Bloodborne

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					                                          Course Curriculum for:
                                         Bloodborne Pathogens


I.     Course Prerequisites
        •    None

II.    Instructor's Qualifications
        •    Prior successful completion of this course
        •    Understanding of the requirements of OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1030

III.   Course Visual Aids
        •    Video: " Bloodborne Pathogens" (optional)
        •    Hepatitis B Declination Form

IV.    Training Method Used
        •       1.5        Hours of classroom instruction
        •       0.5        Hours of practical or hands on training

V.     Course Objectives
       Successful completion of this course is contingent upon the student's ability to demonstrate the
       following:
            Understanding of the Blood borne Pathogen Standard
            Understanding, location and contents of the facilities Exposure Control Plan
            Ability to determine appropriate waste disposal containers
            Understanding of the PPE types, location, decontamination and disposal procedures
            Understanding of the procedures to follow if an exposure incident occurs
            Understanding of the waste disposal procedures


VI.    Course Contents


       A.   Introduction

            The blood borne pathogens standard is designed to minimize or eliminate occupational
            exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. The standard covers all employees
            who could be “reasonably anticipated” to come in contact with blood or blood products as part
            of their job function. OSHA realizes that exposure to these materials can result in disease
            transmission and possibly death. Infectious materials covered by this standard include blood,
            blood products, and almost any body fluid, including semen and saliva.

            OSHA requires employers to provide initial and update training to all employees who may
            come in contact with potentially infectious material. Training must be provided at the time of
            initial assignment to tasks where occupational exposure may take place and at least annually
            thereafter.




                                        Bloodborne Pathogens                                                 1
     Employees working in HIV and HVB laboratories and production facilities require additional
     training which is beyond the scope of this course. This additional training includes training in
     microbiological practices and techniques as well as prior experience handling human
     pathogens.


B.   Explanation of the Bloodborne Pathogens OSHA Standard

     The blood borne pathogens standard is designed to minimize or eliminate occupational
     exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials.


C:   Epidemiology and Symptoms of Bloodborne Diseases

     A bloodborne pathogen is an infectious disease that is present in human blood. The pathogen
     can cause infectious diseases that range from the benign common cold to such fearsome
     conditions as AIDS and hepatitis. Infections are usually characterized by several stages. First,
     the organism gains access to the patient, survives within the body, and multiplies. Next, the
     patient manifests symptoms of illness and, in some instances, sheds organisms that have the
     potential to infect other individuals. The patient may die or recover spontaneously, or the
     infection may respond to specific therapy. After having an infection a person may develop an
     immunity which results in resistance to infection by the same organism in the future.

     AIDS

     Acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a recently recognized disease. It is caused
     by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which attacks selected cells in the
     immune system and produces defects in function. These defects may not be apparent for
     years. They lead to a severe suppression of the immune system's ability to resist harmful
     organisms. This leaves the body open to an invasion by various infections called opportunistic
     diseases, and to the development of unusual cancers. The virus also tends to reach certain
     brain cells. This leads to psychological disturbances caused by physical damage to nerve cells
     in the brain.

     It is estimated that millions of people have been infected with the virus but have not yet
     developed clinical symptoms. AIDS cases have been reported in about 162 countries
     worldwide. No cure or vaccine now exists for AIDS. Many of those infected with HIV may not
     even be aware that they carry and can spread the virus.

     Researchers have isolated HIV from a number of body fluids, including blood, semen, saliva,
     tears, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, and certain cervical and vaginal secretions.
     Strong evidence indicates, however, that HIV is transmitted only through three primary routes;
     sexual activity, non-digestive exposure to infected blood or blood products, and from an
     infected mother to her child before or during birth.

     No scientific evidence supports transmission of AIDS through ordinary nonsexual conduct.
     Careful studies demonstrate that despite prolonged household contact with infected
     individuals, family members have not become infected, except through the routes described
     above. Health care workers have been infected with HIV from exposure to contaminated blood
     or by accidentally sticking themselves with contaminated needles.

