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WELCOME - The University of Waikato

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									>> W E L C O M E
Welcome to Graduate and Postgraduate Study
in the Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
Universities support and encourage research. Academic staff in universities are expected to be active
researchers, producing new knowledge; and their teaching responsibilities include not just lecturing
to undergraduate students but also, and more significantly, imparting research skills to graduate and
postgraduate students by supervising their research projects.
As a graduate or postgraduate student in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, you are an important
part of the research culture of The University of Waikato. If you are enrolled for an Honours degree, or
perhaps for a postgraduate diploma, you will be acquiring greater conceptual sophistication and specific
methodological skills essential for research work, and many of you will carry out a Directed Study as an
initial piece of supervised research.
At Master’s level, a dissertation or thesis will be central to your programme, and designing and executing
this research project will mark an important advance in your intellectual life. During the preparation of
the dissertation or thesis, your supervisors will encourage you to present aspects of your work to graduate
seminars, or staff-student seminars, or at academic conferences: delivering papers in front of your peers
and receiving comments from them is a crucial element in the research process. When your dissertation
or thesis has been completed, you should plan to publish your findings, perhaps co-authoring articles with
your supervisors if you have worked closely with them.
Those of you embarking upon a higher degree at postgraduate level, most commonly a doctoral degree,
are set to become, with guidance from your supervisors, independent researchers who produce original
work on a substantial scale, and major contributors to future intellectual discourse.
We welcome all graduate and postgraduate students who intend to study in the Faculty, whether your
undergraduate degree was taken at The University of Waikato or whether you completed your first degree
at another tertiary institution.
We welcome back those of you who are returning to study at graduate level after a break for work, or
parenthood, or travel. We welcome with special warmth graduate and postgraduate students from other
countries: you bring to the Faculty cosmopolitan qualities and remind us that the transmission and
creation of knowledge is an international activity.

Dr Mark Houlahan
ASSOCIATE DEAN (GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE)
FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES
    CONTENTS
    WHO CAN HELP?                                                                                           4
    GRADUATE STUDY IN THE FACULTY OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES                                               5
    KAUPAPA MĀORI                                                                                           6
    INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SUPPORT                                                                           6
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS                                                                           6

    THE NATURE OF GRADUATE STUDY                                                                            8
    GRADUATE PAPERS                                                                                         9
      Part-time or Full-time Study at Graduate Level?                                                       9
      At the Master’s Level?                                                                                10
    SUPERVISION OF RESEARCH                                                                                 12
    GRADUATE FACILITIES AND RESOURCES                                                                       13
      Te Kura Kete Aronui Graduate and Postgraduate E-Journal, Arts and Social Sciences – TKKA              13
      Funding for Graduate and Postgraduate Student Research                                                13
      Faculty Awards – Honours and Master’s Thesis Awards                                                   17
      Scholarships                                                                                          18
      Teaching Work                                                                                         19
      Computer Facilities                                                                                   19
      Faculty Graduate and Postgraduate Resource Library                                                    20
      The University of Waikato Libraries                                                                   20
    THE PLANNING AND ENROLMENT PROCESS                                                                      21
      Planning                                                                                              21
      Graduate Advisers                                                                                     21
      Enrolling                                                                                             21
      Understanding Paper Codes                                                                             22
      Review of Grades                                                                                      23
      Complaints Procedure                                                                                  24




    The information in this handbook is correct at the time of printing but may change subject to considerations
    such as staffing and other reasons outside the Faculty’s control. The University’s official statement of degree
    requirements, papers offered, and managed entry criteria is in The University of Waikato Calendar, to which
    students should also refer.




2                      FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
GRADUATE QUALIFICATIONS AND ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS                                 25
  Bachelor of Arts with Honours                                                    26
  Bachelor of Social Sciences with Honours                                         27
  Bachelor of Communication Studies with Honours                                   28
  Bachelor of Music with Honours                                                   29
  Bachelor of Tourism with Honours                                                 30
  Master of Arts                                                                   31
  Master of Social Sciences                                                        32
  Master of Applied Psychology                                                     33
  Master of Arts (Applied) – Applied Linguistics                                   33
  Master of Environmental Planning                                                 34
  Master of Music                                                                  34
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE                                                           35
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA                                                               36
SPECIALIST POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMAS                                                   37
BRIDGING QUALIFICATIONS TO GRADUATE STUDY                                          38
MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY, DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS              39

SUBJECTS AND PROGRAMMES                                                            41
  Anthropology                      42    Labour Studies                           94
  Applied Linguistics               45    Mathematics                              97
  Chinese                           49    Media Studies                            99
  Demography                        51    Music                                    101
  Economics                         54    Philosophy                               105
  Education Studies                 59    Political Science                        109
  English                           62    Psychology                               112
  English Studies                   65    Public Policy                            121
  Environmental Planning            67    Religious Studies                        124
  French                            72    Resources and Environmental Planning     125
  Geography                         74    Screen and Media Studies / Akoranga
  German                            78    Whakaata Purongo                         127
  Health Development and Policy     79    Social Policy                            131
  History                           83    Social Science Research                  134
  Human Development                 86    Sociology                                138
  Industrial Relations and                Spanish                                  141
  Human Resource Management         89    Theatre Studies                          142
  International Relations and             Tikanga Māori / Māori Cultural Studies   145
  Security Studies Programme        90    Tourism Development                      147
  Japanese                          92    Women’s and Gender Studies               149

ACADEMIC STAFF RESEARCH INTERESTS                                                  152



                                                                                         3
    WHO CAN HELP?
    The Faculty is dedicated to providing advice and assistance to its graduate and postgraduate
    students. If you are thinking of, or are already enrolled in, graduate or postgraduate study,
    the following people can help you:
    » Graduate Advisors, who are appointed in each subject or programme area, are responsible for providing
      graduate and postgraduate students with academic advice in their respective area(s). If you wish
      to discuss, or need assistance in, aspects of a particular subject or academic advice, speak to your
      Graduate Advisor. Contact details for each subject’s Graduate Advisor are included at the end of each
      subject listing in this handbook.
    » Academic staff working and researching in your area of interest. Academic staff ensure they set times
      aside especially for meeting and speaking with students. Staff contact details are available on the
      Faculty web pages (www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/staff.shtml).
    » The Faculty Graduate and Postgraduate Student Support Coordinator and Faculty Graduate Manager
      provide administrative services and advice for prospective and current graduate-level students. They
      are located in the Faculty Office on the ground floor of J Block. The Faculty Graduate and Postgraduate
      Student Support Coordinator is your first point of contact for:
          •   information about your papers and qualification.
          •   enrolment and programme planning.
          •   regulatory advice.
          •   other assistance and information (e.g. Faculty policy on funding student research expenses).
    » Student Support Coordinators for Māori students and International students also are located
      in the Faculty Office.
    » The Faculty Graduate Working Group (FASSGRAD) led by the Associate Dean (graduate and
      postgraduate) are responsible for organising and facilitating all matters related to graduate
      and postgraduate study in the Faculty.

    The Faculty also provides the following resources and services to graduate and
    postgraduate students:
    » A Faculty website (www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/student/graduate/) for graduate and
      postgraduate students.
    » An email distribution to inform graduate and postgraduate students of any upcoming events or other
      activities that may assist them.
    » A series of workshops and seminars, an annual interdisciplinary conference for graduate and
      postgraduate students to present their research, and various social and networking events held
      throughout the year.
    » An electronic journal – Te Kura Kete Aronui – dedicated to graduate and postgraduate publications
      (www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/tkka/)
    » A number of publications available from the Faculty Resource library designed to assist graduate and
      postgraduate students in their research.
    » An information board in the J Block ground floor corridor where any events and activities for graduate
      level students and other information (for instance regarding scholarships) can be found.




4                     FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
Please feel free to call by the Faculty Office for more information and assistance.


FACULTY OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO
Ground Floor, J Block. Gate 1, Knighton Road, Hamilton
Private Bag 3105, Hamilton New Zealand
Tel: +64 7 838 4080 or 0800 800 145 (for calls within NZ)
Fax: +64 7 838 4636
Email: wfass@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/



GRADUATE STUDY IN THE FACULTY
OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Graduate and postgraduate students form a significant group at the University of Waikato
– more than 20 per cent of the total student body – and they contribute a feeling of
diversity and life experience to the campus community. The University’s qualifications also
attract students from more than 60 nations, bringing together cultures and experiences
from around the world.
We encourage our own graduates to pursue further study in their disciplines and we welcome enquiries
from graduates of other universities.
There are, in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, a wide range of possibilities for graduate and
postgraduate study. Many of our staff are recognised national and international experts in their research
fields and the Faculty is proud of the academic reputation it has established. By careful selection of their
programme, students can choose to study and research topics of relevance to the region, to New Zealand,
and to the wider international community – or a combination of these.
If you are considering graduate or postgraduate study in the Faculty then we suggest that you contact the
staff working in your areas of interest. Faculty academic staff and their research interests are listed at the
back of this handbook. The Faculty web pages also contain information about staff, their research interests
and their publications (www.waikato.ac.nz).
Each department has a Graduate Adviser who can help you plan your programme of study or who can
put you in touch with relevant staff. We encourage you to contact staff in the Faculty to find out more
about the possibilities of further study. In some cases it is possible to design an appropriate programme
of graduate study that includes papers from more than one department, or from other Schools of Studies
within The University of Waikato.




