Exchange Visitor Handbook - University of Cincinnati

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					                                                        Table of Contents
Content                                                                                                                                   Page
 How to use the Services Provided By UC International Services .......................Inside                                              Front Cover
Welcome to the University of Cincinnati .........................................................................                         1
I. Immigration Issues
     Purpose of Exchange Visitor Program .....................................................................                            2
     Important Immigration Documents ...........................................................................                          2
        Forms .......................................................................................................................     2
        I-94 Entry Permit ......................................................................................................          2
        Passport ...................................................................................................................      2
        VISA .........................................................................................................................    2
     Student and Exchange Visitor InformationSystem (SEVIS) ...................................                                           3
        SEVIS Fee ...............................................................................................................         3
        Who must Pay the Fee ...........................................................................................                  3
        Fee Payment Process ..............................................................................................                4
     Visa Application and Initial Admission to the United States ..................................                                       5
        Visa Application Process .........................................................................................                5
        Security Checks .......................................................................................................           5
        Exchange Visitors Not Subject to Passport and Visa Requirements ......................                                            7
        Visa Expiration/Renewal ..........................................................................................                8
     U.S. - Visit Entry/Exit System ....................................................................................                  8
        Upon Arrival .............................................................................................................        8
        Upon Departure .......................................................................................................            8
     Special Registration Requirements for Certain Non-Immigrants ..........................                                              9
        Who is Required to be Registered? .........................................................................                       9
        What are the Requirements? ...................................................................................                    9
        Frequently Asked Questions about NSEERS ..........................................................                                9
     Maintaining Your Status .............................................................................................                13
        iOffice .......................................................................................................................   14
     Visits for Spouse and Children .................................................................................                     14
     Employment ................................................................................................................          15
     Duration of Status and Extension of Program ........................................................                                 15
     Limitations of Stay .....................................................................................................            15
        Professors and Research Scholars .........................................................................                        15
        Short-Term Scholar ..................................................................................................             15
        Students ...................................................................................................................      16
        Specialists ................................................................................................................      16
        Repeat Participation .................................................................................................            16
     Transfer of Program ...................................................................................................              16
     Change of Category ...................................................................................................               16
     Termination of Program .............................................................................................                 18
     Travel Abroad and Re-entry .......................................................................................                   18
        Entering Another Country .........................................................................................                18
        Re-entering the United States ..................................................................................                  18
     Two-Year Home Country Physical Presence Requirement ....................................                                             18
        Government Financing .............................................................................................                19
         Exchange Visitor Skills List ......................................................................................              19
      Waiver of the Two-Year Home Country Requirement .............................................                                       19
         Effects of Waivers on Extensions .............................................................................                   21
      Change of Exchange Visitor Status to Another Status ...........................................                                     22
      Dependents of Exchange Visitors ............................................................................                        22
         Eligibility Requirements ............................................................................................            22
         Obtaining a J-2 Visa and Entering the United States ...............................................                              22
         Employment of J-2 Dependents ...............................................................................                     23
         Travel Abroad and Re-entry .....................................................................................                 23
         Study ........................................................................................................................   23
         Change of Status .....................................................................................................           23
         Departure or Termination of Program ......................................................................                       24
II. Packing and Travel
      What to Bring to the US .............................................................................................               24
         Clothing ....................................................................................................................    24
         Finances ..................................................................................................................      24
         Special Items ...........................................................................................................        24
         Linens, Beddings and Room Furnishings ................................................................                           25
      Tips on Travel .............................................................................................................        25
      Housing ......................................................................................................................      26
         Off-Campus Housing .............................................................................................                 26
         Lease Agreements ...................................................................................................             26
      Money and Banking ...................................................................................................               27
         Banks .......................................................................................................................    27
         Types of Accounts ...................................................................................................            28
         Foreign Currency .....................................................................................................           30
III. Arrival in Cincinnati
      How to Get to UC ........................................................................................................           30
IV.Taxation Issues
         Important Dates, Documents and Forms .................................................................                           31
V. For Assistance
         On-Campus Assistance ...........................................................................................                 32
         Tenant-Landlord Issues ..........................................................................................                32
         General Legal Counseling .......................................................................................                 32
         Cultural Adjustment and Other Issues .....................................................................                       32
      Campus Security ........................................................................................................            33
         Nightwalk .................................................................................................................      33
      Health Care and Insurance Requirements ..............................................................                               33
         University Health Services .......................................................................................               33
         Exchange Visitor Health Insurance ........................................................................                       34
VI. Living in the U.S.
      Cultural Issues ............................................................................................................        34
         Social Invitations ......................................................................................................        35
         Hygiene ....................................................................................................................     35
         Individualism and Privacy ........................................................................................               35
         Directness and Assertiveness .................................................................................                   35
         Friendship and Dating .............................................................................................              36
     American Holidays ....................................................................................................               36
     Major Holidays Explained..............................................................................................               36
VII. Campus and Community ............................................................................................
       Campus Events & Programs.................................................................................                          38
       Worldfest Celebration...............................................................................................               38
       International Friendship Program.............................................................................                      38
       International Education Week...................................................................................                    38
       UC International Services listserv "The Advisor" .....................................................                             38
       International Student/Scholar Organizations............................................................                            38
     Campus Services and Attractions..............................................................................                        39
       Campus Tours ..........................................................................................................            39
       On-Campus Dining ..................................................................................................                40
       On-Campus Attractions ............................................................................................                 40
       Flex $$ or Bearcat Cards .........................................................................................                 40
       Emergency Assistance .............................................................................................                 40
       Parking .....................................................................................................................      40
       Shuttle Bus Service ..................................................................................................             41
       Stores .......................................................................................................................     41
       Mail ...........................................................................................................................   41
       Recreation/Exercise .................................................................................................              41
     About Cincinnati .........................................................................................................           42
       The City ....................................................................................................................      42
       Winter Weather Health Tips .....................................................................................                   42
       Coping with the Effects of the Dry Air ......................................................................                      43
       Transportation ..........................................................................................................          44
     How to Obtain an Ohio Driver’s License .................................................................                             44
       Auto Insurance .........................................................................................................           46
     Dining, Entertainment & Shopping ...........................................................................                         46
       Dining ......................................................................................................................      46
       Bars and Coffee Shops ............................................................................................                 47
       Restaurants ..............................................................................................................         48
       Entertainment .........................................................................................................            51
       Amusement Parks ...................................................................................................                51
       Dance .......................................................................................................................      51
       Festivals in Cincinnati .............................................................................................              51
       Fine Arts ..................................................................................................................       52
       Local Sports .............................................................................................................         52
       Movies .....................................................................................................................       52
       Museums and Other Attractions ...............................................................................                      53
       Music ........................................................................................................................     54
       Theater ....................................................................................................................       54
       Parks ........................................................................................................................     55
       Discounts .................................................................................................................        56
       Shopping ................................................................................................................          56
       Bookstores Off-Campus ...........................................................................................                  56
       Clothing ....................................................................................................................      56
       Food Shops ..............................................................................................................          57
        Grocery and Drug Stores .........................................................................................            58
        Ice Cream, Bakeries, and Sweetshops ....................................................................                     58
VIII. Useful Web Sites about UC & Cincinnati
        University of Cincinnati ............................................................................................        58
        The City of Cincinnati ...............................................................................................       59
Appendices
       Campus Map (West Campus) ....................................................................................                 61
       Campus Map (East Campus) .....................................................................................                62
       Form DS-2019 ............................................................................................................     63
       Map of Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Airport ................................................                          64
Advertisements
       Barlett & Weigle Co., L.P.A. ........................................................................................         12
       Hammond Law Group LLC. ........................................................................................               12
       efollet Bookstore .........................................................................................................   17
       CInco Credit Union.....................................................................................................       28
       PNC Bank...................................................................................................................   29
       Cinco Credit Union......................................................................................................      45
       Cincinnati Symphony...................................................................................................        47
       UC Mobile ...................................................................................................     Inside      Back Cover
                      Welcome to the University of Cincinnati
The Exchange Visitor Handbook has been prepared by the staff of UC International Services. All of us in
UC International Services join the faculty, staff, and students in welcoming you to the University of Cin-
cinnati. We hope that your stay here will be both pleasant and successful.
This handbook has been prepared in an attempt to provide you with the information you will need to begin
your program at the University of Cincinnati and to explain those situations most frequently encountered
by our University of Cincinnati J-1 exchange visitors. Please take the time to read the handbook carefully.
Please give special attention to the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) section.
It is important that you understand the regulations you must follow.
The University of Cincinnati is a large and exciting international community. During 2009-2010, 2,300
students and 498 scholars from over 120 different countries were on campus. UC International Services
staff members advise international visitors on a wide range of topics which include immigration matters,
social and cultural differences, financial matters, and personal concerns. We provide programs designed to
help our visitors and their families quickly adjust to life in the United States. A listserv designed specifically
for international visitors (The Advisor), will keep you up-to-date regarding educational, social, and cultural
activities and changes in immigration regulations. Please make sure you subscribe to UC International
Service's "The Advisor" upon your arrival.
UC International Services is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. We are located in Room 3134
Edwards Center One. Our phone number is (513) 556-4278. If you wish to meet with a staff member, you
should call and make an appointment. We encourage you to make an appointment whenever possible.
Be sure to bring your passport and immigration papers with you when you visit the office, especially if
your question is about immigration regulations.

          Important Note
All new exchange visitors must check in with UC International Services in Room 3134 Edwards Center
One upon arrival at the University of Cincinnati so your SEVIS Record can be made active. Bring all your
immigration documents with you (passport, DS-2019, and I-94 card). ALL NEW EXCHANGE VISITORS
MUST REPORT IN AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. At the time you check in, you will receive information about
obtaining an identification number that you can use until you can obtain a U.S. Social Security number.
You will also receive information about a mandatory orientation you must attend.
Again, welcome to the University of Cincinnati, and best wishes for a successful academic and personal
experience.

          UC International Services Staff
Director:                           Ronald B. Cushing
Assistant Director:                 James Tenney
Advisors:                           Deborah Jones, Jennifer Kutzko, Janet Schneider, Andrea Siouris
Program Coordinator:                Kelly Waikel
Receptionist:                       Greg Williams
Graduate Assistants:                Stephanie Talbot, Collin Noronha, Corri Monks, Zach Darrows
Student Helper:                     Sarah Bickers
Credit:                             Cover design by Sarah Bickers



                                                       1
I. Immigration Issues
                       Purpose of Exchange Visitor Program
The purpose of the Exchange Visitor Program at the University of Cincinnati is to provide courses of study,
lecturing, and research opportunities in our various fields of instruction and research for qualified students,
professors, research scholars, short-term scholars, and specialists to promote the general interest of in-
ternational education and cultural exchange. The activities for your particular exchange visitor program,
as well as the category most appropriate for those activities, will be indicated on the Form DS-2019. It is
your responsibility to make sure you engage in only those activities specified on the Form DS-2019.

                          Important Immigration Documents
        Forms
DS-2019: Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor Status (J-1 Visa)
    1. Facilitates the entry of a new participant of the Exchange Visitor Program.
    2. Extends the stay of an exchange visitor.
    3. Facilitates program transfers.
    4. Facilitates entry of an exchange visitor’s spouse or minor unmarried children into the United States
       separately.
    5. Facilitates re-entry of an exchange visitor who is traveling outside the United States during the
       program.
    6. Facilitates a change of category when permitted by the Department of State (DOS).
    7. Updates significant changes in information about the exchange visitor program

        I-94 Entry Permit (Arrival/Departure Record Admission Number)
The I-94 is the small white card in your passport on which the visa classification and the expiration date
of your authorized stay are written when you enter the U.S. All Exchange Visitors should have J-1 writ-
ten as the visa classification. "D/S"(Duration of Status) refers to the period during which you pursue your
stated program. Upon completion of your program, you have 30 days in which to depart the country. If
you lose your I-94 card, you must file an application form I-102 to replace the card with USCIS. The I-102
can be obtained from UC International Services or U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). A
fee of $320.00 must be submitted with the application. After the details of your entry are verified, a new
I-94 will be mailed to you.

        Passport
A passport is your country’s identification of you as a citizen. Your passport must remain valid at all times.
It is not allowed to expire. You may renew it by contacting your Embassy/Consulate within the U.S.

        Visa: Stamped Page in Passport
A visa normally is a stamp placed in your passport by an official of the United States (or the country you
are entering). IT IS NECESSARY TO RENEW AN EXPIRED VISA ONLY IF YOU ARE GOING TO LEAVE
THE UNITED STATES AND RETURN AFTER IT HAS EXPIRED. Keep in mind, a visa only admits you
to the United States. Having a valid visa does not mean you are in proper immigration status.


                                                      2
      Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS)
As a J-1 exchange visitor you will become part of the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System
(SEVIS). SEVIS is a national tracking/monitoring system that will allow the U.S. government to monitor
and track various events during your program of study. The University of Cincinnati will be required to
provide the following information through SEVIS:

     1. Your name                                6. Date of commencement of program
     2. Date and place of birth                  7. Field of study
     3. Country of citizenship                   8. Program extensions
     4. Address                                  9. Termination date and reason
     5. Status (arrived or not)                  10. Documents related to your admission

You will learn more about SEVIS at orientation upon arrival at UC. However, before you enter the U.S., you
need to understand that once you have arrived, you must be committed to following all the rules related
to your status. Any violations of status will be reported to the U.S. government. Individuals who do what
is required of their status will not be greatly affected by SEVIS.

        SEVIS Fee
Before applying for a J-1 visa, you will be required to pay a fee of $180, called the “SEVIS fee”, to the
U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Individuals who are not required to obtain a visa (Canadian
researchers) will be required to pay this fee before entering the United States. The fee can be paid by mail,
by credit card through the internet, or by Western Union (made payable to the Department of Homeland
Security). If your visa has been denied, you do not need to pay the fee again if you re-apply for the visa
within 12 months of the denial.

        Who must Pay the Fee
You will be required to pay this fee if:

     · You are seeking a J-1 visa from a U.S. Embassy or Consulate for initial attendance at a university
       or initial participation in an exchange program. The fee must be paid before applying for the
       visa.
     · You will enter the U.S. in J-1 status, but are not required to have a visa. The fee must be paid
       before you apply for admission to the U.S.
     · You are applying for a change of status to J-1. The fee must be paid before you submit your
       change of status application.

The fee is NOT required:

     · For J-2 dependents.
     · For J-1 participants in an exchange program sponsored by the U.S. federal government.
     · If your immigration status is J-1 and you are transferring from another school, program, or program
       category.
     · If you are requesting an extension of your program or course of study.
     · If you paid the fee but your application for a J-1 visa was denied and you are re-applying for the
       same status within 12 months of the denial.


                                                     3
        Fee Payment Process
Option #1: Payment by Credit Card
DHS has set up a website to accept electronic submission of Form I-901 and payment of the SEVIS fee
using a credit card. Go to http://www.fmjfee.com. We strongly recommend that you use this option if possible.
Follow the on-line instructions. Print out the payment screen to verify your payment. Take the payment
verification printout with you to your visa interview. Exchange visitors from the following countries are not
eligible to use the credit card and must use option #2 or option #3 : Cameroon; Ghana; Kenya; Nigeria.
Option #2: Payment by Western Union
This option allows Western Union to collect the SEVIS fee in local currency. This option is only available
in countries where Western Union offers its “Quick Pay” service. A properly completed Western Union
receipt serves as immediate proof of payment for the visa interview. You must request a “Blue Form” by
clicking on “Payment Services” or “Quick Pay.” More instructions for paying using this option can be found
on the SEVIS website at http://www.ice.gov/sevis/i901/wu_instr.htm. To find the nearest Western Union
agent location go to http://www.payment-solutions.com/agent.asp
Option #3: Payment by Check or Money Order
When paying by check or money order there are two options:
    A. Internet-generated coupon. Go to the fee payment website (http://www.fmjfee.com), enter basic
       information, print out a coupon, and then mail a check or money order with the coupon to a lock-
       box address in Missouri. Once the information and fee are processed, SEVIS will then be updated
       with the fee payment information.
    B. Paper option. You can download or otherwise obtain Form I-901, fill it in, and mail it, with a check
       or money order, to the specified address in Missouri. Once the information and fee are processed,
       SEVIS will be updated with the fee payment information.
In both cases, a receipt notice will be issued when the fee is processed. The mailing addresses for paying
by check or money order using the coupon or the paper Form I-901 are:

P.O. Box Address:                                        Street Address for Courier/Express Delivery:
I-901 Student/Exchange Visitor Processing Fee            I-901 Student/Exchange Visitor Processing Fee
P.O. Box 970020                                          1005 Convention Plaza
St. Louis, MO 63197-0020                                 St. Louis, MO 63101

Check Specifics:
All checks and money orders must be:
    • Payable to the “I-901 Student/Exchange Visitor Processing Fee”.
    • Only checks and money orders may be used when paying by mail.
    • The check or money order must be made in U.S. dollars and drawn on a bank located in the U.S.
Payment of the SEVIS fee is not limited to the exchange visitor. DHS will accept fee payment from a third
party individual or institution, either in the United States or abroad, using any of the options above.
The fee must be paid at least three business days prior to the scheduled date of your visa interview in
order for the payment information to show up on the SEVIS system. You should bring your I-901 receipt
with you to your visa interview. The paper receipt can be used as verification in place of the internet
verification.

                                                     4
Completing Form I-901:
    A. You must have a Form DS-2019 in order to complete the I-901.
    B. You must have the University of Cincinnati’s Exchange Visitor Program number. UC's program
       number is P-1-00733.
Exchange Visitors from Canada or Bermuda:
Exchange visitors from Canada and Bermuda are exempt from having to apply for a visa. You will have
to provide SEVIS fee payment verification, along with your DS-2019 Form, to an immigration inspector at
the port of entry when applying for entry into the United States as a J-1 exchange visitor.
If your Visa is Denied:
If your visa is denied you may reapply for the visa within a 12-month period, without having to pay the
SEVIS fee again.
Dependents:
If you have obtained a DS-2019 for a spouse or children, they do not have to pay a SEVIS fee in order
to apply for a J-2 visa.


      Visa Application and Initial Admission to the United States
        Visa Application Process
Most foreign nationals are required to have a valid passport and visa to enter the United States. Upon
receipt of your Certificate of Eligibility (DS-2019), you will need to make an appointment with the American
Consulate or Embassy having jurisdiction over your place of permanent residence. In theory, you may
apply for a visa at any consular post in the world. In practice, the administrative officer at the post may or
may not accept applications from individuals residing outside the jurisdiction of that post.

        Security Checks
Due to the tragic events of September 11, 2001 in the United States, many visa applicants will be checked
against databases maintained by the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation). This new security procedure
will delay visa issuance by 20 days or more. If you are from Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Sudan,
or Syria, you will be subject to a security check. If you are studying/working in one of the following fields,
you will likely be subject to a security check:
(1) Conventional Munitions: technologies associated with warhead and large caliber projectiles, fusing
and arming systems, electronic counter measures and systems, new or novel explosives and formulation,
automated explosive detection methods and equipment.
(2) Nuclear Technology: technologies associated with the production and use of nuclear material for peace-
ful and military applications. This includes materials, equipment or technology associated with nuclear
physics or nuclear engineering.
(3) Rocket Systems: technologies associated Rocket Systems and unmanned Air Vehicles including bal-
listic missile systems, space launch vehicles and sounding rockets, cruise missiles, target drones and
reconnaissance drones.
(4) Rocket System and Unmanned Air Vehicle Subsystems: technologies associated with propulsion in-
cluding solid rocket motor stages and liquid propellant engines. Other critical subsystems include re-entry
vehicles, guidance sets, thrust vector controls and warhead safing, arming and fusing.


