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USOC Employee Handbook Revision

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					United States Olympic Committee

     Employee Handbook




          Revised November 9, 2009
November 9, 2009



To All USOC Team Members:

Please find following the newly revised USOC Employee Handbook. Our objectives as
we updated or created new policies and practices were multiple:

   o Create policies that empower employees and leaders alike to have discussions
     and make decisions at the most immediate juncture of employment: between the
     employee and supervisor
   o Ensure our practices and policies are fully compliant with all related federal and
     state regulations
   o Provide the information necessary for everyone to understand expectations, and
     fully and effectively perform their roles

Your action item, after carefully reviewing the USOC Employee Handbook, is to sign
and return the acknowledgement form, which also serves as your commitment to acting
with integrity and excellence in everything you do at the U.S. Olympic Committee.

You have until December 15 to review the policies and procedures, print, sign and
return the acknowledgement form to Human Resources.

Lastly, we ask that you either destroy any and all prior copies of the Employee
Handbook you may have or return the copies to Human Resources. This version and
all future versions will reside solely on The Torch, the USOC’s intranet.

Again, if you have any questions or comments regarding the USOC Employee
Handbook, please contact anyone in Human Resources. We want to ensure your
understanding and success.

Regards,

John McWilliams
Chief Human Resources Officer




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                       USOC Employee Handbook Index


           Employee Handbook Section              Page

Introduction and At Will Statement                    4

Benefits                                              5

Compensation and Pay                               18

Hiring and Retention                               22

Information Technology                             30

Organizational Rules                               33

Time Off                                           49

            Acknowledgement Form                   58




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                    Introduction and At-Will Statement
The United States Olympic Committee (“USOC” or “organization”) is chartered by an act of
Congress known as the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act, 36 U.S.C. § 220501, et
seq. (the "Act"). In order to accomplish the important mission set forth in the Act, the USOC
depends on our employees for our success.

As an employee and team member, you are expected to carry out your job functions in a
professional manner and in a manner that represents the Olympic values. This Employee
Handbook (“Handbook”) summarizes the USOC’s employment policies and practices and the
benefits for which you are eligible as an employee. For a full description of your benefits you
should consult our specific benefits statement, documents or summary plan descriptions, and, in
the event of any conflict between this handbook, oral representations, and the more specific
benefits statements and documents, the benefits statements and summary plan descriptions will
control.

This version of the Employee Handbook is effective as of November 9, 2009, and it supersedes
all prior versions.

About the Employee Handbook
This handbook is designed to acquaint you with the U.S. Olympic Committee and provide
information about working here. The handbook is not all-inclusive, but is intended to provide
you with a summary of some of the organization’s guidelines, policies and practices. As stated
previously, this edition replaces all previously issued editions.

EMPLOYMENT WITH THE USOC IS AT-WILL. EMPLOYEES HAVE THE RIGHT TO END
THEIR WORK RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ORGANIZATION, WITH OR WITHOUT ADVANCE
NOTICE, FOR ANY REASON. THE ORGANIZATION HAS THE SAME RIGHT. THE
LANGUAGE USED IN THIS HANDBOOK AND ANY VERBAL STATEMENTS MADE BY
MANAGEMENT DO NOT CONSTITUTE A CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT, EITHER
EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, NOR DO THEY CONSTITUTE A GUARANTEE OF
EMPLOYMENT FOR A SPECIFIC DURATION.

NO USOC EMPLOYEE OR PERSON, OTHER THAN THE CEO OF THE USOC OR
DESIGNATED HUMAN RESOURCES PROFESSIONAL, HAS THE AUTHORITY TO ENTER
INTO AN AGREEMENT OF EMPLOYMENT FOR ANY SPECIFIED PERIOD. ANY SUCH
AGREEMENT MUST BE IN WRITING AND SIGNED BY BOTH THE USOC CEO AND/OR
THE HUMAN RESOURCES PROFESSIONAL AND THE EMPLOYEE.

No employee handbook can anticipate every circumstance or question. After reading the
handbook, if you have questions please talk with your immediate supervisor or Human
Resources.

The USOC reserves the right to modify or change these guidelines, practices and policies
without prior notice or update the guidelines, practices and policies without prior notice.




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                                     USOC Benefits

                                    Benefits Introduction

The USOC offers a benefits program for all regular and temporary-with-benefits employees
(“benefits eligible employees”) consistently scheduled to work 32 or more hours per week on an
annual basis. In October of each year, Human Resources and division directors will project part
time employees’ work hours for the following calendar year to determine benefits eligibility for
the next year. The USOC’s benefits program includes medical, dental, vision, and life insurance,
along with other optional benefit plans.

The USOC’s Summary of Benefits is posted at The Torch/Human Resources/Benefits and
Medical. Employees may contact Human Resources for details about these benefits. The plan
documents govern the specific benefits available under each separate plan and the limitations
and exclusions applicable to such benefits. In the event that any provision of this handbook is
inconsistent with the language of any specific plan, the language of the plan document will
control.

Lists of network providers are updated periodically. Therefore, employees should always
confirm that benefits providers and/or physicians are still members of the plan network prior to
seeking service, as USOC benefit plans offer limited or no benefits for services provided by out-
of-network providers.

Benefits Changes by the Employee
A life event change or qualifying event is a personal change in status which may allow an
employee to change his or her benefit elections. Generally, when an employee enrolls in
benefits as a new employee or at open enrollment, the employee cannot make any changes
until the next open enrollment period. However, if an employee experiences a life event
change, the employee may be eligible to make mid-year changes, including:

      Change in dependents covered under the employee’s plans
      Enrollment, discontinuation, or changes in employee’s coverage
      Beginning a new or changing an existing Medical or Dependent Care Flexible Spending
       Account

Life event changes may include the following events:

      Marriage, divorce, or legal separation
      Birth or adoption of a child
      A spouse or partner’s employment begins or ends
      A dependent’s eligibility status changes due to age, student status, marital status, or
       employment
      A change in work hours that impacts the employee’s or a spouse/partner’s benefits
       eligibility
      Death of a spouse/partner or other dependent




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30-Day Notification Requirement
Employees must notify Human Resources in writing on a Benefits Change Form (available at
The Torch/Human Resources/Benefits and Medical or by contacting Human Resources) within
30 days of an event that qualifies the employee to change/add/delete coverage. Benefits
Change Forms must be received by Human Resources within the 30-day time frame. No
exceptions will be made; non-notification of the change by an employee will result in no benefit
changes being made until the next open enrollment period or until after another qualifying life
event change. Employees may contact Human Resources with any questions.


                          Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

The EAP provides the following services without cost to employees and their household
members:

      Confidential mental health treatment
      Supervisory and management training sessions
      Six visits per issue per calendar year per dependent
      Unlimited telephone consultations
      Grief counseling
      Referral services to community resources such as financial planning or legal advice
      Stress management

Employees may call Human Resources with any questions regarding EAP benefits.

Confidentiality
The USOC will not be informed of the employee’s participation or the content of discussions
between the employee and his or her counselor. Information will only be released with an
employee’s permission, or as required by law for child or elder abuse, or in a life-threatening
situation.

Profile EAP for All Employees except California Employees
Colorado, New York or other non-Californian employees may call 800.645.6571 to set an
appointment in their area. Profile EAP provides the following crisis intervention number which is
staffed 24 hours a day in case of emergencies: 800.645.6571.

Horizon Health EAP for California Employees
California employees may call 800.221.0945 to reach a counselor or to schedule an
appointment. Horizon Health EAP provides the following crisis intervention number which is
staffed 24 hours a day in case of emergencies: 800.342.8111.


                            Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

The USOC complies with the requirements of the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. FMLA
provides job protection and maintenance of benefits while employees are out on certain types of
leave. The provisions of the USOC's existing leave policies continue to apply and will run
concurrently with FMLA leave. This policy contains an overview of FMLA; however, the specific
provisions, requirements, and definitions of FMLA and the related Department of Labor (DOL)
regulations will be followed in applying this policy.



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Eligibility
To be eligible for leave under FMLA, employees must meet the following conditions:

      The employee must have been employed by the USOC at least 12 months; and
      The employee must have worked for the USOC at least 1,250 hours during the 12-
       month period immediately preceding the commencement of the leave; and
      The employee must need leave for one of the following reasons:
       – Birth, adoption, or foster care placement of a child within 12 months of birth or
          placement; or
       – Serious health condition of the employee's spouse, child, or parent; or
       – A serious health condition of the employee that renders the employee incapable of
          performing the functions of the job; or
       – A qualifying exigency for an eligible employee whose spouse, son, daughter or
          parent is a member of the regular Armed Forces, National Guard or Reserves and
          the exigency arises out of the servicemember's deployment to a foreign country,
          or arises out of notice to the member of the National Guard or Reserves of an
          impending call to covered active duty in a foreign country; or
       – Military caregiver leave for an eligible employee who is the spouse, son, daughter,
          parent, or next of kin of a Covered Servicemember with a serious injury or illness
          incurred or aggravated in line of duty on active duty. As described below, Covered
          Servicemembers include members of the Armed Forces (including the National
          Guard or Reserves) and veterans of the active Armed Forces who receive treatment
          for the serious injury or illness within five years of being a member of the Armed
          Forces (including the National Guard or Reserves). Veterans who were dishonorably
          discharged are not Covered Servicemembers.

Human Resources will notify the employee whether the leave qualifies as FMLA, if the leave will
be designated as FMLA-protected, and the amount of leave that will be counted against the
employee’s leave balance. If it is determined that the leave is not FMLA-protected, Human
Resources will notify the employee and provide a reason for the ineligibility. If the employee is
eligible for FMLA, the notice will specify any additional information required, as well as the
employee’s rights and responsibilities.

Duration of Leave
Eligible employees are entitled to a maximum of 12 work weeks of unpaid leave in any 12-
month period. The 12-month period is calculated as a rolling 12-month period, measured
backward from the date the employee uses any FMLA leave. If the leave is military caregiver
leave, eligible employees are entitled to a maximum of 26 work weeks of unpaid leave during a
single 12-month period. The 12-month period for this leave is calculated from the first day the
leave is taken. The most FMLA leave that may be taken during a 12-month period (alone or in
combination with other FMLA leave) is 26 work weeks. Any leave beyond FMLA leave will be
subject to the USOC's other leave policies.

Combined Leave for Spouses
If both spouses are employed by the USOC and have met the tenure and hours worked
requirements under FMLA, the husband and wife may be limited to combined FMLA leave
periods, in accordance with DOL regulations.

Leave Taken on an Intermittent Basis or Reduced Schedule



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FMLA leave due to a serious health condition or a service member’s serious illness or injury
may be taken on either a consecutive, intermittent, or reduced basis, as provided by FMLA.
Such a schedule must be needed for medical reasons and approved by a healthcare provider.
Leave due to qualifying exigencies may also be taken on an intermittent or reduced leave
basis. However, FMLA leave may not be taken on an intermittent or reduced leave schedule for
the birth, adoption, or foster care placement of a child, unless approved by the
manager. Unless the leave is for a qualifying exigency, the USOC may temporarily transfer an
employee who is taking FMLA on an intermittent or reduced schedule basis if the alternative
position better accommodates the leave and if the leave is foreseeable and based on
planned medical care. The alternative position must be equal in pay and benefits.
Reduced schedule leave will not affect the status of exempt employees.

Substitution of Paid Leave for Unpaid Leave
Employees may use available paid leave (sick, vacation, personal, holiday, or other paid leave
such as maternity leave), leave without pay, or a combination of paid and unpaid leave during
their FMLA leave.

When an employee is receiving Workers’ Compensation payments or disability payments under
a disability plan, the employee may not elect to substitute paid leave for any part of the absence
covered by Workers’ Compensation or disability payments. Also, the USOC may not require the
employee to substitute paid leave for any part of an absence covered by Workers’
Compensation or disability payments.

Disability leave for the birth of a child and for the employee's serious health condition, including
Workers’ Compensation (to the extent it qualifies), will be designated as FMLA leave and will
run concurrently with FMLA leave.

Advance Notice
If the leave is foreseeable, the employee is required to provide 30 days notice and make a
reasonable effort to schedule time off, so that it is least disruptive to the operations of the
USOC. For qualifying exigency leave, or if leave is not foreseeable, the employee should
provide as much notice as is reasonable and practicable. The employee must comply with the
USOC’s normal call-in procedures.

Certification Requirements
Employees are required to provide certification of their need for FMLA leave. There are four
certification forms specific to each type of leave: Employee’s Serious Health Condition, Family
Member’s Serious Health Condition, Qualified Exigency, and Military Caregiver Leave. The
forms are available from Human Resources. Failure to provide complete and sufficient
certification may result in delay or denial of the leave.

Certification regarding the health condition of employee, spouse, child, parent, or covered
service member requires health care provider statements. The USOC may require second or
third medical opinions at the USOC’s expense. Employees also may be required to provide
periodic recertification supporting the need for leave. Certification for a qualified exigency
requires facts supporting the leave request, including any supporting documentation.

Documentation confirming family relationship, adoption, or foster care may be required.




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If an employee takes leave, and only later informs the USOC that the leave was for an FMLA-
qualifying reason, the USOC may designate all or some portion of the earlier leave taken as
FMLA leave under this policy.

Benefits during FMLA
For benefits in effect immediately prior to FMLA, USOC contributions to insurance benefits will
continue during FMLA leave to a maximum of 12 work weeks, or a maximum of 26 work weeks
if the FMLA leave is military caregiver leave. Employees must make prior arrangements with
Human Resources to pay the required employee contribution for such benefits while on leave if
leave is without pay.

If an employee chooses to make premium payments during unpaid FMLA, there will be a 30-day
grace period, after the agreed upon date, during which time the employee must make premium
payments. If the employee fails to make a required payment, the USOC has the option to cease
coverage on the date the grace period ends, as long as it has given the employee 15 days
notice.

Use of FMLA leave cannot result in the loss of any accrued benefit.

Failure to Return to Work
An employee who does not return to work upon expiration of FMLA leave may be discharged.
An employee who fails to return from FMLA leave will be required to refund all USOC benefit
contributions paid during the unpaid portion of the leave, unless the failure to return results from
the continuation, recurrence, or onset of a serious health condition, or something beyond the
employee's control. If an employee is unable to perform an essential function of the position
because of a physical or mental condition, including the continuation of a serious health
condition, he or she should consult with Human Resources regarding the USOC’s Americans
with Disabilities Act process.

Return to Work
Upon return to work from FMLA leave, employees will be restored to the same position or to one
equivalent in pay, benefits, and other terms and conditions of employment. The USOC cannot,
however, guarantee that an employee’s position will remain open in his or her absence. If
FMLA is based on a personal serious health condition, the employee must provide medical
certification that he or she is able to resume the essential functions of their position when he or
she returns to work.

