Docstoc

Brazilians giving up their American dream - DOC

Document Sample
Brazilians giving up their American dream - DOC Powered By Docstoc
					            MIGRATION &
INTEGRATION MEDIA
                   SUMMARY

                           JULY 1st-15th
                                   2009

The Center for International Migration and Integration (CIMI) is an
independent non-profit organization dedicated to the development of effective
practices in the fields of migration and integration. CIMI seeks to facilitate
effective migration management through knowledge exchange, capacity-
building and technical assistance to government and non-government
agencies. Activities include courses, consultations and project development.



          For questions and comments: tsurischoffman@gmail.com
                                       Table of Contents
Africa & The Middle East ............................................ 2
  General ...................................................................................................................... 2
  Enforcement ............................................................................................................. 3
  Employment.............................................................................................................. 4
  Education .................................................................................................................. 5
Asia ................................................................................ 6
  General ...................................................................................................................... 6
  Enforcement ............................................................................................................. 6
  Employment.............................................................................................................. 6
  Integration ................................................................................................................ 7
Europe ........................................................................... 9
  General ...................................................................................................................... 9
  Enforcement ........................................................................................................... 12
  Employment............................................................................................................ 13
  Health ...................................................................................................................... 14
  Integration .............................................................................................................. 15
Oceania ........................................................................ 16
  General .................................................................................................................... 16
  Employment............................................................................................................ 16
  Education ................................................................................................................ 17
North & South America ............................................. 19
  General .................................................................................................................... 19
  Enforcement ........................................................................................................... 21
  Employment............................................................................................................ 21
  Education ................................................................................................................ 23
  Health ...................................................................................................................... 23
  Integration .............................................................................................................. 25
Refugees & Asylum Seekers....................................... 26
Remittances ................................................................. 27
Circular Migration ..................................................... 29
Events .......................................................................... 30
Publications ................................................................. 31




                                                               1
                    Africa & The Middle East
General
Interior Min. set to open gates for 8,700 more Falashmura
Ha'aretz (Israel), July 14, 2009
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1100036.html
Two Interior Ministry delegates will leave for Ethiopia in the coming days to examine
whether 3,000 Falashmura at a transit camp in the city of Gundar are eligible to
immigrate to Israel, Haaretz has learned. Sources close to Interior Minister Eli Yishai
believe that all 8,700 Falashmura there will be examined eventually. The decision
signals a sharp reversal of policy from the previous government, which sought to end
aliyah from Ethiopia. The Falashmura predicament surfaced after Operation Moses,
which brought some 14,000 Ethiopian Jews to Israel in the 1980s. Demands then
began for Israel to absorb the Falashmura, Ethiopian Jews who converted to
Christianity or have other claims to Judaism. Some 26,000 Falashmura have since
come to Israel and converted to Orthodox Judaism, making them eligible for
citizenship under the Law of Return. In 2005, the government ceased all Falashmura
immigration, claiming a continuation of the existing policy will result in the
immigration of individuals completely unconnected to Judaism. However,
immigration continued, in such frameworks as humanitarian cases and family
reunification.


Israel bringing in thousands of migrant workers despite recent arrests
Ha'aretz (Israel), July 13, 2009
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1099700.html
Despite the high-profile operation by the immigration authorities to arrest hundreds of
illegal immigrants, Israel is still issuing permits to bring in new workers, Haaretz has
learned. There are currently tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of
migrant workers, though just 56,000 work permits have been issued to caretakers.


Absorption Ministry woos Maccabiah athletes




                                            2
Maccabiah participants who decide to stay in Israel will get grants, scholarships
and help in finding a job
Ynet (Israel), July 13, 2009
http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3745438,00.html
The Immigrant Absorption Ministry will try to persuade as many Maccabiah Games
athletes arriving in Israel as possible to stay in the country and make it their home
after the event ends. Some 5,700 participants from over 60 countries have come to
Israel to attend the 18th Maccabiah Games, which officially open on Monday, July
13. Any athlete or staff member who decides to make aliyah will receive an
absorption package that exceeds the one currently being given to athlete olim, and
which will include a one-time NIS 4,000 (roughly $1,000) grant to purchase sports
gear, scholarships for students to the tune of NIS 1,200 ($300) per month for nine
months and assistance with job placement.


Enforcement
Immigrant attacked by police wins damages
The Dispatch (South Africa), July 14, 2009
http://www.dispatch.co.za/article.aspx?id=329821
The Port Elizabeth High Court has awarded a Cameroon immigrant R307 000 in
damages for a 'sustained and brutal' attack on him by Port Elizabeth police. Restaurant
and property owner Appolinaire Ngamekam, 44, had claimed that the arresting
officer, Inspector Ivan Westraadt , swore at him and called him a 'Nigerian' when he
tried to board a Cape Town-bound bus in Port Elizabeth in 2007. He said Westraadt
had slapped him, sprayed him with pepper spray and then repeatedly kicked him when
he fell to the ground. Ngamekam was left comatose for about 18 hours after the
assault with a broken ankle and bruises . Police denied the assault but admitted
arresting and detaining Ngamekam, who acquired his South African citizenship in
2005.


Sudanese migrant workers attack immigration officers in Tel Aviv
Haaretz (Israel), July 12, 2009
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1099575.html
Immigration officers were beaten by migrant workers in Tel Aviv Sunday evening,



                                            3
for the second time in a week. The attack occurred at south Tel Aviv's Levinsky Park
during a routine check of documents, after an inspector from the newly created 'Oz'
task force stopped a Sudanese national who did not have the necessary papers on
him. The Sudanese man refused to accompany the officers and - together with five
Sudanese friends - began to attack the inspection team. Police were called to the scene
and all six attackers were transported to the unit's facility in Holon.


New Immigration Police rounds up 300 refugees, illegal workers
Ha'aretz (Israel), July 2, 2009
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1097233.html
A newly-created task force dealing with illegal immigration carried out its first raid on
Wednesday, rounding up 300 foreign laborers in Tel Aviv's southern
neighborhoods. Some 100 members of the 'Oz' task force, which has replaced the former
Immigration Police, raided the Gan Levinsky area near Tel Aviv's new Central Bus
Station, where they filled four buses with foreign workers, a witness reported. As of late
last night, 88 workers and refugees rounded up in the raid remained in police custody.
Both legal and illegal workers were detained, as part of the 'Hadera-Gadera' law, which
rules that foreign workers must reside north or south of the two coastal Israeli cities. As
part of the enforcement of the law, no minors or elderly people will be held, to give their
families time to leave the city under their own volition.


