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					NEBRASKA INVASIVES NEWS NETWORK


http://snr.unl.edu/invasives
invasives@unl.edu
September 2008 E-Newsletter


Welcome to the Summer 2008 issue of the Nebraska Invasives News Network E-Newsletter! In the
interest of safety, I thought we would approach the fascinating subject of Asian Carp in this summer’s e-
newsletter. If you have any requests for future invasive species in the spotlight, please send them to
invasives@unl.edu.

If you or someone you know has an upcoming event, project, or news you would like to share, contact
us today! We need your help to make sure the information you receive is complete and accurate. For
more up to date information, please visit the Nebraska Invasive Species Project Website at
http://snr.unl.edu/invasives

Lastly, mapping and monitoring of invasive species is a continuing topic of interest. If your agency is
hosting data on invasive species, please contact us so that we can begin to link this information to other
sources. Ultimately, help us keep Nebraskan’s as informed as possible!

Note: The website has a new look and a new home! Remember to change your bookmarks to
http://snr.unl.edu/invasives. Check out features including a site wide search, an invasive species events
calendar, and udpates on projects and resources. If you have suggestions on how we can make the site
meet your needs, please let us know.


IN THIS ISSUE


Introducing:

Nebraska Invasive Species Council…bill submitted




Introducing:

Many of the projects that Sandhills RC&D assists with go unnoticed in our communities. A few
of projects that the Sandhills Resource Conservation and Development Council have been
involved with include a multi-county housing rehabilitation program, business development
trainings and rural fire protection assistance. Other projects include grant writing workshops,
local tourism efforts, and rangeland carbon credit workshops. Additional projects include
community infrastructure assistance and natural resource projects like the Cedar Control
Workshop held by Mullen and No-Till workshops held at Paxton. Another natural resource
project involved the formation of the West Central Weed Management Area and an associated
project that endeavors to reclaim the Platte River from an invasive plant called Phragmites.
During 2008, the Sandhills RC&D also worked cooperatively with the Nebraska Grazing Lands
Coalition in their efforts to assist Nebraska’s private grassland managers in the application of
long-term grazing management.

The 2008 Annual Report is available at the website, sandhillsrcd.org or by calling (308)546-
0636. Local residents can also stop by the Sandhills RC&D office 102 SW 2nd street in Mullen
to pickup a copy. The Sandhills RC&D Council is made up of volunteers who serve their
communities with a passion to sustain and improve our quality of life. If you are undertaking a
project, and were wondering if the Sandhills RC&D may be able to assist, please contact the
office at (308) 546-0636. http://www.sandhillsrcd.org


Bob Broweleit
Sandhills RC&D Coordinator

PO Box 28

Mullen, NE 69152

(308)546-0636
www.sandhillsrcd.org




Mike Jess, SNR series
Republican River Compact: How Much Will It Cost To Satisfy Kansas?




The bill in question before the Senate is S 373 and is titled:

To amend title 18, United States Code, to include constrictor snakes of the species Python
genera as an injurious animal. (Introduced in Senate)

 a PDF is available at: http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-
bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=111_cong_bills&docid=f:s373is.txt.pdf
Here is the link to the Nebraska Rural Living article about the river project. Didn't know if everybody had
gotten a chance to see it yet.

Later, Tim
http://www.nebraskaruralliving.com/essays/republican_river.asp




Arthur Drought Seminar a success
On Jan. 29, 2009, NGLC partnered with the NRCS and the Twin Platte NRD to host a drought
management seminar titled "Adapting Your Ranch to the Changing Environment" in Arthur. Norma Van
Nostrand, Rangeland Management Specialist from the Ogallala NRCS office and Bill Carhart, Range
Programs Coordinator of the Twin Platte NRD, were the primary organizers of the daylong workshop.
Speakers included:



Welcome and Introductions

·    Norma Van Nostrand, USDA-NRCS, Ogallala, NE

·    Bill Carhart, Twin Platte NRD, North Platte, NE

Climate Change: Management Implications for Great Plains Rangelands

·    Justin Derner, Rangeland Scientist, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Cheyenne, WY

·    Jack Morgan, Research Leader/Plant Physiologist, USDA Ag Research Service, Fort Collins, CO

Monitoring the Management of Your Rangelands

·    Cindy Tusler, Range Livestock Extension Educator, Sheridan County Extension, Rushville, NE

·    Bethany Johnston, Extension Educator, Central Sandhills Area Extension, Thedford, NE

LUNCH

·    Tamara Choat, Coordinator, Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition

·    Scott Cotton, Livestock Extension Educator, Dawes County Extension

Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP)
·    Kim Borer, County Executive Director, USDA Farm Service Agency, Ogallala, NE

Matching Cattle Production to the Land

·    Aaron Stalker, Beef Specialist, UNL West Central Research and Ext. Center, North Platte, NE

Rancher's Viewpoint: A Road Map for Success

·    Lynn Myers, Rancher and "Cowboy Logic" Ranch Mentor, Lewellen, NE

More than 60 people attended the seminar, which ran from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Vet's Memorial Hall, and
included a lunch sponsored by the Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition. Survey responses from the
audience showed a positive reception to the workshops. Attendees commented they enjoyed learning
about potential changes in climate; matching cows to the weather cycle; methods and ideas for
monitoring and improving grazing land; and hearing different ideas and thoughts on range management
processes.



--

Tamara Choat

Coordinator, Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition

29108 Fletcher Ave.

Elmwood, NE 68349

Work/Cell: 402.430.3656

Work/Home: 402.817.1131
tamara@nebraskagrazinglands.org




                                                                                 A recent Frontiers in Ecology and the

                                                                                 paper about polarized light pollution is the topic of a n



                                                                                 Download ESA Toolbar

                                                                                 ESA Toolbar – ESA At Your Fingertips



                                                                                 ESA Blog: EcoTone
Action Alert: Opportunity to Support the Nonnative Wildlife Invasion
                                                                           Latest ESA Blog Posts
Prevention Act (H.R. 669)
On January 26th, Representative Madeleine Bordallo (D-Guam) introduced
                                                                           ESA Podcasts
the Nonnative Wildlife Invasion Prevention Act (H.R. 669), a bill designed Listen to ESA Podcasts
to better control the introduction and establishment of nonnative species
in the United States.

Addressing invasive species is among ESA’s central policy priorities—
interested members are encouraged to contact their Representative to
request co-sponsorship H.R. 669.

A few highlights:


        The bill would establish a new risk assessment process in which
       the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) would evaluate the risk posed
       by nonnative species before allowing them into the country.

            FWS would, with public input, develop a “green list” of species
       allowed to be imported. Parties who imported species not on this
       list would be subject to penalties under the Lacey Act Amendments
       of 1981, although special permits would be issued on a case-by-
       case basis for species being used for scientific or educational
       purposes. Import fees and penalties would go towards covering the
       c! osts of the risk assessment process.

           Under current regulations, nonnative species may be imported
       so long as they are not considered “injurious” under the Lacey
       Act—that is, unless they have already caused demonstrable harm.
       H.R. 669 therefore represents a key shift from reactive to proactive
       policy, allowing FWS to stop nonnative species invasions in many
       cases before they begin.

                H.R. 669 was drafted in extensive consultation with the
       scientific community, including members of ESA.
To view the complete bill, please visit http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-
bin/query/z?c111:H.R.669.IH:

When contacting congressional offices, members may wish to mention the
following:

              Scientists and economists estimate that nonnative species
       invasions cost the United States more than $123 every year. As
       globalization increases, this figure is expected to rise
            Nonnative species have been introduced to ecosystems across
       all 50 states and U.S. territories, and have in many cases harmed
       not only local habitats and economies, but also native species and
       human health. Invasive species may proliferate quickly, spreading
       disease, damaging property, or leeching resources.

                Detecting nonnative species invasions early on greatly
       increases the likelihood of eradication.

Contact information for Representatives is available at:
https://writerep.house.gov/writerep/welcome.shtml

Remember to include your home address in your email so your
Representative knows that you are a constituent. Piper Corp
(Piper@esa.org) and Nadine Lymn (Nadine@esa.org) of ESA’s Public Affairs
Office are happy to assist interested ESA members as needed.




The National Environmental Coalition on Invasives Species (NECIS)
Action Plan for President Obama and the 111th Congress can be found
online at the Union of Concerned Scientists website:

http://www.ucsusa.org/invasive_species/solutions/NECIS-action-plan.html


More about NECIS is at www.necis.net




We have established a forum with a section for job postings and exotics
news please feel free to join and post appropriate positions or news in
the forum.

http://nativefish.org/forum/index.php
Have a nice day

Robert Rice
www.nativefish.org
www.carpbusters.com




The Invasive Weeds Awareness Coalition(IWAC) invites you to
Washington DCfor a week of events focused on educating our federal
policy makers and elected officials about the environmental and
economic losses caused by invasive weeds.
For additional NIWAWinformation contact Dr. Lee Van Wychen, 202-746-4686,
Lee.VanWychen@wssa.net

10th National Invasive Weeds Awareness Week
February 22-27, 2009

 “Preserving America’s Heritage”




Fifth Annual Tallgrass Prairie Management Seminar
     Free and Open to the Public / Lunch Free if Registered before January 15 / Walk-ins Welcome




              Location                                        Date and Time
              Southeast Community College                     Thursday, January 29, 2009

              Jackson Hall Conference Room                    9:30 am – 4:00 pm

              Beatrice, Nebraska




 http://www.sandhillsrcd.org/
Platte River Restoration Project Focuses on
Lincoln County
The Platte River Restoration Project is a
long-term strategic project that will restore critical
habitat for millions of migratory water fowl
and many other wildlife species as well as reduce
flooding potential to communities along the
river by improving river flow conveyance .
The Platte River of Nebraska is known for
its wildlife habitat and for a diverse range of
flora and fauna. Within the Platte River, an invasive
species called Phragmites has outcompeted
native vegetation by reducing biodiversity.
This plant is an aggressive invader and
rapidly replaces native plant communities. The
Sandhills RC&D, working in conjunction with the
West Central Weed Management Area and many
other partners, has developed a multi-year plan
to reduce Phragmites infestations with a variety
of treatment methods. The project will incorporate
an integrated weed management philosophy
and an applied research approach that is
supported by the state’s Riparian Vegetation
  Management Task Force.


 Sandhills RC&D
Platte River Restoration Marketing Plan
An advertising campaign is being developed
based around the slogan, “Take a
bite out of invasive weeds” and will utilize
a variety of media venues to spread the
message. The challenge is to send a message
that gets landowners to recognize the
problem, then learn about and adopt a solution.
Conservation partners will use their
extensive network including organization
newsletters, fact sheets,
and media contacts to
spread the message.
Promotional materials may
use images similar as these
photos to help the audience
visualize the message
“Take a bite
out of invasive
  weeds”.




If you enjoy the outdoors and our natural resources, you will like The
THREAT CAMPAIGN...400 million have been reached from this effort!

