                           Disagree



Respondents were also asked to rate the quality of their community’s homeowner and rental
housing stock. A majority of respondents (68.5 percent) rated the homeowner housing stock as
being either very good or good. The rental housing stock received a less favorable rating, with
38.9 percent of respondents rating the units ‘ok’.




IACED                                                                                                         33
Table 3-9: Quality of Homeowner Housing                Table 3-10: Quality of Rental Housing Stock
Stock


  Rate the quality of the homeowner                          Rate the quality of the rental
            housing stock                                           housing stock
 50                                                     40


 40
                                                        30

 30
                                                        20                        38.9
                    43.6
 20
                                                                          26.3
          24.9                                          10                                 18.2
 10                         21.4
                                                                10.1
                                     7.8                                                            6.5
                                              2.3        0
  0
         Very      Good      Ok     Poor     Very              Very      Good     Ok      Poor     Very
         good                                Poor              good                                Poor




Respondents were asked if their community needed to focus on new construction and home
repair. The majority (55 percent) or respondents disagreed/strongly disagreed that the community
should focus on new construction as opposed to 49 percent strongly agreeing/agreeing that the
community should focus on home repair.

Table 3-11: Community Should Focus on                  Table 3-12: Community Needs to Focus on
Adding Housing Through New Construction                Housing Rehabilitation of Existing Structures



      Focus on New Construction                                 Focus on Home Repair
 30                                                     40

 25
                                                        30
 20

 15                                           28.1
                                                        20
                                      27
                            23.4                                          32.7
                                                                                   30
 10                 19.9
                                                        10
                                                                16.3                       16.7
  5
                                                                                                    4.3
          1.6
  0                                                      0
        Strongly   Agree   Neutral Disagree Strongly          Strongly   Agree   Neutral Disagree Strongly
         Agree                              Disagree           Agree                              Disagree



When asked about homeowners’ and renters’ abilities to make minor repairs, most respondents
indicated that most homeowners could make needed repairs, but the responses to whether
renters can get landlords to make needed repairs was inconclusive. This may be explained by
the respondents overwhelmingly being homeowners and therefore simply less familiar with rental
issues.




IACED                                                                                                        34
Table 3-13:                                            Table 3-14:


     Homeowners can afford to make                       Renters in this community can get
        minor housing repairs                            landlords to make needed repairs
60                                                      50

50
                                                        40
40
                                                        30
30                 59.5
                                                                                 47.7
                                                        20
20
                                                                         29.3

 10      17.9                                           10
                            15.6                                                          14.2
                                     6.6
                                              0.4               5                                  3.8
 0                                                       0
       Strongly Agree      Neutral Disagree Strongly         Strongly   Agree   Neutral Disagree Strongly
        Agree                              Disagree           Agree                              Disagree



Overall, the survey results indicate that the County does have enough housing to meet demand,
although less so of rentals. The major concern gleaned from this section was that home repair
was identified for community attention.

Housing Affordability. The housing affordability section of this survey asked respondents to
identify if there are enough affordable homeowner and rental housing, whether home and rent
prices are generally affordable and to identify the greatest barrier to owning a home in Hamilton
County. While respondents generally agreed that home and rent prices were affordable and that
there is enough affordable homeowner and rental units, they also indicated that cost of housing
was the biggest barrier to owning a home in Hamilton County. Other significant barriers noted
were coming up with a down payment, lack of stable income and poor or inadequate credit
history.

Table 3-15                                             Table 3-16


  Home prices in this community are                      Rent prices in this community are
        generally affordable                                   generally affordable
 50                                                     40


 40
                                                        30

 30
                    47.9                                20
                                                                                 34.4
 20
                                                                         28.7

                                                        10                                21.9
 10                                  21.6
                             14.3                                                                  10.5
          8.1                                  8.1             4.5
  0                                                      0
        Strongly   Agree   Neutral Disagree Strongly         Strongly   Agree   Neutral Disagree Strongly
         Agree                              Disagree          Agree                              Disagree




IACED                                                                                                       35
Table 3-17                                                                  Table 3-18


          There is enough affordable                                          There is enough affordable rental
             homeowner housing                                                            housing
 50                                                                          30

                                                                             25
 40

                                                                             20
 30
                                                                             15                         30
                                                                                               27.1
 20
                                                                             10                                  19
                                                                                                                         14.6
 10
                                                                              5      9.3


  0                                                                           0
           Strongly   Agree    Neutral Disagree Strongly                           Strongly   Agree   Neutral Disagree Strongly
            Agree                               Disagree                            Agree                              Disagree



Table 3-19


  What is the greatest barrier to owning a
           home in your community


      Affordability/cost too
                                                           33.2
      high


         Down payment                               20.8


          Lack of stable
                                             14.2
          income

 Poor or inadequate
                                             13.7
 credit history
         c

                                         8
 Condition of
 Affordable Housing
                                     6.6
 Location of affordable
 housing
                                   3.5
  Finance costs too
  high


                               0                    10            20   30     40




                                                                                                                                  35
Priority Housing Services. Respondents were asked about the most needed housing services
for Hamilton County. Respondents were given a list of housing types and asked to rank each one
on a scale from highest to lowest priority. The following list is a ranking of each of these housing
types along with the percentage of respondents ranking the item as the high/highest priority:

            1)    Emergency Shelters (43.7 percent)
            2)    Single-Family Homeownership (42.2 percent)
            3)    Assisted Living (37.2 percent)
            4)    Transitional Housing (34 percent)
            5)    Single-Family Rental (29.6 percent)
            6)    Senior Rental (29.5 percent)
            7)    Home Repair Assistance (27.5 percent)
            8)    Demolishing/Rehabilitating Unsafe and Abandoned Properties (23 percent)
            9)    Multi-Family Rental (21 percent)
            10)   Multi-Family Homeownership (18.2 percent)

Special Needs Housing. Respondents were asked about the housing needs in their
communities for populations with special needs, including persons experiencing homelessness,
individuals with physical and developmental disabilities, individuals with mental illness, the
elderly, and individuals living with HIV/AIDS.

Table 3-20: Special Needs Housing Services
Special Needs          Percent Strongly        Percent            Percent Strongly
Group                  Agreeing/Agreeing       Neutral            Disagreeing/Disagreeing that
                       that population is                         population is adequately
                       adequately served                          served
Homeless               31.2                    34.6               39.7
People who are         32.3                    35.5               32.2
Disabled
People with            31.3                    40.8               28
Developmental
Disability
People with Mental     19.9                    46                 34.1
Illness
Elderly                35.8                    26                 38.2
People with            17.5                    60.5               22
HIV/AIDS

The results of these responses may be explained in a few possibilities: 1) Residents are unaware
of the issues facing special needs populations and the majority elected to remain neutral on the
question, 2) Residents are in slight disagreement that the needs of the homeless, people with
mental illness, the elderly and people with HIV/AIDS are being met or 3) Residents are in slight
agreement that the needs of people with disabilities and people with developmental disabilities
are being met. There are no apparent conclusions that may be drawn from this question.
However, respondents were also asked to list ideas on how housing and related needs may be
better met for these special needs populations. The complete list of their responses is listed
below.




IACED                                                                                            37
          Table 3-21: Qualitative Responses for Special Needs Housing


We need shelter for the homeless-We need more affordable living         A homeless or transitional facility could be built. In addition to this
and group homes for the disabled                                        counseling could be provided for these groups

we need independent living facilities with supervision and help         Low income homeowner repair assistance. Transitional housing
available                                                               needs are greatly lacking
Housing needs to be affordable                                          More affordable housing for elderly (60+) on low fixed incomes
Limit ceiling on taxation                                               Additional senior "sensitive" housing need to be built and planned
Elderly are on fix income                                               Sidewalks are a big issue including ramps, ADA curbing an issue

I have no idea what special needs groups exist in my area or what
their needs are                                                         Elderly housing with affordable rents

Noblesville needs to come up with shelters or other housing for the
small but needy homeless population                                     Better rental housing at affordable/subsidized rates
                                                                        Transitional housing with case management services for those with
                                                                        mental illness and developmental delay with appropriate stable
Homeless shelter, safe houses for domestic violence victims             housing available beyond transition
                                                                        Better housing units are needed for the elderly maybe assisted living
Encourage local faith-based or charitable organizations to help out.    housing
Meet their need with job opportunities sand people willing to work      The people who can change and fulfill these needs, need more
with them give them proper clean help.                                  support; (community and funding)
We need more activities for seniors that spark interest and better
advertising of the activities                                           How to be adequate & affordable housing in Hamilton County

To be honest I have no idea what the special needs housing issue        Folks in a poverty level assisted housing, habitat for humanity is very
is.                                                                     sparse in this area
                                                                        Most special needs people or families do not have high paying
More housing at lower cost/prices                                       income-this limits their housing (type & place) transportation, etc

                                                                        Currently the only facilities for the elderly & the physically/mentally
Qualify these persons financially as to allow occupancy into existing   disabled are two apartment groups (homes) and the nursing home.
nursing homes                                                           More available/affordable housing is needed

More government subsidized facilities being available, either homes     More housing developments for assisted living, disable. More local
or apartment housing                                                    programs for elderly, most are located south of Cicero
                                                                        Assisted living housing instead of nursing homes better and more care
Subsidized housing group homes help to not for profit groups that       for mental health, more ways to enter shops and stores for
are already addressing this issue                                       handicapped vehicles

Make a better effort to keep special needs groups aware of what         Better pay and higher qualification standards for all jobs related to
programs rights and help are available to them                          working with elderly, children, or disabled
                                                                        A lot of the mental illness people are moving from one place to
                                                                        another, evicted and move again. I think landlords should have a
                                                                        break on taxes if they rent to these people then they may show more
Unaware of what all we have                                             understanding. Problem landlords be watched by social serv
                                                                        More public awareness-what is available and its location, effort to
Is there housing for people with HIV/AIDS? I had no idea                identify these groups within community
Needs met for people who really desire to own their own home and
don't know all the ways to do so and need someone to advise them        There needs to be greater cooperation from builders to make home
on issues.                                                              handicap accessible

more support to those group that already exist but can't meet all the   There is not enough outside accessibility for any age or handicap at
needs; raise awareness and create incentives for new ways for the       the income apartments. Family members can't go outside and sit on a
needs to be met.                                                        porch to get fresh air and sunlight

I have no idea what opportunities are available therefore I marked
everything neutral, I am new to the community                           We need affordable housing for seniors and for assisted living

                                                                        Many apartments are not handicapped accessible, although
                                                                        modifications can be made to them. Their needs, however, are met
Nicer places for elderly, vets & mentally ill than the govnt.           through fantastic organizations such as Janus and PrimeLife
subsidized Noble Manor                                                  Enrichment. There is a total lack of housing for homeless!
Develop new housing for elderly                                         They are adequate

                                                                        government subsidized housing needs to be increased tremendously.
Group homes, adult day care                                             At least triple what we have now
Make needs know to public & this will result in action                  Homeless shelters, more housing assistance for elderly disabled

          IACED                                                                                                                       38
Adequate sidewalk accommodations for wheelchairs and mobility
carts. People riding in these accessibility devices have to take to
the streets.                                                           Need more programs like Habitat for Humanity, faith based resource
                                                                       Redo some older houses and revamp the homes to relate to the
More downtown stores, more activities                                  peoples different needs
Not spend money that's not needed, 700,000 now 567,000 130,000
spent for what? Start here                                             Lower cost housing for the elderly
More affordable housing                                                Reduce property taxes. Increase state income by same amount
Need more low-income housing build in this area. Need the existing
housing to be better maintained with repairs made at affordable
costs.                                                                 Move to another community
Make the public more aware so they may be a part of what goes on.
Not enough awareness in the communities                                More transitional housing, more section 8 housing
                                                                       I don't know that Carmel has any housing or help for special needs, if
                                                                       its available, its never been brought to my attention, maybe that’s the
Provide more affordable housing                                        problem
Identify those in need and the number of those with the needs.
Then come up with facilities or housing to serve either groups or
individuals as need be. In short- identify the needs/numbers then      Affordable retirement community and assisted living facility would be a
the necessary plan/actions.                                            plus
                                                                       Public transportation leads to better lifestyle housing affordability and
there is an overall lack of community services in Fishers              jobs
assisted living for the elderly                                        Roads in Westfield need to be widened too narrow!
some new homes should be made accessible to the physically
handicapped                                                            Low maintenance housing-association fees extremely high
wheelchair accessibility in town is not adequate. Particular hazards
are railroad tracks. Public transport for physically and mentally
disabled is not adequate                                               More affordable group homes and nursing homes

living in larger cities where public transportation is available       Lower cost
construct senior housing or empty nest subdivisions                    Public transportation
                                                                       Sidewalks needing repaired disgraceful empty boarded up homes
                                                                       removed, code infractions in living conditions in trailer park and other
more group homes. better public transportation system                  parts of our fair city-violations must be handled
I just moved up here from Evansville a year ago so don't know          Relocate them to Johnson County
                                                                       Programs to rehab older homes, property tax breaks on older homes,
                                                                       increased availability of low income housing




          Lead-Based Paint Hazard
          The survey included a question to determine if Lead-Based Paint Hazard training should be a
          public service priority. The majority (54 percent) indicated that this issue was a low priority for the
          community. This response may be attributable to the relatively new housing stock and minimal
          risk of lead poisoning in the community.




          IACED                                                                                                                   39
Table 3-22


          Lead hazard training


30



20

        29.6           30.1
               24.3
 10

                               11.5

                                        4.4
 0
      Lowest   Low    Middle   High   Highest




Fair Housing
The fair housing questions, included in the survey, asked respondents about the prevalence of
discrimination in their communities and the existing barriers to fair housing. The results from the
survey and a review of socioeconomic data indicate substantial opportunities for a high standard
of living for Hamilton County’s minority population. However, it will remain important to inform
individuals and the community of the rights and responsibilities related to housing and economic
opportunity. It is anticipated that the County will continue to cultivate a relationship with the
Indiana Civil Rights Commission to provide trainings and educational materials; and to work with
HUD to address any discrimination complaints that may arise.

Table 3-23: Discrimination Prevalence
Fair Housing Protected Group                      Percent of Respondents Agreeing that
                                                  Discrimination is a Problem
Race/Ethnicity                                    19.4
Family Size                                       15
Single Parents                                    20
Sex                                               1.1
Religion                                          .6
National Origin                                   8.3
Disability                                        11.1
Age                                               16.1
Other                                             8.3
 *It should be noted that out of 261 survey respondents, only 180 people answered this question.
The reason may be that respondents felt there was no discrimination based on any of these
categories or they simply chose not to answer this particular question.




IACED                                                                                            40
Table 3-24: Barriers to Affordable Housing
Barriers                                            Percent of Respondents Agreeing that Issue
                                                    is a Barrier
Cost of housing                                     26.4
Age-restricted housing (e.g. elderly only)          4.5
Distance to employment                              16.2
Lack of knowledge about fair housing rights         7.4
among residents
Lack of accessibility requirements for physically   9
disabled
Lack of knowledge about fair housing rights         6.1
among landlords
Housing discrimination                              2.9
Public Transportation                               27.5

Table 3-25: Fair Housing Issues
Fair Housing Issue      Percent Strongly            Neutral             Percent Strongly
                        Agreeing/Agreeing                               Disagreeing/Disagreeing
Minorities can obtain   61.6                        20.1                18.3
desirable housing
Large families can      61.8                        18.8                18.8
obtain desirable
housing
People are able to      77.1                        18                  5
access
mortgages/refinance
at competitive interest
rates
People know that        71.5                        22.2                6.4
discrimination is
prohibited in
sale/rental of housing,
mortgage & lending
activities
People know whom to 24.5                            43.9                31.6
contact when facing
housing
discrimination


Community Development Needs

The community survey asked respondents about a range of community development priorities,
including infrastructure, public facilities, public service and economic development. The survey
asked respondents to rank the community development needs in specific categories in order of
how much they are needed in the County (with 1 being lowest priority and 5 being highest
priority).

Public Facility Need. When asked to rank public facility needs, the following three areas
received the highest ratings of being a highest/high priority: 1) Youth Centers (45.5 percent), 2)
Child Care Centers (42 percent) and 3) Parks and/or Recreation Facilities (41.6 percent).




IACED                                                                                              41
Table 3-26: Public Facility Priorities
Public Facility Need     Percent rating issue       Percent rating issue   Percent rating issue
                         highest/high priority      middle priority        low/lowest priority
Centers who serve        33.3                       32.3                   34.8
people with disabilities
Child care centers       42                         30.7                   27.4
Health facilities        37.8                       31.1                   31.1
Neighborhood             28.3                       36.3                   34.9
facilities
Parking facilities       24.8                       30                     45.2
Parks and/or             41.6                       27.6                   30.8
recreation facilities
Senior centers           29.6                       40.7                   29.2
Youth centers            45.5                       25.8                   28.7


Public Infrastructure. When asked to rank public infrastructure needs, the following three areas
received the highest ratings of being a highest/high priority: 1) Street Improvements (45.3), 2)
Flood Drain Improvements (45 percent), and 3) Sidewalks (40.4 percent).

Table 3-27: Infrastructure Improvement Priorities
Public Infrastructure Percent rating issue          Percent rating issue   Percent rating issue
                          highest/high priority     middle priority        low/lowest priority
Flood drain               45                        21.5                   33.5
improvements
Sidewalks                 40.4                      22.5                   37
Street improvements       45.3                      25.2                   29.5
Water/sewer               38                        26.9                   35.1
improvements


Public Service Needs. When asked to rank public service needs, the following three areas
received the highest ratings of being a highest/high priority: 1) Transportation Services (52.4
percent), 2) Youth Services (47.9 percent), and 3) TIE Employment Training (40.9 percent) and
Child Care Services (40 percent).

