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					Mail Order Catalog Fall 2010




    Cistus Nursery
      22711 NW Gillihan Road
       Sauvie Island, oR 97231
   503.621.2233 phone 503.621.9657 Fax




        order by phone 9-5 pst
          Fax, Mail, or Email:
       info@cistus.com 24-7-365

             www.cistus.com




    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog       (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                  2

  Abelia x grandiflora 'Little Richard'
   Small and fast-growing abelia, from a hybrid cross between A. chinensis and A. uniflora, reaching only 3 ft x 3 ft
   with dense, evergreen foliage that shows bronze highlights in winter. Useful in the landscape and suitable for a
   hedge. Flowers, small and white, begin in May and continue sporadically throughout the season. Sun to part
   shade with average summer water. Easily frost hardy in USDA zone 6, resprouting in upper zone 5.

        $12.00                                                                                         Caprifoliaceae

  Abutilon megapotamicum ‘Ines’                                                                       flowering maple
   Ines' pale yellow flowers -- nearly white, flared upwards and backed by a dark red calyx -- are striking and
   abundant from spring through first frost. This new flowering maple is a fast-growing, medium shrub, 5 ft tall x 5
   ft wide, with slightly fuzzy leaves. A wonderful introduction by Monterey Bay Nursery, best with protection from
   hot afternoon sun as well as consistent water and nutrients. Mulch and overhead protection provide extra winter
   frost hardiness in USDA zone 8.

         $9.00                                                                                             Malvaceae

  Abutilon ‘Savitzii’                                                                                  flowering maple
   One of the few abutilons we sell that is quite tender. Grown since the 1800s for its wild variegation -- the leaves
   large and pale, almost white with occasional green blotches -- and long, salmon-orange, peduncled flowers. A
   medium grower, to 4-6 ft tall, needing consistent water and nutrients in sun to part shade. Winter mulch increases
   frost hardiness as does some overstory. Frost hardy to 25 F, mid USDA zone 9. Where temperatures drop lower,
   best in a container or as cuttings to overwinter. Well worth the trouble!

         $9.00                                                                                             Malvaceae

* Acacia dealbata                                                                                         silver wattle
   This fern-leaved mimosa is hugely handsome in the garden or in a large container with its finely cut, deep
   gray-green leaves and huge trusses of scented, yellow puffball, spring flowers. Fast growing, to a possible 20-30
   ft in the best conditions, full sun and well-drained soil with good protection from weather extremes. Tolerates
   both droughty and moist conditions. Frost hardy into the teens F, mid USDA zone 8, resprouting should the
   weather be less hospitable.

        $18.00                                                                                              Fabaceae

  Acanthus sennii
   A most unusual species from the highlands of Ethiopia, a shrub to 3 ft or more with silvery green leaves to about
   3" wide, ruffle edged and spined, and spikes of nearly red flowers in summer and autumn. Full to part sun;
   medium or better drainage; and summer water in dry places. The tops are frost hardy into the low 20s F, dying
   back but resprouting with vigor to at least the low teens, lower USDA zone 8, and even lower with mulch.

        $12.00                                                                                           Acanthaceae

  Acorus gramineus ‘Masamune’                                                                         dwarf sweet flag
   A very old Japanese cultivar, a true dwarf used mainly in bonsai work, but equally at home in the garden. To 6"
   tall with grassy foliage in variegations of green and white. Slowly spreads in part shade to shade with consistent
   moisture. Even tolerates shallow standing water. Or tuck it here and there to hide the cracks. Frost hardy to -10F,
   in USDA zone 6.

         $9.00                                                                                             Acoraceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                               (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                3

Acorus gramineus 'Variegatus'                                                               grassy-leaved sweet flag
 Grassy leaves with golden-yellow and cream variegation form clumps to 1 ft tall and wide. Flowers are
 sedge-like, tiny and green. Prefers sun to part shade in moist soils. Even tolerates boggy conditions or standing
 water to 3" deep - but shouldn't dry out. Evergreen in USDA zone 8 and root hardy to zone 5.

      $6.00                                                                                              Acoraceae

Actinidia pilosula                                                                                    variegated kiwi
 Stunning and rarely seen kiwi with long narrow leaves with white tips that contrast brilliantly with the basic green
 foliage, the coloration appearing and/or becoming more pronounced on mature vines. A deciduous vine, to 15-20
 ft, with unusual flowers, clusters of pink blossoms, in spring. Originally from East Asia, these are vigorous
 growers, best with support in full sun to dappled shade or even full shade. Give them rich soil, moist and
 well-drained. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

      $14.00                                                                                          Actinidiaceae

Aeonium castello-paivae 'Variegata'
 Sedum relative with succulent rosettes, in pale green splashed with white, forming compact clumps to 1 ft tall and
 wide. Excellent as a container plant that can be brought inside if temperatures fall below the upper 20s F or in the
 garden anywhere temperatures don't allow plants to freeze. Full to part sun with occasional summer water. Frost
 hardy to mid USDA zone 9.

      $11.00                                                                                           Crassulaceae

Aeonium virgineum                                                                                        velvet rose
 From the Canary Islands, this virgin aeonium probably won't flower for you, but its pale green, aromatic rosettes
 of fuzzy, 8" leaves are enough to satisfy me. Full to part sun with occasional summer water. Frost hardy to about
 20F or so, the bottom of USDA zone 9, so best used as container plant that can be taken inside where
 temperatures are harsher. Should be kept indoors in a bright but cool place with occasional water in winter.

      $14.00                                                                                           Crassulaceae

Aeonium 'Zwartkop'
 Very popular, shrub forming, sedum relative from the Canary Islands with rosettes of nearly black leaves on
 gray-brown stems rising to 3-4 ft. Yellow, star-shaped flowers appear in clusters in late winter and early spring
 on mature plants. For sunny coastal areas or part shade inland with occasional but deep summer water. Frost
 hardy to the mid 20s F, mid USDA zone 9, and a superb container plant to bring inside to a bright spot where
 temperatures drop lower. Also found as A. arboreum 'Zwartkop' and occasionally as A. manriqueorum
 'Schwartzkopf'.

      $12.00                                                                                           Crassulaceae

Aeschynanthus sp. NApe 008
 This diminutive, unidentified species was collected in southern China and grows only 4-6" tall with a spread of
 about 18”. As is typical of the gesneriad family, these can be epiphytic on wood or damp scree or indeed can live
 on a windowsill with fertile soil. The crisp, light green and compact foliage makes a pleasing background for the
 2”, fiery orange, trumpet flowers. We have found it most beautiful in a tall pot with the foliage tailing over the
 side. A superb woodland plant in mild places, these have so far tested frost hardy only to the bottom of USDA
 zone 9.

      $11.00                                                                                          Gesneriaceae




                                 Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                  4

Agapanthus ‘Hinag’ Summer Gold® PP10866                                                                 lily of the nile
 A Japanese cultivar introduced by Barry Yinger. With its lovely strap-like, variegated leaves, pale yellow with
 green center, this agapanthus is as handsome out of flower as in. Summer to autumn flower are
 mid-bluish-purple, and lovely against the pale leaves. Reaches 12-18" high and wide in sun to partial shade with
 summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8, possibly colder with winter mulch. Does well in pots.

      $16.00                                                                                          Amaryllidaceae

Agapanthus inapertus ssp. pendulus ‘Graskop’                                                   grassland agapanthus
 Dark blue, nearly black buds that open to dark, violet-purple flowers mark this striking, deciduous agapanthus.
 Flowering in July and August, the 3 ft stems rise a foot above the clumps of light green, strap-like leaves. A bit
 more cold hardy than evergreen relatives, this cultivar from the northeast Transvaal in South Africa enjoys sun,
 well-drained soil, and spring and summer water. Also tolerates winter rains. Frost hardy to 15 to 20F, mid to
 upper USDA zone 8.

      $16.00                                                                                          Amaryllidaceae

Agapanthus 'Midnight Blue'                                                                             lily of the nile
 Gorgeous globes of deep blue-violet flowers on 2.5 ft stalks appear in July and August above 18-24” clumps of
 dark green, strap-like leaves, narrower than other forms. This Irish selection of a South African native loves sun
 to part shade, plenty of fertilizer in summer, and well-drained soil. Needs water during the growing season;
 resents too much water at any time. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $15.00                                                                                          Amaryllidaceae

Agapanthus 'Streamline'                                                                                lily of the nile
 The medium blue flowers -- with hints of lavender and a darker strip on the petals -- are lovely in July and
 August on this dwarf, evergreen perennial to only 16" tall. This selection of a South African native requires
 well-drained soil and sun to part shade for best performance. Tolerates some drought once established and
 resents too much water but thrives with regular moisturizing in the growing season. Frost hardy in USDA zone
 7. An excellent cut flower.

      $15.00                                                                                          Amaryllidaceae

Agapanthus ‘Tinkerbell’                                                                  dwarf variegated agapanthus
 The variegated companion to Agapanthus ‘Peter Pan’ has dwarf foliage -- green with white edges -- and a dwarf
 flowering stalk of medium blue flowers rising to 18" above the 8" leaves. Useful as container plant especially for
 its sprightly, variegated look. Enjoys sun to part shade in well-drained soil and average summer water. Evergreen
 to the mid 20s F, and cold hardy to at least USDA zone 8 and probably colder.

      $11.00                                                                                          Amaryllidaceae

Agave americana 'Mediopicta Alba'                                                         white-striped century plant
 Beautifully variegated, diminutive form, with rosettes spreading to no more than 2-3 ft, the beautifully curved
 leaves colored a dusty blue-green with a wide creamy stripe in the center. Slowly offsetting in bright light and
 well-drained soil with occasional summer water. As luck would have it, this is one of the forms hardier to frost
 with plants surviving 10 to 15F, USDA zone 8, in soil that is dry in winter. Pull in or cover below 20F or so in
 areas of winter wet.

      $22.00                                                                                               Agavaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                    5

  Agave 'Blue Glow'
   Handsome, small agave, its stiff leaves -- 1-1.5" wide, blue-green with red margins edged with yellow and a red
   terminal spine -- are particularly lovely when backlit. Plants are small, 1-2 ft tall and wide at maturity. This hybrid
   between A. ocahui and A. attenuata, created by Kelly Griffin, is solitary, enjoying full sun, good drainage, and
   little summer water. Frost hardy to at least 15F, mid USDA zone 8 --- always with good drainage -- and possibly
   lower.

        $17.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Agave bracteosa ‘Calamar’                                                                   solitary candelabrum agave
   Selected by Pat McNeal, this is a non-clumping form of the species, still resembling a bromeliad with lax,
   spineless leaves that are, in this form, consistently blue-tinted. As with the species, polycarpic and rare in
   cultivation. Often found clinging to cliff sides, these plants love the cool summer nights of the Northwest. Half
   sun, well-drained soil, and only occasional summer water. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Agave bracteosa 'Monterrey Frost'                                                         monterrey frost century plant
   A rare form of A. bracteosa, only recently available to the public, but high on the agave lovers "want" list for
   some time. Plants eventually reach 1 ft tall x 1.5 ft wide with leaves that can either be described as green with
   wide white margins or white with a green stripe down the middle -- both are true. Offsets occasionally in
   maturity. Prefers lean soil that drains well and protection from the hottest sun, so light dappled shade or
   afternoon shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8. Lovely in a container.

        $24.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Agave ‘Burnt Burgundy’
   Probable hybrid of A. victoriae-reginae and A. pelona, from Gregg Star who chose it for its unusual, smooth,
   burgundy-tinted leaves with dark margins. Small, to only a 1 ft to 18", and slowly clumping in full to part sun.
   Frost hardy so far to a little under 20F, just below USDA zone 9, in our now Eucalyptus-shaded agave patch, but
   a fine pot specimen in colder climates. Eucalyptus mulch optional.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

* Agave chrysantha 'Blue Streak'
   A new Cistus introduction. Found near the Barnhard Trail in central Arizona, where diversity among the species
   if common. This form had the unusual habit of sending out colonies of young plants, each a rather pale,
   jaw-dropping, almost celadon blue. Given the habitat and this plant's situation in a northern aspect, we expect
   tolerance for anything we throw at it and others of its ilk. To about 5 ft x 5 ft with narrow, banded leaves. Prefers
   decent drainage, as one would expect, and winter drought. Happy with fairly generous summer water to push it
   along. Frost hardy, we believe, to between 0 and 10F, USDA zone 7, and possibly tougher.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Agave felgeri                                                                                               mescalito
   Named for friend and botanist, Richard Felger, and found by him as well inhabiting dry, stony hills of western
   Sonora, this rare, A. parviflora relative has more robust leaves and rosettes. Triangular, gray-green leaves adorned
   with white markings and abundant cobweb-like filifers form clumps of multiple rosettes to no more than 8" tall.
   Happy in garden situations if provided excellent drainage and a fine pot specimen as well. Frost hardy to between
   15 and 20F, mid to upper USDA zone 8, the drier the better.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                6

Agave funkiana 'Blue Haze'
 Selected for its striking foliage, toothed and narrowing to a sharply pointed tip with a pale to nearly white
 mid-stripe on the powdery blue leaves. Rosettes can reach up to 2 ft tall and wide. Sun and well-drained soil
 required. Drought tolerant but occasional summer water speeds growth and generally enhances the appearance.
 Frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8. Otherwise a happy container plant.

      $16.00                                                                                             Agavaceae

Agave funkiana 'Fatal Attraction'
 Another selection of the already handsome A. funkiana, this with darker green leaves and and pale green
 midstripe down the center. Leaves are narrow and toothed, ending in a dark and pointed spine tip. For sun and
 well-drained soil, as expected. Drought tolerant but occasional summer water speeds growth. Less frost hardy
 than the species, to 15F, mid USDA zone 8. Does well in containers.

      $16.00                                                                                             Agavaceae

Agave geminiflora                                                                                 twin-flowered agave
 A rare relative in the Agave filifera group, this southwestern Mexico native has intriguing deep green rosettes of
 rubbery, somewhat weeping leaves with enchanting silver-white filifers toward the center of the rosette. Can even
 produce a short trunk. A tender species damaged under about 20F, USDA zone 9, it is best in a tall pot where its
 weeping foliage can spread out and over the rim. When the plants reach 1 ft. or more in diameter, they produce a
 spike of flowers well over 5 ft tall at which time, hopefully, they also produce an offset or two.

      $15.00                                                                                             Agavaceae

Agave gentryi x montana
 Collected originally in the Sierra Madre Orientale of northeast Mexico in an area where the majestic A. gentryi
 meets the more refined and smaller A. montana. The most beautiful silver-gray color represented here suggests
 that A. scabra, the universal partygoer of that region, has come along for the ride as well. To 4 ft wide, this
 stunning plant is tolerant of garden moisture --provided drainage is good -- and prefers full sun for best color.
 Cold hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8. Fast growing.

      $17.00                                                                                             Agavaceae

Agave gracilipes - red spined clone                                                               slim footed agave
 A red-spined selection of this hardy and diverse species, a natural hybrid of A. neomexicana and A. lecheguilla
 from West Texas, New Mexico and Chihuahua, Mexico. These have narrow green to gray-green leaves with
 curved spines along the sides and a sturdy, sharp tip, very red in this form. Rosettes reach 12-18” tall x 18”
 wide and remain solitary, rarely offsetting. Best in lean, well-drained soil with occasional summer water for best
 growth and appearance. Frost hardy to at least –20F, USDA zone 5 and possibly lower.

      $16.00                                                                                             Agavaceae

Agave 'Green Goblet'
 A form selected in the high Sierra Madre Orientale of eastern Mexico by Carl Schoenfeld and Wade Rosch. This
 plant is likely A. gentryi with a little A. montana thrown in and forms 4-5 ft rosettes of fleshy, moss-green leaves
 beautifully patterned and indented. From pine/oak woodland, it is adaptable to moist soil and even partial shade
 where autumn leaves won't collect in the rosettes. Thus far has been hardy to close to 0F, USDA zone 7.
 However, the colder the climate, the more sun and drainage should be provided.

      $16.00                                                                                             Agavaceae




                                 Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                 7

Agave ‘Kissho Kan’                                                                      lucky crown century plant
 Stunning blue-gray leaves edged in white make this symmetrical rosette an outstanding addition to any collection.
 Yellow leaf spines darken to reddish brown adding distinction. To 15” tall x 18” wide and slowly offsetting.
 Needs light, and well-drained soil. Frost hardy to USDA zone 9. Best in container protected from winter wet
 where temperatures drop below the 20s F.

      $15.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Agave lophantha 'Quadricolor'                                                               quadricolor centuy plant
 This lovely Japanese selection of an easy to grow species is small, only to about 6-8", with shiny green leaves
 edged cream and tan. Eventually forms clumps of several rosettes. Best if kept out of hottest afternoon sun in
 well-drained soil with occasional summer water where dry. A fine rock garden creature where temperatures
 seldom fall to 15 F, mid USDA zone 8 and superb in containers where temperatures are too harsh.

      $19.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Agave macroculmis YD 129
 From several places in northeastern Mexico, this collection, from mountain ranges north of Potosi at nearly 7000
 ft in oak, pine, and yes...douglas fir, forms colonies of 4 ft rosettes tinted a lovely blue-gray and showing the leaf
 scars to beautiful effect as each new leaf emerges. The leaf margins are undulating and decorated with dark
 spines. So far these have proven frost hardy to the low teens F, low to mid USDA zone 8, and are quite happy
 with abundant garden moisture so good drainage and air circulation in the winter is helpful. Fine pot specimen.

      $15.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Agave (Manfreda) 'Spot'
 A Cistus introduction from one of our hybrids between A. virginica and A. maculosa. Forms stunning rosettes to
 about 18", with blue-green leaves endearingly adorned with purple spots. Though tolerant of some drought
 prefers a medium to moist situation. Light shade to full sun. Deciduous at 25F (don't worry, it's supposed to do
 that.) Cold hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5 or below, if placed in well-drained soil.

      $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Agave montana ‘Baccarat’
 A selection by Yucca Do Nursery, from high elevation in Mexico’s Nuevo León Province, named after a fine
 crystal because of the leaf imprints on the backs of glaucous leaves that end in spiny black tips - very dramatic.
 Forms striking clumps to 2 ft tall x 3 ft wide. Sun, lean soil, and good drainage. Frost hardy in upper USDA
 zone 7.

      $15.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Agave 'Mr. Ripples'
 Yes, the leaf edges are wavy on this lovely agave, an introduction by Yucca Do Nursery, possibly a cross between
 A. salmiana and A. protoamericana. Forms single rosettes to 3-4 ft tall x 4-6 ft wide, the toothed green leaves
 with a bluish tinge and velvety texture. Full sun with good drainage and little summer water. Frost hardy to 0F,
 USDA zone 7.

      $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                 8

Agave murpheyi                                                                                        murphey's agave
 Sweet little agave, from mid elevation deserts of central Arizona into Sonora, often found associated with Native
 American sites. To 18", or 2 feet at most, with narrow, upright leaves, slightly recurved and steel to powder blue.
 Offsetting fairly quickly. The eventual flowers also produce tiny bulbils -- as the song goes -- which might
 explain its being spread by people in the early days. Because of its drier habitats we keep ours in pots with very
 well drained soil, or only in the most exposed areas of our garden and growing in true grit. Full sun. Again, dry
 conditions with an occasional splash of summer water. Cold hardy into upper USDA zone 7 if dry.

      $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Agave murpheyi ‘Variegata’
 Another sweet little agave, from mid elevation deserts of central Arizona into Sonora, Mexico. Up to 18" to 2 ft
 tall with narrow, upright leaves, wavy with creamy yellow margins, the centers steel to powder blue. Offsets
 quickly. Best planted in truly gritty soil in pots or exposed garden areas with full sun. Provide good drainage and
 dry conditions with a bit of summer water. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7 if dry in winter.

      $17.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Agave neomexicana                                                                                  trailer park mescal
 A tough-as-nails species, closely related to A. parryi but with narrower, deep blue leaves held upright and out and
 adorned with gray marginal spines and long, terminal brownish red spines. Slow growing to an eventual 1-2 ft
 tall x 2-3 ft wide, offsetting to form colonies. After 15 years or so, produces yellow flowers on a 12 ft stalk! Full
 sun and lean, well-drained soil with little, if any, summer water. This native of southeastern New Mexico is one of
 the hardiest species; to -20F, USDA zone 5, with good drainage.

      $14.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Agave ornithobroma                                                                                     maguey pajarito
 Wonderful, short-trunk forming species from subtropical western Mexico, these collections from Sinaloa at
 under 500 ft elevation -- did we say warm? Closely related to A. geminiflora, the 18" rosettes, with extremely
 narrow, flexible leaves of dark green, are beautifully framed by a gazillion curly white filifers or hairs. Quite
 happy with a fair amount of moisture; winter drought decreases chance of problems. We have had this in our
 garden, hardy for the last few years with luck. Really, it should be protected below the mid 20ºs F so best for
 mildest parts of the world or as fabulously small-scale container plants. USDA zone 9/10. Full sun to dappled
 shade in a bright window, or your nearest lava outcrop.

      $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Agave ovatifolia 'Frosty Blue'
 A Cistus introduction and new. This mega-century plant, first discovered by Lynn Lowrey in northeastern
 Mexico some 30 years ago and just named recently by agaveist Greg Starr, might be the largest of the cold hardy
 agaves, reaching eventually to 6-8 ft with beautifully formed, blue leaves. Our selection, made from a more recent
 batch, has a distinct, pale aquamarine hue with the classic shape of cupped, upright, and slightly outward bending
 leaves. The species has taken the cold and wet of Dallas TX, for instance, so upper USDA zone 7 for cold
 hardiness; possibly colder in gritty or dry soil. Fabo container plant.

      $22.00                                                                                              Agavaceae




                                 Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                    9

  Agave ovatifolia [Sierra de Lampazos clone]                                                  whale's tongue agave
   One of the most beautiful century plants, found in the Sierra de Lampazos in the early 80s by the late great
   plantsman, Lynn Lowrey and only named in 2004 by agave-ist Greg Starr. Growing in a limited range of
   pinion/juniper/oak country above 8000 ft, the chalky blue rosettes, exceedingly wide and beautifully toothed, can
   reach over 5 ft in width giving the appearance of a much more tropical species. Has proven to be one of the best
   performers where cold and wet is experienced in winter and has, thus far, proven hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7, or
   even a bit lower. Sun to dappled shade; drainage is always a plus.

        $17.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

* Agave palmeri [Chiricahua Mtns., 6900' elev.]                                                               palmer agave
   A handsome agave, to 3 ft all x 4 ft wide, with stiff, blue-green leaves edged with curved, sharp, red-brown teeth
   and tipped with a long, sharp spine. Native to southeastern Arizona, southern New Mexico, and northern Mexico,
   this form originated in the Chiricahua Mountains of south eastern Arizona at higher than usual elevations. The
   flower stalks, produced in early spring after 5 years, bear pale, greenish yellow flowers followed by banana-like
   fruit. Plants offset, fortunately, as this a monocarpic species that dies after setting seed. Full sun with good
   drainage is best with only very occasional summer water. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Agave parrasana
   This Mexican species is most easily identified by its thick triangular leaves, beautifully marked blue-green in
   color, arranged in a striking rosette and edged with equally thick brown and white spines. Plants form low dense
   mounds, each rosette eventually measuring 2 ft x 2 ft and, in time, sending up 12 ft branched flower spikes of
   warm yellow blushed apricot. Best in mineral soil, sharp drainage, full sun. This represents a high elevation
   collection at over 8,500 ft that has thus far withstood between 0 and 10F, USDA zone 7, with overhead protection
   from excess winter moisture. Stunning pot plant or container specimen.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Agave parryi (aff. var. couesii) SBHMPS 6725
   From one of our favorite places in Arizona, east of Prescott amid nolinas and ponderosa pines, this extremely
   hardy century plant grows in colonies of giant (nearly 2 ft), blue, artichoke-like rosettes. Its habitat is a cold
   climate where temperatures frequently drop below 0F and the ground is snow covered or frozen for long periods
   of time.These plants should be hardy to well below -10F, USDA zone 6. Although this population exhibits
   characteristics of both A. parryi and A. couesii, what we know for certain is that these beautiful blue plants are
   from the highest elevation we have ever found the species and should be exceedingly frost hardy with good air
   circulation, bright light and good drainage.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Agave parryi (aff. var. couesii) SBHMPS 6728
   From the high ponderosa woods at over 8,000 ft between Jerome and Prescott, Arizona, where, in 1981, we first
   set our eyes upon this particular "patch" growing in light shade with beautiful, 24", blue "artichokes" and dozens
   of offsets spreading from the plants, seemingly in a race to get to a nearby clearing. Sometimes the reason the
   plants are brought into cultivation is simply because they are easy to propagate. This little agave is both beautiful
   and.... we can make more. The same culture as for other Agave parryi with dappled shade to bright light and
   fairly free drainage. This clone, however, should be exceedingly frost hardy to at least -10F, USDA zone 6,
   possibly colder. Should still be provided winter protection if grown in container below USDA zone 8.

        $17.00                                                                                               Agavaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                     10

  Agave parryi [N. of Sedona, AZ]
   Tightly clumping agave with seriously impressive leaves and extremely sharp spines. A Cistus collection found
   north of Sedona Arizona, this form reaches 3 ft tall and wide. Best in full sun with excellent drainage and
   occasional water in summer for best appearance. Cold hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7 if kept dry in winter.

        $16.00                                                                                                Agavaceae

  Agave parryi var. huachucensis 'Huachuca Blue'
   A Cistus introduction, bluer than its near relation. Our fabulous selection -- from 7000 ft in the Huachuca
   Mountains in southern Arizona and into northern Sonora -- exhibits particularly steel-blue leaves in the classic
   20-24” artichoke shape, eventually offsetting and forming small colonies. Though not the most frost hardy of
   the A. parryi clan, still takes 10F in stride, USDA zone 8, and lower if very soil is well drained. Full sun in lean,
   well-drained soil with occasional summer water in dry climates.

        $16.00                                                                                                Agavaceae

  Agave parryi var. parryi                                                                                   century plant
   Strikingly handsome agave with blue-gray, sharp-spined leaves that show the imprint of newer leaves. To 2 ft tall
   at maturity, these are best in full sun and soil that is lean and very well-drained. Extra protection from winter
   moisture increases frost hardiness. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 with that excellent drainage. Good in containers
   as well, with extra protection in winter cold.

        $16.00                                                                                                Agavaceae

  Agave parviflora [Ruby, AZ]
   A jewel-like miniature agave from the dry grasslands of southern Arizona and adjacent Sonora, a habitat that
   includes Dasylirion wheeleri and the famed Opuntia violacea v. santa rita, and a rich area where we have
   selected forms of heucheras, Zauschneria arizonica, and numerous desert ferns. Rosettes of only 6- 8", with
   narrow leaves, deep green marked white, and curled filifers that make it an intriguing plant for container or
   garden. The flowering stalks are tall and narrow; the unusual, creamy flowers tinted red, make hummingbirds
   very happy. Provide excellent drainage in bright light to only the lightest of shade for best form. The habitat has
   dry winters and thunderstorm laden summers so these plants are best well watered in summer and kept dry in
   winter, though plants in our Portland garden have been quite happy for some years in a stone wall with no cover.
   Frost hardy from 0 to 10F, USDA zone 7; colder if kept winter dry.

        $16.00                                                                                                Agavaceae

* Agave 'Royal Spine'
   Handsome, small agave, to only 18” tall x 2 ft wide with a dense rosette of dark green leaves blushed white
   (giving rise to an alternative name, A. 'Green Steel’). A cross between A. macroacantha and A.
   victoriae-reginae, the first contributing a dark terminal spine, the second, the darkly chiseled, spineless, leaf
   edges. Sun, good drainage and little summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 9. Looks wonderful in
   containers.

        $16.00                                                                                                Agavaceae

  Agave ‘Ruth Bancroft’                                                                               shark skin agave
   Found in the hills near Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico, where 3 century plants converge (if not collide). This
   selection, from the California garden of Ruth Bancroft, has an exquisitely fine, platinum-colored sheen with no
   white markings -- clearly showing its A. victoria-reginae and A. scabra parentage. To 2-3 ft tall x 3-4 ft wide.
   For bright sun and well-drained soil with little summer irrigation necessary. Great in containers. Cold hardy to
   10F or so, USDA zone 8. Also known as A. ‘Sharkskin’ for its leaf color and texture.

        $18.00                                                                                                Agavaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                   11

* Agave salmiana var. ferox                                                                                giant agave
   Huge, scary agave, to 4-6 ft tall x 6-12 ft wide over time, with an urn-shaped silhouette made up of foot wide,
   gray leaves. Originating in Mexico, these are common as accents in gardens with Mediterranean climates, as they
   rarely flower. Sun, good drainage, and very little summer water is necessary. Cold hardy in USDA zone 9, to
   20-25F. Good for containers.

        $15.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Agave schidigera 'Black Widow'
   A compact selection of this native of western Mexico. The dark green leaves are rigid, widest in the center and
   narrowing to a sharp spine, with silvery markings and showy filifers along the edges. Plants can reach 1 ft tall x
   18” wide forming dense symmetrical rosettes that rarely offset. Lean soil and full sun are fine in coastal
   climates; protection from hottest afternoon sun is important inland. Prefers regular summer water. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 8. Also makes a charming container plant.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Agave schidigera 'Shira ito no Ohi'                                               queen of white thread century plant
   The cultivar name (NOT translated as "Honey, I shrunk the kids") refers to the silky threads or filifers that
   decorate these rosette-forming agaves. They are solitary plants, to 18" tall and wide, with the dark green leaves,
   strikingly variegated with creamy margins, the quite symmetric filifers adding to the show. The species, from the
   high country of Mexico's Durango State, shows a decent tolerance for moisture and frost in USDA zone 8. But
   temperatures below 20F, bottom of USDA zone 9, can mark the beautiful variegations so we recommend a
   moveable container.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Agave stricta - dwarf blue form
   From central northern Mexico at mid elevations and appearing as little, blue-green sea urchins, to only 6-10". A
   fine addition to a detailed area of the garden where moisture can be controlled and temperatures are not likely to
   drop below 18 to 20F, upper USDA zone 8, for any length of time. Otherwise a striking, small container plant for
   bright light.

        $18.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Agave toumeyana var. bella                                                                      toumey's century plant
   A rare and unusual plant with particularly dense rosettes, to 1 ft x 1 ft. The narrow, dark green leaves have
   striking white markings with decorative filifers or threads an added attraction. A colonizer from high elevations of
   central Arizona, this form makes a fine rock garden specimen if excellent drainage and bright light can be
   maintained. Protect from excess winter moisture. Cold hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6, or below in dry soil.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Agave utahensis ssp. kaibabensis SBHMPS 6747
   From the Tuweep area on cliffs and mountaintops on the northern edge of the Grand Canyon abyss amid
   junipers and beautiful red rocks ... and far away from restaurants that serve alcohol, our collection of a
   particularly wide and long leaf form of the highly variable Utah agaves, producing nearly 18” rosettes of a
   cheery blue-green with dark, evenly set spines. I believe this colony to be under the form kaibabensis. These
   plants offset rather sparsely to make attractive clumps rather than colonies. After 10 years or so, flowers spikes
   rise to nearly 10 ft. Though one of the most frost hardy agaves, they do like their drainage, so in areas of high
   moisture, best placed in stone walls or under cover. Cold hardy to about -20F, USDA zone 5. Good container
   plant anywhere.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                               12

Agave utahensis v. eborispina
 Exquisite form, the most northern agave anywhere!, with 6-10" rosettes of chalky blue leaves dressed with ivory,
 corkscrew spines, sometimes black-tipped, up to 1.5" long. Ooooh! Offsets to form small clumps. Bright sun
 with very good drainage. Perfect for your limestone crevice. Frost hardy to well below 0F, USDA zone 7. (Did
 we mention really really good drainage?)

      $16.00                                                                                            Agavaceae

Agave victoriae-reginae 'Porcupine'
 This selection from Yucca Do Nursery has indeed white-tipped, porcupine quill-like leaves with gentle patterning
 on a symmetric plant (think of the shape of artichokes), making it a more dazzling creature than the typical
 Agave victoriae-reginae. Slow growing but worth the wait. Bright light, good drainage, and, preferably, protection
 from winter wet. Frost hardy to below 10 to 15F, USDA zone 8, depending on moisture.

      $15.00                                                                                            Agavaceae

Agave victoriae-reginae var. compacta                                                           queen victoria agave
 A beautiful compact form of an ever-popular species. Each olive green rosette consists blunt, black-spined leaves
 marked with wide, silvery white striations. Each rosette grows to about 6" or less in width, clumping after a year
 or two. Bright light and good drainage. One of the hardier species, originally from near Saltillo in northern
 Mexico, it has been rated frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, but has survived in dry winter places such as Denver
 to well below 0F, zone 7. If this makes you nervous, it makes a beautiful potted specimen.

      $15.00                                                                                            Agavaceae

Agave x arizonica - cl 2
 Wonderful endemic from central Arizona, almost undoubtedly a natural hybrid, originally from only a few plants
 growing among chaparral in miniature oaks and manzanita. This selection, given to us by the late agave God,
 Howard Scott Gentry, is of great ornamental and sentimental value to us. Rosettes are fairly slow growing, to 12"
 or so, with glossy green leaves edged in mahogany, slowly forming a colony to 2 ft across. Beautiful for rock
 garden, dry stone wall, or container. Not particularly fussy about moisture, though careful drainage and bright
 light are always a plus, and drier winter conditions can add several degrees. In our high desert, eastern Oregon
 garden survived a dip to -12F, upper zone 5, in 1990 under bone-dry conditions.

      $22.00                                                                                            Agavaceae

Agave x ferdinandi-regis
 This little century plant comes from one of the more exciting habitats in agaveland, a series of mountains
 northeast of Saltillo in northwestern Mexico where the beautiful A. victoriae-reginae crosses with both A.
 scabra and A. lechugilla. The form of this plant is particularly upright, its leaves marked white with a pinkish
 gray cast and topped with black spines. Reaching 12-18" and offsetting freely, it is hardy to between 0 and 10F,
 USDA zone 7, with excellent drainage. Full sun. Excellent pot specimen.

      $16.00                                                                                            Agavaceae

Agave x gracilis
 The name A. gracilis applies to a group of plants in northwestern Texas into New Mexico, natural hybrids
 between A. lecheguilla and A. neomexicana. This forms blue-gray rosettes of narrow leaves with horizontal
 striping. Rosettes of about 12” make a dense colony if allowed. Bright light and average to gritty, well-drained
 soil. Collected in the Guadeloupe Mountains in southeastern New Mexico at 6200 ft making frost hardiness
 probable well into USDA zone 6.

      $15.00                                                                                            Agavaceae




                                 Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                               (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                    13

  Agave x leopoldii
   Compact and architectural century plant brought to us by Yucca Do Nursery, the narrow, slightly curved leaves
   with a gray-blue-going-green sheen complete with a few stripes and polka dots. Offsets eventually. A most
   attractive, small container plant, rarely growing more than 18”, and a great addition to the dry or rock garden in a
   sunny site with gritty soil. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8, to 15F or so and as low as 10F if protected from
   overhead moisture.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Agave zebra
   From north central Mexico, this beautiful plant, with narrow leaves to 4 ft striped silver-blue and olive-green,
   makes a stunning pot or garden specimen. Though the plant does occasionally offset, offspring might be
   removed not only to propagate the plant but also to maintain the presence of an individual and solitary specimen.
   Not from as high elevation as some, A. zebra seems quite happy into the upper teens F, upper USDA zone 8, but
   can receive frost damage below. Winter drought or cover extends its hardiness lower. Best in full sun with
   excellent drainage.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Akebia longeracemosa 'Victor's Secret'                                                                  chocolate vine
   Most unusual for the genus with attractive evergreen leaves, almost butterfly-like, and racemes, to 5" or more, of
   vibrant pink flowers lasting a long season. Otherwise the same fascinating (intimidating?) fruit aging to a nearly
   metallic blue. All this on a vine of about 10 ft; not as vigorous as some others. Full sun for best flowering though
   perfectly at home in shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7, to just above 0F.

        $15.00                                                                                          Lardizabalaceae

* Allium senescens ssp. montanum 'August Confection'
   Small, NON invasive allium, a selection by plantsman Mark McDonough that forms small, handsome clumps of
   grassy foliage, to only 5" tall, and produces dark, ruddy pink flowers in mid to late summer. Sun to part shade
   and fairly drought tolerant though accepting of summer water as well. Frost hardy to at least 0F, USDA zone 7.

         $7.00                                                                                Alliaceae / Amaryllidaceae

* Alnus formosana [Tayuling 2004]                                                                         formosana alder
   Native to Taiwan at mid to high elevations, this was of interest to us for its evergreen habit, the glossy green
   leaves holding fast, we expect, in temperatures down to 18 to 20F. Though loving damp conditions, these do not
   require quite the riparian situation of many alders. Fast growing, to 30-40 ft tall, in sun to part shade with
   summer water. Stand back! Ultimate cold hardiness is not yet tested but these will remain healthy, though
   deciduous, to the bottom of USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                               Betulaceae

  Aloe ‘Brass Hat’
   A most wonderful Hummel hybrid with dark bronzy leaves and rosettes forming clumps of 6” to 1 ft adorned
   throughout the year with brassy orange flowers. The cross, as follows -- A. (A. haworthioides x A. bakeri) x
   ((A. descoingsii x A. calcairophylla) x A. bakeri) -- seems algebraic and daunting. The plants are not. Alas, frost
   hardy only to about 25F, mid USDA zone 9, so take precautions. Great container plant. Keep dry in winter.

        $12.00                                                                                        Xanthorrhoeaceae




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* Aloe CarmineTM
   Gorgeous aloe hybrid, a Proven Winners selection with rosettes of striking succulent leaves, red-edged with lots
   of small white spots overlaid with red spots, eventually reaching 6-8" tall x 8-12" wide. Best in well drained soil
   in full to part sun. Frost hardy only to 25F, mid USDA zone 9, so best kept in containers to be moved indoors in
   winter. Both heat and drought tolerant in the ground. Let potted plants dry a bit before watering. A nice addition
   to the succulent collection outdoors or in.


        $12.00                                                                                          Xanthorrhoeaceae

* Aloe DonnieTM
   Gorgeous aloe hybrid, a Proven Winners selection with rosettes of succulent leaves, these with small white spots
   and red edges, eventually reaching 2-4" tall and wide. Best in well drained soil in full to part sun. Frost hardy
   only to 25F, mid USDA zone 9, so best kept in containers to be moved indoors in winter. Both heat and drought
   tolerant in the ground. Let potted plants dry a bit before watering. A nice addition to the succulent collection
   outdoors or in.


        $12.00                                                                                          Xanthorrhoeaceae

  Aloe ecklonis                                                                                                grass aloe
   Hardy aloe from South Africa at 7,000 ft. A stemless aloe with lovely, erect, toothed leaves, up to 2 ft tall, and a
   short stalk of orange-red flowers in midsummer. Dies back in winter and returns in spring in any spot where it
   has excellent drainage and gritty soil. Best in full sun. Drought tolerant once established. Frost hardy in USDA
   zone 8...with that fabulous drainage!

        $16.00                                                                                          Xanthorrhoeaceae

* Aloe GuidoTM
   Gorgeous aloe hybrid, a Proven Winners selection with rosettes of striking succulent leaves, white-edged with
   white markings - elongated spots -- on green, eventually reaching 6-8" tall and wide. Best in well drained soil in
   full to part sun. Frost hardy only to 25F, mid USDA zone 9, so best kept in containers to be moved indoors in
   winter. Both heat and drought tolerant in the ground. Let potted plants dry a bit before watering. A nice addition
   to the succulent collection outdoors or in.