Employment
Shura Council Passes Domestic Worker Protections
CommonDreams.org, July 10, 2009
http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2009/07/10-9
Saudi Arabia's Shura Council passed a bill on July 8, 2009, to improve legal protections
for the estimated 1.5 million domestic workers in the country, but the measure still falls
short of international standards, Human Rights Watch said today. The bill goes from the
Shura Council, an appointed consultative body, to the cabinet, which can make further
changes before it is enacted into law. The bill, under consideration for several years,
would require employers to give domestic workers at least nine hours of rest every day,
suitable accommodation, and rest breaks. However, the bill contains vague provisions that
would leave workers open to abuse, including the duty to obey employers' orders and a
prohibition against leaving the place of employment without a 'legitimate reason.'



                                              4
Education
Ministry: First-generation Israeli children's needs not met
Ha'aretz (Israel), July 5, 2009
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1098044.html
The Education Ministry does not properly address the needs of children born in Israel to
immigrant parents, the Immigrant Absorption Ministry said yesterday ahead of its annual
symposium on the subject. In 2008, there were 210,381 immigrant children in Israeli
educational institutions, the Absorption Ministry said. 'Most (63 percent) of these children
were born in Israel to immigrant parents, yet the education system views only children
who were born abroad as immigrant students,' the Absorption Ministry said in a
statement. 'Therefore, the needs of Israeli-born immigrant children are not properly met.'


Health


Integration




                                             5
                                           Asia
General
All students, workers going overseas to be registered
The Times of India, July 9, 2009
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/All-students-workers-going-overseas-to-be-
registered/articleshow/4759704.cms
As a fallout of racial attacks on Indians in Australia, the government plans to plug
loopholes in legislation to bring under its ambit all immigrants — students and workers
— through a registration process. As of now, the ministry for overseas Indian affairs has
data only on a small section of workers that require emigration clearance. For the first
time, education agents and counsellors will also be brought under the law. The proposed
law will also change the definition of immigration to include 'movement abroad for
employment and studies'. 'We will make it mandatory for education agents to be
registered and ensure that they comply by certain requirements. Students are often misled
by unscrupulous agents who make unrealistic promises,' Vayalar Ravi, overseas Indian
affairs minister said.


Enforcement
Draft of new immigration law ready
The Press Trust of India, July 6, 2009
http://www.hindu.com/2009/07/06/stories/2009070656111200.htm
A draft of a new immigration law has been prepared by the Ministry of Overseas Indian
Affairs and it will now initiate consultations with Law, External Affairs and Home
Ministries to finalise the document before tabling it in Parliament. 'A draft for the new
[immigration] legislation is ready,' Minister for Overseas Indian Affairs Vayalar Ravi told
PTI. The draft provides for more power to police to deal with unscrupulous agents who
dupe those migrating to other countries.


Employment
Indonesia seeks greater protection for maids
The New Straits Times (Malaysia), July 6, 2009
http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/NST/Monday/Columns/2600195/Article/index_ht
ml



                                            6
Hajar, 33, had allegedly been caned and scalded by her Malaysian employer, Hau Yuan
Tyung, for whom she had worked for three years until her escape on June 8 with the help
of a taxi driver. Hajar's injuries were horrific. Both Malaysians and Indonesians were
appalled. For Indonesians, though, Hajar's suffering was yet another sign of Malaysian
arrogance and callousness, more so as it came on the heels of Manohara Odelia Pinot's
alleged abuse by her husband, Kelantan royal prince Tengku Temenggong Tengku
Muhammad Fakhry Petra. Hundreds of people demonstrated outside the Malaysian
Embassy in Jakarta over the alleged abuse meted out to Siti Hajar and Manohara. Angry
comments filled Indonesian newspapers, websites and airwaves. 'That country (Malaysia)
is uncivilised,' wrote an Indonesian blogger.


Immigrant Workers Undergo Job Training
The Korea Times (Seoul), July 15, 2009
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2009/07/117_48523.html
Toledo Hermie Abaros, 41, is an immigrant worker from the Philippines who came to
Korea under the employment permit system in 2006 and worked for a small company.
With his departure date nearing, he is busy preparing for a new job after going back to his
homeland. He is the beneficiary of job training courses provided by a Korean human
resources development unit at the labor ministry. He took a PC maintenance and
operation course and plans to establish a store or apply for a job at a Korean company in
his home country. The education course is offered by the Human Resources Development
Service of Korea (HRDSK) for migrant workers to help promote self-employment or
make it easier for them to find a new job after they return home.


Education


Health


Integration
N. Korean defectors train to adjust to life in South
The Associated Press, July 8, 2009
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iAvQMVD576u7PbPHH0-
ymfuXopMgD99A97O80
Dressed in white or yellow T-shirts and black slacks, the dozens of people at


                                                7
Wednesday's ceremony looked like typical South Korean company trainees. But the high
security at the fenced compound hinted at a different kind of induction. They are North
Korean defectors learning a new way of life in a capitalist society. They have flooded
South Korea in recent years to escape hunger and harsh political oppression in their
communist homeland. Hanawon, located in the farming village Anseong, is the
government facility where they go through a three-month course that teaches computer
skills and such everyday lessons as how to use ATMs and shop in supermarkets.




                                            8
                                         Europe
General
New EU presidency to avoid burqa issue
The Associated Press, July 1, 2009
http://www.etaiwannews.com/etn/news_content.php?id=990964&lang=eng_news
Sweden assumes the presidency of the European Union pushing for adoption of common
rules on immigration but tiptoeing around the discussion about banning burqas and other
Islamic garments. A key priority for Sweden, which has been a top European destination
for refugees from Iraq and Somalia, is to get broad support from its partners for common
immigration and asylum rules. Those issues remain largely national responsibilities as
governments are wary of ceding authority in justice matters to the EU.