Table 3-28: Public Service Priorities
Public Service          Percent rating issue        Percent rating issue   Percent rating issue
Needs                   highest/high priority       middle priority        low/lowest priority
Child care services     40                          34.6                   25.4
Crime awareness         36.8                        34.9                   28.3
Employment training     40.9                        30.8                   28.3
Health services         34.8                        30.9                   34.3
Lead hazard training    17.4                        29.9                   52.8
Services for people     34                          31.1                   35
with disabilities
Senior services         34.2                        31.7                   34.1
Substance abuse         33.5                        31.5                   35
services
Transportation          52.4                        18.4                   29.3
services
Youth services          47.9                        23.9                   28.3



IACED                                                                                         42
Economic Development Needs. When asked to rank economic development needs, the
following three areas received the highest ratings of being a highest/high priority: 1) Commercial
Development Leading to Job Creation (48.4 percent), 2) Job Training (41.7 percent), and 3) Small
Business Loans (40.2 percent).

Table 3-29: Economic Development Priorities
Economic              Percent rating issue        Percent rating issue     Percent rating issue
Development Need      highest/high priority       middle priority          low/lowest priority
Commercial            48.4                        18.8                     32.8
development leading
to job creation
Job training          41.7                        27.2                     31.1
Rehabilitation of     37.7                        31.4                     30.9
commercial buildings
Small business loans  40.2                        35.7                     24.2
Technical assistance  29.5                        39.6                     31
to for-profits


The following table is an aggregate of the findings from the community survey and forums and
prioritizes the overall community development needs according to this input.




IACED                                                                                          43
                                            HUD Table 2B
                                 Non-Housing Community Development

        Community Development Needs Table
                                   Community Development Needs                             Priority
                                                                                           Need
                                    1.Senior Centers                                        Low
             Public Facilities      2.Youth Centers                                        Medium
                                    3.Neighborhood Facilities                               Low
                                    4.Child Care Centers                                   Medium
                                    5.Parks/Recreational Facilities                        Medium
                                    6.Health Facilities                                     Low
                                    7.Parking Facilities                                    Low
                                    8.Other Public Facilities—Center       that   Serves
                                    People with Disabilities                                Low
                                    9.Solid Waste Disposal                                  Low
                                    10.Flood Drainage                                       High
          Infrastructure
          Improvement




                                    11.Water                                               Medium
                                    12.Street                                              Medium
                                    13.Sidewalk                                             High
                                    14.Sewer                                               Medium
                                    15.Asbestos                                             Low
                                    16.Senior Services                                      Low
                                    18. Services for Disabled                               Low
                                    19.Youth Services                                       High
                                    20.Transportation Services                              High
             Public Service




                                    21.Substance Abuse Services                             Low
                                    22.Employment Training                                  High
                                    23.Crime Awareness                                     Medium
                                    24.Fair Housing Counseling                              Low
                                    25.Tenant/Landlord Counseling                           Low
                                    26.Child Care Services                                  High
                                    27.Health Services                                     Medium
                                   28. Accessibility                                        Low
                                   29. Residential Historic Preservation                   Medium
                                   30. Non-Residential Historic Preservation               Medium
                                   31. Economic Development Needs                           Low
                                   32.Planning                                              High




IACED                                                                                                 44
         IV. Housing Market Analysis
         This section addresses the requirements of Sections 91.205 and 91.210 of the Local
         Government contents of Consolidated Plan regulations. In contrast to the Housing and
         Community Development Needs section (Section III), which contains a qualitative
         assessment of housing and community development conditions, this section is
         quantitative in nature. Sections III and IV should be read together for a comprehensive
         picture of housing and community development needs in the County. A significant
         portion of this analysis has been borrowed from the 2002 Hamilton County Housing
         Needs Assessments; updates have been made where new Census information has
         become available.


         Housing Types
         There were approximately 78,812 housing units in the County in 2002. In 1990, there
         were 38,834. Approximately 80.9 percent of these units are owner-occupied, 19.1 are
         renter-occupied. Hamilton County realizes an extraordinarily high homeownership rate in
Notes:
         comparison with national data. The national homeownership rate is 68 percent. In
         addition, the number of rental units increased by 40 percent between 1990 and 2000.

         Table 4-1: Housing Types
         City/Town                     Owner-Occupied Rate            Renter-Occupied Rate
         Arcadia                       72.5                           27.5
         Atlanta                       80.5                           19.5
         Cicero                        80.1                           19.9
         Fishers                       77.5                           22.5
         Noblesville                   74.1                           25.9
         Westfield                     NA                             NA


         Housing Supply
         There are 2.88 persons per owner-occupied unit and 2.17 persons per renter-occupied
         unit. The Census reports that permits for 4,344 new residential units were issued in
         2002. The 2000 vacancy rate was estimated by the Census to be only 1.5 percent (State
         of Indiana average, 1.8 percent) for owner-occupied units and an average rental vacancy
         rate of 11.7 percent (State of Indiana average, 8.8 percent). The vacancy rate for rental
         housing is one of the highest in the state. Hamilton County also has the highest average
         one bedroom rental price in the state--$594, compared to an average of $408 for the
         state (Indiana Statewide Housing Market Study, Indiana Housing Finance Authority,
         2000).


             Table 4-2: 2002 Building Permit Data
         Residential Building          Units                          Avg. Cost/Unit
         Permits 2002
         Single Family                 3,479                          $182,024
         Two Family                    44                             $92,659
         Three & Four Family           35                             $83,028
         Five Families and More        786                            $42,986
         Total Permits Filed           4,344                          $155,163




         IACED                                                                                     44
Housing Condition

Measures of housing condition are relatively scarce. However, the release of the long-
form data from the 2000 Census provides a good source of current information on
housing conditions at the County level. Census long-form data are derived from quite a
large sample of housing units; roughly one in six or about 17 percent of all units are
included. Because of the sample size, these data are more precise than estimates
available previously from the Census 2000 Supplemental Survey.

Long-form Census data cover the important indicators of housing quality, including
plumbing facilities, type of heating fuel, age and crowding. In addition to measuring
housing conditions, such variables are also good indicators of community development
needs, particularly of weaknesses in public infrastructure.

Plumbing and Kitchen Facilities. The adequacy of indoor plumbing facilities is often
used as a proxy for housing conditions. According to the 2000 Census, 249 homes were
lacking in plumbing facilities and 199 were lacking complete kitchen facilities.

Heating fuel. Most housing units in Hamilton County are heated by gas provided by a
utility company (62 percent) or by electricity (32 percent), while a portion uses bottled,
tank or LP gas (4 percent). A small number of units (.3 percent) report heating with wood,
and another 77 units (1 percent) do not use any fuel. The lack of heating fuel for units
other than seasonal units is a likely indicator of housing condition problems.

Age. Age may also be a proxy for the condition of housing, especially considering the
risk of lead-based paint. However, the median year built of housing units in Hamilton
County is 1988. The number of homes built 1979 and prior is 25,471 units or 36 percent.
Approximately 6 percent of the housing stock was built prior to the year 1940 when the
risk of lead-based paint was highest.

Table 4-3: Age of Housing Units
Year Structure Built                          Number of Housing Units
1999 to March 2000                            5,653
1995 to 1998                                  14,571
1990 to 1994                                  11,505
1980 to 1989                                  12,278
1970 to 1979                                  11,105
1960 to 1969                                  4,828
1950 to 1959                                  3,655
1940 to 1949                                  1,075
1939 or Earlier                               4,808
Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

In addition to the above demographics, Hamilton County also conducted a windshield
survey of housing unit exteriors as part of the 2002 Housing Needs Assessment. A total
of 411 units were evaluated in areas deemed to have larger concentrations of older
housing in potential need of repair. These areas included Arcadia, Atlanta, Cicero,
Eagletown, Homeplace, Jolietville, Noblesville, Riverwood, Sheridan and Strawtown. The
analysis found that at least 270 homes in Hamilton County have significant problems with
exterior surfaces and property conditions. In addition, there are at least 250 homes with
obvious roof and gutter problems. Additional details regarding this survey are available in
the 2002 Housing Needs Assessment.

IACED                                                                                   45
Lead Safe Housing

Environmental issues are also important to acknowledge when considering the
availability, affordability and quality of housing. Exposure to lead-based paint represents
one of the most significant environmental threats from a housing perspective.

Dangers of Lead-Based Paint. Childhood lead poisoning is one of the major
environmental health hazards facing American children today. As the most common
high-dose source of lead exposure for children, lead-based paint was banned from
residential paint in 1978. Housing built prior to 1978 is considered to have some risk, but
housing built prior to 1940 is considered to have the highest risk. Children are exposed
to lead poisoning through paint debris, dust and particles released into the air, which can
be exacerbated during a renovation. Young children are most at risk because they have
more hand-to-mouth activity and absorb more lead than adults.

Excessive exposure to lead can slow or permanently damage the mental and physical
development of children ages six and under. An elevated blood level of lead in young
children can result in learning disabilities, behavioral problems, mental retardation and
seizures. In adults, elevated levels can decrease reaction time, cause weakness in
fingers, wrists or ankles, and possibly affect memory or cause anemia. The severity of
these results is dependent on the degree and duration of the elevated level of lead in the
blood.

Lead-poisoned children have special housing needs. The primary treatment for lead
poisoning is to remove the child from exposure to lead sources. This involves moving the
child’s family into temporary or permanent lead-safe housing. Lead-safe housing is the
only effective medical treatment for poisoned children and is the primary means by which
lead poisoning among young children can be prevented.

Extent of the problem. There were five or fewer children living in Hamilton County who
tested positive for lead poisoning in 2003. However, homes built before 1940 on average
have paint with 50 percent lead composition. Inadequately maintained homes and
apartments are more likely to suffer from a range of lead hazard problems, including
chipped and peeling paint and weathered window surfaces.

Available Resources. The Residential Lead-Based Hazard Reduction Act of 1992 (Title
X) supports widespread prevention efforts of lead poisoning. In addition, recent changes
to CDBG have added lead based paint abatement to eligible activities.


Housing Affordability and Needs
An affordable housing cost should not exceed 30 percent of a family’s income. When
housing costs do exceed 30 percent of a family’s income it constitutes being a ‘cost
burdened household’. Hamilton County is represented by 18.6 percent (7,510) of owner
occupied households and 28 percent (2,659) percent of renter occupied households as
cost burdened. When housing costs exceed 50 percent of a family’s income the
household is then considered to be ‘severely cost burdened’. There are 6.5 percent
owner occupied households and 12.3 percent renter occupied households in Hamilton
County that are severely cost burdened. Hamilton County’s elderly population accounts
for 19.4 percent of owner occupied households and 61.2 percent of renter occupied
households that are cost burdened. The tables below highlight the particular housing
problems and needs of Hamilton County sub-group populations.



IACED                                                                                    46
                          HUD Table 2A
           Five-Year Housing Needs, Owner Households



Housing Needs Table, Owner Households
                                                              %
                                                          Potentially % With Any                                Cost-
                                                                                   Total
         Housing Needs Category                             Lead-      Housing              Affordable Units   Burden
                                                                                 Households
                                                           Based      Problem**                                 Gap      Priority
                                                            Paint*                                                        Need
                                   1. 0-30% MFI


            (2-4 family members)
                                   Households                   0%         71%           249             72        177 High
                Small Related      2. 30-50% MFI
                                   Households                  43%         78%           486            108        378 High
                                   3. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                  50%         65%          1525            563        962 Medium
                                   4. Total Any Housing
                                   Problem**                               14%         26156          22652       3504
                                   5. 0-30% MFI
         (5 or more family




                                   Households                   0%        100%            79             10         69 High
          Large Related

             members)




                                   6. 30-50% MFI
                                   Households                  49%         41%           102             60         42    Low
                                   7. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                  34%         60%           346            155        191 Medium
                                   8. Any Housing
                                   Problem**                               19%          4944           3600       1344
                                   9. 0-30% MFI
                                   Households                   NA         54%           519            253        266 Medium
            (1-2 members)




                                   10. 30-50% MFI
Owners


                Elderly




                                   Households                   NA         37%           916            576        340    Low
                                   11. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                   NA         31%          1197            832        365    Low
                                   12.Total Any
                                   Housing Problem**                       21%          5805           4603       1202
                                   13. 0-30% MFI
                                   Households                   NA         78%           214             47        167    Low
                                   14. 30-50% MFI
                 All Other




                                   Households                   NA         77%           279             63        216    Low
                                   15. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                   NA         58%           654            278        376    Low
                                   16.Total Any
                                   Housing Problem**                       27%          5054           3720       1334
                                   17. 0-30% MFI
                                   Households                   NA         66%          1061            372        689 High
                 Total Owners




                                   18. 30-50% MFI
                                   Households                  46%         55%          1783            808        975 High
                                   19. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                  37%         52%          3722           1828       1894 High
                                   20.Total Any
                                   Housing Problem**                       17%         41959          35036       6923




                                                                                                                             47
                                                         HUD Table 2A
                                          Five-Year Housing Needs, Renter Households



Housing Needs Table, Rental Households
                                                            %        % With
                                                        Potentially    Any    Total  Affordable    Cost-
         Housing Needs Category
                                                       Lead-Based Housing Households    Units   Burden Gap Priority
                                                          Paint*    Problem**                               Need
                                   1. 0-30% MFI
            (2-4 family members)




                                   Households                36%       76%         398        102        296 High
                Small Related




                                   2. 30-50% MFI
                                   Households                40%       65%         528        176        352 Medium
                                   3. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                11%       28%         729        558        171   Low
                                   4. Total Any
                                   Housing Problem**                   26%        4068      2994        1074
                                   5. 0-30% MFI
         (5 or more family




                                   Households                56%       95%          80          4         76 High
           Large Related

             members)




                                   6. 30-50% MFI
                                   Households                46%       71%          48         24         24   Low
                                   7. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                37%       41%         221        173         48   Low
                                   8. Any Housing
                                   Problem**                           43%         673        384        289
                                   9. 0-30% MFI
                                   Households                 NA       67%         361        121        240 Medium
            (1-2 members)




                                   10. 30-50% MFI
                Elderly
Renter




                                   Households                 NA       76%         311        237         74 High
                                   11. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                 NA       39%         231         89        142   Low
                                   12.Total Any
                                   Housing Problem**                   53%        1104        585        519
                                   13. 0-30% MFI
                                   Households                 NA       83%         408         70        338 High
                                   14. 30-50% MFI
                 All Other




                                   Households                 NA       88%         412         48        364 High
                                   15. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                 NA       44%         786        474        312   Low
                                   16.Total Any
                                   Housing Problem**                   31%        3653      2539        1114
                                   17. 0-30% MFI
                                   Households                45%       77%        1247        297        950 High
                 Total Renters




                                   18. 30-50% MFI
                                   Households                41%       75%        1299        349        950 High
                                   19. 50%-80% MFI
                                   Households                16%       37%        1967      1348         619   Low
                                   20.Total Any
                                   Housing Problem**                   32%        9498      6839        2659




                                                                                                                      48
      Table Explanations

      *Lead-based percentage reflects the number of units that were built before 1970 and are at-risk of containing lead-based paint

      **Any housing problem reflects those units that are cost burdened greater than30 percent of income and/or are overcrowded and/or are without kitchen or plumbing facilities



      The median value of an owner-occupied home in Hamilton County is $166,300 in comparison to the state
      median of $94,300. The median gross rent in Hamilton County is $709 in comparison to the state median of
      $521. The 2004 Fair Market Rent for Hamilton County for a two-bedroom apartment is $592. The following
      table is an example of affordable mortgages for Hamilton County residents that are 30, 50, 60 and 80 percent
      AMI.

      Table 4-4: Income and Mortgage Limit Estimates, Hamilton County
Percent    1 Person 1 Person       2 Person 2 Person         3 Person                                                     3 Person               4 Person             4 Person
AMI        Income     Mortgage     Income       Mortgage     Income                                                       Mortgage               Income               Mortgage
30         $13,450     $0             $15,400     $0           $17,300    $1,510       $19,250      $10,590
50         $22,450     $25,491        $25,650     $40,391      $28,850    $55,291      $32,050      $70,192
60*        $26,922     $46,314        $30,768     $64,222      $34,614    $82,131      $38,460      $95,323
80         $35,900     $86,892        $41,000     $103,689     $46,150    $120,651     $51,300      $137,612
AMI        $44,780     NA             $51,280     NA           $57,690    NA           $64,100      NA
        *60 percent category are not official numbers from HUD, mortgage was computed based on several
      assumptions, mortgage was taken as the least value between a front end 29 percent ratio and a back end 41
      percent ratio
      Source: IACED calculations derived from HUD HOME Program Income Limits

      Table 4-5: Average Rent Comparisons
      Apt Type        0 Bedroom     1 Bedroom       2 Bedroom       3 Bedroom       4 Bedroom
      Tax Credit      NA            $469            NA              NA              NA
      Section 8       NA            $462            NA              NA              NA
      Market Rate     NA            $613            NA              NA              NA
      Fair Market     $393          $492            $592            $741            $830
      Rent
      Average         $426          $594            $738            $865            NA
      Rents
      Source: Fair Market Rents, HUD. Indiana Housing Finance Authority, Housing Market Study.

      Considering the Area Median Income, a family of four with an income of $64,100 could theoretically afford to
      pay $1,602 (including utilities) for a three-bedroom apartment. A very low-income family ($32,050) could
      afford to pay around $801 (including utilities) for a three-bedroom apartment. If the average rent for a three-
      bedroom apartment is $865, this analysis suggests that rents are generally not affordable for low-income
      families.

      The table below is another way of looking at the particular housing needs of specific segments of Hamilton
      County’s population.