                                                      5
(5) Navigation, Avionics and Flight Control Usable in Rocket Systems and unmanned Air Vehicles:
These capabilities directly determine the delivery accuracy and lethality of both unguided and guided weap-
ons. Associated technologies include: Internal navigation systems, Tracking and terminal homing devices,
Accelerometers and gyroscopes, Rockets and UAV and flight control systems, and Global Positioning
systems (GPS).
(6) Chemical, Biotechnology and Biomedical Engineering: associated technologies used to produce chemi-
cal and biological weapons.
(7) Remote Sensing, Imaging and Reconnaissance: technologies associated with satellite and aircraft
remote sensing including military and intelligence reconnaissance activities, drones and remotely piloted
vehicles.
(8) Advanced Computer/Microelectronic Technology: Advanced computers and software that play a use-
ful role in the development and deployment of missiles and missile systems, and in the development and
production of nuclear weapons, over-the-horizon targeting, airborne early warning targeting, and Electronic
Countermeasures (ECM) processors.
(9) Materials Technology: technologies related to the metallic, ceramic and composite materials for struc-
tural functions in aircraft, spacecraft missiles, undersea vehicles and propulsion devices.
(10) Information Security: technologies associated with cryptographical systems to ensure secrecy of
communications video, data and related software.
(11) Laser and Directed Energy Systems: technologies associated with laser guided bombs, ranging de-
vices, and lasers having critical military applications.
(12) Sensors: technologies associated with marine acoustics, missile launch calibration, night vision de-
vices, high speed photographic equipment and magnetometers.
(13) Marine Technology: technologies associated with submarines and deep submersible vessels, marine
propulsion systems designed for undersea use and navigation, radar, acoustic/non-acoustic detection;
(14) Robotics: technologies associated with artificial intelligence, automation computer-controlled machine
tools, and pattern recognition technologies.
(15) Urban Planning: technologies associated in the construction or design of systems necessary to sustain
modern urban societies including architecture, civil engineering, community development, environmental
planning, geography, housing, land use and urban design.
Before you apply for the visa, you should understand the process and the rules governing visas.
Many visa applications fail. In some countries, most applications fail. Often it is because the exchange
visitor did not know the rules or was not prepared. We do not want this to happen to you. Please read
what follows very carefully.
The most important rule may seem strange to you. The consular officer who makes the decision on your
visa application is required to think of you as someone who plans to come to the U.S. permanently, and
you must prove that you intend to return to your country after completing your project. U.S. law very clearly
states that J visas may be given only to persons who intend to remain in the U.S. temporarily. This rule is
the number one reason that J-1 visa applications are denied.
You must document ties to your home country. If you are employed and going on sabbatical, bring a letter
from your employer. If you own a business, take letters from a bank, describing the business, to the visa
interview. If you own property, take the deeds. Do not emphasize any ties you may have to the United
States or to family members in the United States.



                                                     6
Other important rules are: (1) You must have a definite professional objective. You must know what you
are going to study and where it will lead; (2) You must be qualified for the program; (3) You must be ad-
equately financed and have documents to prove it; (4) You must have proficient English skills to carry out
your program.
U.S. government officials are convinced more easily by documents than by spoken statements. When
possible, have papers to show your connections to your home country. The consular officer will take a
very legalistic view. In the U.S., it is considered important to be impersonal when administering laws. This
is considered rude or improper in many countries, but not in the U.S., where the ideal is to apply laws
equally to all regardless of status or sex. Do not try to negotiate or discuss personal matters.
A valid passport and a properly executed Form DS-2019, completed and signed must be presented to
the consular officer.
You also will be required to present other documents that may be requested by the consular officer to
establish that you are a bona fide non-immigrant exchange visitor, have adequate financial support, and
meet all of the other requirements for exchange visitor status, including having a residence abroad that
you have no intention of abandoning.
If the consular officer approves the visa application, he or she will stamp the visa in your passport and note
the period of validity of the visa and the number of entries for which the visa is valid. The consular officer
also will note in the space on the lower left corner of Form DS-2019 whether, in his or her judgment, you
are subject to the two-year home country physical presence requirement. The notation is a preliminary
finding; the Department of State will make the final determination.
Upon arrival at the U.S. port of entry, present your passport, visa, and Form DS-2019 to an immigration
officer. If you are found to be admissible to the United States, the immigration officer will return the Form
DS-2019 to you. The officer will annotate the Form I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record), with the date and
place of your admission to the United States, the immigration classification (J-1 for exchange visitor and
J-2 for dependents), and the abbreviation “D/S” which stands for “duration of status”. The immigration
office will return the I-94 form to you.
You will not be permitted to enter the U.S. more than 30 days prior to the scheduled start date of your
program as indicated on your DS-2019. You will also not be allowed to enter more than 30 days after
the scheduled start date on your DS-2019. You must report to UC International Services within
this 30-day period.

        Exchange Visitors Not Subject to Passport and Visa Requirements
Certain exchange visitors are not required to have a valid passport or visa for entry to the United States.
The most common examples are Canadian citizens entering the U.S. by land or sea, and citizens of the
Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Such individuals should be in-
structed to apply directly to an immigration officer at a U.S. port of entry for admission as a J-1 exchange
visitor, bypassing the procedure of applying for a visa. The procedure at entry is the same as that described
previously, except that you are not required to present either a passport or a visa. Landed immigrants
of Canada can no longer apply for a visa at a U.S. port of entry. They must apply at a U.S Embassy or
Consulate. (Note: Canadians who enter the United States by air must have passports).

        Temporary Admission with Form I-515A
If you have lost or misplaced your Form DS-2019, or for other reasons are unable to produce that form
at the port of entry, you should ask to be admitted on a Form I-515A. In such a case, the immigration of-
ficer will determine if you have a valid J-1 visa and are qualified in all other respects for admission as an

                                                      7
exchange visitor. The officer may admit you to the United States in exchange visitor status for a period of
30 days and issue the Form I-515A. That form instructs you to submit Form DS-2019 and I-94 by mail to
the USCIS office having jurisdiction over your place of activity. Upon receipt of these forms, the USCIS will
convert the date on Form I-94 to "duration of status" by striking out the date and writing “D/S”. The valid
DS-2019 and original I-94 should be submitted so that the DS-2019 can be marked “D/S”.
If the immigration officer at the port of entry is not able to determine that you are eligible for admission
as an exchange visitor, the officer may parole you into the United States for “deferred inspection”, which
requires that you report in person to a USCIS office.

         Visa Expiration/Renewal
This procedure is only necessary when you intend to travel outside the U.S. and the visa stamped in your
passport is expired. To get your visa renewed you will need a valid passport, a properly executed DS-
2019, proof of financial support and/or letter of certification and, evidence of ties to your home country.
You must visit the American Consulate/Embassy office in the country you are visiting in order to get the
new visa issued. A J-1 visa cannot be renewed in the U.S.


                               U.S. - Visit Entry/Exit System
U.S.-VISIT is a U.S. Department of Homeland Security program that enhances the country’s entry and
exit system. It enables the United States to effectively verify the identity of incoming visitors and confirm
compliance with visa and immigration policies.
The goals of U.S.-VISIT are to:
    · Enhance the security of citizens and visitors
    · Expedite legitimate travel and trade
    · Ensure the integrity of the immigration system
    · Safeguard the personal privacy of visitors
The initiative involves collecting travel information and “biometric identifiers” (such as fingerprints, using
a simple, inkless device) from visitors to assist the border officer in making admissibility decisions.
The identity of visitors who need a visa to travel to the U.S. will be verified upon their arrival and departure.
These entry and exit procedures address the critical need for tighter security and our ongoing commitment
to expedite travel for the millions of legitimate visitors we welcome each year to conduct business, study,
see family, or tour the country.

         Upon Arrival
At an airport or seaport, travel documents such as your passport and visa will be reviewed, and a U.S.
Customs and Border Protection Officer will ask specific questions regarding your stay in the U.S.
As part of the enhanced procedures, you will have two fingerprints scanned by an inkless device and
a digital photograph taken. All of the data and information is then used to assist the border inspector in
determining whether or not to admit you.

         Upon Departure
You must return your I-94 card to the airline, ship or border representative when departing the U.S.


                                                       8
Note: Effective May 2007, international travelers are no longer required to checkout at a U.S.-VISIT exit
kiosk. For more information ion U.S.-VISIT, please consult www.dhs.gov/us-visit.


  Special Registration Requirements for Certain Non-Immigrants
As a result of the U.S.A. PATRIOT Act passed by Congress and signed into law by the President in the
wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist acts, non-immigrants from certain countries are required to reg-
ister their presence with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). This requirement is known as the
National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS). Anyone subject to NSEERS must update their
registration at certain pre-determined intervals and notify the DHS of any change of address, employment
or educational institution. Prior to any departure from the U.S., these individuals must notify DHS of their
intended departure AND may only depart the U.S. from certain authorized airports.

        Who is Required to be Registered?
Non-immigrants from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Sudan and Syria who enter the U.S. are required to register with
the DHS. Individuals from other countries may be required to register in NSEERS at the discretion at the
port of entry official!

        What are the Requirements?
Individuals to whom these procedures apply must:
    1. Register with DHS upon entering the U.S.
    2. Be interviewed by DHS within 30 – 40 days of entering the U.S.
    3. Be interviewed again by DHS one year after entering the U.S.
    4. Continue to be interviewed by DHS on the anniversary date of the last admission to the U.S.
    5. Inform DHS within 10 days of any change of address, change of employer or change of school.
    6. Notify DHS of departure by departing the U.S. from a designated port of departure. Cincinnati is
       a designated port of departure.

        Frequently Asked Questions about NSEERS
I am a non-immigrant who was born in one of the five countries, but who is now a citizen of another
country. Do these requirements apply to me?
Yes. The law applies to anyone born in one of these countries. Also, individuals who may have been born
elsewhere, but are citizens of these countries are also subject to this requirement.
I am a non-immigrant who is not from one of these countries. These procedures do not concern
me, right?
Maybe. Maybe not. A U.S. consular officer or a DHS inspector may determine that these procedures apply
to you if you are engaged in work or study in a field that may have national security implications.
How do I register?
Initial registration occurs when you enter the U.S. from abroad. At the time you go through immigration
inspection, if these procedures apply, you will be taken into another room. You will be fingerprinted
and photographed. Also, you will be given detailed information about what to do regarding mandatory
interviews.


                                                     9
After I enter the U.S., when do I have to go for my first interview?
Once you have entered the U.S., you are required to be interviewed by a DHS officer 30 to 40 days
after you have arrived. For example, if you arrive on September 1, you must report to the DHS between
September 30 and October 9 to be interviewed.
Do I have to schedule an appointment?
No appointment is needed. You must show up at a designated DHS office. It is recommended that you
arrive there early in the morning so you can be seen and interviewed the same day. It is suggested that
you inform the DHS security guard that you are there as a result of the special registration process.
Can I go to any DHS office?
No. You can only use the DHS offices that have been authorized to conduct such interviews.
In Cincinnati, the office is:
                       Department of Homeland Security
                       U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement
                       550 Main Street, Peck Federal Building
                       Room 4001
                       Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
What if I am unable to make it to the interview during the required interview period?
You can apply to the DHS for a waiver of all or part of the registration requirements if you become ill such
that hospitalization is required. Otherwise you are expected to appear during the interview period.
When I go to the interview, what should I bring?
You should bring your Form I-94 and any written documents available to show the DHS officer that you
are doing what you said you would be doing at the time of your admission to the country. You should bring
proof of your residence (lease, deed, etc.).
                                                                                                 J-1 Scholar, H, O, TN visa
                      Visitor for Business                 Student
                                                                                                 holders, etc.
                      • Hotel Receipts                     • Class schedule                      • Pay stub, if paid by UC
 Documents to Bring




                      • Cab Receipts                       • Official notification of grades     • Employment contract or letter of
                      • Ticket stubs for places visited    • Student identification card and      appointment

                      • Documents showing where            evidence of participation in ex-      • Letter of invitation if not paid by
                       you have stayed                     tracurricular activities (if appli-    UC
                                                           cable)                                • Letter from UC International verify-
                      • If staying with friends or rela-
                       tives, documents showing their      • Letter from UC International         ing your status with UC
                       name, like a postmarked enve-       verifying that you are a UC stu-
                       lope or bill                        dent in good standing


If I have just arrived, I will not have such things as transcripts or pay stubs. What should I do
then?
Bring whatever documentation you have to demonstrate your legitimate stay in the U.S. (contract letters,
letters of invitation, etc.). Prior to going to the DHS for the interview, you should check in with UC International
Services to obtain a letter verifying your status at UC.
What can I expect during this interview?
You will again be fingerprinted and photographed. The DHS officer may ask you questions regarding your

                                                                         10
stay and may ask questions about any documents you bring with you. Answer each question as best you
can. Try to remain calm and be cooperative.
What if the DHS asks me a question that doesn’t have anything to do with my immigration
status?
This is a possibility. Under current immigration law, you are required to answer any question asked of you
by the DHS, even if there appears to be no relevance to the question. Truthfully answer the question as
best you can. Try to remain calm and be cooperative. Do not lie, under any circumstance.
Do I ever need to be re-interviewed? If so when?
If your stay in the U.S. extends to a year or more, you will be required to report to the DHS on each
anniversary of your admission. You will have a ten-day window from the anniversary date of your admission
to the U.S. to report. In the example above, we assumed you entered the U.S. on September 1, 2006. In
2007, you would need to report to the DHS between September 1-10, 2007.
Will these interviews differ from the initial one done after 30 days of entering the U.S.?
They should all follow the same pattern. By then, you should be fairly settled into your routine and you
should have plenty of documentation to present to show that you are a legitimate exchange visitor. Be
sure to keep any documentation evidencing an address change, job or school change, etc.
How do I notify DHS of changes in address?
Most exchange visitors who are in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information (SEVIS) do not need
to complete the special Form AR-11 SR. Instead you must notify UC International Services within 10
days of moving. You can do this using the SEVIS Update Form found at http://www.isso.uc.edu/forms/
f1/f1_Sevisupdate.pdf.
What do I need to do if I travel outside the U.S.?
You must notify the DHS and leave only through a designated port of exit. If you fail to depart the U.S.
from a designated departure port, your re-entry to the U.S. may be denied.
Can I leave the U.S. from the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Airport?
Yes. The Greater Cincinnati /Northern Kentucky Airport is an approved departure port. UC International
Services also maintains a list of these ports at http://www.cbp.gov/linkhandler/cgov/travel/id_visa/nseers/
nseers_ports.ctt/nseers_ports.pdf
What if I drive to Canada or Mexico on holiday?
Again, you can only use certain designated ports. Consult the list of ports and plan your trip accordingly.
What if I do not comply with this program?
If you fail to comply with these registration requirements, you will be considered to be out of status. You
may be subject to arrest, detention, fines, and/or removal from the U.S. This could impact any future
plans you may have to apply for any immigration-related benefits. Decisions regarding the impact of any
noncompliance will be made on an individual, case-by-case basis. If you fail to depart the U.S. from a
designated departure port, your re-entry to the U.S. may be denied.




                                                    11
                   IMMIGRATION LAW
                             Bartlett & Weigle Co., L.P.A.
                                   Attorneys at Law
                                  432 Walnut Street, Suite 1100
                                    Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
                                     Phone: (513)241-3992
                                   Facsimile: (513)241-1816
                                  E-mail: bartlettlaw@fuse.net
                       Visit our home page at: http://www.bartlettlaw.com

Bartlett & Weigle Co., L.P.A. is a full service Immigration            William T. Bartlett
firm, practicing all aspects of employment based immigration            Douglas S. Weigle
(labor certification, priority workers, national interest waivers),      Darrell S. Wright
J waivers, H-1B’s and family petitions.                                Matthew L. Benson
                                                                         Justin W. Bartlett




                                                     12
                                   Maintaining Your Status

The responsibility for maintaining your immigration status lies with you. There are several requirements
you must follow to maintain status:
Requirement to Keep Your Passport Valid.
Your passport must be valid at all times. Renewal applications must be made with the Embassy or Con-
sulate of the country issuing the passport. You will need a certification of exchange visitor status from the
University of Cincinnati (this can be obtained from UC International Services). Addresses of embassies and
consulates are available from the U.S. Department of State website at: http://www.state.gov/countries.
Requirement to Report Address Changes to UC International Services.
You are required to report any address change to UC International Services within 10 days of the address
change. This includes address changes of any of your dependents as well. To report a change of address
go to https://ioffice.uc.edu/ and submit a "Change in U.S. Address" e-form.
Requirement to Obtain Prior Authorization from UC International Services to Drop Below a Full
Course of Study.
If you are a student, you are required to pursue a full course of study during normal enrollment periods
(Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters). The Reduced Course Load Certification must be completed prior to
dropping below full time status. Full time at the University of Cincinnati is 12 credit hours for undergraduate
students or 10 credit hours for graduate students not receiving a scholarship. You are allowed to deviate
from this full course of study only with PRIOR authorization from a UC International Services advisor,
and only under very limited circumstances including illness, completing all required course work (graduate
students) or being in your last quarter of study. To request this, you will need to submit a Reduced Course
Load e-form by going to https://ioffice.uc.edu/.
Requirement to Report Departure Date and Reason to UC International Services.
For a variety of reasons, exchange visitors leave the University early or unexpectedly. You are required
to inform UC International Services if you plan to leave the University, and the reason for doing so. You
can do this by submittng a departure e-form at https://ioffice.uc.edu/.
Requirement to Abide by Employment Regulations.
Exchange Visitors are permitted to work for UC on the project for which you were brought to campus.
Additional campus jobs unrelated to your project are not permitted. Occasional lectures can be made but
only with prior authorization from UC International Services.
Transfer to Another Institution/Sponsor
You are currently authorized to attend the University of Cincinnati. If you decide to attend another school in
the U.S., you must notify UC International Services of your intent to transfer and the name of the school to
which you intend to transfer. This is done by submitting a transfer request e-form at https://ioffice.uc.edu/.
UC International Services will then enter a "Release" date in SEVIS. After this date is reached the new
school can issue a DS-2019 to you.
Requirement to Apply for an Extension of Program.
You must apply for an extension of your program prior to the expiration date on your Form DS-2019 if
you cannot complete your program by that date. Requests for extensions should be submitted to UC
International Services prior to the expiration date on the Form DS-2019 so the extension process can be
completed before the expiration date on the document. Exchange Visitiors must have their sponsoring
department submitt an e-form request by going to https://ioffice.uc.edu/.
Requirement for Receiving Authorization to Travel.


                                                      13
You must notify UC International Services prior to traveling outside the U.S. so that your DS-2019 can be
endorsed for travel or a new form can be issued, if required. Your DS 2019 form must be signed within
the past 12 months or your reentry will be denied. Exchange visitors must complete and submit to UC
International Services the Travel Request e-form at least 5 days prior to the anticipated travel date, al-
though you are strongly encouraged to submit the e-form even earlier. The e-form can be found at https://
ioffice.uc.edu/.