Creating awareness and action against invasive species is critical. Healthy
Habitats Coalition is developing under their wing as well!

 http://www.wildlifeforever.org/resources/NEW%20PAGES/documents/WEB-
 INVASIVES08REPORT.pdf




Gloria Barron Scholarship

December 15, 2008

The Gloria Barron Wilderness Society Scholarship is available to qualified graduate students. It is created
in honor of Gloria Barron, dedicated educator and tireless advocate for wilderness protection, and
administered by The Wilderness Society, a leading conservation organization based in Washington, D.C.
We award a $10,000 scholarship to a graduate student for the coming academic year to support
research and preparation of a paper on an aspect of wilderness. We strongly encourage proposals
relating to climate change, as well as other topics regarding wilderness conservation.

Additional funding will be provided to pay travel expenses for the recipient to work with staff members
of The Wilderness Society on this project. The Wilderness Society wishes to encourage the publication of
this work in an academic journal or other appropriate medium and has additional funds to help cover
expenses of publishing and publicizing the final paper.

The scholarship seeks to encourage individuals who have the potential to make a significant positive
difference in the long term protection of wilderness in North America. In the past, individuals like Aldo
Leopold and Rachel Carson have made that kind of lasting difference. They possessed all the skills
needed to excel in their respective professions, but they also possessed something more: the courage
and the vision to think afresh about how and why to protect our wild lands and the ability to
communicate those ideas effectively to others.

 http://wilderness.org/content/gloria-barron-scholarship-guidelines

 Management impacts on wildland ecosystems. Question like how do roads affect ecosystem function
 and what roles should roadless areas play in protecting ecosystem integrity, what are the ecological
 and social impacts of grazing in wildland ecosystems, and what can be done to protect wildland
 ecosystems from biological invasion are examples.
 http://www.weedcenter.org/

 CIPM Website Has a New Look and Function
 Explore the new CIPM website! In addition to giving the website an aesthetic makeover, we added
 navigation buttons at the top of the page that provide information about our programs and services
 (Research, Outreach, Policy, etc.), and restructured our popular Resource Directory (right side menu)
 to improve navigation through our extensive library of invasive plant information. We welcome your
 comments about these new changes. Email us at weedcenter@montana.edu.




 Envirathon

 http://www.nrdnet.org/envirothon/files/about.html
 The Envirothon is a program for 9th-12th grade students to learn more about our natural environment.
 The contest tests the students knowledge on subjects such as soils, aquatics, forestry, wildlife, range,
 current environmental issues and one area of national interest. This year, biodiversity is the special
 topic, including information on invasive species in Nebraska.

 Each year several regional Envirothon contests are held across Nebraska. The winning five-member
 team from each regional competition is invited to represent their region at the Nebraska State
 Envirothon Competition. An additional 8 wildcard teams are also invited. The state champion goes on
 to represent Nebraska at the Canon Envirothon.




 Mosquitofish or Plague Minnow?
Because mosquitofish don!t live up to their name, and have become the world!s most
abundant freshwater fish, some experts propose they be called the plague minnow.


A global review of the impacts of the mosquitofish,
also known as the plague minnow (Gambusia
holbrookii, G. affinis), has been written by Graham
Pyke of the Australian Museum.
! In the late nineteenth century, when the role of
mosquitoes in spreading disease became known,
interest in controlling them grew. In 1918
mosquitofish were credited with reducing malaria
along the Mississippi River, and yellow fever in
other countries they were taken to.
! The two fish, native to North America, thus
gained a global reputation for mosquito control, and
releases all over the world followed. They are now
the world"s most abundant freshwater fish.
! Many experts have proclaimed that mosquitofish
reduced disease rates, but according to Graham
Pyke, “other researchers have concluded that there
is no unequivocal evidence that gambusia have
ever reduced mosquito density sufficiently to
control mosquito-transmitted disease”.
! Some evidence suggests that mosquitofish
increase the abundance of mosquito larvae instead
by preying preferentially on notomectids, which are
invertebrate predators of mosquitoes. Notes Pyke:
! “Adoption of the name mosquitofish for both G.
affinis and G. holbrooki contributed to the
unquestioned acceptance of these fish as the
“logical choice for mosquito control” and resulted in
little evaluation of either the effectiveness of these
or other fish in controlling mosquitoes or of the
impacts of such control measures on other
components of the environment.”
! The evidence is stronger that mosquitofish can
have a serious impact on frogs, by eating their
eggs or young tadpoles, and on other small fish.
There are many examples of small fish species
disappearing from wetlands, and certain frogs
becoming scarce, after mosquitofish were
introduced. They have been declared a threatening
process in New South Wales.
! Because of their threats, and doubts about their
effectiveness for mosquito control, many experts
have proposed that they be renamed #plague
minnows". Pyke suggests the common name
#gambusia" as a non-emotive alternative.
! His review draws attention to their extraordinary
environmental tolerances. They can live in water
that varies from 0-45 °C, in the saline waters of
estuaries, and in water that is highly polluted. They
are short-lived fish that seldom last as a long as a
year, but are highly fecund, females reaching
maturity in 18 days.
Pyke, G.K. (2008) Plague minnow or mosquito
fish? A review of the biology and impacts of
introduced gambusia species. Annual Review of
Ecology, Evolution and Systematics 39: 171-191.




Mosquitofish or Plague Minnow?
Defending Favorite Places
How Hunters and Anglers Can Stop the Spread of Invasive Species



America's hunters and anglers represent essential stakeholders in combating invasive species
threatening native fish and wildlife populations and their habitats. Preventing and controlling invasive
species is an achievable goal. Linking invasive species management principles with the hunting and
angling conservation ethic is critical. Invasive species threaten the future of hunting and fishing.
Sportsmen and women across the nation are joining forces to defend their favorite places.

The documentary video, Defending Favorite Places, was produced on DVD as part of the National
Invasive Species Threat Campaign with support from Wildlife Forever, the National Fish and Wildlife
Foundation, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the National Wild Turkey Federation, the Association
of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
the Center for Invasive Plant Management, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, and
many public and private organizations and individuals.




 http://www.fs.fed.us/invasivespecies/prevention/defending.shtml




New Learning Website for Natural Resource Managers

The Center is pleased to announce the second of two learning websites developed for the
US Fish and Wildlife Service National Wildlife Refuge System and beneficial to other natural
resource managers. The website, Managing Invasive Plants: Concepts, Principles, and
Practices, provides an overview of invasive plant management supported by case studies,
quizzes, scientific literature, and web-based resources. The website is best viewed in
Internet Explorer. View website

Learning Website for Volunteers Wins Award

In November, the Center and the US Fish and Wildlife Service received an award from the
National Association of Interpretation (NAI) at the annual conference Media Awards
Competition ceremony in Portland, Oregon. The learning website, Invasive Plants and
Volunteers: Learning and Lending a Hand, received second-place honors in the multimedia
category. The NAI is a professional organization with 5,000 members in over 30 countries.
View website
Practicing EDRR Around the Country
Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) are the methods of choice in fighting nonnative
plant invasions. EDRR efforts take many forms throughout the United States. Four EDRR
programs were highlighted at the "People-Powered Projects" national Cooperative Weed
Management Area (CWMA) conference held in 2008:

•  Comprehensive EDRR methodology used in Oregon's Spartina response
   program (Bonnie Rasmussen, Oregon Dept. of Agriculture).
• Regional working groups within Florida and the state's control efforts for
   several invasive plant species (Tony Pernas, National Park Service).
• Weed risk assessment project combining plant survey data and climate
   modeling used to support early detection of invasive plants in California. (Doug
   Johnson, California Invasive Plant Council).
• Citizen monitoring and reporting efforts in Alaska which will be used as a
   component of a proposed EDRR plan for the state (Gino Graziano, Alaska Assoc. of
   Conservation Districts).
 These 15- to 20-minute PowerPoint presentations with audio are available to view online.




Documenting threats of exotic species on threatened and endangered plants (Nationwide, USA)
From: Amy Young (amy(at)appliedeco.org)

The Institute for Applied Ecology is collaborating with the USDI Bureau of Land Management to evaluate
the extent to which exotic species are impacting rare, threatened and endangered plants. We have
developed a brief online survey to document 1) the nature of impacts of exotic species on listed plant
species, 2) the methods that are currently being used to control exotic species in habitat occupied by
listed species, and 3)additional information and/or tools that are needed for land managers to address
this potential threat to listed species. This information will be synthesized into an online database
available for the general public.

Please follow the link below to participate in our study, and feel free to forward this information to any
interested colleagues. Our deadline for survey responses is November 21.
  http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=GterPE_2bpl9h0J66SQB5UUQ_3d_3d




Study Finds Silver Lining for Maligned Saltcedars
UA research shows that the non-native "invader" isn't as bad as as first thought.



By Susan McGinley, UA College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
October 29, 2008

There is nothing neutral about saltcedar. Imported to America's East Coast from Eurasia as a nursery
plant in the early 1800s, the hardy shrub's popularity grew beyond ornamental purposes in the early
1900s, when thousands were planted out West to stabilize irrigation canals and control erosion along
elevated Southern Pacific rail lines. Satisfaction turned to alarm when the eight imported species of
saltcedar, also called tamarisk, escaped cultivation and spread too fast.

http://uanews.org/node/22298




Fire and Nonnative Invasive Plants now in print (Nationwide, USA)
From: Kristin Zouhar (kzouhar(at)fs.fed.us)

Volume 6 of the "Rainbow series", Wildand Fire in Ecosystems: Fire and Nonnative Invasive Plants, is
now in print! This comprehensive, nation-wide review features 16 chapters with 25 authors and provides
syntheses of the current knowledge regarding fire effects on nonnative invasive plants, effects of
nonnative invasives on fire regimes, and use of fire to control invasive plants. Individual chapters
summarize information on these topics for each of 7 bioregions in the United States, including Hawaii and
Alaska.

 This publication available for download from the Rocky Mountain Research Station publications website
 (www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_gtr042_6.html), and hard copies can be ordered via the same site.




 The Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition is partnering with the South Dakota Grasslands Coalition to host
 a bus tour headquartering out of the Yankton, SD area. The dates are July 21-22, 2009.
 Rainwater Basin Joint Venture Informational Seminar, Hastings Quality Inn, Tuesday, February 10,
 2009.

 This seminar will begin at 9:00am and end at 4:30pm. It will cover a wide variety of topics relating to
 the many facets of management of wetland and associated uplands, landowner perspectives, private
 innovations, governmental regulations and applications and success opportunities for landowners,
 NGO’s and agency staff in the Rainwater Basin.

 For more information, please visit their website at http://www.rwbjv.org/.




For those following the squirrel invasion in Europe, an interesting new twist is being reported in – of all
places – the Dining & Wine section of the NYT today
(http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/07/dining/07squirrel.html?_r=1). Seems eating the invader has become
fashionable in England. From the text:

“Part of the interest is curiosity and novelty,” said Barry Shaw of Shaw
Meats, who sells squirrel meat at the Wirral Farmers Market near
Liverpool. “It’s a great conversation starter for dinner parties.”
While some have difficulty with the cuteness versus deliciousness ratio —
that adorable little face, those itty-bitty claws — many feel that eating
squirrel is a way to do something good for the environment while enjoying a
unique gastronomical experience.



http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/01/12/eco.macquarieisland/?iref=intlOnlyonCNN
Cat control lead to eco disaster on World Heritage island
Efforts to remove cats from Macquarie Island, a sub-Antarctic island and World Heritage Site, have
indirectly led to environmental devastation, according to a report published in the Journal of Applied
Ecology.