                                                                                                                 5
    KAUPAPA M ORI
    It is the policy of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences to encourage and support
    the development of Kaupapa Māori.
    The Faculty supports Māori students in several ways, specifically through the Takawaenga Māori / Māori
    Student Support Co-ordinator position and Te Aka Matua, the Māori student rōpū tautoko. Students are
    encouraged to contact Te Aka Matua (www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/teakamatua/) to ensure an easier
    transition into graduate study with hui whakawhanaungatanga, study wānanga and other Kaupapa
    Māori initiatives.
    The Faculty also welcomes and encourages Māori students to include Māori ideas, perspectives and
    concepts in their work, as appropriate to the assignment topic. For some papers work may be submitted
    in Te Reo Māori, in whole or in part. Students wishing to do this should consult the Convenor of the paper
    in the first instance, with follow up advice from the Māori Student Support Co-ordinator.



    INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SUPPORT
    The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences welcomes graduate and postgraduate international
    students for the experience and expertise they bring to the University.
    All departments have an international students’ adviser to help students plan and carry out their
    programmes of study. In the first instance, however, intending students who are not citizens of New
    Zealand or Australia or permanent residents of either country, should contact the International Centre for
    information on admission and application processes. The University of Waikato’s International Centre has
    staff who can offer assistance and information to international students intending to enrol, or who are
    already enrolled. You are welcome to contact them by letter, phone or email at:

    WAIKATO INTERNATIONAL
    THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO
    Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand
    Tel: +64 7 838 4439
    Email: international@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/international/



    ENGLISH LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS
    Students whose first language is not English are required to provide evidence
    of English language proficiency.
    The minimum English language requirement for admission to graduate study in the Faculty is an IELTS score
    of 6.5 (academic stream) with a writing band of no less than 6.0; or a computer-based TOEFL score of 250,
    with a writing score of 5; or a paper-based TOEFL score of 600, with a Test of Written English (TWE) of 5.
    The University of Waikato has agreed to observe and be bound by the Code of Practice for
    the Pastoral Care of International Students published by New Zealand’s Ministry of Education.
    Copies of the Code are available on request from this institution or from the New Zealand Ministry
    of Education website at www.minedu.govt.nz


6                     FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
CONTENTS
THE NATURE OF GRADUATE STUDY                                                                 8

GRADUATE PAPERS                                                                              9
  Part-time or Full-time Study at Graduate Level?                                            9
  At the Master’s Level?                                                                     10

SUPERVISION OF RESEARCH                                                                      12

GRADUATE FACILITIES AND RESOURCES                                                            13
  Te Kura Kete Aronui Graduate and Postgraduate E-Journal, Arts and Social Sciences – TKKA   13
  Funding for Graduate and Postgraduate Student Research                                     13
  Faculty Awards – Honours and Master’s Thesis Awards                                        17
  Scholarships                                                                               18
  Teaching Work                                                                              19
  Computer Facilities                                                                        19
  Faculty Graduate and Postgraduate Resource Library                                         20
  The University of Waikato Libraries                                                        20

THE PLANNING AND ENROLMENT PROCESS                                                           21
  Planning                                                                                   21
  Graduate Advisers                                                                          21
  Enrolling                                                                                  21
  Understanding Paper Codes                                                                  22
  Review of Grades                                                                           23
  Complaints Procedure                                                                       24




                                                                                                  7
    THE NATURE OF GRADUATE STUDY
    At graduate level, students begin to enjoy intellectual independence. They learn to engage
    critically with scholarship in specialised areas of their major subject, and to produce their
    own independent research work. Whereas undergraduate study relies heavily on secondary
    accounts and summaries provided by lecturers and texts, graduate students begin to
    produce their own accounts of their field of study. To succeed at this level, students need to
    be highly motivated, hard working, and willing to take an active role in debate both in class
    and on paper.
    The standards of work expected of graduate students reflect this expectation of intellectual independence.
    In general, students engaged in graduate level study will learn to demonstrate that they:
    » are conversant with major theories, key debates and bodies of research in the topic area of their
      paper(s) and or discipline(s);
    » possess a high level of critical awareness of research design and techniques;
    » can assume various theoretical positions and use these to critique other positions and arguments;
    » can read beyond minimum requirements and are able to find relevant resources independently using
      library systems and other sources;
    » can write in a scholarly manner using an accepted method of referencing.
    To gain high grades, however, graduate students need to learn to do a little more. They should:
    » begin to generate original arguments, research topics and questions, to locate these within
      scholarly debate in the literature of the topic area, and to suggest methods of researching these
      topics and questions;
    » produce written work of a quality approaching that of work published in refereed journals.




8                     FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
GRADUATE PAPERS
The role of staff who teach graduate level papers is to help students attain intellectual
independence in the context of their academic or professional community. Ways of
achieving this vary according to the discipline, the preference and teaching style of
lecturers and the needs of students.
In many graduate papers a substantial proportion of teaching time is devoted to class discussion of set
readings. A frequent requirement is for students to present one or more seminars in a paper. These may
take the form of a prepared paper similar to a conference paper, or discussion of work in progress, or a
student may get set readings for the class and then lead discussion of these readings.


Part-time or Full-time Study at Graduate Level?
New graduate students sometimes underestimate the quantity and quality of intellectual work demanded
at graduate level; it is quite a step up from undergraduate study. The jolt can be energising; sometimes it is
debilitating. Make sure you understand it is not merely another year of undergraduate study.
As a consequence of the points differentiation (i.e. 500 level papers are normally worth 30 points each),
the expected hours of study per paper are greater than for undergraduate papers. The minimum total
hours of study, including scheduled classes, for undergraduate papers are 150 for 100 level, and 200 hours
for levels 2 and 3. For 500 level papers, the minimum total hours of study is 300 hours per paper. The 300
hours includes scheduled classes, which may be between 36 and 50 hours in total, but that means you
need to be able to schedule at least 250 – 264 hours of your own learning time. And that is a minimum.
What kinds of learning you do in those 250+ hours outside scheduled classes will vary from subject to
subject and paper to paper: reading, note-taking, searching on-line, writing, designing and producing
spreadsheets, preparing presentations for classes, and a host of other activities. But this learning, which we
could call intellectual work, should be focused and energetic, deliberate and purposeful.
In planning your graduate programme, then, make sure your personal timetable of paid employment,
care-giving, perhaps some recreation, even a little sleep now and then, will leave you sufficient hours
through the teaching year to aggregate 1000+ hours of focused study in addition to scheduled classes if
you are a full-time student.
How it will work out on a weekly basis will depend on whether you are doing semester-length papers
or papers which are taught over two semesters. But if there are not enough hours for study, you should
think about a part-time programme, especially if you intend to go on with study at Master’s level, either
immediately or eventually: the normal requirement for enrolment in a Master’s programme is a B+ average
in your Honours programme. In other words, you will need results which are consistently very good.