Requirement to Provide Documentation of Dependents.
You must notify UC International Services of any accompanying dependents in J-2 status and provide
biographical information (e.g., full name, address, country of birth, etc.) and immigration information (e.g.,
passport information, visa information, etc.) about those dependents using UC International Services
"Request for Spouse and Children e-form". UC International Services is required to report information to
the DHS and/or DOS regarding your dependents. The e-form can be found at https://ioffice.uc.edu/.
IMPORTANT NOTE: This information is not exhaustive and is subject to change without notice. Ex-
change visitors should contact UC International Services at 513-556-4278 with questions on any of the
information presented above. To keep up with changes in immigration law and UC International
Services policies, you need to be subscribed to "The Advisor", e-mail listserv. Instructions for
subscribing to "The Advisor" can be found at https://listserv.uc.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A0=uc-isso



           iOffice

All requests for J-1 Exchange Visitor benefits must be submitted electronically using UC International
Services’ iOffice database. To submit a J-1 Exchange Visitor request please go to: https://ioffice.uc.edu.
Click on the "login" button under the “Full iStart Client Services for Students and Scholars” link. Enter your
UC 6+2 login information. Then you can select specific eform requests from the menu. Most requests
will be found in the "J-1 Scholar Services" link. The following e-form requests can be made:

Academic Training                                      Add a New Dependent
Certification Letter                                   Extension of DS-2019
In-Absentia Verification                               Notification of a New Degree Program
Reduced Course Load for Academic Reasons               Reduced Course Load for Medical Reasons
Replace Lost DS-2019                                   SEVIS Transfer Out
Travel Signature Request                               J-1 Departure Certification Form


                             Visits for Spouse and Children
As an exchange visitor you must obtain a DS-2019 to send to dependent family member(s) who wish
to visit you. The family member(s) will use the DS-2019 to support their application for a J-2 visa at the
American Embassy or Consulate in their home country. The embassy or consulate will require evidence
that you have adequate resources for their support. As such, you must furnish proof of financial support
to UC International Services in the amount of $4,000 per year for a spouse, and $2,000 per year for each
child, in addition to the amount needed for your own expenses plus the cost of health insurance.



                                                     14
                                                 Employment
You may receive compensation from the University of Cincinnati for employment when such activities are
part of your program. If you engage in unauthorized employment, you shall be in violation of your status
and subject to termination as a participant in the exchange visitor program. The acceptance of employment
by an accompanying spouse or minor child of an exchange visitor is governed by USCIS regulations and
is discussed in the “Dependents of Exchange Visitors” section of this handbook.


                     Duration of Status and Extension of Program
When you are admitted to the United States as an exchange visitor, you are issued a Form I-94 (Arrival/
Departure Record) which will be marked “D/S” (duration of status) for the validity period. Your form DS-
2019 is also annotated to reflect “D/S”. This means you may remain in the United States as long as you
maintain J-1 status, until 30 days after the termination date written on the DS-2019. The D/S notation
means that USCIS considers you to be in valid J-1 status as long as your DS-2019 is valid and you en-
gage only in activities permitted by the DS-2019. You may file for an extension of stay if it is necessary
to accomplish your program objectives. Please make an appointment with a UC International Services
advisor for extensions prior to the expiration of your DS-2019.


                                        Limitations of Stay
The length of time you may remain in the United States on exchange visitor status is determined by the
general limitations for the category and the length of time needed to complete the exchange objectives.
These limitations apply to the total length of stay as an exchange visitor. Exchange Visitors are allowed
an additional grace period of 30 days to prepare for departure from the United States. It is important to
be aware that the exchange activity and any related employment are permitted only until the end date on
the Form DS-2019. During the additional 30 days, your status will be much like that of a tourist in that you
may remain and travel in the U.S. If you transfer from one program sponsor to another, you cannot use
that transfer to prolong your stay in the United States beyond the limitations of the pertinent category.

         Professors and Research Scholars
The Form DS-2019 may be issued for the period of the exchange up to a maximum of five years for pro-
fessors and research scholars. Extensions beyond five years are not possible.

         Short-Term Scholar
A short-term scholar is defined as a professor, research scholar, specialist, or a person with similar education
or accomplishments who is coming to the United States on a short-term visit for the purpose of lecturing,
observing, consulting, training, or demonstrating special skills at research institutions, museums, libraries,
post-secondary accredited educational institutions, or similar types of institutions. Examples include edu-
cators, scientists, research fellows, writers, and museum administrators. A short-term scholar is permitted
to participate in activities such as conferences, workshops, seminars, and other events if these activities
are stated on his or her Form DS-2019. The maximum duration of stay is limited to 6 months.




                                                      15
        Students
The duration of status or length of time permitted for participation in a program is different for a student
engaged in a degree program and a student engaged in a non-degree program. The ending date on the
Form DS-2019 controls the end date of authorized stay. Except for non-degree students, a student’s stay in
the United States could continue uninterrupted from the first year of a bachelor’s degree program through
the third year of postdoctoral training. Degree students are authorized to participate in an exchange visi-
tor program as long as they are “studying at the post-secondary accredited educational institution listed
on their Form DS-2019”, are “pursuing a full course of study”, and are “making satisfactory advancement
towards the completion of the academic program”. Duration of status may continue for non-degree stu-
dents for a total maximum stay of 24 months as long as they are participating full-time in a prescribed
course of study.

        Specialists
A specialist is an “individual who is an expert in a field of specialized knowledge or skill coming to the
United States for observing, consulting, or demonstrating special skills”. The exchange of specialists
promotes mutual enrichment and furthers linkages among scientific institutions, government agencies,
museums, corporations, libraries, and similar types of institutions. “This category is intended for exchanges
with experts in such areas, for example, as mass media communication, environmental science, youth
leadership, international educational exchange, museum exhibitions, labor law, public administration, and
library science.” Maximum duration of stay for a specialist is one year.

        Repeat Participation
Professors and Research Scholars present in the U.S. for any amount of time will not be allowed to return
to the U.S. as a J-1 research scholar or professor for at least 24 months.


                                      Transfer of Program
It is possible for you to transfer from one program sponsor to another if the purpose of the transfer is to
complete the objective for which you were originally admitted in exchange visitor status and if you remain
within the same category. The transfer is accomplished through correspondence between the two respon-
sible officers and notification to the Department of State in SEVIS.
When transferring from the University of Cincinnati, UC International Services will provide a release of your
records in SEVIS to the new school, but only if it is clear that the transfer is for the purpose of completing
the original objective and is consistent with the goals of the exchange visitor program. You must indicate
to UC International Services the name and program number of the school you want to transfer to and the
date you want to transfer.
The responsible officer of the program to which you are transferring will execute a new form DS-2019
upon securing our release.


                                      Change of Category
When a Form DS-2019 is prepared for you, a particular category of activity is indicated on the form. This
designation of a category helps to establish and define your program objective. For example, the student
category indicates a formal program of study leading to a degree, certificate or other similar educational

                                                     16
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objective, while the research scholar category indicates the objective of academic research. In general,
a change of category represents a change of objective and is not permitted. However, you may request
an exception to this policy. A request for change of category along with supporting justification must be
submitted to the DOS by UC International Services. Upon DOS approval, UC International Services shall
issue you a duly executed Form DS-2019 reflecting such change of category and provide a notification
copy of such form to the DOS. There is a $198 fee that must be paid when submitting a request of this
nature to the DOS.

Requests for a change of category from a research scholar to student will be evaluated recognizing the fact
that, in some cases, research skills can be substantially enhanced by doctoral study. You are considered
to be maintaining lawful status while the application is pending. If you apply for a change of category and
are denied, you will have lawful status for an additional period of 30 days from the day of such notice and
are expected to depart the country within that time or within the period of 30 days after the expiration of
your Form DS-2019, whichever is latest.
In preparing a request for change of category, UC International Services will provide sufficient documen-
tation of the reasons for the change to permit DOS to reach an informed decision. This documentation
may include, but is not limited to, supporting letters from faculty advisors, funding agencies, or the home
government supporting the change; an explanation of how the current and intended activities complement
each other; and a statement from you explaining your objectives and confirming your intention to return
home at the end of the exchange visitor program.



                                                    17
                                   Termination of Program
Exchange visitors who fail to meet the requirements of the program, or who engage in unauthorized em-
ployment, are subject to termination from the program. If terminated, you will be out of status and deport-
able and therefore must depart the United States. A person who is out of status is ineligible for change of
status, extension of stay, or other benefits.
According to regulations, the University of Cincinnati must notify the U.S. Department of State (DOS) if you
withdraw from or complete your program 30 or more days prior to the end date on your Form DS-2019,
or if you have been terminated from your program. As such, if your program ends more than 30 days
before the expiration date on your DS-2019, you must notify the UC International Services so we can
notify the Department of State.
If for any reason you decide to terminate your program and leave the U.S., you must immediately inform
UC International Services. Notify us using the Departure Certification Form in iOffice at https://ioffice.
uc.edu.


                                    Travel Abroad and Re-entry
If you wish to make a temporary visit outside the United States and return to complete your program, you
must be sure to have the proper documents to visit another country and return to the United States.

        Entering Another Country
If you wish to travel to your country of citizenship or permanent residence, a valid passport or travel docu-
ment will ensure entry. For travel to another country, it may be necessary to secure a visa or entry permit.
Those wishing to visit other countries should contact the consulate or embassy of the country to be visited
to determine what documents are necessary for entry.

         Re-entering the United States
If you are making a temporary visit outside the United States, you must have the following documents in
order to reenter the United States in exchange visitor status: A valid passport and a valid visa (unless
exempt from passport and visa requirement); and a current Form DS-2019 signed by UC International
Services to affirm that you are in status. By signing the revalidation section, the University is confirming
that you are in status.
If your visa is no longer valid, or if the number of authorized entries have already been used, you must
apply to a U.S. consulate or embassy outside the United States for a new visa. You do not need a new
U.S. visa if traveling to Canada, Mexico, or other contiguous territories for less than 30 days.


        Two-Year Home Country Physical Presence Requirement
The Two-Year Home Country Physical Presence requirement is one of the most important special char-
acteristics of exchange visitor status and should be thoroughly understood by you as a participant. As
an exchange visitor you may not be eligible to obtain permanent resident, H-1B specialty occupation or
trainee, or L intra-company transferee status in the United States until you have resided and been physi-
cally present in your country of nationality or last legal permanent residence for a total of at least two years
following departure from the United States. If you are subject to the two year home residency requirement,

                                                      18
you are also not permitted to change to any another non-immigrant status in the United States.
These restrictions apply when:
     • Your participation in the program for which you came to the United States was financed in whole
       or in part, directly or indirectly, by an agency of the U.S. government or by the government of your
       home country;
     • At the time of admission or acquisition of exchange visitor status, you were a national or resident
       of a country which the U.S. Department of State designated as clearly requiring the services of
       persons engaged in the field of specialized knowledge or skill in which you are engaged;
     • You came to the United States or acquired exchange visitor status in order to receive graduate
       medical education or training.

        Government Financing
“Financed directly” means financed in whole or in part by the United States government or your home gov-
ernment with funds contributed directly to you in connection with an exchange visitor program. “Financed
indirectly” means 1) financed by an international organization with funds contributed by either the United
States or your home government for use in financing international educational and cultural exchange, or
2) financed by an organization or institution with funds made available by either the United States or your
home government for the purpose of furthering international educational and cultural exchange.

        Exchange Visitor Skills List
The determination as to whether you are subject to the two-year home country physical presence require-
ment, depending on the need for your specialized knowledge or skills in the home country, is made by
reference to the Exchange Visitor Skills List. This is an official list of fields of specialized knowledge and
skills needed in each country as determined by each country’s corresponding government. You are subject
to the two-year home country physical presence requirement only if participation in an exchange program
began after your field of study appeared on the skills list. You can view the skills list at http://exchanges.
state.gov/jexchanges/docs/skills_list.pdf


            Waiver of the Two-Year Home Country Requirement
Exchange visitors who are subject to, but do not wish to comply with, the two-year home country residence
requirement, may apply for a waiver of that requirement under any one of the applicable grounds provided
by U.S. immigration law. They are as follows:
(1) A “No Objection” statement from the home government.
If an exchange visitor elects to apply for a waiver on this basis, the statement of “No Objection” must be
sent directly from his or her embassy in Washington, DC to Visa Services in the United States Depart-
ment of State. The Embassy must state that the visitor’s government has no objection to his or her a)
not returning to the home country to satisfy the two-year foreign residence requirement and b) remaining
in the U.S. if he or she chooses. When the “No Objection” statement originates from the exchange visi-
tor’s government in the home country, it must be forwarded by that government directly to the American
Consul at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate, which in turn will transmit the statement to Visa Services. The
“No Objection” statement should be sent to the Department of State with a Data Sheet and TWO self-
addressed stamped, legal-size envelopes (S.A.S.E.) and a check or money order for $215.00 U.S. dollars
per application, payable to the U.S. Department of State at:


                                                     19
Postal Service:                                        Courier Service:
U.S. Department of State/Waiver Review Division        U.S. Department of State/Waiver Review Division
PO Box 952137                                          P.O. Box 952137
St. Louis, MO 63195-2137                               1005 Convention Plaza
                                                       St. Louis, MO 63101-1200

Data sheets are available from UC International Services or from the DOS website at http://www.
exchanges.state.gov/education/jexchange/. Please write your full name, date of birth, and Social Se-
curity Number, if any, on the check or money order.
Once the Waiver Review Division has received your Data Sheet, they will use your self-addressed,
stamped, legal-size envelope, to send you a case number and instruction sheet on how to proceed with
your application under the basis you designated on your Data Sheet. This information will include a list of
documents that you must submit to complete your waiver review application. After you have received your
case number, you must write the full case number on any documentation you submit, as well as on the
outside envelope of all future correspondence with this office. If you do not write the case number on all
correspondence and on the outside of the envelope, the documents you submit will be returned to you.

It is your responsibility to submit all requested documents and required letters sent on your behalf. Once
they have sent you the checklist of items necessary to complete the review of your application, the Waiver
Review Office will NOT follow up on documents that have not been received. Rather, it will be your re-
sponsibility to ensure that your file is complete.
You may check on the status of your application by telephoning (202) 663-1600 or on line at http://travel.
state.gov/visa/temp/info/info_1296.html. You must have your full case number in order to obtain the status
of your case. We recommend that you submit all the requested documents at the same time. Some let-
ters (such as a “No Objection” statement from your government) must be submitted directly to the Waiver
Review Division by the Embassy. In that case, you, as the applicant, must request that the Embassy write
your full case number on the “No Objection” statement and also on the outside of the envelope to be sent
to the Waiver Review Division. If the third party agrees, you may have all of your documents forwarded
to the Waiver Review Division through the third party. Please note, however, that ALL documents sent
to the Waiver Review Division must have your file number clearly visible on it, and on the outside of the
envelope or they will be returned to you.
At the conclusion of the review process, the Waiver Review Division will forward its recommendation
directly to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and you will receive a copy of that recommendation
at the address listed on your data sheet. If your application is denied, you will be notified directly.
(2) Request by an Interested (U.S.) Government Agency, or IGA.
If an exchange visitor is working on a project for or of interest to a United States government agency, that
agency may determine that the visitor’s continued stay in the United States is vital to one of its programs.
The head of the agency, or duly appointed designee, may request a waiver on behalf of the exchange
visitor stating that his or her continued stay in the United States is in the public interest. The application
must be sent directly to Visa Services (see address above).

If Visa Services agrees with the agency that a waiver should be granted, it will forward such recommen-
dation to USCIS.
(3) Persecution.
If the exchange visitor believes that he or she will be persecuted upon return to the home country due to
race, religion, or political opinion, he or she can apply for a waiver by filing a USCIS Form I-612 with the
USCIS office having jurisdiction over his or her current place of residence in the United States. If USCIS
                                                     20
makes a finding of probable persecution, it will forward the application to Visa Services for its recommen-
dation. Visa Services will then forward the application to the State Department’s Office of Asylum Affairs
for its opinion with respect to the claim of persecution. If it is determined that it is likely that the exchange
visitor will be persecuted upon return to the home country, Visa Services will forward a favorable recom-
mendation to USCIS which will grant or deny the waiver.
(4) Exceptional hardship to a United States citizen (or permanent resident) spouse or child of an
exchange visitor.
If the exchange visitor can demonstrate that his or her departure from the United States would cause ex-
treme hardship to his or her United States citizen or lawful permanent resident spouse or child, he or she
may apply for a waiver by filing a USCIS Form I-612 with the USCIS office having jurisdiction over his or
her current place or residence in the United States. If USCIS makes a finding of exceptional hardship, it
will forward the application to Visa Services for a recommendation. Please note that mere separation from
family is not considered to be sufficient to establish exceptional hardship. If Visa Services determines that
the hardship outweighs the program, policy and foreign relations considerations, it will forward a favorable
recommendation to USCIS, which will grant or deny the waiver. USCIS normally follows Visa Services’
recommendations to grant the waiver on all of the above grounds, although it has the authority to deny
the waiver. If the recommendation from Visa Services is negative, USCIS is precluded from granting the
waiver.
(5) Request by a designated State Department of Health, or its equivalent.
Note: The law permits only medical doctors to apply for a waiver on this basis.
Pursuant to the requirements of Public Law 103-416, signed by President Clinton on October 25, 1994,
if the foreign medical graduate a) demonstrates a bona fide offer of full-time employment at a health care
facility in a designated health care professional shortage area, b) agrees to begin employment at the
facility within 90 days of receiving a waiver and c) signs a contract to continue to work at the health care
facility for a total of not less than three years, the designated State Department of Health, or its equiva-
lent, may request a waiver on behalf of the exchange visitor. The request letter must state that his or her
continued stay in the United States is in the public interest. Copies of all DS-2019 forms issued to the
exchange visitor should be included with the waiver application. The application must be sent directly to
Visa Services (see address above).
Thirty such applications may be granted for each state each federal fiscal year. If Visa Services agrees
with the State Department of Health, or its equivalent, that a waiver should be granted, it will forward a
recommendation to USCIS. This section applies to aliens admitted to the United States under Section
101(a)(15)(J) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.
To apply for a recommendation for a waiver of the two year home residence requirement under any of
the above reasons, applicants must complete the Department of State form DS-3035. It is prefered that
you complete the DS-3035 online at http://travel.state.gov/visa. Forms and instructions are also available
from UC International Services.

         Effects of Waivers on Extensions
No exchange visitor who has received a favorable recommendation from the DOS for a waiver of the
“Two-Year Home Country Residency Requirement” will receive a program extension beyond the date of
the current DS-2019 form, even though the exchange visitor may not have completed the maximum time
in their category. The DOS considers an exchange visitor’s filing of a waiver application as evidence of
his or her intent to abandon his or her exchange visitor program participant status. Accordingly, the DOS
no longer considers the exchange visitor a bona fide J-1 participant.