Italy rapped again over immigration
Another boatload of migrants is returned to Libya
ANSA (Italy), July 1, 2009
http://www.ansa.it/site/notizie/awnplus/english/news/2009-07-01_101319399.html
Italy came under fire for its controversial immigration policy again on Wednesday as it
returned another boatload of would-be migrants intercepted in the Mediterranean back to
Libya. On Tuesday night 89 migrants, including nine women and three children, were
rescued from a dinghy 30 miles off the Sicilian island of Lampedusa and taken back to
Libya, the main stepping-off point for most immigrants. The Council of Europe's Human
Rights Commissioner Thomas Hammarberg reiterated his criticism of the policy
Wednesday, saying it made political asylum request ''practically impossible''. The
commissioner said that while Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi and Interior Minister
Roberto Maroni were ''absolutely right'' that not everyone who arrives in Italy has the
right to asylum, ''they certainly have the right to ask for it''. ''With (their immediate return
to Libya), this is denied to them, as is the possibility that their claims are evaluated
according to the principles of human rights,'' he told Internet news show KlausCondicio.


Britain is a soft touch for people smuggling, say traffickers
The Times (London), July 14, 2009
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/crime/article6702471.ece
People-traffickers view Britain as a 'soft touch' for smuggling illegal immigrants, with
big profits and a low risk of being caught, according to Home Office research


                                               9
published yesterday. Traffickers also allege that officials in the Identity and Passport
Service are willing to take bribes to help illegal immigrants to enter the country. The
research said that a number of factors encouraged illegal immigration, including the
benefits system, a healthy illegal economy, the universality of the English language
and the advocacy of illegal migration by some minority ethnic communities. Other
factors included the ready availability of work in the construction industry, high
demand for prostitution, a comparatively relaxed immigration policy, the way that
migrants and asylum seekers can use the Human Rights Act to remain in Britain, the
ease of getting a passport via marriage to a British citizen and the absence of identity
cards.


Immigrant Parents Send Teens Away for De-Westernization
YLE (Finland), July 13, 2009
http://www.yle.fi/uutiset/news/2009/07/immigrant_parents_send_teens_away_for_de-
westernization_860905.html
Officials say they are learning of an increasing number of cases in which immigrant
parents in Finland are forcibly sending teens back to their home countries to de-
westernize them. The Finnish Red Cross as well as social welfare offices say that
every year dozens of parents who believe their children are becoming too westernized
send their offspring back to African, Asian and Middle Eastern states.


BNP leader says 'sink immigrant boats'
Agence France Press, July 8, 2009
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iSHcZaEB2DmuN3s5Prpfl2Dy5
Ydw
The leader of the far-right British National Party, recently elected to the European
Parliament, said Wednesday that the EU should sink boats carrying African immigrants
trying to reach the continent. Nick Griffin, one of two BNP members elected to the
Brussels parliament in May, told the BBC that those on board would be thrown a life raft,
but insisted only drastic action could stop Europe being 'swamped by the Third
World.' 'The only measure, sooner or later, which is going to stop immigration and stop
large numbers of sub-Saharan Africans dying on the way to get over here is to get very
tough with those coming over,' he told the broadcaster.




                                            10
Immigration: Illegals arrivals from sea halved in Italy
ANSA (Italy), July 9, 2009
http://www.ansamed.info/en/top/ME12.WAM40163.html
The arrival of illegal immigrants in Sicily and Sardinia has fallen by 54% and 56%
respectively. The data was collected during operations carried out by the European
agency Frontex in the Mediterranean and released today in Rome. The decrease in the
number of arrivals, according to Frontex's vice-director, Gil Arias-Fernandez, was also
influenced by the agreements made between Italy and Libya. ''From January 1 2009 to
July 5,'' he affirmed, ''there were 333 illegal arrivals according to our people in the field.
For the same period last year there were 776. As for Sicily, including Lampedusa, the
figure passed from last year's 14,806 to 6,760 this year. From May 15 on, that is from
when the agreements became effective, our agents noticed even more of a decrease. The
decrease in this last month and a half may have even reached -70%.'' A positive vote
therefore for the agreements between Italy and Libya. ''Based on our statistics,'' Arias-
Fernandez concluded, we are able to say that the agreements have had a positive impact.
On the humanitarian level, fewer human lives have been put at risk, due to fewer
departures.


Migrants will not go home in recession, warns expert
Predictions that migrant workers will return home in their droves as the recession
bites are a myth, a leading expert warned yesterday.
The Telegraph (U.K.), July 8, 2009
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/5770947/Migrants-will-not-go-
home-in-recession-warns-expert.html
Professor John Salt, from University College London, said that the foreign population in
Britain will not shrink during the recession. He said the country had experienced similar
conditions in the 1960s and 1970s, when high levels of immigration were initially halted
by an economic downturn. A report he co-authored for the Policy Network, a centre-left
think tank, concluded: 'The evidence we have been able to gather on past recessions in the
UK and more widely in western Europe indicates that foreign immigration falls while
unemployment is increasing but only for a limited period.' In 2004, Prof Salt was
commissioned by the Home Office to draw up estimates of the number of illegal
immigrants living in Britain, and produced a figure of 450,000 to 500,000.


Immigration concerns hit peak


                                              11
Kathimerini (Greece), July 6, 2009
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100008_06/07/2009_108674
Nine in 10 Greeks believe that the country has reached saturation as concerns the number
of immigrants it can accept, according to a new opinion poll carried out for Sunday’s
Kathimerini. The Public Issue survey found that 93 percent of the public questioned
believes that Greece cannot accept any more migrants, while only 4 percent believes that
there is still room for more.


Migrant tide wanes with Spain's economy
The BBC News (U.K.), July 13, 2009
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8148324.stm
'This year, the numbers have more than just stabilised - they're falling,' explains
Orlando Ramos Alayon, the coastguard skipper. 'There's permanent vigilance now,
both by police and coastguard, at the national and EU level.' The tide of illegal
migration peaked in 2006, when 600 boats brought 31,678 desperate people to the
Canaries in search of better times. But over the past three years, numbers have been
falling steadily. In 2008, 9,181 migrants made it to the Canaries, a 71% drop
compared with 2006. And during the first five months of 2009, numbers were down
by half again on the same period last year. Under the EU's Frontex programme,
Spain's Civil Guard police patrol the waters off West Africa, in partnership with the
authorities from Senegal and Mauritania. In the first six months of 2009, these patrols
diverted 762 migrants back to their points of departure.