The removal of cats has led to a boom in the island's rabbit population -- another species introduced by
humans -- causing widespread devastation to the island's vegetation.

According to the study's lead author, Dr. Dana Bergstrom of the Australian Antarctic Division: "Satellite
images show substantial island-wide rabbit-induced vegetation change. By 2007, impacts on some
protected valleys and slopes had become acute. We estimate that nearly 40 percent of the whole island
area had changed, with almost 20 percent having moderate to severe change."
The removal of the invasive species from Macquarie Island, situated halfway between Australia and
Antarctica, also serves as a wider warning about human interference in ecosystems and how good
intentions can go awry.

It is a case from which important lessons must be learned, according to the report's authors.

The scientists behind the study claim that the Macquarie Island is a rare example of so-called "trophic
cascades" -- the knock-on effects of changes in one species' abundance across several links in the food
chain. As well as species extinction, in extreme cases it can even lead to an ecosystem "meltdown".

"This study is one of only a handful which demonstrate that theoretically plausible trophic cascades
associated with invasive species removal not only do take place, but can also result in rapid and
detrimental changes to ecosystems, so negating the direct benefits of the removal of the target
species," says Bergstrom.

Macquarie Island was discovered in 1810 with the remote island's seal and penguin population targeted
for the fur trade. Cats were introduced to the island soon after to eat rats and mice that threatened to
eat the sailors' grain stores. It was sealing gangs who then brought rabbits to the island in 1878 to give
sailors something to eat.

The rabbits provided easy prey for the island's cats, helping their number to grow, but the rabbit
population was also causing catastrophic damage to the island's vegetation.

Myxomatosis, a disease fatal to rabbits was introduced to the island in 1968 to try and curb their
number. It worked at first as rabbit numbers fell from a peak of 130,000 in 1978 to less than 20,000 ten
years later and vegetation recovered.

However, with fewer rabbits as food, the cats began to eat the island's native burrowing birds, so a cat
eradication program began in 1985.

The last cat on the island was killed in 2000, and Myxomatosis had failed to keep rabbit numbers in
check; their numbers bounced back and in little over six years rabbits substantially altered large areas of
the island.

According to Bergstrom: "Increased rabbit herbivory has caused substantial damage at both local and
landscape scales including changes from complex vegetation communities, to short, grazed lawns or
bare ground."

Bergstrom hopes that the problems facing Macquarie Island are a cautionary tale for conservation
agencies: "Interventions should be comprehensive, and include risk assessments to explicitly consider
and plan for indirect effects, or face substantial subsequent cost," says Bergstrom.

The cost to remedy the problems of Macquarie Island is estimated at $16 million.


        Subject: [Aliens-L] Job Posting: Research Ecologist, Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry, USDA
        Forest Service, Hilo, Hawaii
Research Ecologist Position
          Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry
        USDA Forest Service
          Hilo, Hawaii



The Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station
is advertising for a full-time permanent research scientist in the discipline of invasive species
biology. The Research Ecologist will lead, coordinate and oversee research of the Invasive
Species Team within the Institute, whose mission is to develop and deliver information needed
to understand and manage invasive species in native tropical forests. The Team accomplishes
this mission by studying the population and community ecology of invasive species, the impact
of invasive plants on ecosystems, and plant and insect interactions including biocontrol. The
Pacific Islands are recognized global hotspots of native and largely endemic biodiversity. Over
the past century, invasive species in conjunction with land-use and climate change have
threatened this biodiversity. Invasive species have devastated whole ecosystems across Hawaii
and other Pacific islands. Recent estimates suggest that at least 1100 species of exotic plants
have become naturalized in the Hawaiian Islands and many of these pose significant threats to
native ecosystems. The scientist will lead a research program in one or more of the following
areas: (1) understanding how invasive species affect native forest ecosystems and the critical
characteristics of both species and ecosystems that control that interaction across Pacific Island
landscapes (e.g., Hawaii, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, American Samoa, Northern
Mariana Islands, Guam, and the Marshall Islands); (2) predicting and measuring interactions
between climate change and invasive species on Pacific Islands; (3) developing safe and effective
biocontrol agents for invasive species affecting tropical forests of Hawaii and the Pacific and
understanding factors contributing to the success and failure of biological control agents; and
(4) developing protocols for predicting which species may cause ecological and economic
impacts and assess costs and benefits of control. As Team Leader, the scientist will represent the
IPIF on invasive species issues at regional, national and international meetings.

The position will be located at the IPIF Research Center on the campus of the University of
Hawaii-Hilo. This is a full time, permanent position with full health, retirement (including 401k-
type), and vacation benefits. It is being advertised at the GS-13/14/15 level ($70,615 to
$127,604 + 18% COLA) although the actual starting grade level will be determined by a Research
Grade Evaluation Panel, which will evaluate the qualifications and experience of the individual
selected. Interested parties can apply to announcement: TA09-PSW-00232G (R-JEJ) at the US
Federal Government Job website at www.usajobs.gov or by going to:
http://jobsearch.usajobs.gov/getjob.asp?JobID=78496077
The position will be open 1/9/09 – 2/22/09.


Flint Hughes
Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry
USDA Forest Service
60 Nowelo Street
Hilo, HI 96720
        Phone: (808) 933-8121 ext. 117
        FAX: (808) 933-8120
        email: fhughes@fs.fed.us

        Flint Hughes
        Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry
        USDA Forest Service
        60 Nowelo Street
        Hilo, HI 96720
        Phone: (808) 933-8121 ext. 117
        FAX: (808) 933-8120
        email: fhughes@fs.fed.us




http://www.esa.org/pao/policyStatements/Letters/letterPresidentElect_Obama.php

Check out this excerpt from the Ecological Society of America letter to the President Elect.

Controlling invasive species is also important, not only to preserve native biodiversity, but also to
prevent economic damage. Invasive species that lack natural enemies spread quickly, often supplanting
native species. The zebra mussel, for example, kills off native mussels while damaging human
infrastructure such as power plants and water treatment plants, costing the country more than $5
billion each year. Similarly, non-native weeds and grasses have invaded croplands and rangelands,
increasing the frequency of fires and resulting in massive economic losses.




"It is a practical tool for scientists, weed managers, and for landowners wishing to know more about
invasive species and their management ... It is a pleasure to skim through and serves its stated
purpose well"
C.R. Allen, A. Alai, A.C. Kessler, T. Kinsell, A.L. Major, K. Nemec, B.J. Stephen. Great Plains Research
18(2):234

Find out more about the Invasive Plants Guide at their website, http://www.invasiveplantguide.com/.
Invasipedia, a new TNC wiki! (Global, Planet Earth)
From: Barry Rice (brice(at)tnc.org )

There is little doubt that the Global Invasive Species Team web site, now in its 12th year, is chock-full of
useful information. However, some of its resources are rather old. What to do?

To keep the site content relevent and fresh, we have now launched a wiki that can be edited by anyone!
Now, all invasive species practitioners can contribute their vast knowledge and experience to our current
set of documents, and add new content on how to best manage invasive species. While Invasipedia is
currently restricted to plants, if the users wish to expand its scope---well, they can! For those who are
frightened that an open wiki is going to be a recipe for disaster, rest assured that we are monitoring this
site and will watch for pointless vandalism. We are confident that this exciting project will be a place for
users to launch their best management practices.

To help jump start this process, we have preloaded the wiki with GIST treatments for about 30 species.
You can start your wiki-work by reviewing these treatments, and if you see something that could be
added to, please do so. When you get confident, you can start adding treatment for new species! Some
resources to help you get used to Invasipedia are given below.

Have fun!!!!

Invasipedia (http://www.invasipedia.org)




The National Environmental Coalition on Invasives Species (NECIS)
Action Plan for President Obama and the 111th Congress can be found
online at the Union of Concerned Scientists website:

http://www.ucsusa.org/invasive_species/solutions/NECIS-action-plan.html


More about NECIS is at www.necis.net




 Drought management workshop set for Jan. 29 in Arthur

 Three Nebraska conservation organizations partner on event
ELMWOOD, Neb. — Drought is a normal part of Nebraska's climate. To make sure ranchers are
prepared for these dry times that stress pasture and economic resources, three conservation
organizations are hosting a daylong drought management workshop, Adapting Your Ranch to the
Changing Environment, in Arthur, Neb., on Jan. 29. Registration will begin at 10:30 a.m. at the Vet's
Memorial Hall. Speakers from Nebraska, Wyoming and Colorado will present from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. The
seminar and lunch are free with preregistration, due Jan. 23.



The Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (Arthur and Keith
counties), and the Twin Platte Natural Resources District are partnering to sponsor the event. Speakers
will discuss how to prepare for and manage during drought. Topics and presenters include:



          Climate Change: Management Implications for Great Plains Rangelands

          Justin Derner, USDA-ARS Rangeland Scientist, Cheyenne, WY

          Jack Morgan, USDA-ARS Plant Physiologist, Fort Collins, CO



          Monitoring the Management of Your Rangelands

          Cindy Tusler, UNL Range Extension Educator, Rushville, NE

          Bethany Johnston, UNL Extension Educator, Thedford, NE



          Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP)

          Kim Borer, FSA County Executive Director, Ogallala, NE



          Matching Cattle Production to the Land

          Aaron Stalker, UNL Beef Specialist, North Platte, NE



          Rancher's Viewpoint: A Road Map for Success

          Lynn Myers, Rancher & "Cowboy Logic" Ranch Mentor, Lewellen, NE
 Registration to guarantee a meal is required by Jan. 23, and can be made by calling the Ogallala NRCS
 Field Office at 308.284.2048 Ext. 3. To view a complete agenda, visit www.nebraskagrazinglands.org.



 The Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition is an independent organization of ranchers, interest groups, and
 agencies whose mission is to collaborate on projects that improve the management and health of
 Nebraska grazing lands and ensure long-term stability of rangeland resources. The NGLC is funded
 through grants from the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Nebraska Environmental
 Trust Fund, the Nebraska Rural Development Commission and the Sandhills Task Force.



 The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides leadership in a partnership effort to help
 America's private landowners and managers conserve their soil, water, and other natural resources.
 NRCS is an equal opportunity provider and employer.



 Nebraska Natural Resources Districts are local government units with broad responsibilities to conserve
 and protect natural resources. The Twin Platte Natural Resources District includes Arthur, McPherson,
 Keith and Lincoln counties, with the purpose of engaging in programs of management, development,
 and protection of the soil and water resources found in the District.



 ###



--

Tamara Choat

Coordinator, Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition

29108 Fletcher Ave.

Elmwood, NE 68349

Work/Cell: 402.430.3656

Work/Home: 402.817.1131
tamara@nebraskagrazinglands.org

 Jan. 17, 2009. 1:00-2:00 Gardening with Prairie Plants
- a presentation by Bob Henrickson, Assistant Director of Horticulture Programs Nebraska Statewide
Arboretum. C. Y. Thompson Library, Computer Instruction Room, UNL East Campus, 38th & Holdrege St.
(http://www1.unl.edu/tour/#)
JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

Colorado Weed Management Association
Executive Director

The Colorado Weed Management Association (CWMA) is seeking qualified
candidates for the position of Executive Director.

THE ASSOCIATION


CWMA is a non-profit organization whose mission is to provide education,
regulatory direction, professional improvement, and environmental
awareness to preserve and protect our natural resources from the degrading
impacts of invasive exotic noxious vegetation to Colorado and surrounding
states.