                                                       21
          Change of Exchange Visitor Status to Another Status
Your eligibility to change to another non-immigrant status may be limited. If you did not come to the United
States to receive graduate medical education or training, are not subject to the two-year home country
residence requirement, or have had that requirement waived, you may apply for a change to any other
non-immigrant status for which you are qualified. If you are subject to the two-year home country physical
presence requirement, you are eligible to change only to A (diplomatic or government official) or G (inter-
national organization) status, provided that you are accredited by the foreign government or international
organization to the Department of State.
An alien outside the United States who previously had been in the United States as an exchange visitor
may apply for a different non-immigrant visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate. Authority to grant such a visa
lies within the discretionary power of the consular officer. No minimum time abroad is required to obtain
a different visa unless you are subject to the two-year home country physical presence requirement, in
which case you must satisfy that requirement or have it waived before being eligible for an immigrant, H
or L visa. Returning to the United States in another status does not absolve you from a previously incurred
two-year home country physical presence requirement.
If you are eligible to apply for a change of status, you may do so by submitting to USCIS the Form I-539,
a copy of the Form I-94, the required fee, and any other documentation needed to demonstrate eligibility
for the new status. USCIS and the DOS generally do not look favorably on a request by a J-1 exchange
visitor to change to J-2 dependent status, since the J-1 exchange visitor is expected to return home im-
mediately upon completion of the exchange visitor program in the United States. Such requests usually
are either denied or referred to the DOS. An alien who wishes to request such a change of status should
submit the following documents to the USCIS: his or her Form I-94, the Form DS-2019 and a copy of
Form I-94 of the principal J-1 alien whose dependent he or she will be, Form I-539 with appropriate
fee, information about passport validity, and a letter explaining the reasons for the requested change and
justifying the extended period of stay in the United States.


                           Dependents of Exchange Visitors
Your spouse and unmarried minor children under the age of 21 who accompany or follow you to the United
States are usually admitted in J-2 classification, but are not exchange visitors. You are not permitted to
bring dependents to the United States in J-2 classification if adequate funding for their support and health
insurance coverage is not available.

        Eligibility Requirements
Only your spouse and unmarried minor children under 21 years of age are eligible for J-2 status. Other
family members, such as parents, brothers, and sisters are not eligible. Further, J-2 documentation for family
members can only be issued if you can show funding for their support and health care. If your dependents
are to accompany you or join you in the United States, they may obtain their visas and admission to the
United States along with you on the basis of the Form DS-2019 issued in their names.

        Obtaining a J-2 Visa and Entering the United States
Dependents who come to the United States must obtain their J-2 visas using the Form DS-2019 in their
name. The J-2 applicant then presents the Form DS-2019 to the immigration officer at the port of entry
to the United States. Upon entry to the United States, each dependent is issued a Form I-94 (Arrival/
Departure Record), indicating the date of entry, classification, and an admission for D/S.

                                                     22
        Employment of J-2 Dependents
J-2 dependents may apply to the regional USCIS office having jurisdiction over their place of temporary
residence for permission to accept employment, provided the income from such employment will be used to
support your family’s customary recreational and cultural activities and related travel, among other things.
Employment will not be authorized if this income is needed to support the J-1 principal alien. Application
for employment authorization is made on Form I-765, which is filed with the USCIS and accompanied by
the appropriate fee. In addition to the Form I-765, one should submit a letter stating why the employment
is desired, indicating the source and amount of support for the principal participant, and specifically stat-
ing that the income derived from employment will not be used for the support of the J-1 exchange visi-
tor. Financial need is not a criterion for employment authorization of a J-2 dependent. However, USCIS
sometimes requires a budget or statement of estimated expenses to determine that you have adequate
income. UC International Services will provide J-2 dependents with complete application instructions and
will meet with such dependents to ensure that the materials are in order.
If permission for employment is granted, an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) is issued and is
valid for any kind of full-time or part-time employment. If an extension of stay is required in conjunction
with extension of work authorization, the extension of stay notification must be filed prior to the extension
of employment authorization. It is important to file the Form I-765 for continuation of employment autho-
rization in a timely manner in order to preserve the J-2’s right to work.

        Travel Abroad and Re-entry
If a J-2 dependent wishes to travel outside the United States for a temporary visit and to reenter the
country, he or she follows basically the same procedures as a J-1 exchange visitor. To reenter the United
States, the dependent must have a valid passport and visa (unless exempt from passport and visa require-
ments) and a current Form DS-2019 issued in his or her own name. The DS-2019 must be endorsed by
the Responsible Officer (UC International Services). The same regulations and procedures for automatic
revalidation of visas for the J-1 principal participant apply to the J-2 dependent. The dependent may travel
outside the United States and return either with the J-1 Exchange visitor or separately.

        Study
Current regulations allow J-2 dependents to study full-time or part-time at any level without having to
change status to a student visa.

        Change of Status
As in the case of the J-1 exchange visitor, the J-2 dependent may change from J-2 status to another
non-immigrant classification if not subject to the two-year home country physical presence requirement,
or if the requirement has been waived.

A J-2 dependent can change to J-1 status only if he/she has been in the U.S. as a J-2 dependent for
less than six months prior to the change of status. To accomplish this change, the J-2 dependent should
submit to USCIS a Form DS-2019 made out in his or her own name, a copy of his or her Form I-94, Form
I-539, and the appropriate fee. If it appears to USCIS that the change from J-2 to J-1 will cause the ap-
plicant’s stay to extend beyond that of the original J-1 principal, USCIS will also require a letter from the
applicant stating 1) that he or she understands that the original J-1 principal probably will not be allowed
to change to J-2 status and thereby extend his or her stay beyond its original duration to remain in the
United States with the person who has changed from J-2 to J-1 and 2) that he or she wants the change
from J-2 to J-1 despite that understanding. The applicant can save much time by including such a letter
with the application for change from J-2 to J-1 status.
                                                     23
        Departure or Termination of Program
The J-2 dependent’s status terminates in the United States when that of the J-1 participant terminates.
The dependent reports his or her departure from the United States in the same way as the J-1 participant,
by surrendering Form I-94 at the time of departure and notifying UC International Services.



II. Packing and Travel
                                  What to Bring to the U.S.
        Clothing
The climate in Cincinnati changes with the seasons. In the spring, temperatures are moderate, although
it can still be quite cool, particularly in March and April. Temperatures in the summer can get rather high.
Summer is hot and humid. Temperatures of 90°F (33°C) and above are not unusual. You are advised
to bring some light clothing for this season. Fall (beginning of the school year) is pleasant with its bright
colors and moderate temperatures. Winter can get very cold and snowy (10°F/-12°C). It is recommended
that you bring warm clothing with you. However, winter clothing is available in Cincinnati at reasonable
prices.

        Finances
Before beginning your travel to the University of Cincinnati, please remember that your initial expenses
here will be considerably higher than those you will incur later. Therefore, it is necessary for you to
bring at least $2,000 in United States currency or travelers’ checks to cover these expenses. Even
if you are going to receive financial support from the University, your first check will not be available upon
your arrival. The University issues paychecks on the first of the month for work performed in the previous
month. For example, if arriving in September, it will be at least October 1st, and probably November 1st,
before you receive your first stipend check! Before you can expect any money from the University, you
will need to pay tuition, fees, health insurance, buy books for your classes, make a security deposit on
your apartment, pay the first month’s rent, and buy food and other necessities! You must figure your
finances carefully and plan on these expenses without help from the University.
To prepare to meet your financial needs for the entire year, you should make the necessary arrangements
with your government, your sponsor, and any banks in your country to ensure that these funds will be
available to you. Remember that checks drawn on foreign banks will require several weeks to clear
and therefore you will not have access to those funds right away! In order to have money available
to you upon arrival, the necessary funds should be transferred to a local bank in Cincinnati at least one
month prior to your arrival!

         Special Items
UC International sponsors events which highlight the cultural heritage of international students during
which you can display special items. Spices and food items from other countries are available in the U.S.,
so don’t neglect to bring favorite recipes from home. Items of cultural interest such as photos, books,
slides, musical instruments, traditional dress, and taped music will be of interest to your American friends,
if you have room in your suitcase!



                                                     24
        Linens, Beddings and Room Furnishings
Blankets, towels, and room furnishings such as lamps or area rugs are more things you might bring with
you if you have space for them in your luggage. However, remember that you can buy anything you need in
the U.S., and that University housing offers furnished apartments and rooms. You should not attempt to
bring food, plants, or anything that can be interpreted as being drug paraphernalia, such as pipes
or tobacco rolling papers. These will most likely be confiscated from you at the port of entry.


                                          Tips on Travel
 1. Travel with your passport, visa, and DS-2019 in your carry-on luggage. Your documentation will be
    inspected at the port of entry before you claim your checked baggage.
 2. Arrange for a family member, friend, or student group to meet you at the airport, or take the Airport
    Executive Shuttle, as explained in your pre-arrival materials.
 3. Take some of the things that are important to you such as prescription eyeglasses, a bilingual diction-
    ary, and medication etc., and keep them in your carry-on luggage.
 4. To avoid unnecessary delays, make sure your ticket is confirmed at least one month before the day
    you are required to arrive.
 5. Government-sponsored students, and those sponsored by private organizations, should work together
    with their sponsors every step of the way.
 6. Shop around for airfare and check for baggage regulations before deciding which airline to take to
    the U.S.
 7. Arrive at the airport about three hours before the intended flight.
 8. Make sure your schedule allows sufficient time for connecting flights.
 9. Carry sufficient money for unexpected expenses or events, such as missing your flight. You may also
    want to carry an extra change of clothing in your carry-on luggage in case of unexpected delays.
All articles brought into the United States, including gifts for other persons, must be declared to U.S. Cus-
toms on a form they will provide at the time you enter. If all the articles you have to declare are entitled
to free entry under the exemptions allowed, you need not fill in the reverse side of the declaration form.
Instead, you orally declare articles brought with you to the Customs Inspector. If the inspector deems it
necessary, you may be required to make a written declaration and list articles brought with you.
There is no limitation as to the amount of money (U.S. or foreign currency), travelers checks, money orders,
or negotiable instruments in bearer form that you may bring into or take out of the United States. A report,
however, must be filed with U.S. Customs at the time you arrive or depart with an amount which exceeds
$10,000 or the equivalent in foreign currency. A form will be provided to you for this purpose.
The following articles may be brought in free of duty and internal revenue tax, if for personal use and not
for others or for sale:
  • Personal effects (e.g., wearing apparel; articles of personal adornment; toiletry articles; hunting,
    fishing, and photographic equipment).
  • One liter of alcoholic beverages (e.g., wine, beer or liquor) if you are an adult non-resident.
  • 200 cigarettes, or 50 cigars, or 2 kilograms (4.4 lbs.) of smoking tobacco, or proportionate amounts
    of each.
  • Vehicles (e.g., automobiles, trailers, airplanes, motorcycles, boats) for personal use if imported in
    connection with your arrival.

                                                     25
In addition to the above exemptions, articles up to $100 in total value for use as bona fide gifts to other
persons may be brought in free of duty and tax, if you will be in the United States for at least 72 hours
and have not claimed this gift exemption in the past 6 months. You may include in this exemption up to
100 cigars.


                                                Housing
On Campus housing is not available for exchange visitors unless you are enrolled in classes.

                                         Off-Campus Housing

Help in locating housing can be obtained from multiple sources. Off-Campus Referral Service will help
you find off-campus housing. The Off-Campus Referral Office maintains a list of off-campus housing op-
portunities. They can be reached at (513) 556-0682 or by their web site at http://www.uc.edu/gradfami-
lyhousing/offcampus_new.html. UC International Services also has a link to a housing website at http://
www.apartmentfrog.com/. This website offers listings of current students looking for roommates as well
as a comprehensive listing of off-campus apartment listings and helpful tips on finding an apartment.
There are also many companies and complexes advertised in this handbook that can help you find an
off-campus apartment.
If you are ready to look for a house or apartment, there are some things you should know first.

         Lease Agreements
When you rent a room or an apartment you will be required to sign a lease. A lease is a written contract
between you and the landlord (the owner of the rental property). When you sign a lease, you agree to
pay a certain amount of money each month and to follow certain rules in exchange for the right to occupy
the rental property for a set period of time. Most lease agreements require that you pay a security deposit
which is usually equal to one month’s rent. This security deposit will be returned to you if you fulfill all the
terms of the lease. Read the lease carefully and be sure you understand it before signing it.
Here are some key questions to ask any landlord when considering an apartment:
    • How many minutes does it take to get to UC walking? And driving?
    • Is there a bus line close by?
    • What type of apartment is it? A house? An apartment complex?
    • How many bedrooms does it have?
    • How much is the rent per month?
    • Is a security deposit required?
    • What type of lease is offered (monthly, 6 month, 9 month, year)?
    • Are children allowed?
    • Are pets allowed? Is an extra security deposit required for pets?
    • What kind of heat is used (gas, electric, oil, etc.)?
    • Who pays for utilities (heat, electric, water, etc.)?
    • Is the apartment furnished or unfurnished?
    • What type of flooring is there (carpet, hardwood, tile)?
    • Is there a stove? Is there a refrigerator?
    • Is there air conditioning? Are there laundry facilities?
    • What type of parking is available (garage, off-street parking, on-street parking)?
    • How soon will the apartment be available?

                                                      26
Once you have moved in, your main responsibilities are to pay rent on time (use checks only; do not
pay with cash) and keep the property in a clean and safe condition. While you have responsibilities to
pay rent and keep the property in good condition, your landlord has responsibilities, too. If you believe
the landlord is treating you differently than he would treat an American student, or if the landlord is not
keeping the property in working condition, be assertive. Do not accept negligence from your landlord.
Demand that the apartment is in a safe, clean, livable condition. Otherwise, you are inviting the landlord
to victimize you.
If you have problems with your landlord, it is a good idea to photograph the contested areas of the apart-
ment which are in disrepair. In addition, put all of your complaints in writing, send your landlord a copy, and
keep a copy of your complaints for your own files. Let the landlord know that you are willing to go to court
if the problems continue. If the problems are not resolved, consider taking legal action. UC International
Services maintains a list of legal counsel.


                                      Money and Banking
Managing your finances is one of the most important and challenging aspects of an enjoyable academic
experience. This section introduces you to a few of the basic banking options available. When selecting
a bank, you should compare services, service charges and bank locations before making your decision.
There are several banks near the campus.

        Banks
When you open an account with a bank, most banks require two pieces of identification, such as your
passport and UC ID.


Major banks located in the University area include:

Cinco Family Financial Center Credit Union            Cinco University Branch-Tangeman University Center
Auburn and William Howard Taft Avenue                 2766 UC MainStreet #301
Cincinnati, OH 45219                                  Cincinnati, OH 45221
(513) 281-9988                                        (513) 475-6204
                                                      http://www.cinco.org

PNC Bank                                              US Bank
3030 Vernon Place                                     425 Ludlow Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45219                                  Cincinnati, OH 45220
(513) 861-3400                                        (513) 475-6060
http://www.pnc.com                                    http://www.usbank.com

Fifth Third Bank on Corry                             Fifth Third Bank on Calhoun
30 E. Corry Street                                    132 Calhoun Street
Cincinnati, OH 45219                                  Cincinnati, OH 45219
(513) 861-5100                                        (513) 221-2335
http://www.53.com                                     http://www.53.com




                                                     27
        Types of Accounts
Bank Cards: Many banks issue cards that enable you to deposit and withdraw money 24 hours a day
by use of an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). These machines, which are frequently located outside the
bank, are very convenient. By using a bank card, customers avoid waiting in line at the bank and have
access to cash after the bank closes. Banks that are members of a national ATM network allow you to
access your funds with your bank card at selected ATM’s throughout the country. There are many ATM’s
located on campus. In some instances, there may be small fees associated with ATM use.
Cashing checks: To cash a check, you will need to endorse it by signing your name on the back. In addi-
tion, you will be asked for personal identification in the form of a driver’s license, a State of Ohio ID card,
or a UC ID card. Some stores will cash a check for you if you shop there regularly.
Checking Accounts: Banks offer different types of checking accounts designed to fit individual needs.
The cost of checking varies from bank to bank. Some banks charge per transaction, some have a basic
monthly fee, and others offer free services if you maintain a certain minimum balance in your account at all
times. A list of all the account activity for the preceding month, and in some cases your cencelled checks
will be sent to you in a monthly statement. Be careful to keep an accurate record of every check you
write in order to avoid having checks returned due to insufficient funds and incurring additional charges.
“Bouncing” a check (writing a check for more money than you actually have in the account) is illegal and
can cost you time and money. Through some banks, you can apply for a line of credit attached to your
checking account that provides overdraft protection.
Credit Cards: Credit cards may be convenient, especially if you unexpectedly have major expenses. You
can pay expenses such as University and medical fees, airplane tickets and car repairs with any major

                                                      28
29
credit card. You must understand that you can easily accumulate large bills with credit cards, and before
you know it, you may be in debt. Before you accept a credit card, you must be sure to understand all your
obligations. Most banks charge an annual fee. If you are unable to pay your full balance each month, you
will be charged high interest rates (usually 18% or higher) on the remaining balance and any additional
charges you make. Make sure you stay within your budget when making credit card purchases.
Debit Card: A debit card, also known as a check card, allows you to withdraw or deposit money to your
bank account using an automatic teller machine (ATM) and to make purchases at stores that accept the
card. Some debit cards carry a credit-card logo (such as Mastercard or Visa), and can be used in place of
a check or credit card. Debit cards are not credit cards, however, and they can be used only to the extent
that you have funds in the account to which they are linked.

Savings Accounts: A savings account enables you to save money and accumulate interest on your sav-
ings. Interest is paid either monthly or quarterly. The difference between a savings and a checking account
is that you cannot write checks on a savings account.

         Foreign Currency
If you deposit a check drawn on a foreign bank in your U.S. checking account, it may have to go through
a collection process. This means that the money is not available to you until the U.S. bank has collected
it from the foreign bank. It may take several weeks before the money is credited to your account.
In countries with restrictions on foreign exchange, you may need to provide your sponsor or your family
with certification of enrollment in order to receive money from your home country. The application forms
for letters of certification are available in UC International Services. Please allow five working days for
processing.




III. Arrival in Cincinnati
                                          How to get to UC
From the Airport
Upon arrival in Cincinnati, if desired, you can be picked up at the Greater Cincinnati /Northern Kentucky
Airport and taken to temporary accomdations.You need to make sure you arrive in Cincinnati in time to
take advantage of the temporary housingaccomodations in order to give you time to locate permanent
housing if you have not been assigned an on campus dorm/residence hall. You can make reservations
at https://ioffice.uc.edu .
From the North or South via I-75
Exit at Hopple Street. Exit #3 (Exit is on the right driving South, on the left driving North.) At the top of the
exit ramp, turn left onto Hopple Street, cross Central Parkway, and go up Martin Luther King Drive. Follow
the signs to campus.
From the West via I-74
Take I-74 to I-75 South, then use the directions above for getting to the campus from I-75.
From the Southwest via I-71
Take I-71 to I-75 North, then use the directions above for getting to the campus from I-75.



                                                       30
From the Northeast via I-71
Exit at William Howard Taft Road (Exit 3) and turn right onto Taft Road, a one-way (west) street that be-
comes Calhoun Street and ends at the Southwest corner of the UC campus.
From the East
Follow US 50 to William Howard Taft Road. Taft becomes a one-way (west) street that changes to Calhoun
Street and ends at the southwest corner of the UC campus.



IV. Taxation Issues
All J-1 Exchange Visitors (and accompanying dependents) are required to complete an income tax return
annually. For most exchange visitors, this will mean completing the form 1040NR or 1040NR-EZ (U.S.
Nonresident Alien Income Tax Return) and a form 8843. You are required to file an income tax return
even if you have no income from U.S. sources, or if your income is exempt from U.S. taxes due to trea-
ties between the U.S. and your home country. You must file a return even if you don't earn income during
a tax year.