                                                                                                                                                                                    49
                    Name of Jurisdiction:                                            Source of Data:                                              Data Current as of:
                 Hamilton County, Indiana                                        CHAS Data Book                                                             2000
                                                                      Renters                                                                    Owners
                                                         Small          Large                                                       Small          Large
                                       Elderly          Related        Related              All           Total      Elderly       Related        Related           All           Total         Total
                                                                        (5 or                                                                      (5 or
                                        1&2             (2 to 4)        more)             Other          Renters     1&2           (2 to 4)        more)           Other         Owners       Households
                                       member                                          Households                   member                                      Households
                                     households                                                                    households
  Household by Type, Income, &
       Housing Problem                      (A)           (B)            (C)                (D)            (E)         (F)           (G)            (H)             (I)            (J)           (L)
1. Household Income <=50% MFI                     957      1,052           137               1,060        3,206         1,699           910           229                 554     3,392            6,598
2. Household Income <=30% MFI                     463        408               68                 520     1,459              615        370           114                 259     1,358            2,817
3. % with any housing problems                67.8          75.5           94.1                   79.8      75.5         60.2          78.4           100                 80.7     72.4                 74
4. % Cost Burden >30%                         67.8          73.5           94.1                   79.8      74.9         57.7          78.4           100                 80.7     71.3                73.2
5. % Cost Burden >50%                         58.3              65         57.4                   69.2       64          31.7          62.2           91.2                69.1     52.1                58.3
6. Household Income >30% to
<=50% MFI                                         494        644               69                 540     1,747         1,084           540           115                 295     2,034            3,781
7. % with any housing problems                83.8          68.2               71                 85.2       78          37.8          77.8           47.8                76.3     54.6                65.4
8. % Cost Burden >30%                         83.8          65.1           56.5                   85.2      76.2         37.8          77.8           47.8                76.3     54.6                64.6
9. % Cost Burden >50%                         46.6          15.4           14.5                   27.8       28          18.9          49.1           30.4                57.6     33.2                30.8
10. Household Income >50 to
<=80% MFI                                         449        945           249               1,029        2,672         1,565         1,705           385                 729     4,384            7,056
11. % with any housing problems               48.8          25.4           44.2                   41.7      37.4         29.1          65.7           55.8                56.8     50.3                45.4
12.% Cost Burden >30%                         48.8          21.7           28.1                   38.4      33.3         29.1          63.9           51.9                56.8     49.2                43.2
13. % Cost Burden >50%                        16.5              2.1             0                  2.9       4.6             7.3       21.4               9.1             20.6     15.2                11.2
14. Household Income >80% MFI                     420      3,278           375               2,619        6,692         4,553       30,560          5,784            4,685       45,582           52,274
15. % with any housing problems               11.9              8.8        21.3                    3.8       7.7             7.2           8.9        12.9                14.9       9.9                9.6
16.% Cost Burden >30%                         11.9              1.9            2.7                 2.4       2.8               7           8.6        11.7                14.7       9.5                8.6
17. % Cost Burden >50%                            3.6           0.1             0                   0        0.3             1.3           1.2            1.1               2        1.3                1.1
18. Total Households                         1,826         5,275           761               4,708       12,570         7,817       33,175          6,398            5,968       53,358           65,928
19. % with any housing problems               54.6          24.2           39.8                   29.8      31.6              20       13.7           17.6                25.9     16.5                19.4
20. % Cost Burden >30                         54.6          18.7               24                 28.3      27.9         19.7          13.4           16.3                25.8           16            18.3
21. % Cost Burden >50                         32.3              7.4            6.4                11.5      12.5             7.4           3.7            3.7              10        4.9                6.4




IACED                                                                                                                                                                                                         50
Affordable Housing Inventory. The 2002 Hamilton County Housing Needs
Assessment includes an extensive list of affordable housing programs available in
Hamilton County. Interested persons should refer to the document for additional details.
For the purposes of highlighting what is included in this inventory, a summary list is
provided here.

                      •    Public Housing—currently no units
                      •    Section 8 Voucher Programs—163 Section 8 Vouchers, need
                           an additional 300 rental units, 25 emergency shelter beds, and
                           25 units of transitional housing
                      •    Project Based Section 8 Housing—8 HUD-assisted multifamily
                           projects consisting of 346 units
                      •    Rental Housing Tax Credit Projects—9 projects consisting of
                           591 units
                      •    USDA Rental Housing Projects—5 Rural Rental Housing
                           projects consisting of 162 units
                      •    Special Needs Housing—91 apartments available for the
                           elderly and disabled, one emergency shelter (8 units), no
                           transitional housing, no housing specifically for persons with
                           HIV/AIDS
                      •    Low Income Home Ownership—Habitat for Humanity has built
                           28 homes, Indiana Housing Finance Authority programs, USDA
                           Rural Development Rural Housing Loan Program used by a
                           few residents
                      •    Services Supporting Affordable Housing—Utility Assistance
                           provided 170 people assistance in 2000, Fair Housing
                           assistance provided by the Indiana Civil Rights Commission
                           and HUD, Weatherization provided by the Community Action
                           Agency of Greater Indianapolis, Rental Assistance through
                           Noblesville Housing Authority and by emergency through
                           Township Trustees, Repair and Rehabilitation provided by
                           Habitat for Humanity to 12 homeowners, other opportunities
                           available through USDA Home Repair Loans and Grants and
                           CICOA the Access Network for target groups


Barriers to Affordable Housing

Hamilton County has been affected by the State’s overall philosophy to let local leaders
have control over local issues. There are nine Planning and Building Departments in
Hamilton County. Rapid growth and annexation have resulted in a fragmented pattern of
jurisdictions, especially in the southwest corner of the county. It is often difficult for the
average property owner to identify the applicable jurisdiction and zoning ordinance. With
so many plans and ordinances in place, development standards may vary from
subdivision to subdivision, even within the same township. The inspection and permitting
process among the various jurisdictions causes problems for builders.

Other zoning recommendations for affordable housing include:
    • Vacant land zoned for residential use should be appropriate for the type of
        housing authorized.
    • Zoning practices should provide for a diversity of housing types that meet
        affordable housing needs.




                                                                                      51
    •    Zoning ordinances should permit townhouses, multifamily housing, and other
         forms of affordable housing without going through a special exception or other
         approval process.
    •    Zoning ordinances that permit single family detached housing should also permit
         attached housing.
    •    Infill development should be encouraged where appropriate.
    •    Minimum site sizes for PUD/cluster development should be reduced or
         eliminated.
    •    Minimum lot width, setback requirements, and lot sizes should be reduced.

New residential development requires many of the same conditions as new business
development. Adequate access to transportation and other infrastructure will be needed.
Incentives such as adequate infrastructure and land opportunities should also extend to
housing. In the interest of economy of scale and efficiency, plans for a land database
should also include an inventory of available land and structures for residential
development. The recommendation to rehabilitate existing structures when economically
feasible should also extend to residential uses.

The promotion of best development practices includes recommended criteria for
residential development and transportation suitability. As noted, representatives of
neighborhoods and the housing industry should be involved in the development of zoning
tools, development performance standards, and design guidelines.

Encouraging the use of energy efficient building materials and water saving devices will
not only help to optimize usage of available resources, it will also help residents to control
utility costs and maintain affordability.

Transportation planning should continue to consider resident needs, particularly those of
the elderly and low-income households. Low-income wage earners need to be able to
get to work. Census data indicates that many seniors do not have access to
transportation. As the population ages, this need will become more critical.




                                                                                      52
V. Special Needs Population
Introduction

This section discusses the housing and community development needs of special needs
populations in Hamilton County, pursuant to Sections 91.205 and 91.215 of the Local
Government Consolidated Plan regulations.

Due to typically lower incomes and the need for supportive services, special needs
groups are more likely than the general population to encounter difficulties in finding and
paying for adequate housing and often require enhanced community services.


Persons with Development Disabilities
and Physical Disabilities
The state and federal definition of “developmental disability” means a severe chronic
disability of a person that is attributable to a mental impairment, a physical impairment, or
a combination of mental and physical impairments, that is manifested before the person
is 22 years of age, is likely to continue indefinitely, reflects a person’s need for special
care, and results in limitations in certain life skills. The Family and Social Services
Administration is the state agency responsible for coordinating services to this population
through the Bureau of Development Disabilities Services.

Hamilton County is a part of BDDS District 5. Residential services are offered in a variety
of different settings outside of the institutional environment. These include Section 8 rent
subsidies for those who live independently, the Semi-Independent Living Program,
Supported Living, and a variety of Supervised Group Living Facilities (Sheltered Living
Residence, Intensive Training Residence, Development Training Residence, etc.). The
existing system includes more than 450 group homes, two state developmental centers,
numerous community mental health centers, and state mental hospitals.

Current Census data on the number of people living with disabilities in Hamilton County
represent 7,134 people with a physical disability. Of that number, 9.3 percent (2,945)
represent people 65 and over that are physically disabled.

In June of 2000, Step Ahead of Hamilton County published a study of the local situation:
Analysis of Services to Adults with Disabilities Who Reside in Hamilton County. This
study consisted of surveys distributed to service providers, community-based
organizations, and consumers. One hundred and four surveys were completed. Service
providers reported 303 people on a waiting list for supported living services in the home,
and 302 people on a waiting list of home health care. Results showed 97 people living in
group homes, with 48 people living in nursing homes. Of those surveyed, only two were
on a waiting list for group home facilities.


Persons with Serious and Persistent Mental Illness
Serious and persistent mental illnesses include schizophrenia, clinical depression,
delusional disorders, organic mental disorders, and personality disorders. In order to live
independently, members of this population require ongoing supportive services. It is
estimated that there are 236,000 people in Indiana with mental illness and that 68,000 of



                                                                                     53
them are low-income. Local figures are not readily available. However, if one applies the
statewide figures to Hamilton County; it may be presumed that 1 percent, or
approximately 2,000 individuals, of Hamilton County’s population suffers from SMI.
Using the same statewide assumption, that would imply that approximately 580
individuals with SMI are also low-income. In addition, it is estimated that individuals with
serious and persistent mental illness represent 30 percent of the single adult homeless
population.

Most services are available in Marion County, including long-term facilities for adults and
children, and several group homes. Some of these facilities are discussed in the
Affordable Housing Inventory (see page 53).


Persons Living with HIV/AIDS
Between 1,684 and 2,910 people living with HIV/AIDS in Indiana need housing, but there
are currently only 62 subsidized units that are targeted for this population. Thirty-two of
these units are in central Indiana. It is estimated there is a need for between 500 and
700 additional housing units in central Indiana.

Required HUD Table 2 reflects the special housing needs and priorities of the non-
homeless. The estimates should be consider over the five-year period. It should be
noted that the categories are prescribed by HUD and may not reflect all of the special
housing needs in the County.

                                    HUD Table 1B
                 Five-Year Needs for Special Needs Housing, Non-Homeless


Non-Homeless Special Needs Housing
Table
                         Special Needs Housing of the
                                Non-Homeless              Needs Current   Gap     Priority
                                                                                  Need
                 1.Elderly--Renters                         227     102    125 Medium
                 2.Elderly--Homeowners                      862     627    235     Low
                 3.Frail Elderly--Renters                   257     179     78 Medium
Housing Needed




                 4.Frail Elderly--Homeowners                677     507    170     Low
                 5.Persons w/ Severe Mental Illness         580     406    174 Medium
                 6.Developmentally Disabled                1,238    814    424     High
                 7.Physically Disabled                     1,500    890    610     High
                 8.Alcohol/Other Drug Addicted              886       0    886     High
                 9.Persons w/ HIV/AIDS & their families      16      11         5 Medium
                 Total                                     6,243   3,536 2,707


Homeless Persons/Families
Arriving at an accurate count of homeless people in any community is extremely difficult.
The 2000 State of Indiana Consolidated Plan included estimates that up to 88,000 people
in Indiana’s non-entitlement areas have been homeless at some point in their lives and
an additional 81,000 have to move in with friends or family. Other studies place the
number between 30,000 and 60,000. The Indiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence



                                                                                             54
reported serving 30 women and children in Hamilton County in emergency shelters in
1996.

According to the State of Indiana Consolidated Plan, the problem of homelessness in
small cities and rural areas of the state is larger than it appears and has been increasing
steadily. One of the reasons for the increase is that many jobs available in small cities
and rural areas pay only minimum wage. Another reason for the increase is the lack of
available affordable housing. In general, the jobs in Hamilton County pay higher wages,
but there are still individuals who are earning wages below the poverty level. As noted
previously, housing costs are significantly above average.

There is only one homeless shelter in Hamilton County. It is operated by the faith-based
organization, Third Phase, and provides 8 beds for the homeless population. In 2003,
Third Phase served 612 individuals. From January 2004 to July 2004, Third Phase has
already served 810 individuals—putting them in a position to double the amount of
individuals served in the previous year.

Considering the increased demand of Third Phase and their ability to only serve 8
individuals on any given night, it is likely that individuals who are homeless or on the
verge of homelessness are seeking assistance in nearby Marion County.

Transitional housing in Hamilton County is also very limited. Transitional housing is
designed to provide housing and supportive services to homeless individuals, families,
and other special needs populations. Its purpose is to facilitate the movement of
homeless persons to permanent housing within about 24 months.

The Township Trustee infrastructure is able to provide some relief to individuals
experiencing an emergency housing crisis.


Special Needs Homeless
Runaway and homeless youth typically avoid shelters and emergency service providers
for fear of being found by parents or guardians. The latest estimate of homeless youth
outside of larger cities was included in the Indiana Homeless Continuum of Care Gaps
Analysis completed in August 1998. Again, since there are no shelters in the County,
homeless youth are likely to seek assistance in Marion County.

The tables below highlight the need for Hamilton County to become more involved in
meeting the needs of its special populations.

Table Data Assumptions: Numbers are based on state data that suggests approximately 2 percent of the
population is homeless. Considering the affluence of Hamilton County, a more conservative estimate of 1
percent of the population was used to determine the number of homeless in need; which based on Hamilton
County's population of 206,270, means there are approximately 2,063 individuals every year who are homeless
or on the verge of homelessness.
The number of families experiencing homeless was estimated based upon findings in The Blueprint to End
Homelessness, which estimates that 40 percent of the homeless population are families.




                                                                                                   55
                                                                                HUD Tables 1A
                                                                         Five-Year Needs for Homeless

Homeless Needs Table: Individuals

                                                            Homeless Needs
                                                                                                   Individuals     Current
                                                                                                     in Need       Inventory      Gap         Priority
                                                                                                                                               Need
                                              1.Emergency Shelters                                       2,063        1,680           383         High
  Beds




                                              2.Transitional Housing                                          25            0          25     Medium
                                              3.Permanent Housing                                         400              28         372     Medium
                                              4.Job Training                                                  50           50           0          Low
  Supportive Services




                                              5.Case Management                                          1,990              0     1,990       Medium
                                              6.Substance Abuse Treatment                                1,766        1,400           366          Low
                                              7.Mental Health Care                                        746           600           146          Low
                                              8.Housing Placement                                         500           250           250          Low

                                              9.Life Skills Training                                      700           500           200          Low
                                              10.Chronic Substance Abusers                                500           200           300          Low
                                              11.Seriously Mental III                                     746           600           146          Low
  People




                                              12.Veterans                                                     50           30          20          Low
                                              13.Persons with HIV/AIDS                                        50            0          50     Medium
                                              14.Victims of Domestic Violence                             100              30          70          Low
                                              15.Youth                                                        50            0          50     Medium
  Source: 2002 Hamilton County Housing Needs Assessment, 2004 State of Indiana
  Consolidated Plan, Third Phase


 Homeless Needs Table: Families
                                                               Homeless Needs                     Families     Current                  Priority
                                                                                                  in Need      Inventory    Gap          Need


                                                1.Emergency Shelters                                    653            0        653         High
                        Beds




                                                2.Transitional Housing                                    8            0          8    Medium
                                                3.Permanent Housing                                     127           28         99    Medium
                        Supportive Services




                                                4.Job Training                                           16           16          0         Low
                                                5.Case Management                                       630            0        630    Medium
                                                6.Substance Abuse Treatment                             559          443        116         Low
                                                7.Mental Health Care                                    236          190         46         Low
                                                8.Housing Placement                                     158           79         79         Low
                                                9.Life Skills Training                                  222          158         64         Low
                                                10. Chronic Substance Abusers                           158           63         95         Low
                        People




                                                11.Seriously Mental III                                 236          190         46         Low
                                                12.Persons with HIV/AIDS                                 16            0         16    Medium
                                                13.Victims of Domestic Violence                          16           10          6         Low
  Source: 2002 Hamilton County Housing Needs Assessment, 2004 State of Indiana
  Consolidated Plan, Third Phase, The Blueprint to End Homelessness




                                                                                                                                      56
             VI. 2004-2008 Strategic Plan and
                 2004 Annual Action Plan

         Pursuant to Section 91.215 of the Consolidated Plan regulations, this section contains
         the following:

             •   Description of County’s philosophy of addressing housing and community
                 development issues
             •   Discussion of the general obstacles the County faced in housing and community
                 development
             •   How the County intends to address the identified housing and community
                 development needs
             •   How the County determined priority needs and fund allocations
             •   The County’s FY2004 Annual Action Plan

Notes:
         Guiding Principles. The following planning principles were used to develop the 2004-
         2008 Strategic Plan and 2004 Annual Action Plan:

             •   Place high importance on the findings from citizen participation efforts (i.e. public
                 forums, community survey, public comments);
             •   Allocate program dollars to their best use, in adherence to CDBG national
                 objectives;
             •   Understand the challenges of spreading an allocation over an entire County, and
                 respond by thinking creatively about leveraging resources;
             •   Recognize the partners, both for-profit and not-for-profit, that are viable
                 resources in assisting the County to achieve its housing and community
                 development goals.