THE MEMBERSHIP
CWMA members are dedicated to noxious weed management. Our members
include professional weed managers representing many government agencies
as well as private and commercial applicators.

JOB DESCRIPTION
 The Executive Director, reporting to the Board of Directors, will work as
 an ex-officio member of the Board. The position provides administrative
 support to the Association as well as assisting the Committee Chairs with
 completing committee tasks and coordinating the annual training school
 and conference. This is a part-time position that requires flexibility
 to allow for seasonal work demands. The Executive Director will be an
 independent contractor and must provide all office space and equipment.
 The Executive Director will be reimbursed for approved travel expenses.

DUTIES

The principal duties of the Executive Director include:
 1. Serve as the administrator for CWMA
 2. Work closely with the CWMA President, the Executive Committee, the
   Board of Directors and the membership of CWMA
 3. Process membership dues, event registrations and purchases.
 4. Responsible for all aspects of fiscal management working closely with
   the association's Finance Committee and Treasurer.
 5. Carry out tasks and projects assigned by the Executive Committee,
   Board of Directors and Committee Chair
 6. Facilitate interactions between CWMA and other similar organizations,
   working in support of the partnership.
 7. Work with other organizations to enhance participation in CWMA
   activities
 8. Assist with the organization of CWMA meetings and trainings, and in
   consultation with the Committee Chairs, make facility arrangements.

QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

Essential
• Excellent verbal and written communication skills
• Demonstrated analytic ability, knowledge of sound business practices
• Works effectively with a variety of stakeholders
• Demonstrated leadership skills
• Ability to edit and produce quarterly newsletter
• Proficiency using computer software including QuickBooks, Word, Excel,
etc.
• In-depth knowledge of issues relating to noxious weed management
• In-depth understanding of policy issues related to noxious weeds

Desirable
• Experience with organizational administration
• Experience with graphic design
• Experience in grant writing

PAY RATE – Dependent on Experience
Range $17,000-$20,000 Annual Salary
Average 47 hours/month or 560 hours/year

APPLICATION SUBMISSION – DEADLINE: JANUARY 5, 2009

Application materials must include a cover letter, resume, a statement
addressing the essential and desirable qualification requirements, and
three (3) references. Application materials should be sent electronically
in a Word document to:

Elizabeth Brown, CWMA President
Elizabeth.Brown@state.co.us
Cell: 303-547-8690

Physical Address:
Elizabeth Brown
CDOW Aquatics
6060 Broadway
Denver, CO 80216




Island
Invasives Conference in February 2010 which I am unable to
answer. Work on our planning is progressing well. We are on track
to have the registration web page completed by the end of May
2009. Conference costs will not be known before that time.

It looks like attendance will be limited to 240 people.

If you wish to re-read the conference details go to
http://www.issg.org/events.html

Yours

Dick Veitch
Manager, Island Invasives Conference
48 Manse Road
Papakura 2113
New Zealand

Ph/fax +64 9 298 5775
dveitch@kiwilink.co.nz


From Sandhills to Sand Dunes


Dr. Larkin Powell, a UNL School of Natural Resource wildlife professor, and his family will leave Nebraska
later this month and travel to the African country of Namibia on a Fulbright grant for 2009. You can
learn more about Dr. Powell's research and follow his family's journey by reading their blog
http://namibiafulbright.blogspot.com/. It promises to be a great read!

Dr. Powell will teach wildlife management courses at the Polytechnic Institute in Windhoek, the capital
of Namibia, and will do research on landowner decision making concerning invasive species and
collaborative land management for wildlife and rural economic development. The Grassland
Foundation and WWF will provide financial assistance for his research while there and will work with
him on his return to disseminate his findings to interested parties in the Northern Great Plains, including
landowners in the Nebraska Sandhills. We wish Dr. Powell and his family safe travels, and hope you will
follow his blog next year; it promises to be an adventure.


Info to pass on.....
Research and control information sent to the PNW IPC.
Connections to this research information can be found at: http://www.pnw-ipc.org/
Contents:
         1) Biocontrol – from USDA APHIS PPQ. Did you know that APHIS can potentially provide
         bioagents free of charge? See below for more information.
         2) Are you struggling with Phragmites australis? Information on common reed collected
         earlier this fall can be found below.
         3) Temporal Effects of Ulex europaeus on Soil Properties, and Modeling Impact of Invasive
         Species with Respect to Time.
         4) What’s new in weed risk assessments? Check out the new WRA for Botanic Gardens
         recently published in the Plant Protection Quarterly.
                                                                                              &n bsp;
        1) Biocontrol Summary – The following represents an overview of the biocontrol agents
        collected and distributed by the Spokane Work Unit. Find the full report on the PNW IPC
        website under “Invasives/Research/Multi-Species/Biocontrol for knapweed, leafy spurge,
        saltcedar and toadflax”.
        Knapweed agents – Cyphocleonus achates, Larinus minutes, Spenoptera jugoslavica.
        Leafy spurge agents – Aphthona spp.
        Saltcedar agents – Diorhabda elongate
        Toadflax agents – Calophasia lunula, Mecinus janthinus
        Contact information – Larry Skillestad – 509-353-2950, larry.d.skillestad@usda.gov
        2) Phragmites australis – Is it native? Should it be controlled? How?
        You can find a great publication on the IPC website, entitled “A Guide to the Control and
        Management of Invasive Phragmites”. This can be found in the usual location, under
        “Invasives/Research/Single Species/Phragmites australis”.
        Potential contacts – Dennis Chambreau – King County Noxious Weeds, Dave Heimer - State Fish
        and Wildlife, Greg Haubrich – Washington State Dept. of Agriculture. Let us know if you are
        working on phragmites! We can connect all of those working on phragmites in the PNW.
        Report from a conference – “a few years back on Phragmites control at a wildlife preserve run
        by the US Army Corps. They reported that applying glyphosate was only a temporary control but
        wasn't really reducing the infestation. When they switched to imazapyr they had significantly
        better results. I think that's generally the consensus now, both work but imazapyr gives better
        long term control.”
Report from Bernd Blossey - bb22@cornell.edu
Phragmites biocontrol work. Here is a quick summary of where we stand:
            a) Work on Phragmites biocontrol has been ongoing (at a slow pace) since 1998
            b) We have selected 4 promising moth species in the genera Archanara and Arenostola as
            potential biocontrol agents. These species do have severe impacts on Phragmites growth
            and are known to be host specific in Europe
            c) All species are currently undergoing host specificity work in Europe and at the
            University of RI (in quarantine). The focus in Europe is on crop species and discrimination
            between native and introduced North American Phragmites genotypes. The focus in RI is on
            native and related wetland species.
            d) Initial indications are that the herbivores are specific to Phragmites and show a strong
            preference for the introduced genotypes, however, it also appears that some attack may
            occur on the native genotypes. We still need to fine tune these test results with additional
            work in Europe in the field (most data are from field cages or no-choice tests). The
            morphological differences between native and introduced genotypes in regards to the leaf
            sheaths (falling off on the natives and remaining attached on the introduced) will likely
            result in high egg mortality for the moths if eggs are laid on natives. All moth species lay
            eggs under the leaf sheaths in August and eggs overwinter, but again we need to test that.
            e) Work program currently funded by NY DOT is incorporating ecological and economic
            analyses and you may hear more about this in the future. Any potential introduction of
            agents is years away, and will require finding a decision making process that weighs risks
            and benefits of introducing or of not introducing agents that may or may not be 100%
            specific to the introduced genotypes.
            This website by the Ecology and Management of Invasive Plants Program at Cornell, has a
            diagnostic service to determine whether you have a native or an introduced genotype as
            well as a wealth of additional information on phragmites. Check it out!
              http://invasiveplants.net/PhragHost.asp
         3) The Temporal Effects of Ulex europaeus on Soil Properties, and Modeling Impact of Invasive
         Species with Respect to Time, BRONWYN SCOTT and SARAH E. REICHARD (College of Forest
         Resources, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195, bronwyns@u.washington.edu).
    Abstract
    Invasive plants contribute to biodiversity loss and cause extensive economic damage and costs.
    Understanding the ecological impacts of invaders and why they are capable of displacing other
    species and communities is a priority. Much emphasis has been placed on the effects of invasives on
    ecosystem, community and population levels at a single point in time. However, these plants can
    continue to have effects as they stay resident. Gorse (Ulex europaeus) is invasive in many parts of
    the world. This research examined gorse’s ability to alter the soil properties, and was done on the
    Washington coast, where gorse is found growing on sand. In order to determine the age of gorse
    stands, the progression of invasion over time was assessed by counting annual rings in the stems.
    Invaded and univaded areas were compared, and gorse plants were selected randomly. From ring
    count, the gorse established in this area around 26 years ago. Significant linear regressions were
    found of soil properties over time, clearly showing that key soil properties, such as organic matter,
    pH and nitrogen had changed in a relatively short period of time. These unique results are part of
    the empirical evidence needed to evaluate the current status of ecological impact models. Current
    modeling treats impact as a discrete, not a continuous event. With improvements in impact models,
    recommendations can be made for more precise prediction, assessment and management of
    invasives as well as improved recovery of processes to facilitate easier restoration once invasives are
    removed.
         4) Australia’s Botanic Gardens weed risk assessment procedure. Plant Protection Quarterly,
         Vol 23 (4), 2008.
         J.G. Virtue, R.D. Spencer, J.E. Weiss and S.E. Reichard
         This article can also be found on the PNW IPC website under Invasives/Research/Multi-
         Species
Summary
    The majority of agricultural and environmental weeds in Australia have originated from ornamental
    horticulture. Botanic gardens require a simple yet robust method for rapidly screening the relative
    weed risk of taxa in their collections. A ten question, multiple choice, additive weed risk assessment
    system was developed for application to taxa growing in gardens. The major city botanic gardens in
    Melbourne, Hobart and Perth used the system to score 100 taxa. Separately, a national survey and a
    literature review of the same 100 taxa were undertaken to obtain two independent datasets for
    assessing their level of weediness. Testing of the system showed that it has good discriminatory
    power and cut-off scores were chosen that have about 80% accuracy for both low weed risk and
    high weed risk species. There was poorer accuracy to distinguish medium weed risk species. The
    system has wider potential application for the nursery and garden industry as a tool to help reduce
    the number of high weed risk ornamental species in cultivation.
Please remember to send the PNW IPC information on your research and/or control of invasive plants.
Send this to: info@pnw-ipc.org
Also remember to send us any questions/issues you may have on invasive plants. I will send these to
the Listserve. We now have 1478 subscribers. Someone can more than likely help you AND someone
else may very well have similar issues.
AND Please consider becoming a member of the PNW IPC AND use GoodSearch to search the internet to
benefit the PNW IPC. Just use the GoodSearch icon on the PNW IPC webpage and place it on your
toolbar to search in the future. Membership info, the GoodSearch icon and more can be found at:
http://www.pnw-ipc.org/
Lizbeth Ann Seebacher, Ph.D.
Coordinator
PNW Invasive Plant Council
info@pnw-ipc.org
U of W
Box 354115
Seattle, WA 98195
www.pnw-ipc.org


In arid West, a foreign legion of beetles takes on a thirsty invader

Scientists say the beetles released on Southwest riverbanks could tame the water-sucking tamarisk
trees.