Enforcement
UK and France agree on immigration clampdown
£15m allocated to border controls and repatriation of Calais immigrants stepped up
as Brown and Sarkozy meet before G8
The Guardian (U.K.), July 2, 2009
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2009/jul/06/uk-france-calais-immigration-sarkozy
The government today agreed a new deal to handle the growing crisis of migrants
gathered at Calais, allocating £15m to tighten British border controls, while France
promised to begin voluntary and forced repatriations. The deal, agreed as Gordon Brown
met Nicolas Sarkozy for a pre-G8 summit in the Alpine town of Evian, was claimed as a




                                            12
breakthrough by the minister for borders and immigration, Phil Woolas – the first time
France has explicitly agreed to step up removal flights from northern France.


Greek-Spanish bid to curb migrants
Kathimerini (Greece), July 14, 2009
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100006_14/07/2009_108911
Prime Minister Costas Karamanlis and his Spanish counterpart Jose Luis Zapatero
yesterday issued a joint appeal for tighter border controls and closer cooperation
between the European Union and African and Asian states to curb a relentless influx
of illegal immigrants that has placed a particularly heavy burden on Mediterranean
countries. 'Tackling illegal immigration demands solidarity and common action from
within the EU,' Karamanlis said following his talks with Zapatero in Madrid before
boarding a flight to Rome, where he is due to meet with Italian Prime Minister Silvio
Berlusconi today for talks on the same subject.


Detention unit 'more like prison'
The BBC News (U.K.), July 7, 2009
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/kent/8137584.stm
Dover Immigration Removal Centre has become 'more like a prison,' the chief inspector
of prisons has said. Inspectors found some detainees who claimed to be children, but
whose ages were disputed, were kept in what amounted to solitary confinement. Dame
Anne Owers said conditions had deteriorated at the facility, where there had been a
disappointing 'slippage' in several areas. The UK Border Agency (UKBA) said it was
always striving to improve centres.


Employment
On the job market, immigrant groups flock together
The Copenhagen Post, July 7, 2009
http://www.cphpost.dk/culture/culture/122-culture/46191-on-the-job-market-immigrant-
groups-flock-together.html
People who have immigrated to Denmark from a particular country tend to work in the
same job sectors Newly released figures from Statistics Denmark indicate that immigrants
from certain countries tend to gravitate towards the same fields on the job market. The
trend runs true for several groups, including Thai women becoming cleaners, Pakistani



                                            13
men bus or taxi drivers, and Somali women social service sector employees. One in three
Somali women in the workforce are in social services, while one in three Pakistani men
work within the transport branch, primarily driving buses or taxis. One in four Thai
women work in the cleaning business. When it comes to forestry, agriculture and
gardening, people from Ukraine, Latvia and Lithuania dominate, with nine out of 10
Ukrainian men and every other Ukrainian woman working in the field. ‘It’s common for
people of the same immigrant backgrounds to find work in the same areas in Denmark –
it’s basically network recruiting,’ Jens Arnholtz Hansen of the University of
Copenhagen’s Employment Relations Research Centre told Statistics Denmark.


Seven in 10 new jobs go to foreigners
Seven in 10 of the 2 million extra jobs created under Labour have been accounted
for by migrant workers, an international study has found.
The Telegraph (U.K.), July 1, 2009
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/5699689/Seven-in-10-new-jobs-go-to-
foreigners.html
Foreigners in the UK have now taken a larger share of new jobs than in any other major
industrialised nation examined in the report. Up to a third of skilled migrants are also
coming to the UK to take jobs that do not have to be advertised here first, making a
mockery of Gordon Brown's pledge to give British workers the first crack of the
whip. The major study, by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
(OECD), also warned that while migration may be falling during the recession, it is likely
to pick up again once economies improve. For the UK specifically, it said the growing
trend in Poles returning home may be reversed once conditions improve in the UK again
and the pound becomes stronger.


Education


Health
Immigrant doctors fill a gap in the market
The Helsinki Times (Finland), July 9, 2009
http://www.helsinkitimes.fi/htimes/domestic-news/general/7014-immigrant-doctors-fill-a-
gap-in-the-market.html
Latest figures show that foreign-trained doctors are becoming much more common in the



                                             14
wealthier countries. The number of doctors practising in Finland who have been educated
abroad increased threefold from 2000-2007 and has continued to rise, according to the
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) health data report
2009. The only other OECD country with a comparable net gain was Ireland. There are
currently 2447 foreign-trained doctors working here. The number of doctors of other
nationalities has risen from 390 to 618 over the past five years. 30 per cent of foreign
doctors are Russian speakers, while 20 per cent come from Estonia. Markku Viitamäki
from the Finnish Medical Association believes two factors have accounted for the rise.
'First of all, doctors working in Finland are well paid compared with some other
countries, which accounts for the large number of Russian speakers. Secondly, the
increase has been constant since we joined the EU thanks to European rules on free
movement. Thus, since Estonia and Poland joined the European Union we have seen
increases from those countries as well.' According to FMA figures, doctors from about 60
countries are working in Finland at the moment.


Integration
Immigrant Mothers Face Special Language Problems
YLE (Finland), July 6, 2009
http://www.yle.fi/uutiset/news/2009/07/immigrant_mothers_face_special_language_probl
ems_847021.html
More women immigrants in Finland miss out on language instruction than do their male
counterparts. In particular, the opportunities for women who have moved here to join
their immigrant husbands to get language instruction are poor. Lutfeara Hossain moved to
Finland from Bangladesh to be with her husband who studied and later started working
here. This mother of two, who has been in the country for nearly twenty years, in the
spring took part in only her second Finnish language course. 'That time, I don't feel that
I'm staying here, my husband was a student, and when he would be finished, I would go
back. But in the meantime, my children have grown up, so I found that it's difficult to go
back,' explains Lutfeara Hossain. Lutfeara's story is not uncommon. Although the largest
group of immigrants are family members, programmes for integration into Finnish
society, including language instruction, are only for unemployed job-seekers or those
receiving income supports. So, housewives supported by their spouses are just not seen in
language classrooms.