         Geographic Allocation of Funds. In general, the County will target the use of CDBG
         funds to projects in low- and moderate-income areas. When a compelling community
         development need arises in other areas, the County will evaluate the potential benefit to
         low and moderate households as well as the County's overall objectives contained in the
         Consolidated Plan. The table below identifies the areas of Hamilton County that qualify
         as low- and moderate-income. It is important to note that Hamilton County is defined
         as an ‘exception county’ by HUD, meaning that areas represented by at least 35.3
         percent low- and moderate-income individuals qualify under area benefit. Typically,
         area benefit is defined as 51 percent low- and moderate-income individuals.
Table 6-1: Low- and Moderate-Income Areas
Place             Census         Block Group          LMI                           Percent of
                  Tract                               Households                    LMI
Arcadia           1102.01        2                    121                           39%
Arcadia           1102.01        3                    551                           44.4%
Atlanta           1102.01        1                    330                           46.7%
Cicero            1102.02        2                    295                           36%
Delaware          1108.03        3                    26                            47.3%
Township
Fishers           1108.01        2                    39                            52%
Fishers           1108.02        3                    9                             100%
Jackson           1102.02        2                    7                             100%
Township
Noblesville       1101.00        3                    28                            41.2%
Noblesville       1105.02        5                    512                           51.1%
Noblesville       1105.03        2                    382                           57.5%
Noblesville       1105.04        1                    53                            100%
Noblesville       1106.00        1                    1059                          41.5%
Noblesville       1106.00        2                    1127                          76.3%
Noblesville       1107.00        1                    780                           51.4%
Noblesville       1107.00        2                    942                           58.9%
Noblesville       1107.00        3                    338                           49.6%
Noblesville       1108.01        2                    35                            100%
Noblesville       1105.02        2                    19                            46.3%
Township
Noblesville       1105.02        5                    122                           56.7%
Township
Washington        1103.00        5                    166                           98.8%
Township
Wayne             1101.00        4                    403                           37.5%
Township
Westfield         1104.00        4                    54                            36.5%
Westfield         1104.00        1                    750                           35.9%
Westfield         1104.00        2                    288                           36.7%
Westfield         1104.00        3                    1100                          68.9%
White River       1101.00        1                    477                           53.8%
Township
White River       1101.00        2                    617                           37.8%
Township
 Source: Indiana HUD Field Office, Hamilton County LMI Areas 2002

Prioritization of Funds. Adhering to CDBG’s national objectives, priority will be given to
projects that address the housing and community development needs of low- and
moderate-income persons, particularly as they are outlined in the Consolidated Plan.

1. In making funding decisions, the County will give priority to activities that:

    •   Support, complement or are consistent with other current local unit of
        government plans;
    •   Are sustainable over time;




                                                                             58
    •   Have demonstrated cooperation and collaboration among government, private
        nonprofit agencies and the private sector to maximize impacts and reduce
        administrative costs; and
    •   Do not have a more appropriate source of funds.

2. A priority population for CDBG-funded services is individuals (especially people of
color and people with disabilities) who are denied, by poverty and historical institutional
practices, the opportunity to develop their full potential and to enjoy the benefits of
community participation. The County will give priority to programs provided through
organizations or agencies that demonstrate a commitment to making their services
accessible to people through diversity training of staff and Boards, through recruitment
and hiring of minority staff and Board members, and through efforts to provide services in
an accessible and culturally sensitive manner.

3. A priority population for CDBG-funded services is female-headed households with
children, who are currently, and have been historically, disproportionately impacted by
poverty.

4. CDBG funded services must, to the fullest extent possible, be appropriate and
accessible to people with disabilities, people of color, people with limited or no proficiency
in English, and other eligible individuals and families who may face special barriers in
accessing services. The County recognizes that while progress is being made in
improving access to services and activities, specialized access services are likely to
continue to be required in certain instances to ensure that priority populations receive the
services they need.

5. The CDBG program was built on a premise of local involvement in directing funds to
neighborhood and community needs. The County will give priority to programs that
promote community initiatives to identify priority needs and to address those needs.
Recognizing the limits on the ability of service systems to meet all needs, the County will
seek to leverage resources to promote comprehensive, long-term responses that
promote neighborhood self-sufficiency.

6. The County will give priority to programs that provide services addressing the basic
needs of our most at-risk populations.

7. The County will give priority to programs that build and support the capacity of local
organizations to address the needs of residents.

8. The County will give priority to programs that support economic development and other
programs that capture local dollars and prevent them from becoming disinvested in the
community.

9. The County will give priority to programs that promote access to quality jobs - positions
that pay well enough to support an adequate standard of living, allow the purchase of
housing and other basic necessities, offer stability and decent working conditions, and
provide opportunities for advancement.

Summary Findings
Sections II-V of the Plan present findings from the community survey, public forums, and
secondary statistical research. In sum, these data demonstrated the following trends and
implications:

    •   The top housing and community development needs identified in the community
        forums were public transportation, infrastructure, downtown revitalization, home
        repair and health care.

                                                                           59
    •      The top four housing needs identified in the community survey as being
           highest/high priority are:
               o Emergency Shelters (43.7 percent highest/high priority)
               o Single-Family Homeownership (42.2 percent highest/high priority)
               o Assisted Living (37.2 percent highest/high priority)
               o Transitional Housing (34 percent highest/high priority)

    •      The top community development needs identified in the community survey were
           for improved infrastructure, youth programs, and job creation.

    •      Respondents to the community survey were asked if additional housing should
           be added through new construction or if existing housing should be rehabilitated.
           Respondents prioritized rehabilitation over new construction.


    •      Hamilton County is represented by 18.6 percent (7,510) of owner occupied
           households and 28 percent (2,659) percent of renter occupied households as
           cost burdened.

Strategic Plan and Annual Action Plan

Five Year Goals
Three top level goals were established to guide the Five Year Plan. The goals,
strategies, and actions items are not ranked in order of importance.

    I.         Expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing

    II.        Strengthen the community’s living environment

    III.       Promote community services that increase opportunities for economic self-
               sufficiency


Strategies and Annual Action Plan

Goal I. Expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing

A central element to addressing housing needs is expanding the supply of affordable
housing through rehabilitation. Compared to adjacent counties and the balance of the
State, the price of housing in Hamilton County is extremely expensive. Availability of
relatively affordable housing has been decreasing as the County has experienced
significant growth in the past decade. The data on cost-burdened households
demonstrate that an insufficient supply of affordable housing exists. In addition, the
community rated the need for emergency shelter as one of its highest housing priorities.
Citizens of Hamilton County are concerned that their most vulnerable residents, including
the elderly and people that are disabled, are not being served in their home county, but
instead are having to travel to another county to secure shelter whether it be permanent
affordable or temporary housing.




                                                                          60
The strategies developed to accomplish Goal I include:

Strategy 1: Improve the Quality of Housing Stock through Rehabilitation and
            Repair

               Long-Term Outcome: Over the course of the Five-Year Plan, it is
               anticipated that 40 homes will be rehabilitated or repaired. Anticipated
               outcomes are that homeowners will realize an increase in property value
               and utility costs will decrease. This outcome is consistent with the 2002
               Hamilton County Housing Needs Assessment.

               Indicators: Increase in homeowner property values, decrease in utility
               costs

               2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will allocate CDBG
               funds to fulfill this priority. Approximately 8 homes will be rehabilitated or
               repaired and funds may also be made available to address emergency
               repairs.

Strategy 2: Explore the Feasibility of Developing an Emergency Shelter

               Long-Term Outcome: By 2008, a strategy will address how emergency
               shelter will be provided to Hamilton County residents in Hamilton County.

               Indicators: Representative from Hamilton County is engaged in the State
               Continuum of Care process; Development Plan is created that includes
               a project concept, feasibility analysis and financing plan.

               2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2004, Hamilton County will convene a
               stakeholders working group with the purpose of exploring the feasibility
               of developing an emergency shelter in Hamilton County.

Strategy 3: Develop Partnerships to Promote Single Family Homeownership
            Opportunities for Low- to Moderate-Income Residents

               Long-Term Outcome: Not-for-Profit and For-Profit Affordable Housing
               Developers, in partnership with Hamilton County, access appropriate
               federal, state, local and private funding sources to provide
               homeownership opportunities for LMI residents in Hamilton County.
               In consistency with the 2002 Hamilton County Housing Needs
               Assessment, these activities should focus on acquisition—
               rehabilitation—resale projects to benefit low- and moderate-income
               individuals and families.

               Indicators: Identification of Not-for-Profit and For-Profit Affordable
               Housing Partners, Project Concepts are proposed to the County,
               Financing is Secured for Development.

               2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will consult with
               the Hamilton County Housing Task Force to identify Affordable Housing
               Developers.




                                                                          61
Goal II. Strengthen the community’s living environment

The majority of Hamilton County residents enjoys a high standard of living and quality of
life—evidenced by higher than average incomes, home values, and educational levels.
However, there are areas of the community that have not experienced the same levels of
development and growth, which may be resulting in or be the result of declining
infrastructure. In order to attract and encourage vitality to these areas, investments must
be made for improvements in infrastructure, downtown revitalization and historic
preservation.

The strategies developed to accomplish Goal II include:

Strategy 1: Provide Critical Infrastructure Improvements to Sidewalks and Flood Drains

                Long-Term Outcome: By 2008, it is anticipated that 20 sidewalks and 15
                flood drains will be constructed that are vital to both transportation needs
                and a healthy economic impact.

                Indicators: Streetscapes are Improved, Improved Pedestrian Access,
                Percentage of LMI Persons Served.

                2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will allocate CDBG
                funds to fulfill this priority. Approximately 5 sidewalk projects and 5 flood
                drain projects are anticipated.

Strategy 2: Explore the feasibility of enhancing local communities through
            downtown revitalization

                Long-Term Outcome: Incorporate relevant action items and strategies
                from the updated Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, which is
                expected to be completed by January 2005. Update this strategy
                when Comprehensive Plan is complete.

                Indicators: Summary of Comprehensive Plan is included in 2005 Annual
                Action Plan, New Action Items are Proposed that Thoughtfully Consider
                Downtown Revitalization Needs of Hamilton County Communities.

                2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will review the
                updated Comprehensive Plan to identify recommendations for
                revitalization.

Strategy 3: Explore the feasibility of enhancing local communities through historic
            preservation

                Long-Term Outcome: Incorporate relevant action items and strategies
                from the updated Hamilton County Comprehensive Plan, which is
                expected to be completed by January 2005. Update this strategy
                when Comprehensive Plan is complete.

                Indicators: Summary of Comprehensive Plan is included in 2005 Annual
                Action Plan, New Action Items are Proposed that Thoughtfully Consider
                Historic Preservation Needs of Hamilton County Communities.

                2004 Action Item: In PY 2004-2005, Hamilton County will review the
                updated Comprehensive Plan to identify recommendations for
                preservation.

                                                                          62
Goal III. Promote community services that increase opportunities for economic
self-sufficiency

Essential community services may be the key for individuals with LMI’s to move up the
economic ladder in Hamilton County. The increasing cost of child care and health care,
along with worries about the lack of youth activities and access to transportation make
this goal a critical area for consideration.

The strategies developed to accomplish Goal III include:

Strategy 1: Provide public service activities that augment and enhance the human
service delivery system of Hamilton County.

                Long-Term Outcome: Develop a diverse network of needed services
                directed toward enhancing the health, safety and overall well-being of
                LMI individuals and persons with special needs, through the provisions
                for creating and expanding quality public and private human service
                programs.

                Indicators: Subrecipients will be required to develop indicators that are
                appropriate measures for their funded applications.

                Action Item: In PY 2004-05, Hamilton County will set aside up to 15% of
                its CDBG allocation to local community service groups who provide
                public service activities that promote self-sufficiency. It is anticipated
                these dollars will be used to fund approximately 4 organizations that
                address the public service priorities as they were determined by public
                forum and community survey participants.

                Hamilton County will award these 4 organizations through a competitive
                process. Once those awards are made, the action item and long-term
                outcome will be updated to reflect how many individuals are expected to
                be served.




                                                                         63
 2004 Annual Action Plan Allocation
 The Action Items described in the Five Year Strategy consist of the items that will be
 carried out in PY 2004-05. The following table quantifies the overall Action Plan
 Allocation for 2004 in terms of dollar amount. Performance measurements follow in the
 next table.
 Table 8-1: Target Allocations, PY 2004-05

Proposed CDBG Action                        2004-05 Proposed          Percent of Total
Items                                       Allocations               Funding
Goal I, Strategy 1: Improve
the Quality of Housing Stock
through Rehabilitation and
Repair                                                     $187,102                   26%

Goal II, Strategy 1: Provide
Critical Infrastructure
Improvements to Sidewalks
and Flood Drains                                           $295,536                   42%

Goal III, Strategy 1: Provide
Public Service Activities                                   $85,171                   12%

Administration                                             $141,952                   20%

Total CDBG Allocation
Request                                                    $709,761                 100%




                                                                       64
Hamilton County Consolidated Plan 2004-2008
Annual Performance and Evaluation Matrix
Five-Year Goals and Annual Action Plan


                                                 Goal I: Expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing
                                                                                                                                                    Five Year Target
 Strategies                                                                                             Action Items Proposed by Year
                                                                                                                                                           2008
 S1G1: Improve the Quality of Housing Stock through Rehabilitation and Repair by                 2004    8 units                                   8 units per
 providing assistance to homeowners to address code and safety violations through                2005    8 units                                   year/total of 40
 interior repairs, exterior rehabilitation, and repairs to roofs and porches; and by providing   2006    8 units                                   units for 5-yr
 grants for emergency mechanical repairs; provide emergency assistance to correct                2007    8 units                                   period
 conditions that threaten health and safety; and provide minor repairs for senior citizens.              8 units
                                                                                                 2008

 S2G1: Explore the Feasibility of Developing an Emergency Shelter                                        Hamilton County will convene a            By 2008, a
                                                                                                         stakeholders working group with the       strategy will
                                                                                                 2004    purpose of exploring the feasibility of   address how
                                                                                                         developing an emergency shelter in        emergency shelter
                                                                                                         Hamilton County.                          will be provided to
                                                                                                         Hamilton County will convene a            Hamilton County
                                                                                                         stakeholders working group with the       residents in
                                                                                                         purpose of exploring the feasibility of   Hamilton County.
                                                                                                 2005
                                                                                                         developing an emergency shelter in
                                                                                                         Hamilton County. Participation in State
                                                                                                         Continuum of Care process.




                                                                                                                                                              65
                                          Goal I: Expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing
                                                                                                                                       Five Year Target
Strategies                                                                                 Action Items Proposed by Year
                                                                                                                                             2008
                                                                                             Hamilton County will convene a
                                                                                             stakeholders working group with the
                                                                                             purpose of exploring the feasibility of
                                                                                   2006
                                                                                             developing an emergency shelter in
                                                                                             Hamilton County. Participation in State
                                                                                             Continuum of Care process
                                                                                             Hamilton County will convene a
                                                                                             stakeholders working group with the
                                                                                             purpose of exploring the feasibility of
                                                                                   2007
                                                                                             developing an emergency shelter in
                                                                                             Hamilton County. Participation in State
                                                                                             Continuum of Care process
                                                                                   2008      Development Plan Proposed
S3G1: Develop Partnerships to Promote Single Family Homeownership Opportunities              Hamilton County will consult with the     Not-for-Profit and
for Low- to Moderate-Income Residents                                                        Hamilton County Housing Task Force        For-Profit
                                                                                   2004      to identify Affordable Housing            Affordable
                                                                                             Developers.                               Housing
                                                                                                                                       Developers, in
                                                                                             Partners are identified; Project          partnership with
                                                                                   2005                                                Hamilton County,
                                                                                             Concepts Proposed to County
                                                                                   2006      Financing is Secured                      access
                                                                                                                                       appropriate
                                                                                   2007      Construction begins on 10 units           federal state




                                                                                                                                                  66
             Goal I: Expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing
                                                                                                         Five Year Target
Strategies                                                    Action Items Proposed by Year
                                                                                                               2008
                                                                                                        federal, state,
                                                                                                        local and private
                                                                                                        funding sources to
                                                                                                        provide
                                                                                                        homeownership
                                                                                                        opportunities for
                                                                                                        LMI residents in
                                                                                                        Hamilton County.
                                                                                                        In consistency
                                                                                                        with the 2002
                                                      2008      Construction is completed on 10 units   Hamilton County
                                                                                                        Housing Needs
                                                                                                        Assessment,
                                                                                                        these activities
                                                                                                        should focus on
                                                                                                        acquisition—
                                                                                                        rehabilitation—
                                                                                                        resale to low- and
                                                                                                        moderate-income
                                                                                                        individuals and
                                                                                                        families.




                                                                                                                  67
                                                  Goal II: Strengthen the community’s living environment
                                                                                                                                       Five Year Target
Strategies                                                                                  Action Items Proposed by Year
                                                                                                                                              2008
S1G2: Provide Critical Infrastructure Improvements to Sidewalks and Flood Drains              5 sidewalk projects and 5 flood drain   By 2008, it is
                                                                                     2004
                                                                                              projects                                anticipated that 20
                                                                                              5 sidewalk projects and 5 flood drain   sidewalks and 15
                                                                                     2005
                                                                                              projects                                flood drains will be
                                                                                              5 sidewalk projects and 5 flood drain   constructed that
                                                                                     2006                                             are vital to both
                                                                                              projects
                                                                                     2007     5 sidewalk projects                     transportation
                                                                                                                                      needs and a
                                                                                                                                      healthy economic
                                                                                     2008                                             impact.

S2G2: Explore the feasibility of enhancing local communities through downtown                 Hamilton County will review the         Incorporate
revitalization                                                                       2004                                             relevant action
                                                                                              updated Comprehensive Plan.
                                                                                              Summary of Comprehensive Plan is        items and
                                                                                              included in 2005 Annual Action Plan,    strategies
                                                                                              New Action Items are Proposed that      from the updated
                                                                                     2005                                             Hamilton County
                                                                                              Thoughtfully Consider Downtown
                                                                                              Revitalization Needs of Hamilton        Comprehensive
                                                                                              County Communities.                     Plan, which is
                                                                                     2006                                             expected to be
                                                                                                                                      completed by
                                                                                     2007                                             January 2005.
                                                                                                                                      Update this
                                                                                                                                      strategy
                                                                                     2008                                             when
                                                                                                                                      Comprehensive
                                                                                                                                      Plan is complete.
S3G2: Explore the feasibility of enhancing local communities through historic                 Hamilton County will review the         Incorporate
preservation                                                                         2004                                             relevant action
                                                                                              updated Comprehensive Plan.