By Ben Arnoldy | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor/ September 23, 2008 edition




University of California Santa Barbara ecologist Tom Dudley shows how the Diorhabda elongata beetle is
helping to clear the Virgin River Gorge of the tamarisk plant.




Virgin Gorge, Ariz.

Armies of foreign beetles are on the march along the river systems of the desert Southwest, and
ecologist Tom Dudley greets them as little green liberators.

He is among a group of scientists and land managers who are bringing the beetles to America to wage
war on tamarisk, an invasive plant that now dominates the Southwest riverbanks. The program holds
out the promise – and potential peril – of shifting the environment in the west for trees, birds, and
humans alike.

The tamarisk has become a pariah in these parts for crowding out native willow and cottonwood trees,
and worsening wildfires. But it’s the plant’s thirst that earns it the most ire. By some estimates, the
slender-branched shrub uses up more of the Colorado River than the residents of Las Vegas and
southern Nevada.
“We wanted to improve the habitat for native vegetation,” which has the added benefit of using much
less water, “maybe half as much,” says Mr. Dudley, a professor at the University of California, Santa
Barbara.

http://features.csmonitor.com/environment/2008/09/23/in-arid-west-a-foreign-legion-of-beetles-
takes-on-a-thirsty-invader/




6th INTERNATIONAL MARINE BIOINVASIONS CONFERENCE

Marine Bioinvaders: Agents of Change in a Changing World

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon USA

August 24-27, 2009



Conference web site: www.clr.pdx.edu/mbic/


Save the Date and Call for Special Sessions


The Sixth International Conference on Marine Bioinvasions will be held at Portland State University

(Oregon, USA) on 24-27 August 2009.

The conference will address the following:

•Ecological and evolutionary impacts, including potential shifts with global change

•Predicting the scale and diversity of invasions in the face of global change

•Measuring and predicting spread on regional and global scales

•Invasion patterns over time and space: does the past predict the future?

•Advances in detection, identification and tracking-to-origin capabilities

•Management, rapid response, eradication and restoration
A global review of marine invasive species: where they are, how they are
being introduced, and which ones are most harmful

http://conserveonline.org/workspaces/global.invasive.assessment

Aloha,
pt@philipt.com
http://www.philipt.com/
http://philipt.smugmug.com/Scuba%20adventures




Water Resources Specialist

The Lower Platte South Natural Resources District is accepting applications for a Water Resources
Specialist. This is a full-time position, whose responsibilities will
include development and implementation of water quality and quantity monitoring networks, collecting
and interpreting ground and surface water and soil samples, providing technical support for
development, review, and interpretation of models and studies of ground and surface water,
preparation of reports, periodic update of the District’s Groundwater Management Plan and the
District’s ground water management information system. Bachelor degree in natural sciences/resources
with experience in geology and ground water is preferred. The current salary range is $51,152 - $57,107.
The closing date for applications will be
December 19, 2008. If interested, please submit a letter of interest and resume to the attention of Kathy
Spence, Administrative Assistant, Lower Platte South NRD, 3125 Portia Street, P.O. Box 83581, Lincoln,
NE 68501-3581 or e-mail in a Word format to: jobs@lpsnrd.org. For further information please contact
the District at (402) 476-2729 or www.lpsnrd.org.



       Platte River Riparian Vegetation and Phragmites Control Projects Informational Meeting
The Platte Valley Weed Management Area(PVWMA) has received funding for invasive species control
projects over the past year. Governor Heineman signed LB 701 into legislation in 2007 which allocated
funding for vegetation control within the banks of the river systems in areas that are fully and over-
appropriated. Also, the Nebraska Department of Agriculture received an Environmental Trust grant for
noxious & invasive species control in the years 2006-2008, and the 2008-09 CPNRD budget included
funds for vegetation control in flood potential areas.



This PVWMA informational meeting will be reviewing these completed projects and looking ahead to
the 2009 vegetation and phragmites control projects.




  Thursday, December 4, 2008 at 10:00a.m. @ Central Platte
                        NRD Office
                                           (215 Kaufman Ave)




                                            Speakers Include:

                            Tom Carlson – District 38 Nebraska State Senator

                         Rich Walters – Platte Valley WMA Project Coordinator

                    Milt Moravek – Central Platte NRD




If there are any questions, feel free to contact the following people at any time.



Rob Schultz                                      Rich Walters

Hall County Weed Control                 Project Coordinator

2807 W 2nd St                            13650 S. Platte River Rd.
Grand Island, NE 68803                  Wood River, NE 68883

308.385.5097                            308.627.7369




---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Amy Johnson <ajohnso@unlnotes.unl.edu>
Date: Fri, Dec 12, 2008 at 12:06 PM
Subject: Holistic Management Classes Offered in Nebraska
To:



Just a Reminder that Holistic Management Classes will be held in Bloomfield, Nebraska in January.

Introduction to Holistic Management
January 5 & 6, 2009
8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. each day
Bloomfield Community Center
Cost $125 per person (regularly $250) - 2nd person in family or ranch ½ price
Topics include: Holisticgoal and Decision Making

Holistic Management® Financial Planning
January 7 & 8, 2009
8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. each day
Bloomfield Community Center
Cost $125 per person (regularly $250) - 2nd person in family or ranch ½ price

Space is still available. Call the UNL Extension Office at 402-288-5611 or email knox-county@unl.edu to
sign up or for more information.


These course will be taught by Holistic Management® Certified Educators in training with Terry
Gompert, HMI Certified Educator

Amy Johnson
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension
in Knox County
P.O. Box 45
Center NE 68724
402-288-5611
fax 402-288-5612
ajohnso@unlnotes.unl.edu



--
Tamara Choat
Coordinator, Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition
29108 Fletcher Ave.
Elmwood, NE 68349
Work/Cell: 402.430.3656
Work/Home: 402.817.1131
tamara@nebraskagrazinglands.org




Thursday (12-4-08) evening the Utah Wildlife Board acted to list Electric Lake, situated in Emery County,
Utah about 22 miles west of Huntington City at the headwaters of the Right Fork of the Huntington
River as the State's first water infested with Dreissenid mussels. Zebra mussels have been confirmed via
observation of veligers by cross-polarized microscopy followed by molecular PCR analysis using two
independent methods, of which one assesses nuclear DNA and the other assesses mitochondrial DNA.

Additionally, the Utah Wildlife Board listed two more Colorado waters as being infested with quagga
mussels. Jumbo Reservoir (also known as Julesburg Reservoir), which is 40 miles northeast from the
town of Sterling in Logan County, and Tarryall Reservoir, which is 15 miles southeast from the town of
Jefferson in Park County, were each determined to be infested with quagga mussels. Recently, Colorado
Division of Wildlife identified these waters as infested.

Additionally, the Utah Wildlife Board was appraised about Arizona’s Salt River Project canals, which
receive flows from the Central Arizona Project’s Lake Pleasant, that were recently confirmed as being
infested with quagga mussels. This fulfils an anticipated downstream movement of the mussels from
Lake Pleasant. The mussels are anticipated to compromise water delivery infrastructure, but no
recreational waters receive flow from the Salt River Project canals and the canals are not used for
recreational purposes. The Arizona information was not presented for Board action.

 Larry B. Dalton
 Aquatic Nuisance Species Coordinator
 801-652-2465
 larrydalton@utah.gov
 Postal Delivery:
 Utah Division of Wildlife Resources
 1594 W. North Temple, Suite 2110
 P.O. Box 146301
Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6301
2. Phragmites Prescribed Burn Demonstration is a Huge Success – Nebraska NRCS State Range
Conservationist Dana Larsen reported that the prescribed burn workshop held on November 18th was a
big success. The objectives of the burn were to train NRCS planners and partners in designing plans for
Phragmites; observe and understand fire behavior of phragmites; observe fire effects on two stands of
herbicide treated phragmites; observe specialized equipment to aid in safer application of fire; and
reduce the phragmites fuel load at the demonstration site. The demonstration was supported by the
Central Platte NRD, the Prescribed Burn Task Force, the Loess Canyons Rangeland Alliance, The Nature
Conservancy, Nebraska Game and Parks, and Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District.

The site had been sprayed with two kinds of herbicides the previous year to reduce the expansive
amount of phragmites in this portion of the Platte River near an irrigation structure. Phragmites or
common reed is an aggressive invasive plant whose populations have expanded in the river corridors.
Extensive efforts to control this plant through LB701 grants to Weed Management Associations have
resulted in 100's of miles of herbicide treatment on this plant, leaving highly flammable fuel loads. The
demonstration illustrated some of the planning challenges in this landscape where the limited
accessibility, an interstate highway, a power distribution line, and an airport required special planning
and preparation. The specialized equipment was a terratorch operated by the Loess Canyons Rangeland
Alliance which was used to help get fire where it was needed without compromising the safety of the
burn crew. Cooperation from Dawson Public Power, North Platte Airport Authority, North Platte Fire
Department, and Twin Valley Weed Management Association. Below are a couple of pictures from the
Phragmites prescribed burn demonstration.




                    The burn crew unit included; David Carr (Fire Boss), Justin Haahr
                    (NG&P), Lara Fandow (Prescribed Burn Task Force/NG&P), Chris
                     Rundstrom (TNC), Bill Carhart (TPNRD), Teri Edeal (NRCS) and
                                          Leah Carson (NRCS).
                      The fire burn crew initiates the prescribed burn with a torch
                                   that throws a flame up to 50 feet.



Ph.D. Position Open

After reviewing the information available at the web sites, please direct your questions to:
Peter B. Pearman <Pearman@wsl.ch>
Or
Nicolas Salamin <Nicolas.Salamin@unil.ch>

Project: Evolutionary Niche dyNamics of Invasive Species (ENNIS)

Project Description: The ENNIS project seeks to understand the relationship between the evolutionary
history of a clade, the niche variation and accompanying variation in the distribution of species, and the
tendency for plant species to become invasive and/or naturalized. The project will focus on clades that
have naturalized and invasive species in Switzerland and central Europe. We will use an interdisciplinary
approach that includes activities in niche modeling, sequencing DNA regions, phylogenetic
reconstruction and modeling trait evolution. The research includes characterization of the
environmental niches and distribution of clade members using multivariate statistics and niche-based
species distribution modeling; bioinformatics approaches to the use of sequence and phylogenetic
databases, and use of other databases on the distribution of invasive species. A substantial portion of
the research will involve production of DNA sequence data to complete phylogenetic trees of species in
clades that contain invasive and naturalized species in central Europe. Collection of material for
sequencing, and additional data on species global distributions, will involve visiting national herbaria,
botanical gardens, individual researchers, and doing fieldwork throughout the sum distribution of the
species in the focal clades. Phylogenetic reconstruction of evolutionary relationships will be undertaken
using likelihood and Bayesian methods. Modeling of evolutionary processes of ecological diversification
will be approached through the use of experimental software and the development of original
algorithms.

The Ph.D. Student Position
Description
The position includes funding for three years, during which you should be able to complete the degree.
You will be matriculated in the Ecology and Evolution doctoral program of the University of Lausanne
(UNIL), Switzerland, and will be a member of both the Department of Ecology and Evolution (DEE) at
that institution and at the Federal Research Institute WSL, located in Birmensdorf near Zürich. You will
spend substantial periods in residence at both institutions during the three-year period under the
supervision of Drs. Peter B. Pearman (WSL) and Nicolas Salamin (UNIL).