                                                                                                                 9
 GRADUATE PAPERS
 At the Master’s Level?
 For a Master’s degree, you must include a dissertation equivalent to two papers, or a thesis equivalent to
 three papers, or a thesis equivalent to four papers. All Master’s degrees now contain this crucial research
 component: it is through a Master’s degree that you learn to carry out independent research on a
 significant scale, and this distinguishes Master’s degrees from an Honours programme, even if the latter
 includes such a research exercise as a Directed Study.
 Just as it is easy, and not uncommon, for students to underestimate the step up from undergraduate study
 to an Honours degree, so too do many students fail to realise at the start of a Master’s programme that
 the dissertation or thesis is a new level of intellectual engagement, and not simply another year of study.
 It is very tempting to enrol full-time for a Master’s degree without considering the constraints placed upon
 study by other responsibilities, including care-giving but especially opportunities for paid employment. In
 recent years, some staff have reported concerns about Master’s students working too many hours in paid
 employment to give sufficient attention to their dissertations and theses, and consequently either failing
 to complete their research by the due date, and therefore having to re-enrol, or submitting dissertations
 and theses which are of a disappointing standard in content and presentation.
 A number of Master’s students do re-enrol, usually for a further 3-6 months, which means additional fees,
 after being unable to complete their research in a year of full-time study. This ought not to happen except
 in very unusual circumstances, such as severe and drawn out illness of the student or someone for whom
 the student is a primary caregiver.
 Since a Thesis (594) is equivalent to four 500 level papers, and worth 120 points, the total number
 of hours of study is a minimum of 1200 hours (300 x 4).
 You would be wise to allow more than the minimum 1200 hours over twelve months, and perhaps
 schedule as many as 1400 or 1500 hours. This is not, despite all you may have heard from cynical
 survivors, because theses are subject to Murphy’s Law, that if anything can possibly go wrong, it probably
 will, but rather because you are a novice researcher, in a formal academic context anyway, and there must
 be, in many cases, a good deal of trial and error as the research project is shaped and operationalised.
 Beginning researchers with little experience are much less efficient as researchers than those who have
 had years of experience. It will take you longer, perhaps much longer, than it would take your supervisor(s)
 to locate materials, to decide what is relevant, to rank the significance of what is relevant, to develop an
 appropriate methodology, to organise a division of your research results into effective chapters, and to
 write, and probably rewrite, the results of your research in an acceptable and accessible form. Indeed, your
 supervisor(s) may at times forget just how long it takes a tyro to master these skills, and they may become
 impatient with delays or be critical of the standards of your work.
 For these reasons, you should give yourself more than the minimum 1200 hours total study time
 over 52 weeks.
 While you should have regular meetings with your supervisor(s), probably weekly and normally not less
 than fortnightly for much of the period of enrolment, and while there may be seminar presentations to
 your fellow thesis students or to staff in your subject, most of the 1200+ hours will be your own study
 time. It is vital that this time is focused on particular tasks with demonstrable outcomes.




10                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
At the same time, it is imperative that you keep close rein on your paid employment. With your study time
less structured than hitherto, without scheduled classes if you are enrolled for a four-paper equivalent
thesis, you may very easily take up more hours in paid employment than is appropriate for the good of
your thesis. This may be employment outside the University, or employment as a sessional assistant/
tutor/marker by the University, usually by the Department in which you are enrolled for your thesis,
or employment both within and beyond the University. Your obligations to employers will have more
immediate deadlines than your thesis, and indeed may be a welcome distraction. Since you are used
to studying primarily during teaching semesters, you may too readily take up employment between
semesters and after the second semester, forgetting that your thesis study is over a 52 week period,
or, alternatively, omitting to increase your hours of study per week in semester periods to make up for
time away from study outside the semesters.
In these circumstances, extra income can come to seem more important than progress on your
thesis, which is virtually put on hold. If you do end up in this situation, you should either reduce
your paid employment, however painful that may be, or change to part-time enrolment, both in
fairness to yourself and in fairness to your supervisor(s): they will be concerned to see you complete
your research in good time, and will be frustrated (and may express their frustration) if the completion of
agreed activities are constantly postponed. The whole point of learning to be an independent researcher is
undercut if you slide into an amateurish approach to such matters.
The essential calculation is not the number of hours you are in paid employment, or engaged as
a primary caregiver, but the number of hours you have available for concentrated study on your
research project. If these hours, potentially or actually, fall below an average of 30 per week over
a 52 week period, then you will need to adjust the hours given to other activities, including paid
employment, or consider part-time enrolment.




                                                                                                              11
 SUPERVISION OF RESEARCH
 Dissertations and theses are the students’ own research work, but are developed under the
 supervision of one or more academic staff members. In many cases one staff member will
 be the sole supervisor; alternatively there may be a main supervisor, with others involved as
 secondary supervisors for their knowledge of a specialist area of the research, or for their
 experience in the supervision process. Another arrangement is for two or more staff to act
 as equal co-supervisors. As well as being assessed by a supervisor, Master’s theses are sent
 out for external assessment by a scholar at another university. MPhil and PhD theses are
 sent to two or more external examiners.
 The supervision begins with discussion between student and potential supervisor(s) to agree on a topic
 and the form the research will take. These initial meetings should be held before the end of teaching in the
 academic year preceding the year of enrolment for the research project, dissertation or thesis. The student
 may develop, under the lecturer’s guidance, a reading list or other tasks to prepare for the project over the
 summer before formal enrolment.
 Once the project is formally under way, there should be regular supervisory meetings to discuss progress
 (fortnightly is a common frequency for dissertation and thesis supervision meetings). Once writing up of
 the project begins, the supervisor provides feedback on written drafts of the work. The final draft of a thesis
 should be approved by the main supervisor before it is bound.
 Supervision involves balancing two priorities: the students’ need to develop their own reading and research,
 and to express the results of this process in their own words; and the supervisors’ responsibility to ensure
 that students are aware of the range of sources and publications in the topic area, and that the students’
 work meets current standards of research and scholarly debate in the subject.
 In practice this means that students need to read, write and plan for themselves in the lead-up to
 supervisory meetings, and then take seriously the criticisms and suggestions made by their supervisors.
 In many cases the supervisory process takes the form of an ongoing collegial discussion, in which the
 supervisor may raise various objections. These points may anticipate the sort of objections which the
 supervisor suspects will be raised by external assessors and others working in the field. Such criticisms
 invite students to further develop their methodology and arguments.
 The Faculty has produced a handbook, The Graduate Guide to Master’s Theses and Dissertations, for
 Master’s research students and supervisory staff of the Faculty. It provides information on the processes
 involved in undertaking Master’s research in the Faculty. It should be read in conjunction with the relevant
 department graduate handbook.
 Please contact the Faculty Office for a copy or download a copy from:
 www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/student/graduate/gradguide/
 For further information on MPhil and PhD supervision, please refer to the Handbook for
 Research Degrees of MPhil, PhD and EdD at the University of Waikato
 (www.waikato.ac.nz/research/postgraduate/forms_index.shtml).




12                  FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
GRADUATE FACILITIES AND RESOURCES
Te Kura Kete Aronui Graduate and Postgraduate E-Journal,
Arts and Social Sciences – TKKA
Te Kura Kete Aronui is a peer-reviewed electronic journal that showcases original work of graduate and
postgraduate students. Taking advantage of online publishing, TKKA aims to be dynamic, innovative and
interdisciplinary. TKKA will publish thought-provoking interdisciplinary articles, reviews, commentary, visual
and multi-media works that engage critical issues, themes and debates related to the arts, humanities and
social sciences.
Te Kura Kete Aronui, the chosen title for this new graduate journal, prompts reflection on the importance
of place for graduate and postgraduate students. Te Kura Kete Aronui demonstrates the capacity of
bicultural communications to make links between different knowledges. As such, TKKA is a forum for
critical work that opens up spaces of difference and challenges inequalities.
For more information see: www.waikato.ac.nz/fass/tkka


Funding for Graduate and Postgraduate Research
The Faculty provides some financial support for students undertaking research as part of their graduate
and postgraduate studies. The maximum levels of funding are determined by the Faculty policy, which is
outlined below and at www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/student/graduate/funding.shtml.
Assistance is provided for research students doing directed studies, dissertations and theses (including the
Acoustic and Electroacoustic Composition Studies (90 points) or Performance Studies (90 points) papers
for BMus(Hons) and the Acoustic and Electroacoustic Composition Portfolio (120 points) or Advanced
Performance (120 points) papers for the MMus). Only Postgraduate Diploma, Honours, Master’s, MPhil or
PhD research students enrolled in the Faculty will be eligible for any financial support from internal Faculty
funding for research expenses or conference attendance.
Research students who are also staff members in the Faculty and eligible for financial support from the
Faculty for their research and/or conference attendance, may opt to take funding under whichever policy is
the more favourable for them.




                                                                                                             13
 GRADUATE FACILITIES AND RESOURCES
 What can be claimed?
 1. Research Expenses Reimbursement
 Only direct research expenses will be reimbursed. Departments can provide their research students with
 details of eligible expenses relevant to their discipline. Students should make sure they are clear what
 they can claim before embarking on the research.
 What can be claimed will depend on the particular research. For example, some research may require
 access to the internet, and such research may allow students to claim some of the internet charges
 directly related to their research.
 Some further examples:
 » Travel for the purpose of data collection: any travel must be directly related to the research
   (such as visiting a necessary archive or travel to conduct interviews).
 » Photocopying of materials required to undertake the research (such as questionnaires or material
   required from archives) may be eligible. If so, the cost of producing questionnaires will be reimbursed
   up to the amount it would cost at Waikato Print (i.e., this cost sets the maximum that will be
   reimbursed if students produce them themselves and then provide receipts for ink cartridges
   and paper).
 » The costs of some research materials may be eligible for reimbursement. Where the research materials
   are items such as books, pre-recorded tapes, or CDs, then these purchases are the property of the
   University and should be bar-coded by the Library and returned to the University on completion
   of the research.
 » Tapes for recording interviews count as consumable items and these costs can be reimbursed provided
   the taping was a direct component of the research.
 » Where special items of equipment are required for the research, the department may approve their
   purchase. The equipment will belong to the department and must be returned to the department on
   completion of the research.
 » Specialist computer software required to undertake the research and not already provided by the
   department or University may be eligible. The software will belong to the department and must be
   returned to the department once the research is completed.
 This policy assumes that required research equipment (such as experimental control equipment)
 is available in the department concerned.