                                                                                                                                                    68
                                                   Goal II: Strengthen the community’s living environment
                                                                                                                                               Five Year Target
Strategies                                                                                        Action Items Proposed by Year
                                                                                                                                                     2008
                                                                                                    Summary of Comprehensive Plan is          items and
                                                                                                    included in 2005 Annual Action Plan,      strategies from the
                                                                                                    New Action Items are Proposed that        updated Hamilton
                                                                                           2005
                                                                                                    Thoughtfully Consider Historic            County
                                                                                                    Preservation Needs of Hamilton            Comprehensive
                                                                                                    County Communities.                       Plan, which is
                                                                                           2006                                               expected to be
                                                                                           2007                                               completed by
                                                                                                                                              January 2005.
                                                                                                                                              Update this
                                                                                                                                              strategy
                                                                                           2008                                               when
                                                                                                                                              Comprehensive
                                                                                                                                              Plan is complete.


                             Goal III: Promote community services that increase opportunities for economic self-sufficiency
                                                                                                                                               Five Year Target
Strategies                                                                                        Action Items Proposed by Year*
                                                                                                                                                     2008*
S1GIII: : Provide public service activities that augment and enhance the human                      In PY 2004-05, Hamilton County will       Develop a diverse
service delivery system of Hamilton County.                                                         set aside 15% of its CDBG allocation      network of needed
                                                                                                    to local community service groups who     services directed
                                                                                                    provide public service activities that    toward enhancing
                                                                                                    promote self-sufficiency.        It is    the health, safety
                                                                                           2004     anticipated these dollars will be used    and overall well-
*Once awards are made to the 4 organizations through a competitive process, the                     to fund approximately 4 organizations     being of LMI
action item and five year target will be changed to reflect how many individuals will be            that address the public service           individuals and
served.                                                                                             priorities as public forum and            persons with
                                                                                                    community       survey     participants   special needs,
                                                                                                    determined them.                          through the




                                                                                                                                                           69
             Goal III: Promote community services that increase opportunities for economic self-sufficiency
                                                                                                               Five Year Target
Strategies                                                                 Action Items Proposed by Year*
                                                                                                                     2008*
                                                                    2005                                      provisions for
                                                                    2006                                      creating and
                                                                                                              expanding quality
                                                                                                              public and private
                                                                                                              human service
                                                                                                              programs.



                                                                    2007




                                                                    2008




                                                                                                                           70
                                  HUD Table 3
                       Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

Project Title: Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation

Project Description
Improve the Quality of Housing Stock through Rehabilitation and Repair by providing
assistance to homeowners to address code and safety violations through interior repairs,
exterior rehabilitation, and repairs to roofs and porches; and by providing grants for
emergency mechanical repairs; provide emergency assistance to correct conditions that
threaten health and safety; and provide minor repairs for senior citizens.


HUD Matrix Code                  CDBG Citation
14A                              570.202
Location                         CDBG National Objective
Community Wide                   Low/Moderate Housing

Start Date                       Completion Date
01/01/2005                       09/30/2005
Performance Indicator            Annual Units
Increase in                      8 units
homeowner property
values, decrease in
utility costs
Local ID                         Units Upon Completion
TBD                              8


Funding Sources:
CDBG                             $187,102
ESG
HOME
HOPWA
Total Formula
Prior Year Funds
Assisted Housing
PHA
Other Funding
Total

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS
Persons with Disabilities    Public Housing Needs




                                                                                        71
Project Title: Infrastructure Improvement

Project Description
Stimulate increased pedestrian mobility and improve streetscapes by providing funds to
construct eligible public infrastructure improvements in response to the priority
infrastructure needs of varying communities which may include sidewalk and flood drain
improvements.


HUD Matrix Code                  CDBG Citation
03I, 03L                         570.201
Location                         CDBG National Objective
Community Wide                   Low/Moderate Area

Start Date                       Completion Date
01/01/2005                       09/30/2005
Performance Indicator            Annual Units
Streetscapes are                 5 sidewalk projects
Improved, Improved               5 flood drain projects
Pedestrian Access.
Percentage of LMI
Persons Served
Local ID                         Units Upon Completion
TBD                              10 total units

   Funding Sources:
   CDBG                              $295,536
   ESG
   HOME
   HOPWA
   Total Formula
   Prior Year Funds
   Assisted Housing
   PHA
   Other Funding
   Total

 The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS
 Persons with Disabilities    Public Housing Needs




                                                                                         72
Project Title: Public Service

Project Description
Develop a diverse network of needed services directed toward enhancing
the health, safety and overall well-being of LMI individuals and persons
with special needs, through the provisions for creating and expanding
quality public and private human service programs.
HUD Matrix Code           CDBG Citation
05                        570.201
Location                  CDBG National Objective
Community Wide            Low/Moderate Limited
                          Clientele
Start Date                Completion Date
01/01/2005                09/30/2005
Performance Indicator Annual Units
Subrecipients will be     4 organizations per year will
required to develop       be funded
indicators that are
appropriate measures for
their funded
Local ID                         Units Upon Completion
TBD                              Number of people served will
                                 be determined after
                                 competitive application
                                 process


   Funding Sources:
   CDBG                              $85,171
   ESG
   HOME
   HOPWA
   Total Formula
   Prior Year Funds
   Assisted Housing
   PHA
   Other Funding
   Total


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS
Persons with Disabilities    Public Housing Needs




                                                                                        73
       Project Title: Administration

       Project Description
       Plan, program, monitor, and report on the annual CDBG entitlement grant
       programs in the manner necessary to maximize the effectiveness of grant
       resources in compliance with program regulations; inform and involve
       citizens; affirmatively further Fair Housing opportunities; provide full
       accountability for the use of federal funds.
         HUD Matrix Code            CDBG Citation
         21A                        570.206
         Location                   CDBG National Objective
         Community Wide             Within 20% administrative
                                    guideline
         Start Date                 Completion Date
         01/01/2005                 09/30/2005
         Performance Indicator Annual Units
         Monitoring functions are   Not applicable
          completed; attendance at
          public forums/hearings is
          increased; funds are
          expended within 18
          months

          Local ID                         Units Upon Completion
          TBD                              Not applicable




                         Funding Sources:
                         CDBG                           $141,952
                         ESG
                         HOME
                         HOPWA
                         Total Formula
                         Prior Year Funds
                         Assisted Housing
                         PHA
                         Other Funding
                         Total



The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons
with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                                                  74
Application Process. Upon approval from HUD regarding the Consolidated Plan, the
Noblesville Housing Authority will establish an application process. This process will
include establishing guidelines for the use of funds (consistent with federal rules),
developing application forms, creating an objective application review with points
assigned to priorities and inviting community participation.



Institutional Structure
Many firms, individuals, agencies and other organizations are involved in the provision of
housing and community development in the County. Some of the key organizations
within the public, private and not-for-profit sector are discussed below.

Public Sector. Federal, state and local governments are all active in housing policy. At
the federal level two primary agencies exist in Indiana to support housing: the U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Rural Economic Community
Development (RECD). HUD provides funds statewide for a variety of housing programs.
RECD operates mostly in non-metropolitan areas and provides a variety of direct and
guaranteed loan and grant programs for housing and community development programs.

In addition to these entities, other federal agencies with human service components also
help assist with housing, although housing delivery may not be their primary purpose.
For example, both the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of
Energy provide funds for the weatherization of homes. Components of the McKinney
program for homeless assistance are administered by agencies other than HUD.

At the state level, the Indiana Housing Finance Authority (IHFA) is the lead agency for
housing in the state. It coordinates the Mortgage Revenue Bond and the Mortgage
Credit Certificates first time homebuyer programs through its First Home Program,
administers the State’s allocation of Rental Housing Tax Credits and is responsible for
the non-entitlement CDBG dollars dedicated to housing, the Indiana Low Income Housing
Trust Fund, and non participating jurisdiction HOME monies. IHFA is also the grant
administrator for HOPWA. Finally, IFHA is currently a HUD designated Participating
Administrative Entity for expiring use contracts and an approved contract administrator of
certain project-based Section 8 contracts.

The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration administers the Emergency
Shelter Grant program and coordinates the State’s tenant-based Section 8 program
through a contract with community action agencies. It also administers the Medicaid
CHOICE program, the child care voucher program, and other social service initiatives,
and is the lead agency overseeing the State institutions and other licensed residential
facilities. FSSA is the focal point for policies that integrate housing with the provision of
social services. On the County level, the local Office of Family and Children fulfills this
role.

The Indiana Department of Commerce is the main agency involved in community and
economic development and related programs. It administers the State’s CDBG program.
IDOC also administers the Neighborhood Assistance Program and the Individual
Development Account program, which provides first time homebuyer downpayment
assistance.

The Indiana Department of Health coordinates many of the State’s programs relating to
persons living with HIV/AIDS and also administers the State’s blood screening program
for lead levels in children.



                                                                                                75
Other State agencies that are involved in housing and community development issues
include the Indiana Civil Rights Commission through Fair Housing Enforcement, the
Indiana Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology, the Indiana Department of
Environmental Management, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development, the
Indiana Department of Transportation and the Indiana Department of Corrections.

Private Sector. A number of private sector organizations are involved in housing policy.
On an association level, Indiana Realtors Association, Indiana Homebuilders Association,
Indiana Mortgage Bankers Association and other organizations provide input into housing
policy. Private lending institutions are primarily involved in providing mortgage lending
and other real estate financing to the housing industry. Several banks are also active
participants in IHFA’s First Home Program.

Fannie Mae funds programs such as HomeChoice, which provides flexible underwriting
criteria on conventional mortgages to persons with disabilities. The Federal Home Loan
Bank (FHLB) and its member banks in Indiana provide mortgage lending as well as
participate in FHLB’s Affordable Housing Program.

The private sector is largely able to satisfy the demands for market rate housing
throughout the County.

Not-for-profit sector. Many not-for-profit organizations or quasi-governmental agencies
are becoming increasingly interested in learning how to provide affordable housing
opportunities in the County. These organizations represent a continuum of essential
services that low and moderate income individuals need and will play a key role in
outreach efforts.


Anti-Poverty Strategy
Hamilton County does not yet have a formally adopted anti-poverty strategy. However,
the formation of the Consolidated Plan is in essence anti-poverty related because a
stable living environment is also a service delivery platform. Many of the Consolidated
Plan strategies directly assist individuals who are living in poverty. In addition, the goals
of the local Office of Family and Children, Township Trustees, United Way, Community
Action Agency, Housing Authority and other key service providers have been informally
pursuing an anti-poverty strategy as their primary missions.


Obstacles to Meeting Needs
The County faces a number of challenges in meeting the needs outlined in the Plan:

    •   Most of the housing and community development priorities listed require a
        substantially larger investment than the CDBG funds may be able to leverage;
        particularly, emergency shelter, water/sewer infrastructure, and comprehensive
        downtown revitalization.

    •   The housing and community development needs are difficult to measure and
        quantify, as are the goals and action items.

    •   Hamilton County is a significantly affluent community such that substantial needs
        and priorities may become overlooked.




                                                                                            76
         VII. Monitoring Plan
         The following monitoring system was developed to ensure that the activities carried out in
         furtherance of the Plan, are done so in a timely manner in accordance with all applicable
         laws, regulations, policies and sound management and accounting practices. The
         Noblesville Housing Authority will be responsible for implementing and administering the
         Monitoring Plan.

         Guidelines. The Monitoring Plan will operate using the following guidelines:

             •   Detailed contracts will be developed that describe the services to be provided;
                 the cost of the services; specific targeted goals (including appropriate outcomes
                 and indicators) and the timetable for achieving those goals. In addition, contracts
                 will identify all applicable federal, state and local rules and regulations.
Notes:
             •   Monthly progress reports will show funds committed to specific activities; monies
                 spent to date; progress toward goals outlined in the contract; information on the
                 beneficiaries of the activity and any problems or additional comments that affect
                 the project/activity. Noblesville Housing Authority staff that is trained to
                 understand HUD requirements to ensure compliance will review reports.

             •   Claims for reimbursement will not be processed until reports are current and
                 have withstood the scrutiny of review.

             •   On-site monitoring visits of sub-grantee will be conducted annually to review their
                 internal systems and ensure compliance with applicable requirements. A
                 member of the Noblesville Housing Authority staff will meet with appropriate
                 members of the sub-grantee staff to review procedures, client files, financial
                 records and other pertinent data.

             •   All records will be retained according to the applicable federal, state or local
                 regulation.

             •   Citizens, public agencies and other interested parties will be afforded reasonable
                 access to records regarding the past use of CDBG funds, consistent with
                 applicable federal, state and local laws regarding privacy and confidentiality; and
                 in accordance with the Citizen Participation Plan (see Appendix D).

         Records. In order for effective and efficient monitoring, the Noblesville Housing Authority
         will collect and maintain records as outlined in the following tables.




                                                                                                    77
Table 7-1: Management and Accounting Recordkeeping
General               Financial Records      Project and Activity            Subrecipient
Administrative                               Records                         Records
Records

   •   Consolidated Plan    •   Chart of            •   Eligibility of the      •   Subrecipient
       Submission (i.e.         Accounts                Activity                    application
       application,         •   Manual on           •   Evidence of             •   Written
       program                  Accounting              Having Met a                agreement
       descriptions,            Procedures              National                •   Financial
       certifications)
                            •   Accounting              Objective                   Statements and
   •   Executed Grant           Journals and        •   Subrecipient                Records
       Agreement                Ledgers                 Agreement (if           •   Audits
   •   Description,         •                           applicable)
                                Source                                          •   Monthly
       Geographic               Documentation       •   Any Bids or                 Progress
       Location and             (purchase               Contracts                   Reports
       Budget of Each           orders, invoices,   •   Characteristics         •   Drawdown
       Funded Activity          canceled                and Location of             Requests (w/
   •   Eligibility and          checks, etc)            the Beneficiaries           supporting
       National Objective   •   Procurement         •   Compliance with             documentation)
       Determinations           Files (including
       For Each Activity
                                                        Special Program         •   Monitoring
                                bids, contracts,        Requirements                Reports and
   •   Personnel Files          etc.)                   (where                      Correspondence
   •   Property             •   Real Property           applicable)
                                                                                •   Each
       Management               Inventory (if       •   Budget and                  Subrecipient
       Files (if                applicable)             Expenditure                 must also
       applicable)          •   Bank Account            Information                 maintain detailed
   •   HUD Monitoring           Records             •   Status of the               records on its
       Correspondence       •   Drawdown                Project/Activity            organization,
   •   Citizen                  Requests                                            financial and
       Participation        •   Payroll Records                                     administrative
       Compliance               and Reports                                         systems and the
       Documentation                                                                specific CDBG-
                            •   Financial
   •   Fair Housing and         Reports
                                                                                    funded
       Equal Opportunity                                                            project/activity
                            •   Audit Files
       Records
                            •   Relevant
   •   Lump Sum
                                Financial
       Agreements (if
                                Correspondence
       applicable)
   •   Environmental
       Review Records
   •   Documentation of
       Compliance with
       Other Federal
       Requirements
       (e.g. Davis
       Bacon, Uniform
       Relocation Act
       and Lead-Based
       Paint)




                                                                                                  79
Table 7-2: National Objective Recordkeeping
National Objective Criteria                   Records to be Maintained
Low/Mod—Area Benefit                             •    Boundaries of the area
                                                 •    Income data of residents
                                                 •    If less than 51% low/mod, exception criteria
                                                      data
Low/Mod—Limited Clientele                        •    Documentation that facility/service designed
                                                      for or used exclusively by one of the eligible
                                                      “special needs” groups
                                                 •    Documentation of nature and location of the
                                                      facility/service such than it can be presumed
                                                      to service low/mod OR
                                                 •    Date on household size and income of each
                                                      person receiving the benefit
Low/Mod—Housing                                  •    Copy of written agreement with
                                                      landlord/developer with total number of units
                                                      and number to be occupied by low/mod
                                                      persons
                                                 •    Total cost of project (CDBG and non-CDBG
                                                      funds)
                                                 •    Income and household size data for
                                                      occupants/purchasers
                                                 •    Rent charged (where applicable)
Low/Mod—Job Creation                             •    If qualifying under “jobs available to
                                                      low/mod”:
                                                      -copy of written agreement with required
                                                      provisions
                                                     -listing by job title of permanent jobs filled,
                                                     which were available to low/mod and evidence
                                                     of first consideration to low/mod
                                                 •    If qualifying under “jobs held by low/mod”:
                                                      -copy of written agreement with required
                                                      provisions
                                                      -listing by job title of permanent jobs filled and
                                                      which were initially held by low/mod
                                                      -for each low/mod person hired, household
                                                      size and annual income prior to hiring
Low/Mod—Job Retention                            •    Evidence that without CDBG, jobs will be lost
                                                 •    Listing by job title of permanent jobs retained
                                                      (include part-time and those held by low/mod)
                                                 •    Information on job turnover, including jobs to
                                                      be available to and filled by low/mod
                                                 •    For each job retained and held by low/mod,
                                                      household size and income
Slum/Blight—Area Basis                           •    Boundaries of the area
                                                 •    Description of the conditions which qualified
                                                      the area
                                                 •    Local definition of substandard
                                                 •    Pre-rehab inspection report with noted
                                                      deficiencies



                                                                                                     80
                         •   Details of CDBG-funded rehab
Slum/Blight—Spot Basis   •   Description of the specific condition of blight
                             or decay treated
                         •   Description of specific conditions detrimental
                             to public health and safety (rehab only)
                         •   Details of CDBG-funded rehab (rehab only)




                                                                          81
         Appendix A
         List of Key Participants




Notes:




                                    82
List of Key Participants

More than 300 citizens participated in the planning process by responding to a community
survey, attending a public forum, submitting written comments, sitting on the Consolidated
Plan Working Group and/or taking part in a Resident Focus Group. Thanks to everyone
who recognized the importance of this process and responded accordingly.