Starting date: You would hopefully be ready to begin by June 1st, 2009

To Apply: See websites

<http://www2.unil.ch/phylo>

<http://www.wsl.ch/personal_homepages/pearman>

After reviewing the information available at the web sites, please direct your questions to:
Peter B. Pearman <Pearman@wsl.ch>
Or
Nicolas Salamin <Nicolas.Salamin@unil.ch>


The Marine Invasions group of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center has funding for 6
internships.

The project: Assessing the Risk of Recreational Boating and Commercial Fishing as Vectors for Aquatic
Invasive Species in California

Interns are to be based at SERC (Edgewater, MD), SERC's satellite laboratory at The Romberg Tiburon
Center (Marin County, CA) or Portland State University (Portland, OR). Interns will be supervised by one
of several Principle Investigators: Dr I. Davidson and Dr M Sytsma (PSU), Dr C. Zabin (RTC) and Dr G. Ruiz
(SERC). The internships are a part of a larger project and candidates will be expected to conduct
independent work as well as collaborating with other scientists involved.

Start date: late November/early December

Duration: 3-4 months depending on progress and availability

Stipend: $400 per week

Roles and responsibilities: Each intern will be responsible for compiling a substantial literature review on
one of the following subjects:

*    Existing and potential impacts of aquatic invasive species introduced to California via recreational
boating and commercial fishing vectors
*    Fresh-water species and the role of overland recreational boating in introductions of aquatic
invasive species to California
*     Patterns of vessel traffic, vessel maintenance, risks and future trends related to fishing vessels in
California
*     Future trends in aquatic invasive species incursions to California and impact based on potential
changes in societal or industry trends, technological innovations and climate change
*     Management options, including existing management protocols in other parts of the world and
possible future directions (for California) including assessments of feasibility and cost.
*     Risk assessment of establishment and harm from aquatic invasive species introduced by
recreational boating and commercial fishing vectors in California

Eligible students: undergraduates including those recent graduates (within 6 months), students who
have been granted acceptance into a degree granting program (graduate studies) or early Master's
students.

Application process: submit a formal application (available from
http://www.serc.si.edu/pro_training/internships/apply.jsp
<https://webaccess.si.edu/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://www.serc.si.edu/pro_training/internship
s/apply.jsp> ), personal essay (including an indication of which topic(s) the student would be interested
to work on by ranking from 1-6), copy of transcripts (unofficial is acceptable), and two letters of
reference. Application materials should be sent to Christopher Brown (browncw@si.edu
<mailto:browncw@si.edu> or by mail: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, 3152 Paradise
Drive, Tiburon, CA 94920).

Application deadline: 14th November 2008

http://www.tu.org/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=kkLRJ7MSKtH&b=3158879&content_id={C3E7EE79
-4DC9-4F14-9E59-A21FB7ABDBE7}&notoc=1#red_gold


Recent Press Releases

September 12, 2008
Contact:
Erin Mooney, National Press Secretary 703-284-9408

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Trout Unlimited Asks Manufacturers to Eliminate Production of Felt-Soled Waders and Equipment by
2011
Effort will help prevent spread of aquatic nuisance species in America’s rivers and streams.

SALT LAKE CITY –At its annual meeting today, Trout Unlimited (TU) asked fishing equipment
manufacturers to stop producing felt-soled waders and wading shoes by 2011 to help stop the spread
of aquatic nuisance species (ANS) by anglers in America’s rivers and streams.

Many waders, wading boots and shoes used by anglers have felt-soled bottoms that are used to provide
traction while walking in water. Felt is a material that transmits aquatic nuisance species such as New
Zealand mud snails, the invasive algae called didymo and the parasite that causes whirling disease, a
disease fatal to trout. Felt soles can very easily become impregnated with mud and other organic
matter, and become difficult or impossible to clean and disinfect.

                      NDA Environmental Trust Grant in the Central Platte Valley

                                             By Rob Schultz




The Platte Valley Weed Management Area received an NDA Environmental Trust Grant in 2007 for
spraying phragmites and vegetation in the Platte River in Hall & Merrick/Hamilton counties. There was
124 acres phragmites and vegetation sprayed east of the Hwy 14 bridge in Merrick County and 132 acres
sprayed in the main channel between Hwy 281 and I-80 in Hall County. An awareness brochure was
developed and mailed out to all riparian landowners in the four counties. We did receive another grant
this year from the NDA to continue on spraying and do some removal. The USFWS did assist us on some
removal in Hall County on the area sprayed last year between Hwy 281 and I-80. The spraying that was
completed on September 30th took place in four project areas. A fixed wing aircraft was used to apply
aquatic glyphosate. A total of 938 acres were sprayed in the Platte River. The first area was east of the
Haven’s bridge in Polk County, second area was east and west of the prairie island bridge, third area was
around Busch Island in the Chapman area, and the fourth area was in Hall County between I-80 and Hwy
34 bridge. The phragmites and general vegetation is overtaking the river system and limiting the
capacity that it can carry. Everyone in the state of Nebraska needs to be involved in this crisis, or
someday the river will not be able to handle the amount of water that it needs to.




Prescribed burning seminar, tour in Curtis Oct. 14

Loess Canyons Rangeland Alliance to host educational event

ELMWOOD, Neb. — Let it burn! Landowners and conservationists are using one of nature's most
powerful forces — fire — to improve stewardship and forage quality on their land. On Oct. 14, come
learn about prescribed burning during a seminar and tour starting at noon in Curtis, Neb., at the Curtis
Cattle Company Restaurant.

Hosted by the Loess Canyons Rangeland Alliance in partnership with the Nebraska Grazing Lands
Coalition, the lunch seminar will feature two prominent speakers in prescribed burning. Ted Alexander
from Sun City, Kan., is president of the Red Hills Prescribed Burn Association. He and his son Brian will
speak about their experiences in Kansas and how their organization coordinates burns among
landowners. Orrin Connell is the owner of Fire Trax, LLC, out of Sheridan, Wyo. Connell will talk about
business development for entrepreneurs interested in starting a prescribed burning service. Lunch will
be provided for seminar attendees.

In the afternoon the group will tour prescribed burn sites on the Gary Nelson and Stan Pilcher ranches.
This portion of the day will be complete by 5 p.m., and attendees have the option to visit additional sites
owned by Gordon Gosnell and Rich Bringelson.

To learn more about the Loess Canyons Rangeland Alliance, contact president Stan Pilcher at 308-367-
7626 or smpilch@curtis-ne.com.



http://journalstar.com/articles/2008/10/09/news/local/doc48ed3a4919463972497299.txt

Animal Control documents 1st armadillo in Lincoln
BY MARK ANDERSEN / Lincoln Journal Star
Thursday, Oct 09, 2008 - 12:52:33 am CDT

An armadillo roadkill found in Lincoln in September was the first recorded by Animal Control, but the
leathery mammals have been spotted across the state for about a decade, according to the Nebraska
Game and Parks Commission.

They’re widespread but rare.

“It’s the first one we’ve documented,” Robert Westfall, with Lincoln’s Animal Control, said of the Sept.
11 report.



National Ag Week will be March 15–21, 2009.
CAST NOTES While you’re adding fall and winter holidays to your calendar, don’t forget to include this
important spring event: National Agriculture Day, March 20, 2009. That’s the day America recognizes
and celebrates agriculture. Every year, producers, agricultural associations, corporations, universities,
government agencies, and countless others across America join together to honor agriculture for
providing safe, abundant, and affordable products, a strong economy, a source of renewable energy,
and a world of job opportunities. National Ag Week will be March 15–21, 2009.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bw_KlQ2PRZU
Herbicide Ballistic Technology

http://features.csmonitor.com/environment/2008/09/23/in-arid-west-a-foreign-legion-of-beetles-
takes-on-a-thirsty-invader/


CAST FRIDAY NOTES-ZBMayo
(PPS)         September 22, 2008: The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has prohibited or
restricted the importation of ash plants from all foreign countries (except for certain areas in Canada) to
protect against the emerald ash borer. See
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/notices/content/2008/09/ashplant.shtml

(PPS)      September 23, 2008: Healthy-looking soybean plants can still suffer from soybean cyst
nematode. See http://cornandsoybeandigest.com/soybeans/0923_scouting_video/

(PPS)       September 23, 2008: Scientists have been urged to adopt environmentally friendly
methods to control pests. See http://www.freshplaza.com/news_detail.asp?id=29330

(PPS)       September 23, 2008: In the Southeast, thrips are “Enemy Number 1” for tomato and
pepper farmers. See http://southeastfarmpress.com/news/vegetable-diseases-0923/

(PPS)        September 23, 2008: In recent weeks, mountain pine beetles have arrived in Colorado’s
front range. See
http://newsinfo.colostate.edu/index.asp?url=news_item_display&news_item_id=807998234

(PPS)       September 23, 2008: Floods and other unfavorable weather may have wiped out or
limited Midwest crop yields this year, but the conditions seem to be just what weeds like. See
http://www.agweb.com/get_article.aspx?pageid=145882

(PPS)         September 24, 2008: Results of a recent study indicate that extreme flood events in
floodplain grasslands affect carabid beetles and mollusks more than plants. See
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-09/haog-vha092408.php

(PPS)        September 24, 2008: There are new rules on pesticide residues to strengthen food safety
in the European Union. See http://www.pepperstoday.com/new.php?news_id=832

(PPS)        September 24, 2008: The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has suspended the
importation of cut flowers and greenery from New Zealand due to recent interceptions of light brown
apple moth. See http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/content/2008/09/nz_cutflowers_lbam.shtml

(PPS)       September 24, 2008: Pine bark beetles may be altering the Rocky Mountain air quality
and weather. See http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=112290&org=NSF&from=news

(PPS)        September 25, 2008: Scientists have completed the genome sequence and genetic map of
one of the world’s most common and destructive plant parasites. See
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080923104412.htm

(PPS)          September 25, 2008: There are several advantages to controlling winter annual weeds in
the fall. See http://cornandsoybeandigest.com/corn/0925_winter_weed_control/


(PSES)      September 19, 2008: Some plants normally considered weeds can be used as a source of
emergency forage, says a North Dakota State beef specialist. See
http://beefmagazine.com/cowcalfweekly/0919-weeds-used-emergency-crop/
SEPTEMBER


http://wssa.allenpress.com/perlserv/?request=index-html

Invasive Plant Science and Management Journal


Upcoming event of interest to Invasives workers:

Open House at University of Nebraska State Museum's research collections
of plants and animals, Saturday, October 11, 1:30-4:30 on fourth and
fifth floors on the 16th Street side of Nebraska Hall (not the 17t St.
side, and not Morrill Hall !).

The collections have hundreds of thousands of specimens of plants,
insects, fish, reptiles, birds, mammals, and fossils, some of which will
be on display.

Tours of the collections will be given. Specimens of unusual interest
will be on display, including some first Nebraska collections of
invasive plants such as bindweed (in 1889), spotted knapweed (1917), and
purple loosestrife (1972).

A general announcement to the public will be released in October.