        $12.00                                                                                          Xanthorrhoeaceae

  Aloe polyphylla                                                                                                spiral aloe
   One of the most endangered Aloe species, endemic to the high plains of the landlocked South African country of
   Lesotho at over 10,000 ft. Succulent leaves, pointed and toothed, form a single rosette, to 1 ft tall x 1-s ft wide,
   developing a wonderfully distinct spiral pattern as plants mature. Pink flowers appear on a 2 ft stem in early
   summer. Best in cool sun or part shade with abundant summer water. Accustomed to damp summers and dry
   winters, it is also one of the hardiest aloes, to 10F, the bottom of USDA zone 8 and lower if kept dry in the
   winter.

        $24.00                                                                                          Xanthorrhoeaceae

  Aloe striatula
   Multi-trunked shrub from South Africa, the hardiest of the shrubby aloes. To over 3 ft tall and possibly up to 6 ft
   wide with dark green leaves, long, narrow, and pointed, and yellow flowers in spring and summer continuing into
   fall. Plant in sun where drainage is good. Top hardy to 18 F, upper USDA zone 8; has resprouted from 0F, zone
   7, or below with mulch, good drainage, and protection from winter moisture.

        $12.00                                                                                          Xanthorrhoeaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                  (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                  15

  Aloe variegata
   Unique small species from the high elevations of the South African Karoo, this collection from the Sutherland
   Plateau. Scarce in habitat, the partridge-striped, compact leaves, marbled and striking green and white, form small
   clumps under shrubs or in pots in captivity, producing up to 2 ft spikes of very large orange flowers in late
   summer. From higher elevations, this is one of the frost hardier aloes from an area that receives winter and
   summer rainfall, though not a whole bunch of it. In cultivation, certainly prefers gritty soil. Best in full sun,
   though dappled shade isn't a problem especially in hot climates. It has been tolerant of lower temperatures, to
   around 10 to 12F, bottom of USDA zone 8, briefly, possibly even colder if dry. Once a common grocery store
   plant, now difficult to find.

        $11.00                                                                                      Xanthorrhoeaceae

* Alstroemeria ‘The Third Harmonic’
   New hybrid, a cross by California's George Hare between A. 'Harmony' and A. aurantiaca, with dazzling flowers
   that open yellow-orange with markings of black stripes and darken to deeper orange with red on the backs of
   petals -- lots of words for a lovely flower that blooms throughout the year in warmer climates. Plants are
   vigorous, creating clumps of flower stalks rising to 3-4 ft with bright green leaves and large flower clusters. Sun
   to part shade with summer water for best, continuous blooms. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7 and possibly lower.
   A fine and long-lasting cut flower, best pulled rather than cut.

        $12.00                                                                                      Alstroemeriaceae

  Amaryllis belladonna                                                                                   naked lady
   A choice and deliciously fragrant flowering bulb to perfume the late summer garden with abundant light to dark
   pink trumpets on dark stems, to 18-24” tall -- “naked” since the strappy leaves that appeared in winter have died
   back during the summer. Definitely a beautiful lady. Best in a Mediterranean climate with summer heat, good
   drainage and very little summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and in zone 7 with a bit of mulch.

        $14.00                                                                                        Amaryllidaceae

  Amorphophallus konjac                                                                                    voodoo lily
   This arum from southeast Asia is widely cultivated for its edible tuber but we grow it for the huge tropical
   looking leaves and "snakeskin" stem. In spring, long before the leaves appear, a huge and astonishing flower
   dazzles with a 2 ft, purple spadix standing above the purple-black spathe. (The "perfume", designed to attract flys
   for pollination, can be mitigated by simply rinsing the flower.) Plant stems and leaves develop after a
   well-deserved rest and can reach 6 ft tall in part sun to shade with regular summer water. Cold hardy to USDA
   zone 6.

         $9.00                                                                                               Araceae

* Arctostaphylos 'Lutsko’s Pink’                                                                             manzanita
   Evergreen shrub, upright to 4-7 ft tall, with a dense habit and handsome foliage of glossy green leaves. Spring
   flowers are typical manzanita small bells, these in abundant clusters of white blushed with pink. Best in full sun,
   lean and well-drained soil, and little to no summer water once established. A mixed hybrid including at least A.
   densiflora in its parentage, this was originally grown in a Lafayette, California garden and introduced by the
   designer, Bay area plantsman Ron Lutsko. Frost hardy to 10F, bottom of USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                              Ericaceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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* Arctostaphylos silvicola SBH 7491                                                            bonny doon manzanita
   A Cistus collection from Bonny Doon, California of this rare and endangered manzanita, endemic to California's
   Santa Cruz Mountains. A large, evergreen shrub that can reach 10 ft tall x 20 ft wide at maturity, these have
   smooth stems with dark red bark and pale, gray green, somewhat woolly leaves that are especially silvery,
   justifying a second common name, ghost manzanita. Summer flowers are white as well. Full sun to light shade, in
   lean soil with excellent drainage. Tolerant of occasional summer water once established if temperatures are not
   too hot. Frost hardy to 10 to 15F, USDA zone 8.



        $14.00                                                                                                 Ericaceae

* Arctostaphylos x miwukka 'Blue Point'
   This selection, another choice by Allan Taylor from a lovely group of natural hybrids in Eldorado County
   California, is an evergreen mounding shrub, to 3 ft tall or a bit more, with particularly large pale blue leaves, to 3",
   on contrasting mahogany-red stems, to 4 ft, with peachy pink flowers in profusion from late winter to mid spring.
   Best in mineral soil that drains well in full sun with very little summer water once established. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 6b. (A. x miwukka is a stable hybrid between A. viscida ssp. mariposa x A. patula.)



        $15.00                                                                                                 Ericaceae

* Arctostaphylos x miwukka 'Blue Porcelain'
   This selection, another choice by Allan Taylor from a lovely group of natural hybrids in Eldorado County
   California, is an evergreen mounding shrub, to 3 ft tall or a bit more, of lovely jade-blue green leaves, 2" long and
   somewhat wider, on striking mahogany stems. Flowers in profusion with white bells in spring. Best in mineral
   soil that drains well in full sun with very little summer water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6b.
   (A. x miwukka is a stable hybrid between A. viscida ssp. mariposa x A. patula.)


                                                                                                               Ericaceae

* Arctostaphylos x miwukka 'Chocolate Drop'
   This naturally occuring cross is a lovely celadon blue in appearance with contrasting mahogany stems, the
   pointed leaves, about 2" x 2", a perfect backdrop for the white flowers in early winter to spring. The fruit, the
   color of molle, nearly matches the muscular stems. This selection by Allan Taylor in California's Eldorado
   County at 5000 ft. Best in sun with good mineral soil and little summer water once established. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 8. (A. x miwukka is a stable hybrid between A. viscida ssp. mariposa x A. patula.)


                                                                                                               Ericaceae

  Arisaema aff. fargesii
   One of the prettiest of the arisaemas -- we say this mostly because we have it -- this 24" perennial has been a
   beautiful and reliable addition to our shade garden it its compound leaves consisting of many narrow leaflets, in
   this form, banded in the center with silver. These can be late to emerge, sometimes not showing until late summer,
   so plant away from overactive shovels. Requires shade and summer dampness but no winter puddles. Frost
   hardy in USDA zone 7 possibly colder.

        $16.00                                                                                                  Araceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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  Arisaema consanguineum - silvered centered
   Shared with us some years ago by our friends the O’Byrnes, these graceful jack-in-the-pulpits rise to nearly 3 ft
   in late spring with narrow graceful leaflets centered indeed silver. Flowers are deep cinnamon. Adds to its beauty
   by clumping quickly. Dappled shade is best with consistent summer moisture and, of course, decent drainage. A
   wonderful addition to the woodland garden or container. Frost hardy in the ground to 0F, USDA zone 7 or
   below.

        $16.00                                                                                                Araceae

* Arisaema sp. - JSM [Fan Xi Pan, Vietnam]
   This collection from northern Vietnam by Joshua McCullough produces leaves of only about 18" in a pleasing
   spring-green. But more interesting are the late spring and summer, striped flowers with coloring nearly chocolate
   to yellow to light spring-green between the stripes. Shade, rich soil, and summer dampness are best, with good
   drainage for winter rains. Frost hardiness is as yet untested, but we assume at least USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                                Araceae

  Arisaema taiwanense                                                                               taiwan cobra lily
   Extremely rare in commerce but we have a good supply from seeds collected by intrepid friends. The
   lizard-mottled stems bursts out of the woodland ground in April followed by dazzling, cobra-lily black flowers
   and mind-boggling, deeply cut, acid-flashback leaves. For shade to dappled shade in rich soil with average of
   summer water. Frost hardy in the ground in upper USDA zone 6, possibly lower.

        $24.00                                                                                                Araceae

  Arisaema tortuosum                                                                                 whipcord cobra lily
   Surprising, strange, and wonderful Jack-in-the-pulpit from the Himalayas, making its garden appearance in June
   as a 4 ft tall stalk (actually a petiole!) from which two palmate green leaves unfurl, topped by the green flower, the
   "Jack" displaying a loooong, tongue, to 12+", that extends high above the "pulpit." Good soil and average
   summer water in light shade to shade in hottest climates. Frost hardy to at least USDA zone 6.

        $19.00                                                                                                Araceae

* Aristolochia californica                                                                            california pipevine
   This western native Dutchman's pipe, indigenous through western California and southwest Oregon, can be a
   vine to 8 ft or so or a happily scrambling specimen. Either way, it is deciduous, with 3”, heart-shaped leaves and
   olive green stems that are quite attractive in their winter leaflessness. In spring and sometimes beyond into
   summer, light flowers appear -- the Dutchman's pipes of the common name -- often mottled or centered a maroon
   brown. Sun to part shade with afternoon protection in the hottest climates. Happy with extreme summer drought.
   Cold hardy to USDA zone 7. Host to the gorgeous blue Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly.

        $12.00                                                                                        Aristolochiaceae

  Artemisia ludoviciana 'Valerie Finnis'                                                               western mugwort
   From the famed British plantswoman of the same name, this lovely evergreen perennial, from about 18" to 4 ft
   tall, is perfect for a sunny location with very good drainage. Both erect stems and leaves are silver-white, adding
   contrast and texture. Summer flowers are yellow on tallish stems, not significant. Half to full sun. Though
   drought tolerant, occasional summer water replenishes the abundant foliage. Plants can be sheared to reshape.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 6. Much prettier than its common name would suggest.

        $11.00                                                                                              Asteraceae




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Arum palaestinum                                                                                      black calla lily
 One of many delicious arums from the mountains of the Middle East and one that clumps for us instead of
 eating the garden. Winter growing with shiny, bright, 8-12” leaves and velvety, late winter flowers opening black
 and aging to rich, dark maroon. Seems tolerant of summer moisture or complete summer drought. Good for
 shade in the dry border. Intact in our garden after the December 2008 cold spell to 20F. We reckon cold
 hardiness to at least mid USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                                 Araceae

Asarum caudatum f. album                                                       white flowered western wild ginger
 Handsome evergreen goundcover, to only 4-6" tall, and spreading into clumps by underground rhizomes. Leaves
 and roots are are aromatic when crushed. Spring flowers are greenish white in this form, a nice contrast to the
 dark green leaves, though flowers are often hidden under the leaves. Worth searching out. Best in shade in
 well-drained, humousy soil. Needs water to established and then tolerates some summer drought. Frost hardy to
 -20F, USDA zone 5.

      $14.00                                                                                         Aristolochiaceae

Aspidistra caespitosa 'Jade Ribbons'                                                                   cast iron plant
 Shared with us years ago by Barry Yinger, this small, cast iron plant produces leaves, to only about 18" in height,
 in dense clusters of deep green with a satiny blue finish. Intriguingly beautiful for gardens or containers in
 medium shade to the deepest, darkest recesses of the garden. Fairly fast growing in the southeast due to hot
 summer nights; on the West Coast, they are slower but worthwhile. Regular summer water in dryer climates to
 push them along a bit, though they can go without for long periods. Undamaged at 10 to 12F, USDA zone 8, if
 out of wind; can recover from 0F, zone 7.

      $18.00                                                                                            Asparagaceae

Aspidistra elatior 'Asahi'                                                                              cast iron plant
 A gorgeous selection of the same cast iron plant. Though this isn't the "biggest aspidistra in the world," it reaches
 about 1/2 to 2/3 the size of typical at about 18" to 25" tall with 6" wide leaves brushed cream especially towards
 the tips. A stunning garden or container plant that can thrive in the deepest of shade. Best if kept out of direct
 sunlight especially in hot climates. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8; upper zone 7 with protection. Protect from
 slugs and snails.

      $18.00                                                                                            Asparagaceae

Aspidistra elatior 'Big Bang'                                                                            cast iron plant
 A larger version of A. elatior 'Milky Way', to 3 ft tall with arching, glossy leaves and the signature yellow polka
 dots, elongated as if stretched. Pretty in the garden or in containers alongside creams and yellows to bring out the
 contrasting dots. Slow growing, at least in the cool nights of the West Coast. Prefers rich soil and consistent
 summer moisture in shade to deep shade with at least afternoon protection from bright light. Grows in the
 darkest imaginable areas. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 to upper zone 7 with protection.

      $18.00                                                                                            Asparagaceae

Aspidistra elatior ‘Variegata’                                                                         cast iron plant
 The solution to your shadiest spot: a cast iron plant with lovely white stripes on dark green leaves, to 2+ ft tall.
 Hardy outdoors in light to deep shade with normal summer water, they prefer good drainage. Regular summer
 water for best appearance, though tolerant of long dry periods. Clumping plants, they are somewhat slow
 growing, doubling their size in a few years. Also fab in a container. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $18.00                                                                                            Asparagaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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Aspidistra minutiflora                                                                                  cast iron plant
 One of the more intriguing of the cast iron plants, a genus on which we have become rather fixated, this with very
 narrow leaves, to 30” tall and only 1/2 to 1” wide, of deep green with a bit of silky blue overlay. Creates graceful
 clumps reasonably quickly in the woodland garden or in container where the nearly black stem sheaths can be
 easily observed for hours on end … or at least a second or two. Enjoys ample summer moisture, though, as with
 other aspidistras, seems to accept being nearly moisture free in dark, cave-like spaces. A perfect addition under
 shrubs where other plants are not likely to thrive, or in dark entry gardens for instance. Frost hardy to the bottom
 of USDA zone 8. Has also been offered as Aspidistra linearifolia.

      $16.00                                                                                           Asparagaceae

Aspidistra tonkinensis 'Spotty'                                                                       cast iron plant
 A Cistus introduction of a lovely species, this our seedling selection from Southeast China, with graceful, long
 green leaves, to 3 ft or more, emerging with black sheaths, the leaves humorously spotted almost golden. Tolerant
 of deep shade and drought, but more pleased with ample summer moisture and good soil. Thus far frost hardy to
 upper USDA zone 7. We think this is one of the most graceful of all the aspidistras.

      $24.00                                                                                           Asparagaceae

Aspidistra typica 'Old Glory'                                                                         cast iron plant
 Small cast iron plant, selected in Sichuan Province in 2002 by Darrell Probst and named by Plant Delights
 Nursery. To only 15" tall, the wide and shiny green leaves marked by a broad, greenish yellow band down the
 middle and, especially with age, spreckles and spots adding texture. Slowly forms clumps. As with others of the
 genus, does well in containers or in the garden in shade to very deep shade, bringing color to dark corners.
 Tolerates some drought but prefers even moisture in rich soil. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 to upper zone 7 with
 protection.

      $18.00                                                                                           Asparagaceae

Astelia banksii - compact form                                                                         shore astelia
 Graceful member of the genus, this form producing spring-green, arching leaves, to only 2 ft, with striking, silver
 undersides and, in spring and summer, cream to chartreuse flowers. Tolerant of salt spray for coastal gardens and
 easy in any garden with regular summer water and full sun to dappled shade. Frost hardy to the mid teens, mid
 USDA zone 8; has survived 10 to 12F with some protection.

      $16.00                                                                                             Asteliaceae

Astelia nivicola 'Red Gem'
 Our favorite nivicola collection, again from New Zealand, forming clumps to 2 ft wide by roughly 18" tall with
 numerous leaves, all coated with a soft silver fur, that become deep red, almost burgundy, with light and frost in
 winter. Very striking! This has been one of the toughest creatures, not having received frost damage even in the
 14F, arctic extravaganza in 1996. Also an amazingly good container plant where burgundy tones in
 rosette-forming plants are hard to come by. Even summer moisture in bright light for best color, though
 accepting of shade. Tolerant of frost to 10F, USDA zone 8, with reports of near 0F out of the wind.

      $16.00                                                                                             Asteliaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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* Aucuba himalaica var. dolichophylla
   Sweet shrub to small tree with 5", evergreen leaves, long and narrow and, in this form, particularly prominent
   cream-yellow spotting over the dark green leaf surface -- just enough to create a texture moment. Useful in
   otherwise difficult conditions, from the darkest garden corners to places where root competition is severe. These
   can reach small tree size, but remain within the 8-10 ft range in the garden, easily kept smaller. Part to full shade
   serves best in rich soil with summer water for best appearance though some drought is tolerated. Frost hardy to
   just below 0F, upper USDA zone 6.

        $16.00                                                                                              Garryaceae

  Austrocedrus chilensis [Cañon Infernillo, Chile]                                               chilean incense cedar
   Lovely, drought adapted tree with somewhat weeping branches of light green cast in blue and a narrow, upright
   form, to 50 ft tall x 15 ft wide, keeps its columnar shape until quite old when the crown may broaden at the top.
   Bark is orange to darker brown and peels in narrow strips. This high elevation collection from about 4500 ft
   indicates cold hardiness of close to 0F, USDA zone 7, if provided bright light and good drainage. Reminiscent of
   our own native incense cedar, Calocedrus decurrens.

        $18.00                                                                                            Cupressaceae

  Azara microphylla ‘Variegata’                                                                 variegated boxleaf azara
   Extremely handsome, small and arching, evergreen tree, very slow-growing to 15 ft, with small leaves variegated
   green, cream and white, and, in late spring, tiny spring flowers that are intensely scented (with the aroma of white
   chocolate -- or so our employees insist). Orange berries follow for autumn interest. Site in cool sun or part shade
   in well-drained soil with regular summer water. Can be used in container as a showoff specimen. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 8, suffering possible leaf damage below 15F.

        $18.00                                                                                               Salicaceae

  Azara petiolaris HCM 98034
   A distinct species, from from mid to high elevations in south central India, with a small subtending leaf and large,
   oval, very shiny and somewhat crinkled leaves to about 2-3" on rounded 10-12 ft plants. Light yellow, sweet
   smelling flowers appear in March and April in the northern hemisphere. A most attractive small garden tree, best
   if maintained with multiple trunks in full sun to part shade and reasonably well-drained soil. Tolerant of summer
   drought but looks its best with added summer moisture in very dry summer climates. Should be frost hardy into
   the bottom reaches of USDA zone 8 and possibly colder out of the wind. Not at its best in the humid southeast.

        $14.00                                                                                               Salicaceae

  Baccharis pilularis 'Blue Mound'                                                                        coyote bush
   A Cistus introduction, from serpentine coastal bluffs in Harris Beach State Park on the southern Oregon coast.
   This compact male clone grows to only 3 ft high x 5 ft wide with waxy, blue cast foliage. Replete in winter with
   little pink brushes adorning the entire shrub, this good evergreen, ground-hugging plant makes the various winter
   pollinators deliriously happy. Us, too. Best in sun and infertile soil with low summer water. Especially happy in
   coastal conditions. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                               Asteraceae

  Beesia deltophylla
   Very nice small, evergreen groundcover from China with shiny, heart-shaped leaves and spikes of white flowers
   in late summer. Lovely vein patterns add texture to the leathery foliage. Plants form clumps 18” wide x 1 ft tall in
   dappled shade to full shade. Tolerant of many soils but best planted in areas that are consistently moist and
   well-drained soil. Creates a good backdrop for other shade loving perennials. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

        $14.00                                                                                           Ranunculaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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Begonia (dregei) richardsiana
 Intriguing caudex forming species from summer rainfall South Africa. Grows only to about 18" but quickly
 forms a caudex of up to 3" giving the appearance of a miniature baobab (Adansonia digitata). Makes us want to
 create a tiny national park. Ruffled leaves, under 1", are pleasingly undulate and shaded in purples and grays.
 Small, white flowers complement its stature. Frost hardy to only upper 20s F, upper USDA zone 9, but fine for
 the protected garden or as a pot specimen. Faithful list perusers who wonder if this was previously listed as B.
 richardsonii are right to notice a name correction.

      $12.00                                                                                          Begoniaceae

Begonia emeiensis DJHC 98479
 A Dan Hinkley collection from Emei Shan and a striking addition to the increasingly large repertoire of begonias
 hardy in USDA zone 6 or above, this with 6-8” succulent, heart-shaped leaves and, in late summer and fall,
 attractive clusters of luscious pink flowers within the canopy. Shade to afternoon shade in moist conditions.
 Evergreen into the upper 20s F; deciduous but resprouting handily in early spring after temperatures as low as
 -10F, USDA zone 6, especially if mulched. A swollen (node) at the end of each leaf petiole can sprout and
 increase the plant. Easy

      $14.00                                                                                          Begoniaceae

Begonia hemsleyana
 Very hardy begonia grown in gardens for many years. Dormant through winter, emerging in June with fuzzy red
 stems carrying palmate leaves, dark green spreckled white. A very nice texture for the shady, woodland garden, in
 moist conditions -- but not too moist. A bit of drying before watering is welcome. Requires good air circulation
 as well. Found at 4-6,000 ft elevation in Yunnan, China, these are frost hardy to USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                          Begoniaceae

Begonia pedatifida
 From the highlands of southern China, this is one of the loveliest and hardiest begonias. To only 1 ft tall with
 feathered leaves to about 6", pale green often veined pink with silver markings. Substantial pink flowers appear
 mid to late season. Best in shade, in rich soil with adequate summer water. Remains green to the mid 20s F and
 resprouts in USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                          Begoniaceae

Berberis darwinii RCH 404                                                                          darwin's barberry
 A striking, evergreen barberry, with bright, yellow-orange flowers on red stems, showy and cheerful over a long
 season in spring. This form, collected by plantsman Randall Hitchin, reaches 8 ft tall and nearly as wide, with
 arching branches and spiny leaves, dark green above and lighter below. Native to Chile and Argentina, these
 handsome plants enjoy full sun to part shade in reasonably well-drained soil with average summer water. Frost
 hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                         Berberidaceae




                                 Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                               (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                   22

Berberis thunbergii - good purple
 And a very good purple it is! Though it well might have a more “proper” name, this plant, given to us by
 horticulturist Neil Bell, illicits such admiration from garden visitors that we felt a duty to reproduce it -- and thus
 it remains “good purple” for the time being. The overlapping, 1”, velvety, deep burgundy leaves are held late
 into the season on this 6 ft, fountain-like shrub, providing a rich tapestry of fall color, for us in late November
 and December. Rich yellow flowers against the dark leaves are also an attraction in spring as are the small,
 orange-red fruits that adorn the arching branches in late summer and fall. Full sun to bright shade and regular
 summer water. Frost hardy to USDA zone 5 or 6. Not recommended to the Northeast because of invasive
 potential.

      $14.00                                                                                             Berberidaceae

Beschorneria aff. decosteriana - large green
 These seedlings from plants originally collected from Mexico’s Tamaulipas State have grown larger than any
 others we have tried. The succulent, deep green rosettes reach to over 4 ft wide and high and occasional
 cherry-red and green flower spikes, to upwards of 10 ft, suggest giant hummingbirds hovering just out of sight.
 Possibly the best attribute of this wonderful plant -- and the whole genus for that matter -- is its agave-like texture
 coupled with a willingness to grow in medium shade though perfectly at home in full sun in all but the lowest,
 hottest places. Occasional summer thunder storms, or the equivalent thereof, simulate its mountain forest home.
 Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7, having lost its leaves but recovered from around 10F in gardens…not ours,
 thankfully.

      $16.00                                                                                                Agavaceae

Beschorneria albiflora
 One of the larger members of this genus of agave relatives from northeastern Mexico growing amid oaks, pines,
 and many other delicious plants. This species forms open rosettes of pale green leaves, to about 3 ft, with bright
 red, branched flower stalks rising to 6 ft or more, the pendulous flowers often red at the base and very pale green,
 indeed nearly white, at the tips of the sepals. Prefers some summer water where dry. Has performed admirably in
 our garden in dappled shade and should be frost hardy in USDA zone 8, to about 15F with no leaf damage,
 resprouting in spring from 10F or so.

      $16.00                                                                                                Agavaceae

Beschorneria septentrionalis                                                                         false red yucca
 Another bold non-agave from northeastern Mexico, producing rosettes to 2 ft of deep green, 4" leaves, the plant
 resembling a pile of hung-over starfish. The flowering, on red stems, are deep red edged with green and followed
 by red tinted seed pods. Drought tolerant but loves a little summer water along with excellent drainage and partial
 shade to full sun. Essentially a USDA zone 8 plant though success has been achieved in USDA zone 7 gardens
 with occasional protection.

      $15.00                                                                                                Agavaceae

Beschorneria sp. [S. LaPeña, Mex. 8700']
 From a 1993 collection in the rugged mountains of Coahuila, Mexico amid many other botanical treasures,
 comes this strap-leaved, blue-green perennial, to only about 18”, with some of the prettiest flowers to be found in
 the genus. The stems are red, holding orange red flowers with bases dipped in green. Hummingbird magnets!
 We are still looking for a likely name. Because of its high elevation habitat at over 8500 ft, it is expected to be
 frost hardy well into USDA zone 7 and evergreen to 15F. Full sun to medium shade; has succeeded in full shade
 in very hot climates with occasional summer water for best look. A very nice plant.

      $16.00                                                                                                Agavaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                  (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                  23

* Bomarea x Alstroemeria
   A bit of a botanical anomaly, this so far nameless cross, done by both Calvor Palmateer and Martin Grantham,
   has produced upright perennials with blue-green leaves and tubular flowers exhibiting shades of pink, orange,
   and even a little mauve. They have been non-seed producing clumpers in the garden and reliable for several years
   now, happy with bright light and a bit of summer water. Frost hardy to the bottom of USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                      Alstroemeriaceae

  Brahea armata                                                                            mexican blue hesper palm
   The leaves are chalky, dusty blue on this most stunning Mexican palm, slow growing, to 20 ft in a long time. Sun
   to part shade and lean soil that promotes very, very good drainage for best winter hardiness. Drought tolerant but
   faster growing with some summer moisture. Roots should be disturbed as little as possible when planting. Easy
   in USDA zone 9; frost hardy with protection in zone 8 or in pots.

        $18.00                                                                                             Arecaceae

  Brahea brandegeei                                                                                       san josé palm
   The San José palm. From mountains of southern Baja California and across the water in northwestern Mexico.
   Slow growing to 30 ft or more with a thatched trunk and 10ft crown. The fronds are semi-circular and the
   deepest blue-gray, greener above. Surprisingly frost hardy for its mild habitat, these plants have withstood
   temperatures in the mid to upper teens F, though briefly, in areas of high summer heat and well drained soil. Our
   plant in the ground is still very young and we doubt its permanent hardiness in western Oregon except along the
   immediate coast. We do find it, however, to be a fabulous pot specimen worth long periods of staring. Frost
   hardy in mid to upper USDA zone 8.

        $18.00                                                                                             Arecaceae

  Brahea sp. - super blue/silver
   A clumping creature, to 10 ft tall, looking much like Brahea decumbens but with larger leaves and a more
   extended trunk. These are a mid-elevation collection from central Mexico at the edges of thorn scrub where it
   meets oak country. Dappled shade to full sun and generous summer fertilizing with water to speed its slow
   growth. We know it makes a beautiful container specimen but don't yet know its potential frost hardiness. So we
   can only guess at 20F, the bottom of USDA zone 9.

        $15.00                                                                                             Arecaceae

  Buddleja x pikei 'Hever Castle'
   Another delicious hybrid with many fine attributes; one being that it appears to be sterile. Others include a small
   texture with narrow, dusty green, evergreen leaves and the prettiest lavender-blue flowers, fragrant and in great
   profusion from spring until frost. A shrub to 5-6 ft tall, one of the best behaved at the buddleja party, having
   originated at Hever Castle in Kent, England. Sun to dappled shade with reasonable water. Frost hardy to USDA
   zone 7. Also known as B. x pikei 'Hever.'

        $11.00                                                                                       Scrophulariaceae

  Butia capitata [South Carolina Shell Station]                                                              pindo palm
   With our travels far and wide around the world to find ever newer plants, exotic collection sites can hardly get
   better than this. On a road trip to interior South Carolina, having spotted eight lovely pindo palms that had
   withstood rigorous winters and all the harsh conditions a mini-strip mall can provide, we brought home seeds in
   several large Slurpee containers. The palms, a pretty silver-blue, were otherwise typical. They should grow to
   about 15 ft producing lovely arched pinnate leaves that curl upon extension. Bright sun, good drainage, and
   overhead protection at 12 to 15F, lower to mid USDA zone 8.

        $15.00                                                                                             Arecaceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                   24

  Buxus harlandii                                                                                 harland boxwood
   Handsome boxwood, to 4-6 ft tall and vase-shaped, with shiny, leathery leaves, narrow and slightly notched at the
   top. This dense, mounding shrub makes a wonderful hedge, easily sheered to shape. Spring flowers are pale
   yellow and very inconspicuous. Prefers sun to part shade in well-drained soil with average moisture but quite
   tolerant of summer drought once established. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.

        $15.00                                                                                               Buxaceae

  Buxus microphylla 'Curly Locks'
   A most attractive small boxwood, slow growing to 3 ft or so with narrow curled leaves, just as the name would
   imply, providing wonderful texture for the garden. Evergreen with leaves tinting only faintly to that dead meat
   look of winter boxwood (ok, so we could have found a better descriptor). This, however, is offset by the typical
   male cat fragrance given off by most boxwoods....hummmm. Frost hardy to below 0F, into USDA zone 6. And
   all this can be yours brightening that somewhat shaded spot with a bit of summer water.

        $15.00                                                                                               Buxaceae

* Buxus microphylla var. japonica 'Variegata' - dwarf form
   Well...kind of dwarf anyway. Given to us several years ago by the late, great gardener Jane Platt, this compact
   6-8 footer has a naturally pyramidal growth and pleasingly cream and green leaves with nary a reversion to date.
   Excellent and hardy as a container or hedge plant. And easily shorn if a more formal look is desired. Sun to
   dappled shade with regular summer water at least until well established. Frost hardy in low USDA zone 6, we
   hear, possibly colder.

        $12.00                                                                                               Buxaceae

* Buxus sempervirens 'Golden Swirl'
   A collection from a lone surviving shrub in the shade of an ancient pecan in a North Portland “garden”, this 8 ft
   boxwood has a tall, rather narrow habit, with upright branchlets and a pleasing creamy-gold variegation
   throughout the leaves. Drought tolerant and vigorous. You should have one. We would like to see it used as good
   garden furniture. Considering its “habitat” it must be very drought tolerant and, from the original plant’s
   appearance, able to withstand occasional pruning with chainsaws. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6, at least.

        $14.00                                                                                               Buxaceae

  Callicarpa japonica 'Inagali'                                                                     japanese beautyberry
   Diminutive beauty berry, to only 4.5 ft tall x 2-3 ft wide, with abundant pale lilac berries in autumn on a smaller
   scale plant than most found on the market. A deciduous addition to the garden's autumn colors, the vibrant lemon
   yellow leaves creating a great contrast to the berries. Easy in full sun to half shade with regular summer for best
   fruiting. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5. Excellent container plant.

        $14.00                                                                                              Lamiaceae

  Callistemon citrinus                                                                            crimson bottlebrush
   Medium sized, evergreen shrub, to 8-10 ft tall, with handsome, narrow leaves that are lemony when crushed and
   crimson-red, “bottlebrush" flowers in June and July. A hummingbird's friend. This Australian native makes a
   great border shrub or small, specimen tree in full sun and well-drained soil. Drought tolerant as well once
   established! Can also tolerate a bit of frost. Cold hardy in upper USDA Zone 8, resprouting from the base in
   colder temperatures.

        $12.00                                                                                              Myrtaceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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  Callistemon pallidus 'Best Blue'                                                                  lemon bottlebrush
   A Cistus introduction: definitely a collector's callistemon, selected from our blues. Dense evergreen shrub,
   marked by its striking, aromatic, blue leaves and new growth made silky with silver hairs. Blooms in late spring
   to early summer with pale yellow bottlebrush flowers, a nice contrast to the blue foliage. To 10 ft wide x 8 ft
   wide. Best in full sun and lean, well-drained soil with regular summer water until established. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                               Myrtaceae

  Callistemon pallidus 'Eleanor'                                                                              bottlebrush
   Deep violet-red flowers, early and gorgeous, adorn this garden seedling selected by Paul Bonine of Xera Plants.
   An upright shrub with blue-leaved, arching branches, reaching 6 ft tall x 4 ft wide in 5 years. Full sun,
   well-drained soil, and little water once established. Frost hardy in the Portland area for several years, with no
   damage at 12F, USDA zone 8. Resprouts from lower temperatures.

        $14.00                                                                                               Myrtaceae

  Callistemon pityoides 'Kusiosco Princess'                                                           alpine bottlebrush
   A particularly frost hardy callistemon, collected on the upper slopes of Australia's Mt. Kusiosco, a small
   bottlebrush, to 3-6 ft tall, with finely textured, long and narrow, evergreen leaves and pale yellow, “bottlebrush”
   flowers in late spring and early summer. Best in full sun to part shade with summer water, though quite drought
   tolerant once established. One of the hardiest of the genus, performing well in USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                               Myrtaceae

  Callistemon sieberi                                                                                 river bottlebrush
   One of the hardiest of the bottle brushes from southeastern Australia, found growing along creek beds and
   tolerant of both wet and dry conditions. A fountain-like shrub, with fine-textured, narrow leaves, that can be
   pruned to maintain a dense structure or allowed to grow to its desired 6 ft or so. This form has a tight chartreuse
   flower in spring, often repeated in summer. Best in sun to dappled shade. Frost hardy to upper USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                               Myrtaceae

* Camellia sinensis ‘Tea Breeze’
   Traditional tea plant for green and black teas, a vigorous, evergreen shrub, to 4-10 ft tall and wide, but easily kept
   smaller through pruning or, perhaps, regular harvesting of the glossy green leaves. A fall-blooming species, this
   form from Kunming Botanic Garden produces fragrant white flowers in early autumn. Best in full sun to part
   shade where the soil is richly organic and summer water is provided regularly. Frost hardy to at least 0F, USDA
   zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                                Theaceae

  Camellia sinensis var. rubra ‘Blushing Maiden’
   A pink flowered, dark foliaged form of true tea camellia. And, yes, tea can be made from the leaf tips. This
   Chinese selection is daintier than the species with spicy-scented, pink flowers appearing in autumn to brighten
   those fall cleanup days. To 4 ft tall, eventually 5 ft x 4 ft wide. A handsome shrub for part shade with regular
   summer water. Frost hardy to at least 0F, USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                                Theaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Canarina canariensis                                                                              canary bellflower
   Endemic to the dry Canary Island, as one might guess, this lovely, climbing perennial, to 10-12 ft, has showy
   bell-flowers, yellow-orange veined and edged in red and arrow-shaped, somewhat toothy, blue-green leaves.
   Herbaceous with shoots appearing annually from a fleshy tuber as weather cools and moisture returns. Sun to
   part shade with regular water during growth periods and very occasional water in dormancy. Intolerant of cold
   and frost hardy in USDA zone 11. A rewarding container specimen elsewhere.

        $16.00                                                                                         Campanulaceae

  Carmichaelia australis                                                                         new zealand broom
   Sweetly scented pea shrub from the South Island, New Zealand, to only 3-4 ft tall with green flattened branches
   instead of leaves and a somewhat weeping form. Lavender flowers are abundant in spring and summer and
   intensely fragrant. Best in sun with adequate summer water though tolerant of some summer drought. Frost
   hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $9.00                                                                                                Fabaceae

  Carpobrotus chilensis [Pistol River, OR]
   Our collection of this carpet forming ice plant often seen in dunes from the central Oregon coast south
   to….Chile. Though some have surmised it is actually an introduction from South Africa, most data says no.
   Squared, succulent leaves, to 3", with 2” flowers of cerise on this form. Wonderful pot plant or ground cover in
   coastal situations. Full to part sun with dry summers. Frost hardy to 18 to 20F, upper USDA zone 8.

        $11.00                                                                                              Aizoaceae

  Ceanothus impressus 'Vandenberg'                                                                       california lilac
   A new favorite, a compact plant from east of the Santa Lucia Mountains in northern California. Forms a dense
   mound with tiny, crinkled leaves and bright blue, airy flowers in April and May. To 4 ft tall, eventually taller, x 6
   ft wide but easily pruned or sheared for size and shape. Best in sun, mineral soil, and little summer water once
   established, though accepting of summer garden water in cool areas. Cold hardy in USDA zone 7b.

        $14.00                                                                                            Rhamnaceae

  Ceratostigma willmottianum ‘Palmgold’                                                           desert skys plumbago
   A 2001 introduction from the United Kingdom's Palmstead Nursery, this golden foliaged, shrubby perennial is a
   winner with its soft blue flowers appearing like little jewels from late summer until frost. Reaches 1-2 ft tall and
   wide at maturity. Best in full sun in cool climates and part sun with protection from western sun in hottest areas.
   Needs little supplemental water in the summer once established. Remains evergreen to 25F, mid USDA zone 9,
   and frost hardy to mid zone 7 with winter mulch. Cut back in spring after new growth appears.

        $16.00                                                                                         Plumbaginaceae

* Cestrum 'Lemon Meringue'
   A new variegated introduction, given to us by Jimmy Turner of the Dallas Arboretum. Tall lanky shrub, like the
   species, with huge trusses of intensely evening-fragrant yellow flowers all summer but, in this form with
   variegated leaves, green with splashes of white adding texture. Site where you will enjoy its perfume from dusk
   on. Full to part sun with normal water. Cold hardy in upper USDA zone 8, resprouting from lower temperatures.
   A hummmingbird favorite.

        $15.00                                                                                             Solanaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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Cestrum nocturnum                                                                                  lady of the night
 Forget the cocktails and repartee, this night blooming jessamine is reason enough to stay out on the patio after
 dark. Intoxicating creamy white blooms in mid to late summer on this 8 ft shrub for sun and well-drained soil
 with regular summer water. A die-back perennial, going to ground after a freeze and resprouting in spring. Root
 hardy in USDA zone 8. Fine in containers as well.

      $11.00                                                                                             Solanaceae

Cestrum parqui [Remmick]                                                                             chilean jessamine
 If you enjoy special evening perfume in your garden, this plant delivers, bearing a fabulous abundance of yellow
 flowers from summer through frost on a shrubby perennial, to 6+ ft tall, with long, willowy leaves. Fragrance
 appears in the early evening inviting delicious after dinner strolls through the garden. Full sun to light shade with
 regular summer water. Reseeds close to the mother plant making more for friends. This form found by Mike
 Remmick surrounding lakes and seasonal washes in south central Chile. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7. One of
 the Royal Horticultural Society's 200 best plants!