Consolidated Plan Working Group Participants, June 16, 2004

Ann          Alexander                  Hamilton North Public Library
Karen        Blake                      Town of Cicero
Mike         Booth                      Town of Fishers
Jim          Brewer                     Access Hamilton County
Dan          Brown                      BehaviorCorp
Mary         Dotson                     PrimeLife Enrichment
Deborah      Driskell                   Delaware Twp. Trustee
Brenda       Garrod                     Mama's Cupboard
Tiffany      Gray                       WorkOne Express
Judy         Hagan                      Clay Township Trustee
Troy         Halsell                    Noblesville Housing Authority
Marion       Hensley                    Fall Creek Twp Trustee
Christina    Jones                      Noblesville Housing Authority
Margaret     Lukes                      Meals on Wheels
Loretta      Moore                      United Way of Central Indiana
Mike         Murphy                     Cicero Economic Dev’t Committee
Joyce        Rand                       BehaviorCorp
Markine      Sipes                      The Salvation Army
Diana        Walker                     BehaviorCorp
Darrel       Wilson                     CAGI
Susie        Zuniga                     Healthy Families of Hamilton Co.

Consolidated Plan Resident Focus Group Participants, June 16, 2004

Sara         Gibbs
Troy         Halsell
Harvey       Kagan
Kay          Robertson
Mark         Ulman

Fishers Public Forum, June 18, 2004

Mike         Booth                      Town of Fishers
Roger        Norris                     Hamilton Southeastern Schools
Eileen       Pritchard                  Fishers Town Council
Mike         Quinn                      Historic Preservation Comte, Town of
                                        Fishers



                                                                                         83
Steve       Sharp                    Resident
Jackie      Turner                   Development Dept, Town of Fishers
Jim         White                    Hamilton Southeastern Schools

Noblesville Public Forum, 3:00 – 5:00 pm, June 22, 2004

Scott       Bernhardt                Habitat for Humanity Hamilton County
Karen       Blake                    Town of Cicero
Marcia      Brown                    Community Caring Foundation
Susan       Jennings                 Hamilton County Leadership Academy
Michelle    Junkins                  Adams Township
Harvey      Kagan
Margaret    Lukes                    Meals on Wheels of Hamilton County
Mike        Murphy
Katie       O'Keefe                  Noblesville Daily Times
Angie       Pappano                  Kenna Consulting & Mgmt Group
Mark        Ulman
Linda       Williams                 Adams Township

Noblesville Public Forum, 6:00 – 8:00 pm, June 22, 2004

Sara        Gibbs
Constance   Jones                    Habitat for Humanity/HAND
Gail        Rothrock                 Family Service of Central Indiana
                                     Noblesville Housing Authority/HAND
Yvonne      Scott

Arcadia Public Forum, 3:00 – 5:00 pm, June 25, 2004

Ann         Alexander                Hamilton North Public Library
Mike        Baker Jackson            Township Fire Department
Karen       Blake
Colleen     Buesching                Noblesville Housing Authority
William     Cook
Phil        Dunlap                   Indianapolis Star
Angie       Fine                     Angie Lou's Fine Art Studio
Sue         Hahn
Linda       Judd                     Hamilton North Public Library
Ted         Lawhorn
Deanna      Leonard                  Arcadian Design
Tina        Mendenhall Henderson
Rob         Moore
Mitch       Russell
Bette       Shields                  Town of Arcadia
Elizabeth   Tate                     Legacy Fund
Marjorie    Vaughn
Deborah     Webster



                                                                            84
Arcadia Public Forum, 6:00 – 8:00 pm, June 25, 2004

John Abe    Evans                   Atlanta Town Council




                                                           85
         Appendix B
         List of Individuals Consulted
         to Participate in Process




Notes:




                                         86
Elected Officials

First
Name        Last Name   Title                          Jurisdiction
Christine   Altman      County Commissioner            Hamilton County Board of Commissioners
Tammy       Baitz       Clerk of the Circuit Court     Hamilton County
Jim         Belden      Council Member at Large        Hamilton County Council
Greg        Caldwell    City Judge                     City of Noblesville
Billie      Caldwell    Noblesville Township Trustee   Hamilton County
Meredith    Carter      District 1 Council Member      Hamilton County Council
Doug        Carter      Sheriff                        Hamilton County
Gaye        Cordell     Clerk Treasurer                Town of Fishers
Brad        Davis       Highway Supervisor             Hamilton County
Steven      Dillinger   County Commissioner            Hamilton County Board of Commissioners
John        Ditslear    Mayor                          City of Noblesville
Debbie      Driskall    Delaware Township Trustee      Hamilton County
Robyn       Emmerty     Clerk Treasurer                Town of Atlanta
Debbie      Folkerts    Assessor                       Hamilton County
David       Gill        Washington Township Trustee    Hamilton County
Cynthia     Gossard     Clerk Treasurer                Town of Westfield
Judy        Hagan       Clay Township Assessor         Hamilton County
Charles     Harris      County Health Officer          Hamilton County
Jennifer    Hayden      Recorder                       Hamilton County
Marion      Hensley     Fall Creek Township Trustee    Hamilton County
John        Hiatt       District 4 Council Member      Hamilton County Council
Duane       Hiatt       Jackson Township Trustee       Hamilton County
Steven      Holt        County Commissioner            Hamilton County Board of Commissioners
Michael     Howard      County Attorney                Hamilton County
Laurie      Hurst       President of Common Council    City of Noblesville
Phyllis     Jacobs      White River Township Trustee   Hamilton County
Janet       Jaros       Clerk-Treasurer                City of Noblesville
Judy        Levine      District 2 Council Member      Hamilton County Council
Rick        McKinney    Council Member at Large        Hamilton County Council
                                                       Hamilton County Solid Waste
Barry       McNulty     Director                       Management
Robin       Mills       Auditor                        Hamilton County
Ralph       Musselman   Wayne Township Trustee         Hamilton County
                        Washington Township
Jerolyn     Ogle        Assessor                       Hamilton County
Dixie       Packard     Clay Township Assessor         Hamilton County
Connie      Pearson     Clerk Treasurer                Town of Sheridan
Mark        Roberts     Coroner                        Hamilton County
Marilyn     Schenkel    Delaware Township Assessor     Hamilton County
Steve       Schwartz    District 3                     Hamilton County Council
Bette       Shields     Clerk Treasurer                Town of Arcadia
Colleen     Starrett    Jackson Township Assessor      Hamilton County
Janice      Unger       Clerk Treasurer                Town of Cicero



                                                                                                87
Jim         Wallace          Council Member at Large         Hamilton County Council
Kenton      Ward             Surveyor                        Hamilton County
                             Noblesville Township
Robin       Ward             Assessor                       Hamilton County
Linda       Williams         Adams Township Trustee         Hamilton County
Sally       Wilson           Treasurer                      Hamilton County
Pam         Zagar            Fall Creek Township Assessor   Hamilton County

Community Service Providers

                                First
Organization                    Name         Last Name      Title
ACS-IMPACT Job
Preparation
Adult Protective Services,
Hamilton Count
Alternatives Inc
American Red Cross,
Hamilton Co
Assess Hamilton County          James        Brewer         Director
Assistant to Town Council       Karen        Blake
Atlanta-Jackson Township
Public Library

B.A.B.E. and Beyond
Behavioral Corp
BehaviorCorp, Noblesville
CAGI--Hamilton Co
Programs
Camptown
Child Care Answers,
Hamilton County
Cicero Red Bridge Park
CICOA The Access
Network
Community Caring
Foundation                      Marcia       Brown
Division of Family and
Children, Hamilton Co
Office                          Karen        Beaumont       Director
Family Service Association
of Central Indiana
Fishers Parks & Recreation
Dept
Friend to Friend
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County                 Jon          Abernathy      Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County                 Bill         Bernard        Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,           Scott        Bernhardt      Executive Director




                                                                                       88
Hamilton County
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Dave        Bowen       Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Dave        Bowers      Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Kevin       Burrow      Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Nancy       Chance      Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Nancy       Estabrook   Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Constance   Jones       Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Bill        Olsen       Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Christa     Pugh        Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Diane       Rice        Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Randy       Sorrell     Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Tim         Stevens     Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Nick        Tillema     Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County              Kyle        Wenger      Board of Directors
Habitat for Humanity,
Hamilton County
Hamilton County Area
Neighborhood
Development, Inc             Bruce       Merrill     Treasurer
Hamilton County Area
Neighborhood
Development, Inc             Ken         Puller      Vice-President
Hamilton County Area
Neighborhood
Development, Inc             Barbara     Richards
Hamilton County Area
Neighborhood
Development, Inc             John        Terry
Hamilton County Council on
Alcohol and Drugs            George      Kristo
Hamilton County
Government & Judicial
Center                       Fred        Swift       Commissioner's Assistant
Hamilton County Guardian
Ad Litem/CASA
Hamilton County Health
Dept
Hamilton County Health
Dept




                                                                                89
Hamilton County Parks &
Recreation Dept
Hamilton County YMCA
Hamilton North Public
Library
Head Start, Hamilton
County
Healthy Families of
Hamilton County
Indianapolis Neighborhood
Housing Partnership          Todd        Sears
Indy Partnership
Jackson Township Fire
Dept                         Mike        Baker        Fire Chief
Janus Developmental
Services, Inc
Legacy Fund                  Tony        Macklin
Liz Gibson & Associates,
LLC                          Liz         Gibson
Meal on Wheels of
Hamilton County
Mental Health Association,
Hamilton Co
Mental Health Association,
Hamilton Co
Noblesville Counseling
Center
Noblesville Housing
Authority                    Colleen     Buesching    Commissioner
Noblesville Housing          Willis
Authority                    (Rick)      Conner       Chairman
Noblesville Housing
Authority                    Christina   Jones        Occupancy Specialist II
Noblesville Housing
Authority                    Gail        Rothrock     Commissioner
Noblesville Housing
Authority                    Charles     Turean       Commissioner
Noblesville Housing
Authority                    Marjorie    Vaughn       Commissioner
Noblesville Housing
Authority                    Mark        Winzenread   Vice-Chairman
Noblesville Library,
Outreach Program             Melissa     Stewart
Noblesville Main Street
Noblesville Parks &
Recreation Dept
Noblesville-Southeastern
Public Library
Office of Family and
Children
Open Doors of Westfield
Washington Township



                                                                                90
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel,
Food Pantry
People Helping People
Prevail
PrimeLife Enrichment          Sandy      Stewart       Executive Director
Purdue Cooperative
Extension, Hamilton County
Riverview Community
Health Clinic
Safe Place
Salvation Army, Hamilton
County
Shepherd's Gate Food
Pantry
Sheridan Public Library
Sheridan/St. Vincent
Partnership
St. Michael's Episcopal
Church
St. Vincent de Paul Center,
Hamilton Co
Third Phase Christian         Bettie &
Center                        Ruth
United Way                    Loretta    Moore
US Social Security
Administration, Hamilton Co

Victim Assistance                                      Hamilton County Prosecutor's Office
Westfield Public Library
WorkOne Express,
Hamilton Co
                              Aaron      Culp
                              Steven
                              (Andy)     Emmert
                              Michael    Mauro
                                         Mendenhall-
                              Tina       Henderson
                              Todd       Sears




                                                                                             91
         Appendix C
         Consolidated Plan Application and
         Certifications




Notes:




                                             92
                                  LOCAL GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATIONS


In accordance with the applicable statutes and the regulations governing the consolidated plan regulations, the
jurisdiction certifies that:

Affirmatively Further Fair Housing -- The jurisdiction will affirmatively further fair housing, which means it will
conduct an analysis of impediments to fair housing choice within the jurisdiction, take appropriate actions to
overcome the effects of any impediments identified through that analysis, and maintain records reflecting that
analysis and actions in this regard.

Anti-displacement and Relocation Plan -- It will comply with the acquisition and relocation requirements of the
Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970, as amended, and
implementing regulations at 49 CFR 24; and it has in effect and is following a residential antidisplacement and
relocation assistance plan required under section 104(d) of the Housing and Community Development Act of
1974, as amended, in connection with any activity assisted with funding under the CDBG or HOME programs.

Drug Free Workplace -- It will or will continue to provide a drug-free workplace by:

1.      Publishing a statement notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing,
        possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the grantee's workplace and specifying the
        actions that will be taken against employees for violation of such prohibition;

2.      Establishing an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about -

        (a)      The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace;
        (b)      The grantee's policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace;
        (c)      Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and
        (d)      The penalties that may be imposed upon employees for drug abuse violations occurring in the
                 workplace;

3.      Making it a requirement that each employee to be engaged in the performance of the grant be given a
        copy of the statement required by paragraph 1;

4.      Notifying the employee in the statement required by paragraph 1 that, as a condition of employment
        under the grant, the employee will -

        (a)      Abide by the terms of the statement; and

        (b)      Notify the employer in writing of his or her conviction for a violation of a criminal drug statute
                 occurring in the workplace no later than five calendar days after such conviction;

        5.       Notifying the agency in writing, within ten calendar days after receiving notice under
                 subparagraph 4(b) from an employee or otherwise receiving actual notice of such conviction.
                 Employers of convicted employees must provide notice, including position title, to every grant
                 officer or other designee on whose grant activity the convicted employee was working, unless
                 the Federal agency has designated a central point for the receipt of such notices. Notice shall
                 include the identification number(s) of each affected grant;

        6.       Taking one of the following actions, within 30 calendar days of receiving notice under
                 subparagraph 4(b), with respect to any employee who is so convicted -

        (a)      Taking appropriate personnel action against such an employee, up to and including termination,
                 consistent with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; or




                                                                                                                93
        (b)     Requiring such employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation
                program approved for such purposes by a Federal, State, or local health, law enforcement, or
                other appropriate agency;

7.      Making a good faith effort to continue to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of
        paragraphs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

Anti-Lobbying -- To the best of the jurisdiction's knowledge and belief:

1.      No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of it, to any person for
        influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an
        officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the
        awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making of any Federal loan, the
        entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or
        modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement;

2.      If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for
        influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an
        officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this
        Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement, it will complete and submit Standard Form-LLL,
        "Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying," in accordance with its instructions; and

3.      It will require that the language of paragraph 1 and 2 of this anti-lobbying certification be included in the
        award documents for all subawards at all tiers (including subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under
        grants, loans, and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose
        accordingly.

Authority of Jurisdiction -- The consolidated plan is authorized under State and local law (as applicable) and
the jurisdiction possesses the legal authority to carry out the programs for which it is seeking funding, in
accordance with applicable HUD regulations.

Consistency with plan -- The housing activities to be undertaken with CDBG, HOME, ESG, and HOPWA
funds are consistent with the strategic plan.

Section 3 -- It will comply with section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, and implementing
regulations at 24 CFR Part 135.



_________________________________________________________
Signature/Authorized Official                Date


Hamilton County Commissioner
Title




                                                                                                                  94
                                         Specific CDBG Certifications


The Entitlement Community certifies that:

Citizen Participation -- It is in full compliance and following a detailed citizen participation plan that satisfies the
requirements of 24 CFR 91.105.

Community Development Plan -- Its consolidated housing and community development plan identifies
community development and housing needs and specifies both short-term and long-term community
development objectives that provide decent housing, expand economic opportunities primarily for persons of low
and moderate income. (See CFR 24 570.2 and CFR 24 part 570)

Following a Plan -- It is following a current consolidated plan (or Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy)
that has been approved by HUD.

Use of Funds -- It has complied with the following criteria:

1.      Maximum Feasible Priority. With respect to activities expected to be assisted with CDBG funds, it
        certifies that it has developed its Action Plan so as to give maximum feasible priority to activities which
        benefit low and moderate income families or aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight. The
        Action Plan may also include activities which the grantee certifies are designed to meet other
        community development needs having a particular urgency because existing conditions pose a serious
        and immediate threat to the health or welfare of the community, and other financial resources are not
        available);

2.      Overall Benefit. The aggregate use of CDBG funds during program year(s) 2004, 2005,2006, 2007 and
        2008, shall principally benefit persons of low and moderate income in a manner that ensures that at
        least 70 percent of the amount is expended for activities that benefit such persons during the
        designated period;

3.      Special Assessments. It will not attempt to recover any capital costs of public improvements assisted
        with CDBG funds guaranteed funds by assessing any amount against properties owned and occupied
        by persons of low and moderate income, including any fee charged or assessment made as a condition
        of obtaining access to such public improvements.

        However, if CDBG funds are used to pay the proportion of a fee or assessment that relates to the
        capital costs of public improvements (assisted in part with CDBG funds) financed from other revenue
        sources, an assessment or charge may be made against the property with respect to the public
        improvements financed by a source other than CDBG funds.

        The jurisdiction will not attempt to recover any capital costs of public improvements assisted with CDBG
        funds, unless CDBG funds are used to pay the proportion of fee or assessment attributable to the
        capital costs of public improvements financed from other revenue sources. In this case, an assessment
        or charge may be made against the property with respect to the public improvements financed by a
        source other than CDBG funds. Also, in the case of properties owned and occupied by moderate-
        income (not low-income) families, an assessment or charge may be made against the property for
        public improvements financed by a source other than CDBG funds if the jurisdiction certifies that it lacks
        CDBG funds to cover the assessment.