     Following infection with HIV, an individual may show no symptoms at all, or may develop an
     acute but transient mononucleosis-like illness. The signs and symptoms of HIV infection
     include; fever, diarrhea, severe weight loss, persistent night sweats, nausea, headache, sore
     throat, fatigue, rashes, muscle and joint aches, loss of appetite, and swollen lymph nodes. The




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     period between initial infection and the development of AIDS can vary greatly, from about 6
     months to 11 years. Various estimates indicate that somewhere between 26 to 46 percent of
     infected individuals will go on to develop full-blown AIDS within a little more than 7 years
     following infection. Once AIDS sets in, the clinical course generally follows a rapid decline;
     and most people with AIDS die within 5-10 years.

     Hepatitis

     Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. Symptoms include loss of appetite, dark urine, fatigue,
     and sometimes fever. The liver may become enlarged and jaundice may occur, giving the skin
     a yellow tinge. Hepatitis may be acute or chronic. The acute form can subside after about two
     months or, rarely, can result in liver failure. Chronic carriers are at risk of liver disease.

     Hepatitis A, once called infectious hepatitis, is the most common cause of acute hepatitis.
     Usually transmitted by food and water contaminated by human waste, such infections can
     reach epidemic proportions in unsanitary regions. In the United States, increasing numbers of
     drug abusers are coming down with this form of hepatitis.

     Hepatitis B is spread mainly by blood or blood products. It is also known to be transmitted
     from mother to fetus and by sexual contact. Type B virus is resistant to sterilization of
     instruments in hospitals, and it is also frequently seen in drug addicts who have shared
     needles. It often causes an initial episode of liver disease and may lead to chronic hepatitis.

     Hepatits C is also spread mainly by blood or blood products and can be transmitted from
     mother to fetus but rarely by sexual contact. HCV can lead to chronic infection and liver
     disease. Unlike HBV, there is currently no vaccine.


D:   Modes of Transmission

     Transmission of bloodborne diseases can occur through direct or indirect transmission. Direct
     transmission is “person-to-person” and indirect is “object to person”. You must be aware of all
     possible sources of exposure and protect yourself accordingly.


E: Exposure Control Plans

     Each employer having an employee with occupational exposure shall establish a written
     Exposure Control Plan designed to minimize or eliminate employee exposure. The Exposure
     Control Plan shall contain at least the following elements:

            An exposure determination (survey of job classifications and tasks with exposure),
            Schedule and method of implementation for methods of compliance,
            Hepatitis B vaccination policy,
            Post-exposure evaluation and follow-up procedure,
            Communication of hazards to employees,
            Recordkeeping, and
            Procedure for the evaluation of circumstances surrounding exposure incidents.

     Each employer shall ensure that a copy of the Exposure Control Plan is accessible to
     employees. The Exposure Control Plan shall be reviewed and updated at least annually and
     whenever necessary to reflect new or modified tasks and procedures which affect




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     occupational exposure and to reflect new or revised employee positions with occupational
     exposure. The review and update of such plans shall also:

            Reflect changes in technology that eliminate or reduce exposure to bloodborne
             pathogens; and
            Document annually consideration and implementation of appropriate commercially
             available and effective safer medical devices designed to eliminate or minimize
             occupational exposure.

     An employer, who is required to establish an Exposure Control Plan shall solicit input from
     non-managerial employees responsible for direct patient care who are potentially exposed to
     injuries from contaminated sharps in the identification, evaluation, and selection of effective
     engineering and work practice controls and shall document the solicitation in the Exposure
     Control Plan.

     Exposure determination. Each employer who has an employee(s) with occupational exposure
     shall prepare an exposure determination. This exposure determination shall contain the
     following:

            A list of all job classifications in which all employees in those job classifications have
             occupational exposure;

            A list of job classifications in which some employees have occupational exposure, and

            A list of all tasks and procedures or groups of closely related task and procedures in
             which occupational exposure.

         This exposure determination shall be made without regard to the use of personal
         protective equipment.