                                             15
                                      Oceania
General
Migrants treated like waste products - Anderton
The Press (New Zealand), July 8, 2009
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/2573356/Migrants-treated-like-waste-products-
Anderton
New Zealand is treating migrants like waste products using them and then throwing them
away, says Wigram MP Jim Anderton. 'They come under policies that allow and
encourage them to come, and then when things turn bad we kind of dispose of them like a
waste product,' he said yesterday. 'It's inhumane.' Anderton will attend a meeting today at
Christchurch's Skilled Migrant Information and Resource Centre on fair treatment for
migrants who are being forced out of New Zealand if they lose their jobs. He said skilled
migrants should be given time and help in finding another job if made redundant and
should qualify for government assistance while unemployed.


Asylum via false papers on rise
The Australian, July 2, 2009
http://www.news.com.au/story/0,27574,25720052-421,00.html
There has been a sharp rise in the number of people lodging asylum claims on the basis of
forged or missing documents. As border protection authorities battle to cope with a surge
in boat-borne asylum-seekers, figures supplied by the Department of Immigration show a
30 per cent spike in the number of people presenting at Australian ports with fake or
missing travel documents. In 2008-09, 102 people arrived in Australia with 'improper
documentation' before declaring themselves refugees. That compared with a total of 79
people in 2007-08, a rise of 29 per cent.


Enforcement


Employment
Union brands illegal workers 'modern day slavery'
The ABC News (Australia), July 8, 2009
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/07/08/2620522.htm
The building and construction union says the Federal Government should be doing more


                                            16
to stop the exploitation of illegal workers. CFMEU ACT assistant secretary Dean Hall
says the Government should take a more pro-active stance on the issue. 'Until the Federal
Government changes the system and either they step in and start regulating or remove the
ridiculous laws that they've put on us to stop us regulating it, all you're going to do is have
mass exploitation of workers from foreign countries and a deterioration in wages and
conditions for Australian workers,' he said. Mr Hall says the practice of employing illegal
workers amounts to modern day slavery.


Government: Unemployment doesn't end need for migrants
Deutsche Presse Agentur, July 8, 2009
http://www.monstersandcritics.com/news/business/features/article_1488453.php/Govern
ment_Unemployment_doesnt_end_need_for_migrants__News_Feature__
New Zealand still needs skilled immigrants to fill gaps in its workforce despite a rising
number of jobless, now at a six-year high as the country's economy weathers a second
year in recession. That is the message officials were putting out to counter reports that
workers from Britain - traditionally New Zealand's biggest source of migrants - are being
sent home as their temporary permits expire and the recession deepens. With the
unemployment rate at 5 per cent and still rising, Steve Cantlon, a manager at Immigration
New Zealand, a division of the Labour Department, said this week that government
policy had always been based on giving New Zealanders the first opportunity to take up
work vacancies.


Education
More suicides uncovered among overseas students
By Heath Gilmore and Chris Johnston
The Brisbane Times (Australia), July 2, 2009
http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/more-suicides-uncovered-among-overseas-
students-20090701-d59k.html
A growing pattern of suicides among international students in Australia has emerged as
calls continue for better reporting systems for their deaths. In some cases, the Herald has
learned, the students who committed suicide in Australia had pre-existing issues, but
some appeared to be due to problems encountered while in Australia. The South
Australian coroner is investigating the death of an Indian student who died in Adelaide on
November 12 last year. Sources said police treated the death as a suicide. Indian media



                                              17
reported that his parents, from Vadapalani, Chennai, flew to South Australia after failing
to get adequate information about his death by telephone.


Health


Integration




                                           18
                        North & South America
General
Cuba and the U.S. delegates discussed immigration issues for the first time in six
years and all but set a date to meet again.
The Miami Herald (FL), July 15, 2009
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation/story/1141954.html
New York -- The first talks between the Obama administration and Cuba ended Tuesday
with an invitation for U.S. diplomats to visit Havana in December, marking the official
beginning of the first dialogue between Havana and Washington in six years. The
invitation came as the head of the Cuban delegation characterized the six-hour gathering
as a ``fruitful working session.''


Brazil's Lula scolds rich nations on migration
Agence France Presse, July 3, 2009
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jpFFnnFhgJCEKUvnhSOe9RI6e
UAA
Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva issued a law giving tens of thousands of
undocumented immigrants legal status and criticized rich nations for taking a tough
stance against illegal migrants. He also once again blamed the global economic crisis on
'men with blue eyes,' a controversial accusation that he first leveled during a meeting in
March with British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. The law issued by Lula allows all
undocumented foreigners who entered Brazil before last February to obtain two-year
provisional residency permits that can be made permanent. All recipients will be entitled
to work and receive public education and healthcare. Brazil's Justice Department says
there are around 60,000 undocumented foreigners in the country, but non-governmental
groups believe the number could be as high as 200,000 illegal immigrants, with most
coming from Latin America and China.


Canada places visa rules on Czechs, Mexicans
Agence France Presse, July 14, 2009
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gcflVhqKsG3Em5WxXvv7b
I4_G3jQ
Canada on Tuesday reinstated a travel visa requirement for Czech and Mexican



                                             19
passport holders in a bid to crack down on an explosion in the number of fraudulent
refugee claims. The measure, which went into effect at one minute past midnight
(0401 GMT), 'will give us a greater ability to manage the flow of people into Canada
and verify bona fides,' Immigration Minister Jason Kenney said in a statement
Monday. Mexico is the number one source country for refugee claims in Canada,
almost tripling since 2005 to 9,400 claims last year, or 25 percent of the total
received. Of those, only 11 percent were accepted. The visa requirement for the Czech
Republic was lifted in October 2007. Since then, nearly 3,000 claims have been filed
by Czech nationals, compared to less than five in 2006.


Congress urged to revise post-9/11 Real ID Act
The Houston Chronicle, July 14, 2009
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/breaking/6529339.html
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano wants Congress to roll back some of the
more stringent and 'needlessly expensive' post-9/11 driver license requirements designed
to keep licenses and state issued identification out of the hands of terrorists. More than
two dozen states already have rebelled against implementing the Real ID Act of 2005,
either by rejecting participation or passing resolutions opposing the mandate to tighten
security and identity verification by 2017. Officials with the Department of Homeland
Security said the revisions were designed to speed implementation of requirements that
many states have opposed.