Excessive Force -- It has adopted and is enforcing:

1.      A policy prohibiting the use of excessive force by law enforcement agencies within its jurisdiction
        against any individuals engaged in non-violent civil rights demonstrations; and




                                                                                                                     95
2.      A policy of enforcing applicable State and local laws against physically barring entrance to or exit from a
        facility or location which is the subject of such non-violent civil rights demonstrations within its
        jurisdiction;

Compliance With Anti-discrimination laws -- The grant will be conducted and administered in conformity with
title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 USC 2000d), the Fair Housing Act (42 USC 3601-3619), and
implementing regulations.


Lead-Based Paint -- Its activities concerning lead-based paint will comply with the requirements of part 35,
subparts A, B, J, K and R, of title 24;


Compliance with Laws -- It will comply with applicable laws.



________________________________                          _______________
Signature/Authorized Official                            Date


Hamilton County Commissioner
Title




                                                                                                                96
                                    APPENDIX TO CERTIFICATIONS

INSTRUCTIONS CONCERNING LOBBYING AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE REQUIREMENTS:

A.   Lobbying Certification

     This certification is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed when
     this transaction was made or entered into. Submission of this certification is a prerequisite for
     making or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code. Any
     person who fails to file the required certification shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less
     than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.


B.   Drug-Free Workplace Certification

     1.      By signing and/or submitting this application or grant agreement, the grantee
             is providing the certification.

     2.      The certification is a material representation of fact upon which reliance is placed
             when the agency awards the grant. If it is later determined that the grantee
             knowingly rendered a false certification, or otherwise violates the requirements of the
             Drug-Free Workplace Act, HUD, in addition to any other remedies available to the
             Federal Government, may take action authorized under the Drug-Free Workplace
             Act.

     3.      For grantees other than individuals, Alternate I applies.

     4.      For grantees who are individuals, Alternate II applies.

     5.      Workplaces under grants, for grantees other than individuals, need not be
             identified on the certification. If known, they may be identified in the grant
             application. If the grantee does not identify the workplaces at the time of
             application, or upon award, if there is no application, the grantee must keep
             the identity of the workplace(s) on file in its office and make the information
             available for Federal inspection. Failure to identify all known workplaces
             constitutes a violation of the grantee's drug-free workplace requirements.

     6.      Workplace identifications must include the actual address of buildings (or
             parts of buildings) or other sites where work under the grant takes place.
             Categorical descriptions may be used (e.g., all vehicles of a mass transit
             authority or State highway department while in operation, State employees in
             each local unemployment office, performers in concert halls or radio
             stations).

     7.      If the workplace identified to the agency changes during the performance of
             the grant, the grantee shall inform the agency of the change(s), if it
             previously identified the workplaces in question (see paragraph five).

     8.      The grantee may insert in the space provided below the site(s) for the performance of work
             done in connection with the specific grant:

     Place of Performance (Hamilton County, Indiana)




                                                                                                           97
Check      if there are workplaces on file that are not identified here; The certification with regard to
the drug-free workplace required by 24 CFR part 24, subpart F.

9.      Definitions of terms in the Nonprocurement Suspension and Debarment
        common rule and Drug-Free Workplace common rule apply to this
        certification. Grantees' attention is called, in particular, to the following
        definitions from these rules:

        "Controlled substance" means a controlled substance in Schedules I through
        V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C.812) and as further defined by
        regulation (21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15);

        "Conviction" means a finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or
        imposition of sentence, or both, by any judicial body charged with the
        responsibility to determine violations of the Federal or State criminal drug
        statutes;

        "Criminal drug statute" means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute
        involving the manufacture, distribution, dispensing, use, or possession of any
        controlled substance;

        "Employee" means the employee of a grantee directly engaged in the
        performance of work under a grant, including: (i) All "direct charge"
        employees; (ii) all "indirect charge" employees unless their impact or
        involvement is insignificant to the performance of the grant; and (iii)
        temporary personnel and consultants who are directly engaged in the
        performance of work under the grant and who are on the grantee's payroll.
        This definition does not include workers not on the payroll of the grantee
        (e.g., volunteers, even if used to meet a matching requirement; consultants
        or independent contractors not on the grantee's payroll; or employees of
        subrecipients or subcontractors in covered workplaces).




                                                                                                        98
         Appendix D
         Community Survey Instrument




Notes:




                                       99
Dear Hamilton County Resident,

Thank you for completing this survey on local housing and community development issues. This
information is being gathered by Hamilton County in order to prepare the 2004-2008 Consolidated
Plan. Hamilton County is expected to receive over $700,000 from the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development in Community Development Block Grants (CDBG). By participating in this
survey, you will help the county collect information that will aid in identifying housing and community
development needs in Hamilton County and will shape programs that best address those needs.

Please use the enclosed pre-posted envelope to return the survey by June 18, 2004. All survey
participants will remain anonymous.

Hamilton County views resident input as more than a passive exchange of information; rather, your
participation is an opportunity for you to shape the character and aspirations of your community. In
addition to filling out the survey, please consider attending a public forum and hearing for additional
opportunities to participate in the Consolidated Plan process. The forums and hearings invite active
input from Hamilton County residents. Locations, dates and times for the public forums and
hearings follow:

Public Forums                                                Public Hearings
June 22, 2004; 3:00-5:00pm & 6:00-8:00pm (repeated)          July 21, 2004; 3:00-5:00 & 6:00-8:00pm (repeated)
               Hamilton County Commissioner’s Court          Hamilton County Commissioner’s Court
               One Hamilton County Square, Suite 157         One Hamilton County Square, Suite 157
               Noblesville, IN 46060                         Noblesville, IN 46060

June 25, 2004; 3:00-5:00pm & 6:00-8:00pm (repeated)
               Arcadia Town Hall
               208 West Main Street
               Arcadia, IN 46030

Persons wishing to comment, but who are                      Consolidated Plan
unable to attend, may submit their comments in writing to:   Noblesville Housing Authority
                                                             320 Kings Lane
                                                             Noblesville, IN 46060-2423

If you have any questions about this survey or the Consolidated Plan, you may contact the
person(s) below:

Amy Murphy-Nugen                                             Troy Halsell
Indiana Association for Community                            CDBG Grant Administrator
Economic Development                                         320 Kings Lane
324 West Morris Street, Suite 104                            Noblesville, IN 46060-2423
Indianapolis, IN 46225                                       Phone: 317-773-5110
Phone: 317-423-1070
Email: anugen@iaced.org

Thank you in advance for taking an active role in your community.




                                                                                                                 100
 Please answer each question to the best of your ability. If a particular question does not apply to you, or if
 you do not have knowledge of the subject matter, skip the question. This survey should take you about 15
 minutes to complete.




Respondent Information
1. In which city/town in Hamilton County do you reside?
           Arcadia         Atlanta             Cicero          Carmel

           Fishers         Noblesville         Sheridan        Westfield

2. Which of the following categories best describes you?

     Homeowner               Renter            Other __________________________

Housing
Thinking of the city/town in which you reside, please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each
statement below by circling the letters corresponding to the following scale:
                 SA = Strongly Agree, A = Agree, N = Neutral, D = Disagree, SD = Strongly Disagree

3. There are enough homeowner units in my community to meet the demand.                         SA     A   N    D    SD

4. There are enough rental units in my community to meet the demand.                            SA     A   N    D    SD

5. The housing stock in this community is in good condition.                                    SA     A   N    D    SD

6. My community needs to focus on adding housing through new construction.                      SA     A   N    D    SD

7. My community needs to focus on improving housing through rehabilitation of
                                                                                                SA     A   N    D    SD
   existing structures.
8. Homeowners in this community can generally afford to make minor housing
                                                                                                SA     A   N    D    SD
   repairs.
9. Renters in this community can get landlords to make needed repairs.                          SA     A   N    D    SD


On a scale of 1-5 with 1 being Very Good and 5 being Very Poor, Please rate the following items by circling the
numbers corresponding to your opinion:
10. How would you rate the quality of the homeowner housing stock in this
                                                                                                   1   2   3    4    5
    community?
11. How would you rate the quality of rental housing stock in this community?                      1   2   3    4    5


Affordability
Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each statement below by circling the letters corresponding
to the following scale:
                 SA = Strongly Agree, A = Agree, N = Neutral, D = Disagree, SD = Strongly Disagree



                                                                                                                     101
12. Home prices in this community are generally affordable.                                     SA     A    N    D    SD

13. Rent prices in this community are generally affordable.                                     SA     A    N    D    SD

14. There is enough affordable homeowner housing in this community.                             SA     A    N    D    SD

15. There is enough affordable rental housing in this community.                                SA     A    N    D    SD


16. What is the greatest barrier to owning a home in your community (choose only one)?

   Coming up with a down payment                                 Affordability/cost too high
   Location of affordable housing                                Finance costs too high
   Condition of affordable housing                               Lack of stable income
   Poor or inadequate credit history
Special Needs Housing
Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each statement below by circling the letters corresponding
to the following scale:
                 SA = Strongly Agree, A = Agree, N = Neutral, D = Disagree, SD = Strongly Disagree
17. The housing and related needs of people who are homeless are adequately served              SA     A    N    D    SD
    in this community.
18. The housing and related needs of people with physical disabilities are adequately           SA     A    N    D    SD
    served in this community.
19. The housing and related needs of people with developmental disabilities are                 SA     A    N    D    SD
    adequately served in this community.
20. The housing and related needs of people with severe and persistent mental                   SA     A    N    D    SD
    illnesses are adequately served in this community.
21. The housing and related needs of the elderly are adequately served in this                  SA     A    N    D    SD
    community.
22. The housing and related needs of people with HIV/AIDS are adequately served                 SA     A    N    D    SD
    in this community.


23. For the special needs groups listed in the questions above, how can housing and related needs be better
    met? Please be specific.
________________________________________________________________________________________
__
________________________________________________________________________________________
__
________________________________________________________________________________________
__

Fair Housing
24. Is discrimination in housing a problem in this community based on (check all that apply):
        Race/ethnicity                        Family size                                  Single Parents




                                                                                                                     102
        Sex                                Religion                                  National Origin
        Disability                         Age                                      Other
                                                                                ____________________


25. Are the following barriers to housing in your community? (check all that apply):
  Cost of housing                                       Age-restricted housing (e.g., elderly only)
                                                        Lack of knowledge about fair housing rights among
  Distance to employment
                                                        residents
  Lack of accessibility requirements for                Lack of knowledge of fair housing regulations among
  physically disabled                                   landlords.
  Housing discrimination                                Public Transportation

26. Are predatory lending activities a problem in your community?
  Yes (if yes, please explain) ___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________

  No                                                    Don’t know

For statements 26-31 please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree by circling the letters
corresponding to the following scale:
              SA = Strongly Agree, A = Agree, N = Neutral, D = Disagree, and SD = Strongly Disagree

27. Minorities can obtain desirable housing in any area of my community.                  SA    A     N   D   SD

28. Large families can obtain desirable housing in any area of my community.              SA    A     N   D   SD
29. The people in my community are able to access mortgages and refinance their
                                                                                          SA    A     N   D   SD
    homes at competitive interest rates.
30. The people in my community know that discrimination is prohibited in the sale
                                                                                          SA    A     N   D   SD
    and rental of housing, mortgage lending, and advertising.
31. The people in my community know whom to contact when facing housing
                                                                                          SA    A     N   D   SD
    discrimination.
32. The housing enforcement agency in my community has sufficient resources to
                                                                                          SA    A     N   D   SD
    handle the amount of discrimination that may occur.

Community Priorities
In the following sections please identify your community priorities by ranking each item from 1
(lowest priority) to 5 (highest priority).
For items 32-43 identify the housing services that are most needed in your community.
33. Assisted living                                                                        1    2     3   4   5

34. Demolishing/Rehabilitating Unsafe and Abandoned Properties                             1    2     3   4   5

35. Emergency Shelters (family abuse, substance abuse, etc.)                               1    2     3   4   5

36. Home repair assistance                                                                 1    2     3   4   5




                                                                                                              103
37. Multi-family Homeownership (condominiums, cooperatives, etc.)                    1    2   3   4   5

38. Multi-family Rental (apartments)                                                 1    2   3   4   5

39. Permanent Housing (housing with needed services for persons with physical or
                                                                                     1    2   3   4   5
    mental disabilities)
40. Senior Rental                                                                    1    2   3   4   5

41. Single-family Homeownership                                                      1    2   3   4   5

42. Single-family Rental                                                             1    2   3   4   5

43. Transitional Housing (transitional housing for homeless person/families for up
                                                                                     1    2   3   4   5
    to 2 years, youth aging out of foster care)

44. In your opinion what are the three most important housing issues in your community?

a. ______________________________________________________________________

b. ______________________________________________________________________

c. ______________________________________________________________________


For items 44-49 identify the social services that are most needed to address homelessness issues in
your community.

45. Case Management                                                                  1    2   3   4   5

46. Housing Placement                                                                1    2   3   4   5

47. Job Training                                                                     1    2   3   4   5

48. Life Skills Training                                                             1    2   3   4   5

49. Mental Health Care                                                               1    2   3   4   5

50. Substance Abuse Treatment                                                        1    2   3   4   5


For items 50-75 identify the non-housing needs that are priorities in your community.
Public Facility Needs
51. Centers who serve people with disabilities                                       1    2   3   4   5

52. Child Care Centers                                                               1    2   3   4   5

53. Health Facilities                                                                1    2   3   4   5

54. Neighborhood Facilities                                                          1    2   3   4   5

55. Parking Facilities                                                               1    2   3   4   5




                                                                                                      104
56. Parks and/or Recreation Facilities                                               1    2   3   4   5

57. Senior Centers                                                                   1    2   3   4   5

58. Youth Centers                                                                    1    2   3   4   5

Infrastructure
59. Flood Drain Improvements                                                         1    2   3   4   5

60. Sidewalks                                                                        1    2   3   4   5

61. Street Improvements                                                              1    2   3   4   5

62. Water/Sewer Improvements                                                         1    2   3   4   5

Public Service Needs
63. Child Care Services                                                              1    2   3   4   5

64. Crime Awareness                                                                  1    2   3   4   5

65. Employment Training                                                              1    2   3   4   5

66. Health Services                                                                  1    2   3   4   5

67. Lead Hazard Training                                                             1    2   3   4   5

68. Services for people with disabilities                                            1    2   3   4   5

69. Senior Services                                                                  1    2   3   4   5

70. Substance Abuse Services                                                         1    2   3   4   5

71. Transportation Services                                                          1    2   3   4   5

72. Youth Services                                                                   1    2   3   4   5

Economic Development
73. Commercial Development Leading to Job Creation                                   1    2   3   4   5

74. Job Training                                                                     1    2   3   4   5

75. Rehabilitation of Commercial Buildings (publicly or privately owned)             1    2   3   4   5

76. Small Business Loans                                                             1    2   3   4   5

77. Technical Assistance to For-Profits (businesses)                                 1    2   3   4   5

77. In your opinion what are the three most important non-housing issues in your community?

a. ______________________________________________________________________

b. ______________________________________________________________________




                                                                                                      105
c. _____________________________________________________________________________

                                    Thank you for your participation

For more information regarding the Hamilton County Consolidated Plan, please contact Troy Halsell with the
Noblesville Housing Authority at (317) 773-5110 or Amy Murphy-Nugen at 317-423-1070 or
anugen@iaced.org




                                                                                                      106
Appendix E
Citizen Participation Plan




                             107
108
                   Hamilton County Consolidated Plan 2004-2008
                                  Citizen Participation Plan

INTRODUCTION


The Noblesville Housing Authority is the lead entity responsible for overseeing the development of
the Hamilton County Consolidated Plan, and is the entity responsible for administering the
Community Development Block Grant covered by the plan. The Program Year will run from
October 1 to September 30.


Hamilton County has developed the following Citizen Participation Plan in accordance with U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) regulations 24 CFR 91.105. The purpose
of this Plan is to outline the opportunities that residents of Hamilton County will have in planning,
implementing and assessing the Consolidated Plan. Residents must be engaged as active
participants in order to create a unified, coordinated vision of Hamilton County’s housing and
community development needs, priorities, goals and strategies and to determine how funds should
be allocated to best meet those needs. The framework for Hamilton County’s Consolidated Plan is
built upon inclusiveness, holistic vision and subordinated agendas.


A commitment to inclusiveness means that Hamilton County draws a distinction between citizen
input and citizen participation. The former assigns residents to a passive role as merely an
information source. The latter invites residents to take an active role as a change agent. The plan
will capture the voice of segments in the community that traditionally go unheard.

The corollary to inclusiveness is a holistic vision. That is to say, the project mirrors the ideal housing
and community development continuum for Hamilton County. A holistic vision takes into account
the many factors necessary to build a strong community. It ensures that the resulting strategies
and recommendations are comprehensive. However, more importantly it acknowledges strategies
in which all residents’ housing and community development may be met.

By the nature of its purpose and its funding, the Consolidated Plan is held in public trust.
Consequently, individuals and organizations involved in the planning process on occasion may
need to defer an expedient, self-interested decision for a compelling community need.

While implementing the Plan based on the aforementioned principles requires a great deal of effort
and may present challenges, authentic community participation ensures that needs are accurately
reflected and prioritized, residents have a greater sense of ownership and determination, and
decision-makers are more open to hear and support the recommendations.

The following strategies outline various ways that Hamilton County plans to engage residents and
neighborhoods in the Consolidated Plan process. Some are methods of outreach, some are
methods of information sharing, some are methods of advocacy, and some are methods of
community development. The purpose for such variety is that residents will feel comfortable
participating in some activities but not others. It is anticipated that this plan may be revised to
incorporate additional avenues for involvement based upon feedback from residents.


Inviting Public Participation
                                                                            109
In accordance with 24 CFR 91.105 and the County’s commitment to inclusive planning, Hamilton
County’s Citizen Participation Plan both provide for and encourage public participation,
emphasizing the inclusion of those most likely to benefit from U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development funding—individuals with low- and moderate-incomes. In addition, Hamilton
County will take actions that are appropriate to encourage participation of minorities, people who do
not use English as their primary language and people with disabilities.


