US Public Debt and Debt Ceiling

					                                                  US Public Debt and Debt Ceiling
    USD, tr
       15                                                                             Since 2000
        14
        13                                        Debt Ceiling                                                      US Public Debt
        12
        11
        10
          9
          8
          7
          6
          5
              Jan‐00
                       Aug‐00
                                Mar‐01
                                         Oct‐01
                                                  May‐02
                                                           Dec‐02
                                                                    Jul‐03
                                                                             Feb‐04
                                                                                       Sep‐04
                                                                                                Apr‐05
                                                                                                         Nov‐05
                                                                                                                  Jun‐06
                                                                                                                           Jan‐07
                                                                                                                                    Aug‐07
                                                                                                                                             Mar‐08
                                                                                                                                                      Oct‐08
                                                                                                                                                               May‐09
                                                                                                                                                                        Dec‐09
                                                                                                                                                                                 Jul‐10
                                                                                                                                                                                          Feb‐11
                                                                                                                                                                                                    

 

Why is this graph important? 
The  Federal  Government  of  the  United  States  runs  a  chronic  budget  deficit  which  means  the 
government’s  expenditures  are  consistently  higher  than  its  revenues.  The  gap  is  filled  by  borrowing 
money from the markets, at home and abroad. The borrowed money is added to the debt stock of the 
country which represents around 92% of the country’s GDP. In order to keep public debt under control, 
the country sets its own limit to the amount of money it can borrow, and only the Congress can change 
that  ceiling.  Usually,  raising  the  limit  is  not  a  problematic  process,  but  in  this  particular  occasion  the 
ceiling has become the center of a vivid political fight that risks paralyzing the country. If the debt ceiling 
is not raised before the country runs out of cash, the payments will need to be prioritized  and some will 
have  to  be  cancelled  or  delayed.  This  should  make  American  bonds  less  attractive,  forcing  the 
government  to  pay  higher  interest  rates.  Higher  interest  rates  might  affect  consumption,  economic 
growth, employment and inevitably the financial markets in US and the world.  


What does the indicator tell us?  
The graph shows that the US total public debt has continued to increase uninterruptedly since 2000 and 
that, consequently, the debt ceiling set by the US Congress has had to be raised ten times in that period. 
Fiscal trend in the US is worsening in the last years: the government has spent more than it has collected 
in the last 32 months. This year, the gap has averaged $125 billion a month and the total stock of money 
owed  to  creditors  amounts  to  $14.3  trillion,  a  sum  that  almost  equals  the  total  production  of  the 
country  in  one  year.  Despite  having  relatively  high  debt,  the  United  States  usually  encounters  no 
difficulties borrowing from the markets as it is deemed safe when it comes to repaying its loans. Still, the 
US government is expected to run out of cash on August 2nd and, from that day, the Government will not 
be able to pay off all of its bills. Since the debt ceiling has been reached, the US cannot borrow from the 
markets unless the  Congress, which is in charge  of capping and changing  the debt limit, approves the 
raise. 


What are the economic and financial implications? 
Historically reaching the debt ceiling does not have important financial implications since the Congress 
raises the limit almost automatically shortly before it occurs. Not raising the ceiling, when the country is 
systematically  in  fiscal  deficit,  could  have  significant  consequences.  First,  the  government  would  be 
unable to cover all its payments. Even though the interest payments on previous loans will be prioritized 
avoiding  a  default,  hefty  federal  programs  would  have  to  be  cancelled.  Second,  such  process  would 
create  negative  expectations  on  the  capacity  of  the  country to  solve  its  financial  woes.  Under  normal 
circumstances, such expectations would imply that the US has to pay more to be able to borrow. More 
expensive  American  bonds  would  in  turn  make  mortgages,  consumer  loans,  and  capital  costs  more 
expensive.  This  reduces  households’  consumption  capacity  and  firms’  profits,  depressing  economic 
growth and stock markets. There are some mitigating factors at play, however, that might dampen the 
impact of rising interest rates. First, international investors looking for a safe country to put their savings 
do  not  have  many  options.  Europe  is  saddled  with  the  Greek  crisis  and  Japan  is  struggling  with  the 
consequences  of  the  earthquake  and  tsunami.  Second,  two  of  the  biggest  world’s  investors  in  public 
debt, China and Japan, already own great quantities of American bonds. If the price of these bonds fall, 
the value of their debt stocks will drop. It is in their interests to keep investing in US treasuries. Still, we 
expect an agreement to be reached on raising the debt ceiling before the US Government runs out of 
cash which would be a positive for the financial markets.   

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:6
posted:8/15/2011
language:English
pages:2