        Important Dates, Documents and Forms
April 15: The last day on which residents and non-residents who have earned wages from U.S. sources
may file their U.S. federal income-tax returns.
June 15: The last day on which non-resident students and their dependents who have no wage income
from U.S. sources may file their income tax returns.
Form 519: U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens, an IRS publication. This publication is essential for individuals from
nations having tax treaties with the United States.
Form 8843: Statement for Exempt Individuals and Individuals with a Medical condition. This one-page
document must be completed and returned with the 1040NR and 1040NR-EZ. It verifies nonresident
alien tax status. Students who have not earned wages from U.S. sources will file this form only.
Form 1040NR: U.S. Non-resident Alien Income Tax Return. The longer version of the return completed
by many non-residents. This form is distinct from the 1040, 1040A , or 1040EZ filed by residents for tax
purposes. It is not interchangeable with those forms. The IRS publishes an instruction booklet to ac-
company the form.
Form 1040NR-EZ: U.S. Income Tax Return for Certain Non-resident Aliens with No Dependents. A sim-
plified version of the 1040NR. Most F-1 and J-1 students may file the 1040NR-EZ. The IRS publishes an
instruction booklet for this form.
Form W-2: Wage and Tax Statement. A form issued annually by employers (normally during the month
of January). Copies of the W-2 must be filed with federal, state, and local tax returns.
Form W-4: Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate. A form completed by employees at the time
of hire to indicate how much tax is to be withheld from the paycheck.
Form 1042S: Foreign Persons U.S. Source Income Subject to Withholding is a form used to report total
scholarship/fellowship payments income tax withheld and other information relating to grant payments.
Form W-8BEN: Certificate of Foreign Status of Beneficial Owner for United States Tax Withholding is
a form used to certify an individual’s foreign status for tax purposes. Students who receive service-free
scholarships or fellowships must file Form W-8BEN.

                                                    31
Form 8233: Students who are employed in the U.S. (including teaching and research assistants) and are
partially or fully exempt by treaty from U.S. taxation must file Form 8233 and the appropriate attachment
with the employer to claim exemption from withholding each year.
Each spring UC International Services will sponsor income tax assistance which will answer your
questions, and help you complete your tax return. Please subscribe to "The Advisor". It will tell you the
time, dates, and locations of the assistance.
For further information about taxes, please go to http://www.isso.uc.edu/index.cfm?fuseaction=taxInformation.
home



V. For Assistance
        On-campus Assistance
If you are having trouble with anything on campus.
Office of University Ombuds: 607 Swift Hall, (513) 556-5956. Call to set up an appointment with the UC
Ombuds to discuss your problem. The Ombuds is available to all members of the University community
for CONFIDENTIAL discussion of your problem. This is not legal advice, but you will be presented with
University policies and your options. The Ombuds may serve as an informal mediator and will also refer
you to other services, if needed. You can also visit their website at http://www.uc.edu/ombuds/

        Tenant-landlord Issues
If you are having trouble with your landlord.
Tenant Information Project (TIP) at the University of Cincinnati Law School: (513) 556-0053. Call this
number to discuss, by telephone, the Ohio Landlord and Tenant Law with UC law students. They will
research particular points in the legal codes for you and give you reference points if you decide to pursue
further legal assistance. http://www.law.uc.edu/students/tenant.shtml
If you are having trouble with your landlord due to ethnicity, nationality, religious belief, etc.
Housing Opportunities Made Equal (HOME): (513) 721-4663. Call this number when there is reason to
believe that landlord problems may be due to your ethnicity, nationality, religious beliefs, etc. HOME pro-
vides legal aid for those dealing with potential fair housing issues. http://www.cincyfairhousing.com/

        General Legal Counseling
If you are having trouble with anything on or off-campus and need general legal counseling.
Legal Aid: (513) 241-9400. Call this number for any legal concerns you may have. This service is provided
free of charge to low-income individuals in Cincinnati. If Legal Aid is unable to help you, they will advise
you and refer you to other services.

        Cultural Adjustment and Other Issues
Getting used to a new culture can be challenging. The Counseling Center provides assistance with a
wide range of issues, including cultural adjustment, to all students. No concern is too small or too large
for The Counseling Center to help you. If they cannot be of service, they will help you find the right place
for the information or assistance you need. All consultations are strictly confidential.
Counseling Center
316 Dyer Hall
(513) 556-0648
http://www.uc.edu/cc
                                                     32
                                       Campus Security
Security at the University of Cincinnati is provided by the Department of Public Safety, which includes
the Clifton Campus Division and the Academic Health Center Complex. Each division employs full-time,
trained, state-commissioned officers who carry full arrest powers. Their jurisdiction extends to all state-
owned University property, which includes all University facilities and parking areas. They work with the
city police to provide service to the University and surrounding communities.
On the Clifton campus, reports of all emergencies and crimes should be phoned in to the dispatcher at (513)
556-1111 (non-emergency) or 911 (emergency only). Officers will be dispatched immediately to assist.
In the Academic Health Center complex, which consists of University Hospital, Medical Sciences Building,
Barrett Center, Medical Arts Building and all Outpatient Clinics, Holmes Hospital, College of Pharmacy,
College of Nursing, Healthcare Professionals and Kettering Laboratory, the Academic Health Center Po-
lice Divisions should be contacted. The dispatcher should be called at (513) 558-1111 or (513) 558-4900
(non-emergency) or 911 (emergency only).
Reports and inquiries regarding lost property in the Academic Health Center may be phoned to the Po-
lice Headquarters at (513) 558-1111 between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. weekdays. Clifton campus police
headquarters can be reached at (513) 556-1111.
In an effort to make the students’ environment as safe as possible, the police need all the assistance that
students can provide. Therefore, reporting crimes and unusual activities immediately to the dispatcher is
essential to ensure a safe campus.
The Department of Public Safety also provides a Crime Prevention Information Center. This center dissemi-
nates information on methods of resisting threats of crime in the home and on the street. For information
on Crime Prevention Programs offered by the Center, call (513) 558-4900 between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00
p.m. weekdays. For additional information on campus security go to http://www.uc.edu/pubsafety/



        Nightwalk
In addition to the above services, Student Activities and Leadership Development (SALD) also provide a
free walking escort service to anyone who needs an escort late at night across campus. Call 558-WALK
(9255) for assistance.


                    Health Care and Insurance Requirements
        University Health Services
Enrolled students with a health question or problem should go to University Health Services (UHS). The
doctors at University Health Services are the same faculty who teach and train doctors at the University
of Cincinnati College of Medicine. From sore throats to sprained ankles, University physicians are there
for you.
You can receive personalized attention at University Health Services. Services provided include primary
care services, women’s health, dermatology, mental health services, preventative health care, health
education, and wellness promotion. Additional special services include a pharmacy, x-ray, and laboratory
services.


                                                   33
University Health Services is open daily during the week for your convenience. Appointments are required.
There is also a doctor “on call” 24 hours a day to advise you, should you have an emergency when the
Campus Health Center is closed. http://www.uc.edu/uhs/default.html
Exchange visitors not enrolled for classes will not be able to use University Health Services.
However, you will be responsible for paying all co-pays and fees not covered by your policy.

        Exchange Visitor Health Insurance

All exchange visitors must have insurance that covers themselves and any accompanying dependents.
Levels of coverage and special conditions are as follows:
     • Medical benefits of $50,000 per accident or illness;
     • $7,500 for repatriation of remains;
     • $10,000 for expenses associated with medical evacuation to home country;
     • Must include a deductible not in excess of $500.00 per accident or illness and shall not exclude
       coverage for perils inherent to the activities of the program;
     • The insurance policy must be underwritten by an American insurance corporation with an A.M. Best
       rating of 'A-' or above, an Insurance Solvency International. Ltd. (ISI) rating of 'A-1' or above, a
       Standard & Poor's Claims paying Ability rating of 'A-' or above, or a Weiss Research, Inc. rating
       of 'B-' or above. Insurance coverage backed by the full faith and credit of the government of the
       exchange visitor's home country shall be deemed to meet this requirement.
FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH THIS REGULATION COULD RESULT IN THE TERMINATION OF YOUR
EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM.
You are required to have such insurance from Day 1 in the U.S. If your position is covered by University of
Cincinnati benefits, you are in compliance with the insurance regulation. If your appointment is not covered
by UC medical benefits, you are required to provide UC International Services with proof that you have
insurance that meets the requirements upon arrival. Links to insurance companies with qualifying policies
can be found on our website at http://www.isso.uc.edu/forms/j1/j1_insurance_req.pdf.



VI. Living in the U.S.
                                         Cultural Issues
UC is a diverse campus, with students, faculty, and staff from many parts of the world. For people of any
age and background, being in a new country combines a sense of excitement and anticipation with some
fears, loneliness, and doubts. Culture is a pattern of beliefs, values, and behaviors shared by groups of
people. Cultural differences among groups can be sources of interest, pleasure, and growth. Learning
about new and different languages, music, foods, and social customs will enhance your experience. Dif-
ferences, however, can also lead to confusion about how to behave in different situations and the mean-
ing of others’ behavior. Understanding some common cultural patterns in the United States can ease the
transition and help students (and family members here with them) feel more at ease and a part of things.
Understanding another culture does not mean, however, that a person must abandon his or her own ways.
Getting acquainted with social and cultural differences is a very important process because it will help you
to build successful relationships with Americans. The following are some common American customs you
will probably encounter.



                                                    34
        Social Invitations
While you are here, we hope that you will meet and spend time with Americans and their families. These
suggestions may help you feel more comfortable when you are invited out. The invitation is usually for
you only, unless your hosts specifically invite your family or friends. Bringing guests of your own without
asking your host’s permission is considered impolite. The written invitation will include the date, time,
place, and description of the occasion. You should always answer a written invitation, especially if it says
R.S.V.P. (Répondez s’il vous plaît; French for “please respond”). You may respond by telephone or by
letter; prompt notice is appreciated.
Never accept an invitation unless you really plan to go. If you must decline an invitation, it is enough to
say, “Thank you for the invitation, but I am unable to attend”. If an unavoidable problem makes it neces-
sary for you to change plans, be certain to tell the host as soon as possible before the time when you are
expected. Make sure you get directions to the place where the event will be held.
When accepting an invitation for a meal, be sure to explain to your host if there is anything you are not
supposed to eat. This courtesy will help the host to plan for food and beverages that everyone can enjoy.
If you must refuse something after it has been prepared, refuse politely. Never hesitate to ask for any
food on the table: “Would you please pass the rolls?”, since asking for more food is considered to be a
compliment to the host. Being on time is very important in American culture.

        Hygiene
Americans put a great deal of emphasis on personal cleanliness. The standard of personal cleanliness
that an individual maintains will determine (to a large extent) how he or she is accepted in society. Most
Americans are very sensitive to the smells and odors of the human body-sometimes their own, but espe-
cially someone else’s. For this reason, most Americans bathe once a day, and sometimes more during
hot weather or after strenuous exercise. They use deodorants and antiperspirants, and they wash their
clothes frequently. Most Americans are also very concerned about having clean hair and fresh breath.

        Individualism and Privacy
The most important thing to understand about Americans is their devotion to individualism. From childhood,
they have been trained to consider themselves as separate individuals who are responsible for their own
situations in life and their own destinies. They have not been trained to see themselves as members of a
close-knit, tightly interdependent family, religious group, tribe, nation, or other collectivity.
Closely associated with the value they place on individualism is the importance Americans assign to privacy.
Americans assume that people need some time to themselves or some time alone to think about things
or recover their spent psychological energy. Americans have great difficulty understanding foreigners who
always want to be with another person, or who dislike being alone.

        Directness and Assertiveness
Americans generally consider themselves to be frank, open, and direct in their dealings with other people.
Americans will often speak openly and directly to others about things they dislike. They will try to do so in
a manner they call "constructive", that is, a manner which the other person will not find offensive or un-
acceptable. If they do not speak openly about what is on their minds, they will often convey their reactions
in nonverbal ways (without words), but through facial expressions, body positions, and gestures. Americans
are not taught that they should mask their emotional responses. Their words, the tone of their voices, or
their facial expressions will usually reveal when they are feeling angry, unhappy, confused, or happy and
content. They do not think it improper to display these feelings, at least within limits. They are much less

                                                     35
concerned with avoiding embarrassment to themselves or others than most cultures. To Americans, being
honest is usually more important than preserving harmony in interpersonal relationships.

        Friendship and Dating
While many Americans are fairly open and warm people who are quick to make new acquaintances, their
mobility and sense of individualism mean that their relationships are often casual and informal. This is
not to say that Americans take friendship lightly. It just means that while Americans know a lot of people,
their lasting friendships are often few.
Comparatively, women in the United States are generally less inhibited than women from other countries.
They are not usually shy with Americans or international visitors. Their relaxed and more independent
attitude may be misunderstood by people whose native culture is more restrictive of women’s activities. It
is not unusual, for example, for unmarried women to live by themselves, to share living space with other
single women, or to go to public places unescorted.


                                      American Holidays
Which American Holidays Are Important?
Generally, throughout the United States, both the federal and state governments, and much of the pub-
lic, consider the following dates holidays: New Year’s Day (Jan. 1), Martin Luther King Day (celebrated
on the third Monday in January) in honor of the slain Civil Rights leader; Memorial Day (end of May),
Independence Day (July 4), Labor Day (the first Monday in September), Thanksgiving Day (last Thurs-
day in November), and Christmas Day (December 25). Other holidays might include Lincoln’s Birthday,
President’s Day or George Washington’s Birthday; Good Friday or Easter, which occurs either in March
or April, is a holy day for Christians but also includes children’s activities; Columbus Day, the Monday
nearest October 12, honors the “Discovery of America”; Halloween, October 31, is a time to dress up in
costumes and “trick or treat”, especially for children; and Valentine’s Day, February 14, is for sweethearts
to give each other gifts.



        Major Holidays Explained
New Year’s Day - January 1: Federal holiday for schools, offices and banks. Stores are open. New
Year’s Eve, December 31, is more important to Americans than New Year’s Day itself. Everyone gathers
with family and friends to "ring out the old and ring in the new”, an expression that reflects the old custom
of ringing church bells to greet the new year.
Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday - January 18 (Observed on 3rd Monday in January): Federal
holiday that began in 1986. Martin Luther King, Jr. organized and led the civil-rights movement in America
during the 1960s.
Valentine's Day - February 14: Not a federal holiday. Lover’s holiday celebrated by sending cards and
giving candy or flowers.
Saint Patrick’s Day - March 17: Not a federal holiday. St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland, and this
holiday was brought to America by Irish immigrants. People celebrate this holiday by wearing something
green and getting together with friends to party and sing Irish folk songs.
April Fool’s Day - April 1: Not a federal holiday. As in many other countries, this day is marked by the
custom of playing practical jokes on friends and colleagues.
                                                     36
Easter - a Sunday in March or April: Not a federal holiday. A religious holiday for Christians who believe
that on this day Christ rose from the dead. Many folk traditions are now connected with Easter, including
the decoration of brightly colored eggs and giving gifts to children.
Mother’s Day - second Sunday in May: Not a federal holiday. On this day Americans honor their moth-
ers by sending flowers, buying small gifts, and taking their mothers out to dinner so that they don’t have
to cook or do work around the house.
Memorial Day - last Monday in May: Federal holiday. Memorial Day is the day on which Americans re-
member those who died in military service to their country. Many families visit graves and decorate them
with flowers. The day is also marked with patriotic parades. This day is considered the beginning of the
summer season.
Father’s Day - third Sunday in June: Not a federal holiday. Fathers are honored on this day. Children
give them cards and gifts.
Independence Day - July 4: Federal holiday. Independence Day commemorates the day the Declaration
of Independence was signed in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. The holiday is celebrated all over the country
with picnics, political speeches, and community get-togethers that culminate in fireworks displays.
Labor Day - first Monday in September: Federal holiday. This holiday was established in recognition
of the labor movement’s contribution to the productivity of the country. This day is the last holiday of the
summer season and is celebrated with picnics and other outings.
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur - late September / early October: Not a federal holiday. Rosh Ha-
shanah, commemorates the beginning of the Jewish New Year, is the first of the Ten Days of Penitence,
which end with Yom Kippur, the most solemn of Jewish holidays. For Rosh Hashanah, families gather for
a feast in which an apple is dipped in honey to express hope for a sweet year ahead. In Judaism, Yom
Kippur is the day of a atonement; on the eve of Yom Kippur, Jews ask forgiveness from those they may
have wronged. The keynotes of the holiday are fasting and a collective confession, repeated several
times throughout the day.
Halloween - October 31: Not a federal holiday. This was originally a religious holiday, but its religious
character has been lost in the United States, and it is now celebrated mostly as a children’s holiday. Tradi-
tions include carving out pumpkins with funny faces, as well as dressing up in costumes and going around
the neighborhood to receive treats of candy, fruit, and cookies. When people come to the door, children
say "trick or treat", meaning “if you don’t give me a treat, I will trick you.”
Thanksgiving Day - fourth Thursday in November: Federal holiday. The first Thanksgiving Day was
celebrated by the Pilgrims at Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts in 1621 to give thanks for the bountiful
harvest and their triumph of survival over the wilderness. Now it is a time when Americans give thanks
for the good life they enjoy. They celebrate by getting together with family and friends to enjoy turkey,
cranberry sauce, sweet potatoes, and pumpkin pie.
Hanukkah - eight days, usually in December: Not a federal holiday. One of the less solemn of the Jew-
ish holidays, but one widely observed even by nonreligious Jews. The only Jewish holiday connected with
war, Hanukkah celebrates the victory of Jewish Maccabees over their Syrian rulers in 167 B.C. Hanukkah
is marked with parties, games, gifts for children, and the lighting of the eight candles of the menorah.
Christmas - December 25: Federal holiday. Many people regard Christmas as the most important holi-
day of the year, with the holiday season extending from a few days before Christmas to New Year’s Day.
Although its origins are religious in nature, it is a holiday celebrated by almost everyone in the country.
Family members travel great distances to be together on this day on which gifts are exchanged, and a
traditional dinner is shared. Even families who do not have strong religious convictions decorate a Christ-
mas tree and join in the festivities of the Christmas season.

                                                     37
VII. Campus and Community
                              Campus Events & Programs
        WORLDFEST Celebration
The University of Cincinnati holds a special week of international events called “Worldfest: Celebrating a
Caring Community of Culture”. Worldfest typically takes place in May and has many events, including the
International Festival for which international students decorate booths, give performances, and prepare
food from their native countries.
International students play a major role in Worldfest and we hope that you will be involved while you are
attending UC. It’s a week of fun for all!

        International Friendship Program
The University of Cincinnati has a program for incoming international students called the UC Interna-
tional Friendship Program. As a participant in the program, you will be paired with a University faculty/
staff member or community representative with whom you may visit, enjoy an occasional meal, celebrate
holidays, participate in community sports and cultural events, or just relax in conversation. This will be
an opportunity for you to experience American life in a non-university setting and learn first-hand about
our culture.
If you are interested in participating in the UC International Friendship Program, applications will be dis-
tributed during the check-in process or you can pick up an application at UC International Services. Your
obligations as a participant are to accept your “Friend’s” invitations whenever possible and to be willing
to share your culture and enjoy the differences and similarities of the two countries.
We encourage all international students to participate in this program. It will be a valuable experience in
helping you to better understand American culture and in helping Americans to better understand your
culture.

        International Education Week
Each November, the U.S. celebrates its international connections with International Education Week. As a
large international community UC celebrates this week with lectures, film festivals, and many other events
that highlight our international connections. We hope that you will become involved in this week as well.

        UC International Services listserv "The Advisor"
In addition to its primary function of updating you on immigration regulations, "The Advisor" will keep you
informed about upcoming special events, such as the International Coffee Hour and Worldfest.