Definitions
Covered Service member: A current member of the Armed Forces, including a member of the
National Guard or Reserves, who is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy, is
otherwise in outpatient status, or is otherwise on the temporary disability retired list, for a
serious injury or illness that was incurred in the line of duty on active duty that may render the
service member medically unfit to perform the duties of his or her office, grade, rank, or rating,
or a veteran who is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy for a serious injury
or illness and who was a member of the Armed Forces (including a member of the National
Guard or Reserves) at any time during the period of 5 years preceding the date on which the
veteran undergoes that medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy.

Veteran: A former member of the active Armed Services who was not dishonorably discharged.




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Next of Kin: Nearest blood relative in the following order: blood relatives who have been
granted legal custody of the service member by court decree; brothers and sisters;
grandparents; aunts and uncles; and first cousins unless the covered service member has
specifically designated in writing another blood relative as his or her nearest blood relative.

Qualifying Exigency: Specific list of reasons defined by the DOL for which an eligible employee
can take leave arising out of the fact that a spouse, son, daughter, or parent of the employee
is deployed in a foreign country or has been notified of an impending call to such deployment
either as an active duty service member or as a member of the National Guard or Reserves.
Qualifying exigencies may include attending certain military events, arranging for alternative
childcare, addressing certain financial and legal arrangements, attending certain counseling
sessions, attending post-deployment reintegration briefings, and additional activities where the
employer and Human Resources agree to the leave.

Serious Health Condition: As defined by the FMLA, including an illness, injury, impairment, or
physical or mental condition that may involve any of the following:

      Inpatient care (overnight stay) in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility;
      Continuing treatment by a health care provider with incapacity of more than three
       calendar days that also involves treatment by a health care provider two or more times
       within 30 days; the first visit must take place in person and within seven days of the first
       day of incapacity;
      Treatment on one occasion that results in a regimen of continuing treatment (i.e.,
       antibiotics). (Generally, the common cold or flu does not quality as a serious health
       condition.) The treatment must take place in person and within seven days of the first
       day of incapacity;
      Pregnancy or prenatal care;
      Chronic condition requiring periodic visits for treatment such as asthma. Visits for
       treatment must take place at least twice a year and certification form must be turned in
       twice a year;
      Permanent/long term incapacity (e.g., severe stroke, Alzheimer's);
      Absences to receive multiple treatments by or under the supervision, orders, or referral
       of a health care provider and any period of recovery related to the treatments.

Serious Injury or Illness: As defined by the Family and Medical Leave Act, a serious injury or
illness, for a member of the Armed Forces (including the National Guard or Reserves) is an
injury or illness that was incurred in line of duty on active duty in the Armed Forces or that
existed before the member's active duty and was aggravated by service in line of duty on active
duty, and that may render the member medically unfit to perform the duties of his or her office,
grade, rank, or rating. For a veteran who was a member of the Armed Forces (including the
National Guard or Reserves) within five years of receiving medical treatment, recuperation or
therapy for a serious injury or illness, a serious injury or illness is an injury or illness that was
incurred in line of duty on active duty or that existed before the member's active duty and was
aggravated by service in line of duty on active duty, and that manifested itself before or after the
member became a veteran.

Unlawful Acts
FMLA makes it unlawful for the USOC to interfere with, restrain, or deny the exercise of any
right provided under FMLA or to discharge or discriminate against any person for opposing any
practice made unlawful by FMLA or for involvement in any proceeding under or relating to
FMLA.


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Enforcement
An employee may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor or may bring a private
lawsuit against the USOC. FMLA does not affect any federal or state law prohibiting
discrimination, or supersede any state or local law or collective bargaining agreement which
provides greater family or medical leave rights.


                             Workers’ Compensation Program

The USOC provides a safe and secure working environment for employees and complies with
required federal/state/local laws regarding safety in the workplace. Therefore, the USOC
provides Workers’ Compensation coverage for employees, regardless of employment status
(i.e., part time, full time, regular, or temporary) who sustain an injury or illness arising in the
scope and course of their employment. Temporary workers who are secured from third party
service agencies and/or independent contractors or consultants are not covered under the
USOC’s Workers’ Compensation Program. These workers are covered directly by the agency
that employs them.

Initial Injury Reporting
     Colorado Springs, CO: 719.866.4570 – Colorado Springs Security (available 24/7)
     Chula Vista, CA: 619.656.1162 – Chula Vista Security (available 24/7)
     Employees working or travelling outside these two areas – Colorado Springs Security

If Immediate Emergency Treatment Is Required
Employees must contact 911 and secure emergency medical treatment, then call Security to file
an Employee Injury Report. Emergency medical care must be secured for any work-related
injury or illness that could be deemed to be life threatening.

If the employee is unable to obtain an authorization prior to emergency treatment for a work-
related injury or illness, the employee must identify coverage as “USOC Workers’
Compensation” at the hospital. The employee’s personal health insurance must not be used for
work-related injuries or illnesses. The USOC’s employee health/medical insurance provider will
not cover any work-related injury medical services rendered to an employee.

For Non-Emergency Work-Related Injuries or Illness
All work-related injuries must be reported immediately to the employee’s manager and to
Security, regardless of whether first aid is provided or the employee declines treatment.

Unless the injury is considered to be life threatening, employees must contact Human
Resources at 719.866.4970 to schedule an appointment with one of the designated Workers’
Compensation providers. Chula Vista employees may call 619.482.6102. Lake Placid
employees may call 518.523.8420. Treatment obtained outside of the designated Workers’
Compensation provider referral system may be at the employee’s own expense and is subject
to denial of Workers’ Compensation medical benefits.

Employees traveling or performing work at locations outside of the Colorado Springs area,
Chula Vista, or Lake Placid, or on business internationally, must obtain the medical care
required when a work-related injury or illness is sustained. The employee is still required to




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report the work-related injury or illness to his/her immediate manager and to Security on the
next working day following the injury or illness.

Return to Work
The designated physician or facility for each visit related to the work-related injury/illness will
provide documentation which the employee must provide to Human Resources prior to return to
work.

Employees may contact Human Resources for more information on Workers’ Compensation.


                          USOC Plan Notice of Privacy Practice

This notice describes how medical information about individuals may be used and disclosed and
how these individuals can access this information. Please review this notice carefully.

Pledge Regarding Health Information
The USOC understands that health information about individuals covered under the USOC
medical, vision, dental, EAP, and other health benefit plans (the “Plans”) is personal and
protected. The USOC is committed to protecting health information about its employees and
their covered spouses and dependents. The Plans are required to provide a notice to
individuals covered under the Plans under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability
Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”), Title II, Administrative Simplification, and to abide by the terms of the
Notice of Privacy Practices currently in effect.

The following explains the ways in which the Plans may use and disclose protected health
information about covered individuals. It also describes the Plans’ obligations and individuals’
rights regarding the use and disclosure of protected health information.

The Plans are required by law to do the following:

   •   ensure that protected health information that identifies individuals covered under the
       Plans is kept private;
   •   give covered individuals a notice of the Plans’ legal duties and privacy practices with
       respect to protected health information about covered individuals; and
   •   follow the terms of the notice that are currently in effect.

For purposes of this notice, the term “protected health information” means any information
created or received by a health care provider, health plan, employer, or health care
clearinghouse that relates to an individual’s past, present or future physical or mental health or
condition, or provision or payment for health care, that identifies an individual or may reasonably
be used to identify an individual.

If an individual has any questions about any part of this notice or if the individual wants more
information about the privacy practices of the Plans, the individual should contact the Privacy
Officer. The Privacy Officer is the Human Resources Director. The Human Resources Director
can be contacted at 719.866.2075.

How the Plans May Use and Disclose Protected Health Information
The following categories describe different ways that the Plans use and disclose protected
health information. For each category of uses or disclosures, explanations and examples are


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provided; not every use or disclosure in a category will be listed. However, all of the ways the
Plans are permitted to use and disclose information will fall within one of the categories. Any
uses or disclosures of protected health information not falling into one of these categories
require an individual’s signed authorization to allow the uses or disclosures.

For Payment (as described in applicable regulations): The Plans may use and disclose
protected health information about individuals to pay premiums, determine eligibility for plan
benefits, facilitate payment for the treatment and services received from health care providers,
to determine benefit responsibility under the plan, coordinate plan coverage, and for other
purposes permitted under the applicable regulation. For example, the Plans may tell an
individual’s health care providers about the individual’s medical history to determine whether a
particular treatment is experimental, investigational, or medically necessary, or to determine
whether the plan will cover the treatment. The Plans also may share protected health
information with a utilization review or precertification service provider. Likewise, the Plans may
share protected health information with another entity to assist with the adjudication or
subrogation of health claims or to another health plan to coordinate benefit payments.

For Health Care Operations (as described in applicable regulations): The Plans may use and
disclose health information about individuals for other plan operations. These uses and disclosures
are necessary to run the plan. For example, the Plans may use protected health information in
connection with conducting quality assessment and improvement activities; underwriting, premium
rating, and other activities relating to plan coverage; submitting claims for stop-loss (or excess loss)
coverage; conducting or arranging for medical review, legal services, audit services, and fraud and
abuse detection programs; business planning and development such as cost management; and
business management and general plan administrative activities.

To Business Associates: The Plans may contract with individuals or entities known as business
associates to perform various functions on the Plans’ behalf or to provide certain types of
services. In order to perform these functions or to provide these services, business associates
will receive, create, maintain, use and/or disclose an individual’s protected health information,
but only after the individual agrees in writing to implement appropriate safeguards regarding
protected health information.

As Required By Law: The Plans will disclose protected health information about individuals
when required to do so by federal, state or local law. For example, the Plans may disclose
protected health information when compelled to do so by a court order or court-ordered warrant.

To Avert a Serious Threat to Health or Safety: The Plans may use and disclose protected
health information about individuals when necessary to prevent a serious threat to the health
and safety of individuals, the public, or other persons. Any disclosure, however, would only be
to someone able to help prevent the threat.        The Plans also may disclose protected health
information necessary for law enforcement authorities to identify or apprehend an individual in
certain circumstances.

Disclosure to Health Plan Sponsor: Information may be disclosed to the USOC, but only if the
USOC has amended the Plans as required by HIPAA, has certified to the Plans as required by
HIPAA, and established certain safeguards and firewalls to limit the classes of employees or
other persons under the control of the USOC who will have access to protected health
information and to limit the use of this information to Plan administrative purposes and not for
non-permissible purposes. Examples of Plan administration include for facilitating claim
payments under the Plans. The Plans also may disclose enrollment/disenrollment information


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to the USOC, for enrollment or disenrollment purposes only, and may disclose “summary health
information” (as described in applicable regulations) to the USOC for the purpose of obtaining
premium bids from health plans for providing health insurance coverage under the Plans or
modifying or terminating the Plans.

Organ and Tissue Donation: If the individual is an organ donor, the Plans may release
protected health information to organizations that handle organ procurement, or organ, eye, or
tissue transplantation, or to an organ donation bank as necessary to facilitate organ or tissue
donation and transplantation.

Military and Veterans: If an individual is a member of the armed forces, the Plans may release
health information about the individual as required by military command authorities. The Plans
may also release protected health information about foreign military personnel to the
appropriate foreign military authority.

Workers’ Compensation: The Plans may release protected health information about individuals
for Workers’ Compensation or similar programs. These programs provide benefits for work-
related injuries or illness.

Public Health Activities: The Plans may disclose protected health information about individuals
for public health activities. These activities generally include the following:

   •   to prevent or control disease, injury, or disability;
   •   to report births and deaths;
   •   to report child abuse or neglect;
   •   to report reactions to medications or problems with products;
   •   to notify individuals of recalls of products they may be using;
   •   to notify an individual who may have been exposed to a disease or may be at risk for
       contracting or spreading a disease or condition;
   •   to notify the appropriate government authority if the Plans believe an individual has been
       the victim of abuse, neglect, or domestic violence. The Plans will only make this
       disclosure if the individual agrees, or when required or authorized by law.

Health Oversight Activities: The Plans may disclose protected health information to a health
oversight agency for activities authorized by law. These oversight activities include, for
example, audits, investigations, inspections, and licensure. These activities are necessary for
the government to monitor the health care system, government programs, and compliance with
civil rights laws.

Judicial and Administrative Proceedings: The Plans may disclose protected health information
about an individual in response to a court or administrative order. The Plans also may disclose
protected health information about an individual in response to a subpoena, discovery request,
or other lawful process by someone else involved in the dispute, but only if efforts have been
made to tell the individual about the request or to obtain an order protecting the information
requested.

Law Enforcement: Under certain conditions, the Plans may release protected health information
if asked to do so by a law enforcement official in the following circumstances:

   •   in response to a court order, subpoena, warrant, summons, or similar process;
   •   to identify or locate a suspect, fugitive, material witness, or missing person;


                                                                                              14
   •   about the victim of a crime if the individual agrees to the disclosure or, under certain
       limited circumstances, the Plans are unable to obtain the individual’s agreement;
   •   about a death the Plans believe may be the result of criminal conduct;
   •   about criminal conduct at a covered entity; and
   •   in emergency circumstances, to report a crime, the location of the crime or victims, or
       the identity, description, or location of the individual who committed the crime.

Coroners, Medical Examiners, and Funeral Directors: The Plans may release protected health
information to a coroner or medical examiner. This may be necessary, for example, to identify a
deceased individual or determine the cause of death. The Plans also may release protected
health information about hospital patients to funeral directors, as is necessary to carry out their
duties.

National Security, Intelligence Activities and Protective Services: The Plans may release
protected health information about individuals to authorized federal officials for intelligence,
counterintelligence, and other national security activities authorized by law. The Plans may
disclose protected health information to authorized federal officials for the provision of protective
services to the President or other authorized persons, or heads of state.

Inmates: If an individual is an inmate of a correctional institution or under the custody of a law
enforcement official, the Plans may release protected health information about the individual to
the correctional institution or law enforcement official. This release would be necessary (1) for
the institution to provide the individual with health care, (2) to protect the individual’s health and
safety or the health and safety of others, or (3) for the safety and security of the correctional
institution.

Individuals’ Rights Regarding Their Protected Health Information
Individuals have the following rights regarding protected health information the Plans maintain
about them:

Right to Inspect and Copy: Individuals have the right to inspect and copy protected health
information maintained by the Plans. The Plans will act on an individual’s request within 30
days after receipt of the request. To inspect and copy protected health information that may be
used to make decisions about them, individuals must submit requests in writing to the Plans’
Privacy Officer. If an individual requests a copy of the information, the Plans may charge a fee
for the costs of copying, mailing, or other supplies associated with the request.