14                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
2. Conference Attendance
The full costs of conferences cannot be covered and grants-in-aid only will be given. In all cases these will
be made only if the student is giving a paper based on thesis or dissertation research. The supervisor must
confirm in writing that the paper is directly on the student’s research.
When students are working on externally funded projects which also provide funds for conference
attendance, then they can use up to the amount specified by this policy to supplement their expenses
when they are not covered entirely by the outside funds. This also applies when students are on
scholarships which provide a grant-in-aid for conference attendance. In either case, students must submit
budgets to the relevant departments which show the total costs incurred in attending the conference and
also show how much of this is provided by the external source or scholarship.

3. Maximum Amounts
Taught Graduate Papers
» Course expenses: Incurred for taught graduate papers will not be eligible for reimbursement.
» Conference attendance: Students undertaking BA(Hons), BCS(Hons), BSocSc(Hons), BTour(Hons),
  or Postgraduate Diploma are eligible for support for conference attendance when they are enrolled
  in Directed Study (590).

Directed Study (590)
» Research expenses and conference attendance: If the directed study consists solely of a research
  project, then up to $100 may be reimbursed for research expenses and/or for conference attendance
  to present the results of a directed study.

Master’s Dissertation (592)
» Research expenses: Up to $250 for research expenses for a two-paper (60 points) dissertation.
» Dissertation production costs: The cost of binding and copying one copy of a dissertation will be
  covered only if the department has a policy of keeping a copy of each dissertation.
» Conference attendance: Up to $100 for a North Island and up to $250 for either a South Island or
  an overseas conference provided a student is giving a paper or poster on their dissertation and/or the
  student is named as one of the authors in a multi-authored presentation. With the endorsement of
  a supervisor, the fund is available for up to 12 months after the submission of the dissertation.

Master’s Thesis (593)
» Research expenses: Up to $375 for research expenses for a three-paper (90 points) thesis.
» Thesis production costs: The cost of binding and copying one copy of a thesis.
» Conference attendance: Up to $100 for a North Island and up to $250 for either a South Island or an
  overseas conference provided a student is giving a paper or poster on their thesis and/or the student is
  named as one of the authors in a multi-authored presentation. With the endorsement of a supervisor,
  the fund is available for up to 12 months after the submission of the thesis.




                                                                                                                15
 GRADUATE FACILITIES AND RESOURCES
 Master’s Thesis (594)
 » Research expenses: Up to $500 for research expenses for a four-paper thesis (120 points).
 » Thesis production costs: The cost of binding and copying one copy of the thesis.
 » Conference attendance: Up to $100 for a North Island and up to $250 for either a South Island or an
   overseas conference provided a student is giving a paper or poster on their thesis research and/or the
   student is named as one of the authors in a multi-authored presentation. With the endorsement of a
   supervisor, the fund is available for up to 12 months after the submission of the thesis.

 MPhil
 » Research expenses: Up to $500 for research expenses over the whole enrolment in the MPhil.
 » Thesis production costs: The cost of binding and copying one copy of the thesis.
 » Conference attendance: Up to $500 for one conference while enrolled and provided the student is
   giving a paper on their thesis research and the student is one of the authors in a multi-authored paper.

 PhD
 » Research expenses: Up to $1500 over the whole enrolment for research expenses. Where appropriate
   for the research, the department may choose to allow the student to claim some portion of the total
   reimbursement (up to the maximum amount) allowed in a shorter period. Students should be clear
   that once the full $1500 has been claimed, no more can be claimed, even if the thesis continues for
   several more years.
 » Thesis production costs: The cost of binding and copying one copy of the thesis.
 » Conference attendance: Up to $1500 for expenses for up to two conferences while enrolled and
   provided the student is giving a paper on their thesis research and the student is named as one of the
   authors in a multi-authored paper.




16                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
4. Budgeting Research and Claiming Any Reimbursement
Students should discuss with their supervisor(s) what eligible research expenses are and how to
claim any reimbursement before starting research.
Students who are enrolled in more than one department for their thesis or dissertation should clarify
which department will provide any reimbursement prior to starting their research. Departments may
sometimes share this responsibility or one may take full responsibility.
Claims for Master’s and directed study research expense reimbursement can be made during the course
of the research or once the thesis or directed study has been submitted. Students should ask their
supervisor(s) what the department’s policy is on this prior to starting their research.
Note: Some departments require students to work with their supervisors to produce a budget before starting
the research. Some also require that students have their budget formally approved prior to starting, and some
require this to be done before any expenses are eligible for reimbursement. Students should make sure they
are familiar with their department’s procedures on these matters.
Costs should be considered during the research planning phase and the budget should be considered
before finalising the research plan.
Departments have different processes for claiming a refund and for checking eligibility of the expense.
All departments will require receipts before any reimbursement can be made so students should
ensure they collect and retain relevant receipts.


Faculty Awards – Honours and Master’s Thesis Awards
The Faculty offers up to 40 Honours awards and 20 Master’s Thesis Awards each year. These awards are
intended for full-time Honours or Master’s or Postgraduate Diploma students, enrolling in either the
A or B semester, however, part-time students may apply and if successful would receive a pro rata amount.
To be eligible, Honours and Postgraduate Diploma students must be enrolled in at least 60 points in the
Faculty, and Master’s students must be enrolled in a three or four paper Master’s Research thesis or the
equivalent in either the A or B Semester.
The awards are based on academic merit, but will not be held in conjunction with the University of
Waikato Master’s Scholarship and not normally in conjunction with another major scholarship or by
employees of the University of Waikato (and Waikato Institute of Technology) who hold a fixed term
or continuing contract.
Application forms can be downloaded from: www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/student/graduate/awards/




                                                                                                                17
 GRADUATE FACILITIES AND RESOURCES
 Scholarships
 Graduate students who are citizens or permanent residents of New Zealand may be eligible for a range of
 scholarships, including University of Waikato Scholarships for graduate students. Two of the main closing
 dates for scholarships are 30 April and 31 October, annually.
 Students can consult:
 The BreakOut Scholarships Database on University of Waikato computer systems, at:
 www.fis.org.nz/index.php?page=BreakOut
 The University of Waikato Scholarships website at:
 www.waikato.ac.nz/research/scholarships/


 THE SCHOLARSHIPS OFFICE
 B Block
 The University of Waikato
 Private Bag 3105, Hamilton,
 New Zealand
 Tel: +64 7 838 4489
 Email: scholarships@waikato.ac.nz
 www.waikato.ac.nz/research/scholarships/


 Office hours are 8.30am to 5.00pm. Students can subscribe to the Scholarships Office to receive the
 monthly notice that the latest scholarships update has appeared on the web by sending an email request
 containing the words ‘subscribe scholarships update’ in the message to: scholarships@waikato.ac.nz




18                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
Teaching Work
Some departments employ graduate students as Sessional Assistants in undergraduate papers. Subjects
may also provide some financial assistance with the costs of research projects. Students should contact
their department for information about any teaching work and financial assistance available.


Computer Facilities
Graduate students in the Faculty undertaking research projects such as theses may be allocated study
space or may have access to a shared graduate room. Some departments have computers available for their
graduate students – please consult the department administrator to see whether this option is available.
The Faculty currently runs five computer labs for its students. Most are located in J basement and are
available to Faculty students when not booked for teaching. Lab bookings are posted outside each lab with
times available to students.
The labs are:
JB.01      PC Lab (20 PCs)
JB.02      Screen and Media Teaching Lab (Screen & Media students only)
JB.03      PC Lab (30 PCs)
JB.08      PC Lab (20 PCs)
JB.11      Psychology Teaching Lab (24 PCs) (available after hours for Psychology students only)
KB Languages Lab (available after hours for Language students)
Information Commons (120 computers) The Library, level 1

However, these labs can be used after hours once access has been activated on your ID card. You will need
to obtain an application form from the Faculty Information Centre and the charge is $10.00pa.
Note: The Library computer labs cannot be accessed after hours.
For further details on the computer facilities provided by the Faculty please see:
www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/computer-support/




                                                                                                            19
 GRADUATE FACILITIES AND RESOURCES
 Faculty Graduate and Postgraduate Resource Library
 The publications available from the Resource Library are designed to assist graduate and postgraduate
 students in their research.
 Faculty graduate and postgraduate students are able to borrow these resources for one week at a time
 from the Faculty Office (J Block ground floor). A copy of the complete list of available titles is in the red
 folder on top of the bookshelf and at www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/student/graduate/gradlibrary/ Please
 write your name and contact details in the borrowing book on the appropriate page (i.e. under the book
 you are borrowing). Books may be borrowed for one week only, and borrowers should write the ‘return by’
 date on the card in the front of each book.
 Please contact the Faculty Office for further details.