Immigration Judges Found Under Strain
The New York Times, July 11, 2009
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/11/us/11immig.html
Surging caseloads and a chronic lack of resources to handle them are taking a toll on
judges in the nation’s immigration courts, leaving them frustrated and demoralized, a new
study has found. The study, published in a Georgetown University law journal, applied a
psychological scale for testing professional stress and exhaustion to 96 immigration court
judges who agreed to participate, just under half of all judges hearing immigration cases.
The survey found that the strain on them was similar to that on prison wardens and
hospital physicians, groups shown in comparable studies to experience exceptionally high
stress. Surprising the researchers, 59 immigration judges wrote comments on the survey
questionnaire elaborating on why they felt discouraged.



                                             20
Enforcement
Union head: Border is far from secure
The Congress Daily (Washington, DC), July 9, 2009
http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/0709/070909cdpm2.htm
The president of the union representing 12,000 Border Patrol agents on Thursday
disputed arguments from Obama administration officials that the U.S. and Mexican
governments are gaining the upper hand in the battle against drug cartels. 'It's a serious
problem and not one that's likely to be resolved anytime soon,' T.J. Bonner, president of
the National Border Patrol Council, said in an interview. 'You still have the infighting
between the various federal agencies.' About the coordination between U.S. and Mexican
border agents on the front lines, he added, 'Where the rubber meets the road, the level of
distrust is very high.'


New edict on immigration enforcement
Homeland Security tells local police agencies to focus on serious crimes, not minor
ones, in its 287(g) program
The Los Angeles Times, July 11, 2009
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-immig11-
2009jul11,0,3562065.story
Local police agencies empowered by the federal government to enforce immigration law
must focus their efforts on criminals who pose a threat to public safety, with less
emphasis on those who commit minor crimes, Department of Homeland Security officials
announced Friday. The announcement aims to clarify a controversial program that
deputizes police to turn over suspects or criminals to immigration authorities for possible
deportation. Normally police do not enforce federal law. The law, known as 287(g), took
effect in 1996.


Employment
Hiring process for immigrants to get tighter
The San Diego Union Tribune, July 15, 2009
http://www3.signonsandiego.com/stories/2009/jul/15/1b15verify223221-hiring-process-
immigrants-get-tig/?business&zIndex=132158
Getting a job could become harder soon, particularly for immigrants, and not just because
of the recession. The federal government is tightening the hiring process to ensure that



                                             21
employees are legally entitled to work in this country. The Obama administration recently
began audits of 652 firms in a wide range of industries across the nation suspected of
hiring undocumented immigrants, including 39 companies in San Diego County. The
administration extended the electronic employee-verification program, E-Verify.
Beginning in September, contractors and subcontractors that work with the federal
government will be required to enroll in the program.


Senate votes to keep Bush era illegal worker rule
Associated Press, July 10, 2009
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5h0Nj1myJrah-
3nLEEpH18OlEZSbgD99B6U182
The Senate wants to force the Homeland Security Department to stick with a proposed
Bush administration policy requiring employers to fire immigrant workers whose names
don't match their Social Security numbers. By voice vote Thursday, the Senate approved
an amendment to stop the department's plan to dump the so-called 'no-match' rule.


Obama Revives Bush Idea to Catch Illegal Workers
The Washington Post, July 9, 2009
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-
dyn/content/article/2009/07/08/AR2009070800030.html
President Obama will abandon a controversial immigration crackdown, sought by his
predecessor, to pressure U.S. companies to fire 9 million workers with suspect Social
Security numbers, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano announced
yesterday. Instead, Obama will mandate that federal contractors confirm the identities of
4 million workers against federal databases beginning in September, pushing ahead under
pressure from Senate Republicans with another long-stalled Bush administration
initiative. Napolitano said her department will rescind a 2007 rule, tied up in federal
court, that would have sent Social Security 'no-match' letters to 140,000 U.S. employers.
The notices were to warn companies to resolve discrepancies or fire suspect workers
within 90 days, or face criminal penalties.


Over 20k vacancies still left for H1B visas
The Press Trust of India, July 2, 2009
http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/over-20k-vacancies-still-left-for-h1b-
visas/362694/


                                              22
Nearly three months after the US immigration agency started accepting petitions for the
H-1B visas for highly-skilled foreign professionals, it is still looking for more than 20,000
applications to fill the Congressionally-mandated cap of 65,000. Amid the economic
downturn and protectionist provisions in the US stimulus package, the demand for the
visas, which is mostly availed by Indian professionals, has slowed down. The latest
figures released by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) reveal that
approximately 44,800 H-1B petitions have been received by it so far. In the last few
years, there was huge demand of H-1B visas, with the USCIS receiving several times the
quota of 65,000 in the first few days itself. It had to resort to computerised lottery to
determine the successful applicants.


Education
Kent School District joins trend of minority students outnumbering whites
The Seattle Times, July 7, 2009
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/education/2009426121_majorityminority07m.html
Eight years ago, the students at this school, Scenic Hill Elementary, as well as at many
other Kent schools, were largely white. But this past school year the Kent School District
became the seventh Seattle-area district in which the majority of students are minorities,
joining Seattle, Tukwila, Highline, Renton, Federal Way and Tacoma. The change is part
of a demographic shift that's happening in districts across Washington and the nation. It's
fueled in part by immigration and, in Washington, by the fact that the minority population
is younger and growing faster than the white population, whose birth rate is declining,
according to a draft report by Washington State University professor Annabel
irschner. Washington's white population continues to rise, but minority groups —
especially those of Hispanic and Asian descent — are growing faster, especially among
residents under age 18, the report said.


Health
Children Of Undocumented Parents Could Be At Higher Developmental Risk
RedOrbit.com, July 13, 2009
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1719893/children_of_undocumented_parents_coul
d_be_at_higher_developmental_risk/index.html?source=r_health
Undocumented people live in a shadowy world of high fear and stress -- fear of
deportation and stress brought on lack of economic, linguistic and educational



                                              23
resources. And of course if they are parents their worries trickle down to their children. A
new study from UCLA examines parents' concerns about development, learning and
behavior for young children of Mexican origin and identifies whether these concerns
differ by the families' citizenship or documentation status. The study appears in the July-
August issue of the journal Academic Pediatrics. It shows that, as reported by the parent,
Mexican children with an undocumented parent have greater developmental risk than do
Latino and white children whose parents are documented or who are U.S. citizens.