The Plans may deny an individual’s request to inspect and copy in certain limited
circumstances. If an individual is denied access to protected health information, the individual
may request that the denial be reviewed by submitting a written request to the Privacy Officer.

Right to Amend: If an individual feels that protected health information the Plans have about
him or her is incorrect or incomplete, the individual may ask the Plans to amend the information.
Individuals have the right to request amendments for as long as the information is kept by or for
the Plans.

To request an amendment, an individual’s requests must be made in writing and submitted to
the Plans’ Privacy Officer. In addition, the individual must provide a reason that supports his or
her request.




                                                                                                   15
The Plans may deny an individual’s request for an amendment if it is not in writing or does not
include a reason to support the request. In addition, the Plans may deny an individual’s request
to amend information that:

   •   is not part of the protected health information kept by or for the Plans;
   •   was not created by the Plans, unless the person or entity that created the information is
       no longer available to make the amendment;
   •   is not part of the information which the individual would be permitted to inspect and copy;
       or
   •   is accurate and complete.

Right to an Accounting of Disclosures: Individuals have the right to request an “accounting of
disclosures” where such disclosure was made for any purpose other than payment, health care
operations, directly to the individual, or any other purpose for which an accounting is not
required under HIPAA.

To request this list or accounting of disclosures, an individual must submit a request in writing to
the Plans’ Privacy Officer. The request must state a time period which may not be longer than
six years and may not include dates before April 14, 2003. The request should indicate in what
form the individual wants the list (for example, paper or electronic). The first list requested
within a 12-month period will be free. For additional lists, the Plans may charge the individual
for the costs of providing the list. The Plans will notify the individual of the cost involved, and
the individual may choose to withdraw or modify his or her request at that time, before any costs
are incurred.

Right to Request Restrictions: Individuals have the right to request a restriction or limitation on
the protected health information the Plans use or disclose about them for payment, or health
care operations. Individuals also have the right to request a limit on the protected health
information the Plans disclose about them to someone who is involved in their care or the
payment for their care, like a family member or friend. For example, an individual could ask that
the Plans not use or disclose information about a surgery the individual had.

The Plans are not required to agree to an individual’s request. If the Plans agree to a request, it
will abide by the restrictions. The Plans will not agree to restrictions on protected health
information uses and disclosures that are legally required, or which are necessary to administer
the Plans.

To request restrictions, an individual must make a request in writing to the Plans’ Privacy
Officer. In the request, the individual must tell the Plans (1) what information the individual
wants to limit; (2) whether the individual wants to limit the Plans’ use, disclosure, or both; and
(3) to whom the individual want the limits to apply (for example, disclosures to the individual’s
spouse).

Right to Request Confidential Communications: Individuals have the right to request that the
Plans communicate with them about medical matters in a certain way or at a certain location.
For example, individuals can ask that the Plans only contact them at work or by mail.

To request confidential communications, individuals must make a request in writing to the Plans’
Privacy Officer. The Plans will accommodate all reasonable requests. Individuals’ requests
must specify how or where they wish to be contacted.



                                                                                                 16
Right to a Paper Copy of This Notice: Individuals have the right to a paper copy of this notice.
Individuals may ask the Plans to give them a copy of this notice at any time. Even if an
individual has agreed to receive this notice electronically, the individual is still entitled to a paper
copy of this notice.

Individuals may contact the Plans’ Privacy Officer to obtain a paper copy of this notice.

Changes to This Notice: The Plans reserve the right to change this notice. The Plans reserve
the right to make the revised or changed notice effective for protected health information it already
has about individuals, as well as any information it receives in the future. The Plans will post a
copy of the current notice on the plan website. The notice will contain the effective date on the
first page, in the top right-hand corner.

Complaints: If an individual believes his or her privacy rights have been violated, the individual
may file a complaint with the Plans or with the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human
Services within 180 days of when the individual knew or should have known that the act or
omission complained of occurred. To file a complaint with the Plans, an individual should contact
the Plans’ Privacy Officer. All complaints must be submitted in writing. Properly submitted
complaints will be responded to within a reasonable timeframe.

Individuals will not be penalized for filing a complaint.

Other Uses of Protected Health Information: Other uses and disclosures of protected health
information not covered by this notice or the laws that apply to the Plans will be made only with
the individual’s written authorization. If written authorization is provided for a specific use or
disclosure and an individual changes his or her mind and wants to revoke the authorization, the
individual must notify the Privacy Officer in writing. The Plans will stop using an individual’s
protected health information for that specific use or disclosure. An authorization cannot be
revoked for uses and disclosures that already have occurred.

Individuals understand that the Plans are unable to take back any disclosures it has already made
with the individuals’ permission.




                                                                                                     17
                          Compensation at the USOC

                                Compensation Introduction

The USOC is committed to attracting and retaining employees who are capable of exceptional
performance and demonstration of the USOC Core Values.

As such, the USOC has a compensation program that currently includes:

          A competitive pay program that helps attract, retain, and motivate a high-quality
           workforce,
          Base pay levels that are competitive with the external job market in which the USOC
           competes for talent and that are reflective of the internal value of each position, and
          Annual incentives which are commensurate with contribution level and driven by
           individual and company performance.

The USOC has an established salary structure for exempt and non-exempt positions. The
salary ranges have been developed by blending the current compensation philosophy,
competitive salary survey data, and economic business conditions, including geography. The
USOC salary structure may be periodically reviewed and adjusted to reflect changing conditions
in the marketplace and within the organization. As such, the USOC may provide employees
various types of compensation to reward performance, significant job expansion or promotion.
These pay actions may include merit increases, incentive compensation, special adjustments,
or discretionary awards.

The USOC utilizes a performance assessment tool to evaluate mid-year and annual
performance to enable real-time conversations about performance, to assess performance in a
consistent manner, and to tie annual compensation decisions to performance.

The USOC reserves the right to change, cancel, or modify its compensation program,
philosophy or rewards in its sole discretion.


                                     Job Classifications

Employees’ positions paid via the USOC payroll are subject to classification by the criteria
detailed in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and other federal, state, and local laws. Only
Human Resources is authorized to evaluate and classify positions as either non-exempt or
exempt.

      Non-exempt positions are positions that are paid by the hour and are eligible for
       overtime time. Overtime pay in most states where the USOC operates begins after the
       employee has worked over 40 hours in a pay week. Positions based in California are
       eligible for overtime pay after 8 hours of work in a pay day.
      Exempt positions are positions that are paid a weekly salary for a standard 40 hours of
       work in a pay week. Exempt positions are not eligible for overtime pay.




                                                                                               18
Additionally, the USOC also classifies positions as either regular or temporary, and both of
these classifications for positions are also evaluated and set by Human Resources. Regular
and temporary positions impact benefits eligibility, headcount, and budgets differently, and
managers are encouraged to consult with Human Resources to further their understanding of
these classifications.

      Regular positions are positions that trigger headcount, are benefits eligible if the position
       is scheduled to work 32 hours or more in a work week consistently over the course of
       the work year, and can be either non-exempt or exempt.
      Temporary positions are positions that are generally short term in nature, and should be
       scheduled to be less than 1,000 hours in a work year in most situations. Temporary
       positions are also generally benefits ineligible, and can be either non-exempt or exempt.

The last classification of positions involves the number of hours the position is scheduled to
work. The USOC utilizes both full-time and part-time positions.

      Full-time positions are positions that are regularly scheduled to work 40 hours in a work
       week.
      Part-time positions are positions are positions that are regularly scheduled to work less
       than 40 hours in a work week.


                                    Standard Work Week

The USOC defines its work week for pay purposes as one that begins at 12:00 a.m.
Saturday and ends at 11:59 p.m. Friday. The USOC also pays employees on a bi-weekly
basis. The standard office hours for the USOC are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and
departmental leaders have the flexibility to set different working hours to meet business
objectives and provide services to athletes and customers.


                                         Time Keeping

Non-exempt Employees
All non-exempt employees must record all actual hours worked and absences in the USOC’s
Time Reporting System in accordance with the published pay schedule. Non-working meal
periods of 30 minutes or more are not considered time worked, and employees must record
time accordingly. In the event an employee is unable to complete a time record, the manager is
responsible for completing the time record using appropriate time worked or absence codes.
Employees engaging in time keeping violations will receive appropriate disciplinary action
relative to the violation.

Exempt Employees
Exempt employees must record “exception time”, i.e., time that is generally an exception to their
standard schedule. Exception time includes paid time and unpaid time off, such as sick,
vacation, personal, or FMLA leave. Exception time should be recorded in increments of one
hour.




                                                                                                 19
                                        Pay Practices

Overtime
Employees in non-exempt positions are paid overtime as required by federal and state law.
Normally this will occur at one and one-half times the base rate of pay. Paid time off is not
counted as “time worked” for purposes of overtime calculation (i.e., holidays, vacation, personal
days, etc.).

Employees should record all hours worked, including hours worked beyond their normal
schedule. Overtime pay in most states where the USOC operates begins after the employee
has worked over 40 hours in a pay week. Positions based in California are eligible for overtime
pay after 8 hours of work in a pay day.

The use of overtime hours, when required by operational necessity, must be approved in
advance by the manager supervising the department or non-exempt employees. Working
overtime without approval or authorization of a manager or falsely reporting overtime hours may
result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

Travel Time
For non-exempt employees, "travel time" is considered to be hours worked if the period of travel
occurs during an employee's normal work schedule (for example, 8:00-5:00, Monday-Friday), as
well as the same hours on non-working days (Saturday and Sunday). Travel time hours do not
include commuting to and from work or hours worked. If an employee is required by a manager
to work outside of his/her normal work schedule while traveling, these hours also count as
actual hours worked. For travel outside the United States, the policy remains the same.

On-Call Time
On-call hours are hours worked if the employee must be available and ready to immediately
travel to the job, and the employee’s freedom to engage in personal activities is unduly
restricted. On-call hours are not hours worked if the employee is free to engage in personal
activities (i.e., go to the movies, go shopping, attend a sporting event).

Meal Periods
The USOC normally provides meal periods consisting of a 30- to 60-minute break during an
eight-hour day of work. These meal periods are unpaid as long as the time is uninterrupted,
and the employee is relieved from all duty. Employees may be asked to forgo the meal period if
they will be off duty within six hours of the starting time. On occasion an employee may be
required to work during a meal period and will be paid.

Meal periods are scheduled by the manager based on operational necessity. An employee
whose normal workday is eight hours will normally work no longer than five hours without a
meal period, unless the meal period is an on-duty meal period.

Rest Periods
Managers may allow full-time employees ten-minute breaks in their work schedules, normally
mid-way through the first part of the work schedule and mid-way through the last part of the
work schedule. Such rest periods are paid time and are scheduled by the managers based on
operational necessity. Employees will be provided rest periods in accordance with applicable
state and local laws.




                                                                                              20
Termination of Employment
Various state laws require the USOC to pay earned wages and other accrued benefits after
termination within a set timeframe. To assist the USOC in complying with these state laws,
managers must forward a copy of employee’s letter of resignation, including a specific
termination date, to Human Resources as soon as possible and prior to the termination date.
Detailed information about the processes for termination of employment is available at The
Torch/Human Resources/Policies and Procedures.




                                                                                        21
                               Hiring and Retention

                          Hiring and Employment Introduction

The USOC is an equal opportunity employer and hires individuals solely based on their
qualifications and ability to do the job. The USOC further believes that hiring qualified
individuals contributes to the overall strategic success of the organization, and each employee,
while employed, is hired to perform and make significant achievements for the position.
The USOC staffs open positions through a number of ways including promotions, transfer of
current employees and hiring of external candidates.

Open positions are posted via the USOC’s career website for a minimum of five (5) calendar
days, and employees wishing to be considered for an open position should apply online.

Employees must be in their current position for at least six (6), and preferably twelve (12)
months before applying for new positions. Hiring managers seriously considering an internal
candidate must consult with the internal candidate’s current manager regarding performance
and potential transition issues.

Former employees who left the USOC in good performance standing may be considered for
reemployment. Former employees who resigned without written notice or who were dismissed
for disciplinary reasons may not be considered for re-employment.

For external candidates, offers of employment are contingent upon a number of conditions
including the successful passing of a background check, and the agreement to a number of
policies including agreement to the confidentiality policy. Pre-employment drug testing will
begin in January 2010, and will become a condition of employment for external candidates.
Candidates who do not possess the right to work in the United States will require proper
authorization such as a government work visa before beginning employment with the USOC.

Official offers of employment to external candidates, including temps, interns and regular
employees, can only be extended by the CEO or Human Resources, and hiring managers must
consult with Human Resources in advance of such offer extension. Promotions and internal
transfers also must go through an internal approval process including a review of compensation,
and again, hiring managers must consult with Human Resources in advance of offering a
promotion or extending an internal job offer.


                               Alternative Work Schedules

The USOC is open to alternative work schedules to enable the USOC to meet program and
performance goals, while allowing employees the ability to balance work and personal
responsibilities. Both regular and temporary employees are eligible for alternative work
schedules, and having and maintaining good performance is a conditional requirement for
obtaining and maintaining an alternative work schedule. Not all positions at the USOC will
qualify for alternative work schedules, and employees may be required to work hours or shifts
as set by the USOC.



                                                                                             22
Employees interested in alternative work schedules must submit an Alternative Work Schedule
Request to their manager for review and approval. Managers are encouraged to review
approved schedules every three months to ensure all objectives are met and to review any
circumstantial changes that might impact the alternative work schedule.

Various alternative work schedule options are available to employees, including the below.

Flex Time
A flex time schedule is a schedule in which an employee flexes his/her standard arrival and/or
departure time from work. Standard working hours at the USOC are 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., and
an employee may flex his/her arrival/departure from these hours, which may include reducing
lunch breaks from one hour to thirty minutes.

Compressed Work Week
A compressed work week is a schedule when the 40 hours are compressed into a schedule
other than the traditional five days at eight hours schedule. The most common is a 4x10, a four-
day workweek at ten hours per workday, in which an employee works ten hours per workday,
reducing the workweek to four days a week. Paid time off for employees utilizing this schedule
needs to match the number of hours requested. For example, if an employee works a 4x10
schedule and wishes to take a vacation day, the number of vacation hours entered into E-time
should be ten hours.

Non-exempt employees approved for this schedule in states other than California will continue
to earn overtime after working forty hours. Non-exempt employees in California approved for
this schedule will earn overtime after working eight hours, as required by California law.

Part-Time Work
A part-time schedule is an alternative work schedule whereby an employee is scheduled to work
less than 40 hours in a standard work week. Benefits eligibility might be impacted for
employees who work part-time, and pay will reflect the number of hours scheduled and/or
worked. Non-exempt employees working a part-time schedule will earn overtime pay per the
appropriate federal, state, and local laws.