        International Student/Scholar Organizations
The University of Cincinnati has many International Student Organizations whose purposes are to pro-
mote education and understanding among cultures, as well as to create a network of friendship between
students from all over the world. To make these organizations a success, we need your participation.
Below is a list of all International Student Organizations with the names and e-mail addresses of their
Advisors:


                                                    38
Arabic Club                                           Asian American Association
Grace Thome                                           Pallavi Patel
thomege@ucmail.uc.edu                                 patelps@ucmail.uc.edu
Association for India's Development (AID)              Chinese Studenst and Scholars Association (CSSA)
Dr. Manish Kumar                                       Hongssheng Wang
manish.kumar@uc.edu                                    wanghs@ucmail.uc.edu
http://cincinnati.aidindia.org                         http://www.ucbbs.com/forum/
Cultural Connections (C2)                              Hindu YUVA
Andrea Siouris                                         Raj Bhatnagart
andrea.siouris@uc.edu                                  raj.bhatnagar@uc.edu
http://www.uc.edu/groups/csquare/index.htm
Indian Students Assocaition (ISA)                      Japanese and Amercan Student Society (JASS)
Manglik Raj                                            Noriko Tsurui
raj.manglik@uc.edu                                     noriko.tsurui@uc.edu
http://www.uc.edu/groups/isa/
 Latinos En Accion                                     National Association of Black Accountants, Inc.
 Yakaira Ramost                                        Margeret Reed
 Yakaira.ramos@uc.edu                                  margaret.reed@uc.edu


 Nepali Student Association (NSA)                      UC Taiwanese Student Association
 Yizong chengt                                         Alex Lin
 yizong.cheng@uc.edu                                   alex.lin@uc.edu


 UC Alliance of Ethopian Students                      UC African Students Association
 Sarah Leggesse.                                       Dr. John K. Kalubi
 Leggess@ucmail.uc.edu                                 kalubijk@mail.uc.edu
 Vietnamese Student Associaiton                        University of Cinicnnati IHSAN
 Maureen Schomaker                                     Hazeem Said
 maureen.schomaker@uc.edu                              Hazem.said@uc.edu

 International Socailist Association                   Muslim Student Association
 Maurice Peck                                          Ihab Saad
 peckm@mail.uc.edu                                     ihab.saad@uc.edu
                                                       http://masa-cincinnati.org/
 Amnesty International                                 German Club
 Howard Tolley                                         Todd Herzog
 zcilingir@gmail.com                                   todd.herzog@uc.edu




                           Campus Services and Attractions
        Campus Tours
Preview UC Tours are offered nearly every weekday year round and most Saturdays during the school
year. The University is closed on national holidays. Registration is required for the tour. Additional informa-
tion is available at http://www.admissions.uc.edu/visit/Visit_daily.html.


                                                      39
        On-Campus Dining
Students may choose from a number of quick and full-service dining facilities housed on campus. Visitors
are also welcome in the Siddall and Center Court residence dining rooms.
Tangeman University Center (TUC): TUC has a food court which includes Chick-fil-A, Sushi, Goldstar
Chili, Pizza Hut, and Burger King. Mick and Mack’s is a full service restaurant located in Tangeman Uni-
versity Center. Quick Mick’s has food items which can be purchased quickly.
Student Life Center: Adjacent to Tangeman University Center, the Student Life Center houses Starbuck's
Coffee and Subway Sandwiches.
The CCM Café: Located in Emery Hall. Offers Java City Coffee, bagels, soups and sandwiches.
Campus View Café: Located in University Hall; this café offers a variety of food options.
Center Court and Siddall Hall Dining Centers: One price - all you care to eat: Home-style entrées, grill,
Bene’s Pizza, Pan Geos (fresh and made to order), salad and deli bar. Menus include American favorites,
ethnically inspired cuisine, and vegetarian selections.
Stadium View Café: Offers a variety of food options including deli-styled sandwiches, chicken strips and
chicken wings. Located between Nippert Stadium and the Campus Recreation Center, above Center
Court.

        On-Campus Attractions
MainStreet Cinema: Located in the TUC. Showing recently released films as well as classic movies.
Tickets cost $2 dollars with your Bearcat Campus Card.
Catskeller Game Room & Sports Lounge: Located on the first floor of TUC with entrances from both the
Food Court and the Bearcat Plaza patio facing the press box at Nippert Stadium, the Catskeller features
Golden Tee, pool tables, ping pong, Air Hockey, darts, Dance Revolution and more.

        Flex $$ or Bearcat Cards
At each of the locations above, students will be able to use their flex dollars or Bearcat cards in-
stead of cash. Payment options for the card are flexible, and students have many menu alter-
natives on campus, making mealtime convenient. You can choose from many different meal
plans, from three meals a day to seven meals a week plus additional cash on the Flex$$.

        Emergency Assistance
If you need assistance for any reason, pick up any of the Help Phones located throughout campus
marked by a blue light and a sign. No need to dial; you’ll be connected immediately with the UC Public
Safety Office.

        Parking
Parking for a fee is available in the following locations: Clifton Court Garage, Calhoun Garage, Campus
Green Garage, CCM Garage, Corry Garage, Goodman Street Garage, Woodside Garage, Medical Sciences
Garage, B lot and C lot (limited availability). You may park for a fee in most other campus lots between 4
p.m. and 9 p.m. For more information visit http://www.uc.edu/pubsafety/parking_services/




                                                   40
        Shuttle Bus Service
UC provides campus shuttle buses Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. There is also shuttle
service now available to Newport on the Levee. Schedules and routes are posted on thier website at
http://www.uc.edu/shuttle

        Stores
Clinique: Hypo-allergenic cosmetics, makeup, facial cleansers and fragrances. Located in Tangeman
University Center inside the University Bookstore.
Bookstore: Located on West Campus in the south wing of the Tangeman University Center, the book-
store can serve many of your needs in addition to supplying your textbooks. It now carries a vast array
of school supplies, clothing, food, office and art supplies, computer software, greeting cards, etc. There
is also a bookstore for medical students on east campus, located on the 1st floor of the Medical Sci-
ence Building. You can purchase textbooks, lab gowns, white coats, various instruments, school sup-
plies, etc. Phone: (513) 556-1700.
Business on Main: Provides students, staff and faculty with copying, printing, and shipping services.
Located in the Steger Student Life Center.
Market on Main: A campus grocery with fresh produce, everyday items, frozen meals and beverages.
Located at the Campus Recreation Center, Market on Main is open to 6 a.m. to 1 a.m.

        Mail
The nearest U.S. Post Office is located on Vine Street. Its hours of operation are weekdays 7:30 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. and Saturdays 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The telephone number is (513) 751-4384.
Currently it costs 44 cents per ounce (17 cents each additional ounce) to send a letter anywhere in the
United States. For overseas air mail letters, the cost is 90 cents for the first ounce and 45 cents for the
next half ounce. Letters to Canada cost 75 cents for the first half ounce and 25 cents for each additional
ounce. Letters to Mexico cost 79 cents for the first ounce; 55 cents for each additional half ounce up to
3.5 ounces. You can register or insure valuable documents or letters for an additional fee. These services
sometimes allow for a return receipt, a postcard that is sent automatically to you when the letter is deliv-
ered to the addressee. All other countries is 0.98 cents.
The U.S. Postal Service will ship packages both within the U.S. and overseas. However, there are private
companies which can ship packages; some will provide overnight guarantees. United Parcel Service (UPS)
and Federal Express (FedEx) are two examples.

        Recreation/Exercise
The University of Cincinnati Campus Recreation Center (CRC) is a state-of-the-art fitness and recreation
facility. With over 200,000 square feet of recreation space, the Center offers University students, employ-
ees, and friends of the University a wide range of exercise and fitness opportunities, including: three pools
(50-meter x 25-yard lap pool, Leisure pool, Whirlpool, and 2 one-meter & 1 three-meter diving boards). The
center also includes 3 multipurpose fitness rooms, 8 racquet courts, 6-court gymnasium, 40 foot climbing
wall, 10 foot bouldering wall, suspended running/walking track and over 200 pieces of specialized equip-
ment. All University facilities are available to students. Visit http://www.uc.edu/reccenter to learn more.


Non-students can use the facilities by paying a quarterly fee.

                                                     41
                                         About Cincinnati
        The City
Cincinnati is the home of many multi-national corporations, including Procter & Gamble. Its metropolitan
area is home to more than two million people. The small-town aspects of the city include beautiful parks,
easy commuting, and an accessible downtown. Cincinnati was recently named one of the top 10 cities in
the United States (http://www.cityrating.com). Our international airport makes Cincinnati an easy commute
from your home country.We have professional sports teams like the Cincinnati Reds baseball team and
the Cincinnati Bengals (American football team), world-class museums and art galleries and a vigorous,
diverse economy with opportunities for co-op employment, internships and careers after graduation. Our
downtown is easy to navigate on foot, and its charming neighborhoods date back to the 19th century.
Because of all that we have to offer, Cincinnati has been rated one of the most livable metro areas in
America. Cincinnati’s riverfront has parks with places for strolling and sunbathing, watching a ballgame
or dining in a riverfront café. Downtown contains architectural gems like the art-deco Carew Tower and
majestic Music Hall. Cincinnati’s art deco train station has been converted into a stunning museum center
with an Omnimax theater and the fascinating Cincinnati History Museum. The Cincinnati Zoo is interna-
tionally known for its collection of endangered species. And, if you’re in need of a mid-February visit to the
tropics, the rain forest and floral exhibits at the nearby Krohn Conservatory are sure to chase the winter
blahs.The climate in Cincinnati changes with the seasons.

                  Jan.    Feb.    Mar    Apr.    May      Jun.   Jul.    Aug.   Sept.    Oct.   Nov.    Dec.
Ave. Max
                  2.9     5.3     11.9   18.2    23.7     28.2   30.0    29.6    25.9   19.7    11.9    5.4
Temp Celsius
Ave. Min.
                  -5.8    -4.1    1.3     6.5    12.0     16.6   18.8    17.8    14.3    7.8     2.7    -2.9
Temp Celsius




        Winter Weather Health Tips
Coping with the extreme winter weather conditions can be challenging. Here are some tips that will help
make the weather conditions more tolerable.
Wear layers of clothing. You will be much warmer if you wear several layers of clothing rather than one
heavy shirt and a coat. For your first layer, you could start with a long sleeved thermal shirt. For your
2nd layer, a t-shirt is advisable. After that, you could wear a long sleeved flannel shirt. If temperatures
are extreme, you could wear a quilted/lined flannel shirt rather than just a regular one. All of these are
available at stores such as Wal-Mart and Target. Thermal shirts would be in the departments where you
buy underwear. You can also get thermal pants to wear under your jeans, pants, or sweat pants. We often
refer to thermal shirts/pants as "long underwear" or "long johns". Benefits to wearing layers are that you
can remove some of them if you get too warm indoors, or you can add more if you are still too chilled. The
biggest reason for layering, though, is that the layers really do protect you from the cold.
Wear a hat! Between 35-50 percent of body heat is eliminated through the head. If you want to use that
heat to stay warm, cover your head! The following is a quote from the NOLS Wilderness, First aid, Cold
Injuries website:
        "when exposed to the environment, the skin acts as a radiator. Unlike in the rest of the body, the
        blood vessels in the head do not constrict and reduce the blood supply flowing to the scalp. The


                                                     42
       head is therefore an excellent radiator of heat, eliminating from 35 to 50 percent of our total
       heat production. The effectiveness of garments designed to reflect and conserve radiative heat
       is not agreed upon universally, but the effectiveness of dry insulation, especially in the head,
       is undeniable."
If you are displeased with the way a hat can mess-up your hair, you can use a long winter scarf instead.
Just lay it over your head and wrap the long ends around your neck. It won't mess your hair up as much.
You can also use the hood of your winter jacket (if it has one). In extreme cold, some people use both a
hat and the hood.
Keep your socks dry. If you have had your socks on all day, your feet will have perspired some. If
you've walked a lot, they will have perspired more. Even a little perspiration will cause your socks to
be damp. If your feet are even a little damp, they will be cold, and if your feet are cold, you will be cold.
Walking through snow or walking in the rain will obviously contribute to the problem. It's a good idea to
change into a clean, dry pair of socks before you go back outside-especially if you have to be out for
very long.

        Coping With the Effects of Dry Air
Dry Lips. You cannot live in cold weather regions without keeping at least one kind, if not an assort-
ment, of lip balms. These come in various forms such as sticks, tiny jars, and tubes. Various brands are
Chapstick, Blistex, Carmex, and others. They cost about a dollar, and during the winter they are often on
display near the check-out (cashier) line in grocery stores and drug stores. They are also in the medicine
sections of these stores.
Dry Nose. The air during winter is drier than during other seasons. Dryness is even worse because of the
dry heat in our apartments. Many newer homes are built with humidifiers that automatically put moisture
into the air. But older houses and most apartments don't have humidifiers. You have several options:
  1. You can purchase small humidifiers, sometimes called "room humidifiers" for around $35.00.
  2. You can buy a vaporizer for about $10.00-15.00. These are sold in pharmacies or sometimes in the
     pharmacy department of the grocery store. Often they are used when a person has a cold or flu to
     keep the air moist near where the person is sleeping. (Since one usually must breath through the
     mouth due to nasal congestion, moist air helps keep the mouth and throat from getting too dry, which
     can cause excessive coughing.) Special cold medications can be added to this apparatus, but they
     are not necessary if you simply want the benefit of the steam moisture it produces.
  3. If you don't wish to purchase either of the above items, you can boil water in your apartment to add
     moisture to the air. Do be careful that you don't forget to turn off your stove.
Added moisture in the air will also help to reduce the amount of static electricity that causes those irritat-
ing shocks!
Dry Skin. Be sure that you apply moisture lotion to your skin at least once a day. The best time to apply it is
just out of the shower because it is then more readily absorbed. Reputable brands are: Vaseline Intensive
Care (Dermatologist recommended), Nivea Cream Moisture Lotion, Keri Lotion and Cetaphil (Cetaphil is
excellent for anyone with sensitive skin or allergies to most lotions and creams). Others are good, too, but
you will get a better product and, therefore, better results if you don't buy the cheapest brand.
Hydration. Drink lots of water!! It's the best way to keep your body hydrated. If you drink coffee, tea,
or caffeinated soda, the caffeine dehydrates your body, so drink even more water to replace the loss
caused by the caffeine. Doctor-recommended water consumption per day is between eight and ten 8
oz. glasses.


                                                      43
        Transportation
The transportation system in the United States is quite different from that in most other countries. Most
Americans own cars, which are the most common form of transportation. Our rail and bus systems are
not as extensive as those of many other countries.
The Metro: Greater Cincinnati’s public transportation system, the Metro, offers bus service in Hamilton
County and portions of Butler County and Clermont County every day of the year. For complete route,
schedule and fare information, check http://www.sorta.com or http://www.go-metro.com, or call Metro at
513-632-7528 (TDD Ohio RelayService 1-800-750-0750), weekdays 6:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. or visit Metro
Center’s information office at 120 East Fourth Street, open weekdays, 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. for more infor-
mation got to www.go-metro.com/ucprogram.html
Taxicabs. There are many taxicab companies in Cincinnati. The Yellow Cab Company (241-2100) is reli-
able and experienced, but there are many other taxicab companies to choose from. You must call to be
picked up; taxis do not cruise around town like in many other big cities.
Out-of-Town Bus Service. The Greyhound bus station is located at 1005 Gilbert Avenue, downtown
Cincinnati. Call 1-800-231-2222 (out of town) or 352-6012 (local) for schedule and fare information. Bus
fares are reasonable and riding the bus is a great way to see the United States and its people.
http://www.greyhound.com
Train Services. The Amtrak train station is located at 1301 Western Avenue, Queensgate. Routes may
be limited. For more information call 1-800-872-7245, 651-3337 (local), or a travel agent.
http://www.amtrak.com
Air Travel. the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Airport is the city’s international airport. Flight and
other travel information is available through any travel agency. Consult the Yellow Pages for conve-
niently located agencies. www.cvgairport.com/contact.html


                       How to Obtain an Ohio Driver’s License

If you have a valid International Driver’s License or a valid driver’s license from another U.S. state, you
may drive a car in Ohio for up to one year from the date of your arrival in the U.S. Your DS-2019 must
have been issued for a duration of time that exceeds one year in order to obtain an Ohio Driver's license.
However, if you purchase a car and register it in your name, or if you do not have a valid driver’s license
from Ohio, the procedure for obtaining an Ohio Driver’s license is as follows:
 1. Get a copy of the Digest of Ohio Motor Vehicle Laws from any Bureau of Motor Vehicles.
 2. Visit the nearest Deputy Registrar Office to get a temporary permit application packet. A fee will be
    charged, and you will need to bring identification with you.
 3. Go to the nearest Bureau of Motor Vehicles license exam station to take a vision test and a written
    test on Ohio motor vehicle regulations and traffic signs. After you pass the written test, you will be
    issued a temporary instruction permit which authorizes you to practice for your road test only when
    there is a licensed driver seated in the front seat.
 4. When you have developed your driving skills well enough, contact the nearest exam station to sched-
    ule a road test.




                                                     44
Sparen groen wanneer u groen gaat.
Sauf le vert quand vous allez vert.
Excepto verde cuando usted va verde.
Save green when you go green.

In any language, riding Metro is a great deal
for you and our planet.

Visit www.go-metro.com or check us out on
Twitter at www.twitter.com/cincinnatimetro




                  45
 5. In order to be issued a license, a foreign national must present:
     a. Valid passport;
     b. U.S. visa;
     c. I-94 card;
     d. One of the following: An I-20, or a DS-2019, along with an original letter from UC International
         Services stating that you are affiliated with UC.
     e. The foreign national must show he or she will reside or has resided in Ohio for 12 months, which
         can normally be proved using the above documentation; and
     f. Each applicant must state whether a permanent Social Security number has been assigned. How-
         ever, a permanent Social Security number is not required to be issued a driver’s license.
As stated above, foreign nationals who will not reside in Ohio for more than 12 months can drive on an
international driver’s license. More detailed information about getting an Ohio driver’s license and license
plates can be found in the Digest of Ohio Motor Vehicle Laws. You can also find information for new Ohio
residents who hold a valid driver’s license from another state and want to get an Ohio driver’s license in
the Digest. Please make sure you purchase auto insurance. It’s against the law to drive without it!
Driver’s License Exam Stations and Deputy Registrar’s Offices:
 10940 Hamilton Avenue, Seven Hills,OH (513) 674-7830 and
 11177 Reading Road, Sharonville, OH   (513) 769-3047
Additional information is available at http://www.dmv.org/oh-ohio/department-motor-vehicles.php.

        Auto Insurance
In order to obtain license plates for a car, you will be required to show proof that you have auto insur-
ance. Many companies offer a variety of auto insurance policies, so you should “shop around”. When
you have selected a policy, read it carefully before signing any documents. The following companies offer
auto insurance.

            Company                              Web Site                            Phone
Allstate Insurance                   http://www.allstate.com             1-847-402-5000
American Family Insurance            http://www.amfam.com                608-249-2111
Geico Direct                         http://www.geico.com                1-800-841-3000
Liberty Mutual                       http://www.libertymutual.com        1-800-225-2467
Nationwide Insurance                 http://www.nationwide.com           1-800-882-2822
Progressive Insurance                http://www.progressive.com          1- 800-776-4737
State Farm Insurance                 http://www.statefarm.com            1-877-734-2265


                         Dining, Entertainment & Shopping
                                                 Dining

Cincinnati is full of places to purchase all amenities to meet your living needs as well as places and ac-
tivities to keep you entertained during your free time. This section of the handbook will serve as a guide
to help satisfy all your needs.