 The University of Waikato Libraries
 There are three libraries on campus, the Central Library, the Law Library, and the Education Library.
 The Library is open seven days a week, and offers students 1,024 places to study and read. The Library
 contains over 1,012,000 volumes, including books, journals and microforms, plus a large collection of maps.
 It also has a comprehensive New Zealand collection. The Library receives 3,483 print journal titles and
 around 29,500 electronic journal titles annually.
 All materials held by the Library are listed in the Catalogue, which can be accessed via:
 www.waikato.ac.nz/library/ or direct at http://waikato.lconz.ac.nz/
 The Library subscribes to a number of international electronic databases which are available via LibraryLink
 (www.waikato.ac.nz/library/resources/librarylink/) to all students, both on and off-campus, who have
 University of Waikato usernames and passwords. There is an Inter-Library Loan service that allows students
 to access material from other libraries within New Zealand when needed. Library staff offer tutorials on
 referencing and EndNote as well as subject-specific tutorials for graduate groups.
 Facilities within the Library include an Information Commons with over 120 computers:
 (www.waikato.ac.nz/library/business/infocommons.shtml)
 Graduate students should contact their Subject Librarians, Heather Morrell, Jenny McGhee, Jillene Bydder
 and Ruth Ivey, for any help required with Library resources:
 (www.waikato.ac.nz/library/business/subject_librarians.shtml)




20                  FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
THE PLANNING AND ENROLMENT PROCESS
Planning
Students should begin planning graduate study early. University of Waikato undergraduate students
intending to enrol in graduate study should discuss and plan an appropriate programme of study with
the department graduate adviser during their third year of study (as some graduate papers have specific
300 level papers as prerequisites). Students new to the University of Waikato should contact the
department to discuss their proposed study well in advance.
Students seeking a supervisor for their research project, dissertation or thesis should consult the research
interests of individual staff in the staff profiles on the department/subject websites. Staff research interests
are listed at the back of this handbook. Most departments have formal procedures for this planning
process, forms that must be completed in consultation with academic staff, and deadlines by
which they must be submitted. Details of these procedures can be found in the departmental or subject
graduate handbook(s). Academic staff may provide students with reading lists for the summer recess.


Graduate Advisers
Each subject/programme designates a staff member as its graduate adviser.
The graduate adviser will assist students with the process of planning their graduate study either by
discussions with them or by suggesting which academic staff the student should approach.
They are also available to discuss students’ progress with graduate study and advise them on any problem
which may be hampering their progress. The names and contact details of graduate advisers can be found
in the subject/programme listings in this handbook.


Enrolling
Once a student has obtained the agreement of the major subject for their graduate programme of study,
they should complete an Application To Enrol (ATE) form.
To complete an application now:
» Visit the University of Waikato website. An Application To Enrol form may be completed on-line at:
  www.waikato.ac.nz/enrol/ate.shtml
» Call 0800 924 528 for an Application Pack. This includes an Application To Enrol form and an updated
  list of the papers available in 2009.
Before an application can be approved by the Faculty’s student services and enrolment team, applications
must be signed by the graduate adviser of the relevant department or the Chairperson of Department.
There is space on the application form to gain the necessary signatures. Any other form of written approval
for graduate papers (e.g. a memo or email) must be either attached to the application form, or emailed/
posted through to the Faculty Office. If approval is not indicated on the ATE, applications are sent to the
department for approval and usually processed within 3 working days.
If you wish to discuss your application or programme of study before you submit your ATE, please contact
the Faculty Office.




                                                                                                              21
 THE PLANNING AND ENROLMENT PROCESS
 Understanding Paper Codes
 The code of each paper shows the subject, the level, the period of teaching and the teaching location.
 Example: APPL552-09B (HAM) Language Assessment and Evaluation
 APPL       5          52          09          B             (HAM)
 Subject    Level      Paper       Year        Semester      Campus

 Note: A number of subjects/programmes offer some graduate papers as half papers. These are signalled with
 ‘(15 points)’ after the paper and semester code. A half paper represents half the paper content and half the
 assessed workload of a full paper, i.e. two half papers are equivalent to one paper.

 Semester Indicators
 A          = 1st semester (February – June)
 B          = 2nd semester (July – November)
 Y          = taught over the full academic year (February – November)
 C or D     = an atypical teaching period
 C          = Graduate research papers (which can be taken over six months
            (26 weeks) or twelve months (52 weeks))
 S          = Summer School


 Location Indicators
 BLK        = papers taught in block mode
 HAM        = papers taught in Hamilton
 NET        = papers taught on the internet
 TGA        = papers taught in Tauranga




22                  FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
Review of Grades
Querying a grade for a specific piece of internally assessed work
If you feel that your work has not been fairly assessed, you have the right to take this further. First, you
should discuss the matter with the convenor of the paper. If it is agreed that a reconsideration of the mark
or grade is warranted, it is the convenor’s responsibility to ensure that the work is re-marked by another
staff member.
If you are not satisfied with the outcome, you should next approach the Chairperson of Department. If
discussion with the Chairperson of Department does not lead to an acceptable resolution, you may express
your concerns, in writing, to the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences.

Review of a final grade
You may apply for a review of grade once you have received your final results if you consider that a
mistake has been made in the process of determining the grade for a paper. Applications must be received
no later than 14 days after receiving your final results. Application forms are available from The Gateway
and a fee is required for each paper under review. If your application is successful and your grade changes,
the fee will be refunded. Full details on the regulations about review and appeal of grades are in The
University of Waikato Calendar.

Final submission of internally assessed work
The last day for submission of graduate level internally assessed course work is not later than one
week after the conclusion of the examination period.
Honours and Master’s students should note the following:
» IC grades: Not handing in all the required pieces of work for a paper or not sitting the final exam will
  result in an IC grade and IC grades count as FAIL grades.
» Withdrawal from a paper: It is possible to withdraw from a graduate paper up to the day of the
  final examination or the final date for submission of the last piece of assessment. There is no penalty
  for this and the student’s record will show a withdrawal rather than an IC grade (but fees will not be
  refunded if the withdrawal is after specified dates).
» Failing papers (including getting IC grades): If a student fails a graduate paper (including getting
  any IC grades) then, within an Honours or Master’s degree, they may re-sit that paper once only or
  take an agreed alternative paper(s) instead. They may fail and re-sit either one 30 point paper or
  two 15 point papers within a degree. Thus failing the paper(s) a second time or failing the agreed
  alternative(s) means they cannot proceed further with that qualification.
» Calculation of level of Honours when fail grades (including ICs) have been obtained: Note that
  although the student who has failed up to 30 points must pass the re-sits or alternative papers to get
  their degree, it is the grade received for the first attempt at that paper (or for the initial paper, where
  an alternative is substituted) that is used in calculating the level of honours. An IC grade is counted
  as a ZERO in these calculations and so contributes less to the level of honours than, say, a D grade.




                                                                                                               23
 THE PLANNING AND ENROLMENT PROCESS
 Complaints Procedure
 If you are concerned about some aspect of your academic programme, University processes or procedures,
 or actions by University staff (excluding harassment, which is covered by the University Harassment
 Policy) you have the right to make a complaint.
 First, clarify the nature of the issue and the improvements that you would like to see. You should then
 discuss this with the staff member to see if you can resolve the issue. If you have not felt able to speak
 directly to the staff member or have not been satisfied by their response, you should approach the
 Chairperson of Department or staff in the Faculty Office. If you still are not satisfied with the outcome,
 your next step is to make your complaint, in writing, to the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences.
 The Students’ Academic Complaints Policy provides details of the University’s process for handling concerns
 and complaints and is available from the Faculty Office, on the University web site or from The Gateway,
 and Student and Academic Services Division.
 The subject/programme listings in the following pages contain general information on the graduate
 qualifications and graduate papers offered in 2009 for each Faculty subject or programme.
 For more detailed information on specific department admission criteria; full details on the papers
 offered (description, prerequisites, assessment, texts, etc); and department policies, please contact the
 relevant department directly for a copy of their graduate handbook or check the departmental website.