Telecommuting
Telecommuting is an arrangement that allows the employee to work from a location other than
an established USOC premises, such as working from home. Telecommuting may be approved
by a manager temporarily, for example, one day only for a special need, or for a longer term.
Telecommuting may be for part of a work week or for the full work week. Employees who
telecommute regularly from home must consult with IT and Risk Management in advance to
understand the technology and liability requirements for regularly working from home.

Job Sharing
Job sharing is an alternative work schedule in which two part-time employees share one full-
time position.

Approval Process
An employee wishing to work an alternative schedule should submit a request in writing to
his/her manager. The manager is responsible for reviewing, modifying, and approving or
denying any schedule requests by employees. This includes determining if the entire
department or an entire shift must convert to one of the above alternative scheduling options.
While considering a request, a manager must assess the impact the schedule might have on



                                                                                             23
productivity, quality, and absenteeism, and if the alternative work schedule is in the best
interests of the department, organization, and employee. Additionally, both the employee and
manager must discuss clear expectations for performance and deliverables, while working an
alternative schedule, especially in the case of telecommuting.

Approved requests for alternative work schedules should be forwarded to Human Resources for
inclusion in the employee’s personnel file and for updating or adjusting any pay, benefits, time
off, or time recording requirements.

The USOC reserves the right to modify or stop an employee’s approved alternative work
schedule, although the USOC would endeavor to provide sufficient notice of the change to the
employee.

General questions about alternative work schedules should be directed to Human Resources.


                             Background Checks and E-Verify

The USOC requires pre-employment background checks, conducted by an external provider, for
final applicants for a USOC position of employment and prior to an offer of employment to meet
the following objectives:

      to ensure a safe living, training, and competition environment for athletes;
      to ensure a safe working environment for employees;
      to protect persons at risk, including minors, and
      to protect USOC property and information.

All applicant background checks will include the following:

      Two independent national database searches;
      Searches of all available state sex offender registries;
      Social Security number and address verification;
      Federal terrorist database search;
      Searches of county criminal records for each county where the applicant currently lives
       or has lived during the past seven years – going back a period of seven years for each
       county searched;
      International background checks for countries where the applicant has lived, worked, or
       studied for three or more consecutive months during the past seven years;
      Motor vehicle records check;
      Education verification of final degree received (on initial background check only); and
      Credit history check (only for Executive Team members and employees who work in the
       Finance or Audit Divisions).

All background checks will be in compliance with the Fair Credit Reporting Act and the Fair and
Accurate Credit Transactions Act.

In addition, the external vendor will perform a limited automatic re-check twelve months after the
initial pre-employment background check on individuals still employed by the USOC. The
recheck will include checks of one national database, all available state sex offender registries,
and motor vehicle records.


                                                                                               24
Final job offers are contingent upon applicant’s successfully passing the background check.

The USOC also voluntarily participates in E-Verify, an Internet-based system operated by the
Department of Homeland Security in partnership with the Social Security Administration that
allows employers to electronically verify the employment eligibility of their newly hired
employees.

In addition to pre-employment background checks, background checks identical to those
detailed above, including limited automatic rechecks, are conducted on all active employees
every two years, based on their employment hire dates, and in accordance with the USOC
Employee Periodic Background Check Policy, available at The Torch/Human
Resources/Policies and Procedures. Employees’ continued employment with the USOC is
contingent upon employees’ passing the successive background checks as the checks are
conducted

Questions regarding the USOC’s use of background checks for applicants and employees can
be directed to Human Resources.


                      Employee Service Dates (Length of Service)

The USOC considers an employee’s service dates to be the employee’s actual time employed
on the USOC’s payroll, as recorded in the HR Information System. If an employee had multiple
employments with the USOC, with a break in service, the service dates are determined by
adding together the times of employment from the original hire date to the original termination
date, plus the time from the date of rehire to the current date. These service dates will be used
to calculate eligibility for service awards (if applicable).

For insurance purposes, all employees who have a break in service will be required to adhere to
the normal enrollment dates associated with benefits.


                                Learning and Development

The USOC believes strongly in the individual growth of employees through a number of learning
opportunities including on-the-job experience, classroom learning, informal coaching by peers
and leaders, or external conferences and events. The USOC supports learning opportunities
additionally through its Tuition Assistance Program (see Handbook policy) and Olympic
University (http://www.olympicuniversity.org/), an internal learning and development program.

Employees should discuss their development and learning desires with their manager and
collectively decide the learning and growth objectives and the best paths to accomplish those
opportunities. Attendance in some learning programs is mandatory, and attendance in others is
by open enrollment or invitation only after receiving manager approval. External learning
opportunities that impact a departmental budget require manager’s approval.

Overall, the USOC understands the importance of learning and development, its impact on
overall employee engagement, and is committed to offering relevant programs.




                                                                                              25
                                Performance Management

Performance Management is the system of processes, feedback and tools that the USOC and
its employees use to set expectations for job responsibilities and to grow, improve, manage and
measure performance. The USOC aligns its Performance Management system to the calendar
year.

The USOC leader’s role is to set expectations for performance, to coach and provide feedback
on performance and to measure performance annually. The USOC employees’ role is to
understand the expectations, drive performance and to self-evaluate throughout year.

The primary performance tool is the performance appraisal form, and employees and managers
should use it to document performance, results and behaviors used in obtaining results. The
performance appraisal provides a means for discussing, planning and reviewing the
performance of each employee.

Performance appraisals may influence compensation decisions and/or employee development,
so it is critical that managers be objective and constructive in conducting performance reviews
and in assigning overall performance ratings. Because of the significance of the performance
appraisal, Human Resources will collect and file a copy of an employee’s annual performance in
his/her official personnel file.

Performance Improvement
The USOC uses a practice called performance improvement to alert employees to declining
performance, missed expectations, ethics or other violations, or unprofessional or inappropriate
behaviors in the workplace. Performance improvement plans may take the form of verbal
counseling, written counseling or warning, termination, suspension, demotion, pay changes, or
other employment actions dependent on the severity of the situation and in keeping with the
USOC’s policy as an at-will employer. In some situations, the USOC will refer matters to the
appropriate civil or criminal authorities as appropriate discipline action.

USOC managers are responsible for documenting performance, and should contact Human
Resources to consult before delivering written warnings to employees or taking other serious
employment actions.       Progressive performance plans resulting in termination requires
consultation with and final approval by Human Resources and Legal.

The fact the USOC has or has not utilized any of these actions in any individual case does not
set any precedent applicable to other cases and should not be relied upon in future disciplinary
situations by any employee.

Questions regarding the Performance Management system may be directed to an employee’s
immediate manager or Human Resources.


                     Professional Memberships and Certifications

The USOC recognizes that it benefits from its employees' ability to maintain and update
professional skills, knowledge of current trends and technological advances in their areas of
specialization.




                                                                                             26
The USOC’s various divisions budget for professional membership, certifications, licenses and
professional development for employees as appropriate. An employee who holds a license that
is directly related to their job function should keep such licensure up to date and in good
standing at all times while employed by the USOC. Additionally, if an employee identifies a
professional development association or certification that he/she believes will be helpful in the
current role, the employee should discuss the benefits and costs of joining the professional
association with his/her manager.

Because the approval is at the manager’s discretion, the manager has the right to ask for any
associated documentation to support the request. Ultimately, the approval of the dues or
associated fees is at the discretion of the manager. If the manager does not believe the request
will benefit the division or organization in any way, the employee can opt to accept the
responsibility of the payment on their own.

It is the USOC’s policy that college coursework may be reimbursed only through the USOC’s
Tuition Assistance Program, and for more information, please see Tuition Assistance Program.

The USOC reserves the right also to require licenses or certifications for certain positions as
condition of employment or continued employment.


                                Termination of Employment

An employee’s employment may end in one of two ways, either voluntarily or involuntarily. If an
employee decides to leave the USOC voluntarily, he/she should first discuss with and provide a
resignation letter to his/her manager who should alert Human Resources before the employee’s
last day of work.

Reasons for involuntary terminations might include for-cause terminations, death, or position
reductions or redundancy, in addition to other reasons. Recommendations for involuntary
terminations are reviewed by Human Resources and Legal in advance of the employee
receiving notice.

Generally, employees who are terminating will receive information from Human Resources
concerning their final paycheck and, if benefits eligible, information on 403(b), options for
extending benefits through COBRA, and the payout of unused and earned vacation pay. For
detailed information on termination of employment, please visit The Torch/Human
Resources/Policies and Procedures.


                                Tuition Assistance Program

The USOC encourages its employees to continue their formal education and has established a
Tuition Assistance Program to enable them to do so. The USOC’s Tuition Assistance Program
provides reimbursement of certain educational expenses upon proof of satisfactory completion
of college coursework, as more fully detailed below. With the USOC’s approval, employees
may pursue a degree or take individual courses at approved and accredited educational
institutions under this program, provided the course of study is directly related to the employee’s
current position or functional area, or to another functional area at the USOC for which the
employee could become qualified.



                                                                                                27
Completion of a course of study will not necessarily result in promotion, transfer, reassignment,
salary increase, or any other changes in employment status.

This program may be suspended or terminated at any time. Should the USOC terminate the
program, the USOC will reimburse employees who are enrolled and approved for the program
as agreed.

Human Resources coordinates and administers the Tuition Assistance Program.

Eligibility
Benefits eligible employees in good performance standing are eligible to apply for tuition
assistance after completion of six continuous months of benefits eligible employment prior to the
start of any coursework.

Applying for Tuition Assistance
For each course, the employee wishing to receive reimbursement should complete the
Application for Tuition Assistance Form (available at The Torch/Human Resources/Tuition
Assistance Program or from Human Resources), attach a course description, and submit for
approval from his/her manager. The manager should assess the cost, course and/or degree,
taking into accounts the employee’s current and future assignments and potential impact on the
employee’s work responsibilities. The costs are borne by the departmental budget.

The manager will forward the form to Human Resources for final review and approval. Final
approval by Human Resources is required prior to the start date of the course.

The employee will receive a copy of the approved Application for Tuition Assistance Form. In
the event an application for assistance is declined, the employee will be notified in writing. Initial
approval of a course of study does not obligate the USOC to future/continued approval of
courses in that course of study. Approvals are only valid for the course and semester given.

Coursework and Educational Institutions Covered by Tuition Assistance
Coursework considered for Tuition Assistance must be directly related to the employee's current
job or functional area or must be related to another functional area for which the employee
could, in the opinion of the USOC, realistically become qualified. Courses required within a
qualifying degree program, which may not otherwise qualify, may also be considered for
reimbursement. Certain courses may be subject to taxation in accordance with IRS regulations
when reimbursed; it is the responsibility of the employee to ensure that appropriate tax
treatment of the education-related reimbursements occurs.

Schools or universities which qualify under this program are accredited colleges or universities
providing associates, bachelors, masters, and/or doctorate degrees, including their online
programming, from the U.S. Department of Education Database of Accredited Postsecondary
Institutions and Programs List: http://ope.ed.gov/accreditation/.

What Is Covered?
The Tuition Assistance Program provides reimbursement only for the cost of tuition, required
textbooks, and required course laboratory fees; Human Resources’ decision on what constitutes
required textbooks and course laboratory fees will be final. There will be no reimbursement of
shipping and handling for books, registration fees, application fees, supplies or equipment
purchased by employees to accommodate their study, parking fees, transportation fees, room


                                                                                                   28
and board fees, social fees, athletic fees, computer access charges, etc. Reimbursement is
limited to $3,000 per calendar year (based on the pay date on which the reimbursement is
made).

The amount of the USOC’s reimbursement will be reduced by any other financial aid that does
not have to be repaid (such as grants, scholarships, other reimbursement programs, military
tuition assistance, Colorado Opportunity Fund, etc.).

Education initiated by an employee and covered by this policy should be pursued outside
normal working hours. In instances where classes are only available during normal working
hours, managers are encouraged to provide flexible work schedules and appropriate use of paid
leave (vacation or personal days). However, any such work scheduling to accommodate class
time is subject to manager approval in advance of registration, and will be reviewed every
semester.

Applying for Reimbursement
The reimbursement amount is based on the final grade as follows:

       Final Grade of A or B – 100% reimbursement
       Final Grade of C – 50% reimbursement
       Final Grade D or below – No reimbursement
       Final Grade Pass/Fail – Pass paid at 50% reimbursement; no reimbursement for Fail

For each course, the Tuition Reimbursement Request Form (available at The Torch/Human
Resources/Tuition Assistance Program or from Human Resources) must be completed and
submitted with original receipts and the final grade report not later than 90 calendar days after
the end date of the course.

No portion of the anticipated reimbursement may be advanced to the employee.

At Termination of Employment
An employee who received approval for Tuition Assistance but who voluntarily resigns during
the course, or after completion of the course but prior to receiving reimbursement, will not be
eligible to receive reimbursement. Additionally, an employee who voluntarily terminates will be
required to repay the USOC for any coursework reimbursed within one year prior to the
voluntary termination.




                                                                                              29
                             Information Technology
No Expectation of Privacy
The USOC treats all information transmitted through or stored in its business system, including
e-mail and voice mail messages, as USOC business information. All messages, files, and other
business information stored on USOC systems, even if considered “personal” by an employee,
are and remain the property of the USOC. They are not the private property of any employee,
and the USOC may review or use such business information as it deems appropriate. No
employee should have any expectation of privacy in the contents of USOC business or
computer systems.

Security
The USOC issues login names and passwords for individual use only. All login names,
passwords and other information regarding access to USOC systems must be kept confidential
by USOC employees. Sharing of login names and passwords is strictly prohibited. Certain
USOC management, however, may have access to logins and passwords of others for
purposes of monitoring contents of USOC computers, computer systems, networks, databases,
software, information storage media, or any other USOC information system.

No employee may engage in or do the following:

      Knowingly gain access to, attempt to gain access to, or cause access to be gained to
       any computer, computer system, network, database, software, information storage
       media, or any other USOC business system for which they do not have authorization.
      Copy to a personal system any data, information, or programs contained on or in a
       computer, computer system, network, database, software, information storage media, or
       other device owned or licensed by the USOC without consent of the USOC.
      Alter, delete, or destroy USOC data, information, or programs contained on or in a
       computer, computer system, network, database, software, information storage media, or
       other device owned or licensed by the USOC without consent of the USOC.
      Knowingly introduce a set of instructions (such as a virus), programmatic or otherwise,
       into a computer, computer system, network, database, software, storage media, or other
       device owned or licensed by the USOC to perform any act that is inconsistent with the
       business purposes or requirements of the system or the USOC.

The Internet is a public network and as such information sent over the Internet (including e-mail
or instant messaging services (IM)) is not secure. Sensitive or confidential information should
not be transmitted over the Internet unless appropriate precautions are taken.