      $12.00                                                                                             Solanaceae

Chaenomeles japonica ‘Atsuya Hamada’                                                              flowering quince
 A gorgeous quince with dark maroon-red, nearly black flowers, this from a wild collection by Pacific Northwest
 plantsman Roy Davidson on the slopes of Mount Fuji. Early spring bloom lasts over a long period and attracts
 lots of admiring attention. For full to half sun with regular summer water. These "must-have" plants reach 10 ft
 or so. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5 and possibly colder.

      $18.00                                                                                               Rosaceae

Chaenomeles ‘Oyashima’                                                                              flowering quince
 Lovely little quince, to only about 4 ft tall, with compact, spineless, and somewhat undulating branches that
 produce an abundance of double white flowers in winter through spring. One of the most asked after quinces in
 our garden. For us sometimes flowers as early as the new year, thereby forming wonderful winter forcing for cut
 flowers. Full sun to dappled shade. Though drought tolerant, some summer moisture in dry climates improves
 bud set. The only problem we have seen in our garden is a propensity to being run over by large trucks if planted
 too close to the drive… Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

      $14.00                                                                                               Rosaceae

Chaenomeles x superba 'Mandarin’                                                                     flowering quince
 One of our favorite quinces, another spineless shrub, to only about 4 ft tall, possibly 5, with deep coral-orange
 flowers over a long season in winter and spring. We have planted ours with golden foliage such as Choisya
 ternata ‘Sundance’ for, if we say so ourselves, a dazzling winter effect. Excellent for cut flowers. Full sun to
 medium shade with occasional summer water to improve bud set. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6, possibly 5.

      $14.00                                                                                               Rosaceae

Chamaecyparis thyoides ‘Glauca Pendula’                                                           atlantic white cedar
 Evergreen shrub to small tree from the southeastern United States, fast-growing to 8 ft tall, eventually to 15 ft or
 so, with spreading, pendulous branches and green-blue foliage etched white. Yum! Great accent for full sun and
 fertile, well-drained soil where it can receive summer water. Frost hardy to USDA zone 5 and possibly colder
 with good drainage and ample water.

      $18.00                                                                                           Cupressaceae




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Chlorophytum 'Gold Nugget'
 From the Drakensburgs of eastern South Africa and shared with us by plantsman Gary Hammer, this is
 essentially a dwarf, variegated, ground-covery spider plant -- with no macramé hangers needed. (Does anyone
 remember macramé?) Has been a wonderful addition to container plantings for us with its 6", light cream and
 green striped leaves and has been hardy in the ground, frosting back only when temperatures drop to 20F, USDA
 zone 9, though we would recommend a mulch with such temperatures. Even summer moisture; bright light to
 fairly deep shade. Decent drainage best.

      $12.00                                                                                           Asparagaceae

Choisya arizonica 'Whetstone'                                                                            mexican orange
 A Cistus introduction. Our own collection from the Whetstone mountains of southern Arizona, selected for its
 winter red tint, fine foliage, and extra vigor. Small shrub, to under 3 ft, with filigreed leaves of 1-2" -- yet
 produces the largest flowers choisyas are known for, often in both winter and summer. Sun to dappled shade,
 good drainage. Drought tolerant in all but the lowest deserts. Cold hardy in mid to upper USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                               Rutaceae

Choisya ‘Aztec Pearl’                                                                           mexican orange
 Wonderful, medium-sized, evergreen shrub, a cross between C. ternata and C. arizonica, with handsome, narrow
 leaves and abundant, fragrant, white, orange-blossom-scented flowers in spring and summer. To 3-5 ft tall, a
 useful and tough evergreen shrub for full sun to part shade and average summer water. Frost hardy to USDA
 zone 8.

      $12.00                                                                                               Rutaceae

Choisya ‘Gold Fingers’                                                                         mexican mock orange
 Lovely, golden form of the Mexican orange. Evergreen shrub, to 6 ft or so, with spicy-sweet aromatic leaves and
 abundant white flowers in spring and often again in fall. Full sun to part shade in well drained soil with some
 summer water. A great landscape plant, easy and rewarding. Frost hardy to USDA zone 8.

      $16.00                                                                                               Rutaceae

Choisya ternata 'Sundance'                                                                           mexican orange
 Golden foliaged Mexican orange contrasts nicely with its green leaved parent. Evergreen shrub, to 3-5 ft tall and
 wide, with shiny, dense, aromatic foliage and citrus-scented white flowers in spring, occasionally in summer with
 a second flush in autumn. Full sun to morning sun in hottest climates and regular garden water. Cold hardy to
 USDA zone 8.

      $12.00                                                                                               Rutaceae

Chrysanthemum pacificum ‘Pink Ice’
 An evergreen mum often grown for its handsome foliage -- lovely dark green leaves edged in the silver color of
 the leaf undersides. Plants form a dense mound to 18" tall and, eventually, 3 ft wide making a good ground cover.
 Autumn flowers simmer a soft pink with large yellow centers clustered above the foliage. Full sun to part shade
 especially in hot summer climates. Good drainage is essential for winter survival. Prefers average summer water.
 Frost hardy in USDA zone 5 with protection.

      $9.00                                                                                               Asteraceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Chrysanthemum x rubellum ‘Clara Curtis’
   Terrific perennial for ground cover, garden accent, or pot specimen in full sun to light shade with regular summer
   water. Foliage is a very respectable blue-green that is completely covered in late summer/early autumn by profuse
   daisy-like flowers, wonderfully warm pink with yellow centers -- a pink everyone can love. Forms clumps 2-3 ft
   tall by 2 ft wide, spreading underground. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.

        $11.00                                                                                               Asteraceae

  Cissus striata RCH 393                                                                           miniature grape ivy
   A rich collection by Randall Hitchin from southern Chile in rocky areas in damp woodlands. Most pleasing
   evergreen vine that can grow to 10-15 ft if pushed. A miniature Boston ivy in appearance, with reddish stems and
   4” leaves crinkled with lighter veins. Wonderful for a wall or covering that old cyclone fence you’ve been
   meaning to get rid of. Also, a fine container component. This collection should be fully frost hardy to 15F and
   resprout vigorously from 10F, USDA zone 8. Shade to full sun; some summer water in dry places for extra
   vigor.

        $12.00                                                                                                 Vitaceae

  Cistus x obtusifolius                                                                                          rock rose
   And easy going rock rose that is also striking, blooming abundantly from late spring well into summer, covering
   the deep green, evergreen foliage with masses of white flowers followed by attractive, reddish seedheads that
   persist into the fall. To 3 ft tall x 3 ft wide; easily kept smaller trimming after the blossoms fade. As with all
   cistus, best in full sun where the soil is lean and drains well. Needs little summer water once established. Frost
   hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                                Cistaceae

  Cistus x purpureus 'Alan Fradd'
   Low-growing, evergreen shrub, to only 3 ft tall and spreading to 3 ft or so. This exuberant spring bloomer
   produces large, pure white flowers with a cool red dash at the base of each petal. The foliage is handsome as well
   and gives off a pleasant resinous scent in the summer. For full sun and well-drained soil with little summer water
   once established. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7 with good drainage.

        $11.00                                                                                                Cistaceae

* Citrus medica - Fingered Citron                                                           fingered citron; buddha's hand
   The citrus with strange and wonderful fruit that does, indeed, look like ancient pictures of the hand of Buddha. A
   charming small tree, to only 6 ft tall or so, with shiny, slightly serrated leaves, purplish in new growth and
   somewhat lumpy and rumpled looking in maturity. From early spring onward, purple blushed buds open to
   white, scented flowers followed, in winter, by the singularly entertaining fruit. Though without pulp or juice, the
   abundant oils provide lots of citrus aroma, while the outer rind is wonderful for cooking or for candied peel.
   Loves sun, rich soil, and moisture. Hates cold, only tolerating low temperatures in the 30s F, USDA zone 10. So
   grow outside in summer and bring indoors well before the first frost. And enjoy!

        $16.00                                                                                                Rutaceae

* Clematis orientalis var. tenuifolia
   It is hard to believe this strikingly architectural vine is a relative of the loved and maligned C. tangutica.  Reaches
   to about 10 ft, with finely dissected leaves looking as if they have been cut from metal.  From mid to late summer
   and into the fall, waxy, six-petalled, yellow flowers appear looking as if they have been cut from orange
   rind. These are followed by large, fluffy, white seed heads every bit as beautiful as the flowers. An easy grower in
   dappled shade to full sun.  Drought tolerant once established. Frost hardy from 6F to near 0F, mid USDA zone
   7 and below.

        $16.00                                                                                           Ranunculaceae



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  Colchicum ‘Giant’                                                                                     autumn crocus
   One of the fall croci, these rank with cyclamen as must-haves for the autumn garden. Anywhere from late August
   into November, from bare earth come 4-6" crocus flowers of pink with a pale lilac throats. In late fall, though
   much later in colder climates, the coarse textured leaves appear growing vigorously until mid spring. A fairly
   quick multiplier, they are great under shrubs or in any neglected area of the garden in dappled shade to full sun.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

         $4.00                                                                                            Colchicaceae

  Convolvulus cneorum                                                                             bush morning glory
   This hardy, Mediterranean, morning glory’s silver foliage provides interest all year and good contrast to the pink
   flower buds and white flowers infused with lavender in spring and summer. A mat forming shrub, 2-3 ft tall by 4
   ft wide, this lovely, silvery presence does not spread by seed or runners. Prefers sun and good drainage. Very
   drought tolerant. Frost hardy to USDA zone 8.

        $11.00                                                                                          Convolvulaceae

  Coprosma 'Beatson's Gold'
   One of the early coprosmas to migrate to North America from New Zealand via England, this tiny-leaved shrub
   grows to a layered 3 ft or so in height by about 4 ft wide with bronzed stems and pea-green leaves blotched with
   mustard yellow. Even moisture. Though frost hardy to low USDA zone 8, every coprosma makes a fabulous pot
   specimen or filler with C. 'Beatson's Gold' looking particularly fetching with maroons and oranges.

        $11.00                                                                                                Rubiaceae

* Cordyline australis ‘Inner Glow’
   Another wonderful selection of ths lovely accent plant for the garden -- this one having narrow, salmon colored
   leaves with a pronounced midrib. Can reach 10 ft tall if the winter weather isn't too harsh. Best in sun to part
   shade with average summer water but tolerates some drought once established. Can withstand short bouts of
   temperatures in the teens F, longer bouts if wrapped and mulched for protection. Resprouts from 10F, the bottom
   of USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                  Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

  Cordyline australis ‘Purpurea’
   We have noticed that the purple and bronze forms of this striking garden feature, not common enough in our
   gardens, produce a range of color from the bronzy browns to cheerful purples and burgundies. These, selected
   from our own plants, tend toward the purple-burgundy. Can reach 10 ft tall if the weather doesn't interfere. Sun
   to part shade. Best with summer water but fairly drought tolerant. Can withstand short bouts in the teens F,
   longer with protection, and resprouts from 10F, bottom of USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                  Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

  Cordyline sp. [Wanaka Lake, NZ]
   At first we thought this collection was C. pumilo but these are slowly forming trunks, so we expect whatever this
   is to become a multiple trunked, large shrub, especially thrilling for us in that this was a high elevation collection
   in a place that regularly visits the teens F in the winter with snow. Leaves are green with a most attractive purple
   flush for much of the season. Grow as for other cordylines in sun to part shade in dampish soil as a container or
   garden specimen. Ultimate hardiness as yet untested but we are guessing 15F, mid USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                  Liliaceae / Asparagaceae




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Corokia cotoneaster
 Evergreen, divaricating shrub from New Zealand, our hardiest selection of this odd little dogwood relative
 collected from a garden in Eugene, Oregon. Silver gray stems with tiny leaves and, in spring, tiny, fragrant, yellow
 flowers. To 8 ft x 8 ft in time. Full sun to part shade with good drainage and summer water. Frost hardy to
 USDA zone 8.

      $12.00                                                                                          Argophyllaceae

Corokia cotoneaster 'Anton's Dwarf'                                                                  wire netting bush
 A dwarf version of the species, this evergreen, divaricating shrub from New Zealand matures at only 2-3 ft tall or
 so with delightfully attractive, tangled twiggy growth. Like the species, stems are silver gray with teeny tiny leaves
 and, in spring, tiny, fragrant yellow flowers. Full sun to part shade with good drainage and summer water. Frost
 hardy to USDA zone 8. Excellent in a container or at the front of a bed.

      $14.00                                                                                          Argophyllaceae

Corokia cotoneaster ‘Little Prince’
 Dwarf version of this odd little dogwood relative from New Zealand. Our parent plants have topped out at about
 5 ft. Tiny, evergreen leaves adorn angular and interlaced, fine-textured branches adding, in spring, tiny yellow
 flowers. Dodo grazing adapted. Sun to part shade with medium summer water. Frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA
 zone 8.

      $14.00                                                                                          Argophyllaceae

Corokia x virgata 'Frosted Chocolate'
 New from New Zealand where a genus with only 4 species has produced amazing forms and colors, this dazzling
 shrub, to about 6 ft tall x 4 ft wide, has chocolate-maroon leaves with silvery undersides on silvery stems. Small,
 yellow flowers lead to fruit that is a light purple aging to nearly maroon. Sun or part shade in hottest climates
 with even summer moisture. A good small-scale background plant or pot specimen planted with contrasting
 colors. Frost hardy to the upper end of zone 8.

      $16.00                                                                                          Argophyllaceae

Corokia x virgata 'Orangerie'
 A Cistus introduction. Though we would like to say this lovely plant is a result of years of careful hybridization
 under tightly controlled circumstances, we actually found it growing on the floor or one of the greenhouses as a
 tiny seedling...but we are willing to take full credit. This grows as other C. x virgata forms, to a 6-8 ft shrub, but
 with a more upright form and butter-yellow aging copper-orange leaves with reflective, nearly white, undersides.
 In the garden, some summer water, the foliage showing warm yellow in light shade to deeper orange in sun. Very
 good container specimen. Great when planted with burgundies or other dark foliage plants. Frost hardy in
 USDA zone 8.

      $16.00                                                                                          Argophyllaceae

Coronilla valentina ssp. glauca ‘Variegata’
 Variegated form of an obscure plant, though hopefully not for long -- obscure that is.... A Mediterranean shrub,
 rewarding not only for its soft, blue-streaked-white leaves, but also its canary yellow flowers from late winter
 through mid-spring then sporadically through the rest of the year. Strongly sweet smelling and most rewarding
 planted near a path where the foliage stands out and the fragrance can be enjoyed. Quite summer drought tolerant
 in dappled shade to bright sun. Lean conditions create more compactness. Frost hardy to USDA zone 8.

      $12.00                                                                                                Fabaceae




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  Correa 'Dusky Bells'                                                                                australian fuchsia
   This old standby of the Australian fuchsias (actually in the citrus family) has been available but scarce on the
   West Coast for many years. Shrubs to 4 ft with small rounded leaves and nearly brick-red bell flowers, blooming
   profusely from mid autumn through winter and occasionally in summer, preferring soil that is not rich and
   summer water that is only occasional in any exposure but the deepest shade. Though most at home in coastal
   gardens, we find it makes an indispensable container plant – think winter flowers on the front porch -- having
   been damaged in our garden only twice when temperatures dipped below 20F. Frost hardy in uppermost USDA
   zone 8 in the ground.

        $14.00                                                                                               Rutaceae

  Cortaderia selloana ‘Silver Comet’                                                           silver comet pampas grass
   Perfect sized pampas grass, to 6 ft tall x 4-6 ft wide, with foliage edged in white, creating a bright and
   fine-textured effect. Flower plumes are white in summer to early fall. Best in full sun with summer water to
   established. Drought tolerant thereafter. Evergreen and frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                                Poaceae

* Craspedia globosa                                                                           billy buttons; drumsticks
   An odd little evergreen perennial from the plains of eastern Australia with shiny silver-blue-green, felted foliage
   (whew!) in clumps of 12-18" and architectural spheres of yellow flowers held atop 3 ft stalks. Great for cut
   flowers or use in a sunny border. Tolerates heavy soil in sun with regular summer water. Cold hardy into USDA
   zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                              Asteraceae

* Crassula corymbulosa                                                                          shark's tooth crassula
   Small succulent from South Africa, to 6-10" tall x 12-20" wide, with medium green, triangular leaves overlapping
   in stacked, pagoda-like rosettes that add red tones in the sun and produce small white flowers at the top before
   dropping its leaves to produce more plants. Full sun for best leaf color. Very drought tolerant once established
   and frost hardy in USDA zone 9. Excellent in pots or hanging baskets. Tres retro!

        $10.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

  Crinodendron patagua                                                                                white lantern tree
   Slow-growing, evergreen from Chile, a large shrub to 6-10 ft or small tree to 10-12 ft and possibly up to an
   eventual 25 ft in the happiest of circumstances. The shiny, dark green leaves create a nice backdrop for the
   summer flowers, fragrant white, bells that hang from the younger branches. Red seed pods, a bit like flattened
   bell peppers add interest into the winter. Best with regular summer water in full to part sun in well-drained soil
   that is rich and moist, taking care to keep the roots cool in summer. Frost hardy into the upper teens F, upper
   USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                         Elaeocarpaceae

  Crinum bulbispermum                                                                            south african river lily
   Striking South African lily with a large long-necked bulb. Arching, strap-like, blue-green leaves form clumps to 3
   ft tall & wide, topped in mid-spring with large, funnel-shaped, fragrant flowers in white or shades of pink with a
   red streak on each petal. Best in sun or part shade in hot climates with plentiful water during during the growing
   season. Tolerates soggy soil but appreciates a dryer environment in dormancy. Dislikes being transplanted and
   takes time to establish. Frost hardy in USDA zones 7-10.

        $14.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae




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Cryptomeria japonica ‘Dacrydioides’                                                        whip-cord japanese cedar
 Stunning shrub to small tree, to as much as 10-20 ft tall eventually, with long, pendulous branches and
 gray-green, aromatic foliage that adds brown overtones in winter. Needle-like leaves overlap, creating a rope-like,
 or whipcord texture. Best in full sun with adequate summer water in soil that drains well. Frost hardy to at least
 USDA zone 6.

      $15.00                                                                                          Taxodiaceae

Cupressus himalaica                                                                                 bhutan cypress
 Shared with us by Tony Avent whose plant apparently succumbed to impact by meteor (he says it was an ice
 storm) -- the most important point being that, compared to C. cashmeriana, in prolonged temperatures below
 20F the species is quite a bit tougher having withstood dips below 10F no worse for wear. A pyramidal tree
 eventually to 20-30 ft in cultivation with deliciously weeping branchlets of powder blue contrasting stoically with
 the rich, orange-red bark. We provide ours consistent but infrequent irrigation in summer. Fast growing.
 Probably cold hardy to the bottom end of USDA zone 7, possibly squeaking into zone 6; maybe you can tell us.

      $18.00                                                                                         Cupressaceae

Cupressus macrocarpa 'Citriodora'                                                         golden monterey cypress
 This Monterey Cypress selection from the United Kingdom has luscious, dense foliage, both lemon-colored and
 deliciously lemon-scented. Somewhat smaller than other forms, this one can reach 20 ft tall eventually, but is
 easily kept smaller and maintained as a large shrub by pruning or perhaps through hedging. Best in full sun in
 well-drained soil, these need little summer water once established. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.

      $16.00                                                                                         Cupressaceae

Cupressus macrocarpa 'Fine Gold’                                                          golden monterey cypress
 One of several golden forms of the revered Monterey cypress, this one providing not only a narrow, upright form
 in the garden, but also one of bright, rich yellow....and the aroma of lemon soap. An easy and fast grower to
 about 15 ft. Best if given somewhat lean soil, as too many nutrients make for bolting growth and instability -- at
 least in the plant. Fine container specimen. Wonderful as garden accent or formal element. Does not perform as
 well in high summer heat and humidity - e.g. Florida. Frost hardy to the upper end of USDA zone 7.

      $16.00                                                                                         Cupressaceae

Curculigo sp. JSM
 Josh McCullough’s collection from the lower slopes of northern Vietnam’s Fan Xi Pan mountain. A beautiful,
 evergreen, groundcovering forest dweller. Though we are as yet unsure of its hardiness, we suspect a USDA
 zone 9 or upper zone 8 cutoff. Worth a try in milder gardens where summer water is plentiful or as an attractive
 container plant anywhere. Would prefer shade or dappled sunlight.

      $14.00                                                                                        Hypoxidaceae

Cyclamen hederifolium - silver shades
 Our seedlings of these fall flowering beauties, taken from isolated plants of entirely silver-leaved forms. The
 same warm pink flowers appear early, at the end of August, and often continue into October and November
 giving way to way to sheets of silver leaves. Wonderful when interplanted with black mondo grass
 (Ophiopogon planiscarpus’Nigrescens’). Easy in USDA zone 6 or above in open areas of light shade and little
 disturbance. Has been grown successfully as low as zone 4 with culms mulched or planted a bit deep.

      $12.00                                                                                          Primulaceae




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Cymbidium sinense - Yucca Do Clone
 Native from Queensland, Australia to Japan, a slowly spreading perennial, to 12-18" tall, with green, strappy
 leaves from a pseudo bulb. Yellow and green flowers often have a maroonish blush at the base and always the
 intense fragrance of lemons in late winter to mid spring, occasionally in autumn. This vigorous garden clone
 shared with us years ago by the great Yucca Do Nursery. For damp but well-drained light shade. Frost hardy to
 brief periods in upper USDA zone 7. However, we recommend protection during long periods below 15 to 20 F,
 mid to upper zone 8. Superb pot plant to bring indoors while in flower.

      $22.00                                                                                            Orchidaceae

Cyrtanthus brachyscyphus                                                                                     dobo lily
 Orange-red, bell-shaped flowers rise above grass-like foliage for a long season in spring and summer. This
 South African bulb, a tender amaryllis relation, was shared with us by Nevin Smith of Watsonville. Foliage is
 semi-evergreen in mid USDA zone 9. Best in bright shade with well-drained soil and average summer water. A
 great container plant for the patio or in a plunge bed where it can be put away for the hard winter. Frost hardy in
 USDA zone 8.

      $12.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

Cyrtanthus mackenii - yellow
 From a beautiful genus -- akin to a red agapanthus -- springing forth with leaves emerging in late spring and
 dangly flowers, usually orange, but dazzlingly golden yellow in this form. To 12-18" for bright conditions and
 well drained but summer damp soil. As its high, Drakensburg Mtn., South Africa, habitat suggests, hardy to
 between 0 and 10F, USDA zone 7, if well mulched. Stunning pot specimen.

      $14.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

Cyrtanthus x - orange trumpets
 These hybrids of South African native bulbs have large, dangly, orange trumpet flowers, nearly 1.5 inches wide,
 on 1 ft stalks. Strappy leaves, to 12-18", emerge in late spring. Best in bright conditions and well-drained but
 summer-damp soil. Frost hardy to between 0 and 10F, USDA zone 7, if well mulched. These make stunning pot
 specimens.

      $14.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’
 This stylish dahlia has greenish bronzy-black leaves and deep orange-scarlet flowers, a good contrast and just the
 color for fall. To 3 ft tall or so. You may lift them in winter or leave them in the ground if your soil is very well
 drained. Full sun and normal summer water. Cold hardy to USDA zone 7; lower if mulched.

      $12.00                                                                                              Asteraceae

Dahlia ‘Bonne Esperance’
 Blooming all summer with small pink, yellow-centered flowers, this is a classic small dahlia, reaching only
 12-18” tall, a nice addition to a perennial border accent among shrubs. Bees love them. As with all dahlias, good
 drainage keeps them healthy in winter; and water keeps them blooming in summer. Best in full sun but tolerates
 some shade. No need to lift the tubers in USDA zone 8 with good drainage.

      $12.00                                                                                              Asteraceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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* Dahlia sp. - black flowered D67-61
   A must for the chocoholic! This Cistus wild collection from Neuvo Leon, Mexico has dark, 2” flowers that are
   both chocolate colored and chocolate scented. Reaches to 3 ft tall easily, developing from tubers that are huge...
   but not chocolate. Easy in the garden with sun and summer water. Fully frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                               Asteraceae

  Dasylirion aff. leiophyllum [Mammalique]
   Closely related to the smooth-leaf sotol, this form from Mammalique, Cohillo Mexico has narrow, arching leaves
   ending in frilly, white filifers, the sides dressed with pale, backward facing spines. To 4-6 ft, a standout in the
   sunny, well-drained garden with only occasional summer water. Summer flowers are greenish white on dramatic
   stalks to 12 ft. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                                Liliaceae

  Dasylirion texanum                                                                                           texas sotol
   As the name would imply, this gem of a garden plant is native to west and southern Texas into Mexico and is one
   of the hardiest of the lot. Deep green rosettes, with small backward pointing spines and attractive golden filifers at
   the ends of the leaves, eventually form small trunks but are attractive as focal points or repeated rosettes in the
   garden. As denizens of the southern Great Plains, they love a thunderstorm or two in the summer and don't mind
   being dry in the winter, though they are tolerant of moisture. Sun to dappled shade, the main problem with
   dappled shade being dead leaves, not fun to pull out of the center of the plant -- your arm could get stuck that
   way, as my dad used to say about forbidden things. Reports tell us of frost tolerance up to -20, USDA zone 5.
   Wow! Also great container plants.

        $16.00                                                                                                Liliaceae

  Decumaria barbara SBH 2320                                                                                 woodvamp
   Our collection of this lovely, climbing hydrangea relative from east central Georgia (also a newly charted, very
   northern habitat of the needle palm, Rhapidophyllum hystrix). These most attractive vines make an evergreen
   groundcover or a dense, clinging vine for tree or trellis, flowering only after they have climbed a year or two with
   white lace caps held horizontally against the foliage. Enjoys summer water in sun or shade, flowering more
   heavily in sun. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6, probably zone 5.

        $15.00                                                                                           Hydrangeaceae

  Dendropanax trifidus
   Another marvelous ivy-on-a stick, this plant -- having had a presence in collector's gardens in the southeast and
   on the West Coast, then nearly disappearing in cultivation -- is back! Shiny, three-lobed, glossy green, evergreen
   leaves of about 6" adorn this narrow, umbrella shaped, small tree, eventually to 10-15 ft. A lover of shade to
   dappled sun, these seem fine in full sun if provided consistent moisture. A great plant for tropical effect in the
   garden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                               Araliaceae

  Desfontainia spinosa ECEH                                                                                       taique
   Gorgeous Chilean shrub, collected by plantsman Eric Hammond, bushy and slow-growing, to 10 ft x 10 ft, with
   holly-like, evergreen leaves and, from summer to autumn, tubular flowers of scarlet to orange with yellow tips that
   produce cherry-sized fruits. Needs a cool, moist climate in a partially shaded location with acid soil that is
   moisture retentive. Tolerates short periods of drought but best with ample, regular water. Cold hardy in USDA
   zone 8 and tolerates occasional snow cover.

        $14.00                                                                                          Columelliaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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  Dianella intermedia 'Marcia's Giant'                                                               new zealand blue berry
   Fabulous plants with upright, flax-like green leaves, to 3-4 ft tall in this form. Plants are handsome, airy panicles
   of white to lilac flowers are nice, but the fruit is fabulous, rich, metallic blue berries on thin stems, seeming to
   float above the plants until fall. This selection from the Berkeley garden of Marcia Donahue is a very consistent
   fruit former. For half sun with even moisture. Excels in a container. Expect frost damage at 15F, mid USDA
   zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                                 Liliaceae

  Dichroa versicolor 'Fan-Si-Pan Mauve'
   This larger cousin of D. febrifuga is another of the evergreen members of the hydrangea family. From China and
   only recently available in the US, these shrubs reach 6-8 ft tall x 4 ft wide, the foliage a medium green becoming
   maroon in winter. Flowers are lace-caps, pinkish blue in this selection, and produce winter berries in metallic
   turquoise for extra winter interest. Half sun is best with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                            Hydrangeaceae

  Dierama pulcherrimum                                                                             angel’s fishing rod
   Lovely South African irid with nearly evergreen foliage appearing as a delicate grass, to 18” tall, with 4–6 ft
   wands bearing pleasing, often salmon-pink flowers at the ends. Each stem produces flowers for several weeks to
   several months, depending on the season, adding wonderful movement to any garden as they sway in the breeze.
   Given their wild habitat in damp meadows and near seeps, occasional deep irrigation in the summer is beneficial.
   These collections become deciduous below 10F, USDA zone 8, but should be quite frost hardy in zone 6 with a
   bit of mulch.

        $12.00                                                                                                 Iridaceae

  Dierama pulcherrimum 'Ginny's Ultra Dark'                                                      angel’s fishing rod7b
   Culled from generations of seedlings, this very dark flowering, South African iris relative has deep burgundy
   flowers and stems to 5 ft. Wonderful on a bank where the flowers can reach out and be seen from below. The
   grass-like foliage is evergreen -- so it shouldn't be cut back -- and slowly forms a clump to 2-3 ft wide. Full sun
   and good drainage is best. Frost hardy to below 10F, into USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                                 Iridaceae

* Digitalis dubia                                                                               dwarf spanish foxglove
   A wonderful Spanish foxglove to only 15-18" tall the leaves dark green and crinkled above and white and woolly
   below. Flowers are pink with a shiny exterior and fuzzy interior. For full sun and fertile, well-drained soil with a
   bit of water in summer. Adaptable, charming, and deer-resistant. Also frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

         $6.00                                                                                           Plantaginaceae

  Disporum aff. cantoniense DJHC 724 - dark leaved
   Shared with us by Dan Hinckley, this evergreen solomon seal, to an eventual 4 ft or more, has purple tinted leaves
   and branches and cream and chartreuse flowers in spring and summer. For shade to dappled sun with consistent
   summer water. Can be cut to the ground yearly to savor the flush of new growth or maintained as a virtual shrub
   where temperatures stay above the teens F, mid USDA zone 8. Otherwise root hardy to at least 10F.

        $12.00                                                                                                 Liliaceae




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* Disporum cantoniense 'Golden Temple'                                                              chinese fairy bells
   A new and lovely form of the Chinese fairybell, this with wide, deep gold centers in the green leaves, brightening
   any shady spot. Given to us by Ted Stephens of Nurseries Carolinianas and one of the prettiest selections so far,
   To only 30" tall, these have typical white, bell flowers in early summer followed by purple-black fruit. Rich, moist
   soil in light shade is best with regular summer water. Evergreen above 0F, USDA zone 7 and root hardy to -20F,
   USDA zone 5.

        $12.00                                                                                                Liliaceae

* Disporum cantoniense ‘Night Heron’
   An extra special seedling from one of Dan Hinkley's trip to the far east. This one emerges blackish-purple in
   spring and ages to a purply-green. Clusters of white bell flowers hang down from 6 ft stems in early summer and
   produce purple-black fruit. Rich, moist soil in light shade is best with regular summer water. Evergreen above 0F,
   USDA zone 7 and root hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.

        $18.00                                                                                                Liliaceae

  Distylium myricoides                                                                                mosquito myrtle
   Evergreen shrub from southern China, a charming witch hazel relative with tiny fringed, ruby red, witchhazel
   flowers in early spring, nestled among the blue-green leaves. To 3-4 ft tall with layered branches are held in
   graceful, arching sweeps. Happy in full to part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                         Hamamelidaceae

  Drimys lanceolata ‘Suzette’
   An exquisite variegated form of the Tasmanian pepperwood, marbled cream and yellow throughout -- with age,
   the yellow variegation becoming even more striking against the red stems. I first observed this plant, still
   unnamed, at an exhibition in London by Bluebell Nursery. They sent us their first propagation with the only
   caveat that it be named after it's discoverer....and here it is. Though requiring the same conditions as the species,
   this garden seedling -- now about 8 ft in our garden -- is, luckily, from hardy stock and, so far undamaged by a
   windy 20F. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $17.00                                                                                             Winteraceae

  Drimys winteri var. chilensis
   Gorgeous aromatic tree from Mexico, Chile and Argentina, with lance-shaped, lustrous leaves, green above and a
   stunning pale blue-white beneath. Smaller than the species, reaching 10-15 ft, rarely to 25 ft. Flowers are fragrant,
   creamy white, in umbels of up to 20 blossoms, in spring to early summer. Plant in sun to part sun with shelter
   from wind and provide regular moisture. Frost hardy in USDA zones 8.

        $14.00                                                                                             Winteraceae

* Echeveria agavoides 'Red Tip'                                                                          carpet echeveria
   Sweet and very cold hardy echeveria with fleshy leaves, light green blushed red on the tips and edges. Round
   rosettes can reach 6" tall x 1 ft side, topped by red flowers with a yellow tip in spring through early summer.
   Tolerant of sun or shade preferring lean, well-drained soil and only occasional summer water. Frost hardy to
   15F, or so, mid USDA zone 8 so possible in the ground. Also fine in containers.

         $6.00                                                                                             Crassulaceae




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  Echeveria ‘Black Prince’
   There can never be too many “black” plants and, if you consider black to be the new beige, as we do, this is a
   must have. An exquisite garden plant especially as background for such creatures as blue leaved yuccas or
   agaves. Where temperatures frequently fall to 20ºF or below, they are fine as small container plants. The dense
   rosettes of pointed leaves are a chocolate to purple-black, darkening with frost or bright light. Bright orange
   flowers in spring and summer. Simple requirements: a free draining soil drying in winter and bright light. A
   hybrid between E. shaviana and E. affinis. Frost hardy in USDA zone 9.

         $9.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

* Echeveria' Milk Chocolate'
   Delicious rosettes of chocolate colored leaves...a tender succulent that is perfect for containers or even a
   houseplant in bright light.. Easy in full sun to light shade with occasional summer water. Likes to dry out
   between waterings, especially indoors. Winter blooming with tall spikes of orange/pink flowers. Multiplies
   quickly, so bring a single rosette inside before a hard freeze and save it for spring. Frost hardy to 20 to 25F,
   USDA zone 9.

         $6.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

  Echeveria ‘Perle von Nuremberg’
   Wonderful relative of hens & chicks with rounded leaves, pink and blue blushed with a powdery white dusting,
   in rosette form, to 6-8" and slowly clumping.
   Flowers are deep pink on the outside and yellow inside, born on foot long reddish stems. At least occasional
   moisture is required and good drainage, especially for winter survival. And, for best color, bright light indoors or
   out. Frost hardy in USDA zone 9, to about 20 F. A superb pot plant!

        $12.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

* Echeveria 'Rosea'
   Charming succulent perennials forming rosettes of fleshy leaves, gray-green with overtones of lavender.
   Handsome by themselves and striking with coral-orange flowers spikes. Bright light out of the hottest sun,
   well-drained soil, occasional water in summer and as little as possible in winter. Expected to be frost hardy
   briefly in the lower 20s F, USDA zone 9, so best in containers that can be winter protected where temperatures
   can drop lower.

         $6.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

* Echeveria secunda MK 3406
   Powder blue rosettes form clusters to about 18" with nodding, orangey-pink flowers with yellow tips. Very nice.
   This high elevation collection has been frost hardy so far to as low as 12F! Wahoo! That's almost to the bottom
   of USDA zone 8. Needs lean, well-drained soil and occasional water, drying out a bit in between. Wonderful in
   rock garden walls or containers.

        $12.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

  Echeveria x ‘Topsy Turvy’
   A plant with a sense of humor, this fasciated sport has cupped and undulated blue leaves on small rosettes, under
   about 6", with pink to salmon flowers in spring and summer. Prefers mineral soil. A great plant for dish gardens,
   containers, or planting out where temperatures fall to 20F, USDA zone 9. Fun for the whole family.

        $12.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae




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  Echinacea purpurea 'Green Envy' PPAF
   This is one way cool, hot off the presses plant! introduced by New York party planner Mark Veeder. New petals
   on this flower open a luscious light green, starting in mid-June, and slowly fade to a pinkish purple over time.
   Grows to 30 inches tall and is easy in full sun with some summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4. A
   must have for the summer garden border.

        $15.00                                                                                                Asteraceae

* Echium wildpretii                                                                                       tower of jewels
   An extraordinary addition to the dry garden, one of the plants in our garden that receives the most comment when
   in bloom with its huge column of dark red-pink flowers, to 4-8 ft tall, rising out of the low-growing rosette of
   narrow, silvery leaves. This native of the Canary Islands is a biennial, forming a handsome, 2 ft rosette in the first
   year and blooming spectacularly beginning in spring of the second year. Produces abundant seed to perpetuate
   itself, especially if surrounding soil is loose and undisturbed. Best in full sun, very well-drained soil, and little or
   no summer water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 9.

         $9.00                                                                                             Boraginaceae

  Edgeworthia chrysantha 'Akebono'                                                                      red paper bush
   Another amazing daphne relative, this rarer form of the paper bush shrub has Crayon® orange flowers rather
   than yellow. Not quite as scented as the species. Deciduous, slow-growing shrub, to 5-6 ft tall, with winter
   blooms on handsome, bare stems. Sun to part shade with plentiful summer water. Frost hardy in upper USDA
   zone 7.

        $22.00                                                                                           Thymelaeaceae

  Edgeworthia chrysantha ‘Nanjing Gold’                                                      gold flowered paper bush
   Flora gives the species a star. Winter flowering native of China, a deciduous shrub, to 6 ft wide x 8 ft tall, with
   handsome bare stems in winter, warm brown and marked with leaf scars, that are hidden in summer by attractive
   new foliage. In late winter, wonderfully fragrant flowers appear just when needed most, the globose flower heads
   opening bright yellow and aging to creamy white, followed by dry drupes. Rich soil and sun to part shade with
   more plentiful summer water in brighter light. Frost hardy in USDA zones 8-10.

        $18.00                                                                                           Thymelaeaceae

  Elaeagnus pungens 'Clemson Variegated'                                                                       silverthorn
   Variegated olive relative, this with striking center markings of yellow and gold on dark green foliage...or perhaps
   better described as yellow and gold foliage with a narrow, dark green margin. By either description a striking
   evergreen shrub, over time to 10 ft tall x 10 ft wide, with fragrant flowers in the fall. Enjoys well-drained soil and
   average summer water. Plant in sun, where it holds its color very well, or part shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone
   7.

        $14.00                                                                                             Elaeagnaceae

  Elaeagnus pungens 'Hosoba-fukurin'                                                                         silverberry
   This shrub is as durable in the landscape as it is handsome with narrow, creamy yellow margins that set off the
   small, shiny green leaves on thorny branches. Evergreen, growing rapidly to at least 5 ft tall or so and nearly as
   wide with a somewhat lax and spreading habit. Autumn flowers are white and intensely fragrant, attracting
   passersby. Sun or half sun and regular summer water, though tolerant of some summer drought. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                             Elaeagnaceae




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* Epiphyllum sp. 'Antique Orange'                                                                    christmas cactus
   This most beautiful orchid cactus, passed along to us from a family who had had it for generations, has flowered
   each winter in our main retail area provoking many requests for babies. And now they are available! Plants are
   about 3 ft wide and produce intense, florescent orange flowers in abundance. In summer, plants should be
   well-watered and kept in reasonably bright light, then drought stress and allowed to cool in autumn to promote
   buds. Frost hardy outdoors in USDA zone 10 but most effective as an indoor/container or hanging basket
   specimen.

         $12.00                                                                                                Cactaceae

  Eryngium bourgatii                                                                          mediterranean sea holly
   Steel blue flowers and prickly green leaves with distinctive white markings make this an especially attractive
   perennial for the garden border. Leaves are striking when they emerge in spring to form a base for the 2 ft flower
   stalks of thistle-like, summer flowers. For full sun and sandy or well-drained soil. Accepting of summer water
   but a long tap root makes them both drought tolerant and difficult to transplant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

         $6.00                                                                                                  Apiaceae

  Eryngium paniculatum RCH 453                                                                                  chupalla
   Yet another graceful evergreen sea holly, this from south central Chile and growing to about 18” with arching,
   shiny, spring green leaves, often faintly marked silver. The flowers in spring and summer are decorated with
   sputnik florets, small white flowers, and particularly attractive at a distance. Drought tolerant, though summer
   water is appreciated. Sun to light dappled shade and tolerant of poorly drained soil. Frost hardy to 10 to 12F,
   USDA zone 8, or even a bit lower.