F:   Recognizing tasks that can result in exposure

     At this point, the instructor and student shall discuss all possible routes of exposure in their
     workplace.


G:   Control Measures – Methods Used to Prevent or Reduce the chance of exposure

     Universal precautions shall be observed to prevent contact with blood or other potentially
     infectious materials. Under circumstances in which differentiation between body fluid types is
     difficult or impossible, all body fluids shall be considered potentially infectious materials.

     Work Practice Controls means controls that reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering the
     manner in which a task is performed (e.g., prohibiting recapping of needles by a two-handed
     technique).

     Hand washing is the single most important measure for self protection against contagious
     diseases.

     To clean objects that have been contaminated by body fluids use disinfectant or chemical
     germicide that has been registered by the EP A. These can be found at hospitals and medical
     facilities. If these substances are not available use a mixture of 10 parts warm water to 1 part
     household bleach (5.25% sodium hypochlorite).




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Engineering and work practice controls shall be used to eliminate or minimize employee
exposure. Where occupational exposure remains after institution of these controls, personal
protective equipment shall also be used.

     1. Engineering controls shall be examined and maintained or replaced on a regular
        schedule to ensure their effectiveness.

     2. Employers shall provide hand washing facilities which are readily accessible to
        employees.

     3. When provision of hand washing facilities is not feasible, the employer shall provide
        either an appropriate antiseptic hand cleanser in conjunction with clean cloth/paper
        towels or antiseptic towelettes. When antiseptic hand cleansers or towelettes are
        used, hands shall be washed with soap and running water as soon as feasible.

     4. Employers shall ensure that employees wash their hands immediately or as soon as
        feasible after removal of gloves or other personal protective equipment.

     5. Employers shall ensure that employees wash hands and any other skin with soap
        and water, or flush mucous membranes with water immediately or as soon as
        feasible following contact of such body areas with blood or other potentially infectious
        materials.

     6. Shearing or breaking of contaminated needles is prohibited.

     7. Contaminated needles and other contaminated sharps shall not be
        bent, recapped or removed unless the employer can demonstrate
        that no alternative is feasible or that such action is required by a
        specific medical procedure.

     8. Such bending, recapping or needle removal must be accomplished
        through the use of a mechanical device or a one-handed technique.

     9. Immediately or as soon as possible after use, contaminated reusable sharps shall be
        placed in appropriate containers until properly reprocessed. These containers shall
        be:

                Puncture resistant;
                Labeled or color-coded in accordance with this standard;
                Leak proof on the sides and bottom; and
                Reusable sharps that are contaminated with blood or other potentially
                 infectious materials shall not be stored or processed in a manner that
                 requires employees to reach by hand into the containers where these sharps
                 have been placed.

     10. Eating, drinking, smoking, applying cosmetics or lip balm, and handling contact
         lenses are prohibited in work areas where there is a reasonable likelihood of
         occupational exposure.

     11. Food and drink shall not be kept in refrigerators, freezers, shelves, cabinets or on
         countertops or bench tops where blood or other potentially infectious materials are
         present.




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    12. All procedures involving blood or other potentially infectious materials shall be
        performed in such a manner as to minimize splashing, spraying, spattering, and
        generation of droplets of these substances.

    13. Mouth pipetting/suctioning of blood or other potentially infectious materials is
        prohibited.

    14. Specimens of blood or other potentially infectious materials shall be placed in a
        container which prevents leakage during collection, handling, processing, storage,
        transport, or shipping.

               The container for storage, transport, or shipping shall be labeled or color-
                coded and closed prior to being stored, transported, or shipped. When a
                facility utilizes Universal Precautions in the handling of all specimens, the
                labeling/color-coding of specimens is not necessary provided containers are
                recognizable as containing specimens. This exception only applies while
                such specimens/containers remain within the facility. Labeling or color-coding
                is required when such specimens/containers leave the facility.

               If outside contamination of the primary container occurs, the primary
                container shall be placed within a second container which prevents leakage
                during handling, processing, storage, transport, or shipping and is labeled or
                color-coded.