HIV travel restriction set to be lifted
The Brownsville Herald (TX), July 8, 2009
http://www.brownsvilleherald.com/news/hiv-99759-aids-health.html
A rule that prevents many HIV-positive immigrants and travelers from entering the
United States will likely be lifted before the year is up, after the Department of Health
and    Human      Services    earlier     this        month   recommended   changing    the
regulation. Immigration and HIV/AIDS advocacy groups have been working to repeal the
22-year-old rule, which they call discriminatory, dangerous, and debilitating to the
strength of the U.S. scientific community. A large number of foreigners with the human
immunodeficiency virus would benefit from the change, the groups say, when these
individuals would finally be able to enter the country to see loved ones, attend medical
conferences, or seek advanced medical treatment.


Immunization classes reach out to immigrant communities
Too many parents don't understand the health need
The Chicago Tribune, July 8, 2009
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/chi-immunizations-city-
zonejul08,0,1479138.story
After attending an immunization training session last year, JP Jael decided to broaden the
content of his violence prevention workshops.No parent would leave without information
on vaccinations as well, said Jael, a project coordinator for the non-profit Asian Human
Services, which provides social services for Chicago's pan-Asian community. 'I think
immunization is one of the things that they should learn, especially in my community
because they're not familiar with it,' he said. Every year the Chicago Area Immunization
Campaign (CAIC) holds in conjunction with the Chicago Department of Public Health
holds free training sessions for community health workers.




                                                 24
Insurance for legal immigrants stripped
The Lowell Sun (MA), July 5, 2009
http://www.lowellsun.com/todaysheadlines/ci_12757513
As many as 30,000 legal immigrants in Massachusetts will lose state-subsidized health
insurance as the state tries to control health-care costs. Lawmakers came to view health
care for 'special status' immigrants as a luxury, at a time when other programs and
services are being slashed to balance the state budget. Though the cut saved the state
approximately $130 million this year, critics see the change as a significant retreat from
health-care reform when the nation is looking to Massachusetts to gauge whether its
experiment with mandated coverage can be replicated on a national scale.


Integration
Federal minister says integration of immigrants possible without loss of identity
The Canadian Press, July 11, 2009
http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5hlEPJ0hZJeVwDS
91E9B5Y4U70hVw
Canada's citizenship minister says it's a challenge to get immigrants to fit into society
when only one-quarter of them actually take advantage of free language
training. Jason Kenney was in Calgary on Friday to announced $9.5 million in federal
funding for nine organizations offering such training. 'Only a quarter of newcomers
are enrolling in the programs that are offered by organizations like these,' Kenney
said. 'Common sense just tells me that 25 per cent is too low and we'd like to see more
people enrolling.' Improving language skills makes life easier for immigrants, Kenney
said. He also suggested that learning the language is key to integrating people from
different ethnic backgrounds into Canadian society. 'Our new focus is on integration.
We don't want to create a bunch of silo communities where kids grow up in a
community that more resembles their parents' country of origin than Canada,'
explained Kenney, who is also minister of immigration and multiculturalism.




                                           25
                   Refugees & Asylum Seekers
France Wants Other Countries to Follow Burden-Sharing Example
The Times of Malta, July 10, 2009
http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20090710/local/france-wants-other-
countries-to-follow-burden-sharing-example
About 92 migrants left for France yesterday, embarking on a journey into a new
future that has been secured by a responsibility-sharing initiative between the French
and Maltese authorities. The relocation was France's response to Malta's appeal to
share the burden of immigration, said French Ambassador Daniel Rondeau, who
wants to 'pull' other EU countries to follow suit. The pilot project was the first, but not
the last, and Mr Rondeau said the French government was considering doing it again
next year. 'But we would not like to be alone', he insisted, seeing off and embracing
the migrants at Malta International Airport.


Italy in Migrant Mistreatment Row
ANSA (Italy), July 14, 2009
http://www.ansa.it/site/notizie/awnplus/english/news/2009-07-14_114386443.html
The United Nations refugee agency UNHCR and the Italian government clashed
Tuesday over claims that Italian soldiers mistreated migrants intercepted off the
Sicilian island of Lampedusa earlier this month. UNHCR said it had collected
evidence that soldiers had used force when intercepting 82 mainly Eritrean migrants
on July 1 some 30 miles from Lampedusa who were then returned to Libya under
Italy's controversial new 'push-back' immigration policy. Six Eritreans required
medical attention as a result of the military using force, the agency said, adding that
the migrants had been given nothing to eat during the 12-hour operation. It also said
Italian authorities had confiscated the migrants' personal belongings, including
identity documents, and had failed to return these upon their arrival in Libya.


Process asylum claims overseas: groups
The Australia Associated Press, July 13, 2009
http://news.theage.com.au/breaking-news-national/process-asylum-claims-overseas-
groups-20090713-dibi.html


                                            26
Processing the claims of asylum seekers before they reach Australia will help prevent
perilous boat trips to the mainland, a refugee advocate group says. A boat carrying about
70 suspected Afghan asylum seekers sank in treacherous Indonesian waters on its way to
Australia last week. The federal government says the boat has been located and its
passengers accounted for, following a number of conflicting reports from Indonesia. The
Refugee Action Coalition says dangerous situations could be prevented if applications for
asylum in Australia were processed when people reached Indonesia.


Risking Israel's ire, US takes 1,350 Palestinian refugees
The US is generally reluctant to resettle Palestinians, but these are refugees from
Iraq who have been targeted since the invasion.
The Christian Science Monitor, July 7, 2009
http://www.csmonitor.com/2009/0708/p02s04-usgn.html
The State Department confirmed today that as many as 1,350 Iraqi Palestinians – once the
well-treated guests of Saddam Hussein and now at outs with much of Iraqi society – will
be resettled in the US, mostly in southern California, starting this fall. It will be the
largest-ever resettlement of Palestinian refugees into the US – and welcome news to the
Palestinians who fled to Iraq after 1948 but who have had a tough time since Mr. Hussein
was deposed in 2003. Targeted by Iraqi Shiites, the mostly-Sunni Palestinians have spent
recent years in one of the region's roughest refugee camps, Al Waleed, near Iraq's border
with Syria.