24                  FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
CONTENTS
GRADUATE QUALIFICATIONS AND ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS                       25
  Bachelor of Arts with Honours                                          26
  Bachelor of Social Sciences with Honours                               27
  Bachelor of Communication Studies with Honours                         28
  Bachelor of Music with Honours                                         29
  Bachelor of Tourism with Honours                                       30
  Master of Arts                                                         31
  Master of Social Sciences                                              32
  Master of Applied Psychology                                           33
  Master of Arts (Applied) – Applied Linguistics                         33
  Master of Environmental Planning                                       34
  Master of Music                                                        34

POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE                                                 35

POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA                                                     36

SPECIALIST POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMAS                                         37

BRIDGING QUALIFICATIONS TO GRADUATE STUDY                                38

MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY, DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS*   39




                                                                              25
 BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH HONOURS
 BA(Hons)

 The Bachelor of Arts with Honours (BA(Hons)) involves two semesters of full-time study,
 or the equivalent in part-time study. The BA(Hons) comprises 120 points at 500 level (of
 which 30 points may be a directed study). The BA(Hons) is awarded with classes of honours.
 In general, to be admitted to the BA(Hons) you must have a B grade average in the 300 level papers of
 your undergraduate major subject. You need to have majored in the same subject for your undergraduate
 degree as that in which you intend to enrol at graduate level. In some cases, a substantial undergraduate
 supporting subject may be a sufficient prerequisite. A number of the graduate subjects/programmes are
 interdisciplinary in nature, and may accept students with appropriate undergraduate majors in other
 relevant subjects. Admission criteria may vary so please consult the appropriate subject/programme
 Graduate Adviser for their specific admission criteria.


 Subjects Offered for the Bachelor of Arts with Honours
 » Anthropology*                               » Japanese
 » Chinese                                     » Mathematics
 » Education Studies                           » Music
 » English                                     » Philosophy
 » French                                      » Political Science
 » Geography*                                  » Psychology*
 » German                                      » Screen and Media Studies
 » History                                     » Theatre Studies
 Note: Māori Media and Communication, Te Reo Māori and Tikanga Māori can be taken for the BA(Hons),
 but students must enrol through the School of Māori & Pacific Development.
 * Subject to CUAP approval.




26                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
             GRADUATE QUALI FI CATI ONS & A D M I S S I O N R E Q U I R E M E N T S




BACHELOR OF SOCIAL SCIENCES WITH HONOURS
BSocSc(Hons)

The Bachelor of Social Sciences with Honours (BSocSc(Hons)) involves two semesters
of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study. The BSocSc(Hons) comprises
120 points at 500 level (of which 30 points may be a directed study). The BSocSc(Hons)
is awarded with classes of honours.
In general, to be admitted to the BSocSc(Hons) you must have a B grade average in the 300 level papers of
your undergraduate major subject. You need to have majored in the same subject for your undergraduate
degree as that in which you intend to enrol at graduate level. In some cases, a substantial undergraduate
supporting subject may be a sufficient prerequisite. A number of the graduate subjects/programmes are
interdisciplinary in nature, and may accept students with appropriate undergraduate majors in other
relevant subjects. Admission criteria may vary so please consult the appropriate subject/programme
Graduate Adviser for their specific admission criteria.


Subjects Offered for the Bachelor of
Social Sciences with Honours
» Anthropology                                  » Political Science
» Demography                                    » Psychology
» Economics                                     » Public Policy
» Education Studies                             » Resources and Environmental Planning
» Geography                                     » Social Policy
» Health Development and Policy                 » Social Science Research
» History                                       » Sociology
» Human Development                             » Tikanga Māori/ Māori Cultural Studies
» Labour Studies                                » Women’s and Gender Studies
» Philosophy

Note: The undergraduate subject of Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management (IR & HRM) is
an interdisciplinary major of related papers which at graduate level exists as a stream within Labour Studies.
Similarly, Tourism Studies is a stream within Geography.
Graduate students enrolled in the BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) degrees are not restricted to taking
papers in their main subject only. Provided your main subject agrees, you may take up to 60 points
from other subjects, of which up to 30 points may be taken from outside the subjects listed for
the degree. You should discuss your intended programme with the Graduate Adviser in each of the
departments concerned. Individual subjects may have their own guidelines for numbers and types
of papers outside the subject.




                                                                                                                 27
 BACHELOR OF COMMUNICATION STUDIES
 WITH HONOURS
 BCS(Hons)

 The Bachelor of Communication Studies with Honours (BCS(Hons)) involves two
 semesters of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study. The BCS(Hons)
 comprises 120 points at 500 level (of which 30 points may be a directed study).
 The BCS(Hons) is awarded with classes of honours.
 In general, to be admitted to the BCS(Hons) you must have a B grade average in the 300 level papers of
 your undergraduate major subject. You need to have majored in the same subject for your undergraduate
 degree as that in which you intend to enrol at graduate level. In some cases, a substantial undergraduate
 supporting subject may be a sufficient prerequisite. A number of the graduate subjects/programmes are
 interdisciplinary in nature, and may accept students with appropriate undergraduate majors in other
 relevant subjects. Admission criteria may vary so please consult the appropriate subject/programme
 Graduate Adviser for their specific admission criteria.
 Graduates of the BCS(Hons) who have a B+ or better average in their honours papers and who wish to
 continue on to Master’s will normally enrol in the Master of Arts (MA) in either English or Screen and
 Media Studies.


 Subjects Offered by the Faculty for the Bachelor of
 Communication Studies with Honours
 » English Studies
 » Media Studies
 Note: Management Communication, Marketing, Public Relations and Māori, Media and Communication
 can be taken for the BCS(Hons), but students must enrol through the Waikato Management School or
 School of Māori & Pacific Development.
 Graduate students enrolled in the BCS(Hons) degree are not restricted to taking papers in their
 main subject only. Provided your main subject agrees, you may take up to 60 points from other
 subjects, of which up to 30 points may be taken from outside the subjects listed for the degree.
 You should discuss your intended programme with the Graduate Adviser in each of the departments
 concerned. Individual subjects may have their own guidelines for numbers and types of papers
 outside the subject.




28                   FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
            GRADUATE QUALI FI CATI ONS & A D M I S S I O N R E Q U I R E M E N T S




BACHELOR OF MUSIC WITH HONOURS
BMus(Hons)

The Bachelor of Music with Honours (BMus(Hons)) involves two semesters of full-time
study, or the equivalent in part-time study. The BMus(Hons) comprises 120 points at
500 level (of which 30 points may be a directed study), specialising in either composition
or in performance. The BMus(Hons) is awarded with classes of honours.
In general, to be admitted to the BMus(Hons) you must have a B grade average in the 300 level Music
papers of your undergraduate degree. Admission criteria may vary so please consult the appropriate
subject/programme Graduate Adviser for their specific admission criteria.




                                                                                                      29
 BACHELOR OF TOURISM WITH HONOURS
 BTour(Hons)

 The Bachelor of Tourism with Honours (BTour(Hons)) involves two semesters of full-time
 study, or the equivalent in part-time study. The BTour(Hons) comprises 120 points at
 500 level (of which 30 points may be a directed study). The BTour(Hons) is awarded with
 classes of honours.
 In general, to be admitted to the BTour(Hons) you must have a B grade average in the 300 level papers of
 your undergraduate major subject. You need to have majored in the same subject for your undergraduate
 degree as that in which you intend to enrol at graduate level. In some cases, a substantial undergraduate
 supporting subject may be a sufficient prerequisite. A number of the graduate subjects/programmes are
 interdisciplinary in nature, and may accept students with appropriate undergraduate majors in other
 relevant subjects. Admission criteria may vary so please consult the appropriate subject/programme
 Graduate Adviser for their specific admission criteria.
 Graduates of the BTour(Hons) in Tourism Development who have a B+ or better average in their
 honours papers and who wish to continue on to Master’s will normally enrol in the Master of Social
 Sciences (MSocSc).


 Subjects Offered by the Faculty for the
 Bachelor of Tourism with Honours
 » Tourism Development
 Note: Tourism and Hospitality Management can be taken for the BTour(Hons), but students must enrol
 through the Waikato Management School.




30                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
             GRADUATE QUALI FI CATI ONS & A D M I S S I O N R E Q U I R E M E N T S




MASTER OF ARTS
MA

Following the successful completion of the BA(Hons) you may apply for the Master of Arts
(MA). Again, this degree is awarded with classes of honours. The MA involves one year of
full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study. It comprises either a 120 point thesis,
or a 90 point thesis and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation
and 60 points from approved 500 level papers.
To be admitted to the MA, you must have completed a Bachelor of Arts with Honours (or the equivalent)
in the same subject and must have achieved a satisfactory grade average – normally a B+ average or
better. You also need to have appropriate supervision arranged. Admission criteria may vary so please
consult the appropriate subject/programme Graduate Adviser for their specific admission criteria.
Admission to the MA requires the agreement of the Chairperson or Director of the major subject or
programme and agreement of the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences (or nominee).