               If the specimen could puncture the primary container, the primary container
                shall be placed within a secondary container which is puncture-resistant in
                addition to the above characteristics.

    15. Equipment which may become contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious
        materials shall be examined prior to servicing or shipping and shall be
        decontaminated as necessary, unless the employer can demonstrate that
        decontamination of such equipment or portions of such equipment is not feasible.

               A readily observable Biohazard label shall be attached to the equipment
                stating which portions remain contaminated.

               The employer shall ensure that this information is conveyed to all affected
                employees, the servicing representative, and/or the manufacturer as
                appropriate, prior to handling, servicing, or shipping so that appropriate
                precautions will be taken.

Contaminated Sharps Discarding and Containment – Contaminated sharps shall be discarded
immediately or as soon as feasible in containers that are:

               Closable;
               Puncture resistant;
               Leak proof on sides and bottom; and
               Labeled or color coded to indicate Biohazard

When moving containers of contaminated sharps from the area of use, the containers must be
closed immediately prior to removal or replacement to prevent spillage or protrusion of
contents during handling, storage, transport, or shipping. Containers must be placed in a




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     secondary container if leakage is possible. The second container must be closable,
     constructed to contain all contents and prevent leakage and labeled or color-coded to indicate
     biohazard.

     During use, containers for contaminated sharps must be easily accessible to personnel and
     located as close as is feasible to the immediate area where sharps are used or can be
     reasonably anticipated to be found. The containers must be maintained upright while in use,
     and must be replaced routinely and not be allowed to overfill.

     Housekeeping - Employers shall ensure that the worksite is maintained in a clean and sanitary
     condition. The employer shall determine and implement an appropriate written schedule for
     cleaning and method of decontamination based upon the location within the facility, type of
     surface to be cleaned, type of soil present, and tasks or procedures being performed in the
     area.

            All equipment and environmental and working surfaces shall be cleaned and
             decontaminated after contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials.

            Contaminated work surfaces shall be decontaminated with an appropriate disinfectant
             after completion of procedures; immediately or as soon as feasible when surfaces are
             overtly contaminated or after any spill of blood or other potentially infectious materials;
             and at the end of the work shift if the surface may have become contaminated since
             the last cleaning.

            Protective coverings, such as plastic wrap, aluminum foil, or imperviously-backed
             absorbent paper used to cover equipment and environmental surfaces, shall be
             removed and replaced as soon as feasible when they become overtly contaminated or
             at the end of the work shift if they may have become contaminated during the shift.

            All bins, pails, cans, and similar receptacles intended for reuse which have a
             reasonable likelihood for becoming contaminated with blood or other potentially
             infectious materials shall be inspected and decontaminated on a regularly scheduled
             basis and cleaned and decontaminated immediately or as soon as feasible upon
             visible contamination.

            Broken glassware which may be contaminated shall not be picked up directly with the
             hands. It shall be cleaned up using mechanical means, such as a brush and dust pan,
             tongs, or forceps.

            Reusable sharps that are contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious
             materials shall not be stored or processed in a manner that requires employees to
             reach by hand into the containers where these sharps have been
             placed.

H:   Personal protective equipment (types, selection, use, location, removal,
     decontamination disposal)

     According to the OSHA standard, when there is occupational exposure, the
     employer shall provide, at no cost to the employee, appropriate personal
     protective equipment such as, but not limited to the following:

                     Gloves to protect hands,
                     Gowns and laboratory coats to protect skin and clothing




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                Face shields or masks and eye protection to protect the face, and
                Mouthpieces, resuscitation bags, pocket masks, or other ventilation devices

Personal protective equipment will be considered "appropriate" only if it does not permit blood
or other potentially infectious materials to pass through to or reach the employee's work
clothes, street clothes, undergarments, skin, eyes, mouth, or other mucous membranes under
normal conditions of use and for the duration of time which the protective equipment will be
used.