                                 Remittances
‘Remittances to poor countries to plunge’
The Inter Press Service, July 16, 2009
http://businessmirror.com.ph/home/top-news/13278-remittances-to-poor-countries-to-
plunge.html
The amount of money immigrants from poor countries send to their families back home is
expected to decline between 7 percent and 10 percent in 2009 compared with 2008 levels,
according to a new report released here on Monday by the World Bank. Poor countries in
Europe and Central Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean will
be hardest hit, according to the report, which was released during the opening session of a
two-day International Conference on Diaspora and Development at the bank’s
headquarters here. The decline is expected to bottom out next year, however. Remittances


                                            27
should begin a gradual rebound in 2010, reaching $313 billion worldwide by the end of
the year, or 3 percent greater than the $304 billion that is currently estimated for 2009.



Bulgarian migrant workers remitted $2.63B in 2008 - World Bank
The Sofia Echo (Bulgaria), July 14, 2009
http://www.sofiaecho.com/2009/07/14/754698_bulgarian-migrant-workers-remitted-
263b-in-2008-world-bank
Bulgarian migrant workers sent remittances worth the equivalent of $2.63 billion last
year, the World Bank estimated in its updated Migration and Remittances Factbook
report for 2008. The update revised the figures upward from the first edition of the
report, published in March 2009. The figure is the equivalent of 5.4 per cent of
Bulgaria's gross domestic product, increasing by 23.5 per cent from 2007, when
remittances were $2.13 billion, according to World Bank estimates. Overall,
remittances flows to developing countries were revised upward to $328 billion,
compared to $305 billion in the earlier report. Middle-income countries received the
bulk of the funds, $297 billion, with the remainder going to low-income countries.
Total remittances globally stood at $433.1 billion.


Bangladesh remittances up
Reuters, July 5, 2009
http://www.straitstimes.com/Breaking%2BNews/Asia/Story/STIStory_399421.html Bang
ladesh’s expatriate workers sent home a record US$9.68 billion (S$14.09 billion) in the
fiscal year that ended in June, 22.3 per cent higher than in 2007/08, in spite of the global
economic downturn. The impoverished South Asian country received US$911.62 million
in remittances from more than 6 million migrant workers in June, a central bank official
said on Sunday.


Mexico remittances plunge in worst drop on record
The Associated Press, July 1, 2009
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/business/6506977.html
Money sent home by Mexicans working abroad fell by 19.9 percent in May, the biggest
monthly decline on record as the U.S. recession slashed jobs. Remittances dropped to
$1.9 billion from $2.4 billion in May 2008, the central bank said on Wednesday. The
amount of money sent home in the first five months of 2009 fell 11.3 percent to $9.2


                                             28
billion compared with the same period last year. Remittances are the second-biggest
source of foreign currency after oil exports in Mexico, and their decline has contributed to
the country's own economic downturn.




                            Circular Migration
From N.E. back to Brazil, with regret
Homeland's economy crushes dreams
The Boston Globe, July 8, 2009
http://www.boston.com/news/world/latinamerica/articles/2009/07/08/for_brazilian_immi
grants_return_home_can_be_tougher_than_imagined/?page=full
Gizele Prata sits gloomily inside the villa she built for her mother in this sleepy town in
southeastern Brazil, unmoved by the views of verdant hills and the meandering Doce
River. It is the dream house Prata had imagined as she and a sister scrubbed floors in
Boston to pay for it, and Prata returned last year intending to stay. But her homecoming
has been a deep disappointment: The university where she studies pharmacy is more than
an hour away. The long lines and bureaucracy drive her crazy. She cannot find a job - and
is anxious that she will never have a real career. Now she has a new dream: To return to
the United States. 'I’m going back,’’ said Prata, a 29-year-old naturalized US citizen, as
she sat in her mother’s living room, appointed in earth tones and comfortable chairs. 'I’m
not thinking about it. I’m going. Everything I want to do here, I can’t do.’’




                                             29
                                   Events

     Date & time             Location            Initiative      Contact & info

     20.07.2009     Conference Room,         'E-Verify: An       http://contact.m
1.   11:00 –12:30   Migration Policy         assessment of its   igrationpolicy.or
                    Institute                strengths and       g/site/Calendar/
                    1400 16th Street, NW     weaknesses'         456687983
                    Suite 300 (Third
                    Floor)
                    Washington, DC
                    20036

     14-18.08.09    Copenhagen, Demark       14th Int’l          http://www.metr
2.                                           Metropolis          opolis2009.org/i
                                             Conference          ntroduction/inde
                                             MIGRATION           x_all.html
                                             AND MOBILITY
                                             NATIONAL
                                             RESPONSES TO
                                             CULTURAL
                                             DIVERSITY




                                        30
                                  Publications
Caring for Trafficked Persons: Guidance for Health Providers
http://publications.iom.int/bookstore/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&
products_id=510
Free download at: http://publications.iom.int/bookstore/free/CT_Handbook.pdf
For many trafficked persons, the physical and psychological aftermath of a trafficking
experience can be severe and enduring. Health providers may come into contact with
victims of trafficking at different stages of the trafficking process and at different
stages of their recovery. For health practitioners, diagnosing and treating trafficked
persons can be exceptionally challenging. The informed and attentive health care
provider can play an important role in assisting and treating individuals who may
have suffered unspeakable and repeated abuse.


Introduction to Basic Counselling and Communication Skills: IOM Training
Manual for Migrant Community Leaders and Community Workers
http://publications.iom.int/bookstore/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&
products_id=511
This manual is a pandemic preparedness for migrants and host communities capacity
development tool to strengthen basic counseling and communication skills. The
manual is designed for use by humanitarian workers such as development and
community health workers and leaders who engage with migrants and mobile
populations. The manual will strengthen counselling and communication skills that
can be used to assist children, adolescents, adults and families living in migrant and
host communities, and help them cope before, during and in the aftermath of a
pandemic or any other crisis.




                                            31

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:10
posted:8/15/2011
language:English
pages:32