                                                     46
                                                                                  Live music
                                                                                  each weekend
                                                                                  in downtown
                                                                                  Cincinnati
                          Student tickets $12
                     513.381.3300 I csosymphony.org
        Bars and Coffee Shops
Arlin’s Bar: 307 Ludlow Avenue. Arlin’s features an outdoor patio with live jazz on Sundays. Phone:
(513) 751-6566.

Baba Budan’s: 239 W. McMillan. (513) 221-1911

Fries Cafe: 3247 Jefferson Avenue. Fries features seasonal cookouts, outdoor patio, shuffleboard, pool
tables and darts. Phone: (513) 281-9002.

Highland Coffee House: 2839 Highland Avenue. Phone: (513) 861-4151.

Mad Frog: 1 E. McMillan, Clifton. Live music five nights a week. Phone: (513) 784-9119.

Panera Bread: 120 Calhoun Street. (513) 961-6300. Enjoy Coffee, Pastries, Salads and Paninis.

Sitwell's Coffeehouse: 324 Ludlow Ave., Clifton. This is a place for people-watching, book-reading,
studying and playing games. Internet hook-ups allow customers to check their e-mail or do research.
Phone: (513) 281-7487

Starbucks: 202 W. McMillan, Starbucks also specializes in gourmet coffees; Phone: (513) 241-7015.

Sudsy Malone’s Laundry and Bar: 2626 Vine Street, Corryville. Do your laundry while listening to live
music! Phone: (513) 751-2300



                                                 47
        Restaurants
American
Arby's: 180 W. McMillan Street, Clifton. Phone: (513) 281-1528.

Bagel Brothers: 347 Calhoun Street, Clifton. Phone: (513) 221-4000.

Bruegger’s Bagel Bakery: 3317 Clifton Avenue. Phone: (513) 221-2243. Bruegger’s has delicious bagel
sandwiches and soups.

Buffalo Wild Wings: 200 Calhoun Street. Phone: (513) 281-9464.

Camp Washington Chili: 3005 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati. Phone: (513) 541-0061. For a city known for
its love of chili, Camp Washington has always been near the top of the list.

Chicago Gyro: 200 W. McMillan, Clifton. Phone: (513) 621-3828.

Corinthian Restaurant and Lounge: 3253 Jefferson Avenue. Phone: (513) 961-0013.

Daniel’s Restaurant & Pub: 2735 Vine Street, Clifton. Phone: (513) 281-1026.

Frisch’s Big Boy: 3226 Central Pkwy. Phone: (513) 559-0555.

Jersey Mike: 211 W. McMillan, Clifton. Phone: (513) 421-6453.

Jimmy John's: 335 Calhoun St., Clifton. Phone: (513) 751-9555.

Gold Star Chili: 2713 Vine Street, Cincinnati. Phone: (513) 751-8841.

Holy Grail: 13 West Charlton St., Clifton. Phone: (513) 961-2200.

Izzy's Restaurant: Located at 612 Main St. Phone: (513) 241-6246 and 800 Elm St. Phone: (513) 721-
4241. Izzy's is famous for their corned beef sandwiches.

Mt. Adam’s Bar and Grill: 938 Hatch, Mount Adams. Phone: (513) 621-3666.

Penn Station: Clifton 208 W. McMillan, Cincinnati. Phone: (513) 961-7366. Famous hot grilled subs.
http://www.penn-station.com/index.php.

Potbelly: 210 Calhoun St., Clifton. Phone: (513) 961-1500.

Proud Rooster: 345 Ludlow Avenue, Clifton Gaslight District. Phone: (513) 281-4965. Most famous for
their breakfasts, the Proud Rooster also serves chicken and has lunch and dinner menus.

Riddle Road Market: 533 Riddle at Marshall. Phone: (513) 751-7333.

Skyline Chilli: 290 Ludlow Avenue. Phone: (513) 221-2142.

Uncle Woody’s: 339 Calhoun Street, Clifton. Phone: (513) 751-2518.

Asian
China Food: 410 West McMillan, Fairview. Phone: (513) 784-1113.

                                                 48
China House: 1 West Corry Street, University Plaza. Phone: (513) 281-1300.

China Kitchen: 323 Ludlow Avenue, China Kitchen offers free delivery. Phone: (513) 221-5333.

Chinese Combo King: 28 West 4th Street, Downtown. Phone: (513) 369-0101.

Cilantro Vietnamese Bistro: 2510 Clifton Ave., Clifton Heights. Phone: (513) 281-1732.

Dragon City: 8343 Vine Street. Phone: (513) 761-2328.

King Wok: 203 West McMillan St., Clifton. Phone: (513) 723-1999.

Orient Restaurant: 627 Main St., Downtown. Phone: (513) 241-9191.

Red Pepper Chinese Restaurant: 204 W. McMillan St., Clifton. Phone: (513) 559-9229.

Thai Cafe: 316 Ludlow Avenue. Phone: (513) 961-5678.

Thai Express: 213 W McMillan. Phone: (513) 651-9000.

Wah Mee: 435 Elm Street, Downtown. Phone: (513) 579-0544.

Wok Inn Express: 4609 South Vine Street, St. Bernard. Phone: (513) 641-2888.

Yum Yum: 909 Race Street, Downtown. Phone: (513) 721-7705.

French
Cafe de Paris: 17 Garfield Place, Downtown. Phone: (513) 651-1919.

Jean-Robert at Pigall’s: 127 W. Fourth St., Downtown. Phone: (513) 721-1345.

Palace Restaurant: At the Cincinnatian Hotel, Sixth and Vine St., Downtown. Phone: (513) 381-6006.

German
Hofbrauhaus: 200 E 3rd St Newport, KY. Phone: (859) 491-7200.

Lenhardt's: 151 West McMillan St., Clifton. Phone: (513) 281-3600.

Mecklenburg Gardens: 302 E. University Ave. Phone: (513) 221-5353.

Indian
Akash India: 24 E 6th St., Cincinnati. Phone: (513) 723-1300.

Ambar India: 350 Ludlow Avenue, Clifton Gaslight District. Phone: (513) 281-7000.

Amol India: 354 Ludlow Ave. Phone: (513) 961-3600.

Apna India Restaurant: 341 Ludlow Ave., Clifton. Phone: (513) 861-6800.

Krishna Indian Carry-out : 313 Calhoun Street. Phone: (513) 961-2878.

Mayura: 3201 Jefferson Avenue, Clifton. Phone: (513) 221-7125.

                                                 49
Italian
Biagio’s Bistro: 308 Ludlow Avenue. Phone: (513) 861-4777.

Buca di Beppo: 2635 Edmondson Rd., Norwood. Phone: (513) 396-7673.

Campanello’s: 414 Central Avenue, Downtown. Phone: (513) 721-9833.

La Rosa’s: 2717 Vine Street. Phone: (513) 347-1111.

Pomodori’s: 125 W.McMilllan St., Clifton. Phone: (513) 861-0080

Papa Dinos: 349 Calhoun Street. (513) 221-4747

Martino’s: 2618 Vine Street, Corryville. Phone: (513) 221-8487.

Scotti’s: 919 Vine Street, Downtown. Phone: (513) 721-9484.

Japanese
AOI Japanese Cuisine: 1 Levee Way Newport, KY 41071. Located at the Plaza Level on the Valet
Circle. Phone: (859) 431-9400.

Benihana Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar: 126 E 6th Street. Phone: (513) 421-1688.

Ko-sho: 215 E. 9th Street, Downtown. Phone: (513) 665-4950.

Mexican
Burrito Joe’s: 328 E 4th Street, Downtown. Phone: (513) 751-5637.

Cactus Pear: 3215 Jefferson Avenue, Clifton. Phone: (513) 961-7400.

Chipotle: 2507 Clifton Ave. University Hts. Phone: (513) 281-8600.

Currito: 222 Calhoun Street, (513) 281-1500.

Daniels Restaurant: 2735 Vine Street, Corryville. Phone: (513) 281-1026.

Habanero: 358 Ludlow Avenue, Clifton. Phone: (513) 961-6800.

La Mexicana: 642 Monmouth St., Newport, KY. Phone: (859) 291-3520.

Middle-Eastern
Andy’s Mediterranean Grill: 906 Nassau St., Walnut Hills. Phone: 281-9791.

Floyd’s: 129 Calhoun Street, Clifton. Phone: (513) 221-2434.

Mediterranean House: 235 W McMillan. Phone: (513) 784-0144.

Vegetarian
Clifton Natural Foods: 169 West McMillan Avenue, Clifton. Phone: (513) 961-6111.


                                                 50
Myra’s Dionysus: 121 Calhoun Street, Mount Auburn. Phone: (513) 961-1578.
Many of these restaurants have discount coupons available in the Bearcash and Saver Coupon books,
which are found at many campus locations.


                                             Entertainment

        Amusement Parks
Coney Island Sunlite Pool: Located at 6201 Kellogg Avenue, Coney Island has the world’s largest re-
circulating pool complete with a rowboat lifeguard patrol. The pool features the Zoom Flume, the Zip, two
thrilling water slides plus miniature golf, paddle boats, tennis courts and a picnic area. Open daily Memorial
Day through Labor Day (232-8230).
Cedar Fair Kings Island: Located North on I-71 exit 24 (6300 Kings Island Drive), Kings Island is the
largest and best theme park in the Midwest. Features include thrilling roller coasters such as The Beast,
Flight of Fear and Diamond Back, Whitewater canyon, Planet snoopy and a 16 slide wet and wild water
park. Open daily Memorial Day through Labor Day, and weekends only from mid April to Memorial Day
and Labor Day to the end of October. Special events are scheduled for Halloween and sometimes during
the Christmas holiday season.
The Beach Water Park: I-71 North Exit 25 (King’s Mills Road, across from Kings Island, 2590 Water Park
Dr.). The Beach features a wave pool, a real sand beach, 8 main attraction water slides, sand volleyball
and a video arcade. Open Memorial Day through Labor Day (398-7946).

        Dance
Cincinnati Ballet Company at Music Hall: The season runs September through April. The annual
performance of “The Nutcracker” in late December has become a Cincinnati tradition. Student rates are
available. The Cincinnati Ballet participates in Enjoy the Arts (see Fine Arts section below for further de-
tails). Phone: (513) 621-5282.
Corbett Theater: UC Main Campus. The College-Conservatory of Music offers a full slate dance perfor-
mances yearly. Phone: (513) 556-4183.

        Festivals in Cincinnati
Appalachian Festival: One of Cincinnati’s most popular annual festivals -- The Appalachian Festival--
began 38 years ago in the basement of Cincinnati’s Music Hall as a quaint crafts’ exhibition developed by
the Cincinnati Junior League. Phone: (513) 251-3378 http://www.appalachianfestival.org/.
Festival of Lights: A beautiful display of Christmas lights and fireworks at the Cincinnati Zoo, nightly in
November and December. Phone: (513) 281-4700.
May Festival: Featuring the May Festival Chorus and the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Festival
presents marvelously concentrated choral repertoire rarely found in the usual concert season. Many choral
festivals are largely repetitions of the standard repertoire from the subscription season. Nothing about the
Cincinnati May Festival is routine - musically, socially or personally. http://www.mayfestival.com/
Oktoberfest: Held within a six-block area surrounding Fountain Square in downtown Cincinnati in Sep-
tember. http://www.oktoberfest-zinzinnati.com/.




                                                     51
Panegyri Greek Festival: Greek food, beverages, music, dancing, grocery and boutique. Held in June at
the Holy Trinity-St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 7000 Winton Road, Finneytown. http://www.greek-
fest.com/North/Cincinnati/cincinnati.html.
Queen City Blues Festival: Held in Cincinnati at Sawyer Point Park, by the Ohio River in the downtown
area. Over 30 national, regional, and local acts. Everything from electric blues to acoustic blues to boogie
woogie piano to gospel. http://www.cincyblues.org/events.htm.
Riverfest: Live bands, food and a fantastic 45 minute fireworks display on the Sunday of Labor Day
weekend. This is the third largest fireworks display in the country.
Summerfair: 300 artists from the US and Canada, 5 stages of local entertainers, strolling performers,
youth arts festival, kids' hands-on crafts and delicious food court. http://www.summerfair.org/.
Tall Stacks: The Tall Stacks Music, Arts & Heritage Festival presents music, food, fun and riverboats to
entertain and educate thousands and to once again shine positive national attention on the Tri-State http://
www.tallstacks.com/. The festival is held every 4 years. The last one occured in 2006.
Taste of Cincinnati: A gastronomic feast held in late May, downtown on Central Parkway. Taste portions
of many restaurant specialties for $2.00 or less!

        Fine Arts
The best way to get up to date information on concerts, exhibits, plays, lectures, and other cul-
tural events, is to consult the listings of events in the Cincinnati Enquirer or Cincinnati Post or at:
http://www.cincinnati.com.

        Local Sports
UC Bearcats: football, basketball, baseball, soccer, tennis and other sports are free with student I.D
Cincinnati Reds Baseball: Great American Ballpark. Tickets are $7.00 to $17.00.
Cincinnati Bengals Football: Paul Brown Stadium. Tickets are $34.00 and up.
Cincinnati Cyclones Hockey: US Bank Arena. Tickets are $ 12.00 to$ 24.50.The US Bank Arena, located
in downtown Cincinnati, at 100 Broadway, hosts various events including concerts rodeos, motorcross
and monster truck races, and figure skating. Phone: (513) 421-4111.

        Movies
First Run Theaters
Esquire: 320 Ludlow Avenue in Clifton. Foreign films, art movies, and independent films. Call 281-8750
or 281-2803. http://www.esquiretheatre.com/home.htm
AMC Theaters: Located in The Newport on the Levee, Kentucky AMC Entertainment is a leader in the
theatrical exhibition industry. Call 859-261-8100 to get AMC show times and reserve tickets with a ma-
jor credit card. http://www.amctheatres.com/
Showcase Cinemas/National Amusements: http://www.nationalamusements.com/
Erlanger (Kentucky): off I-75 South, 3220 meadow lane             Norwood: Reading Road.
Phone: (859) 342-8866                                             Phone: (513) 351-2232
Florence: 2028 Florence Mall, KY                                  Springdale: 12064 Springfield Road
Phone: (859) 371-1231                                             Phone: (513) 671-6884


                                                    52
Kenwood: Kenwood Town Centre, 7875 Montgomery Rd.                  Western Hills: 5870 Harrison Avenue
Phone: (513) 791-2248                                              Phone: (513) 699-1500

 Milford: 500 Rivers Edge Drive, Milford
 Phone: (513) 699-1500


Second Run Theaters (Super Saver Cinemas)
Cincinnati Mills: Forest Park-1st run shows $4.50 before 6:00, $7.00 after 6:00; all 2nd run shows are
$2.60 at all times. Phone: (513) 671-1710.
Danbarry Dollar Saver: 5190 Glen Crossing - $2.50 at all times. Phone: (513) 451-2300

        Museums and Other Attractions
Art Academy of Cincinnati: 1212 Jackson St. (513) 562-6262, located next to the Art Museum. Aside
from a variety of temporary and student exhibits the Art Academy also offers non-credit workshops and
art classes for the public. For more information, call the Community Art Education Department at (513)
562-8748. http://www.artacademy.edu.
Carew Tower and Fountain Square: Located on the corner of 5th Street and Vine Street (downtown).
On a sunny day there is a great view of the entire city from the top of our tallest building. Afterwards, stop
and enjoy ice cream on Fountain Square. However, watch out for the pigeons, because they are always
hungry!
Cincinnati Art Museum: 953 Eden Park Drive (513) 721-2787. Open year round, free ad-
mission on Saturday, and closed Mondays. 118 galleries and many temporary special exhibits.
http://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org.
Cincinnati Museum Center: Located on 1301 Western Avenue (513) 287-7000. An art deco train station
turned into a world-class museum. It’s the world’s largest half-dome structure with a magnificent series
of mosaics depicting the history of transportation. There’s also a children’s discovery center, a pre-school
playhouse, and a garden area. The center includes the Cincinnati History Museum, Cinergy's Children
Museum and the Museum of Natural History and Science, which includes a planetarium and all new
exhibits. Union Terminal is also the proud host to the Omnimax Theater which plays special feature films
with great acoustics and almost 180 degrees of screen surrounding the audience. This is a wonderful
thing to do while in Cincinnati! Admission is charged. http://www.cincymuseum.org.
Cincinnati Zoo: 3400 Vine St. Two blocks North of the Medical Center on the corner of Erkenbrecher and
Vine (513) 281-4701, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is consistently ranked as one of the top zoos
in the country. Opened in 1875, it is the nation's second oldest zoo and a national historic landmark. The
Zoo's 75 acres house more than 500 animal species and 3,000 plant varieties. This not-for-profit entity is
internationally known for its success in the protection and propagation of endangered animals and plants,
and engages in research and conservation projects around the world. Visit http://www.cincinnatizoo.org
for information on special events, current hours, admission, membership and more.
Contemporary Arts Center: Located at 44 East 6th St (downtown). (513) 345-8400, the Contemporary
Arts Center has all the latest in weird and wonderful art! Admission is free on Mondays from 5pm-9pm.
http://www.spiral.org.
Krohn Conservatory: 1501 Eden Park Dr. in Eden Park. (513) 421-4086. It's open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
the Krohn Conservatory contains specimens of tropical plants and has beautiful seasonal floral displays.
During the winter holidays, there is a giant Christmas tree and live manger scene. Admission is free.

                                                     53
National Underground Railroad Freedom Center: 50 East Freedom Way (513) 333-7500. The Freedom
Center is located on the banks of the Ohio River in Cincinnati, Ohio. The National Underground Railroad
Freedom Center stands as the nation’s newest monument to freedom. It brings to life the importance - and
relevance - of struggles for freedom around the world and throughout history, including today. Made up of
three buildings that symbolize the cornerstones of freedom - courage, cooperation, and perseverance - the
Freedom Center’s curving architecture reflects the winding river and the often-changing path to freedom.
There is a charge for admission, except on special occasions as announced http://www.freedomcenter.
org.
Newport Aquarium: Located on One Aquarium Way, Newport Ky. 41071-1679. It offers unexpected delights
of undersea creatures and many adventures in an exciting fishbowl. Price: Adults $17.95; Seniors (citizens,
65+) $13.95; children (ages 2-12) $10.95. Phone: (859) 261-7444. http://www.newportaquarium.com.
Taft Museum: Located at 316 Pike St. downtown (513) 241-0343. Built in 1820, the Taft family residence
includes collections of Rembrandt, Croga, and Chinese and French art. Admission is free on Wednesdays.
http://www.taftmuseum.org.