The employer shall ensure that the employee uses appropriate personal protective equipment
unless the employer shows that the employee temporarily and briefly declined to use personal
protective equipment when, under rare and extraordinary circumstances, it was the
employee's professional judgment that in the specific instance its use would have prevented
the delivery of health care or public safety services or would have posed an increased hazard
to the safety of the worker or co-worker. When the employee makes this judgment, the
circumstances shall be investigated and documented in order to determine whether changes
can be instituted to prevent such occurrences in the future.

The employer shall ensure that appropriate personal protective equipment in the appropriate
sizes is readily accessible at the worksite or is issued to employees. Hypoallergenic gloves,
glove liners, powderless gloves, or other similar alternatives shall be readily accessible to
those employees who are allergic to the gloves normally provided.

The employer shall clean, Iaunder, and dispose of required personal protective equipment at
no cost to the employee. The employer shall repair or replace personal protective equipment
as needed to maintain its effectiveness, at no cost to the employee. If a garment(s) is
penetrated by blood or other potentially infectious materials, the garment(s) shall be removed
immediately or as soon as feasible.

All personal protective equipment shall be removed prior to leaving the work area. When
personal protective equipment is removed it shall be placed in an appropriately designated
area or container for storage, washing, decontamination or disposal.

Gloves - Gloves shall be worn when it can be reasonably anticipated that the employee may
have hand contact with blood, other potentially infectious materials, mucous membranes, and
non-intact skin; when performing vascular access procedures; and when handling or touching
contaminated items or surfaces. Disposable (single use) gloves such as surgical or
examination gloves, shall be replaced as soon as practical when contaminated or as soon as
feasible if they are torn, punctured, or when their ability to function as a barrier is
compromised. Disposable (single use) gloves shall not be washed or decontaminated for re-
use.

Utility gloves may be decontaminated for re-use if the integrity of the glove is not
compromised. However, they must be discarded if they are cracked, peeling, torn, punctured,
or exhibit other signs of deterioration or when their ability to function as a barrier is
compromised.

Masks, Eye Protection, and Face Shields. Masks in combination with eye protection devices,
such as goggles or glasses with solid side shields, or chin-length face shields, shall be worn
whenever splashes, spray, spatter, or droplets of blood or other potentially infectious materials
may be generated and eye, nose, or mouth contamination can be reasonably anticipated.

Gowns, Aprons, and Other Protective Body Clothing. Appropriate protective clothing such as,
but not limited to, gowns, aprons, lab coats, clinic jackets, or similar outer garments shall be




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     worn in occupational exposure situations. The type and characteristics will depend upon the
     task and degree of exposure anticipated.

     Surgical caps or hoods and/or shoe covers or boots shall be worn in instances when gross
     contamination can reasonably be anticipated (e.g., autopsies, orthopedic surgery).

I:   HBV vaccinations. (efficacy, safety, method of administration, benefits, free of charge)

     The employer shall make available the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series to all
     employees who have occupational exposure, and post-exposure evaluation and follow-up to
     all employees who have had an exposure incident.

     The employer shall ensure that all medical evaluations and procedures including the hepatitis
     B vaccine and vaccination series and post-exposure evaluation and follow-up, including
     prophylaxis, are:

                      Made available at no cost to the employee;

                      Made available to the employee at a reasonable time and place;

                      Performed by, or under the supervision of, a licensed physician or by, or
                       under the supervision of, another licensed healthcare professional;


     Hepatitis B Vaccination. Hepatitis B vaccination shall be made available after the employee
     has successfully completed blood borne pathogens training and within 10 working days of
     initial assignment to all employees who have occupational exposure unless the employee has
     previously received the complete hepatitis B vaccination series, antibody testing has revealed
     that the employee is immune, or the vaccine is contraindicated for medical reasons.

     The employer shall not make participation in a prescreening program a prerequisite for
     receiving hepatitis B vaccination. If the employee initially declines hepatitis B vaccination but
     at a later date while still covered under the standard decides to accept the vaccination, the
     employer shall make available hepatitis B vaccination at that time. The employer shall ensure
     that employees who decline to accept hepatitis B vaccination offered by the employer sign the
     vaccine declination statement.