         $12.00                                                                                                 Apiaceae

  Escallonia x exoniensis
   Old-fashioned and one of the most useful of the Escallonias, this dense, rounded-leaved shrub, to 6-8 ft , is great
   for hedging, mass planting, or backgrounds. And yes, parking strips. The flowers, often beginning early spring
   and repeating throughout the season, are pale salmon-pink contrasting nicely with the red tinted foliage. In
   summer weather the entire shrub carries the vanilla infused fragrance of pine in warm afternoons. Though
   somewhat drought tolerant, they prefer regular, deep watering in dry summer places. Frost hardy to USDA zone
   7 with reports from sheltered zone 6.

         $11.00                                                                                            Escalloniaceae

* Eucalyptus gunnii var. divaricata                                                                                cider gum
   A traditional choice for the small, urban garden, this ultra hardy subspecies is a slow and steady grower,
   eventually reaching about 30 ft. Trees are multi-trunked with lovely multi-hued bark. Juvenile foliage is, small,
   silvery blue, and perfoliate (stem circling), the leaves rattling in the breeze. After two or three years, the longer,
   lanceolate adult leaves appear. As with most eucalyptus, best in sun with good drainage and little or not summer
   water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

         $12.00                                                                                                Myrtaceae

* Eucalyptus mitchelliana                                                                          mount buffalo gum
   This relatively rare and graceful species endemic to Mt Buffalo in northeastern Victoria, Australia, can be single
   or multi-trunked, reaching 15-20 ft fairly quickly in cultivation. Long, narrow leaves emerge maroon and mature
   to gray-green on weeping branchlets. Reddish brown bark peals on young specimens, adding to the
   enchantment. Needs sun, soil that is lean and well-drained, and, in the driest places, occasional and deep summer
   water. Frost hardy in mid USDA zone 8.

         $14.00                                                                                                Myrtaceae




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* Eucalyptus parvula                                                                       small leaf gum, kybean gum
   An extremely well-mannered, small tree, often multi-trunked, growing slowly to 35 ft or so with a broad, graceful
   form, somewhat flat-topped with age. Narrowly oval adult leaves of 2-3" -- deep, matte green with purple and
   blue overtones -- follow the rounded juvenile foliage. The bark is colorful as well, brown peeling to pink and
   green patches. These tolerate drought and somewhat poor drainage, though well-drained soil is best in full to part
   sun. Frost hardy to 5 F, mid USDA zone 7. Can resprout from the base.



        $12.00                                                                                                 Myrtaceae

* Eucalyptus perriniana                                                                                      spinning gum
   This is the eucalyptus most often seen as cut foliage at the florist, with the juvenile leaves that encircle the stem.
   Plants can be coppiced to maintain a smaller size as well as the attractive, juvenile foliage or grown into
   multi-trunked trees, quickly reaching 30 ft, with flaking bark and long, narrow adult leaves to 6" with juvenile
   foliage showing as well. Requires full sun, lean and well-drained soil, and little summer water once established.
   Easy and very frost hardy, to 0F, USDA zone 7, or lower.

        $12.00                                                                                                 Myrtaceae

  Eucalyptus subcrenulata                                                                            alpine yellow gum
   Rather than the usual blue-gray foliage, this eucalyptus has deep green, glossy leaves, ruffled and crisped around
   the edges, the adult leaves longer and narrower than the 3 x 2" juvenile foliage. A sturdy, upright tree, quickly
   reaching 30 ft in the garden with bark, reddish brown in young plants, that matures to silver-gray peeling to
   yellowish orange and green. Resprouts from the base and can be coppiced. Full sun, lean and well-drained soil,
   and not much summer water as with most eucalyptus. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                                 Myrtaceae

  Eucomis autumnalis 'Wahroaneta Giant'                                                                   pineapple lily
   Gargantuan version of the South African pineapple lily, selected from our own collection here at Cistus. These
   stood out in our shady greenhouse with flower stems fully 6 ft tall and foliage in broad rosettes to over 4 ft tall.
   As with the species, the leaves are broad and soft with wavy edges; the long-lasting flowers are pale, greenish
   yellow with tuft-like bracts at the top, the pineapple look. These winter dormant bulbs are best in fertile soil that
   drains well with generous water during the growth period. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7, lower with mulch.

        $16.00                                                                                                  Liliaceae

  Eucomis ‘Can Can’                                                                                      pineapple lily
   Cultivar of a South African native, this one with pink, “pineapple”-like flowers on purple stems in August -
   September. Leaves are long, narrow and tropical looking. Plants emerge in spring and need water for proper
   growth. Best in bright light, full sun to part shade, where they can be protected from excess winter water, perhaps
   by an overhang. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7; lower with mulch. Can be grown in pots or lifted for the winter.

        $14.00                                                                                                  Liliaceae

  Eucomis comosa                                                                                              pineapple lily
   Perennial bulbs from South Africa, the flowers resembling a pineapple just as the common name suggests. The
   leaves are a bit tropical and exotic, upright, light green and strappy, to 2.5 ft long, appearing in late spring. In late
   summer they surround a 12" flower stalk of white-blushed-pink, star shaped flowers with a little crown of green
   bracts at the top, providing more pineapple-ness. Not so choosy about soil as long as its well-drained or
   protected from winter rains. Average summer water. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                                  Liliaceae




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Eucomis comosa ‘Maroon Margin’                                                                         pineapple lily
 An exquisite plant with an unexciting name. This pineapple lily from the Drakensburg Mountains of South
 Africa forms a slowly colonizing clump of wide-leaved, deep green rosettes -- edged burgundy in this form. In
 late summer the flowers appear as dense clusters atop the long stem, supported and topped by small rosettes of
 leaves -- yes, looking very much like a pineapple. A native of moist swales, all Eucomis are tolerant of heavy soil.
 This species is deciduous at first frost, resprouting as soon as soil warms. Even moisture. Frost hardy to USDA
 zone 6 with many reports of success in 5. Mulch where soil freezes deeply.

      $14.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

Eucomis comosa ‘Oakhurst’                                                                         purple pineapple lily
 Dark leaved pineapple lily that holds its reddish purple color late into the season. To 1-3 ft tall, the leaves
 forming tropical looking clumps, with late summer flowers, pink florets topped with a crown of bracts, atop an
 18" flower stalk. Rich, well-drained soil, in any sunny location that does not collect too much water in the winter.
 Frost hardy into USDA zone 7, colder with mulch. This wonderful plant adds a dramatic punch to the mixed
 border or potted plant collection.

      $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

Eucomis comosa ‘Tugela Ruby’                                                                             pineapple lily
 Upright, somewhat fleshy leaves to 18” tall, colored a deep, dark purple in this cultivar and, in mid summer,
 saturated pink, fragrant flowers, darkening over time. The flower stalks, looking indeed a bit like pineapples,
 make very good cut flowers. Full sun or part shade in hottest climates gives the best foliage color. Requires water
 in the spring and summer growing season and relief from winter moisture – very well-drained soil or overhead
 protection. This South African native is best left undisturbed for a long and fruitful life. Frost hardy in USDA
 zone 7; mulch for extra protection.

      $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

Eucomis ‘Innocence’                                                                                    pineapple lily
 From a South African native. Striking white to pale pink, “pineapple”-like flowers on purple tinted stems in
 Aug-Sept with long, narrow, “tropical” leaves. Bright light, full sun to part shade with water in spring during
 growth and protection from excess winter water, perhaps by an overhang. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7; lower
 with mulch. Can be grown in pots or lifted for the winter.

      $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

Eucomis pole-evansii                                                                               giant pineapple lily
 From South Africa, a wonderful and hard-to-find perennial with rosettes of bright, pale-green leaves, to 3 ft tall
 and 4-5" wide, appearing in late spring and topped in late summer by creamy, green-center florets in a long cone
 with tufts of green leaves at the top. An impressive presence in sun to partial light shade. Tolerates poor drainage
 but prefers well-drained soil, especially in winter wet, and performs best with average summer water. Mulch and
 drainage improve winter cold hardiness to 0F, USDA zone 7. A fine container plant.

      $14.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

Eucomis ‘Reuben’                                                                                       pineapple lily
 From South Africa by way of New Zealand, this cultivar has upright, green leaves to 18” tall and stalks of
 pineapple-like flowers, these with dark, red-purple buds opening to mauve-pink flowers. Handsome and a good
 cut flowers. Full sun or part shade in hottest climates and water in the spring and summer growing season with
 relief from winter moisture – very well-drained soil or overhead protection. Best left undisturbed for a long and
 fruitful life. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7 and possibly lower; mulch for extra protection.

      $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae




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Eucomis ‘Toffee’                                                                                        pineapple lily
 Cultivar of a South African native, this one with light pink, “pineapple”-like flowers on contrasting mahogany
 stalks in August - September. Leaves are long, narrow and tropical looking. Plants emerge in spring and need
 water for proper growth. Best in bright light, full sun to part shade, where they can be protected from excess
 winter water, perhaps by an overhang. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7; lower with mulch. Can be grown in pots or
 lifted for the winter.

      $11.00                                                                                                Liliaceae

Eucomis vandermerwei                                                                       dwarf spotted pineapple lily
 A rare pineapple lily and one of the most graceful, this form has prolific rosettes, to 6" tall in clumps to 15" wide,
 of ruffled leaves tinted purple with darker polka dots and a pinkish flower spike of only 6-8" in height. Native to
 the Drakensberg Mtns in rocky crevices, they need very good drainage for winter survival. A lovely perennial
 bulb and easy with summer water anywhere the ground does not freeze deeply, e.g., mid to upper USDA zone 7.
 Otherwise a very nice container specimen.

      $14.00                                                                                                Liliaceae

Euonymus europaeus ‘Red Ace’                                                                                spindle tree
 The most expensive plant Exuberant Garden’s Dorothy Rodal ever purchased, having fallen in love with its
 scarlet seed pods that open to reveal dusky orange seeds -- just as everyone does who sees it. And now we have
 enough to share. A large, deciduous shrub to small tree, to 8-10 ft tall x 8 ft wide, with 3" leaves that turn a
 flaming, crimson red in autumn. The flowers in small, yellow-green clusters are not showy but produce the
 exquisite and abundant fruit that IS showy. Native to Europe and western Asia. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

      $14.00                                                                                             Celastraceae

Euonymus fortunei 'Wolong Ghost'
 Striking and unusual, evergreen vine, the dark green leaves veined in silvery white. Selected by Dan Hinkley from
 wild collections in China, this euonymous makes a good ground cover or, with age, a self-clinging vine for fence
 or wall. Sun to deep shade with some summer water. Brightens deep shade, even in a relatively dry spot. Frost
 hardy in USDA zone 5.

      $11.00                                                                                             Celastraceae

Euphorbia 'Blue Haze' PPAF                                                                               milkwort
 Small-scale evergreen spurge, a hybrid between E. nicaeensis and E. sequieriana subsp. niciciana, to only about
 18” tall in dense mounds to 2 ft wide. Leaves are blue-green, 1" long and narrow on 2" rosettes; flowers are the
 typical chartreuse over a long season. Very good knitter or spiller with year-round color. Summer drought
 tolerant, preferring bright light and good drainage. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

      $12.00                                                                                           Euphorbiaceae

Euphorbia mauritanica                                                                                pencil milkbush
 The common name, pencil milkbush, describes the round, green branches that exude white sap when injured. A
 many branched shrub from South Africa, to 3-4 ft tall, with tiny evergreen leaves, silver-gray and succulent,
 appearing only on young stems. Midwinter flowers are yellow on stem ends. Drought tolerant. Sun and good
 drainage. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 with protection.

      $15.00                                                                                           Euphorbiaceae




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  Fascicularia bicolor ssp. bicolor - cl. 2
   Interesting and, yes, attractive terrestrial bromeliad from southern Chile and adjacent Argentina. A genus of only
   a couple of species, at least currently, this collection from the University of Chile in Vilches is found on rocky
   places and sometimes even epiphytically. Succulent leaves form 18” rosettes, flowering from the center in the
   third year or so, the sky-blue blossoms surrounded by burgundy leaves! They prefer cool conditions though
   drought tolerant if given some shade. Frost hardy to 10 to 15F, USDA zone 8, with little or no damage; plants
   have withstood 0F, zone 7, and recovered.

        $18.00                                                                                          Bromeliaceae

  Fascicularia pitcairnifolia [UCBG]
   Terrestrial bromeliad from southern Chile and adjacent Argentina, this clone from the University of California
   Botanical Garden. Rosettes, to 18”, flowering in the third year or so, the sky-blue blossoms surrounded by
   burgundy leaves! Cool conditions though drought tolerant in some shade. Frost hardy to 10 to 15F, USDA zone
   8; plants have recovered from 0F, zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                          Bromeliaceae

  Fatsia japonica                                                                                      japanese aralia
   Bold foliage for a shady spot. This garden workhorse is perfect for the hard to maintain area. Evergreen,
   multi-stemmed shrub to 10 ft with glossy green, palmate leaves, often up to 10” across. Whitish flowers (not so
   showy, but ‘interesting’ and great good for birds) are followed by black berries. A staple of area dentist office
   landscapes that can be transformed and transforming in the garden. Regular summer water. Fully frost hardy in
   USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                             Araliaceae

  Ficus afghanistanica 'Dwarf Green Filigree'
   A Cistus introduction, the third in a serious of selections made here from this beautiful species. This form is a
   diminutive and compact plant, growing less than 3 ft in as many years, and finely textured with filigreed, lacy
   foliage. Very drought tolerant once established in sun to part shade. Frost hardy to the upper edge of USDA
   zone 7 so far. From a species native to Northern India, western Iran, as well as Afghanistan.

        $22.00                                                                                              Moraceae

* Ficus afghanistanica ‘Green Filigree’
   A Cistus introduction, the third in a serious of selections made here from this beautiful species. This form has
   intricately lobed, filigreed leaves of deep green. Very drought tolerant once established in sun to part shade.
   Eventually 15-20 ft tall, kept smaller with pruning. Frost hardy to the upper edge of USDA zone 7 so far. From a
   species native to Northern India, western Iran, as well as Afghanistan.

        $15.00                                                                                              Moraceae

  Ficus carica x pumila 'Ruth Bancroft'
   Vining shrub seldom exceeding 4-6 ft in height, that clamors through deciduous shrubs & against walls. his
   cultivar, found in Ruth Bancroft's garden, has the same mitten-shaped leaves, to 3-4", but more gracefully lobed.
   Teeny, 1 cm figs. For sun to shade, damp or drought though average summer water is best. Essentially
   evergreen, but deciduous below 15 to 18F, mid USDA zone 8, and freeze-back at 10 to 15F. Resprouts from
   upper USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                              Moraceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Ficus heterophylla DJHC
   Though we have several ficus collections under this name, this one, by Dan Hinkley, is my favorite thus far. A
   shrub, to about 6 ft, with intriguing, narrow leaves flushed orange, red, and green. A most unusual garden texture
   for full sun to about half shade. Ours lost their leaves but remained unharmed at our below 20F freeze in
   December 08. Most years, however, it has remained evergreen. Looks to be ultimately frost hardy to about 10F,
   the bottom of USDA zone 8, and probably lower with mulch.

        $16.00                                                                                              Moraceae

* Fothergilla x intermedia‘Blue Shadow’
   Elegant blue, blue, blue leaves, rounded and, yes, blue! except in autumn when they put on a display of
   purple-orange-red. A compact, decidious shrub, to 5 ft tall x 3 ft wide over time, with ivory flowers decorating
   the branch tips in spring. Ejoys full sun if water is plentiful; otherwise, light shade with consistent moisture.
   Frost hardy to -20F - USDA zone 5.

        $15.00                                                                                       Hamamelidaceae

* Fraxinus schiedeana
   Of all the ashes, including many we would not plant in our garden, we feel this one is quite worthy, bringing
   delicate spring green under the harshest conditions. From central and north central Mexico, this F. greggii
   relative grows to 10-15 ft, possible eventually to 25 ft, with a dainty structure dressed with 4” evergreen leaves
   consisting of multiple leaflets. Exceedingly drought tolerant.This is a fabulous addition to gardens in the
   southwest along with milder areas in the rest of the country. Evergreen to the upper teens F, it has not been tested
   below the low teens. So let’s stick with upper USDA zone 8 for the moment.

        $12.00                                                                                              Oleaceae

  Fuchsia denticulata
   The blue-green leaves on this species Fuchsia are nice, but I could stare at the flowers for hours at a time.
   Clusters of 3-4" cerise tubes, shiny green bracts and tangerine petals. Wow. To 6 ft or more, can be “lifted” to
   expose flaking bark or cut to the ground each year for use as a perennial. The tops are frost hardy to the high 20s
   F, USDA zone 9; resprouts from 15F, mid zone 8 or so if the crown is mulched. Part shade and damp
   conditions. Excellent pot specimen.

        $12.00                                                                                            Onagraceae

  Gardenia augusta ‘Chuck Hayes’ PP8755                                                      hardy double gardenia
   Tough, hardy, and lovely gardenia for USDA zone 7, down to 0F, really! Wonderfully fragrant, double white
   flowers in June and July, and occasionally in autumn when temperatures cool down. Compact evergreen shrub, to
   3 ft, blooms in full to half sun with normal garden water. Developed by the late Chuck Hayes and Dan Milbocker
   at the Virginia Beach Research Station, VA.

        $14.00                                                                                             Rubiaceae

  Gardenia jasminoides ‘Frost Proof’
   The “more” gardenia -- more tough, more cold tolerant and sun tolerant, more adaptable, and said to be more
   deer resistant -- not to mention beautiful! Double white flowers are extremely fragrant and profuse, continuing
   over a long season beginning in spring. They can even take a bit of spring frost without dropping. Evergreen, to
   2-3 ft tall and a bit wider, and happy in full sun to part sun with summer water where dry. Definitely frost hardy
   in USDA zone 8 and expected well into the upper reaches of zone 7.

        $15.00                                                                                             Rubiaceae




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* Garrya elliptica 'James Roof'                                                                        coast silktassel
   Evergreen shrub, native along the coast ranges of California and Oregon, multi-stemmed and eventually reaching
   8-10 ft tall and wide. The leaves are shiny, matte green above -- pale and woolly beneath, the edges widely
   toothed and somewhat wavy or rolling. In winter to early spring, long, purple-gray catkins make a great show
   hanging from the branches. A very tough plant, excellent as a screen or single specimen. Accepts sun on the
   coast to part shade inland. Drought tolerant but also accepts summer water where well drained. A wonderful plant
   for the coast. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                               Garryaceae

  Gladiolus papilio
   A species gladiola -- lovely, simple, and unusual with grassy foliage, to 2 ft tall, and a flower stalk that rises above
   in August and September showing off lavender blooms with purplish “butterfly” markings inside. They need
   well-drained soil with consistent summer moisture and bright light. Best planted where they have plenty of room
   and robust neighbors. Perennial, dying back in winter and returning in spring. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.

        $11.00                                                                                                 Iridaceae

  Graptopetalum paraguayense                                                                        mother of pearl plant
   Surprisingly tough, silvery purple succulent from the mountains of Paraguay, just as one might guess, with
   rosettes to 6" across. Very attractive spilling over pots or planters. Quite drought tolerant, but grows quickly with
   summer moisture. Full sun to part shade. This clone has been hardy for many years in Portland and can be
   planted out where temperatures seldom drop below 15F, mid USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                              Crassulaceae

  Grevillea 'Poorinda Queen'
   One of the first of the Poorinda hybrids developed in the '50s and '60s, thought to be a hybrid between G.
   juniperina and G. victoriae. An evergreen shrub, to 8-10 ft, with long silvery leaves and soft apricot flowers, a
   pleasure over a long period in late winter and through spring. Best in sun and lean, well-drained soil, with little
   water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                                Proteaceae

  Grevillea victoriae ‘Marshall Olbrich’
   This Western Hills Nursery form is far superior to all others of the species. Extremely floriferous, this evergreen
   shrub reaches 6 ft or a bit more. The foliage is handsome and olive-like, lighter on the undersides, and the orange
   flowers brighten a winter day, for hummingbirds as well. Full sun, good drainage, and average summer moisture.
   As with all proteas, avoid fertilizers with potassium or phosphorous. Frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                                Proteaceae

  Gunnera prorepens
   Think of your typical dinosaur food then think of the opposite. This tiny perennial with chocolate leaves reaches
   only 3” in height, spreading slowly. Prefers damp sites and bright light for best foliage color. Wonderful in pot
   combinations or in the ground near the leaky faucet or water feature. Can handle some heat as long as nights are
   generally cooler so not a favorite for the southeastern United States. Also a fine subject for partially submerged
   pots, e.g., the way one might grow carnivorous plants. Late season fruit creates a wonderful contrast and lasts
   into winter. Protect from tiny grazing New Zealand dinosaurs. Frost hardy in the upper teens F, USDA zone 8b.

        $12.00                                                                                              Gunneraceae




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  Habranthus martinezii 'Mini Cherry'                                                                        rain lily
   Shared with us by plantswoman extraordinaire, Linda Guy, this oh-so-vigorous rain lily, originally collected in
   Mexico, quickly produces 18” clumps of narrow, chive-like foliage and dark-stemmed, cheery pink flowers from
   spring through autumn, seemingly after every watering or, indeed, rain. One of the best we’ve found so far for a
   sunny place in the garden, stonewall or container. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

* Haemanthus humilis ssp. hirsutus
   Our collection years ago from the eastern Drakensburgs of South Africa growing in the grasses with many other
   scrumptious plants at about 9,000 ft. Opposite leaves covered with fine hairs emerge from a bulb that can reach
   6" or more. White, rounded flowers appear in spring and summer. Bright light and at least some summer water is
   a must for happy plants. The bulbs alone are attractive enough that they are often lifted in pots to be grown
   almost as bonsai. Strangely, we have not planted any of ours outside, though their collection location suggests
   frost hardiness to at least upper USDA zone 8. Excellent pot specimen.

        $12.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

  Halimium x pauanum
   Upright, evergreen shrub, to 6 x 4 ft, with gray-green foliage and, in May and June, abundant, brilliant yellow
   flowers, larger than most species and lasting for several weeks. Performs best in the sun, planted in mineral soil
   with good drainage. Drought tolerant once established. This cross between H. halimifolium and H. lasianthum is
   among the hardiest to frost: USDA zone 8 in Mediterranean conditions.

        $12.00                                                                                               Cistaceae

  Haworthia angustifolia var. liliputana
   This South African member of a very large genus is one of the tiniest. A childhood plant -- that is, having been
   in our/Sean's collection since some time in the early 70s-- that has rosettes of little teeny weeny, pointed leaves,
   each about the size of a nickel, growing fairly quickly to form 5-6 “ clumps in a few years. A lover of either
   winter or summer moisture but tolerant of drought any time. The perfect plant for a windowsill or for a miniature
   container garden -- perhaps in a teeny tiny condo. Good drainage is a must in full light to dappled shade except
   in the hottest climates. A rock garden plant in USDA zone 9 or above.

        $12.00                                                                                          Asphodelaceae

  Hechtia texensis 'Big Red'                                                                           texas false agave
   A new Cistus introduction. This burgundy-tinted-if-not-downright-burgundy clone was found in the Big Bend
   region of Texas on a lovely hillside of this endemic terrestrial bromeliad. Though it is said these bromeliads are
   not carnivorous, we suspect that, with their spiny leaves, they catch large herbivores, including humans, for long
   term ingestion. Not so dangerous as a plot plant in a well-drained, sunny site or, of course, as a container
   specimen. Each rosette to about 18” with flower spikes to 3 ft or more bearing clusters of coppery orange
   flowers in spring and sometimes throughout the summer. This might very well be the most frost hardy hectia,
   certainly to 10F, bottom of USDA zone 8, if dry, and possibly lower.

        $18.00                                                                                           Bromeliaceae

  Helleborus x hybridus - Cistus white strain
   Large, clean white flowers, mostly unspotted, with wide overlapping "petals" in broad scalloped or pointed starry
   shapes. The best from a group in our north garden that shine out from an otherwise leafless area in late winter.
   These lovely creatures begin flowering as early as December! For part sun to shade in humus rich soil with
   average summer water. Frost hardy to USDA zone 5.

        $24.00                                                                                          Ranunculaceae




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  Helleborus x hybridus - double black
   Rich, luxurious double-flowered black hellebores. These lovely winter bloomers, from Cistus Nursery’s
   breeding program, can add beauty to a shady garden spot in late winter to early spring. Part shade, dappled shade,
   deep shade -- all good, with occasional summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6 and possibly below.

        $18.00                                                                                            Ranunculaceae

  Helleborus x hybridus - double white
   These graceful, double-flowered white hellebores are lovely winter bloomers from Cistus Nursery’s breeding
   program. They can add bright spots to a shady garden in late winter to early spring. Part shade, dappled shade,
   deep shade -- all good, with occasional summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6 and possibly below.

        $19.00                                                                                            Ranunculaceae

* Helleborus x hybridus - ex white, brushed pink
   From Cistus Nursery's breeding program, these lovely winter bloomers have white to light pink flowers centered
   with a delicate picatee of rose to nearly purple towards the apex of each petal. Perfect for bringing color to the
   shady garden spot in late winter to early spring. Part shade, dappled shade, deep shade -- all are good, with
   occasional summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6 and possibly below.

        $18.00                                                                                            Ranunculaceae

  Helleborus x hybridus - slate seedlings
   These, from our best slate flowered plants, have a mauve-ish overlay with an almost metallic sheen, particularly
   beautiful in the faded light of winter. Care as for others of its kind in mid-shade to full sun in any but the wettest
   soil. Wonderful planted with such creatures as black mondo grass to provide winter contrast to the flowers. Frost
   hardy in USDA zone 5 with protection from wind – or higher.

        $18.00                                                                                            Ranunculaceae

* Helleborus x orientalis - bicolor blue
   From Cistus Nursery's breeding program, these lovely winter bloomers have deep plum flowers with an almost
   late blue cast to the outer petals. Perfect for bringing color to the shady garden spot in late winter to early spring.
   Part shade, dappled shade, deep shade -- all are good, with occasional summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone
   6 and possibly below.

        $17.00                                                                                            Ranunculaceae

* Helleborus x orientalis - bicolor pink
   From Cistus Nursery's breeding program, these lovely winter bloomers have flowers that are pink in the center
   fading to cream on the outside. Perfect for bringing color to the shady garden spot in late winter to early spring.
   Part shade, dappled shade, deep shade -- all are good, with occasional summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone
   6 and possibly below.

        $17.00                                                                                            Ranunculaceae

* Helleborus x orientalis - large red
   From Cistus Nursery's breeding program, these lovely winter bloomers are selected from particularly
   large-flowered plants in colors of deep plum going on flame-grape-red! Stunning. Perfect for bringing color to
   the shady garden spot in late winter to early spring. Part shade, dappled shade, deep shade -- all are good, with
   occasional summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6 and possibly below.

        $17.00                                                                                            Ranunculaceae




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* Helleborus x sternii - very silver
   A third generation selection from particularly silver parentage, plants from our own garden. The interspecies
   crosses of H. argutifolius x H. lividus are grown for their handsome, silver-grey-green foliage with white veins
   and hints of purple -- this form adding blue and purple accents to the mix. Flowers of lime-green flushed pink
   appear in late spring. To only 18-24" tall and wide in full to half sun. Accepts regular garden water and
   occasional summer drought as well. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

        $16.00                                                                                             Ranunculaceae

  Helwingia chinensis DJHC 695
   Unusual, evergreen shrub, to 6 ft tall x 3 ft wide, with dark green foliage tending toward maroon -- this form, a
   Dan Hinkley collection from China, with leaves narrower than the straight species. Odd flowers are little white
   bubbles sitting in the leaf centers, appearing in spring and, occasionally again in fall. Best in at least light shade
   and well-drained soil with regular summer water. A colorful addition to the woodland garden. Frost hardiness
   expected to extend to USDA zone 7 as with the straight species.

        $14.00                                                                                             Helwingiaceae

  Hemerocallis ‘Penny’s Worth’
   Lovely yellow daylily, this one a dwarf, early blooming, long blooming, and reblooming with small, bright yellow
   flowers in abundance. To 10-14” tall in clumps as wide. Sun to light shade with average summer water. Lovely
   in and about a rock garden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

         $9.00                                                                                             Asphodelaceae

  Hermodactylus tuberosus                                                                             snake's head iris
   Wonderfully exotic, wonderfully fragrant, late winter flowering irid from the Mediterranean regions in unique
   colors of beige and purple blue. To 12-18" tall. Rhizomatous and forming colonies that love sun and gritty soil.
   Seemingly, the more extreme the climate, the better. Strangely, we had here a description for a tuberose, an error
   very recently brought to our attention by a customer. Our thanks. And now we can tell you as well that this irid
   that would hate hothouse conditions, has grown and flowered profusely adjacent to the heat loving tuberose.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

        $11.00                                                                                                  Iridaceae

  Hesperaloe parviflora - yellow flowered
   A selection from Ron Gass at Mountain States Nursery in Glendale, Arizona, this form is typical of H. parviflora
   in its 3-4 ft rosettes and 5-6 ft flower stalks but with canary yellow flowers. A very pretty and unusual selection
   and most attractive when combined in single plantings with the coral-orange flowered forms. Full sun to part
   shade with little summer water. An easy grower, frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

        $16.00                                                                                                  Liliaceae

  Hibbertia aspera                                                                                      rough guinea-flower
   Tender, viney, evergreen shrub from Australia, to 18-24" tall x 3-4 ft wide, with small leaves, shiny and rounded,
   seeming almost succulent. Bright yellow, buttercup-like flowers are very showy in spring to early summer. Best
   in partial shade in fertile, well-drained soil that is kept moist. A cheery plant, but sadly, not frost hardy, tolerating
   temperatures only to freezing and better above that, USDA zone 9. So for balmy climates or containers that move
   inside for the cold months.

        $14.00                                                                                               Dilleniaceae




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  Hibiscus syriacus -white leaves/ pink flwrs                                                              rose of sharon
   A nice selection of a popular plant, this rose of sharon has leaves that emerge white and darken to green and pink
   flowers in summer. A deciduous shrub, multi-stemmed to 6-8 ft tall x 4-8 ft wide, that is easily pruned to tree
   form. Prefers rich soil in full sun to part shade with average moisture but tolerates less ideal situations including
   urban conditions, poor soil, and some summer drought. Fine as a small, street tree. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA
   zone 5.

        $11.00                                                                                              Malvaceae

  Huodendron tibeticum                                                                                   xi shan mo il
   Rarely offered evergreen shrub to small tree, growing slowly. Can reach 30 ft, but 15 ft is more reasonable in the
   garden. Closely related to Styrax, this collection from Yunnan is frost hardy in USDA zone 8 if planted where it
   gets even moisture over the summer and isn’t soggy in the winter. Long, narrow leaves are shiny green with
   bronze coloration in new growth. White bell flowers are abundant in spring when mature. Best in sun to part
   shade.

        $14.00                                                                                             Styracaceae

  Hydrangea integrifolia
   Evergreen, climbing hydrangea blooming from June to September with lovely white lace-caps that bees and
   butterflies love. The shiny foliage brightens up any partly shady or shady spot. Rich soil and average summer
   moisture is best. Can reach 10 ft or more but is easily pruned in autumn or early spring. Though self-clinging,
   outreaching branches can break so some support is required. Very frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                          Hydrangeaceae

  Hydrangea scandens 'Fragrant Splash'
   A unique and hard-to-find hydrangea, low growing, the branches trailing along the ground with handsome, new
   leaves, emerging purple marked with pale yellow veins. White, lacecap flowers, arriving surprisingly early in
   spring, are numerous, floriferous, and charming. Dappled shade to part shade with summer water. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                          Hydrangeaceae

* Ilex dimorphophylla x I. cornuta
    This very compact shrub, to upwards of 6 ft and rather narrow, has densely held, 1-2", almost succulent,
    spring-green leaves with spines towards the ends. This cross has all the glossiness and cold hardiness of I.
    cornuta and the delicate beauty of the more tender I. dimorphophylla. Good for small specimens or hedges and a
    most attractive pot specimen. Prefers dappled shade to full sun and regular, even if infrequent, summer water.
    Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 6 or low zone 7.

        $15.00                                                                                           Aquifoliaceae

  Impatiens arguta
   Very nice lavender-blue flowers are showy on this very hardy impatiens, said to withstand temperatures in the
   single digits in USDA zone 7. To 16-18” tall with handsome foliage that dies back in the winter. Striking in
   dappled shade to shade with consistent summer water and rich soil.

        $11.00                                                                                          Balsaminaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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Impatiens arguta – upright form
 A vigorous perennial for damp shade, growing to 3 ft in height and 3 ft or more in spread, with 2", glossy leaves
 and relatively large, cupped, rich lavender-blue flowers over a long season. Spreads by short tubers in rich soil
 with regular water. Tough enough to tolerate some dry shade. A wonderful spiller for containers. Frost hardy in
 USDA zone 7, possibly colder with mulch.

      $11.00                                                                                         Balsaminaceae

Impatiens briartii
 Another African species, this an upright perennial with warm, pink flowers towards the top of rather exotic, 3 ft
 stems in mid and late season. From Derick Pitman, aka Mr. Impatiens, who described the flowers as looking like
 an octopus, a pink one at that. And who doesn't need a pink octopus? For morning light to dappled shade in a
 cool greenhouse, or mulch outdoors in USDA zone 8.

      $12.00                                                                                         Balsaminaceae

Impatiens flanaganae
 Very new to cultivation and rare, this species from East Africa grows to 3 or 4 ft on red, potato-like, prolific,
 tuberous roots and produces masses of orchid-like flowers on tall stems with magenta upper petals and large soft
 pink lower petals. Very exotic. For shade and moist soil. From a low elevation, but surprisingly frost hardy, to
 10F, USDA zone 8, or lower.

      $12.00                                                                                         Balsaminaceae

Impatiens lawii
 Semi-tuberous perennial, to 3 ft tall x 18” wide, its closest relative being the other yellow flowered species, I.
 stenantha. Long flowering in the shady garden with consistent moisture. This glossy, deep green leaved form is
 leaf hardy into the upper 30sF and most probably a good garden candidate to mid USDA zone 8. Does not
 seem to set seed.

      $11.00                                                                                         Balsaminaceae

Impatiens namchabarwensis                                                                   blue diamond impatiens
 Stunning new impatiens from one remote location in Tibet’s Tsango Gorge, in moist, shady clearings with ample
 summer rainfall. More annual than perennial, germinating in early spring and producing dazzling, blue flowers
 from late spring to early summer - even through the first light frost. Can be brought through winter as cuttings
 but does reseed in well watered garden areas. Perennial in USDA zone 10; reseeds in colder zones.

      $7.00                                                                                          Balsaminaceae

Impatiens omeiana 'Silver Pink'
 This wonderful new selection of the Mt. Omei impatiens spreads slowly into a dense colony of 6" bronzy stems,
 and gorgeous leaves a dark bronzy green sprinkled with silver like fairy dust and central veins in pink that
 darkens and spills into the leaf. Yum. Mustard to salmon flowers a great contrast from late summer to frost.
 Shade to deep shade in moist soil with, of course, summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $16.00                                                                                         Balsaminaceae

Impatiens rhombifolia
 For the impatiens lover -- this creeping impatiens is tough in part shade to shade and surprisingly frost hardy.
 Only 6” tall, plants root along the stems to cover moist ground, blooming in late summer and autumn with
 interesting yellow flowers. Likes regular water and rich soil. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7!

      $14.00                                                                                         Balsaminaceae



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* Impatiens stenantha
   Exciting and surprisingly frost hardy impatiens from the mountains of China's Yunnan province, a trailing
   creature with green, ruffle-edged leaves, green tinged with red, and lovely yellow flowers with curling tails and
   spotted red throats, the flowers held above the foliage for maximum enjoyment from spring to fall. Best with
   coolish conditions in bright shade with average summer moisture. Not expected to enjoy intense heat or
   humidity. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7!

        $11.00                                                                                          Balsaminaceae

* Indigofera heterantha                                                                              himalayan indigo
    Very tough and very beautiful, deciduous pea shrub with rose-purple flowers from May through frost. Grows
    quickly to 5 ft wide and high, but can be kept much smaller through the growing season and even cut to the base
    in late winter to refresh. It blooms on new wood so it gets bonus points from us. Sun to part shade with little
    summer water necessary once established. Heat tolerant as well. Frost hardy to -15F, mid USDA zone 5.

        $11.00                                                                                               Fabaceae

  Indigofera pseudotinctoria 'Rose Carpet'
    From an increasingly large group of pea shrubs now available for gardens, this is one of the best we have found
    in some time. Remaining under a foot in height but spreading or spilling to several feet with delicate, compound
    leaves of under an inch and intense rose flowers over a very long season from spring through fall. A lover of
    moderately rich soil, this is a must-have for container or the sunny border that receives at least occasional
    summer water. Trim once a year to maintain desired shape. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                               Fabaceae

* Ipheion uniflorum 'Charlotte Bishop'                                                            pink spring starflower
    A somewhat new, pink form of this always popular flowering bulb, with lightly fragrant and particularly large,
    star-shaped, bright pink flowers in late winter to early spring. Clumps of, grassy, blue-green leaves rise to only
    4-5“, fitting anywhere in sun to part shade. Drought tolerant but appreciates some summer water. Particularly
    useful under the bright edges of shrubs where there is much root competition or anywhere spring pink is
    welcome. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

        $12.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

  Ipheion uniflorum 'Froyle Mill'                                                                            star flower
    This Uruguay native was selected for its deep, uniform blue-purple color and its large flower size. A hardy bulb,
    its foliage appears with the flowers in early spring, then fades in summer heat, returning in September. Best in
    light shade in rich, light soil with regular summer water. Extremely easy to naturalize. Frost hardy in USDA zone
    5.

         $7.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

  Ipheion uniflorum ‘Rolf Fiedler’                                                                    spring starflower
    One of the prettiest of the numerous cultivars now available, ‘Rolf’ forms a moderately expanding clump of
    blue-green leaves rising to only 4-5“ with fragrant, deep purple-blue streaked flowers fading to violet from fall
    here to early spring. Likes sun to part shade and appreciates summer water though doesn't depend on it.
    Particularly useful under the bright edges of shrubs where there is much root competition. Frost hardy in USDA
    zone 5.