        Music
Cincinnati Opera at Music Hall: 1243 Elm Street (513) 241-2742. The season runs from June through
August, with additional performances in March and September. The Cincinnati Opera honors Enjoy the
Arts membership discounts. http://www.cincinnatiopera.com.
Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra: The Orchestra plays at the Memorial Hall, located at 1406 Elm
Street and offers several concerts during the year. Call (513) 723-1182 for more information.
http://www.cincychamberorch.com.
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra: At Music Hall and Riverbend. For ticket sales, call (513) 381-3300.
Regular season (Music Hall) runs September through May. http://www.cincinnatisymphony.org/home.
asp.
College Conservatory of Music (CCM): Performances are on the main campus of UC, usually at Patricia
Corbett Theater. CCM sponsors a variety of events, including performances by the renowned LaSalle
Quartet, CCM’s Philharmonic Orchestra, and various ensembles presenting Baroque through contemporary
music. Students with a ID can attend most of the events for free. A free schedule of events for each quar-
ter is available by calling the box office at (513) 556-4183. http://www.ccm.uc.edu/events/calendar.aspx.
Riverbend Music Theater: 6295 Kellogg Ave. Large outdoor amphitheater with the closest seats under-
cover (price difference). Big name shows all summer long! Phone: (513) 232-6220. http://www.riverbend-
music.com.
US Bank Arena: 100 Broadway (downtown). Home to indoor concerts and entertainment events. Phone:
(513) 421-4111.

        Theater
Playhouse in the Park: 962 Mt. Adams Dr. (513) 421-3888. Cincinnati’s major summer theater which
presents a variety of productions from classical Greek to contemporary pieces. Two separate theaters
carry different schedules: the large Marx Theater and Shelterhouse offer shows from September to June.
The smaller Marx Theater offers summer productions. Student rates are available. Playhouse in the Park
participates in the Enjoy the Arts program.

Bogart’s: 2621 Vine Street in Corryville, Bogart's has live concerts by national and international acts.
Phone: (513) 281-8400.

                                                    54
Showboat Majestic: 435 E. Mehring Way (downtown). Phone: (513) 241-6550, during April through
October, this theater has local productions of musicals, reviews, and dramas. The cost is $16.00 each for
students, senior citizens and groups of 20 or more (regular prices are $17.00).
Taft Theater: Located on the corner of 5th and Sycamore St. in downtown, Cincinnati, (call (513) 721-
8883 for a recorded message) this theater presents many Broadway-type musicals, concerts, spoken
word tours and shows. No student rates.
The Aronoff Center: 650 Walnut Street, downtown Cincinnati. Phone: (513) 721-3344. Administration
tickets: (513) 241-7469 Cincinnati’s newest theater which presents a variety of productions from Broad-
way musicals to concerts.

         Parks
Alms Park: Tucked away off Tusculum Avenue in Mt. Lookout, Alms is one of the city’s smaller and qui-
eter parks.
Ault Park: Located on Principio and Observatory Avenues in Hyde Park, this 237 acre park is the city’s
largest, featuring an extensive garden of roses, peonies, dahlias and annuals in season. A good place
to catch free summer symphony concerts as well as a nice Fourth of July fireworks celebration. As with
many of Cincinnati’s parks, Ault Park has a nice view of the city.
Bellevue Park: Located on Ohio Avenue, this park is small but it is close by and has a fantastic view of
the city.
Burnet Woods: Situated at Clifton Avenue between Martin Luther King Drive and Ludlow Avenue, this
park offers the Trailside Nature Center, free Sunday concerts in the summertime, a great set of swings,
and picnic facilities.
DeVou Park: This park is actually located in Covington, Kentucky, across the Ohio river from Cincinnati.
Take I-75 South to the Covington, 5th Street exit. Turn left at the first traffic light and left again at 4th Street.
At the end of 4th Street turn right. Then turn left onto Western Avenue. Turn a hairpin right up a hill after
the first stop sign and you’ll arrive at a fantastic view, Cincinnati’s “Inspiration Point”. DeVou also has golf,
tennis and a beautiful ampitheater.
Eden Park: At 2000 Gilbert Avenue between Walnut Hills and Mt. Adams, Eden Park is Cincinnati’s pre-
mier park, hosting the Art Museum, Playhouse in the Park, the Cincinnati Historical Society and Krohn
Conservatory. Free concerts and other events at the Seasongood Pavilion take place during the summer.
The park has some spectacular views, a Parcourse Fitness Trail, and a reflection pool and fountain perfect
for wading in the summer and skating in the winter.
Mt. Echo: On Elberon Avenue on the west side of town, this park has one of the best scenic overlooks of
the city, the Ohio River and the hills of Kentucky.
Mt. Storm Park: Situated at Lafayette and Ludlow Avenues, this is an accessible getaway spot that is
nice for an afternoon picnic. Sitting on top of a hill which overlooks the “I-75 Valley” between Clifton and
the west side of town, Mt. Storm Park has a very nice view of the city.
Winton Woods: Completely surrounding the city of Greenhills, Winton Woods, at 2,449 acres, is one of
the biggest and most popular parks in the Hamilton County Park District. The park has a 3-mile paved
hike-bike trail (bike rental is available), bridle trail and riding center on the south side of Winton Lake. The
park also has a dozen picnic areas, a 1-mile fitness trail, a boathouse, nine shelters and an 18-hole Frisbee
golf course and a regular golf course. Parky’s Farm, a combination play farm and petting zoo, is a great
attraction for kids. Winton Rd. and Lake Forest Dr., Springfield Township. Phone: (513) 521-7275
Yeatman’s Cove Park: Immediately adjacent to Sawyer Point Park (downtown), Yeatman’s Cove features
                                                        55
the Serpentine Wall and splashing fun at the Concourse Fountain wading pool. The big event at the park
is the annual WEBN Labor Day fireworks display, one of the biggest and best displays in the country.
Summer parties in the park are also held here for free.

        Discounts
Enjoy the Arts: Entertainment discounts can be received for many activities by obtaining a membership
(full-time students: $25.00 a year, individuals age 30 and under: $40.00) in Enjoy the Arts. Membership
benefits include the following:
       • Over $500 in free tickets to arts events and museums in the Cincinnati area.
       • Two $12 tickets (or lowest advertised student rate) to many dance, music, and theatre events,
          as often as you'd like.
       • Get two $10 tickets to most 20/20 Festival events (some discounts vary).
       • Free and discounted tickets are good for both the member and a guest.
       • Really fun member-exclusive social events.
       • Discounted movie tickets (purchased directly from us).
       • Discounted Cincinnati Zoo and Newport Aquarium tickets.


Contact Enjoy the Arts at (513) 621-4700, 1338 Main Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45210-2333 Web site:
http://www.etastart.com
Entertainment Coupon Booklet: Approximately $40.00. "Two for one" discounts for many recreational
activities, including several fine arts performances. This coupon booklet contains discounts for various
restaurants from gourmet to fast food and discounts for major movie theater chains. Call (513) 672-3100
for information.

                                              Shopping

        Bookstores Off-campus
DuBois Bookstore: Located at 321 Calhoun Street, the DuBois Bookstore offers an alternative to the
UC Bookstore. They also carry textbooks, school supplies, clothes, posters, etc., and have late hours.
Phone: (513) 281-4120.
Student Bookstore: Located at 335 Calhoun St., the Student Bookstore also offers textbooks, school
supplies, clothes, posters, etc. Phone: (513) 221-7771.

        Clothing
There are many clothing shops in downtown Cincinnati. Located just 5 to 10 minutes from campus, down-
town is a convenient shopping location and easily accesible by bus. Go south on Vine to Central Parkway,
right (west) on Central Parkway to left (south) on Race Street. Begin looking for parking once you’ve come
to 7th Street. Shopping downtown offers the advantages of a concentrated number of stores within short
walking distance of each other. Remember that the hours of downtown stores are more likely to follow 9
to 5 working hours than stores in suburban malls which often stay open until 9:00 or 10:00 p.m.
Sears: Located at Northgate, Tri-County and Eastgate Malls, among others.

                                                   56
Macy's: At Fountain Place downtown, as well as in Tri-County, Kenwood, and other mall locations.
Saks Fifth Avenue: Located at Fifth and Race Streets, also downtown, Saks has high quality men’s and
women’s clothing.
Tower Place Mall: At 28 West Fourth Street downtown, this mall has a wide variety of clothing and other
shops. It’s the place to shop downtown.

         Food Shops
Asian
Francis International Market: 4414 Colerain Avenue (Northside); phone: 681-9253.
Asian Market: 11259 Reading Road (Sharonville); phone: 563-9922.
Dong Ying Asian Market: 3207 Jefferson Ave, 861-6007.
K&P Oriental Food Store: 9731 Montgomery Road (Montgomery); phone: 891-9280.
The Saigon Market: 119 W. Elder St. 45202; phone: 721-8053.
Thanh Mai: 918 East McMillan (Walnut Hills); phone: 221-2929.
Tokyo Oriental Food Shop: 10738 Reading Road (Evendale); phone: 563-5990.

Indian
Indian Grocers: 7617 Reading Road (Roselawn); phone: 821-0304.
Jagdeep's Indian and Pakistani Grocery: 356 Ludlow Ave, 961-2699.

Jewish
Queen City Kosher/Aris Grill: 4070 East Galbraith (Dillonvale); phone: 792-9961.

Mediterranean
Athena Foods: 8548 Winton Road (Finneytown); phone: 729-0440.
Mediterranean Foods: Located at 314 Ludlow Avenue, this is a small specialty grocery which offers some
take-out deli items. The Mediterranean Foods phone number is 961-6060.
Mediterranean Imports: 108 West Elder (Over-the-Rhine); phone: 241-8222.

Miscellaneous
Clifton Natural Foods: In the area near campus on 169 W. McMillan St., this is a good place to pick up
health food, vitamins and spices. They also have a juice bar, serve frozen yogurt, and have deli food for
takeout; phone: 961-6111.
Findlay Market: This open air farmer’s market is located at 1801 Elder Street in the Over-the-Rhine area.
This is a great place to get good buys on very fresh fruit and vegetables, meats, eggs, cheese and more.
The earlier you get there the better the selection. Findlay Market is open Monday and Tuesday, 8:00 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. and Wednesday thru Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m; phone: 721-6533.
Marina’s International Deli: Specializes in European Food. 11426 Montgomery Rd. 469-6100,
http://www.marinasdeli.com.



                                                  57
         Grocery and Drug Stores
Bigg’s Place: Located in five areas around Cincinnati: Eastgate, Ridge Road, Colerain Avenue, and
Western Hills. "Bigg” is the correct word: There are over 50 checkout lanes and large carts. This is a store
with groceries, electronics, clothing, and much more. Prices tend to be low because of the large quantities
they buy. The Ridge Road, Colerain Avenue and Western Hills Bigg’s have food only.
CVS Pharmacy: Located at 101 W.H. Taft Rd. 569-4300. Also open 24 hours a day, it’s the place to go
for pharmaceutical products.
Kroger: Located in the University Plaza. This is a well-stocked, crowded place, especially on Fridays.
Kroger honors “Double Coupons”, and offers good specials and a decent selection of wine and beer.
They have a salad bar with all the fixings where you pay by the pound. The Kroger stores have a good
bakery as well.
Jungle Jim’s: 5440 Dixie Highway (Fairfield); phone: 674-6000. Specializing in international cuisine from
around the world, Jungle Jim’s is a favorite shopping location for many students.
Trader Joe's: There are more than 2000 unique grocery items in their label, all at honest everyday low
prices. All of their private label products have their own “angle,” i.e., vegetarian, Kosher, organic or just
plain decadent, and all have minimally processed ingredients. Located in Kenwood, 7788 Montgomery
Road Cincinnati, OH (513) 984-3452. Across the street from Taco Bell. Open daily from 9am-9pm.
Walgreens: Located in the University Plaza, this is an inexpensive store open 24 hours a day. It’s the
place to go for pharmaceutical products. Look for coupons in the Sunday papers.

         Ice Cream, Bakeries, and Sweetshops
Cold Stone Creamery: Cold Stone Creamery offers ice cream, yogurt and Italian sorbet. Located at 1
Levee Way, Newport, KY 41071
Graeter’s: When you speak of ice cream in Cincinnati, there is only one name, Graeter's. Located at
332 Ludlow Avenue in Clifton’s Gaslight District, they make terrific ice cream and pastries. Phone: (513)
281-4749
UDF (United Dairy Farmers): 3325 Clifton Avenue. (513) 751-5132. Ice Cream is their specialty although
they are a convenience store carrying many products.
Servatii: Located at 286 Ludlow Avenue. Servatii specializes in French pastries, Vienna tortes and vari-
ous other sweets. Phone: (513) 861-0672.




VIII. Useful Websites
         University of Cincinnati
College of Allied              http://www.cahs.uc.edu          School of Social Work:   http://www.uc.edu/socialwork
Health Sciences:
College of Applied Sciences:   http://www.uc.edu/cas           Undergraduate            http://www.admissions.uc.edu
                                                               Admissions:              1-513-556-2417
McMicken College of            http://www.artsci.uc.edu        Graduate School:         http://www.grad.uc.edu
Arts & Sciences:


                                                          58
College of Business:             http://www.business.uc.edu        UC International         http://www.isso.uc.edu
                                                                   Services:
Clermont College:                http://www.ucclermont.edu         Bookstore:               http://www.uc.edu/bookstore

College Conservatory of          http://www.ccm.uc.edu             Honors Scholars          http://www.uc.edu/honors
Music:                                                             Program:

College of Design,               http://www.daap.uc.edu            Housing & Dining         http://www.uc.edu/housing
Architecture, Art & Planning:                                      Services:
College of Education, Criminal   http://www.cech.uc.edu            One Stop Student         http://www.onestop.uc.edu
Justice & Human Services:                                          Service Center:
College of Engineering:          http://www.eng.uc.edu             Orientation:             http://www.uc.edu/orientation
College of Nursing:              http://www.nursing.uc.edu         Student Activities &     http://www.uc.edu/sald
                                                                   Leadership
                                                                   Development:
College of Pharmacy:             http://www.pharmacy.uc.edu        Student Financial Aid:   http://www.financialaid.uc.edu
Raymond Walters College:         http://www.rwc.uc.edu

The City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport             http://www.cvgairport.com/
Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau                      http://www.cincyusa.com/
Cincinnati's Local News Guide                                  http://www.cincinnati.com/
Regional Tourism Network                                       http://www.cincinnatiusa.com/
Best of the Web - Cincinnati                                   http://local.botw.org/Ohio/Cincinnati/
Cincinnati's Entertainment Guide                               http://rodeo.cincinnati.com/cinweekly/




                                                              59
Appendices




    60
61
62
                                                                                           U.S. Department of State                                                                                   OMB APPROVAL NO.1405-0119
                                                                                                                                                                                                      EXPIRES: 07-31-2011
                          CERTIFICATE OF ELIGIBILITY FOR EXCHANGE VISITOR (J-1) STATUS                                                                                                                ESTIMATED BURDEN TIME: 45 min
                                                                                                                                                                                                      *See Page 2

1. Family Name:                                                     First Name:                                             Middle Name:                                                Gender:
  Bearcat                                                            Joseph                                                                                                                 MALE                N0000126226
Date of Birth (mm-dd-yyyy) :                  City of Birth:                Country of Birth:                             Citizenship Country Code:         Citizenship Country:
 12-18-1964                             Kabul                                           AFGHANISTAN                           AF                              AFGHANISTAN
                                                                                                                                                                                                                             J-1
Legal Permanent Residence Country Code: Legal Permanent Residence Country:                               Position Code:             Position:
 AF                                    AFGHANISTAN                                                            213              UNIVERSITY TEACHING STAFF INCLUDING
Primary Site of Activity:     1234 Bearcat Way                                                                                             RESEARCHERS
                              Cincinnati, OH 45221

2. Program Sponsor:                                                                                                                                         Exchange Visitor Program Number:
 University of Cincinnati                                                                                                                                             P-1-00733
Participating Program Official Description:
 PROFESSOR; RESEARCH SCHOLAR; SHORT-TERM SCHOLAR; STUDENT ASSOCIATE; STUDENT BACHELORS; STUDENT
 DOCTORATE; STUDENT INTERN; STUDENT MASTERS; STUDENT NON-DEGREE




Purpose of this form:      Begin new program; accompanied by number (0) of immediate family members.

3. Form Covers Period:                                               4. Exchange Visitor Category:
                                                                        RESEARCH SCHOLAR
 From (mm-dd-yyyy) :       09-01-2010
                                                                     Subject/Field Code:         Subject/Field Code Remarks:
 To      (mm-dd-yyyy) :    08-31-2015                                   26.0701                  Research in Zoology.
5 . During the period covered by this form, the total estimated financial support (in U.S. $) is to be provided to the exchange visitor by:
  Current Program Sponsor funds : $150,000.00
  Total : $150,000.00




Sample
6. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE / DHS USE OR CERTIFICATION BY
   RESPONSIBLE OFFICER OR ALTERNATE RESPONSIBLE OFFICER
   THAT A NOTIFICATION COPY OF THIS FORM HAS BEEN PROVIDED
   TO THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE ( INCLUDE DATE).




8. Statement of Responsible Officer for Releasing Sponsor(FOR TRANSFER OF PROGRAM)
   Effective date (mm-dd-yyyy) :
                                                                                           7.   Ronald Cushing


                                                                                                2548 Clifton Avenue
                                                                                                Cincinnati, OH 45221
                                                                                                                          Name of Official Preparing Form



                                                                                                          Address of Responsible Officer or Alternate Responsible Officer



                                                                                                          Signature of Responsible Officer or Alternate Responsible Officer


                                                                    . Transfer of this exchange visitor from program number                                               sponsored by
   to the program specified in item 2 is necessary or highly desirable and is in conformity with the objectives of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, as amended.
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Responsible Officer

                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Title

                                                                                                                                                                                                           513-556-4278
                                                                                                                                                                                                             Telephone Number

                                                                                                                                                                                                             02-09-2010
                                                                                                                                                                                                             Date (mm-dd-yyyy)




                    Signature of Responsible Officer or Alternate Responsible Officer                                                                                                    Date (mm-dd-yyyy) of Signature

PRELIMINARY ENDORSEMENT OF CONSULAR OR IMMIGRATION OFFICER REGARDING SECTION 212(e) OF THE                                                                         TRAVEL VALIDATION BY RESPONSIBLE OFFICER
IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT AND PL 94-484, AS AMENDED (see item 1(a) of page 2).                                                                                               (Maximum validation period is 1 year*)
The Exchange Visitor in the above program:
                                                                                                                                                                *EXCEPT: Maximum validation period is up to 6 months for Short-term
 1.            Not subject to the two-year residence requirement.                                                                                                Scholars and 4 months for Camp Counselors and Summer Work/Travel.
                                                                                                                                                                (1) Exchange Visitor is in good standing at the present time
                                                                                         (ALL USAID PARTICIPANTS G-2-00263 AND ALL ALIEN
 2.            Subject to two-year residence requirement based on:                      PHYSICIANS SPONSORED BY P-3-04510 ARE SUBJECT TO
                                                                                         THE TWO-YEAR HOME RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT )
          A.           Government financing and/or
                                                                                                                                                                                               Date (mm-dd-yyyy)
          B.           The Exchange Visitor Skills List and/or

          C.           PL 94-484 as amended
                                                                                                                                                                       Signature of Responsible Officer or Alternate Responsible Officer
                                                                                                                                                                (2) Exchange Visitor is in good standing at the present time


                                               Name                                                                         Title

                                                                                                                                                                                               Date (mm-dd-yyyy)

                           Signature of Consular or Immigration Officer                                                Date (mm-dd-yyyy)

          THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MAKE FINAL DETERMINATION REGARDING 212 (e).                                                             Signature of Responsible Officer or Alternate Responsible Officer

      EXCHANGE VISITOR CERTIFICATION: I have read and agree with the statement in item 2 on page 2 of this document.



                                         Signature of Applicant                                                                            Place                                                               Date (mm-dd-yyyy)

DS-2019                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Page 1 of 2
07-2008




                                                                                                                     63
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