J:   Post exposure evaluation and follow up.

     Post-exposure Evaluation and Follow-up – Following a report of an exposure incident, the
     employer shall make immediately available to the exposed employee a confidential medical
     evaluation and follow-up, including at least the following elements:

          1. Documentation of the route(s) of exposure and the circumstances under which the
             exposure incident occurred;

          2. Identification and documentation of the source individual, unless the employer can
             establish that identification is infeasible or prohibited by state or local law;

                     The source individual's blood shall be tested as soon as feasible and after
                       consent is obtained in order to determine HBV and HIV infectivity. If consent
                       is not obtained, the employer shall establish that legally required consent
                       cannot be obtained. When the source individual's consent is not required by




                                Bloodborne Pathogens                                                     9
                  law, the source individual's blood, if available, shall be tested and the results
                  documented.

                When the source individual is already known to be infected with HBV or HIV,
                 testing for the source individual's known HBV or HIV status need not be
                 repeated.

                Results of the source individual's testing shall be made available to the
                  exposed employee, and the employee shall be informed of applicable laws
                  and regulations concerning disclosure of the identity and infectious status of
                  the source individual.

     3. Collection and testing of blood for HBV and HIV serological status;

                 The exposed employee's blood shall be collected as soon as feasible and
                  tested after consent is obtained.

                 If the employee consents to baseline blood collection, but does not give
                  consent at that time for HIV serologic testing, the sample shall be preserved
                  for at least 90 days. If, within 90 days of the exposure incident, the employee
                  elects to have the baseline sample tested, such testing shall be done as
                  soon as feasible.

     4. Post-exposure prophylaxis, when medically indicated, as recommended by the U.S.
        Public Health Service;

     5. Counseling; and

     6. Evaluation of reported illnesses.

Information Provided to the Healthcare Professional – The employer shall ensure that the
healthcare professional evaluating an employee after an exposure incident is provided the
following information:

     1. A copy of any applicable blood borne pathogen regulation;

     2. A description of the exposed employee's duties as they relate to the exposure
        incident;

     3. Documentation of the route(s) of exposure and circumstances under which exposure
        occurred;

     4. Results of the source individual's blood testing, if available; and

     5. All medical records relevant to the appropriate treatment of the employee including
        vaccination status which are the employer's responsibility to maintain.

Healthcare Professional's Written Opinion – The employer shall obtain and provide the
employee with a copy of the evaluating healthcare professional's written opinion within 15
days of the completion of the evaluation.

     1. The healthcare professional's written opinion for Hepatitis B vaccination shall be
        limited to whether Hepatitis B vaccination is indicated for an employee and if the
        employee has received such vaccination.




                            Bloodborne Pathogens                                                      10
             2. The healthcare professional's written opinion for post-exposure evaluation and follow-
                up shall be limited to the following information:

             3. That the employee has been informed of the results of the evaluation; and

             4. That the employee has been told about any medical conditions resulting from
                exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials which require further
                evaluation or treatment.

             5. All other findings or diagnoses shall remain confidential and shall not be included in
                the written report.


     Sharps injury log – The employer shall establish and maintain a sharps injury log for the
     recording of percutaneous (punctured skin) injuries from contaminated sharps. The information in
     the sharps injury log shall be recorded and maintained in such manner as to protect the
     confidentiality of the injured employee. The sharps injury log shall contain, at a minimum:

             1. The type and brand of device involved in the incident,
             2. The department or work area where the exposure incident occurred, and
             3. An explanation of how the incident occurred.


K.   Curriculum Quiz:

     A curriculum quiz score of 80% or greater is required to demonstration understanding of the
     material presented. To ensure that the students understand the questions, this quiz may be
     presented orally by the instructor.

     Any student not trained to this level must repeat the training and be retested.