        $12.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae




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  Itea ilicifolia                                                                                  holly leaved sweetspire
    Foot long, fragrant racemes of tiny, greenish white flowers drip down in summer from this graceful, 10 ft,
    evergreen shrub with its soft, holly-like leaves. Bees love it. You will, too, in the background, as a specimen or an
    effective screen. For shade or part sun with protection from the afternoon sun in hottest places. Prefers rich soil
    and regular summer water. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                                 Iteaceae

  Jasminum mesnyi ‘Full Moon’                                                                         primrose jasmine
   Also known as Jasminum primulinum, a mounding shrub to 4-5 ft or a vine to 10 ft or more, these with green
   leaves tipped in gold, creating a cheerful presence. Sun for best color but very adaptable to shade. Flowers are
   pale yellow appearing from spring through autumn. Drought tolerant though appreciates occasional summer
   water in dry climates. Frost hardy to 10F, the bottom of USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                                Oleaceae

  Jasminum mesnyi ‘Gold Tip’                                                                         primrose jasmine
    Similar to Jasminum mesnyi 'Full Moon' but with leaves that are variegated gold and green, creating a mounding
   texture. Also a mounding shrub to 4-5 ft or a vine to 10 ft or more. Sun for best color but very adaptable to
   shade. Cheerful, too. Flowers are similar as well, pale yellow appearing from spring through autumn. Drought
   tolerant though appreciates occasional summer water in dry climates. Frost hardy to 10F, the bottom of USDA
   zone 8. Also known as Jasminum primulinum,

        $16.00                                                                                                Oleaceae

* Jasminum nudiflorum 'Aureum'                                                                     golden winter jasmine
   Rare, diminutive form of the winter jasmine, reaching to less than 4 ft tall but bright with yellow-splashed leaves
   and, before the leaves appear, the same yellow flowers as the species in late winter to early spring. The willowy
   stems are attractive as well in winter. Beautiful year round for espalier, hanging baskets, or ground cover. Flowers
   best in bright light, sun to part shade. Very drought tolerant once established. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone
   6.

        $11.00                                                                                                Oleaceae

* Jasminum odoratissimum                                                                              sweetest jasmine
   Delightful Middle Eastern jasmine clammering to 6-8 ft with dark, evergreen leaves and typically star-shaped,
   highly fragrant, bright yellow flowers from spring through fall, even in winter in the warmest climates. Sun to
   part shade in rich soil. Drought tolerant but flowers abundantly with summer water. Fully hardy only where
   temperatures aren’t likely to drop below 18F, upper USDA zone 8. Exquisite and long flowering potted
   specimen.

        $13.00                                                                                                Oleaceae

  Jasminum primulinum                                                                               primrose jasmine
   A large member of the genus with arching stems, to 5-6 ft tall, and small leaves, deep green and mostly evergreen.
   Flowers are semi-double and canary-yellow, appearing in spring and continuing into autumn. Best in bright light
   to dappled shade with some summer water preferred. Particularly useful on banks or as spillage out of large
   containers. This form was given to us by Cotswold Garden Flowers under the assumption of greater hardiness.
   These have proven frost hardy to low USDA zone 8 possibly upper zone 7.

        $11.00                                                                                                Oleaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                 54

Jasminum sp. DJHC 056
 A collection from the wilds of China shared with us by plantsman Dan Hinkley, it is probably Jasminum humile
 ssp. revolutum. If so, it is a fairly diminutive form; our plants have grown over the years to about 4-5 ft with
 glossy green stems and fine-textured, multi-leafletted leaves of only 1" or 2". Cream flowers with a very light
 fragrance top the plant in mid to late summer. Keep watered in summer; provide fertile soil with bright light to
 dappled shade. A surprisingly cold hardy form; fellow garden friends in colder parts of the world report upper
 USDA zone 6 having had no ill effects on these plants.

      $12.00                                                                                               Oleaceae

Jovellana sinclairii
 Stump your horticultural friends with this one. Very pale lilac, bell-shaped flowers, purple spotted on the inside -
 reminding us a bit of Calceolaria blooms -- appear in summer on this 2-3 ft, evergreen shrub from New Zealand.
 Prefers part to full shade and consistently moist soil. A collector plant, but easy. Can be cold hardy in USDA
 zone 8.

      $13.00                                                                                         Calceolariaceae

Justicia rizzinii                                                                                   firecracker flower
 Semi-hardy, small, rounded 3-4 ft shrub with small,evergreen foliage and tubular winter flowers in scarlet with
 yellow tips. Best in sun to part shade in fertile soil with regular summer moisture. Very tolerant of heat and
 humidity. Excellent in a container. Definitely worth the trouble to take cuttings to overwinter or lift and store
 inside. Frost hardy in USDA zone 10.

      $12.00                                                                                            Acanthaceae

Kadsura japonica 'Variegata'                                                               variegated magnolia vine
 Choice evergreen vine with handsome, variegated leaves, shiny green, irregularly edged in creamy white --
 sometimes entirely white. This magnolia relative, found in China, Japan, and Korea, eventually reaches 15 ft tall
 and 10 ft wide, twining on pergolas, sculptures, fences, or anything handy. Spring flowers, also creamy white, are
 cup-shaped and add to the show, as do the fall clusters of red berries. Brightens any shady spot that has rich soil
 and receives ample summer moisture. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                          Magnoliaceae

Kniphofia northiae                                                                                          giant poker
 A hot poker that always looks good. Evergreen plant, from seed collected in South Africa by Cistus, has
 yucca-like leaves, to 6” wide x 2 ft long, and a bit of a trunk. Thick flowers of creamy yellow topped with salmon
 appear in early spring and often in fall. Full to part sun in any soil, any drainage. Drought tolerant but best with
 summer water. Adaptable! Cold hardy to USDA zone 6.

      $13.00                                                                                          Asphodelaceae

Ledebouria socialis                                                                                     silver squill
 Small, South African plant, to 6” x 8” with fancy, strappy leaves of silver-gray “leopard spotted” with green
 rising from red bulbs just above the soil. Greeny white flowers are a winter addition. Loves well-drained soil in
 sun or, in hottest climates, a bit of shade. Needs to dry out between waterings and tolerates some drought. Frost
 hardy in the ground into the upper teens F, USDA zone 8b. Easily grown in pots or indoors on the windowsill.

      $11.00                                                                                               Liliaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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Lespedeza thunbergii 'Spilt Milk'                                                             variegated bush clover
 Lovely bush clover, gently variegated in pale green splashed white. A deciduous shrub, to 4 ft tall x 6 ft wide, with
 an arching habit. Flowers in mid spring and often again in autumn, with clusters of lavender flowers that
 demonstrate their inclusion in the pea family. This Japanese selection enjoys rich soil in sun to part shade with
 average summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.

      $14.00                                                                                                  Fabaceae

Libertia ixiodes ‘Goldfinger’                                                                       new zealand iris
 One of the brightest, with cascading, gold-orange foliage on a clumping, garden accent, to about 18” x 18”.
 White star-like flowers appear in clusters mid-spring, producing large yellow berries for fall. Sun to part shade.
 The New Zealand natives prefer rich, moist, well-drained soil but tolerate some summer drought once established.
 Easily frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and reported to tolerate temperatures as low as 0F.

      $16.00                                                                                                  Iridaceae

Libertia ixioides                                                                                    new zealand iris
 This New Zealand iris relative has fan-shaped green leaves, tinted yellow with a center stripe of orange or yellow.
 To 15-18” tall with sprays of white flowers in spring followed by small, attractive, orange fruit. Loves full sun or
 dappled shade and occasional summer water. One of the frost hardiest of the genus, to 10F or so, USDA zone 8.

      $16.00                                                                                                  Iridaceae

Libertia ixioides 'Taupo Blaze' PP18 486                                                                 taupo libertia
 Stunning leaves, nearly brick-red infused with cooper-orange, and more olive-green tones in summer. Very nice.
 Selected from L. ixiodes 'Taupo Sunset' by Phillip Smith of Taupo, New Zealand, and introduced to the United
 States only in the past few years. Leaves are stiff and erect leaves, to 18" tall, gradually forming clumps to 1-2 ft.
 Clusters of 3-petaled, white flowers rise above the foliage in spring and produce attractive yellow-orange seed
 pods. Sun to part shade in well-drained soil with occasional summer water. Frost hardy to a bit below 10F, just
 below USDA zone 8. Good in containers and particularly handsome when backlit.

      $14.00                                                                                                  Iridaceae

Libertia peregrinans ‘Gold Leaf’                                                                         new zealand iris
 Introduced from New Zealand in about 2006 this evergreen “flag” makes spreading clumps of plants, to 18”
 tall, with dainty, iris-like foliage tinted a golden-orange that is more intense in winter. Slightly lean soil and bright
 light for best color. White spring flowers produce clusters of black fruit, attractive against the foliage. Able to
 withstand wet soil and all but severe drought. Another good container specimen and/or knitter. Frost hardy to the
 low end of USDA zone 8.

      $12.00                                                                                                  Iridaceae

Ligustrum japonicum 'Aureum'                                                                             japanese privet
 Shared with us by Pat McCracken, this 5 ft, compact shrub produces the same waxy, shiny leaves as the species
 but they are of a rich, warm golden. In full sun the tips bleach, giving it a two-tone effect; in more shade the
 protected branches maintain a spring-green tone. Clusters of creamy white flowers attract bees in spring. Provide
 even summer moisture. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7. A fine pot plant.

      $13.00                                                                                                  Oleaceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                  (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                   56

  Ligustrum japonicum 'Ko Ryu'                                                                          japanese privet
   New and unusual evergreen shrub, a Japanese selection with shiny, dark green leaves, narrow, curved, and slightly
   twisted with a ridge along the midrib, creating a striking and irregular texture. Becomes graceful with age as,
   eventually, a handsome, small tree for sun to part shade with regular summer water. A good container plant. Frost
   hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                               Oleaceae

* Lilium aff. pardalinum - prolific JSM
   This collection by Joshua McCullough comes from a species endemic to the Siskiyou region of southern
   Oregon, this clone found growing at the edge of a bog and quite possibly possessing some hybrid vigor. Spreads
   quickly offering every more of the late spring/early summer nodding flowers, deep orange fading to reddish with
   petals only slightly recurved. Provide a sunny spot for best flowering without too much compost. Tolerant of
   both very wet conditions and some summer drought. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

* Lilium bolanderi                                                                                        bolander's lily
   These perennials are grown from virus free stock raised from seed that was wild collected in its native habitat in
   the Siskiyou Mountains. Stems, to 24-48" have waxy, glaucous leaves in whorls and, in early summer, produce
   stunning, brick-red flowers, bell-shaped and pendant with dark spots on the inner petals, up to 9 per stem. A
   drought tolerant lily that prefers well-drained, mineral and little summer water. Frost hardy to at least USDA zone
   7.

        $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

  Liriope muscari 'Monroe White'                                                                        white lily turf
   A durable ground cover for full sun to full shade, with narrow, dark green leaves and white, grape hyacinth-like
   flowers rising above the foliage on 6" spikes in early summer. Slowly spreads by underground rhizomes to form
   small clumps 1-2 ft wide. Good under trees or shrubs where grass refuses to grow. Full sun in cool, coastal
   conditions; a bit of shade in hotter places. Evergreen in USDA zone 7 and frost hardy in zone 6.

        $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

  Liriope muscari ‘Okina’                                                                         frosted monkey grass
   Brighten a garden spot with this stunning, clumping monkey grass, to 10” tall, from China. Evergreen leaves
   emerge a very eye-catching white in spring and become streaked through the season, turning all green in the fall.
   Stalks of lilac flowers in late summer add to the delight of this special plant. For sun to shade. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 6.

        $16.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

  Liriope muscari ‘Pee Dee Gold Ingot’                                                                 golden lily turf
   This golden-foliaged monkey grass, from the highlands of Kentucky, can take a bit of shade and still flower just
   like the regular green one, producing purple clusters in midsummer, a great contrast with the chartreuse foliage.
   Accepts half sun to full shade, growing to 12” or so. Useful as edging or in a container. Be the first on the block
   with this stunner. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6.

        $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                   57

  Liriope ‘Silver Dragon’                                                                            variegated lily turf
   This silvery striped, grassy groundcover is as tough as a dragon ... well, maybe not quite that tough, but it works
   well even in dry shade. Flowers are pale lilac on short spikes in summer followed by black berries in fall.
   Spreads by underground rhizomes forming a mat over time to approximately 12” high and wide in part sun to
   sun. Tolerates some summer drought and accepts summer water. Evergreen in USDA zone 7 and frost hardy in
   zone 4.

        $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

* Lithocarpus densiflorus var. echinoides SBH 7413
   A favorite West Coast native shrub and very diminutive form of the tan oak. These Siskiyou Mountains
   endemics grow only to 3-4 ft in height, forming dense rounded shrubs. The leaves -- to 2" and the most intense
   light blue we have ever found in this collection from the Oregon Mountain -- have undersides of nearly white and
   new growth a blue-tinted-pink and furry.The flowers look those of a chestnut with branched, cream-colored
   inflorescences and golden brown “acorns.” Tough, native mostly to serpentine soil regions, they seem at home
   anywhere on the West Coast with lean soil and away from summer garden water. Not a plant for humid summer
   climates. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

        $14.00                                                                                               Fagaceae

* Lomatia fraseri - cl. 1 [Spinner’s Nursery]                                                             tree lomatia
   Upright large shrub to small tree given to us by Kevin Hughes while at Spinner's Nursery in the United
   Kingdom. To up to 25 ft tall and 12 ft wide over time, with long, lance-shaped leaves, green above and pale on the
   undersides, and toothed on the margins. Summer flowers, white and honey-scented, are produced in frilly
   clusters followed by small, winged fruit. Native to mountainous regions of Victoria and New South Wales in
   Australia, these plants enjoy light shade to full shade with good drainage and plentiful summer water. Sadly not
   for the humid Southeast. Frost hardy in lower USDA zone 8..

        $14.00                                                                                              Proteaceae

* Lomatia myricoides - narrow leaf form
   Protea relation from Australia, a handsome evergreen easily grown as a multi-stemmed shrub or trimmed as a
   small tree and reaching 8-10 ft and possibly to 15 ft over a long time. The abundant leaves are long and, in this
   form, yellow-green and especially narrow with edges that are widely toothed -- say bumpy -- creating an
   interesting texture. Blooms over a long period in summer, the clusters of fragrant, white flowers nestled amongst
   the leaves. Sun to part shade is best in well-drained soil. Avoid fertilizer as with all proteaceous plants. Somewhat
   drought tolerant but best with regular summer water. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                              Proteaceae

  Lonicera crassifolia
   A teensy weensy goundcovering honeysuckle….it’s about time. This Asian, woodland, evergreen rarely grows
   more than 3” in height, a single plant spreading to about 3 ft in as many years. Foliage is dense, with small,
   shiny, rounded leaves, thick and succulent as the crassifolia name implies. A profusion of cream colored flowers
   with hints of pink appear in late spring to early summer leading to bluish black berries for autumn and beyond.
   Great small-scale groundcover for the woodland or spiller for container. Likes consistent moisture and shade to
   half sun. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $15.00                                                                                          Caprifoliaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                58

Lonicera nitida ‘Lemon Beauty’
 If you are going to commit a horticultural faux pas, you might as well do it with this. Evergreen shrub, to 4-6 ft
 with tiny green leaves edged yellow, remaining so in a bit of shade; variegation becomes less distinct, more
 overall yellow, in brightest light. ‘Lemon Beauty’ makes a very nice low hedge. As a single plant, it shines. Sun
 to part shade with normal water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

      $12.00                                                                                         Caprifoliaceae

Lonicera nitida ‘Red Tips’
 A new cultivar of this very useful, small-leaved, evergreen shrub with red new growth that matures to dark green
 with hints of red. Seems to top out at about 4 ft or so. Useful as formal or informal hedge, accent, or foundation
 plant. Full to part sun with regular summer water for best appearance. Easily pruned to shape. Frost hardy in
 USDA zone 6.

      $9.00                                                                                          Caprifoliaceae

Lophomyrtus obcordata
 Myrtaceous shrub of New Zealand, this form has wiry, deep brown stems with 1/4-1/2", round, plum-tinted
 leaves appearing to float among them. In spring these 6-8 ft shrubs are adorned with clusters of rounded, white,
 fragrant flowers. Fine garden specimens, hedges, or container plants and easily shorn to shape. At least tolerant
 of dappled shade though leaf color is at its best in bright light. Also prefers well-drained soil relatively low in
 nutrients. This is one of the hardiest species, doing well in our garden for some time though should be protected
 where temperatures drop regularly into the upper teens F, USDA zone 8b.

      $14.00                                                                                             Myrtaceae

Lophomyrtus x ralphii ‘Little Star’
 Petite little shrub, eventually to 3-4 ft though can be kept much smaller, with evergreen, 1/3” leaves streaked pink
 and white. Wonderful small garden specimen or container knitter. Frost hardy into the upper teens briefly –
 upper USDA zone 8. Otherwise easy to grow in full sun to partial shade with some summer water. Avoid heavy
 fertilizing. Good addition to flower arrangements.

      $15.00                                                                                             Myrtaceae

Lophomyrtus x ralphii 'Sundae'
 Lovely evergreen shrub from New Zealand, to 8-12 ft tall x 4-8 ft wide, the foliage rounded and puckered with
 creamy margins, turning to shades of maroon in winter. Small white flowers appear in summer. Best in bright
 light with good drainage and regular summer moisture. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 8.

      $15.00                                                                                             Myrtaceae

Loropetalum chinense ‘Carolina Ruby’
 One of the newest in dark-foliaged fringe flowers, this introduction from plantsman Ted Stephens grows to an
 upright 8 ft with somewhat pendulous branches clothed with burgundy, almost black leaves and bright cerise
 flowers. The leaves fade a bit in high summer temperatures but are still dark and attractive. This is a particularly
 good form to grow as a standard exposing the graceful form and mottled, flaking bark. Average summer water in
 sun in cool coastal climates to part shade in hotter areas. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7B.

      $16.00                                                                                       Hamamelidaceae




                                 Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Loropetalum chinense ‘Snow Dance’
   Hassle free and easy witch-hazel relative. This odd little evergreen is a large shrub or small tree, to 6-8 ft if left on
   its own, but easily pruned to any size. New leaves emerge with red-maroon tips fading to lime. In spring, white,
   fringe-like flowers cover the foliage. Rich soil in full to part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                            Hamamelidaceae

  Loropetalum chinense 'Zhuzhou Pink'                                                             chinese fringe flower
   We at Cistus seem to be bent on growing every Loropetalum there ever was -- and then some. 'Zhuzhou Pink'
   has been a favorite. The weeping habit of its branches, the darkest burgundy leaves and the large, 1", spidery pink
   to cerise flowers together make it a dazzling garden or container species. It has also been rated as among the
   most frost hardy, surviving winters to as low as several degrees below 0F with little damage, though should be
   planted in the warmest places anywhere frost might nip at late season new growth. Lovers of summer water and
   bright light for best color though quite at home in dappled shade. Frost hardy just below USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                            Hamamelidaceae

* Luzuriaga radicans                                                                                             quilineja
   Evergreen creeping shrub or climber from Chile with a long, narrow leaf and delicate, six-petalled white flowers
   in late winter followed by cherry-like, bright red berries that persist for a long time. Lovely and enticing though
   not easy. Requires deep shade with no direct sunlight; humid conditions both above and below ground; and acid
   soil that drains well and remains cool. Frost hardy in USDA zone 9, recovering easily from brief dips to 20F.

        $14.00                                                                                                    liliaceae

* Lysimachia paridiformis var. stenophylla DJHC 704
   Dan Hinkley's collection from China's Emei Shan from whence have come so many exciting plants, this is a
   striking, evergreen perennial with dense clusters of golden-yellow flowers all summer long atop stems to 10" tall
   or more. Forms well-behaved clumps of whorled foliage, the leaves dark green and shiny with hints of bronze, in
   sun or part shade where soil is well-drained and some summer water is provided. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                                Primulaceae

  Lysionotus pauciflorus
   Another intriguing gesneriad, this with deeply lobed shiny leaves to about 18” frequently adorned with
   lavender-purple “snapdragons”. A very good plant indoors anywhere, or outdoors where temperatures do not
   fall below the upper 20sF. We find it is vigorous enough to make a very good pot stuffer for shady situations.
   Keep from the hottest of sun and place on a saucer of damp gravel if used as an indoor plant. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 9b.

        $12.00                                                                                               Gesneriaceae

  Mackaya bella                                                                                              forest bell bush
   Strange and wonderful, member of the acanthus family, endemic to South Africa, this clambering, evergreen
   shrub -- to 6-8 ft if trained against a wall, 4-5 ft if left on its own -- boasts glossy leaves on wiry stems and, in
   spring and summer, papery, white-bracted flowers, veined with a purple-blue -- reminiscent of Chinese lanterns.
   Drought tolerant, though loves rich garden conditions and summer water with good drainage to protect from
   winter rains. Full sun in cool climates or bright shade elsewhere. Evergreen in USDA zone 9 and perennial where
   temperatures drop below 20F. Best planted out where only light frosts occur. Good container plant or winter
   house plant. Particularly beautiful in gardens along the California and Oregon coasts.

        $14.00                                                                                                Acanthaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                   (* = new to mail order list)
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  Magnolia figo ‘Port Wine’                                                                             banana shrub
   This lovely evergreen, now included in the genus magnolia, grows to 10 ft or more, with shiny, slightly leathery
   leaves. Needs a warm, protected spot for producing the best flowers, those delicious creations of cream inner
   petals and and outer petals colored a dusky port-wine -- all with an intense strawberry banana bubble gum
   fragrance. Sun and well-drained soil with some supplemental water in summer. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                          Magnoliaceae

* Magnolia laevifolia - round leaf
   Stunning plant! Recently called M. dianica and previously Michelia yunnanensis but this plant is always
   fabulous with its graceful, ropey foliage; profuse, intensely fragrant white blooms in spring and summer; and
   first rate cinnamon indumentum on the buds in autumn! This form has pleasingly rounded leaves and a more
   compact habit than the straight species, reaching only 6-8 ft in time. Easily accepts sun to half shade with regular
   water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and very possibly into mid zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                          Magnoliaceae

* Magnolia x foggii 'Jack Fogg'
   A long ago hybrid of M. figo and the renowned M. doltsopa. In mild climates it reaches a narrow 15 ft or so with
   stems and buds bathed in coppery indumentum. Flowers are white tinged with purple-pink on the edges,
   abundant, and, like M. figo, fragrant with hints of banana cream pie. Best in rich, well-drained soil in sun to part
   shade where there is shelter from drying winds. Frost hardy to uppermost USDA zone 7 with good drainage,
   summer water, and feeding.

        $18.00                                                                                          Magnoliaceae

  Mahonia eurybracteata
   Not only one of the best mahonias to come along in years – these brought to us from Japan -- but one of the best
   new garden textures. Leaves, 8” to 1 ft long with exceedingly long narrow leaflets of olivey green sometimes cast
   in silver, give a tropical effect, not found elsewhere in the temperate world…to my knowledge. The plants grow to
   about 4 ft producing sprays of branches, late autumn bunches of yellow flowers, and, if we are at all lucky, bluish
   black fruit through winter. Excellent in containers or the light woodland garden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
   To quote Hayes Jackson, “don’t be dumb, get you some.”

        $19.00                                                                                           Berberidaceae

* Mahonia eurybracteata 'Soft Caress' PP 20183
   Selected by plantsman Ozzie Johnson as a particularly silver and more frost hardy form of a most lovely species,
   this plant to about 4 ft tall with finely divided leaves appearing almost as a delicate palm. For dappled shade to
   full sun with at least occasional summer water where dry. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8a, though known to have
   come through an Atlanta, zone 7 winter with only scorching.

        $19.00                                                                                           Berberidaceae

* Mahonia repens                                                                                      creeping mahonia
   Native from British Columbia to northern California and east to the Rocky Mountains, this evergreen shrub can
   reach 18" tall and spread to 3 ft or so wide, creating an attractive and useful groundcover. Leaves are holly-like,
   bluish green in summer, adding purple tones in cold weather. Clusters of yellow flowers appear in spring
   followed by blue-purple berries that are good for feeding birds or making jelly. Enjoys well-drained soil in full
   sun to light shade. Drought tolerant once established but accepts summer water as well. Frost hardy in USDA
   zone 6.

                                                                                                         Berberidaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Maihuenia poeppigii [Lowrey clone]
   Collected as seed 30 years ago by the Lowrey of rock garden fame, this southern Chilean cactus, appearing on
   volcanic slopes amid monkey puzzles and flame trees, grows to a 6” high by 3 ft wide mound with tiny fingers
   adorned with rice-grain-sized leaves. Cheery yellow flowers occur in spring. An easy plant, requiring full sun,
   good drainage, and occasional summer water for quicker growth. A fine container or pot specimen or in the rock
   garden or rock wall. We have ours growing with the hardy bromeliad, Fascicularia bicolor for great contrast.
   Expected frost hardy to USDA zone 5.

        $15.00                                                                                              Cactaceae

  Mammillaria gracilis                                                                                  thimble cactus
   One of Sean’s childhood plants, this is a clustering, small cactus from central Mexico that eventually produces
   8” mounds covered with crystalline white spines and, in summer, pinkish flowers. Any brightly lit situation is
   fine, especially those that dry out a bit in winter. A good small rock garden plant where temperatures remain
   above 20F, USDA zone 9.

        $15.00                                                                                              Cactaceae

  Manfreda ‘Macho Mocha’
   Possibly a hybrid between Manfreda jaliscana and Agave scabra, this nearly 2 ft plant, from the semi-desert
   canyons just over the mountains from Monterey, Mexico, boasts deep purple leaves with, indeed, coffee-colored
   polka dots over the entire plant. For sun, good drainage, and average summer water. Evergreen to 20F and root
   hardy into the low teens, USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

* Manfreda undulata 'Chocolate Chip'
   Brand new and rare cultivar with striking leaves, long and narrow with wavy edges and very densely spotted with
   ... well, chocolate chips. This form of a Mexican native, selected by Yucca Do Nursery, is small, to 4" tall x 15"
   wide with leaves about 12" long, and offsets very slowly. Prefers good drainage, protection from the afternoon
   sun in the hottest places, and occasional summer water. Root hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

* Melicytus obovatus                                                                         new zealand shrubby violet
   This shrubby, evergreen violet relative reaches to 6-8 ft tall or larger with 1 cm, rounded leaves on divaricating,
   arching branches and small white flowers that produce white berries sometimes tinted pink or blue. Best in sun to
   lightly dappled shade with freely draining soil and occasional summer water. A handsome and architectural plant
   for simple wall planting or container. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                              Violaceae

  Metapanax delavayi                                                                               delavay false ginseng
   A truly elegant, evergreen aralia relative from Southern China, a shrub to 6-8 ft tall and wide, with finely cut,
   compound leaves and, in maturity, clusters of white flowers in late summer turning to black berries, winter food
   for the birds. Best in dappled sun to partial shade in rich, moist soil. Our clone, from the University of
   Washington Arboretum in Seattle is frost hardy to upper USDA zone 7 and possibly lower. (Synonym:
   Nothopanax delavayi)

        $18.00                                                                                              Araliaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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Moraea huttonii
 A most interesting South African irid from mid to high elevations in the Drakensberg Mountains. Flowers from
 spring and often through summer producing large, yellow, fleur-de-lys on indeterminant stems. Strappy leaves of
 over 1" thick are coated at the base with netting...looking like poorly fitting nylon stockings…..really attractive!
 In garden conditions they can be in either well-drained or saturated soil in the garden if provided bright light.
 Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

      $12.00                                                                                              Iridaceae

Muscari macrocarpum 'Wayne's Clone'
 It’s the fragrance! Amazing and rich in this selection of a reasonably rare grape hyacinth from our friend Wayne
 Roderick. Robust, yellow spring flowers and nearly evergreen in foliage. Slowly increases by division of bulbs.
 Best in well drained soil or in a container. Fragrance is orgasmic. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and possibly into
 zone 7.

      $12.00                                                                                              Liliaceae

Myoporum parvifolium 'Burgundy Carpet'
 This Australian creeper -- to only about 6” in height but extending to 6 ft or more spilling over walls or covering
 ground -- caught our eye some time ago for use as a most attractive knitter or spiller in containers. We also
 recommend it for garden use in climates more moderate than our own, having lost it or nearly so in two unusual
 winters. The small whitish flowers are inconsequential: it’s really the leaves and the stature that count. Drought
 tolerant once established in full sun for best color. Frost hardy in USDA zone 9.

      $12.00                                                                                       Scrophulariaceae

Myrtus communis ‘Ann McDonald’
 Long having had an interest in this classic, I was delighted to see a large shrub of 8 ft in the wonderful and
 historic garden of Ann McDonald in Portland, this having been planted some 30 years ago or more and selected
 for its 1” leaves and large, 1/3” blue-black fruit produced from an exceedingly heavy flowering. Full sun to
 dappled shade in lean soil with little summer water. This garden provenance has produced a plant able to
 withstand between 10 to12F – bottom of USDA zone 8 -- with little appreciable damage.

      $14.00                                                                                             Myrtaceae

Myrtus luma ‘Glanleam Gold’
 Cheerful, large shrub, slowly to 8 ft or so, with cinnamon bark peeling in patches and tiny, evergreen leaves
 variegated with creamy yellow margins and pink tinged when young. Small, white spring flowers become edible
 fruit, it is said. Sun to part shade -- afternoon shade in hottest climates -- with good drainage and regular summer
 water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                             Myrtaceae

Narcissus bulbocodium v. conspicuus                                                         hoop petticoat daffodil
 Diminutive and tough little daffodil, superbly adapted to dry areas and rock gardens. The 6-12" tufts of chive-like
 foliage appear in autumn in mild climates with bright yellow, 1" hoops appearing as early as February. In colder
 climates, foliage appears in February with flowers in early spring. This European native multiplies freely in
 well-drained soil in sun to a bit of shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

      $11.00                                                                                        Amaryllidaceae




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  Narcissus sp. - (China Doll Narcissus)
   A lovely creature with a long history in horticulture; a plant introduced from its Asian origin hundreds of years
   ago via the silk road. Also a favorite from Sean’s childhood garden. Several fragrant, 1” flowers with a
   yellow-orange trumpet are produced in late November but certainly by January. For a sunny spot with good
   summer baking. Frost hardy to the bottom of USDA zone 8.

        $11.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

* Nerine 'Blue Flash'
   Amaryllis relative from South Africa, this very striking cultivar having leaves with an unusally blue cast and coral
   flowers with cental blue streak. This form seems to multiply quickly as well. As with others in the genus, these
   are summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in
   December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and
   sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose
   leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.

        $16.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

* Nerine bowdenii 'Audrey's Hardy'
   Delightful and suprisingly frost hardy, deep-pink flowered amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa, adapted
   to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Summer dormant; flowers emerge "nekked" in
   September to November while leaves appear beginning in December and January. This form is typical for the
   species but has tolerated particularly harsh winters in England, accepting temperatures to 0F, USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

* Nerine 'Coral Cape'
   Amaryllis relative from South Africa, this one with flowers of deep coral, as the name would suggest. Another
   striking variety. As with others in the genus, these are summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked"
   September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring.
   Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly
   above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter
   protection.

        $16.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

  Nerine filamentosa
   Beautiful and rare amaryllis relative from a small area of South Africa's Eastern Cape Province. A summer
   growing species of this varied genus and one of the more delicate, with thin, threadlike leaves and, in late
   summer/early autumn, fancy pink flowers, very frilly with long stamens, several to a 6-12" stem. Very exotic. Sun
   to light shade in soil that drains well where they can receive moderate water from spring to late autumn and
   remain a bit dryer in winter. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

  Nerine sarniensis ‘Old Rose’                                                                           guernset lily
   This amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa is very floriferous. Summer dormant, the large, deep rose,
   lily-like flowers appear alone and "nekked" from September through November followed by the grassy foliage
   that emerges in December and January growing happily with spring rains before going dormant. Adapted to wet
   or dry summer provided the soil drains well. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost
   hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.

        $12.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae




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* Nerine sarniensis 'Pink Satin'
   Another delightful amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa, this with deep pink, lily-like flowers. Summer
   dormant, the flowers emerge "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and
   January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be
   planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper
   teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.

        $16.00                                                                                        Amaryllidaceae

  Nerine sarniensis x bowdenii 'Silver Pink’                                                              guernsey lily
   From South Africa, these bulbs are winter growing, producing their flower buds in autumn, followed by
   strap-like leaves that continue through winter. Flowers are, yes indeed, silver pink, appearing just when color is a
   bonus. Best in full sun with very good drainage and little summer water. Plant with bulb necks slightly above
   ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.

        $12.00                                                                                        Amaryllidaceae

* Nerine x 'Afterglow'
   An amaryllis relative, this cross between N. sarniensis and N. bowdenii has bright red flowers, nearly twice as
   large as typical N. sarniensis hybrids. As with others in the genus, these are summer dormant, the flowers
   emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining
   through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb
   necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add
   mulch for winter protection.

        $16.00                                                                                        Amaryllidaceae

* Nerine x humilis - deep pink
   Floriferous bulbs, offspring of N. humilis and N. sarniensis, amaryllis relatives South Africa, this with
   particularly deep pink flowers and the petals with wavy margins. As with others in the genus, these are summer
   dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and
   January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be
   planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper
   teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.

        $16.00                                                                                        Amaryllidaceae

* Nerine x pudica 'Strawberry Sorbet'
   Another nerine cross, this between the coral-pink flowered N. sarniensis and the white N. pudica creating a
   delicious strawberry flower. As with others in the genus, these are summer dormant, the flowers emerging
   "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through
   spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks
   slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for
   winter protection.

        $16.00                                                                                        Amaryllidaceae

  Nolina 'La Siberica' D07-64
   A Cistus introduction. Selected from seed collected at 8000 ft, in La Siberica, Mexico, this handsome plant, a
   symmetrical fountain of long, graceful, flowing leaves, eventually develops a trunk up to 6 ft tall. Definitely
   attracts attention on the Cistus garden. Enjoys full sun and requires very little summer water. Frost hardy to 0F,
   USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                             Agavaceae




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  Nolina microcarpa SBH 6726                                                                                    bear grass
   Beautiful, tufted, liliaceous perennial to 4 to 5 ft high and wide and retaining its dark green luster throughout the
   winter. The leaf tips are edged in a curled “doodad,” making them even more interesting when backlit. This
   collection from one of my favorite places -- above Jerome, Arizona at over 8,000 ft. The hardiness should allow
   cultivation in areas of cold at the lower edges of USDA zone 5, possibly much colder with snow cover. The
   inflorescences are narrow, reaching 8 ft or more. with clusters of small white flowers looking vaguely pampas
   grassy. Drought tolerant though faster growing with regular summer water.

        $15.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Nolina texana                                                                                            bear grass
   A bigger, bolder version of the somewhat more common and varied N. microcarpa. This Texas native grows to a
   bold textured 5 ft with deep green arching leaves and creamy white flower spikes rising to 8 ft or more in spring
   and summer. Exceedingly drought tolerant but a little summer water would increase its growth rate. Sun to
   dappled shade. Frost hardy to about 0F, USDA zone 7, or even a little below.

        $15.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

* Nothoscordum (Ipheion) sellowianum                                                                   false yellow crocus
   Found in the wild in South America, these small bulbs form little clumps of narrow, grassy, green leaves, to only
   1" tall and 6" wide, and produce cheerful, fragrant, yellow, crocus-like flowers from winter to spring, each flower
   lasting only part of a day. Easy in rich, well-drained soil in sun to part shade with little water during summer
   months. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                                Liliaceae

  Olea europaea ‘Arbosana’
   Small to medium, picturesque, evergreen tree to 12-15 ft with 2" bright green, silver dusted leaves & small to
   medium, purple-brown, late season fruit. Best in sun in lean, well-drained soil with little summer water once
   established. All water should be withheld in late summer to allow plants to harden off, increasing hardiness.
   Good in container or in the garden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8; zone 7 if well hardened.

        $18.00                                                                                                Oleaceae

  Olea europaea ‘Farga’
   Spanish olive, producing small, brownish black olives valued for their oil, but only with a friend nearby. Sun,
   well-drained soil and occasional summer water in hot dry places for best fruiting. Quite drought tolerant once
   well established. For increased hardiness to cold, best to withhold water in the late season for hardening off new
   growth. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $18.00                                                                                                Oleaceae

  Olea europaea ‘Favarol’
   Ancient Italian cultivar. Self-sterile so requires a friend for fruit production. Sun, well-drained soil and occasional
   summer water in hot dry places for best fruiting. Quite drought tolerant once well established. For increased
   hardiness to cold, best to withhold water in the late season for hardening off new growth. Frost hardy in USDA
   zone 8.

        $18.00                                                                                                Oleaceae




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Olea europaea ‘Grignan’
 Ancient Italian cultivar. Self-sterile so requires a friend for fruit production. Sun, well-drained soil and occasional
 summer water in hot dry places for best fruiting. Quite drought tolerant once well established. For increased
 hardiness to cold, best to withhold water in the late season for hardening off new growth. Frost hardy in USDA
 zone 8.

      $18.00                                                                                                Oleaceae

Olea europaea ‘Mixan’
 A hardy variety from Albania, grown for its high productivity and high oil content. ‘Mixan’ is self-fertile, though
 having a friend nearby never hurts. Full sun, well-drained soil, supplemental water to establish and to plump the
 fruit, withhold water in late summer to harden the leaves– you know, all the usual stuff for hardy olive trees.
 We’re not certain about the ultimate height if left unpruned for generations, perhaps 30 to 40 ft, but easily kept
 much shorter. Cold hardy to 10F or less, USDA zone 8.

      $18.00                                                                                                Oleaceae

Olearia macrodonta                                                                                  new zealand holly
 Evergreen, shrubby daisy from New Zealand, to 10 ft tall x 5 ft wide, a charming, holly-wanna-be, with long,
 serrated leaves and clusters of fragrant, white, daisy-like flowers in summer. On mature plants, the bark peels in
 graceful strips. A rapid grower that tolerates hard pruning. Full sun and well-drained soil is best with average
 summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

      $12.00                                                                                               Asteraceae

Olearia moschata                                                                                   incense plant
 A cold hardy, shrubby ‘daisy’ from New Zealand with handsome, ever-gray foliage and awesome white leaf
 undersides and stems. White corymbs of small daisy flowers appear in summer. Full sun and well-drained soil is
 best. Drought tolerant once established. Grows to 4 ft or so high and wide. Cold hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8a.

      $9.00                                                                                                Asteraceae

Olearia paniculata                                                                                       daisy bush
 This medium-sized, New Zealand shrub, multi-trunked to 8-10 ft tall, thrives in full to half sun with regular
 summer water producing white, fragrant, daisy flowers in autumn. Frankly, the evergreen foliage is so great -- the
 leathery, yellow-green leaves having white undersides and wavy margins -- who cares if it flowers? Makes a
 dense and useful hedge. Needs well-drained soil and summer water in sun to part shade. Somewhat more tender
 than its relatives; frost hardy in mid USDA zone 8.

      $12.00                                                                                               Asteraceae

Olearia x mollis 'Zennorensis'
 One of the most architectural of the olearias, this form, found at Zennor Manor in a particularly windy part of the
 United Kingdom, is a 4 to 6 ft, layered shrub with golden, flaking bark and 3-4" leaves -- narrow, silvered, and
 sharply serrated -- on dark stems. White flowers appear in summer but not in great abundance. Perfect with such
 cohorts as corokia and astelia for that powdered silver garden. Has experienced close to 0F without serious
 injuries in the United Kingdom and even resprouted from slightly lower. Prefers sun to part shade and even
 moisture especially in hot summer climates. Frost hardy to at least mid USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                               Asteraceae




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  Ophiopogon clarkei                                                                     narrow-leaved monkey grass
   A much more gracile form of monkey grass with green, grassy foliage up to 10” tall. This slowly spreading,
   Chinese evergreen is perfect for a shady nook. White flowers blushed pink and metallic royal blue berries. Very
   striking. Prefers regular summer water, but surprisingly drought tolerant as well. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $11.00                                                                                  Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

  Ophiopogon japonicus var. nana ‘Minor’                                                            dwarf mondo grass
   This, the tiniest of the dwarf mondo grasses, is an extremely slow-growing, evergreen lily-turf, spreading only
   about 1" per year, so plant densely if you want coverage in your lifetime. Perfect for the tiny garden. The flowers
   are white and the berries sky-blue. Fine in part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

        $11.00                                                                                  Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

  Opuntia acanthocarpa ‘High Ho Silver’
   Introduced by cactus maven, Sarah McCombs, this 5 ft chollo, with 2” stems clothed in brilliant, silver-white
   spines, makes an outstanding garden or pot specimen especially where backlit by the sun. Extremely drought
   tolerant but fastest growing with occasional summer thunderstorms… even those from hoses. Tolerates
   temperatures a little below 0F with ease, upper USDA zone 6. Best not planted near helium balloons but,
   otherwise, very easygoing.