Laptop computers are frequently targets of theft and may contain USOC confidential
information. If an employee is issued a laptop computer, it is the employee’s responsibility to
remove unneeded confidential information, password protect confidential files, and ensure that
the information on the laptop cannot be misappropriated.

As part of the USOC information security practices, employees are required to establish a
screensaver and a password for such screensavers. Secured screensavers must be used to
protect USOC information while employees are not at their desks.




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E-mail and Instant Messaging
The USOC has an electronic mail (e-mail) network and provides limited access to IM services.
Internet e-mail and IM greatly extend the USOC’s e-mail system, and all computer use policies
apply equally to internal as well as external e-mails. These systems and all messages
composed, sent, and/or received using these systems are the property of the USOC. The
USOC has software and systems in place to monitor and record all e-mail usage, and the
USOC uses these monitoring and recording systems. There is no such thing as personal e-
mails stored on the USOC’s systems, and no employee should have any expectation of privacy
with regard to his/her e-mail usage. The USOC reserves the right to search, access, copy, and
use as it sees fit any and all e-mail messages in its systems. Improper, unprofessional, or
offensive use of these communication methods will not be tolerated.

E-mail Guidelines
Employees should address e-mail messages only to those recipients who need the information
in the message. Mass communication e-mails are prohibited and any appropriate mass
communications should be posted on The Torch. In special cases, a mass e-mail may be sent
to the entire organization (or subset of the organization) with pre-approval from the divisional
leader. Abuse of e-mails may result in the removal of the employees account and thereby their
ability to leverage the USOC e-mail system. Be aware that messages may be forwarded and
read by others in addition to the original addressees. The e-mail system is not intended and
should not be used as a storage or electronic filing system.

Internet
The USOC may supply Internet access to employees. Each employee must sign the USOC
Internet Acceptable Usage Policy (available at The Torch/Human Resources/HR Forms or from
Human Resources) before any access to the Internet is provided. Internet access is a business
tool and must be used in an appropriate manner. USOC employees must conduct themselves
appropriately on the Internet and respect copyrights, software licensing rules, property rights,
and privacy, as in any other business dealing. All existing USOC policies apply to an
employee’s conduct on the Internet, including those that deal with intellectual property
protection, privacy, misuse of resources, sexual harassment, data security and confidentiality.
The USOC has software and systems in place to monitor and record all Internet usage, and the
USOC uses these monitoring and recording systems regularly. No employee should have any
expectation of privacy with regard to his/her Internet usage.

Blogs and Social Networking Sites
Personal use of Blogs and Social Networking Sites (Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, etc.) is
expected to be on the employee's own time and is not to interfere with the employee’s job
responsibilities. For both business and personal use of these sites, guidelines that apply
include the following:

      Any messages that might act as the “voice” or position of the USOC are not authorized,
       unless pre-approved by the Chief Communications Officer.
      Do not disclose confidential information.
      Do not include defamatory or racially or sexually offensive material.
      Do not disparage the USOC, its sponsors, or its competitors.
      Do not use the company logo or intellectual property of the USOC without Sales and
       Marketing approval.
      Be truthful and respectful.




                                                                                             31
Personal Use of USOC Communication Devices and Assets
USOC communication devises and assets are intended primarily for business purposes. While
the USOC recognizes there are times personal use of cell phones, text messaging, IM, e-mail,
the internet, etc., will be necessary, the employee must not abuse this privilege. Excessive
personal use of USOC communication devices and assets may result in devices being taken
away from the employee, the employee being charged for personal usage, or employee
discipline, up to and including termination of employment.

Use of Communication Devices while Driving
Employees should not use any communication devices (handheld or hands-free) while driving
on USOC business, except to call 911 or to contact medical, fire, or police personnel about an
emergency. This is a safety hazard and is illegal in some states where the USOC operates.

Hardware
Various types of hardware, including desktop workstation, laptop computer, Smartphone, cell
phone, pager, or radio may be issued to an employee. The employee is responsible for each
piece of hardware. Maintenance and warranty service are not available on hardware if abuse
(beyond normal wear and tear) has occurred. In that case, the cost for repair is charged back to
the employee’s department and reported to his/her manager. In case of stolen/lost hardware,
the employee must report the theft to the IT Help Desk and Security Division as soon as
possible. Security will provide a follow-up report. The employee’s department will be charged
for the stolen/lost item.

Software
To prevent computer viruses from being introduced into the network, downloading files from the
Internet is strictly prohibited. When required for valid business purpose, the IT division will
download files from the Internet and check for viruses. Installing any personal software on
USOC computers is strictly prohibited without prior IT approval. Unlicensed software may not
be installed on any USOC computer. The USOC reserves the right to remove unauthorized
software or files at any time.

Employees with questions about this policy may contact the IT Help Desk.




                                                                                             32
                                Organizational Rules

                                Absenteeism and Tardiness

Unexcused absences and tardiness impact the USOC’s ability to deliver services, both internally
and externally, and except as set forth below are unacceptable. Employees absent from work
for any portion of the scheduled work day or shift are required to notify their manager within 30
minutes of the scheduled start or absence, using the department’s protocol for notifications.

Additionally, employees are expected to notify their manager on a timely basis of any event that
may cause them to be tardy/late for their scheduled work shift or work event.

Any unreported absence of three consecutive scheduled workdays will be considered job
abandonment and will result in termination.

                       Alcohol, Drugs or Other Illegal Substances

It is the goal of the USOC to foster a work environment free from the behavior altering effects of
drugs and alcohol. Use of alcohol and drugs alters employees’ judgment resulting in increased
safety risks, workplace injuries and faulty decision-making. Therefore, working after the use of
alcohol, a controlled or illegal substance, or any other substance that affects an employee’s
performance in the workplace is prohibited. Furthermore, the possession, purchase,
consumption (use) or sale of a controlled or illegal substance or alcohol on USOC premises or
while conducting USOC business is prohibited. Alcoholic beverages served in conjunction with
an authorized USOC event are an exception to this prohibition.

To comply with Federal Department of Transportation regulations, individuals employed as
drivers, including employee drivers, contract drivers, and applicants for positions as drivers, are
subject to drug screening under the USOC’s Driver Drug Testing Program. For information
about the Driver Drug Testing Program, employees should contact Human Resources.

Effective January 1, 2010, new employees, including regular, temporary and interns, will be
required to submit to a drug substance test as a condition of employment and pass the test as
free of illegal or banned substances or drugs before beginning work. Former employees who
rejoin the USOC after January 1, 2010, will also be required to submit and pass a drug free test.

The USOC is proud of its role as a leader in the fight against doping in sport. USOC employees
are prohibited from providing substances or methods prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Code
to athletes, coaches, or any other individual for the purpose of enhancing athletic performance.


                        Confidentiality and Privileged Information

The USOC treats the protection of its confidential information as an important component of
stewardship and leadership of the U.S. Olympic movement. The confidential information of the
USOC belongs to the USOC and not to any individual employee. USOC employees may have
access to privileged or confidential information and are prohibited from disclosing this



                                                                                                33
confidential information to anyone internally or externally without proper authority. Agreement to
the USOC’s expectations regarding confidentiality is a condition of employment.

If an employee has a question of whether certain information is considered confidential, the
employee should check with the legal department.

Confidential information may include, but is not limited to information concerning human
resources and personnel, legal actions, opinions, documents, internal communications, court
proceedings, controversial issues, communications with the USOC’s legal counsel, documents
containing confidential or proprietary information (including, but not limited to sponsor
agreements and other contractual terms), or other sensitive matters about which employees
generally do not have a need to know.

Every employee is required to safeguard confidential information and should take the following
precautions:

      Ensure the safe securing of USOC confidential information (i.e., payroll, credit card
       numbers, addresses, Social Security numbers, etc.) including locking the data or
       information in a secure environment, password protecting, or encrypting confidential
       information.
      Prevent the release or avoid discussion of confidential information in the presence of
       others without a need to know and avoid discussing confidential information in public
       areas.
      Limit the reproduction and distribution of confidential information to what is absolutely
       necessary. Destroy any excess copies using a shredder or appropriate technology.
       Documents of a confidential or sensitive nature may not be placed in any trash
       receptacle unless shredded.

Furthermore, certain employees have a duty to comply with certain federal, state and local laws
that protect the privacy of individuals’ information and data such as HIPAA. Employees in the
areas of Human Resources, Payroll, Finance, and Medical Clinics and other employees who
have access to health and insurance information are required to comply as dictated by these
laws.

Employees are required to sign a confidentiality and non-disclosure agreement as a condition of
employment, the non-signing or breach of which may provide a basis for termination or
rescission of a job offer.


                                      Conflict of Interest

A conflict of interest may occur when outside activities or personal interests interfere with or
influence, or appear to interfere with or influence, an employee’s ability objectively to perform
his/her job or to act or be perceived as having acted in the best interests of the USOC. A conflict
of interest may also exist if the demands of any outside activities hinder or distract an employee
from job performance or if an employee uses USOC resources for non-USOC purposes. All
financial, business, and other activities both inside and outside the job must be lawful and free
of conflicts or free of even the suggestion of a conflict with the responsibilities as a USOC
employee.




                                                                                                34
Examples of potential conflicts of interest include:

      Having a financial interest in a customer’s private company or business;
      Serving as a board member of any organizations with ideals that conflict with the
       USOC’s ideals or mission, or serving in a role that decides whether or how another
       organization does business with the USOC;
      Hiring or supervising a relative or cohabitant or determining or influencing their
       promotions or pay raises;
      Hiring a vendor or supplier managed by a family member, relative or close friend; and
      Receiving discounts or personal gifts from actual or potential suppliers or customers with
       a value in excess of $100.00.

Holding a second paying position of employment, even self-employment, may represent a
conflict of interest, especially for employees who hold full-time positions with the USOC.
Employees who are considering establishing or have established his/her own company or sole
proprietorship, and/or are considering a second paying position should disclose to and discuss
with his/her manager before accepting an offer of second employment to ensure no conflict of
interest.

USOC employees are encouraged to participate in professional organizations and community
activities, and are expected to uphold the USOC’s reputation via appropriate participation.

Questions regarding real or potential conflicts of interest should be directed to Human
Resources or Legal.


                                     Grooming and Dress

The USOC requires employees to dress in clothing appropriate for their job responsibilities and
a professional work environment. Dress should always incorporate good hygiene and any
requirements established by the department for safety reasons, and dress standards may vary
department by department, including the requirement of uniforms for some departments.

Managers are responsible for setting, interpreting and enforcing dress and grooming standards
in their departments, including counseling employees whose appearance is inappropriate or
whose attire that does not meet safety or hygiene requirements.

Contact Human Resources for questions about appropriate dress that cannot be addressed by
managers.


                               Equal Employment Opportunity

The United States Olympic Committee is dedicated to the principles of equal employment
opportunity in any and all terms, conditions or privileges of employment including hiring,
promotions, termination, training and compensation. The USOC does not discriminate against
applicants or employees on the basis of age, race, sex, color, religion, national origin, disability,
veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, genetic condition or any other
status protected by federal, state or local law, where applicable.



                                                                                                  35
Furthermore, the USOC is committed to a work environment free of discrimination and
harassment through respecting and valuing the diversity among employees and all those with
whom the USOC does business.

Employees are expected to report any occurrence of discrimination or harassment to Human
Resources by email, telephone, or in person. If an employee is uncomfortable bringing the
matter to Human Resources for any reason, employees may contact the Chief Legal
Officer/General Counsel. Charges of discrimination will be promptly, discreetly and thoroughly
investigated.

If the USOC determines that discrimination or harassment has occurred, appropriate disciplinary
action will be taken. A nonemployee, such as a visitor, contractor or customer, who subjects an
employee to discrimination in the workplace, will be informed of the USOC's policy, and
appropriate action will be taken.

An employee, who remains unsatisfied after investigation by Human Resources or the Chief
Legal Officer/General Counsel, may seek review from the CEO. The CEO may direct or conduct
an independent investigation, including witness interviews and statements concerning the
complaint.

The USOC understands that these matters can be extremely sensitive and so far as is
practicable, will keep employee complaints and communications, such as interviews and
witness statements, in strict confidence. Absolute confidentiality, however, cannot be
guaranteed.

The USOC will not tolerate retaliation against any employee who complains of discrimination or
harassment, who assists in an investigation of a complaint of discrimination, or who provides
information in connection with any such complaint. Retaliatory action or behaviors may also
subject the offending employee to disciplinary actions, up to and including termination of
employment. Any allegations of retaliation should be reported using the same process as for
reporting the discrimination or harassment set forth above.


                           Employment of Relatives (Nepotism)

The USOC may employ a relative, spouse, or domestic partner of an employee, except in the
following circumstances:

      If either would be in a position to supervise the other or to exercise direct or indirect
       authority to appoint, dismiss, discipline, or influence employment-related decisions for
       the other.
      If either would be in a position to audit, verify, receive, or be entrusted with money
       handled by the other.

Should two employees who are in one of the above situations or another conflict of interest
situation begin a personal or intimate relationship that progresses beyond professional, the
employees are required to disclose to and discuss with their manager(s) the relationship.

If after the disclosure, the employees involved in the conflict cannot resolve or devise a solution,
the USOC will endeavor to provide solutions to alleviate the potential or real conflict of interest



                                                                                                 36
that the relationship creates which may or may not include the transfer of one employee to
another USOC department or a change in either or both employee’s reporting structure. If no
options are available, the USOC reserves the right to require one employee to resign his or her
position to relieve the potential or real conflict of interest.

Non-disclosure of a relationship between two employees that results in a conflict of interest may
result in a disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.

As with other conflicts of interest, questions regarding real or potential conflicts of interest
should be directed to Human Resources or Legal.


                                  Entering Into Contracts

The USOC approaches its relationships with vendors, independent contractors and sponsors
with professionalism, and with business and legal integrity.

Only certain employees are authorized to sign or otherwise agree to services provided by third
parties, as more fully detailed in the Contract Policy on The Torch/Legal & Government Affairs.

Employees entering the USOC into a formal contract with a vendor or a third party must consult
with Legal and follow the federal, state and local laws regarding the rules for entering and
authorizing a legal contract for work or services. Contracts should be generated before the
vendor or third party begins work.

Independent contractors hired by the USOC are subject to review by Human Resources and
Legal to ensure compliance with the Internal Revenue Service’s rules on independent
contractors, and employees responsible for engaging independent contractors are responsible
for ensuring that they understand the criteria and guidelines for independent contractors before
entering into an agreement with the contractor.

It is the policy of USOC Finance to pay third parties, vendors or contractors only after a legal
contract has been approved as more fully detailed in the Contract Policy and signed by
authorized signatory. Payment for services or work may be withheld by USOC Finance if an
employee fails to establish a legal contract appropriately.