                                   Bloodborne Pathogens                                                  11
                               Record of Training for:
                               Bloodborne Pathogens
I.    Date of Training:      _______/______/______

II.   Method of Training:

       •             Hours of classroom instruction
       •             Hours of video or hands on training

III. Site Specific Procedures:
In addition to successful completion of the Bloodborne Pathogens training course,
employers must ensure that the student(s) understand the additional, often site specific,
information detailed below. An individual familiar and knowledgeable in the subject
matter must cover the following topics with the student:
        Location and contents of the facility’s Exposure Control Plan (Exposure
         control plans include Sharps containers)
        Identification of waste disposal containers
        PPE types, location, decontamination and disposal procedures
        Actions to take and who to contact in an emergency involving blood or other
         potentially infectious materials.
        Procedure to be followed if an exposure incident occurs – Include method of
         reporting and medical follow-up that will be made available.
        Waste Disposal Procedures (Sharps containers, bags, etc)
        An opportunity for interactive questions and answers with the person
         conducting the training.

IV.   Visual Aids and Handout Materials:
       •   Blood Borne Pathogens Video (optional)

V.    Student's Acknowledgment:
      I hereby acknowledge that I have completed the training course outlined above
      and understand the material presented to me.


                 Signature                                   Printed
VI.   Instructor's Certification:
      Through class participation and quiz completion, the above named student has
      successfully demonstrated the knowledge and abilities as defined in the course
      objectives.




                                Bloodborne Pathogens                                    12
                               Curriculum Quiz for:
                             Bloodborne Pathogens

                                              Test Score:
                                              Passing Score: =      80%

This quiz is to be completed without the use of reference materials. Answer all
questions by circling the best choice. If you do not understand a question, tell
the instructor.

1.    True Fals     The blood borne pathogens standard is designed to
           e        minimize or eliminate occupational exposure to blood or
                    other potentially infectious materials.

2.    True Fals     Hand washing is not a measure of self protection against
           e        blood borne pathogens and contagious diseases.

3.    True Fals     Bloodborne Pathogen transmission can occur through
           e        direct or indirect transmission. Direct transmission is
                    “person-to-person” and indirect is “object to person”.

4.   OSHA requires employers to provide training to all employees who may come in
     contact with potentially infectious material:

      a. At the time of initial assignment to tasks where occupational exposure may
      take place
      b.   Annual training
      c.   Both a and b
      d.   Only to employees working in HIV and HVB laboratories


5.   The Exposure Control Plan shall contain which of the following elements:

      a.   The exposure determination
      b.   The schedule of each shift
      c.   The procedure for the evacuation of personnel
      d.   All of the above




                               Bloodborne Pathogens                               13
6. Contaminated sharps shall be discarded immediately or as soon as feasible in
containers that are:

      a.    Closeable
      b.    Puncture resistant
      c.    Leak proof on sides and bottom
      d.    Labeled or color coded to indicate Biohazard
      e.    All of the above

7.   Gloves shall be worn when it can be reasonably anticipated that the employee may
     have hand contact with:

      a.    Blood
      b.    Non-intact skin
      c.    Mucous membranes
      d.    All of the above

8.   Work Practice Controls means:

      a.    Repeating tasks until you become proficient at them
      b.    Controls that reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering the manner in
            which a task is performed
      c.    Controls used to stop only direct transmission of blood borne pathogens

9.   The sharps injury log shall contain:

      a.    The type and brand of device involved in the incident
      b.    The department or work area where the exposure incident occurred
      c.    An explanation of how the incident occurred
      d.    All the above
      e.    None of the above


10. To clean objects that have been contaminated by body fluids use disinfectant or
    chemical germicide that has been registered by the EPA. If these substances are
    not available use a mixture of:

      a.    10 parts warm water to 1 part household bleach
      b.    1 part warm water to 10 parts household bleach




                                Bloodborne Pathogens                                  14
c.   10 parts cold water to 10 parts household bleach
d.   10 parts cold water to 1 part household bleach




                        Bloodborne Pathogens            15

				
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