        $18.00                                                                                                Cactaceae

  Opuntia basilaris ‘Peachy’                                                                         beavertail cactus
   This beavertail cactus, a native from the Mohave desert of California into northern Sonora, was given to us from
   an old Albuquerque garden and has been one of the best performers. Attractive clumps, from 3-4 ft wide and 18”
   in height, with 6” pads of powdery blue-tinted-pink, burgundy in winter, and, indeed, peachy pink flowers in
   spring and early summer. Though a clone more tolerant of garden water, they still prefer well-drained, gritty soil,
   especially where winters are wet …and an occasional thunderstorm, artificial or not, in dry summer climates.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

        $12.00                                                                                                Cactaceae

  Opuntia basilaris ‘Sara’s Compact’                                                                  beavertail cactus
   One of many fabulous beavertail cactus selections, this is a lovely semi-dwarf form, reaching an eventual 18”
   with soft, pinkish-gray pads covered in colorful orange-red glochids -- not to be licked! -- and deep rose flowers.
   This cultivar was selected by Sara McComb. Plant in full sun in mineral soil where drainage is sharp. Frost
   hardy to USDA zone 5.

        $16.00                                                                                                Cactaceae

* Opuntia basilaris var. treleasei                                                     trelease's beavertail prickly pear
   A most attractive beavertail prickly pear, once having inhabited vast areas of California's southern San Joaquin
   Valley and now reduced to but a few populations. Forms individual clumps to 18" or 2 ft, with light blue pads
   adorned with small, golden spines and glochids, and, in spring, light, almost orchid-like, pink flowers. Sun, lean
   soil and well-drained soil, and little summer water. Able to take winter dampness along as the drainage is
   excellent. Frost hardy to at least USDA zone 6.

        $12.00                                                                                                Cactaceae




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* Opuntia compressa [Indiana collection]                                                          eastern prickly pear
   Collected on stable sand dunes in southern Indiana and given to us some years ago, this is a native of the eastern
   and central states. Five inch, rounded pads of bright green spread to fairly dense clumps, to about 6” high and 3
   ft across in as many years. Chartreuse and yellow flowers appear in mid summer. These moisture tolerant cacti
   also tolerate drought; they need sun and an open spot to grow. Very good container or rock garden plants
   spilling nicely over any edges. Frost hardy to -30F or lower, USDA zone 4.

        $14.00                                                                                               Cactaceae

* Opuntia (Cylindropuntia) spinosior                                                                           cane cholla
   Tall, architectural cactus found in southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico in Mexico and growing up to
   8 ft tall with thick joints that are gray-green and tinted purple, with darker purple tones in winter, and covered in
   gray spines. The flowers that appear in late spring to early summer can vary in color from white to yellow to red
   or purple - in this clone purple. Best in lean soil and bright light with little to no summer water. Frost hardy to
   -20F, USDA zone 5.

        $17.00                                                                                               Cactaceae

  Opuntia erinacea x O. fragilis var. columbiana 'Clarno'
   Particularly attractive form of this lovely native from the painted desert country in Central Oregon. Rounded
   pads, to 3" across, bear evenly spaced, golden spines and form clumps to 18" tall. Lean, well-drained soil
   provides the best site in the garden with little water in summer. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5, or lower. A
   good container or rock garden plant.

        $11.00                                                                                               Cactaceae

* Opuntia fragilis - dwarf golden
   Shared with us by friend Panayoti Kelaidis of Denver, this small mat former, quickly to about 3" high x 18" wide
   and eventually larger, has 1/2" pads with golden glochids and spines. Shy to flower. Very attractive in troughs,
   pots, or rock gardens, anywhere a low sun angle can can make the golden spines glow. Cactus conditions
   required -- sun, lean and well-drained soil, and little summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

        $12.00                                                                                               Cactaceae

  Opuntia fragilis SBH 6778                                                                       brittle prickly pear
   Lovely compact form, Sean's collection from the dry hills east of Ashland, Oregon. To only 4” or so. Slow to
   bloom but when they do, the flower color is deep, chartreuse-yellow. This one is capable of withstanding any
   amount of winter moisture -- short of submersion. Frost hardy in at least USDA zone 4.

         $7.00                                                                                               Cactaceae

* Opuntia humifusa - dwarf from Claude Barr
   This early selection by Great Plains plantsman Claude Barr grows to only 5-6" in height but forms a rather dense
   mat of rounded, shiny green and nearly spineless pads to about 3 ft wide. Cheery yellow flowers appear in
   summer followed by reddish fruit. Fabulous for planters or as spillers and easy to grow in most soil provided
   there is no standing water. Some summer water helps to push growth. Frost hardy in USDA zone 3 or 4.

        $12.00                                                                                               Cactaceae




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* Opuntia microdasys [Albuquerque]
   Another of Sean’s favorite, early childhood succulents, one that still entrances him (until violently shaken) and
   can only be described as “cute” -- the opuntia that is -- with nearly perfectly round pads dressed in tiny clusters
   of pale glochids -- which, by the way, are not cute, as they get in ones clothing – and yellow flowers in summer.
   Though most often grown as a container plant, the species is hardy outdoors in USDA zone 8 or above. This
   came from a decidedly zone 7 place, an old garden in Albuquerque, NM. Full sun or brightest windowsill for
   best appearance.

        $14.00                                                                                             Cactaceae

* Opuntia polyacantha 'Imnaha Blue'
   A Cistus introduction. A common native of western dry lands, this clone, from northeastern Oregon's Imnaha
   Canyon, was found weeping several feet off a cliff of red ryolite, the nearly spineless, gray-blue pads appearing
   almost as if hanging in chains. Assuming not everyone has a cliff, these will form spreading mats to 4-12" tall
   and up to several feet wide. Early summer flowers are a warm, soft yellow.. Ordinary cactus requirements -- sun,
   lean and well-drained soil, and little or no summer water. Undoubtedly frost hardy into USDA zone 4.

        $12.00                                                                                             Cactaceae

* Opuntia polyacantha 'Imnaha Sunset'
   A Cistus introduction. These common natives of western dry lands have round to oval pads -- from 1-4" long
   with dense, orange spines (polycantha means "many thorns) up to 2" long -- and form spreading mats to 4-12"
   tall and up to several feet wide. Early summer flowers are, in this selection, yellow with orange stamens and
   particularly abundant. Frost hardy at least into USDA zone 4.

        $12.00                                                                                             Cactaceae

* Opuntia polyacantha 'Peter Pan'                                                             hedgehog prickly pear
   Collected by Kelly Grummons in Colorado's Pawnee National Grasslands, this stunning, perpetually juvenile,
   non-flowering form has pads of 1-3" covered in bright, white spines. Forms a spiny, white carpet to only 3" tall
   and spreading slowly to up to 2 ft wide. A good selection for rock gardens or troughs in sun and well-drained
   soil. Drought tolerant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 3.

        $12.00                                                                                             Cactaceae

* Opuntia polycantha x erinacea v. columbiana x O. fragilis SBH
  7523
   Discovered in the upper reaches of Oregon's Imnaha Canyon, a particularly densely clumping plant producing
   abundant small pads that begin deep green then add gray and white spines. The pads are rounded and somewhat
   easily detached, suggesting its hybrid parentage. Flowers are an exciting lemon yellow with pink-tipped petals
   and orange stamens. Cactus requirements -- lean soil, good drainage, and little to no summer water. Frost hardy
   in USDA zone 4.

        $12.00                                                                                             Cactaceae

  Opuntia santa-rita x O. basilaris ‘Baby Rita’
   One of the most beautifully colored forms of the frost hardy cacti, a compact prickly pear to 2 ft, with pads, to
   3-4", that emerge blue-green often aging -- though not from lack of fertilizer -- to greenish yellow tinted pink.
   Late spring flowers of ruffled add to the palette. This has all the charm of O. santa-rita in a much smaller plant.
   Full sun with sharp drainage. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6. Great in containers.

        $14.00                                                                                             Cactaceae




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  Opuntia spinosior - highest elevation form [Pinaleño Mtns.]                                                cane cholla
   This classic and most attractive cholla, from elevations over 8100 ft in southeastern Arizona, has tightly held,
   silvery spines tinted pink on rounded branches and cherry red flowers in late spring on “shrubs” to about 4 ft --
   the entire plant a luscious purple in the colder months of winter with the branchlets handing downward. A
   beautiful contrast to the greeny yellow fruit. Full sun, good drainage, and, where dry, occasional summer water to
   boost growth. Frost hardy in zone 5, possibly a bit lower.

        $14.00                                                                                              Cactaceae

* Opuntia strigil                                                                               marblefruit prickly pear
   Unusual, south Texas native, prickly pear, to 3-4 ft or so,with round, 6" pads, the sharp spines chocolate-brown
   and evenly spaced. Creamy yellow flowers appear in May or June and produce small fruit that blushes red. Does
   well in full sun to bright shade, lean and well-drained soil, and little or no summer water. Frost hardy to 10 to
   15F, USDA zone, more reliable if dry in winter or with excellent drainage. A very good container plant for bright
   light.

        $15.00                                                                                              Cactaceae

* Opuntia x rutila - red/black spines
   This so far unnamed hybrid was an early Colorado Plateau collection by plantsman Claude Barr. Stout
   orange-red and black spines mark pads roughly 3" long, the elongation suggesting parentage by O. polycantha
   and O. fragilis. Mid spring, yellow flowers fade to apricot. Wonderful for small rock gardens with the usual
   cactus conditions -- sun, lean and well-drained soil, and little or no summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

        $12.00                                                                                              Cactaceae

  Oscularia deltoides                                                                                     pink ice plant
   Seriously cute ice plant from South Africa, this one evergreen with succulent, fleshy leaves -- light blue-green and
   somewhat 3-sided with toothed edges -- on dark stems! What’s not to love? Add the fragrant, deep pink,
   daisy-like flowers with yellow centers for more fun in spring and summer. Full sun to a bit of shade and good
   drainage. Drought tolerant but fatter and fuller with regular water. Frost hardy to 15-20F, upper USDA zone 8.

         $4.00                                                                                              Aizoaceae

  Osmanthus armatus                                                                                toothed sweet olive
   This substantial sweet olive’s foliage reminds you of a holly, but its sweetly perfumed white flowers in fall will
   surprise you. Dark, leathery leaves are less spiny when mature. Handsome, multi-stemmed shrub to 10 ft or so,
   and evergreen. Makes an excellent screen. Full sun to dense shade in fertile soil with regular water. Frost hardy
   in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                               Oleaceae

  Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Goshiki’
   This fragrant olive’s rounded outline and foliage make it an excellent border shrub. Goshiki is ‘five colored’ in
   Japanese and refers to the rainbow-splashed variegation in the new growth. Intensely fragrant, tiny, cream, fall
   flowers are added attractions. To 4-8 ft in sun to part shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA
   zone 7, possibly 6.

        $15.00                                                                                               Oleaceae




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* Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Gulftide'                                                                          false holly
   A handsome plant and a terrific screen or hedge, this evergreen shrub, to 8 ft tall and 5 ft wide, has spiny,
   holly-like leaves, shiny dark green and very densely held. Flowers appear in autumn, their tiny whiteness hidden
   amongst the leaves but the sweet fragrance easily noticed. Prefers sun to part shade in well-drained soil with
   summer water but easily adapts to many soils. Also can be pruned to maintain a smaller size. Frost hardy to 0F,
   USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                               Oleaceae

  Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Rotundifolius’
   Slow growing and quite showy evergreen shrub with rounded, shiny, dark green foliage -- a very unlikely sweet
   olive. White flowers in winter, small but intensely fragrant. Reaches 5 x 5 ft or so at maturity in sun to part shade
   where the soil is rich and receives regular summer water. Can be used for a low hedge. Frost hardy in USDA
   zone 7.

        $13.00                                                                                               Oleaceae

  Osmanthus 'Jim Porter'
   Thought to be derived from O. armatus, O. ‘Jim Porter’ has one of the most beautifully sculptured appearances
   of any in the genus. Reasonably fast to 6-8 ft and a narrow pyramidal form with 4", narrow, shiny green leaves
   dissected more than halfway back to the mid vein in a wonderful spiked pattern. Flowering begins in September
   and often lasts through November and December with very fragrant, small, white clusters amid the leaves. Typical
   Osmanthus culture -- reasonably well-drained soil; sun to light shade; summer watering is best in dry climates to
   maintain vigor. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $15.00                                                                                               Oleaceae

  Oxalis hirta
   Sweet perennial from South Africa, making low mats of bluish green leaves on 5” stems. A drought tolerant
   plant growing primarily in fall through winter and producing bright, rose-pink flowers. For sun to part shade.
   Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 8; lower in a protected garden spot.

        $12.00                                                                                            Oxalidaceae

* Oxalis oregana [Rowdy Creek]                                                                        redwood sorrel
   A Cistus introduction, collected near Rowdy Creek on the Smith River almost directly on the California/Oregon
   border. This form of the native redwood sorrel grows to 6-8" in height, the leaves dark green above with deep
   maroon undersides and the flowers, smallish and pale pink in spring and summer. Works well in the deepest
   dark, dry shade, or in dappled sun. Happy to to dormant in the summer but remains evergreen with some water.
   Grows vigorously in winter. Cold hardy in USDA zone 7. An excellent small-scale groundcover.

        $11.00                                                                                            Oxalidaceae

  Penstemon pinifolius ‘Mersea Yellow’
   Long-lived perennial with evergreen, pine-like foliage and hundreds of small bright yellow flowers in late spring
   and summer. Hummingbird candy. This sport was discovered in England with a flower color that is quite
   unusual for this genus. Great on a sunny slope or rock garden. Grows to about 1 ft high x 2 ft wide. Needs good
   drainage in any soil and occasional summer water where dry. Prune back in March. Evergreen to -20, USDA
   zone 5, and frost hardy in zone 4, as kindly reported by a inhabitant of climates much colder than ours.

        $12.00                                                                                          Plantaginaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Petasites fragrans                                                                                  winter heliotrope
   This small-leaved, Mediterranean native coltsfoot is perfect for the summer drought border–it simply goes
   dormant if unwatered. The small, round-leaved foliage is fragrant as are the white, vanilla-scented flowers in
   winter, a source of winter food for bees. Best in shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                                Asteraceae

* Petasites frigidus var. palmatus ‘Golden Palms’                                                     golden coltsfoot
   A golden form of our northwest native, originally collected by Chuck Pavlich. The bright yellow, fragrant leaves
   are palmate and deeply lobed and can reach 2 ft in diameter on 12" stems. Whitish flowers are produced in late
   winter/early spring before the foliage is fully present. Best in a shaded spot. Spreading by underground
   rhizomes, this herbaceous perennial is an exuberant grower where moisture is plentiful; more restrained with
   average water; can go dormant if dry in summer. You decide. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 6.

        $12.00                                                                                                Asteraceae

* Philadelphus 'Belle Etoile'                                                                              mock orange
   A must have for the fragrant garden, this deciduous shrub has late spring flowers, white with a maroon blotch
   near the center and a sweet, spicy fragrance. Delicious! Large and rangy, to 6 ft tall and wide in full sun or, in the
   hottest summer climates, light shade with protection from western sun. Provide well-drained soil for best
   appearance and regular summer water for best blooms. Can be stooled to rejuvenate. Frost hardy in USDA zone
   5.

        $15.00                                                                                            Hydrangeaceae

  Philadelphus mexicanus ‘Floroplena’                                                  double flowered mock orange
   Choice evergreen, arching shrub with abundant, intoxicatingly fragrant, double white flowers through much of the
   summer. Can be 15 ft tall with support or maintained as a medium shrub, removing oldest branches after
   flowering. Full sun to part shade. Drought tolerant once established but accepting of summer water. Tolerates
   heat with humidity. Frost hardy to mid USDA zone 8 and above.

        $14.00                                                                                            Hydrangeaceae

  Phillyrea angustifolia ‘Mallorca’
   A Cistus introduction originally collected in Mallorca by Kevin Hughes and an accommodating, evergreen olive
   relation, to an eventual 8-10 ft tall x 5 ft wide. Very architectural, dressed with long, dark green leaves, clusters of
   small, white, sweetly fragrant flowers in spring, and olive-like fruits. Makes an excellent small specimen tree or
   hedge. Tolerant of coastal conditions, many types of soil, and summer drought. Enjoys sun or part shade in
   hottest climates. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $15.00                                                                                                 Oleaceae

  Phormium 'Maori Sunrise'
   Handsome, semi-dwarf yet vigorous flax with olive-green leaves streaked peach and coral giving any border or
   container a cheery appearance. To 2.5-4 ft tall, this is one of the tougher forms, enduring cold into the teens F,
   mid USDA zone 8, with less damage than might be experienced by other cultivars. Sun to part shade with
   summer water to establish.

        $18.00                                                                                         Xanthorrhoeaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                  (* = new to mail order list)
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Phormium tenax [Lake Te Anu, NZ]
 This South Island collection from some elevation -- the parents in standing water for part of the year -- has
 proven to be a very good garden specimen in the only two years we have had it in the ground. Upright, to 6-7 ft,
 with rather wide leaves of olive-green, ever-so-slightly burgundy tinted. We expect these to be a bit hardier to
 frost than some, to 15F, mid-USDA zone 8, at least. Otherwise, bright light, summer water to establish, and
 mulch for winter protection in colder climates.

      $16.00                                                                                       Xanthorrhoeaceae

Phormium tenax ‘Platt’s Black’                                                          platt’s black new zealand flax
 Fairly new selection, to under 4 ft, with upright narrow leaves of deepest maroon to indeed nearly black --
 plantman's black. Introduced by New Zealand's Graham Platt, this compact plant adds contrast like no other. We
 have used it with silvers, burnt oranges, and chartreuse yellows to great effect. Of typical frost hardiness to the
 mid to upper teens F, mid USDA zone 8, with no sign of damage. Below that, "duck and cover." Excellent in
 container.

      $16.00                                                                                       Xanthorrhoeaceae

Pinus johannis                                                                              dwarf pinon, johann's pine
 One of several attractive Mexican pinon pines. This 20-30 ft compact plant, collected in the mountains south of
 Saltillo, Mexico, has blue-green needles, attractive flaking bark, and yes, eventually, delicious edible nuts. Though
 adaptable to any garden, prefers full sun and well-drained soil. Very good in desert conditions. Frost hardy in
 USDA zone 7A, possibly 6b.

      $15.00                                                                                               Pinaceae

Pittosporum aff. daphniphylloides DJHT 99111
 Dan Hinkley's collection from Taiwan of one of our favorite genera. These can be grown into a large,
 multi-stemmed shrub or trained as a miniature, single-trunked tree, to 10-12 ft, with lance-like foliage both shiny
 and beautifully rain tipped. Flowers are small, greenish white, and highly fragrant appearing in mid to late spring
 and followed by yellow fruit. Best with some summer water in full sun to medium dappled shade and
 well-drained soil. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                          Pittosporaceae

Pittosporum eugenioides v. minor ‘Variegata’                                                       variegated lemonwood
 A smaller version of an attractive species, to only 10 ft or so rather than the 30 ft of its near relation. Evergreen
 with dense foliage of pale green with white, slightly wavy margins and, in spring, intensely fragrant, spring
 flowers. Useful as a specimen or hedge. Site out of harsh winds and in a protected spot with full sun and regular
 summer water. Frost hardy to USDA zone 8a

      $14.00                                                                                          Pittosporaceae

Pittosporum heterophyllum                                                                      chinese pittosporum
 This evergreen "mock orange" should be in every shopping center parking lot– it’s that tough. Sadly, it’s not
 well represented anywhere. Medium shrub to small tree,12 to 15 ft, with glossy, narrow foliage and, in spring,
 pale yellow, intoxicatingly scented flowers. Delicious! Sun to part shade with regular water. Frost hardy in upper
 USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                          Pittosporaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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Pittosporum heterophyllum ‘Winter Frost’
 One of the most frost hardy of the Chinese mock oranges, this form introduced only a few years ago from Japan
 grows to 4 ft or so with 2” leaves margined and streaked most attractively in white and cream. Creamy flowers
 are scented of orange blossoms in mid spring to early summer. Can be shorn as hedge or used as specimen
 plants in decently drained soil. Prefers supplemental summer water where very dry. Sun to half shade. Easy.
 Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7 .

      $14.00                                                                                            Pittosporaceae

Pittosporum illicioides 'Strappy'
 Too rare in horiticulture. Selected by Sean Hogan from Taiwanese collections by Dan Hinkley - P. illicioides
 DJHT 99079, chosen for the extremely narrow leaves present a fine texture in the garden. A tall, evergreen shrub,
 to 12-15 ft, with fragrant, white flowers in spring and, in autumn, very small, blue-black fruit in orange capsules.
 Best in light shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and expected in zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                            Pittosporaceae

Pittosporum parvilimbum
 A Pittosporum for USDA zone 7! one known to have survived many harsh winters at the JC Raulston Arboretum
 in North Carolina. Having been introduced there as the completely unrelated Phillyrea, it was only after many
 years the plant was noticed and properly identified as this recently described and excellent species. From China, a
 tall, evergreen shrub, to 10-12 ft, densely branched and adorned with small, narrow leaves. Blooms in spring with
 small, white fragrant flowers followed by tiny, black fruits in orange capsules. Sun to part shade with regular
 water. A treasure for the Pittosporum-lover’s garden!

      $16.00                                                                                            Pittosporaceae

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana'
 Of the often jewel-like members of this highly selected species from New Zealand, P.t. 'Argentea Nana' is indeed
 one of the most exquisite. Young plants form mounds, 18" to 2 ft , of densely held, 1/4" leaves on black stems.
 As plants emerge into their adult phase, the leaves grow farther apart and the plants become more open. This too
 is attractive but if one misses the old days, a little shearing can never hurt. On older plants late spring flowers are
 under 1/3", maroon to nearly black with the fragrance of dianthus. Dappled shade to full sun with regular
 summer water preferred. Exquisite container plant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

      $16.00                                                                                            Pittosporaceae

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Black Lace'
 Another of the diminutive forms of this treasure of a species, P. t. 'Black Lace' is among the tiniest of them all.
 Threadlike, black branches on this delicately mounding small plant, to 3 ft, bold leaves often under 1/4", each leaf
 tinted chocolate-burgundy in winter with olive tints in summer. Eventually plants may reach 6 ft at which time
 leaves begin to grow somewhat larger and flowers occur in spring with typical maroon, small bells, scented of
 carnations. Bright light to dappled shade, regular summer water. Not a heavy feeder. Superb small garden or
 container plant having proven hardy to mid USDA zone 8, possibly a little cooler if protected from wind.

      $16.00                                                                                            Pittosporaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                  (* = new to mail order list)
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  Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Elizabeth’
   A southern hemisphere pittosporum from New Zealand, this is a vigorous male cultivar. Small, nearly black
   flowers provide deliciously fragrant inspiration in spring and the shiny, wavy edged, light blue-green leaves --
   variegated with white edges, pink flushed especially in winter -- contrasting with purplish stems provide a nice
   texture year round. A large shrub to small tree, possibly to 25 ft, but more probably remaining 10-12 ft x 6-8 ft, it
   can be easily trimmed as a hedge. Enjoying regular summer water, they are best in well-drained soil in sun or part
   shade, perhaps with extra protection of a south wall or overstory where temperatures dip into the teens regularly.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 with good protection.

        $16.00                                                                                          Pittosporaceae

  Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Gold Sheen’
   Beautiful evergreen shrub with bright foliage -- wavy, golden-green, white-edged leaves on black stems! --
   making this New Zealand pittosporum a bright spot in the garden. To about 10 ft tall x 4 ft wide, but easily
   trimmed to a smaller size. Prefers well-drained soil in sun to part shade with little summer water once established.
   New to us but we expect cold hardiness in mid to upper USDA zone 8, 15 to 20F in any freeze of long duration.
   We do know it makes a great container plant and enjoys life on the coast. Sadly, intolerant of humid summers

        $16.00                                                                                          Pittosporaceae

  Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Irene Patterson'
   Selected in the wild on New Zealand's South Island, we brought this cultivar back from England in the mid
   1990s. Strikingly white speckled variegation on leaves emerging nearly all cream and aging to spring-green and
   held on typical black stems make this 4- 5 ft, dense shrub a standout in the garden. Small blackish flowers, with
   the typical, dianthus-like, spicy fragrance, can actually be seen in spring with the naked eye against the light
   colored leaves. A wonderful container plant or garden subject with regular water, dappled sun or full sun out of
   the most glaring conditions, and leanish soil. Has taken low temperatures to near 0F in England. A champion
   during a ferocious, 3 day, December freeze in 2009, so definitely frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                          Pittosporaceae

  Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Moonlight’
   Yet another good variegated form of one of our favorite groups, this rather dense shrub to 4-6 ft has rounded
   very glossy leaves centered cream to nearly golden and edged green. Early spring flowers are of deep maroon,
   smell like carnations, and are almost visible to the naked eye. This is one of the more frost hardy cultivars,
   withstanding temperatures into the mid to upper teens F, upper USDA zone 8, with no visible damage. We don’t
   yet know its lower limit.

        $15.00                                                                                          Pittosporaceae

* Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Nutty Leprechaun'
   This selection originated in Irelands though its parentage is, of course, from New Zealand. A good addition to the
   purple-leaved pittosporums, growing only to about 3 ft tall with small, deep burgundy leaves, under 1/2”, a
   striking contrast with the florescent chartreuse of the new spring growth. These are not only compact, they have
   an almost creeping quality, separating P. t. ‘Nutty Leprechaun’ from other small, purple cultivars. Also one of
   the tougher of the purple group, these have been frost hardy so far into the low teens F with no noticeable
   damage. Full sun for best color. At home on the West Coast of North America, but not happy in the hot, humid
   southeast. Frost hardy in lower USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                          Pittosporaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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* Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Tandarra Gold’
   A most refined P. tenuifolium, said to be a sport of P. t. ‘Silver Sheen’ with its ever-so slightly silver tinted
   leaves. Most importantly, though leaves of under 1/2” carry the same silvery coloring, in this form a yellow
   blotch takes up nearly the whole leaf, creating a wonderful color contrast with the typical black stems. Without
   pruning, becomes upright to 8-10 ft or more with an almost cloudlike texture … yellow clouds, of course.
   Provide summer water and, for the most dainty appearance, keep out of the hottest afternoon sun. Makes a
   suburb pot plant, luckily for, alas, it is one of the more tender with possible damage in the upper teens F, upper
   USDA zone 8. Otherwise easy care.

        $15.00                                                                                           Pittosporaceae

  Pittosporum tobira 'Shima'
   Low growing form of the Japanese mock orange, about the size of P. t 'Wheeler's Dwarf and about 3 ft in height
   x 4 ft in width eventually. A very compact growth with leaves streaked cream, the lightest yellow, and green.
   Wonderful foundation planting or foreground to frame perennials. A plant frequently commented upon at the
   entrance of our nursery where it is it planted adjacent to variegated forms of Trachelospermum for a....variegation
   echo. Shy flowering. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                           Pittosporaceae

  Pittosporum tobira ‘Tall n Tough’
   The hardiest of P. tobira clones, this selection is from JC Raulston Arboretum has survived temperatures to 0F
   without blinking. Large, evergreen shrub to small tree, to 8 ft tall x 6 ft wide, has shiny, dark green, rounded
   leaves and, in early summer, intensely fragrant, citrus-like, white flowers. Appreciates full sun to part shade, with
   regular summer water until established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                           Pittosporaceae

  Pittosporum tobira ‘Turner's Dwarf'
   One of the evergreen "mock oranges," so named for its transcendental fragrance, evocative of orange blossoms,
   from small, white spring flowers. A smallish shrub, to 4-6 ft tall x 4 ft wide with variegated foliage, the light green
   leaves edged in creamy white. Full sun for best bud set, but tolerates dappled shade. Best in a fairly warm, sunny
   spot against the shelter of a wall or building. Frost hardy in mid USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                           Pittosporaceae

  Plectranthus ‘Mona Lavender’
   A handsome perennial forming a round, bushy shrub to about 2 ft tall and wide with spikes of lavender flowers
   held above the dark green leaves in summer and beyond. Trim to shape and deadhead for longer blooming
   period. Rich soil and plenty of water in part shade. Frost hardy outside in USDA zone 10 but good in pots and
   happy as a houseplant as well.

         $9.00                                                                                               Lamiaceae

  Podocarpus alpinus ‘County Park Fire’
   OoooH! We think we are becoming quite enamored with these little podocarps. Another down-under plant
   selected by famed County Park Nursery in the United Kingdom, this jewel-like little conifer, reaches only about
   3' with densely held, shiny, rounded needles of deepest green/maroon in summer, taking on fiery purple-orange
   tints in winter, especially in new growth. A fabulous addition to container or garden. The P. alpinus group is one
   of the most hardy of the genus, this plant having been hardy to close to 0F in several gardens. Stunning when
   planted with other party goers such as Uncinia rubra and, maybe our favorite, Libertia peregrinans for a rusty
   contrast. Average soil conditions; bright light best; not appreciative of prolonged drought. Frost hardy in USDA
   zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                           Podocarpaceae



                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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Podocarpus alpinus ‘Red Tip’
 A very hardy podocarp selection from New Zealand, a dwarf conifer with needle foliage that emerges burnished
 red in spring and matures to dark, blue-green. Grows slowly to only 1 ft tall, spreading to 3 ft wide with an
 arching habit. Inconspicuous flowers produce red berries. Lean soil and regular summer water in full to part sun.
 Cold hardy to USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                           Podocarpaceae

Podocarpus falcatus UCSC95.340
 A graceful podocarp reaching large tree size in the highlands of the eastern South African Drakensberg range
 and a medium grower -- to 30 ft or so at least so far -- in our Western gardens. As the South African podocarps
 have never been thought to be the most frost hardy creatures in the world, I was surprised to find this successful
 (until removed by chain saw) at the JC Raulston Arboretum in USDA zone 7 in North Carolina. The thin
 stemmed, upright tree, with somewhat weeping branches and almost bamboo-like, narrow curving foliage,
 provides much grace for specimen or background planting in the garden. Though somewhat tolerant of drought,
 prefers regular irrigation to keep from becoming spindly. Full sun to medium shade, average fertility and
 drainage. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8, possibly 7 if in North Carolina.

      $16.00                                                                                           Podocarpaceae

Podocarpus lawrencei x totara
 A most attractive large shrub to small tree, which was shared with us by the University of California at Santa
 Cruz Arboretum. This cross between two striking podocarps has attractive sprays of densely held, 1” needles
 edged a light cream color, enhancing the texture. Prefers summer water in dry areas, but is otherwise at home in
 any well drained soil in sun to dappled shade. Appears to be frost hardy at least to 15F, mid USDA zone 8, but
 certainly might tolerate lower temperatures.

      $14.00                                                                                           Podocarpaceae

Podocarpus macrophyllus - self-fruiting clone
 Shared with us some years ago by plant geek buddy, Mike Remmick, originally from his stay at the North
 Carolina State University Arboretum, now the JC Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh, NC. Though he has not been
 able to locate the original plant during our many trips to this fabulous institution, Mike's specimen has grown to a
 beautifully conical, 12 feet ... ok...minus one bout of falling into a creek...but it's back. This form is particularly
 desirable to us, not only because of its hardiness, having survived well below 0ºF in Raleigh, but also because of
 its heavily powder-blue dusted foliage and quite attractive red "berries" produced with no playmates in sight.
 Average garden conditions; dappled shade to bright light with decent drainage. Doesn't turn down a little manure
 once in a while. Frost hardy to at least USDA zone 7.

      $18.00                                                                                           Podocarpaceae

Podocarpus macrophyllus var. maki 'Irvington'
 This selection is from an ancient plant growing on a west wall in a northeast Portland home and has remained
 undamaged by any cold ever thrown at it. Lacy, evergreen, upthrusting shrub to 15 ft tall x 3 ft wide. Red berries
 in winter. Full to part sun in well-drained soil. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and upper zone 7 with protection.

      $17.00                                                                                           Podocarpaceae

Podocarpus nivalis ‘Otari’
 Male variety of this handsome podocarp, slowly to 3-4 ft x 5-6 ft wide, with olive green, needled foliage that turns
 a very rich, bright bronze in winter. Best in bright light for good winter color with good drainage and even
 moisture. Frost hardy at temperatures close to 0F, USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                           Podocarpaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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  Podocarpus totara 'Pendula'
   Gracefully weeping large shrub, easily trained to small tree size, 8-12 ft tall or so, with yellow-green, densely held
   needles and dense weeping branches as well, though these can be thinned to enhance this fine plant's graceful
   appearance. Easy care, requiring regular but infrequent water in dry summer places and sun for best needle
   color, though perfectly happy in dappled shade. This New Zealand native seems adaptable to both east and west.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 7. Excellent container plants.

        $15.00                                                                                           Podocarpaceae

* Podophyllum pleianthum - short form
   An outstanding addition to the shade garden. Huge leaves in summer-- starry saucer-shaped with high, dark
   green gloss. Burgundy flowers hang below the leaves in spring, followed by rounded, yellow fruit. In fact,
   everything about this selection is the same as the species, except its height - in this case to only 18" tall. Best in
   shade with regular summer water, as drought stress may trigger early dormancy. Winter dormant and frost hardy
   in USDA zone 6.

        $24.00                                                                                            Berberidaceae

* Polianthes tuberosa 'The Pearl'
   Wonderfully fragrant bulb from Mexico loving dappled shade to sun and all the heat you can give it. Thought by
   many to have been selected originally by the Mayans back before ... the 1960s, but definitely discovered in the
   1870s by nurseryman John Hendserson. Clusters of deliciously fragrant, creamy white, double flowers appear in
   late summer to autumn on 2-3 ft stalks, opening from pink-blushed buds. Given hot sun and ample fertilizer and
   summer moisture, these are cold hardy in USDA zone 7. Otherwise great as pot plants -- a necessity once one
   has become addicted to the fragrance. Can be allowed to dry in winter.

        $14.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Poncirus trifoliata ‘Flying Dragon’
   Ancient Asian selection of the bitter orange with lovely twisted stems & wicked thorns. Extremely hardy (-20F),
   deciduous citrus, best in winter when the green stems and huge thorns are exposed and large orange fruits hang
   on. In spring, white flowers with a sweet fragrance. Plant in containers for the most drama; in the ground for
   easiest care. 10 ft in time... a long time. Extremely frost hardy, to USDA zone 5.

        $14.00                                                                                                Rutaceae

  Prostanthera rotundifolia 'Variegata’                                                  variegated australian mint bush
   Another wonderful, Australian shrubby, mint, this one with deep purple-blue flowers in spring and summer and
   strikingly creamy, variegated foliage, the 1/2" rounded leaves emitting a strong, almost bitey, minty fragrance. The
   entire plant grows to 4-5 ft in height but is easily shorn to any reasonable height. Average soil conditions, though
   good drainage is a plus. Bright to dappled light. Prostantheras vary in hardiness; this one seems to have about an
   18 to 20F threshold, upper USDA zone 8, so best for protected garden spots along the West Coast, but a
   fabulous container plant anywhere.

        $12.00                                                                                               Lamiaceae

* Prunus subcordatum
   This small cherry relative, from the southern Cascades and the Sierras, growing to only 6-8 ft tall, has attractive,
   shiny bark, narrow deciduous leaves, and white flowers followed by purple fruit -- good bird food especially for
   cedar waxwings. Attractive both as a shrub or pruned into a small, multi-trunked tree. A surprisingly drought
   tolerant creature that doesn't refuse occasional summer water in sun to dappled shade where soil is well-drained.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

        $14.00                                                                                                Rosaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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Pseudopanax ferox                                                                                toothed lancewood
 One of those cool dinosaur plants found down Kiwi way that catches the eye and triggers the lust gene in plant
 geeks and adventurous gardeners. Juvenile leaves are dark brown, long, very narrow, stiff, and saw-toothed,
 growing downward from a central stem -- odd indeed. Slow growing, trees reach 20 ft in 20+ years, only then
 producing adult foliage, shorter, wider, and green. Sun to dappled or bright shade and regular summer water.
 Frost hardy in USDA zone 8b in a sheltered location, though even in Portland we keep most of ours in
 containers and shelter during winter cold.

      $24.00                                                                                             Araliaceae

Pseudowintera colorata ‘Red Glow’
 Another shrubby member of the Winteraceae from New Zealand. To 3-4 ft tall with succulent appearing leaves
 colored orangey-red and nearly pink new growth....ooh! Small white flowers produce bluish black berries,
 adding interest to the plant. Very good container or garden specimen. Full sun for best color and well-drained
 soils with reasonable summer moisture. Container plant only in the humid Southeast. Frost hardy to about 15F,
 mid USDA zone 8, though has come through 10F with protection.

      $18.00                                                                                           Winteraceae

Pseudowintera colorata [UCSC]
 Another member of the Winteraceae from New Zealand, this one to over 4 ft was wild collected from the
 University of Santa Cruz Arboretum. Succulent appearing leaves of blue-green tinted orange-red. Small white
 flowers produce bluish black berries, adding interest to the plant. Very good container or garden specimen full
 sun for best color and well-drained soils with reasonable summer moisture. Container plant only in the humid
 Southeast. Frost hardy to about 15F – mid USDA zone 8 -- though has come through 10F with protection.

      $16.00                                                                                           Winteraceae

Punica granatum ‘Lubimi’                                                                                  pomegranate
 Medium-sized fruiting, pomegranate, a southern Russian selection also known as 'Favorite'. Silky, pink-orange
 flowers & medium-sized dusky orange fruit that often lingers through the brilliant fall colors of red and yellow.
 A small, deciduous shrub, to 4-5 ft in full sun with summer water for best fruit. Harvest fruit after first frost to
 make into jam, Grenadine, or eat fresh! Frost hardy to less than 10F, USDA zone 8.

      $17.00                                                                                            Lythraceae

Puya alpestris                                                                                         sapphire tower
 This amazing succulent has shocking, sapphire-blue flowers held on 4-5 ft spikes over rosettes of spiny leaves.
 Despite their made-out-of-plastic appearance, they are the "real deal." Think spiky bromeliad, ‘cause that’s what
 it is. Leaves are 2-3 ft long, narrow and arching, green above and silver beneath, with spines along the margins.
 Drought tolerant, but some summer water is a good thing. Full sun and good drainage, of course. Frost hardy to
 25 degrees F, mid USDA zone 9, perhaps lower with the perfect micro climate.

      $14.00                                                                                          Bromeliaceae

Puya dyckioides SBHMPS 6285
 Our collection from northwest Argentina at nearly 10,000 ft. Gracefully arching, very shiny leaves tinted red are
 stunning growing from a high cliff. Luckily you do not have to hang by your ankles to have this plant. Has
 flowered for us with rosey red, 2 ft spikes with a celadon blue flower, a color that should not be found in nature.
 Should be hardy to at least 10 to 15F, mid USDA zone 8, making it one of the toughest bromeliads for garden
 use. Full sun to dappled shade; good drainage.