Questions regarding contracts may be directed to the Legal Division.


                                     Employee Conduct

The USOC requires employees to follow generally accepted rules of conduct in the workplace
which includes acting with integrity and representing the core values and ethics of the USOC
consistently. Any conduct by an employee that is illegal, dangerous and/or adverse to the
general well being of the organization or other employees will not be tolerated.

Annually, the USOC will distribute the Code of Conduct to employees with the expectation that
employees review and understand behaviors set forth in that document and conduct themselves
accordingly.




                                                                                              37
Additionally, employees are encouraged to read the following list of actions and to understand it
fully. The list is not intended to be exhaustive. If any one of these actions, or any action in
violation of the policies in this Handbook, is taken, the action may result in disciplinary action, up
to and including termination:

      Improper treatment of a fellow employee, customer, or any other non-employee
      Insubordination or lack of cooperation
      Failure to follow instruction, or perform work requested by a supervisor or manager
      Misuse of the USOC provided technology or other job related tools
      Unauthorized or excessive absences including late arrival and early departure from work
      Sleeping while scheduled to be working
      Abuse, waste, or theft of USOC property or the property of any USOC employee or non-
       employee
      Removal of USOC property or records without written authorization
      Falsification of an employee’s employment application, resume, or other personnel
       records
      Falsification of USOC reports or records (including time reporting)
      Violation of federal, state or local law on USOC premises, including gambling
      Unauthorized possession of firearms, weapons, or dangerous substances while
       performing job duties or on USOC premises
      Reporting to work in a condition unfit to perform duties, including reporting to work with
       illegal drugs or controlled substances in the employee’s system or being under the
       influence of alcohol or drugs or controlled substances
      Consumption or sale of alcohol, illegal drugs, or controlled substances on USOC
       premises or while performing job duties
      Smoking in prohibited areas
      Violation of USOC safety rules/practices or creating or contributing to unhealthful or
       unsanitary conditions
      Acting in conflict with the interests of the USOC
      Disclosure of confidential USOC information without authorization
      Failure to fully and truthfully cooperate in any USOC investigation.

Managers have the responsibility to provide feedback to employees regarding their conduct and
behaviors in general, and to counsel employees on inappropriate conduct or behaviors utilizing
the progressive discipline process, up to and including the termination of employment

Questions regarding acceptable conduct in the workplace may be directed to an employee’s
immediate manager, Human Resources or the Legal Division.


                                           Harassment

The USOC values a work environment free of discrimination and harassment through
respecting and valuing the diversity among employees and those with whom the USOC does
business.

Each USOC employee has the right to work in an environment free of illegal harassment or
discrimination. The USOC prohibits illegal harassment against employees on the basis of age,
race, sex, color, religion, national origin, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender



                                                                                                   38
identity or expression, genetic condition or any other status protected by federal, state or local
law, where applicable.

The USOC strongly opposes harassment in the workplace, whether sexual or otherwise, and
the USOC expects all employees to conduct their work in a professional and business-like
manner at all times. Harassment of employees, applicants, or third parties by other employees
or third parties is prohibited. Additionally, employees are strictly prohibited from harassing
athletes residing or training at the USOC provided or sponsored premises.

Sexual harassment is a violation of state and federal law. It includes unwelcome sexual
advances, requests for sexual favors, sexually motivated physical contact and other verbal or
physical conduct, or visual forms of harassment of a sexual nature when submission to such
conduct is either explicitly or implicitly made a term or condition of employment or is used as the
basis for employment decisions or when such conduct has the purpose or effect of
unreasonably interfering with an individual's work performance or creating an intimidating,
hostile, or offensive work environment.

In the event that any ethnic, racial, religious, or sexual harassment, or similarly abusive verbal
or physical conduct interferes with any individual's work performance or creates an intimidating,
hostile, or offensive work environment, employees should report the harassment or
discrimination by email, telephone, or in person immediately. USOC managers are required to
report any rumored or actual incidences of harassment or discrimination to either Human
Resources or Legal immediately.

To report any occurrence of harassment or discrimination, employees may avail themselves of
the following methods for reporting:

      Immediate manager or departmental leader
      Human Resources leader
      General Counsel
      Ethics Hotline: 1.877.404.9935, which allows for anonymous reporting

Allegations of harassment and discrimination are taken seriously, and charges of harassment
will be promptly and thoroughly investigated. The USOC understands that these matters can be
extremely sensitive, and so far as possible, will keep all employee complaints and all
communications, such as interviews, witness statements and results, in strict confidence.

If the USOC determines that harassment has occurred, appropriate relief for the employee
bringing the complaint and appropriate disciplinary action against the harasser will follow. A third
party or non-employee who subjects an employee to harassment in the workplace will be
informed of the USOC's policy and appropriate action will be taken.

An employee, who remains unsatisfied after investigation by a Human Resources leader or the
General Counsel, as appropriate, may seek review from the CEO. The CEO may direct or
conduct an independent investigation, including witness interviews and statements concerning
the complaint.

The USOC will not tolerate retaliation against any employee who complains of sexual or other
harassment or discrimination, assists in an investigation of a complaint of harassment, or
provides information in connection with any such complaint. Retaliation in and of itself may



                                                                                                 39
subject the offender to disciplinary action, up to and including termination. Any allegations of
retaliation should be reported using the same process as for reporting the harassment set forth
above. This policy applies even if an allegation was made in good faith but appears ultimately
to be groundless.


                                         Media Inquiries

The USOC CEO is the official staff spokesperson for the USOC, and the Chief Communications
Officer is the media spokesperson. All queries, verbal and written, from the media or other
external sources should be referred to the Media and Public Relations Division for response. No
USOC employee is authorized to speak to the media about any matter related to the USOC
unless specifically authorized by the CEO or the Media and Public Relations Division.

Failure to follow this policy may result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination.


                                No Solicitation or Distribution

No solicitation of any kind by employees, including but not limited to, verbal or written
solicitations for memberships, subscriptions, raffles, or collections, will be permitted during work
time without the consent of the Chief Human Resources Officer.

No distribution of any kind by employees of non-work-related materials, including brochures,
pamphlets, circulars or other printed or electronic materials will be permitted during work time or
at any time in work areas or on the USOC’s technology, computer and telephone systems,
without the consent of the Chief Human Resources Officer. Any solicitation or distribution
interfering with other employees’ work is strictly prohibited.

The sole exceptions to this policy are charitable and community activities supported by the
USOC management and USOC-sponsored programs related to Olympic or Paralympic products
and services, and after approval by the Chief Human Resources Officer.


                                      Open Door Process

The USOC is committed to providing exceptional working conditions for its employees. Part of
this commitment is encouraging an open and frank atmosphere in which any problem,
complaint, suggestion or question receives a timely response.

The USOC strives to ensure fair and honest treatment of all employees. Supervisors, managers
and employees are expected to treat each other with mutual respect. Employees are
encouraged to offer positive and constructive criticism.

If an employee disagrees with established rules of conduct, policies or practices or a decision
that impacts the working environment in which the employee works, he/she can express
concern through the Open Door procedure set forth below. No employee will be penalized,
formally or informally, for voicing a complaint with the USOC in a reasonable, professional
manner or for using the Open Door procedure.



                                                                                                    40
If a situation occurs when an employee believes that a condition of employment or a decision
affecting him/her is unjust or inequitable, the employee is encouraged to make use of the
following steps.

An employee may discontinue the procedure at any step.

   1. The employee presents the problem to his or her immediate manager within a
      reasonable time frame and preferably less than 30 days after a problem has arisen. If
      the manager is unavailable to address the problem or if the employee believes it would
      be unreasonable to contact the immediate manager, the employee may present the
      problem to the departmental leader.
   2. The manager responds to the problem during the discussion or within 14 calendar days.
      Consulting with appropriate management may be necessary.
   3. If the employee is dissatisfied with the response or solution presented by the immediate
      manager, the employee may then raise the problem to the departmental leader.
   4. If the problem is unresolved following discussions with the immediate manager and the
      departmental leader, the employee may present the problem to Human Resources.
   5. Human Resources will take an appropriate action to the problem presented by the
      employee, including but not limited to coaching, interviews or investigations.

If at any time, the employee believes that the immediate manager, departmental leader, and
Human Resources are part of the problem, the employee may elect to go directly to the General
Counsel or the CEO for presentation and resolution of the problem. Additionally, if the
employee believes that the problem is an ethical one, the employee may use the USOC Ethics
Hotline, 1.877.404.9935, to report the problem in a confidential manner.


                               Ownership of Work Product

During their course of their employment with the USOC, employees may produce or develop
work product such as inventions, works of authorship, improvements, designs, developments, or
discoveries relative to their work for the USOC, or may generate present or prospective
business or research for the USOC. The USOC encourages this pursuit of excellence and
innovation.

As such, employees are required to promptly disclose and assign such works to the USOC via
disclosure and discussion with their managers. Additionally, in certain cases, assignments of
work may take a formal path such as recognition of a trademark, patent or copyright and
employees are required to work with the Legal Division as appropriate for this recognition.

Because employees are paid by the USOC, use USOC materials, equipment, services, and/or
resources, and work on USOC time, any new work product, whether registrable as a patent,
trademark, copyright, or otherwise, constituting a trade secret or not, is the property of the
USOC. At the sole discretion of management, the USOC may authorize special compensation
for employees who make contributions in this area.




                                                                                           41
                                     Personnel Records

The USOC Human Resources Department Employee maintains personnel records for each
active employee in Colorado Springs.

Access
Current employees may request access to their own personnel records by submitting a written
request to the Human Resources Director. Upon receipt of a written request, Human
Resources will schedule an appointment at a mutually convenient time to view the records, in
the presence of a Human Resources staff member, during normal office hours.

Employees may not review documents that would violate the confidentiality of another
employee. Employees are not permitted to alter or remove any documents from their personnel
records, but may provide written responses to any document in the record; written responses
will be attached to the original documents in the personnel record.

Employment Verification
Due to varying state regulations regarding providing employment information, only USOC
Human Resources is authorized to provide employment verifications or references. The USOC
reserves the right to verify to outside sources basic information such as employment status,
dates of employment, and job title, without notification to the employee. The USOC also
reserves the right to cooperate with law enforcement, public safety, or medical officials who
have a valid need for limited, specific information about an employee, without notification to the
employee involved.

In the event an employee would like to authorize a third party to verify his/her employment
status at the USOC, such employee must authorize this release of information by Human
Resources in writing. Written authorization is needed for the USOC to provide salary
information or data other than employment status, dates of employment and job title, for
example, for confirmation of employment for mortgage or other loans, government security
clearance, or future employment.

Changes in Personal Information
Employees are requested to notify Human Resources in writing within 30 days of changes in
personal information. All forms to report personal information changes are available from
Human Resources or at The Torch:

      Benefits Change Form at The Torch/Human Resources/Benefits and Medical

      Employee Address and Emergency Contact Change Forms at The Torch/Human
       Resources/Forms


                                       Political Asylum

No USOC employee shall assist, participate in any way, or take action that could be construed
as requests for political asylum in the United States by foreign officials or athletes with whom
the USOC employee has contact or a relationship.




                                                                                               42
Any employee approached by a foreign national should state that he/she cannot be involved
and that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (800.375.5283) handles these matters or
that the foreign national should contact the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate if in a country other
than the United States.

Employees also should report the request to the Chief Security Officer or his or her designee
immediately or within twenty four hours of receiving the request.


                       Respect for Intellectual Property of Others

It is the policy of the USOC to recognize and respect the intellectual property rights of others.
This includes respect for copyrights, trademark rights, patent rights and trade secrets. USOC
employees must refrain from any activity that infringes upon the intellectual property rights of
others. If an employee has any question about whether a particular activity may infringe upon
the intellectual property rights of any third party, he or she should contact the Legal Division or
refer to the Code of Conduct.


                                     Safety and Security

The USOC is dedicated to providing a safe and secure working environment for employees,
volunteers, guests and athletes. The USOC requires employees to be active participants in
ensuring that the working environment, whether at a regular site such as an Olympic Training
Center or an event site sponsored by the USOC, is safe and secure through the reporting of
concerns or observations of potential or real safety or security breaches to the Chief Security
Officer or a security designee.

Certain situations might require a more immediate action, and all employees are encouraged to
use their best judgment in contacting 911 if a work situation warrants it.

USOC Security has detailed information on security procedures on The Torch/Security:
Employees are encouraged to visit this site to familiarize themselves with security procedures,
and to contact Risk Management with safety questions and concerns.

While the below does not represent all potential safety or security situations or issues, it
represents some of the high priorities or more common occurrences of safety and security
issues that employees should be aware of and understand how to respond to, report or handle.

Bicycle, Skates and Skateboard Policy
In an effort to keep athletes, employees and visitors out of harms way, the use of bicycles, in-
line skates, roller skates or similar wheeled devices and scooters is limited to certain locations
on USOC properties. Skateboards are prohibited on USOC properties.

Bomb Threats
In the event that a USOC employee receives a bomb threat (either call-in or written) pertaining
to a USOC property or sponsored event, the employee should contact the Chief Security Officer
immediately or contact 911. For detailed procedures, employees should refer to The
Torch/Security.




                                                                                                43
Cameras
The USOC reserves the right to install and monitor security cameras in work areas for specific
business reasons, such as security, theft protection, protection of proprietary information, and
safety. All camera usage will be in compliance with federal, state and local laws regarding
privacy

Driving, Parking, and Use of Vehicles on USOC Business
Parking at a USOC work location or sponsored site is considered a privilege of working for the
USOC. All employees, guests and athletes are expected to use caution while driving and
parking on USOC properties and to recognize that employees, guests and athletes may be
using the roads and open spaces for walking, traversing and exercising in addition to the
intended use of driving vehicles. All employees are required to follow the safety signs and
instructions posted around the property.

Additionally, personal vehicles used by employees to enter a USOC property must have
appropriate decals or identification issued by USOC security, and the drivers must have proper
insurance, driver’s license and registration. USOC Security reserves the right to issue driving
and parking citations for violations and to revoke any driving and parking privileges granted to
employees.

Employees who are authorized to drive USOC provided vehicles, including rental vehicles, have
the obligation to comply with federal, state and local laws including proper licensure.

For specific requirements for driving and parking on USOC property and for driving any vehicle
on USOC Business, employees should visit The Torch/Security.

Evacuation
A full or partial evacuation might be required in the situations of fire, water or gas leak or
explosion or bomb threat or after receipt of suspicious packages. In the event that an
evacuation is necessary from a USOC property or sponsored site, employees are required to
follow the instructions of the local authorities assisting in the evacuation, USOC Security or the
most senior USOC person present, including re-entry instructions.