I just received your email forwarded from our regional office in Omaha and thought that I would pass on
some information. In your email you had, "If your agency is hosting data." I didn't exactly know what
you meant by that, but figured that you were asking agencies to share data on their weed control
efforts. In the midwest region of the national park service we have a webpage highlighting our efforts.
There are two teams. At Scotts Bluff we are serviced by the Northern Great Plains Exotic Plant
Management Team as compared to the Great Lakes Team. Both teams' annual reports can be found at
the email address below. The address is lengthy so people may want to simply cut and paste it and then
save it as a favorite or just check it out one time. Fell free to place this in your next newsletter so that
others in the state can see what we are up to in weed control in the midwest region.

http://midwest.nps.gov/office/natural/other_natural_resources/exotic_plant_mgmt_teams.cfm#SOP

Thanks,

Robert Manasek
Resource Management Specialist
Scotts Bluff National Monument, NE

voice: 308 436-9721
fax: 308 436-7611


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/09/14/AR2008091401640.html
Hunter Green
The People Behind a Conservation Success Story
By Steve Sanetti

Monday, September 15, 2008; Page A19

Today's green movement uses certain buzzwords -- organic, locavore, renewable -- to the wry
amusement of 15 million to 20 million of us who've actually lived the eco-friendly lifestyle that these
words describe.

We are hunters.

As a subset of America, we're admittedly somewhat smaller than we used to be. Our numbers have
been steadily pressed beneath a culture growing ever faster, more complex and distant from its rural
ancestry. Now, like growing vegetables, gathering fresh eggs and raising farm animals for the table, the
proclivity and skill to harvest Earth's bounty of wild game -- and to pass on this tradition to those longing
for simpler ways of life -- reside in only a relative few of us.

The meats that hunters and their families consume are grown unfettered by hormones, processed feeds
or fences. Low in fat and cholesterol, high in protein, wild game is organic defined. The American Heart
Association and American Cancer Society recommend venison, rabbit, pheasant and duck over many
commercially produced, packaged and distributed alternatives.




Data gathered by my organization show that 84 percent of us hunt exclusively in our home states. Only 5
percent never hunt locally. Compared with consumers of U.S. supermarket food, which routinely travels
as much as 2,500 miles from source to table, we are model locavores.

But "renewable" is perhaps where hunters shine greenest.

Today, every state has thriving game populations in habitats that sustain hunted as well as non-hunted
species. It's a richness of life that many Americans enjoy regardless of their environmental persuasion.
Yet most also take it for granted, unaware of the mechanisms that sustain this public resource. They see
more wildlife every year but are oblivious to why that's so.

Begun well over a century ago, the success of modern conservation can only be fully understood against
the backdrop of historical slaughter for markets that took 40 million buffalo to the brink of extinction
and 5 billion passenger pigeons beyond it. It was hunters who led a revolution of new values, new
science and new approaches for responsible use of these resources. Seasons, game limits and wildlife
conservation funds all came from hunters, and we are immensely proud of that effort. Because of us,
white-tailed deer, pronghorn antelope, elk, wild turkeys, wood ducks and hundreds of other cherished
life forms transitioned from vanishing to flourishing.

Even in today's renaissance of eco-consciousness, we remain the most stalwart supporters of wild
things. Hunters and sport-shooters now pay for more than 80 percent of all conservation and habitat
programs in America. Through licenses, tags, permits, fees and special excise taxes on firearms,
ammunition, bows and arrows, we've paid -- and state fish and game agencies have successfully plied --
more than $5.3 billion since 1939. And we pushed for this tax on ourselves. No conservation system has
accomplished more.

As the cost of conservation rises, we're upping our outlays even as we remain a relatively small
percentage of the population. In fact, our data show that the price of hunting licenses is outpacing the
rate of inflation by more than 30 percent. Each year America's hunters contribute more for wildlife.

Taxing hunters to fund the health of public wildlife is a proud part of our heritage. In tomorrow's world,
however, this financing may be merely the second-best byproduct of what we do. As civilization
struggles to balance modern lifestyles with organic, local, renewable resources, hunters are indeed
among the deepest wells of expertise on the planet.

Our very identity clings steadfastly to stewardship of land, clean water and air, intimate knowledge of
natural communities, and careful interaction with the good earth -- because that's how we've ensured
abundant wildlife and good hunting for more than 100 years.

For us, the amusing irony is that American society, which has looked down its nose at hunters more
sternly with each passing generation, is discovering that camouflage has been a primary shade of green
all along.

Steve Sanetti is president and chief executive of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, a trade
association based in Connecticut. Previously he was an executive and general counsel for the firearms
manufacturer Sturm, Ruger and Co.

http://arkansasmatters.com/content/fulltext/news/?cid=115361

UA Art Professor's Little Shop of Horrors
Reported by: KARK 4 News

Thursday, Sep 18, 2008 @10:00am CST

Snakehead fish, honeybees, kudzu and feral pigs — also called razorbacks — are all invasive species.
Some scientists think such invaders are among the top two or three forces driving other species into
extinction.
Kristin Musgnug finds in them the potential for art and for a different way of looking at the natural
world. Musgnug, an associate professor of painting in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and
Sciences at the University of Arkansas, has won a fellowship from the Virginia Center for the Creative
Arts. From Sept. 23 through Oct. 19, she will be in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in rural
Virginia, one of 20 fellows concentrating on their creative projects at a working retreat for visual artists,
writers and composers.



SUMMER

Species Spotlight: This will feature a new invasive species every month, including links to further
information.
Silver and Bighead Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Hypophthalmichthys nobilis)

Project Spotlight: This will feature a new invasive species research project every month.
Aquatic Invasive Species Research: Evaluating Asian carp colonization potential and impact in the Great
Lakes. National Sea Grant.

Introducing: This will feature a group doing great things for invasive species management.
The Nebraska Leafy Spurge Working Task Force
The Nebraska Grazing Lands Coalition
The Weed Science Society of America

Invasives News: This will feature a variety of interesting stories, events, and projects going on in
Nebraska, and more!
Flying Fish Breaks Arkansas Teen's Jaw
Angler issues call to arms for sport fishermen to develop a taste for Asian carp
Asian Carp Website
Updates by Mitch Coffin, Noxious Weed Program, Nebraska Department of Agriculture
View the Missouri River Watershed Coalition’s map of Saltcedar
Reclaimed River
Ranking and mapping exotic species at Capulin Volcano and Fort Union national monuments
Dawes County Offers Bindweed Mites As Alternative To Spraying
Leaders Adopt National Plan to Combat Invasive Species
The Non-Native Wildlife Invasion Prevention Act
Friendly Invaders
Invasive Species Manager’s Toolkit
Invasive Weed Impact Calculator
Biocontrol Insect Exacerbates Invasive Weed

Just For Fun: Check out fun features, like recipes and fun facts.
Explore landscapes with Michael Farrell
Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants
David Jude’s professional and musical career

Upcoming Events: Check here for upcoming invasive species events.
September 9-11, Husker Harvest Days
September 20-21, Missouri River Outdoor Expo
September 21, UNL Department of Entomology, Experience the Power of Bugs
October 7-10, Annual RC&D Conference
October 14 – 17, Nashville, Tennessee, 2008 Natural Areas
October 28-29, Nebraska Weed Control Association Fall Training



SPECIES SPOTLIGHT



PROJECT SPOTLIGHT


INTRODUCING


INVASIVES NEWS


2. Goodbye tncweeds web site; hello tncinvasives (Global, Planet Earth)
From: Barry Rice (brice(at)tnc.org )

Webmasters note: our web site url has changed from http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu to
http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu. All deeper url references are unchanged other than the top-level url
change; for example the Gallery of Pests url has changed from http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu/gallery.html
to http://tncinvasives.ucdavis.edu/gallery.html, etc.

In fact, you can simply refer to our front page using the much simpler: http://www.tncinvasives.org

Nice, huh?




Research and control information sent to the PNW IPC.
Connections to this research information can be found at: http://www.pnw-ipc.org/

        1) Biocontrol Summary – The following represents an overview of the biocontrol
        agents collected and distributed by the Spokane Work Unit. Find the full report on the
        PNW IPC website under “Invasives/Research/Multi-Species/Biocontrol for knapweed,
        leafy spurge, saltcedar and toadflax”.
        Knapweed agents – Cyphocleonus achates, Larinus minutes, Spenoptera jugoslavica.
        Leafy spurge agents – Aphthona spp.
        Saltcedar agents – Diorhabda elongate
        Toadflax agents – Calophasia lunula, Mecinus janthinus
        Contact information – Larry Skillestad – 509-353-2950, larry.d.skillestad@usda.gov
         2) Phragmites australis – Is it native? Should it be controlled? How?
         You can find a great publication on the IPC website, entitled “A Guide to the Control and
         Management of Invasive Phragmites”. This can be found in the usual location, under
         “Invasives/Research/Single Species/Phragmites australis”.
         Potential contacts – Dennis Chambreau – King County Noxious Weeds, Dave Heimer -
         State Fish and Wildlife, Greg Haubrich – Washington State Dept. of Agriculture. Let us
         know if you are working on phragmites! We can connect all of those working on
         phragmites in the PNW.
         Report from a conference – “a few years back on Phragmites control at a wildlife preserve run by
         the US Army Corps. They reported that applying glyphosate was only a temporary control but wasn't really
         reducing the infestation. When they switched to imazapyr they had significantly better results. I think that's
         generally the consensus now, both work but imazapyr gives better long term control.”
Report from Bernd Blossey - bb22@cornell.edu
Phragmites biocontrol work. Here is a quick summary of where we stand:
             a) Work on Phragmites biocontrol has been ongoing (at a slow pace) since 1998
             b) We have selected 4 promising moth species in the genera Archanara and Arenostola as potential
             biocontrol agents. These species do have severe impacts on Phragmites growth and are known to be
             host specific in Europe
             c) All species are currently undergoing host specificity work in Europe and at the University of RI
             (in quarantine). The focus in Europe is on crop species and discrimination between native and
             introduced North American Phragmites genotypes. The focus in RI is on native and related wetland
             species.
             d) Initial indications are that the herbivores are specific to Phragmites and show a strong preference
             for the introduced genotypes, however, it also appears that some attack may occur on the native
             genotypes. We still need to fine tune these test results with additional work in Europe in the field
             (most data are from field cages or no-choice tests). The morphological differences between native and
             introduced genotypes in regards to the leaf sheaths (falling off on the natives and remaining attached
             on the introduced) will likely result in high egg mortality for the moths if eggs are laid on natives. All
             moth species lay eggs under the leaf sheaths in August and eggs overwinter, but again we need to test
             that.
             e) Work program currently funded by NY DOT is incorporating ecological and economic analyses
             and you may hear more about this in the future. Any potential introduction of agents is years away,
             and will require finding a decision making process that weighs risks and benefits of introducing or of
             not introducing agents that may or may not be 100% specific to the introduced genotypes.
            This website by the Ecology and Management of Invasive Plants Program at Cornell,
            has a diagnostic service to determine whether you have a native or an introduced
            genotype as well as a wealth of additional information on phragmites. Check it out!
            http://invasiveplants.net/PhragHost.asp
         3) The Temporal Effects of Ulex europaeus on Soil Properties, and Modeling Impact of
         Invasive Species with Respect to Time, BRONWYN SCOTT and SARAH E.
         REICHARD (College of Forest Resources, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195,
         bronwyns@u.washington.edu).
     Abstract
Invasive plants contribute to biodiversity loss and cause extensive economic damage and costs. Understanding the
ecological impacts of invaders and why they are capable of displacing other species and communities is a priority.
Much emphasis has been placed on the effects of invasives on ecosystem, community and population levels at a
single point in time. However, these plants can continue to have effects as they stay resident. Gorse (Ulex
europaeus) is invasive in many parts of the world. This research examined gorse’s ability to alter the soil properties,
and was done on the Washington coast, where gorse is found growing on sand. In order to determine the age of
gorse stands, the progression of invasion over time was assessed by counting annual rings in the stems. Invaded and
univaded areas were compared, and gorse plants were selected randomly. From ring count, the gorse established in
this area around 26 years ago. Significant linear regressions were found of soil properties over time, clearly showing
that key soil properties, such as organic matter, pH and nitrogen had changed in a relatively short period of time.
These unique results are part of the empirical evidence needed to evaluate the current status of ecological impact
models. Current modeling treats impact as a discrete, not a continuous event. With improvements in impact models,
recommendations can be made for more precise prediction, assessment and management of invasives as well as
improved recovery of processes to facilitate easier restoration once invasives are removed.




http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/01/12/eco.macquarieisland/?iref=intlOnlyonCNN


Cat control lead to eco disaster on World Heritage island
(CNN) -- Efforts to remove cats from Macquarie Island, a sub-Antarctic island and World Heritage Site,
have indirectly led to environmental devastation, according to a report published in the Journal of
Applied Ecology.
The removal of cats has led to a boom in the island's rabbit population -- another species introduced by
humans -- causing widespread devastation to the island's vegetation.