Subjects Offered for the Master of Arts
» Anthropology*                                         » Japanese
» Chinese                                               » Mathematics
» Education Studies                                     » Music
» English                                               » Philosophy
» French                                                » Political Science
» Geography*                                            » Psychology*
» German                                                » Screen and Media Studies
» History                                               » Theatre Studies
» International Relations and Security Studies

Note: Māori Media and Communication, Te Reo Māori and Tikanga Māori can be taken for the MA, but
students must enrol through the School of Māori & Pacific Development.
Students who wish to take International Relations and Security Studies for the MA are normally required to
have completed the Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations and Security Studies.
* Subject to CUAP approval.




                                                                                                             31
 MASTER OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
 MSocSc

 Following the successful completion of the BSocSc(Hons) you may apply for the Master
 of Social Sciences (MSocSc). Again, this degree is awarded with classes of honours.
 The MSocSc involves one year of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study.
 It comprises either a 120 point thesis, or a 90 point thesis and 30 points from approved
 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved 500 level papers.
 To be admitted to the MSocSc, you must have completed a Bachelor of Social Sciences with Honours (or
 the equivalent) in the same subject and must have achieved a satisfactory grade average – normally a
 B+ average or better. You also need to have appropriate supervision arranged. Admission criteria may vary
 so please consult the appropriate subject/programme Graduate Adviser for their specific admission criteria.
 Admission to the MSocSc requires the agreement of the Chairperson or Director of the major subject or
 programme and agreement of the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences (or nominee).


 Subjects Offered for the Master of Social Sciences
 »   Anthropology                                »   Philosophy
 »   Demography                                  »   Political Science
 »   Economics                                   »   Psychology
 »   Education Studies                           »   Public Policy
 »   Geography                                   »   Social Policy
 »   Health Development and Policy               »   Social Science Research
 »   History                                     »   Sociology
 »   Human Development                           »   Tikanga Māori/ Māori Cultural Studies
 »   Labour Studies                              »   Women’s and Gender Studies

 Note: The undergraduate subject of Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management (IR & HRM) is
 an interdisciplinary major of related papers which at graduate level exists as a stream within Labour Studies.
 Similarly, Tourism Studies is a stream within Geography.
 Graduate students enrolled in the MA or MSocSc degrees are not restricted to taking papers in their
 main subject only. Provided your main subject agrees, you may take up to 60 points from other
 subjects. You should discuss your intended programme with the Graduate Adviser in each of the
 departments concerned. Individual subjects may have their own guidelines for numbers and types
 of papers outside the subject.




32                  FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
            GRADUATE QUALI FI CATI ONS & A D M I S S I O N R E Q U I R E M E N T S




MASTER OF APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY
MAppPsy

Following the successful completion of the BSocSc with a major in Psychology you may
apply for the Master of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy), with Community Psychology,
Organisation Psychology, or Behaviour Analysis as a programme of study. This degree is
awarded with classes of honours. The MAppPsy involves two years of full-time study, or
the equivalent in part-time study. It comprises 240 points from approved 500 level papers,
including any compulsory papers prescribed in the Psychology entry of the University of
Waikato Calendar.
To be admitted to the MAppPsy, you must have completed a Bachelor of Social Sciences (or the
equivalent) majoring in Psychology and must have achieved a satisfactory grade average over your
300 level Psychology papers – normally a B+ average or better. Admission criteria may vary so please
consult the appropriate subject/programme Graduate Adviser for their specific admission criteria.




MASTER OF ARTS (APPLIED)
– APPLIED LINGUISTICS
MA(Applied)

Following the successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma in Second Language
Teaching (PGDipSLT) you may apply for the Master of Arts (Applied) (MA(Applied)).
This degree is awarded with classes of honours. The MA(Applied) involves one year of
full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study. It comprises 120 points from approved
500 level papers. Students may include a dissertation equivalent to 30 points,
or a dissertation equivalent to 60 points, or a thesis equivalent to 90 points.
To be admitted to the MA(Applied), you must have completed a Postgraduate Diploma in Second
Language Teaching (or the equivalent) and must have achieved a satisfactory grade average – normally
a B+ average or better. Admission criteria may vary so please consult the appropriate subject/programme
Graduate Adviser for their specific admission criteria.




                                                                                                          33
 MASTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
 MEP

 Following the successful completion of the BSocSc(Hons) in Resources and Environmental
 Planning you may apply for the Master of Environmental Planning (MEP). This degree may
 be awarded with Distinction. The MEP involves one year of full-time study, or the equivalent
 in part-time study. It comprises 120 points at 500 level, including at least one practicum
 paper equivalent to 30 points and a dissertation equivalent to 60 points and one other
 30 point paper relevant to planning, or a thesis equivalent to 90 points.
 To be admitted to the MEP, you must have completed a Bachelor of Social Sciences with Honours (or the
 equivalent) in Resources and Environmental Planning and must have achieved a satisfactory grade average
 – normally a B+ average or better. You also need to have appropriate supervision arranged. Admission
 criteria may vary so please consult the appropriate subject/programme Graduate Adviser for their specific
 admission criteria.




 MASTER OF MUSIC
 MMus

 Following the successful completion of the BMus(Hons) you may apply for the Master of
 Music (MMus). This degree is awarded with classes of honours. The MMus involves one year
 of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study. Candidates must gain 120 points
 at 500 level, comprising either Acoustic and Electroacoustic Composition Portfolio or
 Advanced Performance.
 To be admitted to the MMus, you must have completed a Bachelor of Music with Honours (or the
 equivalent) and must have achieved a satisfactory grade average – normally a B+ average or better.
 Admission criteria may vary so please consult the appropriate subject/programme Graduate Adviser for
 their specific admission criteria.




34                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE
PGCert

The Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) is available to meet the needs of graduates who wish
to broaden and deepen their knowledge in the subject they studied at undergraduate level.
The prerequisite for the PGCert is normally a Bachelor’s degree acceptable to the Chairperson of the
subject or programme, and to the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences (or nominee). Students must have
completed study at an advanced level in their undergraduate degree in order to study the subject for
the PGCert.
The PGCert requires the completion of 60 points at 500 level or above in one PGCert subject.
For a list of subjects offered by the Faculty for the Postgraduate Certificate, see the subjects listed below
for the Postgraduate Diploma.
*Note: A candidate who has been awarded the PGCert may, with departmental approval, relinquish it for
credit of 60 points towards the BA(Hons), BSocSc(Hons), BCS(Hons), BMus(Hons) or BTour(Hons) in the
same subject. A transfer credit fee will apply.




                                                                                                               35
 POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA
 PGDip

 The Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) is available to meet the needs of graduates who wish to
 broaden and deepen their knowledge in the subject they studied at undergraduate level.
 The prerequisite for the PGDip is normally a Bachelor’s degree acceptable to the Chairperson of the subject
 or programme, and to the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences (or nominee). Students must have completed
 study at an advanced level in their undergraduate degree in order to study the subject for the PGDip.
 The PGDip requires the completion of 120 points at 500 level or above, including at least 90 points in
 one PGDip subject.


 Subjects Offered by the Faculty for the Postgraduate Diploma
 » Anthropology                                         » Japanese
 » Applied Linguistics                                  » Labour Studies
 » Chinese                                              » Mathematics
 » Demography                                           » Music
 » Economics                                            » Philosophy
 » Education Studies                                    » Political Science
 » English                                              » Psychology
 » Environmental Planning                               » Public Policy
 » French                                               » Screen and Media Studies
 » Geography                                            » Second Language Teaching
 » German                                               » Social Policy
 » Health Development and Policy                        » Social Science Research
 » History                                              » Sociology
 » Human Development                                    » Theatre Studies
 » International Relations and Security Studies         » Women’s and Gender Studies




36                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
SPECIALIST POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMAS
The following specialist or professional graduate and postgraduate diplomas are offered
by the Faculty. For more detailed information, please see the subject/programme listing
in this handbook.


Specialist Postgraduate Diplomas and Certificates
Postgraduate Diploma in the Practice of Psychology – see page 114
Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology (Clinical) – see page 113
Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology (Community) – see page 113




                                                                                          37
 BRIDGING QUALIFICATIONS TO GRADUATE STUDY
 Students who do not have a substantial component of a particular subject in their
 undergraduate degree can enrol in either a Graduate Diploma (GradDip) or
 Graduate Certificate (GradCert) to prepare them for graduate study in that subject.
 These qualifications may also be taken for interest.
 The prerequisite for the GradDip or GradCert is normally a Bachelors degree acceptable to the Chairperson
 of the subject or programme, and to the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences, or nominee.


 Subjects available for the Graduate Diploma or
 Graduate Certificate
 Students may take the GradDip or GradCert in any Arts, Social Sciences, Communication Studies,
 Music or Tourism undergraduate major, except Social Work.
 Note: Some subjects require specific papers for the GradCert. See The University of Waikato Calendar
 for full details.