Fire Drills
The USOC follows federal, state and local requirements for fire drills, and the responsibility for
fire drills at a USOC property or site belongs to Security, Risk Management and Facilities. All
employees are required to participate in fire drills and to follow the instructions of the local
authorities assisting in the fire drill, USOC Security and /or Facilities personnel.

Identification Badges
All USOC employees are required to obtain from Security and wear USOC photo identification
while on USOC premises, and the ID badge must be visible. In some situations, such as the
USOC sponsored events and the Games, employees may also be required to present and/or
wear additional identification and credentials. Loss of identification badges or access cards
should be reported immediately to Security.

Incident Reporting
An incident is any occurrence at a U.S. Olympic Committee location that involves personnel,
property, or buildings that could result in an injury, loss of life or property, cause loss of prestige,
or create unfavorable publicity to the U.S. Olympic Committee or a National Governing Body.



                                                                                                     44
Incidents occurring off the Olympic Committee location involving USOC or NGB personnel
should also reported to USOC Security when known.

Employees involved in any personal injury accident while at work must report the injury to
USOC Security as soon as possible. A Security Officer will interview the employee(s), complete
an official report and provide to Human Resources for consideration of Workers’ Compensation.

Additionally, if an employee suspects or believes a theft of either USOC or personal property
while on USOC property has occurred, the employee should contact USOC Security
immediately. USOC Security will coordinate appropriately with local authorities to respond and
investigate.

The USOC also encourages employees to report any concerns of safety to USOC Security such
as faulty lighting in buildings or unsafe stairs or walkways especially during icy/snowy
conditions. USOC Security will be responsible for directing the concerns to the proper USOC
department for review and/or remedy.

Severe Weather Impacting USOC Locations
All USOC locations will encounter severe weather situations occasionally, such as tornados,
snow, high winds, or wildfires, which might impact safety of employees. Employees are
encouraged to listen to local authorities and meteorologists to understand the impact the severe
weather might have on their ability to commute to or from the workplace, and to discuss severe
weather concerns with their direct manager. More information about inclement weather can be
found in the Severe Weather Impacting USOC Locations policy.

Suspicious Package or Object
If a suspicious looking object is found, DO NOT open or move the article. Move a safe distance
away from the object and notify the most senior USOC person present and USOC Security or
the appropriate authorities immediately.

The senior person present at the site will evaluate the threat and make the decision to evacuate
or not to evacuate, and will provide instructions for a quick and safe evacuation using the
appropriate methods available for the location. The senior person will also be responsible for
authorizing re-entry after consultation with Security and/or the appropriate authorities.

Visitors and Guests
The USOC welcomes visitors and guests at the Olympic Training Centers and its offices, and
has public tours available to guests and visitors at some sites. Employees are expected to
escort personal visitors and guests through USOC buildings and locations that are not part of
the tours, and are required to honor the posted rules that limit access to some facilities that are
athlete or authorized personnel access only.


                       Severe Weather Impacting USOC Locations

All USOC locations may encounter severe weather situations occasionally, such as tornados,
snow, high winds, or wildfires, which might impact the safety of employees; however, the USOC
will make every effort to maintain normal work hours even during inclement weather or other
natural events to service (1) athletes who reside at the Olympic Training Center and (2) other



                                                                                                45
customers. Employees are encouraged to listen to local authorities and meteorologists to
understand the impact the severe weather might have on their ability to commute to or from the
workplace, and to discuss severe weather concerns and plans with their direct manager in
advance if possible.

During extremely severe weather conditions, including winter weather, the USOC may delay
opening facilities, close early or close for short periods depending on weather conditions and
the ability to clear the premises of snow/ice for safety reasons.

Notification of Delayed Opening or Closure
In the rare event that the USOC decides to delay opening or to close facilities early, the
following steps will be taken to notify all personnel:

Information on Closure or Delay at Colorado Springs OTC:
Weather Line: 719.866.4766 (by 6:00 a.m.)
Radio: CS102 (KKCS 101.9 FM), (KKCS 1460 AM), PEAK 95.1 (KRDO FM)
TV: KRDO – ABC Channel 13, KOAA – NBC Channel 5, KKTV – CBS Channel 11

Information on Closure or Delay at the Lake Placid OTC:
Radio: WLPW 105.5 FM (Lake Placid) and WYZY 106.3 FM (Saranac Lake)
TV: WPTZ – Channel 5 (Plattsburgh)

Information on Closure or Delay at the Chula Vista OTC:
Security – OTC Main Gate – 619 482 6114
Radio – KPBS 89.5 San Diego
TV: KNSD NBC 7/39 & KUSI – Channel 9

Closures or Delays at other USOC Locations:
The senior leader in locations other than the three noted above may make the call to close early
or delay opening, and will establish appropriate communication methods for the teams in those
locations. The leader must also alert Payroll of the decisions made.

Notification to Reopen a USOC Site after a Winter Closure or Delayed Opening
If weather conditions improve and snow and ice can be cleared in a timely manner after a
delayed opening or closure, Facilities Management will reopen the USOC site for full business.
Employees will be expected to report to work as usual, if they can safely travel. For Colorado
Springs specifically, the Weather Line will be updated announcing the reopening of the complex.

There may be times when people live in certain areas where weather conditions are worse, and
safe travel may not be possible, or the employee must make arrangements for the care of family
member(s). If the USOC site is open for business, the employee must decide whether or not he/
she can safely report to work and discuss with his/her manager directly. If the employee feels
he/she cannot safely report to work, the employee must notify his/her manager as soon as
possible, within 30 minutes of the scheduled start time, to explain the circumstances. An
employee and manager may also discuss and decide, in advance, if telecommuting is an option
for these circumstances.

If the USOC site reopens and an employee is unable to return to work, he or she must use
vacation or personal days for paid time off due to severe winter weather, or if non-exempt
without available vacation or personal days, take the time off as unpaid.



                                                                                             46
Should the USOC close early or delay opening, Payroll will advise employees on the proper
coding of the time in The Time Recording System.

Questions regarding the options of available to employees during severe weather should be
directed to the employee’s direct manager, and then to Human Resources.


                                 Smoking and Tobacco Use

It is the goal of the USOC to foster a work environment that is healthy for all employees, guests,
athletes and volunteers.

As such, smoking or use of tobacco products (including, but not limited to, cigarettes, pipes,
cigars, snuff, or chewing tobacco) is prohibited in all USOC buildings, facilities, and vehicles by
employees except in designated areas.

The USOC offers a smoking cessation program via the Employee Assistance Program (EAP),
and all employees may avail themselves of this smoking cessation program confidentially by
contacting the EAP directly (see the EAP policy in this Handbook).


                                     Workplace Violence

The U.S. Olympic Committee is committed to preventing workplace violence and to maintaining
a safe work environment.       The USOC has adopted the following guidelines to deal with
intimidation, harassment, or other threats of (or actual) violence that may occur during business
hours or on its premises.

All employees should treat each other, guests and athletes with courtesy and respect at all
times. Employees are expected to refrain from fighting or other physical conduct that may be
dangerous to others.

Firearms, weapons, and other dangerous or hazardous devices or substances are prohibited
from the premises of the USOC without proper authorization from the Chief Security Officer.

Except as set forth in this paragraph, no firearms or weapons are allowed on USOC premises,
unless authorized in writing by the Chief Security Officer. Certain athletes need firearms for
preparation for their athletic competitions (e.g., shooting, biathlon), and in such cases the
firearms are allowed in designated areas only.

Conduct that threatens, intimidates, or coerces another employee, customer, athlete or a
member of the public will not be tolerated. This prohibition includes all acts of harassment,
including harassment that is based on an individual's age, race, sex, color, religion, national
origin, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, genetic
condition or any other status protected by federal, state or local law, where applicable. Further
details on this subject are provided in the USOC Harassment Policy.

All threats of (or actual) violence, both direct and indirect, should be reported as soon as
possible to an employee’s immediate manager and to the Chief Security Officer. This includes
threats by employees, as well as threats by customers, vendors, solicitors, or other members of


                                                                                                47
the public. When reporting a threat of violence, the employee should be as specific and detailed
as possible.

All suspicious individuals or activities should also be reported as soon as possible to a manager
or the Chief Security Officer.

The USOC will promptly and thoroughly investigate all reports of threats of (or actual) violence
and of suspicious individuals or activities. The identity of the USOC employee making a report
will be protected as much as is practical. In order to maintain workplace safety and the integrity
of its investigation, the USOC may suspend employees, either with or without pay, pending
investigation.

Anyone determined to be responsible for threats of (or actual) violence or other conduct that is
in violation of this policy will be subject to prompt disciplinary action, up to and including
termination of employment.

The USOC encourages employees to bring their disputes or differences with other employees to
the attention of their managers or Human Resources before the situation escalates into potential
violence.




                                                                                               48
                                  Time Off Policies

                                  Time Off Introduction

While work makes up a large portion of an employee's life, the USOC believes that a balance
between work and play is essential in maintaining quality performance and the fun atmosphere
in which we work. The USOC provides vacation, personal days, and other time off options to
eligible employees, so that employees can pursue personal endeavors, such as family time,
sports, or other personal passions. The USOC also provides time off through its Leave of
Absence policies and compliance with the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) to allow for
adequate recovery time from illness or injury.

Time off and leave regulations and laws vary by geographical location, and the USOC will
comply with the appropriate federal, state and local regulations. In particular, California,
Colorado, and New York employees should check with HR if they have a time off or leave
request that is addressed by state or local law and not explicitly covered by a USOC policy.


                                       Bereavement

The USOC provides up to four days of paid bereavement to benefits eligible employees in the
event of the death of an immediate family member or other close relative, defined as:

      Spouse, common law spouse, or same sex partner
      Parent, stepparent, or parent-in-law
      Grandmother
      Grandfather
      Sister or stepsister
      Brother or stepbrother
      Child or stepchild
      Grandchild

Bereavement of up to two days is provided to employees in the event of the death of a relative
not listed above.

Employees are required to inform their manager when bereavement becomes necessary, and
managers have the ability to approve up to four days of time off for bereavement.

In the event the employee feels additional time off is necessary or desired, the employee may
request time off without pay or request available vacation or personal days. Days of
bereavement are to be taken consecutively, within a reasonable time, to travel and attend the
funeral.

Eligible employees are paid at their regular rate of pay during the approved bereavement. The
absence is not counted as time worked for purposes of overtime pay. Holidays that occur
during approved bereavement should be recorded as holidays and are paid accordingly. Upon
returning to work, the employee must record his/her absence as bereavement on his/her
attendance record in the Time Recording System.



                                                                                           49
                                           Jury Duty

The USOC provides paid time off to employees who are summoned for jury duty. A copy of the
jury duty notification must be submitted to the employee’s manager and then forwarded to
Human Resources. If the employee is released from jury service during normal working hours,
the employee is required to return to work and complete the workday. The employee must
obtain a signed Certificate of Jury Service from the court verifying actual dates and time of
service.

Employees who serve jury duty will receive their normal base rate of pay while serving jury duty,
up to a maximum of ten working days in a calendar year. In the event jury duty lasts longer than
ten working days, the employee should contact Human Resources for guidance. Employees
may keep any monies earned for serving on jury duty.

If the jury duty falls at a time when the employee cannot be away from work (during Games, for
example), the USOC will support an employee’s request to the court to allow the employee to
choose a more convenient time to serve if he/she makes a request in accordance with the
court's procedures.


                                      Leave of Absence

Maternity, Paternity, Adoption, and Foster Care Leave
Maternity, paternity, adoption, or foster care leave is paid leave associated with the birth of an
employee’s own child or the placement of a child with the employee in connection with adoption
or foster care. Only benefits eligible employees are eligible for maternity, paternity, adoption,
and foster care leave. Employees must also additionally meet the following criteria:

      The employee must have been employed by the USOC at least 12 months; and
      The employee must have worked for the USOC at least 1,250 hours during the 12-
       month period immediately preceding the commencement of the leave.

The USOC requires that paid leaves for maternity, paternity, adoption, or foster care run
concurrent to Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) time off requests. Maternity, paternity,
adoption, and foster care leave are paid at the employee’s regular rate of pay as of the start
date of the leave.

Definitions of Leave: Maternity leave is six weeks of paid time off starting with the date of the
birth of the child(ren) and is intended for the purposes of the employee’s medical recovery
following birth and for the care of the newly born child(ren).

Paternity leave is one week of paid time off that may be taken as early as the date of the birth of
the child(ren) and up to three months following the birth of an employee’s child.

Adoption or foster care leave is six weeks of paid time off starting with the date that the
child(ren) is placed in the full-time and legal care of the employee. Adoption and foster care
leave are intended for employees who are adopting or fostering a child(ren) under the age of 18
years. If two employees are adopting or fostering a child together, one of the two employees


                                                                                                50
may take the full six weeks of paid time off, or the two employees may split the six weeks of
paid time off between them.

The USOC reserves the right to require documentation of the birth, adoption, or legal placement
of the child(ren) in addition to any required FMLA certifications.

Benefits Eligibility during Leave: Employees will remain eligible for benefits during maternity,
paternity, adoption, or foster care leave, if they were enrolled in benefits at the commencement
of the leave. In the situation where an employee is on leave during the open enrollment period
for benefits, the employee is responsible for re-enrolling in benefits.

Additionally, if an employee wishes to add a new dependent or child to his/her benefits, the
employee has 30 days from the effective date of the change (i.e., birth or legal adoption) to
enroll the new dependent. The employee should contact Human Resources regarding benefit
questions for new dependents.

Requests for Leave: The employee must provide 30 days notice (or as much notice as
practicable, if the leave is not foreseeable) to his/her manager for the request for leave. The
employee also must complete the necessary forms at Human Resources, including FMLA
Certifications.

Since the actual leave begins on the day of birth or the placement date for adoption or foster
care, Human Resources must be notified as soon as possible of the exact start date. Sick days
or short term disability will be used prior to the birth of a child, when medically necessary.

Maternity, paternity, adoption, or foster care leave is considered time used against the
maximum twelve weeks of FMLA and runs concurrently with FMLA or any other related leaves
for which the employee is eligible. FMLA allows employees up to a total of twelve weeks of
leave. Employees may use available paid leave or leave without pay for the remainder of their
FMLA, maternity, paternity, adoption, or foster care leave.

Employees not eligible for FMLA may refer to the Personal Leaves of Absence without Pay
policy after the paid maternity, paternity, adoption, or foster care leave is completed regarding
continuation of insurance coverage for employees on unpaid leaves of absence.

Temporary employees are not eligible for maternity, paternity, adoption, or foster care leave.
Temporary employees who may be eligible for leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act
are limited to 12 work weeks of leave and are ineligible for additional leave granted under this
policy.