The National Environmental Coalition on Invasives Species (NECIS)
Action Plan for President Obama and the 111th Congress can be found
online at the Union of Concerned Scientists website:

http://www.ucsusa.org/invasive_species/solutions/NECIS-action-plan.html


The impacts of invasive species go well beyond a local site or a single state. Countless expert
reports from public and private groups have brought attention to these impacts and called for
federal action to address invasive species problems. To date, progress has been woefully
inadequate. However, there are opportunities to act. We call upon President Obama and
the 111th Congress to immediately take the following steps to benefit our nation:

1. Screen intentional imports
2. Prevent inadvertent introductions
3. Fund early detection and response
4. Create and support federal leadership
5. Fill other funding gaps



http://www.ucsusa.org/assets/documents/invasive_species/invasives_tragedy_revisted_1.pdf

The tragedy of the commons revisited:
invasive species
Just as an individual who benefits from grazing cattle
on the village commons may be depleting the resource
for others, importers generally benefit from introduced
invasive species that may cause harm in some way. These
introduced species cause enormous economic (Pimental
et al. 2000) and environmental (Mack et. al. 2000) problems,
including competition for resources, alteration of
ecosystem properties such as nutrient cycling and hydrology,
and increased disturbances. Controlling problem
species often requires application of pesticides and
mechanical controls that are harmful to non-target
species. Economic damage includes the loss of fisheries,
forests, and suitable farmland, and the cost of control.

JUST FOR FUN



http://www.phragwrites.com/index.html
Friends and foes of Phragmites australis are welcome to this site that challenges the notions of good
and evil, right and wrong, profit and non-profit. This tiny, tiny business is driven by an unholy
capitalistic goal to go out of business - to be so successful as to depleat the Phragmites resource until
it vanishes from its adopted habitats.
Phragwrites, pronounced [FRAG-right-ease], are pens constructed with an invasive strain of the plant
Phragmites australis, also called the common reed. Originally from Europe, this strain grows in dense
stands that disrupt the ecology of North American wetlands, especially along the Atlantic Coast.




UK accused of 'racism' towards invaders from across the pond

"Save the aliens!" is the cry – and an unusual one too. Safeguarding
Britain's flora and fauna from the ravages of mankind and "non-native
invader" species has become the largely unquestioned cause célèbre of a
generation.

In a new book, however, a leading historian argues this "culturally-
determined" idea of native and non-native species is fundamentally flawed,
and calls attempts to preserve the genetic identity of British wildlife
"quasi-racist"...

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/nature/uk-accused-of-racism-towards-invaders-from-
across-the-pond-1515728.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/07/dining/07squirrel.html?_r=2


Saving a Squirrel by Eating One
RARE roast beef splashed with meaty jus, pork enrobed in luscious crackling fat, perhaps a juicy, plump
chicken ... these are feasts that come to mind when one thinks of quintessential British food. Lately,
however, a new meat is gracing the British table: squirrel.



February 03, 2009

Climate Change's Impact On Invasive Plants In Western US May Create Restoration Opportunities (Jan
30, 2009)
ScienceDaily.
A new study by researchers at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International
Affairs has found that global climate change may lead to the retreat of some invasive plant species in
the western United States, which could create unprecedented ecological restoration opportunities
across millions of acres throughout America. At the same time, global warming may enable other
invasive plants to spread more widely.




January 26, 2009

Barack Obama and Joe Biden: Committed to Great Lakes Restoration (PDF | 51 KB)
Great Lakes Environmental Law Center.
The Obama-Biden Administration will address the serious problem of invasive species by taking more
aggressive steps to prevent their introduction into the Great Lakes. He will join in efforts with the eight
Great Lakes states to stop the discharge of invasive species from the ballast water of ships. They will
aggressively pursue policies and dedicate federal funds to control and prevent Asian Carp and other new
harmful species from entering the Great Lakes. They will also enhance investment in research,
development and necessary actions, such as electric barriers, to support efforts to prevent, control, and
eradicate invasive species, as well as to educate citizens and stakeholders.




January 12, 2009

CSREES, EPA and IPM Centers Release IPM in Schools Strategic Plan (Jan 7, 2009)
USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES), in partnership with the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Regional Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Centers
and the IPM Institute released a strategic plan to implement IPM practices in schools. The plan was
created to reduce pest and pesticide-related hazards to children in the U.S. public schools by 2015.

School IPM 2015: A Strategic Plan for Integrated Pest Management in Schools in the United States (Dec
3, 2008; PDF | 2.3 MB)




January 05, 2009

Grazing Animals Help Spread Plant Disease (Dec 29, 2008)
Oregon State University.
Researchers have discovered that grazing animals including deer and rabbits are actually helping to
spread plant disease – quadrupling its prevalence in some cases – and encouraging an invasion of annual
grasses that threatens more than 20 million acres of native grasslands in California.




http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/deer.htm

SNAKES, SALAMANDERS AND OTHER CREATURES THRIVE IN AREAS WITH HIGHER DEER
POPULATIONS

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Reducing the number of deer in forests and parks may unexpectedly reduce the
number of reptiles, amphibians and insects in that area, new research suggests.




The Nebraska Department of Agriculture Western and Central Nebraska Nursery Inspector position is
currently being advertised and closes 1/23/09. Please forward to anyone you think may be interested.
They will consider May 2009 college graduates.

http://www.das.state.ne.us/personnel/nejobs/pro.htm#engineer
Explore landscapes with Michael Farrell
L. Kent Wolgamott
August 11, 2008



NSF IGERT PhD Traineeships for Risk Analysis of Introduced Species and Genotypes

The Risk Analysis for Introduced Species and Genotypes IGERT at the University of Minnesota
seeks applicants to enter the program in Fall 2009. This Integrative Graduate Education and
Research Traineeship (IGERT) Program is supported by the National Science Foundation and
focuses on policy-relevant research. Questions should be directed to the program director, Prof.
Ray Newman ISGIGERT@umn.edu.

The program educates Ph.D. students to conduct research to improve Ecological Risk Analysis
and contribute workable solutions to policy questions and problems affecting management of
introduced species and genotypes. Trainees will complete a graduate minor in Risk Analysis for
Introduced Species and Genotypes and typically receive two years of NSF funding which
includes a stipend of $30,000 and an annual allowance of $10,500 to cover tuition and health
insurance.




Eulogy to Grass by John James Ingalls – Taken from Steve Chick, State Conservationist’s Friday
Message.

“Next in importance to the divine profusion of water, light, and air, those three physical facts which render
existence possible, may be reckoned the universal beneficence of grass. Lying in the sunshine among
the buttercups and dandelions of May, scarcely higher in intelligence than the minute tenants of that
mimic wilderness, our earliest recollections are of grass; and when the fitful fever is ended, and the
foolish wrangle of the market and the forum is closed, grass heals over the scar which our descent into
the bosom of the earth has made, and the carpet of the infant becomes the blanket of the dead.

Grass is the forgiveness of Nature – her constant benediction. Fields trampled with battle, saturated with
blood, torn with ruts of cannon, grow green again with grass, and carnage is forgotten. Streets
abandoned by traffic become grass-grown, like rural lanes, and are obliterated. Forests decay, harvests
perish, flowers vanish, but grass is immortal. Beleaguered by the sullen hosts of winter it withdraws into
the impregnable fortress of its subterranean vitality and emerges upon the solicitation of spring. Sown by
the winds, by the elements which are its ministers and servants, it softens the rude outlines of the world.
It invades the solitude of deserts, climbs the inaccessible slopes and pinnacles of mountains, and
modifies the history, character and destiny of nations. Unobtrusive and patient, it has immortal vigor and
bides its time to return, and when vigilance is relaxed or the dynasty has perished, it silently resumes the
throne from which it has been expelled but which it never abdicates: It bears no blazonry of bloom to
charm the senses with fragrances or splendor, but its homely hue is more enchanting than the lily of the
rose. It yields no fruit in earth or air, yet should its harvest fail for a single year famine would depopulate
the world.”
UPCOMING EVENTS


Odum Conference 2009, "Understanding and managing biological invasions
as dynamic processes: integrating information across space and time"
http://nyisri.org/Odum.aspx

Conference dates: April 30 – May 1, 2009

Venue: The Rensselaerville Institute, and the E.N. Huyck Preserve and
Biological Research Station, both in, Rensselaerville, NY, USA (about 25
mi. from Albany, NY)

Speakers: Prominent figures in invasion ecology, management, and policy
will be giving individual presentations and holding panel discussions.
For a complete list of speakers, please visit the conference website:
http://nyisri.org/Odum.aspx

Theme: This conference will focus on: 1) incorporating a dynamic
perspective into invasion ecology and management; 2) developing specific
mechanisms to assemble and evaluate the needed datasets; and 3)
fostering a collaborative research-management approach wherein
site-specific data reveal broad patterns, which in turn yield management
recommendations.



              8th Annual Planned Grazing Systems
                              Educational Workshop
                        Lifelong Learning Center – Norfolk, Nebraska

                                   Tuesday, February 10, 2009

                                       10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.




the 2009 North American Weed Management Assoc. (NAWMA) Annual Conference and Trade Show
Sept. 21-24, 2009 in Kearney, Ne. We look forward to having you display some information about your
organization at our conference. If there are any questions, feel free to get in contact with me at any time.


International Congress on Biological Invasions, Fuzhou, China
The International Congress on Biological Invasions (ICBI) will be held on 2-6 November 2009 in Fuzhou,
Fujian Province, China. The theme of ICBI is managing biological invasions under global change. This
congress will be a forum to respond to increasing IAS issues worldwide, targeting the needs of IAS
management at national, regional and international levels.
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