      $16.00                                                                                          Bromeliaceae




                                 Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                       80

  Puya venusta - pink stemmed form
   One of the thrills of 2005 was receiving seed collected by Mike Remmick at over 6000 ft in the coast range of
   Central Chile. This is one of the most dazzling of the Puyas with clumping 3 ft rosettes so glaucous as to appear
   nearly white, and on this form the deep blue-black flowers were supported by 6-8 ft stems of nice pink. This
   collection is particularly exciting as, most forms in cultivation having been coastal, this seed came from plants
   growing among even the Krumholtz timberline of Nothofagus obliqua. Took our rather nasty January 2007
   extended cold spell of at least 19F in stride. Woo hoo! Expected to be hardy to between 10 and 15 F, lower
   USDA zone 8, given bright conditions and well-drained soil. A great pot plant.

        $18.00                                                                                               Bromeliaceae

  Pyrrosia hastata                                                                                                  felt fern
   An evergreen fern, quite rare in cultivation as it spreads very slowly, but attractive with thick, three lobed leaves,
   up to 16" long x 6-8" wide, green above and stippled with coppery felt below, on black stems to 6-12” tall and
   slowly expanding into larger clumps. Found clinging to rocks and tree trunks in China, Japan, and Korea, these
   are best in part shade to shade in well-drained, even rocky soil with summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8
   and into zone 7 with winter protection. Also does well in pots and as an indoor plant.

        $20.00                                                                                              Polypodiaceae

* Quercus aff. rugosa - La Siberica strain
   This is from our 1991 collection from high valley in Mexico's Nuevo Leon state and named for the town and the
   cold climate from which it comes. In habitat these form dense 6-8 ft shrubs with undulate and glossy
   fiddle-shaped leaves, deep green and ever so lightly furry above with a thick woolly coating of cream to light
   orange fur beneath. OoooH! Our original seed collections have grown in our somewhat more lavish conditions to
   15 ft small trees just large enough tshow off the reflective undersides of the leaves. OoooH! OooH! From its
   habitat we suggest this might well be frost hardy into USDA zone 6 but we know zone 7 is a no-brainer.
   Ohhhhh, ohhh, ohhh!

        $14.00                                                                                                   Fagaceae

* Quercus chrysolepis                                                                                     cañon live oak
   An extremely handsome, evergreen native oak found in western dry country and able to withstand great drought,
   these from acorns collected in the wild near Cave Junction, Oregon at 4000 ft. Wonderfully adapted to dry
   summer climates and very successful as a street tree. Fast growing when young and slowing in maturity, these
   can reach 20-30 ft in your lifteime in deep soil with bright sun to part shade. Frost hardy into at least the single
   digits, F, low USDA zone 7. Can be shrubby when young so encourage a strong leader.

        $16.00                                                                                                   Fagaceae

* Quercus graciliformis                                                                       chisos oak, slender oak
   Closely related to and possibly a variant of Q. canbyi, the lovely Chisos oak is found primarily in dry canyons of
   the Chisos Mountains in western Texas. A small tree, semi-evergreen and slow growing, it can reach 30 ft tall and
   wide with long, narrow, leathery leaves edged with widely spaced, short, pointed lobes. Arching branches suggest
   the common name of graceful oak. Best in full to part sun in gritty, well-drained soil. Needs occasional summer
   water in hottest climates and tolerates regular water with good drainage. Evergreen where frosts are short and
   mild; deciduous in colder areas, dropping leaves in shades of red and orange. Frost hardy to at least USDA zone
   7 and probably zone 6.

        $16.00                                                                                                   Fagaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                   (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                    81

  Quercus hypoleucoides                                                                                     silver oak
   We first fell in love with this plant in the 1980s upon seeing a collection from an expedition of Boyd Kline and
   Frank Callahan to northeastern Mexico. Our first up close and personal experience was on New Year's Day,
   seeing these exquisite 25 ft tall by 15 ft wide trees in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeast Arizona where,
   under bright blue skies and with a few inches of snow on the ground, the dazzling sliver undersides of the leaves
   reflected as if illuminated by spot light. Fast growing when young. The narrow leaves are very leathery and
   shiny and can age to maroon on the upper surface in cold temperatures. A plant for sun, well-drained soil, and
   quite possibly hardy into low to mid USDA zone 6. But we are sure about zone 7. Our favorite oak, really.

        $18.00                                                                                                Fagaceae

  Quercus laceyi                                                                            lacey oak, texas blue oak
   Rare endemic from the Big Bend region of Texas, forming a beautifully rounded, upright tree, to 20-30 ft tall,
   with gently lobed leaves of blue-green turning apricot tones only at the very end of autumn and shedding in early
   spring when new leaves emerge. Named for Howard Lacey who first collected it in Kerrsville,
   Texas. Perfect for the dryland garden... or giant limestone chasm planting. Prefers good drainage and little
   fertilizer. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6. Full sun for best color.

        $15.00                                                                                                Fagaceae

* Quercus phellos                                                                                              willow oak
   Handsome and long-lived southern oak, deciduous with narrow, willow-like foliage, small leaves for easy raking.
   Grows somewhat fast, reaching 60-80 ft tall x 30-40 ft wide with a dense rounded crown. Produces small acorns
   that provide food for birds. A fine street tree tolerating heat, humidity, air pollution, and even standing water and
   compacted soils. Drought tolerant for brief periods but grows best in moist, well-drained soil. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 5.

        $12.00                                                                                                Fagaceae

  Quercus sadleriana                                                                                 sadler oak, deer oak
   One of the handsomest of the western, evergreen oaks, this native of southwest Oregon to northern California is a
   small shrub, to only 6-10 ft tall x 3 ft wide, with huge, shining leaves, oblong and serrated, dark green above and
   paler beneath. Best in well-drained soil in understory conditions in light shade. Tolerant of summer drought and
   hot conditions as well as heavy winter rains. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

        $14.00                                                                                                Fagaceae

* Quercus suber                                                                                              cork oak
   The famed cork oak from the savannas of southwestern Europe, indeed used for repeated harvest of the real
   thing! Coming from our mirror climate, this makes a most beautiful and useful street or garden tree, reaching an
   eventual 50 ft, with thickened, orangey bark and rounded, evergreen leaves, somewhat shedding briefly in early
   spring as the new leaves emerge. (By the way, pigs love the acorns ... just saying.) Accepts a fair amount of
   garden water but most at home with long summer drought. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.


        $12.00                                                                                                Fagaceae

* Quercus vaccinifolia                                                                                     huckleberry oak
   Walking through a ‘"forest" of this oak can be hard on your ankles or knees since these only reach 2-3 ft at
   maturity, making this dwarf alpine oak perfect for the rock wall or rock garden. Evergreen with lustrous, green
   leaves and a dense, tight habit. A very dependable small shrub in full sun to part shade with at least occasional
   summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7 and possibly into upper zone 5.

        $16.00                                                                                                Fagaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                  82

  Quercus wislizeni SBH 7198                                                                          interior live oak
   Our collection, probably of the variety frutescens, from near Weaverville in the Siskiyou Mountains of southern
   Oregon. This evergreen, rounded tree to about 25 ft, produces crinkled, somewhat spiny, deep green leaves,
   silvery bark, and most attractive missile shaped acorns in late summer through autumn. A tough species for the
   droughty west and one of the most easily moved at larger sizes. Nice planted where one might want contrast to an
   olive as they reach about the same size. From this elevation we expect frost hardiness to be below 0F, into USDA
   zone 6. Full sun, well-drained soil, preferably on a steep cliff, but not necessarily so.

        $14.00                                                                                              Fagaceae

* Rhamnus californica - Cistus seedling
   Though we have not named this plant yet -- it appears that Rhamnus alaternus might be involved somehow -- we
   think it a worthy and useful addition to the summer dry garden where an upright shrub or, if properly pruned,
   small tree, to 10 ft tall, with glossy leaves and silver bark is always welcome. A vigorous plant for hedging for
   single specimen. Best in sun to dappled shade with decent drainage. Very summer drought tolerant and expected
   frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                           Rhamnaceae

* Rhamnus californica - narrow leaved form
   Collected near Shasta Lake, California and given to us by plantsman Frank Callahan, this form of the western
   native coffeeberry has narrower leaves than the species, to only 1.5" wide. A handsome evergreen shrub, to 4-8 ft
   tall x 3-5 ft wide, with foliage that is silvery green above and paler below on stems that range from green to
   maroon. A nice contrast. Insignificant flowers turn into handsome, pea-sized fruit that ripens from yellow-green
   to red to black, often showing all three colors. Sun to part shade in any but damp soil with occasional deep,
   summer watering to establish and none thereafter. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                           Rhamnaceae

* Rhamnus californica ssp. tomentella SBH 7451                                                              coffeeberry
   From the north fork of the American River in the northern Sierras comes this 6 ft form of the western native
   coffeberry with its narrow leaves that appear as if clothed in gray-blue flannel, darkened stems, and red fruit
   aging to dark purple -- all making a most wonderful display. Very summer drought tolerant; perfect for the
   native, silver border. Sun for best results and low fertility in well-drained soil. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                           Rhamnaceae

  Rhaphiolepis umbellata f. ovata
   One of the more handsome Indian hawthorns, this bold textured, evergreen, shrub (or miniature tree?), to 5-8 ft, is
   adorned with glossy, 3", rounded oval leaves of deep green with a light coating of hairs, and white to shell pink
   flowers spring through fall. Drought tolerant but fine with summer moisture. Full sun to dappled shade;
   reasonable drainage; low or high nutrients. Frost hardy to the lower end USDA zone 8; possibly 7.

        $12.00                                                                                              Rosaceae

  Rhaphiolepis umbellata 'Minor'                                                                minor indian hawthorn
   Very nice, small evergreen shrub, native to Japan and Korea. To 3-4 ft tall by 2-3 ft wide, densely branched with a
   rounded form. Good for foundation plantings or a small hedge. The leaves are small, glossy and dark green
   turning bronze in winter and in new growth and the late spring flowers are white followed by purple-black
   berries. Full sun to part shade. Prefers moist, well-drained soil but tolerates some drought. Frost hardy to USDA
   zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                              Rosaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                               (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                   83

  Rhapidophyllum hystrix                                                                                   needle palm
   Wonderful rare species growing amid the cypress swamps of northern Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and
   Georgia, and just nipping into South Carolina. This slow growing clumper -- though can reach 10 ft with
   multiple offsets -- has a trunk covered with blackish fur and numerous spines and graceful, glossy green leaves
   on long petioles. An easy plant in the garden; happy in shade to full sun in coastal climates and appreciative of
   generous summer water. Slow growing where nights are cool. Possibly the hardiest palm with numerous reports
   of little to no damage at 0 to -10F, USDA zone 6, and some of survival as cold as -22F, upper USDA zone 4,
   with only a little protection. Avoid root disturbance when transplanting. Very slow from seed. Ours are 7 years
   old.

        $19.00                                                                                              Arecaceae

  Rhodohypoxis baurii 'Venetia'
   From the Drakensberg Mountains of South Africa, a tiny, clumping perennial with grassy leaves, to only 3-4"
   tall. Grown mostly for its charming, star-shaped, rose-red flowers that sit on the top of each stem in late spring.
   Sun and well-drained soil is best with consistent moisture in summer and little moisture in winter. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 8 with good drainage.

        $12.00                                                                                          Hypoxidaceae

  Rhodophiala bifida                                                                                       oxblood lily
   Lovely South American equivalent of the South African amaryllis. Flowers in late summer with deep dusky-red,
   lily-like blooms on 1 ft stems. Grass-like, strappy leaves follow the flowers. Easy in the garden, in well-drained
   soil with protection from the very hottest sun. Water in their growing season. Easily grown as a houseplant and
   encouraged into bloom for the holiday season. Frost hardy with mulch in upper USDA zone 6.

        $15.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae

  Ribes aff. wilsoniae DJHC 777
   Collected by Dan Hinkley in 1996 on the summit of Emei Shan in southwestern China, this attractive evergreen
   groundcover reaches 1ft high x 4ft wide. Clusters of greenish-yellow flowers appear in late winter. Best in bright
   shade and humus-rich soil with some added summer moisture. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                         Grossulariaceae

* Ribes sanguineum x malvaceum 'Pink Pearl'
   A Cistus introduction. Though this new cross should involve long story about an involved, Cistus hybridization
   program, in fact, this was a seedling in our garden ... for which we are happy to take credit. And yes, it's possible
   the world doesn't need another Ribes sanguineum cultivar, but this one's different ... with dense, hanging clusters
   of late winter flowers that open white and fade to a warm pink. Flowers very well and we believe represents a
   color combination not in the trade. Typical western native plant care is required in lean soil and dappled shade --
   though for this one full sun can't hurt --. with summer water to be applied sparingly and carefully only in cool
   weather. We expect frost hardiness to at least the bottom of USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                         Grossulariaceae

  Rohdea japonica ex. ‘Striata’                                                                             sacred lily
   These seedlings -- true to type from an 18”, evergreen perennial, the narrow leaves streaked with light cream
   ridges -- behave much like other members of the species, providing interest in the deepest darkest corners of the
   garden where nothing but Aucuba might survive. Small clusters of pale lavender to white flowers give way to
   impressive clusters of orange-red berries in autumn. Summer moisture speeds growth. Frost hardy in USDA
   zone 6.

        $18.00                                                                                               Liliaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                   84

  Rohdea japonica ‘Mure-suzume’
   Exquisitely variegated, miniature Rohdea with 8-12'' rosettes and diminutive deep green leaves streaked and
   margined cream and white. Very slow growing. Excellent as a pot specimen or in a small space in the woodland
   garden. Lovers of deep shade and even moisture for best growth. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6.

        $21.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

  Rohdea japonica 'New Moon'
   Petite selection of this Japanese iconic plant growing to about 12" in height and width with graceful narrow, deep
   green leaves, streaked and striped white. Small flowers lead to attractive red fruit from late fall through spring.
   Slow growing but tough; able to withstand the deepest shade or pot culture in dark rooms. Think
   Sanseverria...but wait, there's more. This little evergreen is frost hardy into USDA zone 6. Loves warmth and
   humidity in summer for fastest growth.

        $21.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

  Romneya coulteri                                                                                      matilija poppy
   Also known as ‘fried egg plant’ for its huge white flowers in late summer that look just like that. This is a big
   plant, fast-growing to 5 ft tall and forming large clumps of stalks with blue-green foliage and those fabulous
   flowers. HOT, DRY, DROUGHTY neglect is what it wants and lots of space. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $18.00                                                                                           Papaveraceae

* Rosa banksia 'Purezza’                                                                  repeating white bank’s rose
   This cross between the miniature ‘Tom Thumb' and Rosa banksiae var. lutescens is a rather large, vigorous,
   repeat blooming rambler or climber, to 15-20 ft, with large and abundant white flowers -- very close to a double
   flowering Bank’s rose. Thornless as well and resistant to black spot, mildew and rust! Blooms on old wood so
   easily pruned after flowering. Provide full sun and plentiful water then stand back and enjoy. Frost hardy in
   USDA zone 7, remaining completely evergreen in zone 8.

        $13.00                                                                                               Rosaceae

  Rubus idaeus ‘Aureus’
   Bright yellow foliage on this raspberry relative, to 1-2 ft tall and spreading by underground rhizomes. Good
   groundcover or cheerful accent. For best color, sun on the coast and, inland, bright light with protection from
   hottest afternoon sun. Typical, small white flowers in late spring. Enjoys well-drained soil with moisture.
   Drought tolerant once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

        $12.00                                                                                               Rosaceae

  Rubus parvifolius' 'Ogon'                                                                           japanese raspberry
   Deciduous, ground-covering shrublet, a selection of a Japanese native species also occuring in Australia. Lax
   stems are often prostrate but can reach up to 3 ft tall or so with rounded, three-part leaves, very golden in this
   form, and pink flowers in late spring. Grown primarily for the bright foliage, though edible red fruits may appear.
   Cool sun or afternoon shade in moist, rich soil with average summer water. Frost hardy to at least 0F, USDA
   zone 7, and possibly lower.

        $12.00                                                                                               Rosaceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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* Rubus pentalobus 'Sonya's Parasol'                                                    variegated creeping raspberry
   A sport of a most useful, groundcovering rubus, Sonya's Parasol maintains wonderfully cream-streaked, shiny
   green leaves on plants rarely exceeding 4" in height but spreading to form a small groundcover or container
   plant. We were thrilled to find this as our own variegated introduction was lost some years ago. Good for
   lighting the understory of small shrubs or shady nooks. Works in fairly deep shade to all but the most blasty full
   sun. Would like regular water in dry places. Frost hardy to upper zone 6.

        $13.00                                                                                              Rosaceae

  Ruellia makoyana                                                                                      monkey plant
   These old fashioned house plants bloom continuously with lip stick colored tubes pointing out in every direction
   above the velvety, white veined foliage. Classy like a pink Cadillac. We are hoping for someone to try a mass
   planting of these. Best with some shade, rich soils, and moisture. Cold hardy in USDA zone 10.

        $11.00                                                                                            Acanthaceae

  Ruschia namaquana                                                                                            ice plant
   Shrub to about 2 feet with clasping succulent leaves giving it the appearance of a strange sea creature rather than
   a desert shrub. One of the first succulents Sean received as a child from a defunct succulent nursery in the San
   Joaquin valley. Very drought tolerant as its Namaqualand origins would indicate, though it prefers to be damp in
   the winter for best growth. Full sun. Excellent pot specimen. Reliably hardy to just a bit under 20F, uppermost
   USDA zone 8; colder with protection.

        $12.00                                                                                              Aizoaceae

  Ruschia sp. ‘Calvinia Pink’                                                                          shrubby ice plant
   This South African succulent is both evergreen and very cold hardy, with small, blue-green leaves on 18" stems
   and, in late spring, lavender-purple, "daisy" flowers in profusion, nearly covering the 2 ft wide shrublet.
   Originally collected in the South Karoo by Panayoti Kelaidis of the Denver Botanic Gardens, these thrive in sun
   and well-drained soil with little summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

        $11.00                                                                                              Aizoaceae

  Sabal etonia
   A rather rare endemic to southern Florida that grows on sandy soil. Essentially trunkless and only about 6 ft
   high, the light green, blue-tinted leaves are quite fetching with unusual white threads. Surprisingly drought
   tolerant, though in cool summer areas should have water and fertilizer lavished upon it in the warm season.
   Relatively hardy, again for its native haunts, having survived temperatures in the low teens F, USDA zone 8, with
   little damage and recovering from brief dips in the single digits though losing its fronds.

        $16.00                                                                                              Arecaceae

  Sabal louisiana
   This close relative of Sabal minor, a particularly large growing form, to 6 or 8 ft or more with leaves infused in
   blue, often forms a very short trunk. Great for a large scale ground cover or individual specimen. Prefers
   well-drained but moist soil and loves summer warmth. Has proven frost hardy to 0, USDA zone 7 or so coming
   back from the base; and at 10 to 15F, mid zone 8 without leaf damage.

        $16.00                                                                                              Arecaceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                     86

  Sabal palmetto
   From seeds shared with us by fellow plant nut, Hayes Jackson, in Aniston, AL, from his quick growing
   specimen, one having survived a couple of dips below 10ºF no worse for wear. The state tree of South Carolina,
   this stately palmetto reaches 30 ft or more, though quickly in the southeast, quite slowly in the cool summer night
   West. Lovers of heat and consistent summer moisture: fast growing in any hot-summer-night area and slow to
   form a trunk elsewhere. Because it stretches from the coast of the Carolinas to the Gulf to the Caribbean, we are
   always on the lookout for northern forms. "Don't be dumb, get you some" -- Hayes Jackson 2002. Frost hardy
   in USDA zone 8.

        $16.00                                                                                                Arecaceae

  Sabal uresana
   A native to the foothills of the Sierra Madre Occidental, at elevations up to 4,500 ft in dry, stony scrub.
   Short-trunked plant with stunning deep blue-gray leaves on long petioles. One of the most beautiful sabals and
   frost tolerant to the mid to upper teens F with little damage but a little more protection is due in areas of cold wet
   winters. Plants have survived 8 to 10F, upper USDA zone 7, but for brief periods though its worth a little
   experimenting.

        $18.00                                                                                                Arecaceae

  Salix integra 'Hakuro-nishiki'                                                                         dappled willow
   For the sparkling look in the garden, this variegated willow has pink, white and green tones in the foliage. A
   deciduous, large shrub to small tree, to 6-10 ft tall and wide, has lightly drooping branches. For full sun to partial
   shade. Likes fertilizer and a bit of spring pruning to encourage variegation on new growth as well. Prefers
   occasionally wet soil for best color. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

        $12.00                                                                                                Salicaceae

* Salvia apiana                                                                                                  white sage
   Also called bee sage, these salvias create bee heaven in spring to early summer when tall stems of fragrant white
   flowers stand above the foliage. An evergreen perennial, with lance-shaped and aromatic, pale gray-green, almost
   white leaves on shrub-like stems to 3-4 ft tall and wide, this California native requires, sun, terrific drainage
   against winter's wet, and little summer water. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7 and lower, to zone 5, where
   winters are dry.

        $12.00                                                                                                Lamiaceae

* Salvia sonomensis 'North Fork'

    A Cistus introduction. Another plant from one of our favorite haunts, the canyons of the American River in the
    California Sierra Nevada. This high elevation collection, at nearly 5000 ft in yellow pines woods, produces dense,
    4" tall carpets of gray-blue leaves with little, stacked salvia flowers of lavender in spring. Lovely in West Coast
    gardens with mineral soil and very little summer water. It should be kept in mind that, with too much nurturing,
    this species can develop dead patches, to best kept lean in dappled shade to full sun. Particularly happy growing
    atop a mulch of pine needles or gravel. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                                Lamiaceae

  Sarcandra glabra
   Evergreen gound cover with shiny, serrated foliage, the leaves 4-6" long and half as wide. Plants form small
   mounds 1 to 3 ft high and wide. Small, yellowish flowers appear in May followed by 1/4" orange-red fruits
   (drupes) in autumn, remaining through spring. A woodland plant in its native Asian habitat; appreciates regular
   water and at least dappled shade in hottest climates. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                           Chloranthaceae



                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                  87

Sarcococca balansae BSWJ 7285                                                                                sweet box
 A collection in Northern Thailand by the intrepid Wynn-Jones of Crug Farm, this is one of the first of the "big"
 hardy, sweet box to make it into the US. Up to 6 ft tall with rather large, tropical-looking leaves and the fragrant
 white flowers you have come to expect in mid-winter. Cold hardy to USDA zone 8 in a sheltered site with
 moisture and shade. Very exciting!


      $15.00                                                                                                Buxaceae

Sarcococca orientalis
 Our selection of this exceedingly handsome, 4 ft, rather dense, evergreen shrub with 2" x 1" leaves set amid the
 layered branches, each festooned with flowers up to 1/3" from mid-fall to through late winter. Wonderfully
 fragrant. We have found this plant to be one of the most fully evergreen and rewarding of the genus. A great
 addition under other shrubs in nearly full shade to bright light, but best out of hottest afternoon sun in warm
 climates. Regular summer water and average fertilizing. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $16.00                                                                                                Buxaceae

Sarcococca ruscifolia                                                                                       sweet box
 Evergreen shrub, to 4-6 ft, quietly fills an empty spot in part to dense shade and bursts forth in winter with a
 remarkably sweet fragrance from an abundance of small, white, thread-like flowers. Red berries turn black and
 remain through summer. Branches root easily providing more plants for more winter fragrance. Regular summer
 water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $11.00                                                                                                Buxaceae

Sarcococca ruscifolia var. chinensis ‘Dragon Gate’
 Discovered in 1980 by Roy Lancaster in Yunnan China, and named Dragon Gate for the temple entrance near
 which it was found. With this prestigious provenance, a 4 ft, arching shrub with staunchly evergreen leaves,
 looking much like Danae racemosa. Very late autumn to mid winter flowers of creamy white followed by
 blue-black berries. A wonderfully fragrant and handsome addition to the winter garden. Tolerant of deep shade to
 nearly full sun in all but the hottest climates. Appreciative of some summer water where dry. Frost hardy in
 USDA zone 7.

      $15.00                                                                                                Buxaceae

Sarcococca saligna                                                                                       sweet box
 This winter-blooming shrub, with tiny white, thread-like flowers and delightful December to February fragrance,
 comes from the high mountains of Afghanistan. To 3 ft tall x 6 ft wide eventually, with densely held, evergreen
 leaves, narrow and tapered, dark green above and lighter beneath. Full sun to part shade with regular summer
 moisture. This form was shared with us by Western Hills Nursery. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

      $15.00                                                                                                Buxaceae

Sauromatum venosum                                                                                   monarch of the east
 Striking, tuberous Araceae, the spring flowers (spathe) mottled in fleshy pink to metallic maroon and followed by
 an attractive, single leaf on a 2-3 ft petiole. Stunning, especially in flower. Very tropical. Also aromatic, redolent
 of fly-attracting odors that can be mitigated by a spray of water or left to work their own kind of magic. Best in
 half sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

      $12.00                                                                                                 Araceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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* Saxifraga veitchiana                                                                                      rockfoil
   A lovely strawberry begonia shared with us by the Elizabeth C. Miller Garden in Seattle. Much like the classic
   pass-along plant, but possessing smaller leaves, evergreen and deep velvety green adorned with scalloped edges
   that could only be described as cute. White summer flowers appear in delicate sprays. Spreads gently by
   runners. Part shade to shade in moist soil with summer water in dry areas. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7. A
   very nice container plant or small scale groundcover.

        $11.00                                                                                           Saxifragaceae

* Schefflera arboricola BSWJ 7040                                                                     dwarf umbrella tree
   Nice, five to nine leafletted evergreen from southeast Asia collected by famous plants hunters Bleddyn and Sue
   Wynn-Jones. Exciting and unusual. Can be pinched for a compact shrub or pruned as a small tree and allowed
   to reach its full height of 10-15 ft over time. Best in partial shade with rich soil and regular summer water. Frost
   hardy in USDA zone 9B. A find pot specimen where temperatures drop into the low 20sF.

        $28.00                                                                                              Araliaceae

  Schefflera delavayi
   In our never ending search for garden hardy evergreen Schefflera relatives, here's one that's actually a Schefflera.
   This Himalayan species grows eventually to 6 or 8 ft and can have leaves in excess of 2 ft with an exquisite
   tawny indumentum. So far has proven hardier than even Fatsia to a low USDA zone 7!! Dappled shade is best
   with even moisture.


        $28.00                                                                                              Araliaceae

  Schisandra propinqua var. sinensis
   Shared with us years ago by plantsman Dan Hinkley, this small evergreen vine, to 6-8 ft, is replete with stems and
   petioles tinted burgundy and shiny, 3” leaves. The spring and summer flowers contribute another reddish
   element to the entire plant’s moody appearance. We have found it an attractive addition to the base of larger vines
   where woody stems are exposed and a useful spiller in containers. Suitable in both shade and sun with at least
   occasional summer water in either spot. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                          Magnoliaceae

  Scilla peruviana                                                                                         giant squill
   A Mediterranean bulb named for a South American country, botanists of the time having named it for The Peru,
   the ship that first brought bulbs to England. However it was named, this large flowered scilla is a huge hit in the
   early spring garden with 6-12" flower stalks of azure blue flowers resembling a hyacinth. Summer dormant with
   rosettes of strappy leaves emerging in fall. Full sun and well-drained soil. Drought tolerant though remains
   evergreen with summer water. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.

        $11.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

* Scilla scilloides                                                                                       chinese scilla
   Perennial bulb, also sold as S. chinensis and S. japonica, a dwarf squill found in rocky areas of China and Japan,
   unusal for flowering in autumn. The leaves are grassy and lax, to 10" long, and the fall flowers appear in pink
   racemes on upright stems to 6-12" tall. Self-sows to form a nice drifts in sun to part shade in well-drained soil
   with regular summer water. Tolerates drought but may go dormant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

         $9.00                                                                                               Liliaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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* Sedum acre 'Elegans'                                                                                  golden moss
   Little sedum, evergreen with densely held leaves, light green with creamy white variegations. Very sweet. To only
   2-3" tall in clumps to 8-12" wide. Summer flowers are bright yellow adding even more cheer above the foliage.
   Does well in full sun to bright shade with little summer water once established. Frost hardy to -40F, USDA zone
   3. Provide winter protection if you live north of the Canadian Shield!

         $6.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

  Sedum album 'Nigra'
   This most useful Mediterranean native sedum, a must-have for dry gardens and green roofs, has produced yet
   another good form, this with small-textured leaves that form a dense mat of deep-green-tinted-burgundy-brown
   foliage becoming even darker in winter’s cold. A very good contrast for lighter foliage and, as this is winter
   growing, a good weed barrier for Mediterranean annuals, such a problem on the West Coast. Sun to dappled
   shade; decently drained soil. A very successful container plant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

         $7.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

* Sedum 'Chocolate Ball'
   A new small sedum with entirely delicious, needled foliage -- like a teeny conifer -- in dark green with hints of
   black in summer, adding in dark red brown -- think chocolate -- in cold weather. To only 6-8" tall spreading to
   12-14" wide. A great groundcover for sun, well-drained soil, and occasional summer water for best appearance.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 8; reported hardy in zone 7 and even colder.

         $6.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

  Sedum makinoi 'Limelight'                                                                         limelight stonecrop
   A bright sedum for SHADE! A vigorous Japanese variety, compact and low growing with yellow flowers in
   summer and bright foliage forming evergreen mats to 2-4" tall x 12-24" wide. Lime-colored, succulent leaves
   have bronzy tones in colder weather adding color to any part of the garden. Also good in containers. Morning
   sun to dappled shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant once established -- after the first season. Said to be
   deer resistant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

         $7.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

* Sedum nokoense 'Mini'                                                                           japanese stonecrop
   Fairly new on the scene, this Japanese stonecrop from the edges of woods and rocky situation has leaves of less
   an 1/4" across, shiny green but reddening with summer drought or winter cold. The plants themselves rarely
   reach more than 1" in height and forming small mates. Any soil will do but this species needs to be kept a bit
   more moist than many. A great little sedum in situations too well watered for others. Frost hardy in USDA zone
   7.

         $1.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae

  Sedum pachyclados                                                                                     afghan sedum
   A lovely evergreen groundcover for the dry garden, this sedum from Pakistan and Afghanistan, to only 6" tall,
   forms a spreading carpet of small, succulent, blue-green rosettes. A great texture for the rock garden. Clusters of
   white flowers appear in mid to late summer. Does well in fertile to poor soil, well-drained of course, in sun to part
   shade. Drought tolerant once established but accepts summer water as well. Frost hardy to at least -20F, USDA
   zone 5.

         $5.00                                                                                            Crassulaceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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* Sedum reptans
   Evergreen succulent from Mexico with slender leaves, yellow-green to darker green, in small rosettes to only a
   few inches tall but spreading as branches touch the ground and root. Leaves take on red tints in summer sun and
   darker red color in winter. A bold textured groundcover for sun to part shade and little summer water once
   established. Not as frost hardy as some, taking temperatures in the upper teens F, upper USDA zone 8.

         $6.00                                                                                             Crassulaceae

  Sedum rubrotinctum                                                                                    jellybean sedum
   A trailing Mexican sedum, sometimes called Donkey tail for the stems that dangle as much as a foot. A succulent
   perennial, to 6-8" tall, with little leaves that become become rusty and rosy as they grow. Best in sun to light
   shade and well-drained soil with little summer water once established. Frost hardy to 25F, mid USDA zone 9,
   and lovely trailing over the sides of pots that can be moved indoors to a bright window where temperatures drop
   below.

         $5.00                                                                                             Crassulaceae

* Sedum spathulifolium 'Purpureum'                                                              purple broadleaf stonecrop
   Native succulent, forming mats of flat leaves in sweet, little rosettes, the bluish leaves tinged a striking purple in
   this cultivar, darkening further in winter. To only a few inches tall but spreading to 24" wide. Clusters of yellow
   flowers are produced in summer. Best in sun in coastal climate and light shade inland, neat and textured ground
   cover or garden accent. Likes well-drained soil and occasional summer water but tolerates some summer drought.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

         $5.00                                                                                             Crassulaceae

  Sedum spathulifolium ssp. anomalum [Italian Bar, CA]
   This variant of our own western native comes from the central Sierra Nevada and Tuolomne county in the region
   of Italian Bar -- not a place for cocktails but rather a series of beautiful cliffs along the Stanislaus River where
   this lovely creature forms compact carpets of deep green, shiny foliage, spreading quickly and quite happily. A
   good contrast with lighter blue succulents or an understory of native shrubs and grasses. Quite summer drought
   tolerant. This we suspect is of USDA zone 6 frost hardiness.

         $7.00                                                                                             Crassulaceae

* Sempervivum 'Dream Catcher'                                                                             hens & chicks
   Dark maroon leaves held tightly in small rosettes make this succulent a striking addition to the rock wall, outdoor
   container, hellstrip, or random little nooks and/or crannies. Offsets little chicks to form small colonies that are
   easily divided. For sun to part shade in any soil that drains well. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

         $4.00                                                                                             Crassulaceae

* Sempervivum 'Rita Jane'
   Hardy succulent for the rock wall, outdoor container, hellstrip, or random little nooks and/or crannies, this with
   rosettes of blue-gray leaves tinged red and gold and edged in purple. For sun to half shade in any soil that drains
   well. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

         $4.00                                                                                             Crassulaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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Solanum capsicastrum ‘Variegatum’                                                              false jerusalem cherry
 Not only are the leaves of this tomato relative edged and streaked with creamy silver but the round, bright
 orange-red fruit also exhibits stripes and marbling as well. (Decorative but not to be eaten!) Actually found in
 Madeira rather than the holy land, the green form has been long cultivated as a house and garden plant, enduring
 in old Portland gardens from the Victorian era. We like to promote this as an excellent, hardy shrub, to 2 ft tall,
 with white flowers in late summer and striking berries holding for most of the winter. Sun to part shade with
 regular was. Can also be grown as a house plant. Frost hardy and easy in USDA zone 8.

      $14.00                                                                                             Solanaceae

Solanum jasminoides 'Aureovariegata'
 Very useful vine for container or garden with its lovely green-centered, yellow-margined leaves -- as if a small,
 irregular green leaf were surrounded by yellow -- and clusters of white flowers. To not more than 5 to 8 ft in a
 much more diminutive way than its all-green cousin. Wonderful planted among roses or at the bases of Clematis
 where things get rather spindly down low, we have used it frequently in containers to contrast with maroons or
 cool down flowers of tangerine or pink. Loves to be babied with regular fertilizer and moisture but survives
 about anything. USDA zone 8; has survived zone 7 with a bit of mulch. In containers anywhere.

      $12.00                                                                                             Solanaceae

Sophora microphylla ‘Sun King’
 This Hillier’s introduction is hardier than either of its parents, withstanding temperatures in the upper teens F.
 Striking, vase-shaped shrub to 6 ft or so, loaded with large, luscious, bell-shaped, golden pea flowers over a long
 late spring bloom period. Evergreen foliage is dark, the leaves pinnate and fine-textured. Sun with average
 summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

      $18.00                                                                                               Fabaceae

Sophora molloyi ‘Dragon’s Gold’                                                                STEPHEN’S ISLAND KOWHAI

 Shrubby endemic from the Cook Strait, home of the prehistoric Tuatara “dragon”, New Zealands’s only living
 dinosaur. Dense growth, to 6 ft or more, and small, yellow, tubular flowers in spring. Generally evergreen, but
 may go deciduous in bad winters. Sun and summer water are best, but fairly drought tolerant once established.
 Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

      $16.00                                                                                               Fabaceae

Sophora prostrata ‘Little Baby’
 A smallish shrub from New Zealand with narrow wiry stems growing in a zigzag fashion, bearing pretty leaves
 with tiny leaflets. Golden orange pea flowers are produced late in the season. Best in full sun, lean soil and not
 much fertilizer. Most we’ve seen reach 4 ft or so in a Rastafarian tangle. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8, possibly
 into zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                               Fabaceae

Strobilanthes sabiniana
 From the childhood garden of plantsman and friend Derick Pitman. For part shade or dappled shade with
 summer water. Nice dark foliage with purplish veins and purple undersides, the foliage enhanced in summer by
 blue flowers. Frost hardy into the low 20s F, USDA zone 9, so a protected spot or container.

      $9.00                                                                                             Acanthaceae




                                 Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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* Styrax officinalis SBH 7443                                                                                showdrop bush
   Many people don't realize the West Coast has its own native snowbell, a delicate shrub to small tree, from 5-10 ft
   tall x 3-5 ft wide, with silver bark and a very interesting basil burl allowing it to resprout after, heaven forbid, fire,
   or the more likely unfortunate mowing accident. Leaves are rounded and heart-shaped, to about 2", and the
   showy flowers, appearing in spring to early summer, are particularly large, bells to 1". In our region quite happy
   to go deciduous in a dry summer but with careful garden watering can go on to produce vibrant yellow fall color.
   Lean soil is best in sun to part shade. Prefers summer drought once established but tolerates occasional water.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

         $14.00                                                                                                Styracaceae

  Symphoricarpos orbiculatus ‘Aureovariegatus’                                                               coralberry
   Old fashioned deciduous coralberry with knock your socks off variegation - green leaves with creamy white
   edges. Pale white-tinted-pink, mid-summer flowers attract bees and butterflies and are followed by bird friendly,
   translucent, coral berries. To 6 ft or so in most any normal garden conditions - full sun to part shade with regular
   summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 2.

         $12.00                                                                                             Caprifoliaceae

  Talbotia elegans                                                                                       false dracena
   One of the more peculiar South African, asparagus relatives, this lovely perennial, has rosette forming, deep green
   leaves, long and narrow on trailing stems, and star-shaped, white, flowers with a sweet, coconut scent we look
   forward to each spring. Makes a lovely shade to half sun container specimen or small-scale garden plant in
   USDA zone 8b or above. Slow growing, it seems to take the dimmest conditions … or gardeners like us on
   occasion … in stride. Likes even moisture, especially in container, and accepts any well-drained soil. Frost hardy
   in upper USDA zone 8 and above.

         $12.00                                                                                               Velloziaceae

  Tephrocactus articulatus var. strobiliformis
   Weird and wonderful opuntia relative from northwest Argentina, this form looking for all the world like a stack
   of conifer cones... or various other things the imagination might conjure. Lovers of heat, drought and sun. Decent
   drainage, summer water, winter drought with frost hardiness to a little below 20F, USDA zone 9 or so. Otherwise
   fabo container plant to amuse friends and frighten neighbors.

         $16.00                                                                                                 Cactaceae

* Teucridium parvifolium
   New Zealand shrub, to 5 ft tall or so, with dainty, mid-green leaves and mustard-yellow stems that beautifully
   accentuate the dark leaf petioles -- a most attractive effect. White, pendulous flowers appear in winter and early
   spring. An architectural plant with interesting color combinations and unusual texture for the garden. Best in
   dappled sun to shade in rich soil with some summer water. Evergreen in USDA zone 9 and upper zone 8;
   resprouts from the bottom of zone 8.