Copies of this Citizen Participation Plan, as well as summaries of basic information about
Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME),
Emergency Shelter Grants (ESG), Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) and the
Consolidated Plan process will be made available in the language of residents who request them.
Residents who require translated documents should contact the Noblesville Housing Authority at
317-773-5110.


Participatory Engagement of People with Low-Incomes


There are three primary purposes for improving communities through the use of programs
associated with the Consolidated Plan: (1) provide decent and affordable housing, (2) encourage a
suitable living environment and (3) grow economic opportunities—all primarily benefiting people
with low- and moderate-incomes.


Consequently, those that stand to benefit the most from the programs should have ample
opportunities to help determine how needs are determined and funds are allocated. Hamilton
County will encourage this input throughout the following stages of the Consolidated Plan
development:
   •     Identifying needs.
   •     Setting priorities among these needs, deciding how much money should be allocated to
         each high-priority need, and suggesting the types of programs to meet high-priority needs.
   •     Monitoring the way in which programs are implemented.


Hamilton County developed nine strategies for public participation. They are as follows:


   I.       Information Distribution
            During the month of May 2004, brochures will be designed to inform Hamilton County
            residents of Consolidated Plan activities. This information will include locations of
            forums, addresses to send written comments, general overviews regarding federal
            programs and other relevant items associated with the Consolidated Plan. The brochure
            will be printed in English and Spanish and will be distributed to over 2,500 households
            and agencies. The brochure will also be made available in electronic format.


   II.      Convene Resident Focus Group


                                                                         110
       During the month of June 2004, invitations will be sent to individuals to participate in a
       Resident Focus Group. The purpose of the focus group will be to identify housing and
       community development needs, review work products produced for the Consolidated
       Plan and to recruit participants for the public forums and hearings. Since the primary
       beneficiaries of the funds covered by the Consolidated Plan are individuals with low-
       incomes, those in minority groups and individuals with disabilities, efforts will be made to
       ensure the Resident Focus Group represents this microcosm of Hamilton County. It is
       anticipated that this group will meet at least two times during the planning process.


III.   Consolidated Plan Working Group
       During June 2004, invitations will be sent to elected officials, social service providers,
       private industry representatives, housing developers and other core elements of
       Hamilton County to serve on a Consolidated Plan Working Group. This group will have
       similar functions to the Resident Focus Group in providing information on housing and
       community development needs, overseeing Consolidated Plan work products and
       encouraging their peers to become involved in the process. It is anticipated that this
       group will meet at least two times during the planning process.


IV.    Public Forums
       Four public forums will be held in June 2004—two occurring each on June 22 and June
       25, 2004. The forums will be regionally dispersed, with two occurring in both the
       northern and southern portions of Hamilton County. The June 22, 2004 forums will be
       held at the Hamilton County Commissioner’s Court at One Hamilton County Square
       Suite 157 Noblesville, IN 46060 from 3:00-5:00pm and again from 6:00-8:00pm. The
       June 25, 2004 forums will be at the Arcadia Town Hall at 208 West Main Street Arcadia,
       IN 46030 from 3:00-5:00pm and again from 6:00-8:00pm. Both sites selected for the
       forums are accessible to persons with disabilities. Hamilton County residents and
       agency representatives will be informed of the meetings using various outreach
       methods: brochures/flyers, personal invitations, public service announcements and
       media releases. Each forum will have the same format for easy comparison.
       Participants will engage in exercises that will assist the County in determining priority
       needs.


V.     Housing and Community Development Needs Survey
       During June 2004, approximately 2,500 surveys will be distributed to local government
       leaders, community residents, housing providers, social service providers, healthcare
       agencies and other interested parties. An attempt to randomize survey recipients will be
       made to encourage increased validity in the responses. The goal will be to have a
       response rate of 30% or approximately 750 surveys. The surveys will be designed to
       augment the information that will be gleaned from the public forums. Individuals, who
       may feel uncomfortable or do not have time to attend a forum, may be more likely to
       respond to a survey instead.


VI.    Five-Year Strategic, Annual Action and Allocation Plans Development
       Once the survey and forum data have been analyzed, this information will be used to
       create the 2004-2008 Five Year Strategic Plan and the 2004 Annual Action Plan. These

                                                                      111
           plans will than be used to determine how funds will be allocated to meet community
           need.


   VII.    Public Comment Period
           A draft of the Consolidated Plan will be made available to the public for a 30-day
           comment period. During this time, copies of the draft plan will be made readily available
           both electronically and in hard copy. The county will respond to all public comments
           received at the end of the 30-day comment period. Copies of both the received letters
           and County responses will be included in the Consolidated Plan.


   VIII.   Public Hearings
           Two public hearings will be held on July 21, 2004 to solicit feedback on the draft
           Consolidated Plan. Residents, community organizations and agencies will be notified of
           the public hearings during the forums and by public notification in newspapers and
           electronically. The public hearings will be held at Hamilton County Commissioner’s
           Court at One Hamilton County Square Suite 157 Noblesville, IN 46060 from 3:00-
           5:00pm and again from 6:00-8:00pm. The location is accessible to individuals with
           disabilities.


   IX.     Annual Performance Report Comment and Public Hearing
           At the end of Hamilton County’s program year, an annual performance report will be sent
           to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Before this report is sent,
           the County will hold a public hearing and comment period for residents. There will be 30
           days advance notice of and availability of an Annual Performance Report preceding the
           public hearing. A complete copy of the Annual Performance Report will be made
           available to the public at no cost within two working days of a request. Copies will be
           available at the locations indicated in the next section titled “Notifying the Public.” The
           public hearing will be conducted by the Noblesville Housing Authority, and will be
           attended by County Commissioners and other elected officials. It will take place no
           sooner than 30 days after the public has had the opportunity to review the Annual
           Performance Report.




NOTIFYING THE PUBLIC


In order for residents to prepare for and respond to elements in the Consolidated Plan process,
adequate notice must be given for public meetings. The following table identifies the major public
meetings that are planned, locations and dates for those activities and document availability.




                                                                         112
Consolidated        Date(s)     Date(s) of      Location(s)   Document Availability
Plan Activity       of Public   Activity        of Event
                    Notice

Public review of    May 25,     May 25,         NA            Public libraries, Social Service Agencies, City
and comment on      2004        2004-June 7,                  Offices, County Offices, IACED website
the Citizen                     2004
Participation
Plan
Public Forums to    June 8,     June 22,        Arcadia &     Public notices will be published in the
identify housing    2004        2004 from       Noblesville   Noblesville Daily Times and Indianapolis Star
and community                   3:00-5:00pm                   as display advertisements in a non-legal
development                     & 6:00-                       section of the newspapers; Press releases will
needs                           8:00pm; June                  be sent to all major media outlets; Public
                                25, 2004 from                 Service Announcements and press releases
                                3:00-5:00pm                   will be distributed to local radio and television
                                & 6:00-                       stations; notice will also be given through
                                8:00pm                        letters to neighborhood organizations, public
                                                              housing resident groups, faith-based
                                                              organizations, and organizations/companies
                                                              that provide products to people with low-
                                                              incomes; notice will be sent to any person or
                                                              organization requesting to be on a mailing list
Consolidated        Ongoing     TBD             TBD           Invitation letter mailed
Plan Working
Group
Resident            Ongoing     TBD             TBD           Invitation letter mailed
Advisory Focus
Group
Public comment      July 1,     July 1-31,      NA            Public notices will be published in the
period for review   2004        2004                          Noblesville Daily Times and Indianapolis Star
of and comment                                                as display advertisements in a non-legal
on proposed use                                               section of the newspapers; Press releases will
of funds                                                      be sent to all major media outlets; Public
                                                              Service Announcements and press releases
                                                              will be distributed to local radio and television
                                                              stations; notice will also be given through
                                                              letters to neighborhood organizations, public
                                                              housing resident groups, faith-based
                                                              organizations, and organizations/companies
                                                              that provide products to people with low-
                                                              incomes; notice will be sent to any person or
                                                              organization requesting to be on a mailing list
                                                              Draft Consolidated Plan will be available at
                                                              Public libraries, Social Service Agencies, City
                                                              Offices, County Offices, IACED website
Public hearings     July 1,     July 21,        Noblesville   Same as public comment period
for review of and   2004        2004; 3:00-
comment on                      5:00pm &
proposed use of                 6:00-8:00pm
funds
                                                                                             113
Public Access to Information


As required by law and consistent with Hamilton County’s commitment to full
access, the County will provide the public with reasonable and timely access to
information and records relating to the data or content of the Consolidated Plan;
including the proposed and actual use of funds covered by this Plan.
Reasonable public access will be available for a minimum of five years.


Hamilton County will also provide the public with reasonable and timely access to
local meetings relating to the proposed or actual use of funds, such as the
Resident Focus Group or the Consolidated Plan Working Group.


In the spirit of encouraging public participation, copies of standard documents will
be provided to the public at no cost and within five working days of a request.
Standard documents refer to the Citizen Participation Plan, proposed and final
Five-Year Strategic Plan (Consolidated Plan), proposed and final Annual Action
Plan and Annual Performance Reports. These standard documents will be
available at: the Noblesville Housing Authority, City Offices, County Offices,
Public Libraries and in electronic format on government websites.


GRIEVANCE OPPORTUNITIES


Written grievances from the public will receive a meaningful, written reply within
15 working days.


AMMENDING THE CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN


This Citizen Participation Plan may be changed only after the public has been
notified of intent to modify it, and only after the public has had a reasonable
opportunity to review and comment on proposed substantial changes to it. For
the purposes of this plan, a reasonable opportunity is defined as a minimum of
14 calendar days.




For more information regarding the Hamilton County Consolidated Plan, please
contact Troy Halsell with the Noblesville Housing Authority at (317) 773-5110 or
Amy Murphy-Nugen at 317-423-1070 or anugen@iaced.org.




                                                                    114
         Appendix F
         List of all Individual Housing and Community
         Development Ideas Public Forums 2004




Notes:




                                                  115
accessibility infrastructure      increase funding for trustees office
adult day care                    increase technology access
adult day care                    infrastructure
adult education classes           infrastructure
affordable housing                infrastructure
affordable housing                infrastructure
affordable housing                infrastructure in Arcadia and Atlanta
affordable housing                job creation
affordable housing                job creation in Cicero
affordable housing                job creation/higher incomes
affordable housing                job creation/retention
affordable housing for special
needs populations                 job training
affordable rental housing         job training
affordable rental housing         job training
affordable rental housing for
people with special needs         job training/creation
Ambassador House improvements     job training/creation
Ambassador House improvements     land acquisition
assisted living                   library access
assisted living                   library activities
assisted living                   literacy
assisted living                   lower tax for seniors
assisted living                   meals on wheels
assisted living                   meals on wheels
                                  medical and utility assistance for
bike paths                        seniors
Carnegie Library restoration in
Atlanta                           microenterprise loans
case management for persons
with mental illness               microenterprise loans
child care                        microenterprise loans in Cicero
child care                        more activity centers
child care                        more mailboxes in neighborhoods
                                  more playground equipment and
child care                        repair
child care                        more police
child care in Cicero              moving assistance
clothing allowance                neighborhood revitalization
commercial development            neighborhood revitalization
commercial development            neighborhood revitalization
                                  non-English speaking community
community building                needs
community building                park improvements in Arcadia
community building                park master plan (Arcadia)
community building in Arcadia     park playground equipment



                                                                       116
community garden plot                park/recreational programs
community parks                      paving streets
community parks                      planning for Wayne Township
computer education facility          playground equipment and repair
computer education facility          public library
crosswalk access                     public library
demolition of trashed mobile
homes                                public restrooms in Atlanta
demolition of vacant housing units   public restrooms in Atlanta
downpayment assistance for first
time homebuyers                      public safety
downtown revitalization              public transportation
downtown revitalization              public transportation
downtown revitalization              public transportation
downtown revitalization              public transportation
downtown revitalization              public transportation
downtown revitalization              public transportation
downtown revitalization              public transportation
downtown revitalization              public transportation
downtown revitalization              public transportation
downtown revitalization in Arcadia   public transportation
drainage                             public transportation
drainage                             public transportation
drainage                             public transportation
drainage                             public transportation
drainage                             public transportation
drainage improvements in Fishers     public transportation
emergency response training          public transportation
emergency shelters                   public transportation
emergency shelters                   public transportation
emergency shelters                   public transportation in Atlanta
                                     public transportation in Noblesville
emergency shelters                   and Atlanta
energy efficiency                    relocate flood plains housing
energy efficiency                    rent subsidies
energy efficiency                    repairing gutters
fair housing activities              restore Arcadia library
                                     reuse the New Horizon Development
                                     Center for special needs housing
financial literacy education         (Arcadia)
financial literacy education         senior center
financial literacy education         senior center (Fishers)
fire prevention                      senior center in Cicero
fire protection                      sewer and water infrastructure
fire protection                      sewer and water infrastructure
                                     sewer and water infrastructure in
fire station                         Cicero



                                                                            117
food pantry                         sidewalk
food pantry in Arcadia              sidewalk accessibility
                                    sidewalk/crosswalk (236th St. in
grocery stores                      Cicero)
grocery stores North of Cicero      sidewalks
handicap access to public library
in Atlanta                          sidewalks
handicap accessibility              sidewalks
health care                         sidewalks
health care                         sidewalks
health care                         sidewalks
health care                         sidewalks
health care                         sidewalks
health care                         sidewalks
health care                         sidewalks
health care in Cicero               sidewalks
healthy meals for latch key
children in Atlanta                 sidewalks
higher education facilities         sidewalks in Arcadia
historic preservation               sidewalks in Atlanta
historic preservation               sidewalks in Cicero
historic preservation in Arcadia    sidewalks with accessibility
historic preservation in Arcadia    sidewalks with accessibility
historic society activities         sidewalks with accessibility
home modification                   sidewalks with accessibility in Atlanta
home modification                   sidewalks/crosswalk (Highway 37)
home modification                   sidewalks/lighting
home modification                   sidewalks/lighting
home repair                         storm drains
home repair                         street lights
home repair                         street lights
home repair                         substance abuse treatment services
home repair                         summer school
home repair                         textbook rental assistance
home repair                         textbook rental assistance
home repair                         transitional housing
home repair                         transitional housing
home repair                         transitional housing
home repair                         transitional housing
home repair                         transitional housing
home repair                         transitional housing
home repair                         transportation for elderly
home repair                         utility assistance
home repair                         utility assistance
home repair                         utility assistance
home repair                         utility assistance




                                                                        118
home repair                    youth center in Atlanta
home repair                    youth center in Hamilton north
home repair                    youth programs
home repair                    youth programs
home repair                    youth programs
home repair                    youth programs
home repair                    youth programs/youth center
home repair in Cicero
homeowner repair/energy
efficiency
housing counseling services
housing needs assessment
in home support services for
elderly and disabled




                                                                119
         Appendix G
         Summary of Citizen Comments




Notes:




                                       120
Following is a summary of comments and views of citizens received in writing or orally
during the two public hearings held at the Hamilton County Commissioner’s Court on July
21. The comments are regarding the 2004 Annual Action Plan and Five Year Strategic
Plan.

July 21, 2004, 3:00-5:00pm

Attended by:

Marcia Brown             Community Caring Foundation
Colleen Buesching        Noblesville Housing Authority & Community Resident
Maggie Charnoski         St. Vincent Carmel Hospital
Karen Goldstein          Noblesville Zoning Board
Judy Hagan               Clay Township Trustee
Troy Halsell             Noblesville Housing Authority
Diana Lamirand           Noblesville Ledger
Mike Murphy              Cicero/Jackson Township Economic Development Commission
Kay Robertson            Resident
Amy Shankland            Noblesville Preservation Alliance
Mark Sipes               Resident
Mark Ulman               Noblesville Resident
Deborah Webster          Noblesville Preservation Alliance

Comments:

Mike Murphy recommended that the County explore the idea of basing the eligibility for
public infrastructure expenditures to individual homeowners rather than using an area
benefit approach. Mr. Murphy’s reasoning for this suggestion was that individual
homeowners are ultimately financially responsible for the sidewalks in front of their
properties.

County Response
It is the intent of the County to distribute funds according to area benefit. Although Mr.
Murphy’s suggestion is thoughtful, the County is concerned that addressing the public
infrastructure needs in this manner may result in an uncoordinated approach. It is the
County’s overall goal to improve sidewalks in such a manner that pedestrian mobility is
improved and streetscapes become more attractive to businesses and visitors. The
County’s priority in public infrastructure will be to address areas with the highest
concentration of LMI individuals and where infrastructure needs are greatest.

Marcia Brown submitted written comments. Ms. Brown’s comments reflected a concern
regarding the increasing elderly population and their quality of life needs—especially as
they relate to elderly who are represented among the LMI population.

County Response
The County shares Ms. Brown’s concerns regarding the daily needs of our community’s
elderly, as well as other vulnerable populations. For this reason, the County has decided
to make available approximately 12 percent of it’s CDBG allocation for public service
activities. It is the intent of the County to distribute this allocation in a competitive
process.

In addition, the County is recommending that approximately 8 owner occupied homes be
rehabilitated during the 2004-2005 program year for which elderly homeowners are
eligible. These funds will also be awarded through a competitive process.




                                                                           121
Amy Shankland acknowledged that she was glad to see the County priorities of
strengthening the community’s living environment and action item of exploring how the
County may be more supportive of historic preservation.


July 21, 2004; 6:00-8:00pm

Attended by:

Karen Blake             Resident
Todd Sears              Resident
Gail Rothrock           Family Services Association

Comments:

Todd Sears expressed that he was very supportive of the priorities in the 2004 Annual
Action Plan and Five-Year Strategic Plan.




                                                                        122

				
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