Military Leave of Absence
All employees who are members of the U.S. Armed Forces Reserve or National Guard will be
granted an unpaid leave of absence if called for any service or training. This time is granted in
addition to earned vacation time. However, employees desiring to use vacation time for this
purpose may voluntarily do so if they make a written request to Human Resources. Upon return
to the USOC after separation from military service, employees may be re-employed in
accordance with federal, state and local laws.




                                                                                              51
Personal Leave of Absence – Unpaid
The USOC may grant unpaid leaves of absence to benefits eligible employees after one
continuous year of employment. Such leave may be approved for up to a maximum of three
months for reasons other than those covered under FMLA (i.e., for a personal sabbatical leave).
To request an unpaid leave of absence, the employee must submit a written request to his or
her manager. The request must state the reason and the desired beginning and ending dates
of the leave. If the personal leave of absence time off request is approved by the manager, the
employee must consult with Human Resources regarding the time off and its impact to benefits,
tenure, etc.

Upon return to work, the employee will normally return to the position held prior to the
commencement of the leave; however, the USOC cannot guarantee that an employment
opportunity will be available. If the employee fails to return to work on the first workday after the
end date of the approved leave time, the employee may be terminated.

Time during the leave period will count toward years of service. Coverage in benefit programs
will continue; however, the employee will be required to pay the USOC and the employee
portion of the benefit premiums on a monthly basis during the approved leave. Holidays will not
be paid to the employee during an unpaid leave of absence, and vacation leave will not accrue
during an unpaid leave of absence.

Short Term Disability
The short-term disability benefit provided by the United States Olympic Committee is a self-
funded plan for income replacement for benefits eligible employees unable to work due to
illness, complications of pregnancy, or injury.

Eligibility: A benefits eligible employee who meets the eligibility requirements and who is unable
to work due to illness, complications of pregnancy, or injury (other than a self-inflicted injury) is
eligible for short term disability. Benefits commence on the 30th day of total disability. An
employee receiving Workers’ Compensation or disability pay under any state or federal plan or
private insurance policy is ineligible for this benefit. To be eligible for continued disability
benefits, the employee must not engage in outside employment and is expected to avoid
activities that may delay recovery and a return to work. The maximum duration of benefits
payable is nine weeks from the beginning of short term disability.

Medical Certification: The employee must provide medical certification of the disability, including
the starting and expected ending date of the disability. This certification must be submitted to
Human Resources who will review the certification and make a determination on benefit
qualification.

Benefit Payment: The short-term disability benefit payment is 66-⅔ percent of the employee’s
base weekly wages or salary calculated on average earnings in the previous six months, to a
maximum of 66-⅔ percent of the employee’s base weekly wages at the beginning of short term
disability. Payments are made on regularly scheduled paydays. The benefit is taxable income.

Return to Work: The employee must return to work as soon as is permitted by his or her health
care provider. The employee must submit a fitness-to-return-to-duty clearance to Human
Resources. An employee whose absence has been designated as FMLA leave is eligible for
reinstatement, as provided by the FMLA.

Employees with questions regarding this policy should contact Human Resources.


                                                                                                  52
Long Term Disability
The long-term disability benefit provided by the USOC is a self-funded plan for income
replacement for benefits eligible employees who elect the benefit as a new hire or during open
enrollment and who are unable to work due to a long term illness, complications of pregnancy,
or injury.

Eligibility: A benefits eligible employee who is unable to work due to illness, complications from
pregnancy, or injury (other than a self-inflicted injury) is eligible for this benefit of long term
income replacement. Long term disability benefits commence on the 91st day from the start of
the disability. An employee receiving Workers’ Compensation or disability pay under any state
or federal plan or private insurance policy is ineligible for this benefit. To be eligible for
continued disability benefits, the employee must not engage in outside employment and is
expected to avoid activities that may delay recovery and a return to work. Long term disability
payments will end when the employee is no longer considered disabled or reaches normal
retirement age.

Medical Certification and Supporting Documentation: The employee must provide medical
certification of the disability and any other documentation requested by the long term disability
provider, including the starting and expected ending date of the disability to be considered for
long term disability benefits. The USOC has delegated the authority to the long term disability
provider to either approve or deny an employee’s request for long term disability.

Benefit Payment: The long term disability benefit payment is 60 percent of the employee’s base
monthly wages or salary calculated on average earnings in the previous twelve months, to a
maximum of $17,000 per month. Payments are made monthly and provided to the employee
directly by the long term disability provider. The benefit may be taxable income.

Termination of Employment with the USOC: When the employee moves from short term
disability to long term disability on the 91st day of disability, employment with the United States
Olympic Committee will terminate. The USOC will endeavor to place employees who return
from long term disability in a similar position, but does not guarantee a return to a position or
employment with the USOC.

Employees with questions regarding this policy should contact Human Resources.


                                        Personal Days

Benefits eligible employees are eligible for personal days to deal with any personal matters or to
attend activities for their school aged children. Requests for personal days must be approved in
advance by the manager.

Effective January 1, 2010, and as of January 1 of each subsequent new year, benefits eligible
employees receive personal days for use during that calendar year, as follows:

Benefits Eligible Employee Personal Days effective January 1, 2010
Regularly Scheduled Work Week Hours    Personal Days Accrual
40 hours per week                           24 hours personal days (3 days)
32-39 hours per week                        19 hours personal days
Less than 32 hours per week                 Not eligible for personal days



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Benefits eligible employees hired after January 1 are eligible for personal days on a prorated
basis for that year. At the end of the calendar year, unused personal days are forfeited.

Personal days are paid at the employee’s regular rate of pay, and absences due to personal
days are not counted as time worked for calculation of overtime pay. Unused personal days are
forfeited upon termination of employment.


                                         Public Holidays

Holidays currently observed by the United States Olympic Committee are usually announced in
the fourth quarter for the following year. Holidays observed may vary from year to year;
however, holidays typically observed include the following:

          New Year's Day
          Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
          Presidents’ Day
          Memorial Day
          Independence Day
          Labor Day
          Veterans Day
          Thanksgiving Day
          Day after Thanksgiving Day
          Christmas Eve
          Christmas Day
          New Year’s Eve

Through December 31, 2009, regular full-time employees are eligible to be paid for holiday
hours, and regular part-time employees are eligible to be paid for one-half of the holiday hours.

Effective January 1, 2010, benefits eligible employees are eligible to be paid for holiday hours,
as follows:

Benefits Eligible Employee Holiday Pay effective January 1, 2010
Regularly Scheduled Work Week Hours       Holiday Hours Paid for Each Holiday
40 hours per week                             8 hours holiday pay
32-39 hours per week                          6 hours holiday pay
Less than 32 hours per week                   Not eligible for holiday pay

Temporary without benefits employees are not eligible for holiday pay.

Holidays that occur during scheduled days off (i.e., vacation, bereavement, paid sick days, or
personal days) are paid as holidays.

Although most USOC offices are closed in observance of approved holidays, certain employees
may be required to work on holidays, based upon the operational requirements of the
organization. In such cases, non-exempt, benefits eligible employees are paid at their regular
hourly rate for the holiday, plus regular pay for the number of hours worked on the observed



                                                                                              54
holiday. The holiday hours do not count as time worked for overtime purposes; however, any
hours actually worked on the holiday will count toward overtime.

Employees who traditionally observe religious holidays not observed by the USOC may request
personal days, vacation, or time off without pay for observance of these holidays. Employees
wishing to take time off should make requests to their managers as far in advance as
practicable. Managers will attempt to accommodate these requests, as long as the employees’
absence is reasonable under the circumstances.

Employees are only eligible for holiday pay if they are employed by the USOC at the time of the
holiday.


                                             Sick Days

Sick days are designed to provide short term paid time off for employees who are absent due to
personal illness or injury, to attend a health care provider appointment, or to care for a sick family
member. Benefits eligible employees are eligible for sick days.

Effective January 1, 2010, and as of January 1 of each subsequent new year, benefits eligible
employees receive an annual sick days accrual, as follows:

Benefits Eligible Employee Sick Days effective January 1, 2010
Regularly Scheduled            Sick Days Accrual          Maximum Accrual Limit
Work Week Hours
40 hours per week                  56 hours (7 days)            520 hours
32-39 hours per week               45 hours
Less than 32 hours per week        Not eligible for sick days   NA

Benefits eligible employees hired after January 1 are eligible for sick days on a prorated basis for
that year. Any unused sick days balance at the end of the work day or shift on December 31 will
be carried forward to the new calendar year.

Sick time may be used in increments as short as a quarter hour and must be reported to the
manager no less than 30 minutes prior to the scheduled workday or shift.

Sick days pay cannot exceed the total number of sick day hours available to the employee. The
employee may elect to use available personal days or vacation, if absence continues when sick
days have been exhausted, or to apply for Short-term Disability. Sick days are paid at the regular
base rate of pay and are not counted as time worked for calculation of overtime pay.

Non-emergency and routine examinations or treatments should be made during non-working
hours, when practicable. When appointments are scheduled that require an employee's absence
from work, the employee must notify his/her manager as far in advance as practicable for
approval. If an appointment is non-emergency or routine, the manager may require the employee
to reschedule the appointment as dictated by operational necessity.

When an absence for medical reasons lasts three or more consecutive workdays, the USOC may
require a written physician's statement prior to permitting the employee to return to work. The
physician’s statement must include dates of absence, diagnosis, release to return to work date,
and specification of any limitations or restrictions placed on the employee.


                                                                                                 55
Unused sick days are not paid upon termination of employment.


                                            Vacation

The United States Olympic Committee provides paid vacation time for benefits eligible
employees. Temporary employees, including interns, are not eligible for vacation time.
Vacation is accrued on each pay period, and employees are eligible to take vacation after it is
accrued and the time off is approved by the manager.

Accruing and Earning Vacation
The vacation accrual rate is based upon length of service. When the accrual rate changes due
to the occurrence of an employee’s employment anniversary, the new rate takes effect in the
pay period of the employment anniversary. Employees may accrue vacation up to maximum
accrual limits indicated below. Upon reaching the limit, vacation will cease to accrue until
vacation is taken, and the accrued balance falls below the maximum limit. Accrued balances
are posted on each pay stub and current time sheet.

Through December 31, 2009, vacation accrual rates are as follows:

Regular Full-Time Employee Vacation Accrual Rates through December 31, 2009
                                                               Maximum
Length of Service  Vacation Accrual Rate                       Accrual Limit
0-1 year              3.08 hours per pay period (approx. 10 days per year)    80 hours
2-9 years             4.62 hours per pay period (approx. 15 days per year)    160 hours
10+ years             6.16 hours per pay period (approx. 20 days per year)    200 hours

Regular Part-Time Employee Vacation Accrual Rates through December 31, 2009
Length of Service  Vacation Accrual Rate              Maximum Accrual Limit
All                   .03847 hour per actual hour worked         80 hours

Effective January 1, 2010, vacation accrual rates are as follows:

Benefits Eligible Employee Vacation Accrual Rates effective January 1, 2010
Length of        Regularly Scheduled Work                            Maximum
Service          Week Hours               Vacation Accrual Rate      Accrual Limit
                  40 hours per week              3.08 hours per pay period
0-1 year                                         (approx. 10 days per year)    80 hours
                  32-39 hours per week           2.46 hours per pay period
                                                 (approx. 8 days per year)
                  40 hours per week              4.62 hours per pay period
2-9 years                                        (approx. 15 days per year)    160 hours
                  32-39 hours per week           3.70 hours per pay period
                                                 (approx. 12 days per year)
                  40 hours per week              6.16 hours per pay period
10+ years                                        (approx. 20 days per year)    200 hours
                  32-39 hours per week           4.93 hour per pay period
                                                 (approx. 16 days per year)




                                                                                            56
Regular Part-Time Employee Vacation Accrual Rates effective January 1, 2010
Length of       Regularly Scheduled Work                           Maximum
Service         Week Hours               Vacation Accrual Rate     Accrual Limit
                  Less than 32 hours per week   .03847 hour per actual hour   80 hours
All               and hired before December     worked
                  31, 2009
                  Less than 32 hours per week   Not eligible for vacation     NA
                  and hired after January 1,
                  2010

Regular part-time employees hired after January 1, 2010, who are consistently scheduled to work
less than 32 hours per week on an annual basis, are ineligible to accrue vacation.

Employees are encouraged to request vacation time at least two weeks in advance. The
employee’s manager must approve vacation requests in advance of an employee taking
vacation. There may be operational requirements that restrict an employee’s ability to take
vacation during the requested dates. Employees may not be advanced or borrow future vacation
time. Benefits eligible employees may use accrued vacation to attend activities for their school
aged children.

If a holiday occurs during an employee's scheduled vacation, it is counted as a holiday for pay
purposes. If, during an employee’s scheduled vacation, the employee needs change the type of
time off initially requested due to unforeseen circumstances such as illness or bereavement, the
employee should discuss this with his/her manager as soon as practicable, and may be asked to
provide appropriate documentation to substantiate the change in time off request. Generally, the
USOC is receptive to these rare occurrences of changing time off reasons.

Vacation pay is paid at the employee’s regular base rate of pay. Vacation hours taken are not
counted as time worked for calculation of overtime pay.

Unused, earned vacation will be paid to terminating employees in their final paychecks.


                                        Voting Time Off

Voting is an important responsibility of all U.S. citizens. The USOC encourages employees to
exercise their voting rights in all municipal, county, state, and federal elections. Under most
circumstances, it is possible for employees to vote either before or after work. If it is necessary
for employees to arrive late or leave work early to vote in an election, they should make prior
arrangements with their manager no later than the day prior to the Election Day.




                                                                                                57
                        2009 USOC Employee Handbook Acknowledgement




I acknowledge that I have received a copy of the USOC Employee Handbook (the "Handbook"), which
describes important information about the USOC, and understand that I should consult Human
Resources if I have questions. I understand that neither this Handbook or any other USOC policy,
practice or procedure is intended to provide any contractual obligations related to continued
employment, compensation or nor should it be viewed upon as an employment contract.

Since the information, policies and benefits described here are necessarily subject to change, I
acknowledge that revisions to the Handbook may occur at any time, except to USOC’s policy of
employment-at-will. I understand that the USOC may change, modify, suspend or cancel, in whole or
part, any of the published or unpublished personnel policies or practices, at its sole discretion, without
giving cause or justification to any employee.

I understand and agree that I will read and comply with the policies contained in this Handbook and any
revisions and am bound by the provisions contained therein. I acknowledge and agree that should I
violate any of the policies in the Handbook, I may be subject to disciplinary actions up to and including
termination.




___________________________________

Employee Name (Printed)

___________________________________

Employee Signature

___________________________________

Date



Rev. 11/9/09




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