         $12.00                                                                                                 Lamiaceae

  Teucrium flavum
   Evergreen mounding subshrub -- 6 -12" x 18-30" across -- with the palest green leaves and cream to
   lemon-yellow flowers in spring and periodically through summer. As pretty in the winter as in summer and a
   great addition to the dry summer garden. Full sun to dappled shade; at its loveliest in brighter light and with
   well-drained, somewhat infertile soil. Particularly stunning when planted with darker green foliage or with
   contrasting dark blue or purple flowering plants. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

         $12.00                                                                                                 Lamiaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                   (* = new to mail order list)
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* Tibouchina urvilleana 'Variegata'
   This variegated form of a hugely popular, Brazilian exotic has handsome and unusual, velvety leaves with mixed
   colors ranging from pale, gray-green through yellow-green to dark green, with narrow white edging and hints of
   coral! The summer flowers are normal, if huge clusters of violet-purple flowers can be said to be normal. Bound
   to wow everyone. Full sun or part shade with regular water and fertilizer and mulch for winter protection. Root
   hardy to mid USDA zone 8 but flowers too late to enjoy. So where temperatures drop into the 20sF, best in
   containers kept dryish and protected in winter to blossom early the next year. Otherwise a great houseplant.

        $14.00                                                                                        Melastomataceae

  Tigridia pavonia                                                                                       tiger flower
   Beautiful irid widespread in Mexico, these high elevation collections produce 4” flowers of orange to dark
   yellow. Loves most garden conditions provided some summer water where dry. Will go happily winter dormant
   in the 20s F but resprouts again in spring, especially if mulched….even lower, to 10F, USDA zone 8, with more
   mulch… but there has to be a limit… Sun to dappled shade, spreading freely into attractive clumps. Good in
   containers.

        $11.00                                                                                               Iridaceae

  Trachelospermum asiaticum - bicolor variegated                                                    asian star jasmine
   Star jasmine with foliage beautifully streaked cream, green, and orange, this having been given by plantsman
   Barry Yinger to the JC Raulston Arboretum some years ago. Rather slow growing but a most attractive ground
   cover or container plant. Sun to part shade with occasional summer water. Has withstood winters below 0F,
   USDA zone 7.

        $15.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum asiaticum ‘Goshiki’
   Another wonderful star jasmine, an evergreen vine, to 6 ft, with leaves emerging pink and turning to cream and
   green. Fragrant yellow flowers add to the attraction. Can be kept as a mounding shrub as well. Light shade is
   best with some summer water. Frost hardy to the mid teens. F, mid USDA zone 8.

        $15.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum asiaticum ‘Kiifu Chirimen’                                                          asian star jasmine
   Extremely congested Asian jasmine from the Miniature Plant Kingdom who used it mostly for bonsai & penjing
   work. It is a standout in the rock garden or in the open garden. Rarely flowering, its evergreen leaves are very
   handsome, especially with the slightly crinkled finish to them. Best in full to part sun with summer water. Frost
   hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum asiaticum ‘Nagaba’
   Hardy flowering jasmine, to 10 ft or so, for trailing or climbing a wall, variegated foliage, marbled in white, green
   and red. Very nice. Flowers are fragrant and creamy. Full sun for best bloom but part shade is fine for foliage.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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* Trachelospermum asiaticum [NCSC, Japanese garden area]
   This plant, now growing in the JC Raulston Arboretum in North Carolina, was given to us some years ago by JC
   himself as an unknown jasmine. Chances are it is part of a collection brought from Japan and placed there some
   years earlier by Barry Yinger. Whatever it's proper name, it's lovely, with long narrow leaves splashed cream,
   white, and coral -- some leaves nearly completely white -- all accented by dark stems. We use this frequently both
   in container and as a small ground cover planting. Flowers if allowed to grow to the top of a stone wall or other
   support. Provide summer water for best vigor. Has withstood at least two winters dipping into USDA zone 6.

        $13.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum asiaticum 'Oblanceolatum'                                                           asian star jasmine
   Long in horticulture in the Willamette Valley, this vigorous ground cover or vine, to 8 ft, has narrow leaves (as the
   name suggests), wider at the base, deep green marked with silver that turns a most attractive purpley-bronze in
   winter. Sweetly fragrant creamy flowers if allowed to climb. Summer moisture for best growth. Sun to dappled
   shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum asiaticum ‘Ogon Nishiki’                                                           asian star jasmine
   This ever-colorful evergreen's leaves keep growing in yellow-orange-red-green marbled patterns along the
   ground, over a bank, up a trellis or a tree. Do you like the way the fresh new growth unfolds in the spring and the
   way the old growth colors in response to winter cold? I do too. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7. Sun to part
   shade. Adaptable. Summer moisture for faster growth.

        $14.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum asiaticum ‘Red Top’                                                                  asian star jasmine
   Hardy flowering jasmine, evergreen, to 10 ft tall or so, for trailing or climbing a wall. This one with deep, reddish
   bronze new growth is deep reddish bronze and dark bronze winter color. White flowers have a sweet and creamy
   fragrance. Sun to part shade with summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum asiaticum ‘Theta’                                                                 asian star jasmine
   A Cistus introduction, named for Sean’s mother, this extremely ornamental star jasmine has distinctve foliage --
   very narrow, under 3/8" wide x 2" long -- and a vining, scrambling habit, draping beautifully over walls, in a
   rockery, or in a container. Vigorous and hardy in full to part sun with some summer water. Frost hardy in USDA
   zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum jasminoides 'Madison'                                                               asian star jasmine
   A selection several years ago from Madison, Georgia where several species, some thought to be quite frost hardy
   were killed in a sub 0F freeze. This free flowering selection has 1 1/2" rounded leaves, quite felty on the reverse,
   and nearly 1/2" palest yellow flowers in great abundance in spring through early summer, then sporadically
   through fall. Makes a fine ground cover or pot specimen. One plant near our Portland home graces a 2 1/2 story
   chimney and is drop-dead gorgeous. Full sun to partial shade; at home in full shade but flowers more sparsely.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 7, possibly even brief dips into upper zone 6.

        $14.00                                                                                           Apocynaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Trachelospermum jasminoides ‘Mandianum’                                                           asian star jasmine
   From Bob McCartney in Aiken, South Carolina comes this exceptionally durable, hardy star jasmine, to 10-12 ft,
   with shiny, leathery, dark green leaves and fragrant, creamy flowers at the yellow edge of the species’ variation.
   Regular summer water in full sun for most fragrant bloom. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $12.00                                                                                            Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum jasminoides - marbled long leaf                                                       asian star jasmine
   This star jasmine with a rather dull name, brought from Japan just a few years ago, has leaves up to 4" x 1",
   marbled and streaked jade green, silver, and cream, blushing to a beautiful pink and maroon during the winter
   months. Not at all dull! It is also free flowering, especially when somewhat root bound in a container or grown
   in bright light,with large white flowers more sweetly scented than the...hint-of-electrical-fire fragrance of some
   star jasmine flowers. (You know you are a plant geek when you can walk amongst a star jasmine collection and
   tell them apart by their individual fragrances. We must get out more.) Full sun to full shade where it might make
   a beautiful contrast under darker leaved, broad-leaved evergreens. Reasonably fertile soil with regular summer
   water. A few nutrients never hurt. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                            Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum jasminoides 'Variegatum'                                                             asian star jasmine
   A pretty and delicate form brought from England in 1997, this cultivar is as vigorous as the species but the leaves,
   measuring about 1/2" x 2", are margined and streaked creamy white and plants show a great propensity for
   climbing. Sweetly scented flowers, more white than cream, in great abundance but small. Makes a wonderful
   contrast with other clinging vines with dark green leaves, e.g., creeping figs (Ficus pumila) or climbing evergreen
   hydrangeas (Hydrangea seamanii). We have used this in dark courtyards with such plants as variegated forms of
   Fatsia japonica and variegated Aspidistra to great effect. Shade to sun, though not likely to flower in deepest
   shade. Fertile, well-watered soil preferably. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

        $14.00                                                                                            Apocynaceae

  Trachelospermum jasminoides 'Wilsonii'                                                          asian star jasmine
   Tough evergreen vine to climb, scramble, or spread for a nicely textured groundcover. Leaves are dark green
   mottled with white marbling. Very glossy, very striking. Creamy white flowers are intensely fragrant in summer.
   Sun is best with some summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                            Apocynaceae

  Trachycarpus martianus [Khasia Hills Form]                                                himalayan windmill palm
   This most graceful Himalayan windmill palm, to 30 ft in time, is easily recognized by its narrow petioles and
   wide fans lined in short fur. The trunk often sheds its wool in age; unusual for a Trachycarpus. The entire tree
   has a decidedly more tropical effect than others of its genus and … well... for good reason.…It is. Unlike the
   below 0F frost hardiness hardiness of T. fortunei, 15 to 20F, mid USDA zone 8, seems to be the lower limit of
   this lovely plant. Enjoys sun and summer water. Plant where protected or use as a container plant.

        $19.00                                                                                               Arecaceae

* Trachycarpus takil                                                                               kumaon fan palm
   A vigorous chusan palm with exceptionally large fronds, standing upwards of 4-5 ft and bending in a uniform
   manner giving the tree a robust and almost weeping effect. Quick growth, sometimes more than 18" of trunk per
   year in happy times. Best in sun, though quite elegant in dappled shade, in rich soil with summer water where
   dry. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7 though fans can tatter below 10F, regrowing in summer.

        $12.00                                                                                               Arecaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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Trachycarpus wagnerianus                                                                       japanese temple palm
 To us the most exquisite of the Trachycarpus clan, found nearly 200 years ago in a temple in southern Japan and
 known only from cultivation. The stiff, symmetric leaves, looking as if shorn carefully at the ends, are lightly
 edged in white indumentum and often have most attractive pale blue undersides. Because of the rigidity of the
 leaves, they never tatter in high winds. Their most unique feature and what makes them most easily recognized is
 the several years spent resembling a miniature palm, as from very early on their fronds become "adult" -- even
 when only 4" or 5" across. Can be kept dwarf for many years but in the ground, with adequate summer water,
 they grow even more quickly than typical chusan palms, actually doubling in size for several years. Our 10 year
 old plants are now approaching 12-15 ft in height. (A small tidbit: though an incorrect entry, a palm book years
 ago confused T. wagnerianus with T. takil when actually they have little in common.) Best in bright sun. About
 as frost hardy as T. fortunei but shows damage less easily, e.g. no tattering. Our seed is produced from our own
 isolated plants. Woohoo! These plants already at least 4 years old and producing adult fronds. Frost hardy to 0F,
 USDA zone 7.
      $22.00                                                                                             Arecaceae

Trichocereus chiloensis var. eburneum
 Our collection of this black-spined cactus, found in the high mountains east of Santiago, Chile at the base of a ski
 resort. Reaching to 8-10 ft tall in their native habitat, these are handsome at any size with their cluster of black
 spines on top. Sun, of course. Occasional summer water speeds growth. Tolerant of winter wet if the soil is very
 well-drained. Provide protection where temperatures drop below 15F, mid USDA zone 8, or so.

      $16.00                                                                                              Cactaceae

Tricyrtis macranthopsis                                                                                       toad lily
 This, to us, is the gateway toadlily, an intriguing herbaceous perennial that turned us on to so many others worthy
 of growing. To 18” tall with weeping foliage of shiny bright green and, beginning in mid summer, large, 1”
 yellow flowers, bell-shaped and sometimes with minute polka dots or raspberry spreckles. A must-have in the
 garden for the scale and colors, the flowers sometimes continuing into December. Slower than some other
 species, but well worth it. Enjoys summer moisture, rich soil, and, for us, dappled late afternoon shade to avoid
 leaf burn. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.

      $12.00                                                                                               Liliaceae

Trillium angustipetalum                                                                        narrow petal wake robin
 Large trillium species, native in California and only slight beyond, this species related to the T. chloropetalum
 coast group in California and Oregon. To 15" tall, with wide, oval leaves, very horizontal, forming whorls up to 2
 ft across, sometimes mottled in darker green. Spring flowers are showy, dark red-purple when new, with the long,
 narrow petals described by the name. Summer drought tolerant, these are happy in dappled shade to light shade.
 Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $15.00                                                                                          Melanthiaceae

Trillium kurabayashii
 Described from near the mouth of Oregon’s Rogue River in the early 70s and endemic to that region as a
 northernmost form or representative of T. chloropetalum. These seeds, second generation and now 4 year plants,
 grow to 18” with purple mottled leaves and brick red to occasionally orange-yellow flowers. Prefers summer
 dry in dappled shade but not difficult. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.

      $18.00                                                                                          Melanthiaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Triteleia hyacinthina
   One of a large group of western native bulbs, this, a seed collection from Oregon's central Willamette Valley, is
   one of the most beautiful denizens of the open grassland and oak savanna -- of which very little remains -- often
   flowering from late April into May with pale lilac heads and onion-like leaves; often still in flower as their
   surrounding grasses and winter annuals have browned for the dry season. Great plant for the Mediterranean
   garden. Fine in heavy or light soils provided they dry and bake in summer. Each pot contains several large and
   small bulbs. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7, possibly 6.

         $9.00                                                                                Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

  Tropaeolum tuberosum ‘Ken Aslet’
   The tubers are edible on this very vigorous, climbing, perennial nasturtium with vibrant orange flowers in late
   summer. Give it good moisture, shade at its feet and something to climb and it will reward you all summer ... and
   feed you as well. Frost hardy in USDA zone 9.

        $11.00                                                                                         Tropaeolaceae

* Tulbaghia simmleri (fragrans) 'Alba'
   Grassy, garlic-scented leaves on this onion relative and, in spring and occasionally beyond, clusters of white
   flowers, very fragrant especially in the evening. Prefers rich, well-drained soil and moisture in the summer with
   protection from soaking wetness in winter. Containers work well. Foliage succumbs in the low 20s F. Bulb
   hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $11.00                                                                                        Amaryllidaceae

  Umbellularia californica - dwarf form SBH 7188
   A Cistus introduction. Another dwarf Oregon myrtle (or dwarf California bay), this one collected above the
   north fork of the Smith River just west of Oregon's kalmiopsis wilderness, each plant remaining under 4 ft in
   height. Another opportunity to have this wonderful species in the garden. Very good dense shrub, the evergreen
   leaves emerging bronze and aging to deep green. Small clusters of brush-like, yellow flowers produce shiny,
   green, nearly 1" “avocados” in autumn. Aromatic leaves can be used as seasoning (they are related to the
   Grecian Laurus nobilis). Should be an iconic shrub for the West Coast. Drought tolerant for sun or part shade.
   Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 5, at least.

        $15.00                                                                                              Lauraceae

  Umbellularia californica - dwarf form SBH 7204                                                dwarf oregon myrtle
   A Cistus introduction. Dwarf Oregon myrtle (or dwarf California bay if living south of 42 degrees north). A
   normally stately tree in the avocado family inhabiting western Oregon and coastal California, these Siskiyou
   endemic forms reach only 6-8 ft and remain a tight gumdrop shape for may years. This is an opportunity to have
   this wonderful species and yet not have it be the only plant in your garden. Very good dense shrub, the evergreen
   leaves emerging bronze and aging to deep green. Small clusters of brush-like, yellow flowers produce shiny,
   green, nearly 1" “avocados” in autumn. Aromatic leaves can be used as seasoning (they are related to the
   Grecian Laurus nobilis). Should be an iconic shrub for the West Coast. Drought tolerant for sun or part shade.
   Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 5, at least.

        $15.00                                                                                              Lauraceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                               (* = new to mail order list)
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* Umbellularia californica - dwarf form SBH [O'Brien Bog]
   A Cistus introduction. Dwarf Oregon myrtle (or dwarf California bay if living south of 42 degrees north). A
   normally stately tree in the avocado family inhabiting western Oregon and coastal California, these Siskiyou
   endemic forms reach only 6-8 ft as dense shrubs with evergreen leaves emerging bronze and aging to deep green.
   This clone becomes a dense, pyramidal form with leaves held upright displaying bluish undersides. A perfect
   chance to acquire this wonderful species in a manageable size. Small clusters of brush-like, yellow flowers
   produce shiny, green, nearly 1" “avocados” in autumn. Aromatic leaves can be used as seasoning (they are
   related to the Grecian Laurus nobilis). Should be an iconic shrub for the West Coast. Drought tolerant for sun
   or part shade. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6, at least.

        $14.00                                                                                              Lauraceae

  Urginea maritima                                                                                           sea squill
   Think of this as a eucomis with a serious attitude. Huge bulbs (up to 6" in diameter) throw up 5 ft tall,
   purple-scaped inflorescences with pale white to lavender flowers. Foliage grows from November on, going
   dormant in summer and blooming in August-September. Best in full sun with super drainage and very little
   summer water. Foliage is frost hardy to the low 20s and bulbs survive in upper USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

* Vancouveria hexandra                                                                               inside-out flower
   An excellent choice for out under the Doug Fir where you just can’t seem to get enough water for anything to
   thrive. This West Coast native is low growing, to only 8-12" tall, and produces charming tiny white flowers with
   a spot of red dangle in spring. Shade is best, possibly some morning sun, in fertile soil with mulch. Needs water
   to establish and tolerates prolonged drought thereafter. Evergreen in USDA zone 8; root hardy to -10F, zone 5.

        $12.00                                                                                          Berberidaceae

  Viburnum odoratissimum 'Variegatum'
   Large evergreen shrub to small tree, this one with occasional pale markings on the leaves. Grows up to 20 ft tall,
   with 6” leaves, leathery and densely held. Good for hedging or a single specimen, with spring clusters of sweet,
   white flowers and, at maturity, red berries aging to black that supply the birds with winter food. Sun to part sun
   with average water in summer. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8

        $14.00                                                                              Caprifoliaceae / Adoxaceae

  Viburnum plicatum 'Kern’s Pink'
   Beautifully layered deciduous shrub -- to 8 ft or so though easily kept smaller -- with ruffled leaves (think Lays
   potato chips) tinted rose-red and turning peachy to burgundy in fall. The pompom flowers are a rich cream to
   pink, a rarity in the viburnum world. Great for planting in light woodlands though perfectly at home in full sun if
   provided plenty of water. Hard to come by. Cold hardy to USDA zone 5.

        $16.00                                                                              Caprifoliaceae / Adoxaceae

  Viburnum propinquum                                                                                chinese viburnum
   Truly striking, evergreen viburnum, from central and western China, to 6-8 ft tall x 4-6 ft wide with shiny, dark
   green leaves on reddish stems. Late spring/early summer flowers are greenish white cymes followed by blue to
   black fruit in autumn. Average summer water in full to part sun; a bit of afternoon shade in hottest climates. Frost
   hardy in USDA zone 7. One of the best and a great substitute for the more common V. davidii.

        $12.00                                                                              Caprifoliaceae / Adoxaceae




                                   Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Wasabia japonica 'Mr. Kim'                                                              wasabi, japanese horseradish
   Native to Japan and usually found near or in mountain streams, but cultivated since the 10th century. A
   slow-growing perennial with large, handsome, heart-shaped leaves on 12-24" stems and a thickened rhizome that
   can be turned into the tasty and healthful wasabi powder. Blooms in late winter to early spring with small, white
   flowers on stems above the foliage. Prefers light to full shade in cool conditions -- moist, even boggy soil or
   water gardens. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.

        $17.00                                                                                              Brassicaceae

  Weigela 'Looymansii Aurea'
   Glowing yellow foliage emerges in spring and gradually fades to spring green on this handsome, deciduous
   shrub, to 4-6 ft tall and as wide. Pink flowers brushed with purple appear in late spring and early summer adding
   yet more bright cheer. Bright light with protection from the hottest sun keeps the foliage fresh along with regular
   summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

        $13.00                                                                                             Diervillaceae

* Woodwardia fimbriata                                                                                     giant chain fern
   The classic, redwood forest, understory fern, this monster can reach well above head height, up to 6 ft tall x 6-8 ft
   wide, in a moist, cool, shaded glen where the frost does not linger. Remains evergreen most winters. A sturdy
   native of the west coast, this clone has lingered where others fail. Rich, fertile soil with regular and plentiful
   moisture for best performance and size. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $14.00                                                                                              Blechnaceae

  x Fatshedera lizei 'Angyo Star'
   One of the most beautiful selections of this popular plant, this from Japan and shared with us by plantsman Ted
   Stephens. Can be used as a low climber to 5 ft, a container plant, or ground cover. Evergreen leaves, to 5-6", are
   margined creamy white against deep green. Should be frost hardy into the single digits, lower USDA zone 7.
   Though it has been successful in exceedingly dark places, happiest in light shade with supplemental summer
   water where dry.

        $18.00                                                                                                Araliaceae

  x Fatshedera lizei ‘Curly’
   This cross between ivy and fatsia is a winner in all respects. A viney shrub, non-clinging with somewhat lax
   stems that can reach 3 ft tall. This one has cute, curly leaves that add texture. Usually single stemmed, but
   branching can easily be encouraged by pinching the tips. As with others, it has been successful in exceedingly
   dark places, but prefers light shade with supplemental summer water where dry. Makes a fine houseplant. Frost
   hardy in USDA zone 8.

        $12.00                                                                                                Araliaceae

  x Mangave ‘Bloodspot’
   New and gorgeous, this hybrid between a unknown species of Agave and Manfreda has long, narrow, blue leaves
   liberally spotted in red with bright red teeth along the edges. Who wouldn’t want that? Rosettes are 1 ft tall x
   14” wide and hardly ever offset. Sun and lean, well-drained soil. That much is known. Winter hardiness is not
   completely known yet, but hardy so far to 20 degrees, USDA zone 9. Great for a container while experiments
   continue.

        $14.00                                                                                                Agavaceae




                                     Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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x Pyracomeles vilmorinii
 An interesting, arching cross between Pyracantha crenatoserrata and x Osteomeles subrotunda with small, lobed
 leaves, deeply cut, and profuse, white flowers followed by pink-red berries. Birds LOVE them. A 3-4 ft x 4-6 ft,
 semi-evergreen shrub for a sunny bit of your garden in moist, well-drained soil. Deciduous but frost hardy at the
 bottom of USDA zone 6 and possibly into zone 5.

      $15.00                                                                                                Rosaceae

x Sedeveria 'Jet Beads'                                                                          jet beads stonecrop
 This brightly colored hybrid of Sedum and Echeveria, to only 4" tall, has small, succulent leaves of bronze and
 green along stems creating a beaded effect and a striking bicolor texture. Foliage darkens to nearly black in
 cooler weather. Full sun to light shade in well-drained soil with little summer water necessary once established.
 Frost hardy to 25F, mid USDA zone 9. A fabulous addition to containers or troughs.

      $12.00                                                                                             Crassulaceae

Yucca aloifolia                                                                                      spanish bayonet
 One of the larger hardy Yucca, forming a trunk to 5-20 ft.... eventually. A great addition to the garden and fine in
 a container as well -- easy in both. Leaves are large, to 2 ft, sweeping, and sharply pointed. Mature plants produce
 spikes of white flowers tinged purple appear in early to mid summer. Full sun to half sun in well-drained soil.
 Easy. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.

      $14.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

Yucca angustissima 'South Side'
 A Cistus introduction. This diminutive relative of Y. elata occurs mostly north of the Colorado River in the area
 fondly regarded as the Arizona strip. Our collection, from the Hualumpai area, was found hanging from cliffs
 over the Grand Canyon creating a small “tree” to about 3 ft with compact, symmetric heads of leaves adorned
 with silver filifers. Eventually offsets forming a small colony. A beautiful plant for repetition or for container
 specimen. And a bit easier to grow than its larger cousin. Particularly beautiful where the sun can backlight the
 foliage. Drought tolerant though summer water where particularly dry can speed growth in dry areas. Frost hardy
 in USDA zone 5.

      $18.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

Yucca baccata                                                                            spanish bayonet, banana yucca
 This trunk-forming yucca is a knockout in the landscape with curving trunks -- up to 10 per plant -- that snake
 out and stand up to 8 ft tall. Green leaves are stiff and decorated with longish filifers. Very architectural! In early
 summer, short flower stalks carry abundant white flowers. Full sun with excellent drainage, and, for best
 appearance, occasional summer water. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5 and possibly colder.

      $15.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

Yucca baccata var. vespertina 'Hualampai Blue'                                                           banana yucca
 A new Cistus introduction. From our earliest days of botanically exploring the rich area from south western
 Utah to northern Arizona we’ve noticed the banana yucca, with forms there having upright, very blue leaves
 looking much like a misplaced sanseverria. This clone, from the south side of the Colorado river in Mojave
 County, is one of the bluest of the blue. Slowly offsetting clumps have upright leaves, to 4 ft or more, of pale blue
 adorned with curly filifers. The flowers, cream with nearly red bracts, rise to about 1/2 the leaf height ... but don’t
 hold your breath for the flowers. This is one of the prettiest yuccas we have come across. Tolerant of all kinds of
 miserable conditions including drought and poor soil but deserving decent drainage and little push of summer
 water in the driest spots. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4!

      $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae




                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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Yucca ‘Bright Star’ PPAF/COPF
 This mutant, an offspring of Y. gloriosa 'Variegata', has olive green and delightful, warm cream leaves, their
 variegation covering most of the leaf. Not as fast growing as its parent, but vigorous nonetheless. To about 18”,
 enjoying partial shade to full sun ... mostly shade in extremely hot summer climates. A definite bright spot in the
 garden or in container, it has been unfazed by temperatures of 14F and will probably go to about 10F, the bottom
 of USDA zone 8. Drought tolerant as with most yuccas but would enjoy occasional summer water to speed
 growth.

      $20.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Yucca elata - large form SBHMPS 6733
 As close to ‘It’ from the Addams Family as you can find in nature, this Cistus collected form is single-trunked
 and multi-branched yucca, to 10 ft tall and more, with long, hanging leaves and "gobs" of white flowers on tall
 stalks in summer. What's not to love? Sun, well-drained soil, and occasional summer water for best growth and
 appearance. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6, or lower.

      $15.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Yucca faxoniana
 It has been long thought that many of the tree yuccas of northern Mexico are not frost hardy, but recently many
 of us rosette-fanciers have discovered their toughness. Yucca faxoniana produces 3-4 ft rosettes of stiff,
 emerald-green leaves with symmetric, pearly cream to brown filifers adorning each leaf. Quick to form full sized
 rosettes; slow to build a trunk that eventually reaches to 16 ft or more; and slow to branch. Fastest when given
 plenty of root room, free draining soil, and some supplemental water in very dry summer places. Excellent
 container plants. Prefer bright light. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7 with some success in warm zone 6 with
 excellent drainage and protection from freezing winds.

      $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Yucca faxoniana [Albuquerque]
 Another of the tough Yucca faxoniana, this one collected near Albuquerque, New Mexico with the same 3-4 ft
 rosettes of stiff, emerald-green leaves, each leaf adorned with symmetric, pearly cream to brown filifers. Quick to
 form full sized rosettes; slow to build a trunk that eventually reaches to 16 ft or more; and slow to branch. Fastest
 when given plenty of root room, free draining soil, and some supplemental water in very dry summer places.
 Excellent container plants. Prefer bright light. USDA zone 7 with some success in warm zone 6 with excellent
 drainage and protection from freezing winds.

      $15.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Yucca filamentosa
 A fairly common yucca, especially in older neighborhoods of Portland. Still handsome and easy. Trunkless and
 clumping, with stiff, evergreen leaves, to 2.5 ft with thin filaments that shred from the leaf margins providing
 interest and texture. White flowers appear in summer on 3-6 ft woody stalks. Sun with some summer water for
 best appearance. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

      $15.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

Yucca filamentosa ‘Bright Edge’                                                               variegated adam's needle
 A handsome yucca, popular for its long, strappy and lax leaves, to 2-3 ft long, green-centered with gold margins
 and curly threads on the edges. Flowers are very showy, white on flower stalks to 12 ft tall. Excellent as a visual
 accent with leaf edges that aren’t sharp so it can line a path or border. Lean, well-drained soil in full sun with
 average summer water for best color, though tolerates some shade and some drought. Definitely frost hardy in
 USDA zone 7 and reportedly in USDA zone 5.

      $14.00                                                                                              Agavaceae



                                  Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                                                  102

  Yucca filamentosa ‘Hairy’
   Dazzling form of this southeastern native selected at the JC Raulston Arboretum in the early 1990s and just now
   becoming available. 3 ft, trunkless rosettes of soft-textured but wide, blue tinted leaves are adorned with
   particularly large numbers of curly white threads, giving the entire plant a dazzling cobweb effect. Wonderful
   placed where backlighting occurs. One of the easiest to grow species in any soil, with bright light to dappled
   shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Yucca filifera
   Tree forming yucca and one of the most sculptural, the trunk eventually forming a swollen base and slowly
   branching. To upwards of 15 ft tall, with 2 ft rosettes of tightly held blue-green leaves covered with delicately
   intertwining filifers. Fabulous garden or container specimen for full sun and well-drained soil. Happy with
   summer moisture and winter drought, though quite versatile provided temperatures don't drop below 15F for
   extended periods. Cold hardy into the mid teens, mid-USDA zone 8; colder with exceptional drainage.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

* Yucca gloriosa 'Tiny Star'                                                                         tiny star soapwort
   Charming yucca, small and slow growing, to only 18" tall x 3 ft wide eventually, with variegated leaves, creamy
   yellow edged in green. Fits well into a rock garden. A selection of a southeastern US native, introduced from
   Japan in the 1970s by plantsman Barry Yinger, this form accepts the usual yucca conditions, sun to light shade,
   well-drained soil, and occasional water in summer for best appearance. So far, none have been seen to flower.
   Frost hardy to at least 0F, USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Yucca gloriosa ‘Tricolor’
   One of the most useful of the trunk-forming, southeastern US native yuccas found growing from South Carolina
   all the way around to the Gulf side often within sea spray. 2-3 ft rosettes of upwardly pointed leaves and trunks
   as high as 4 ft, this form variegated with cream and light yellow and infused with pinks especially with winter
   frost. Tolerant and even fond of average garden water and very long lived in container. Very good focal point for
   the garden. Has been quite happy and frost hardy to mid USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

* Yucca linearifolia
   One of the most beautiful yucca species, related to Y. rostrata. The 3 ft rosettes atop an eventual 3-8 ft trunk
   resemble the Australian grass trees, xanthorroea, or a dim version of Dasylirion quadrangularis. Leaves are
   flattened and somewhat triangular, spring-green to nearly turquoise, and flowers are white on stalks to 3 ft or so
   above the foliage. Full sun to part shade with good drainage and lean soil. Best with occasional summer water.
   Found in a few scattered localities, these are from north of Galleana, NL, Mexico, in a most diverse habitat.
   Though the southern habitat would suggest little frost tolerance, these have so far withstood 5F, mid USDA zone
   7.

        $18.00                                                                                              Agavaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Yucca linearifolia 'Dusky Blue'
   One of the most beautiful yucca species, related to Y. rostrata. The 3 ft rosettes atop an eventual 3-8' trunk
   resemble the Australian grass trees, Xanthorrhoea, or a dim version of Dasylirion quadrangularis. Flattened
   somewhat triangular leaves of spring green to nearly turquoise and white flowers to 3' or so above the rosette.
   From only a few scattered localities, these from north of Galleana, NL, Mexico, in a most diverse habitat. This
   form is particularly blue and quite vigorous adding 6-8" of trunk each year. Our plant often elicits comments
   from garden visitors. The southern habitat of the species would indicate lack of frost tolerance but plants have so
   far withstood 5F, mid USDA zone 7. Full sun to partial shade and summer water with, as always, well-drained
   soil.

        $18.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

* Yucca nana [Rob Larkin]
   This segregate from the earlier named Y. harrimoniae is essentially a dwarf relative of the tree-like Y. elata. This
   from further west, in southwestern Utah, has nearly trunkless rosettes of 1/2" wide, bluish leaves adorned with
   attractive filifers, each rosette smaller than 6" or so and colonizing slowly. These plants look almost more like a
   delicate agave than a yucca. For sun to part shade where drainage is decent. Best provided with a bit more water
   and soil room for improved vigor. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.

        $14.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Yucca periculosa
   From semi-arid slopes at mid to high elevations in southern Mexico, this small tree, to 20 ft or so and eventually
   branching, forms multiple rosettes of blue-green leaves, with evenly spaced, small filifers and outward facing
   flowers. For sun, lean soil, and dry places but enjoys an occasional summer thunderstorm. Has been unusually
   tolerant of frost for its southern latitude habitat, being reliable to about 20F, USDA zone 9, and a bit lower if
   winter dry. Otherwise a particularly nice container plant for many years, appearing like bonsai with its swollen
   caudex of a trunk.

        $15.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Yucca recurvifolia ‘Gold Ribbons’
   A Cistus introduction. This large growing native, from the Carolinas to the Gulf in sandy spots, forms a stunning
   rosette of weeping leaves and eventually a trunk to 4-5 ft. The plant is useful in all forms but Y. r. ''Gold
   Ribbons', can serve as a striking focal point or container plant with its blue dusted leaves and wide center strip of
   deep creamy yellow. We have used it as a substitute for the more spectacular, gold variegated, New Zealand flax
   (Phormium) in exposed or particularly frosty areas. Did we say spectacular? Fairly dry to quite damp conditions;
   decent drainage a plus. Full sun to dappled shade. Not advisable to let too many leaves collect in the crown if in
   shade. USDA zone 7; 6 in protected spots.

        $16.00                                                                                              Agavaceae

  Yucca recurvifolia ‘Marginata’
   Soft leaves on this large, handsome yucca are green-centered and yellow-edged, 3 to 4 ft and arching from a 3 ft+
   trunk. Large trusses of open white flowers in summer. Extremely useful in a container, but happy in the garden
   as well. Full sun is best. Drought tolerant but appreciates occasional summer water. Cold hardy in USDA zone
   6b.

        $18.00                                                                                              Agavaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)
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  Yucca rigida
   Bold textured relative of the stunningly gorgeous Yucca rostrata, spending its very long youth as a 2 to 3 ft
   rosette of 1"wide, silver-blue leaves, eventually forming trunks to 5 to even 8 ft with small candelabras of white
   flowers in summer at maturity. This species from northern Mexico requires full sun to dappled shade in the most
   deserty areas and a touch of additional water in the driest spots. Not particular about soil as long as its not sitting
   in water. Our plants are putting on about 6" of trunk each season. Frost hardy in warm USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Yucca rostrata [Black Gap, TX collection]
   From the Big Bend region of Texas this colony, forming the northernmost habitat for the species and the only
   one in the United States, gives a beautiful cast to the entire landscape. Growing to over 10-12 ft, occasionally
   branching into small trees with 4-5 ft rosettes, they are truly a stunning creature and a perennial in my top 10
   favorite plants. That says a lot! Ours are seed grown and beautiful as garden or pot specimen with many
   hundreds of leaves in each, rustling like grass off a thickened trunk…but wait, there’s more! As an already frost
   hardy yucca, this is a northern colony, plants of which have survived in USDA zone 5, making it one of the two
   frost hardiest tree yuccas.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

  Yucca rostrata ‘Sapphire Skies’
   A Cistus introduction. Although Yucca rostrata is one of the most gorgeous species available, and definitely one
   of our top 500 favorite plants, it is exceedingly slow to reproduce from offsets, seed is difficult to come by, and
   seedlings vary as to their...blue-osity. Yucca rostrata 'Sapphire Skies' is a selection from one of our collections in
   the early 90s in northern Mexico, out of a seed batch of stunning blue-leaved plants. Through the magic of tissue
   culture, we now have a reliable source. These vigorous young plants quickly form a 3 ft, multi-leaved rosette of
   nearly jade-blue, forming 3 to 4 ft plants in 7 or 8 years under good conditions, eventually to 10 ft or more.
   Excellent container plants, providing fine architecture, or repeated in the dry garden and looking of dusty blue
   fireworks from a distance. Particularly beautiful reflected in late afternoon/evening light. Full sun to dappled
   shade. Not particular about soil, excepting standing water. Some supplemental irrigation in dry summer places.
   Frost hardy in USDA zone 7; has been successful in zones 5 and 6 including the Denver Botanic Garden
   (Really!).

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

* Yucca schottii                                                                         schott's yucca, mountain yucca
   From the mountains of southwestern New Mexico, a hardy yucca, single-trunked in youth to about 6 ft tall x 4 ft
   wide; multi-trunked and up to 20 ft tall with time in optimal conditions, the leaves -- to 3 ft long and
   gray-blue-green -- are sharply pointed and, though stiff, are more flexible than other tree-forming yuccas. Early
   summer flowers are white on tall stalks. For sun to part shade and very drought tolerant, this is an excellent
   garden species and very frost hardy, accepting temperatures to -10F, USDA zone 6.

        $14.00                                                                                               Agavaceae

* Yucca torreyi                                                                           torrey's yucca, spanish dagger
   Picturesque, very large yucca with leaves in excess of 4 ft, eventually forming a large shrub or small tree, usually
   single trunked, to 10 ft and taller with great age. Mature plants produce white bell flowers on 4 ft spikes, usually
   in spring but not every spring. Native from southwestern Texas to the mountains of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon,
   Mexico, this represents a particularly blue-leaved form from south of the border. Best with lean soil and good
   drainage in full sun or very light shade. Drought tolerant but faster growing with occasional summer water.
   Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.

        $16.00                                                                                               Agavaceae




                                    Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
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Zantedeschia aethiopica ‘Hercules’                                                                 hercules calla lily
 A truly large form of calla lily that we obtained from Western Hills Nursery in Occidental, CA, bigger in both
 leaves and flowers -- and, of course, better. Leaves are spotted with cream dots and 8-10”, white flowers appear
 in early spring on stalks up to 6 ft tall. Full sun to part shade with adequate summer water. Frost hardy in
 USDA zone 7. Bulbs can be mulched or lifted in colder climates.

      $16.00                                                                                                Araceae

Zantedeschia aethiopica - super dwarf form
 Given to us many years ago by Western Hills Nursery's Marshall Olbrich, one can only say these are "cute",
 especially the calla. To only about 20" tall and quickly clumping, with mostly evergreen leaves, only 4-5“ across
 as are the flowers. Drought tolerant though can sit in standing water at least in the summer seasons. Leaves will
 frost down only below 20F; ground hardy into USDA zone 6 if well mulched.

      $15.00                                                                                                Araceae

Zephyranthes 'La Buffa Rosea'                                                                       giant prairie lily
 This lovely rain lily, discovered in 1990 in Tamaulipas, Mexico by Yucca Do Nursery, begins flowering mid
 summer, producing multitudes of six-petalled, 3" stars on 12" stems in colors ranging from white to blushed
 pink to pink. The evergreen foliage is shiny and grass-like, to only 6-10" tall, forming clumps to 4-6" across.
 Wonderful as single plants or in drifts in sun to light shade with occasional summer water. Frost hardy in
 USDA zone 7. Thought to be a natural intergeneric hybrid between cooperia and cephyranthes, rain lily expert
 Thad Howard suggests the proper name would be x Cooperanthes 'Labufaroseas'. So far, zephyranthes remains
 the species, though the cultivar has many spellings, including variations on 'Labuffarosea'.

      $14.00                                                                                         Amaryllidaceae




                                 Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                 (* = new to mail order list)
                                                                                        106




                                 We are:


                 Deborah Chaffee, Client Services, Editor
                     Alison Henderson, Propagator
          Nathan Limprecht, Nursery Manager, Retail Manager
                     Sean Hogan, Owner, Manager
                     Jim Mecca, Business Manager
                   Alec Schmidt, Production Assistant
                    Anya Stewart, Nursery Assistant
           Jessica Tenenbaum, Assistant Production Manager
                   Ryan Wilson, Production Manager



                               We are also:

Extremely grateful for all of our wonderful interns, volunteers, and fellow
               plantsmen in town and around the globe.




                       Thanks for your interest.
               We’re open just about everyday from 10-5.
                         Come out and visit.




                           Cistus Nursery
                           22711 NW Gillihan Road
                           Sauvie Island, Oregon 97231
                           503.621.2233 / 503.621.9657 fax
                           Info@cistus.com




          Spring 2010 Mail Order Catalog                                (* = new to mail order list)

				
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