 Graduate Certificate
 Students must gain 60 points at 100 level or above, including at least 40 points at 300 level or above.
 Students must gain at least 40 points from one subject.


 Graduate Diploma
 Students must gain 120 points at 100 level or above, including at least 80 points at 300 level or above.
 Students must gain at least 80 points from one subject. Some subjects (e.g. Psychology) require specific
 papers to be passed in the graduate diploma. These are usually the compulsory papers of an
 undergraduate major.
 Students who successfully complete the GradDip may then apply to continue in that subject at a higher
 level of study, such as a Bachelor with Honours, leading to a Master’s degree, if desired.
 For the full regulations governing the GradDip and GradCert, see The University of Waikato Calendar.
 Note: Students wishing to use a Graduate Diploma or a Graduate Certificate as a pathway to Postgraduate
 study should consult the relevant subject/programme Graduate Adviser before enrolling.




38                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY, DOCTOR OF
PHILOSOPHY AND DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS *
MPhil, PhD and DMA

Three higher degrees are available to students who have completed their first graduate
degree. These are the Master of Philosophy (MPhil), involving a minimum of one year of
original research culminating in the writing of a thesis, the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD),
involving a minimum of two years of original research culminating in a thesis and the
Doctor of Musical Arts*, involving a minimum of three years of original research, including
research-based performances, culminating in a final public performance supported by a
written thesis.
The MPhil, PhD and DMA can also be taken part-time.
These degrees are overseen by The University of Waikato Postgraduate Studies Committee, which must
approve any student’s registration as a candidate for MPhil, PhD or DMA.


Master of Philosophy and Doctor of Philosophy
Most subjects listed in this handbook are available for postgraduate research for the MPhil and PhD,
subject to available resources and supervision.
The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences will support higher degree proposals where the candidate
has completed an MA or MSocSc degree with first or second class honours (Division 1) which
includes a substantial research component. The candidate should also have had training in research
relevant to the proposal. (Please also see the relevant department about research requirements for
postgraduate study in that subject.)
The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences will not normally support proposals directly from the
BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons). To be considered for entry to the MPhil or PhD directly from an honours
degree, the candidate must have attained first class honours in their honours degree, and must be able to
demonstrate that they have undertaken a significant independent research project. This project should be
relevant to their MPhil or PhD research, should have received at least an A grade or above, and should be
such that it shows very clearly their readiness for postgraduate study. If the potential supervisors consider
a candidate could be suitable for entry to the MPhil or PhD directly from an honours degree, then the
supervisors should make the case for this direct entry to the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, providing
appropriate documentation relating to the independent research project.
In special circumstances, a candidate who does not have the required formal academic qualification but
who has appropriate research experience might also be accepted. The case for such entry needs to be
supported by the Faculty and is then submitted to the Postgraduate Studies Committee for consideration.




                                                                                                                39
 MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY, DOCTOR OF
 PHILOSOPHY AND DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS *
 Acceptance as a candidate for a higher degree is dependent upon the University being able to provide
 expert supervision in the intended area of research or performance and being assured that the resources
 required for that research are available.
 Students intending to register for the MPhil or PhD must first approach academic staff in their intended
 subject of study (or subjects, since much higher degree research is cross – or inter-disciplinary) to
 find supervisors for their thesis project and to check their eligibility to register. The next step involves
 submitting a detailed proposal for the project, which will be considered by the academic staff of the
 subject(s) and by the Postgraduate Studies Committee in deciding whether to approve the student’s
 registration. PhD registration is normally conditional for up to six months until a full research
 proposal has been approved by the supervisors and by the Postgraduate Studies Committee.
 For the full regulations governing the MPhil and PhD, see the Handbook for Research Degrees of MPhil,
 PhD and EdD at the University of Waikato and The University of Waikato Calendar.


 Doctor of Musical Arts*
 The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences is introducing a Doctor of Musical Arts in 2009, subject to CUAP
 approval. The DMA is a three-year research degree comprising original research in the form of work(s) of
 artistic and creative merit supported by a written thesis.
 The DMA will equip candidates with the skills required for a career in music performance (solo, chamber
 or orchestral playing; accompanist; recording artist; repetiteur), music journalism (radio or print media),
 instrumental or vocal teaching and as performer-academic in the tertiary sector.
 Candidates for the DMA must have completed a MMus (Performance) with first or second class honours
 (Division 1) or equivalent and audition successfully on an applied instrument or voice.
 For the full regulations governing the DMA, see The University of Waikato Calendar.
 *Subject to CUAP approval.
 For more information about the application process for the MPhil, PhD or DMA, intending
 postgraduate students should contact:


 THE POSTGRADUATE STUDIES OFFICE
 THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO
 Private Bag 3105
 Hamilton, New Zealand
 Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6279
 Fax: +64 7 858 3795
 www.waikato.ac.nz/research/postgraduate/


 Please note that all enquiries from international students should be directed to the International Centre
 (international@waikato.ac.nz) in the first instance. Further information for international students can be
 viewed from the website: www.waikato.ac.nz/international/




40                  FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
CONTENTS
SUBJECTS AND PROGRAMMES                                    41
  Anthropology                                             42
  Applied Linguistics                                      45
  Chinese                                                  49
  Demography                                               51
  Economics                                                54
  Education Studies                                        59
  English                                                  62
  English Studies                                          65
  Environmental Planning                                   67
  French                                                   72
  Geography                                                74
  German                                                   78
  Health Development and Policy                            79
  History                                                  83
  Human Development                                        86
  Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management       89
  International Relations and Security Studies Programme   90
  Japanese                                                 92
  Labour Studies                                           94
  Mathematics                                              97
  Media Studies                                            99
  Music                                                    101
  Philosophy                                               105
  Political Science                                        109
  Psychology                                               112
  Public Policy                                            121
  Religious Studies                                        124
  Resources and Environmental Planning                     125
  Screen and Media Studies / Akoranga Whakaata Purongo     127
  Social Policy                                            131
  Social Science Research                                  134
  Sociology                                                138
  Spanish                                                  141
  Theatre Studies                                          142
  Tikanga Māori / Māori Cultural Studies                   145
  Tourism Development                                      147
  Women’s and Gender Studies                               149

ACADEMIC STAFF RESEARCH INTERESTS                          152


                                                                 41
A


    ANTHROPOLOGY
    www.waikato.ac.nz/anthropology/

    Anthropology can be defined as ‘the study of human diversity’. Anthropology at the
    University of Waikato is particularly concerned with sociocultural anthropology: the
    comparative study of the range of societies and cultures, from tribal and peasant to industrial
    and global. Our discipline’s distinguishing methodology is the ethnographic or face-to-face
    study of specific communities and lifeways. The Pacific region, with its many and diverse
    societies and cultures, is the main focus of teaching and research in our programme.
    Staff research and teaching interests include:
    » Ethnicity, ‘race relations’ and cultural identity, with particular reference to contemporary ethnic
      conflicts, processes of ethno-racial classification, and issues surrounding the ownership of culture.
      Our research has a significant focus on, but is not restricted to, New Zealand.
    » Social anthropology of the contemporary Pacific, with specific reference to the maintenance of
      tradition and identity in the island nations and in migrant communities, material and expressive
      culture, religious life, development strategies (such as tourism and mining), cultural logics of power,
      mining and land rights, urban settlements and urban/village relations. Staff members have field
      research experience in many parts of the Pacific, including Tikopia, Tonga, Tuvalu, Niue, Cook Islands,
      Fiji, Samoa, Papua New Guinea and Australia.
    » Issues of theory and method in cultural anthropology, including language and power,
      poststructuralism, the history of anthropology, gender studies, performance and ritual, ethnographic
      fieldwork and representation.
    » The application of anthropological theory and method to health, development, citizenship, social
      welfare, and the ethnography of workplaces.


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in Anthropology, a student
    should normally have majored in Anthropology in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B average
    in either the best three of their 300 level Anthropology papers or all of their undergraduate Anthropology
    papers. Students should also have successfully completed the core undergraduate papers in the Waikato
    University Anthropology major, or their equivalent at another university.
    To complete a BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in Anthropology, students must complete 120 points
    at 500 level including at least 60 points from the papers listed for Anthropology.
    Entry to the MA or MSocSc is open to students who have completed Honours in Anthropology (or
    equivalent) to a satisfactory standard. Enrolment in all Honours and Master’s programmes of study is
    subject to Dr Macdonald’s approval. In addition, enrolment in directed studies, dissertations and theses is
    subject to the selection of a suitable supervisor from the Anthropology staff and Dr Macdonald’s approval.
    To complete a MA or MSocSc in Anthropology, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point
    thesis and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from
    approved 500 level papers.




42                     FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                           SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                A



Papers Offered in 2009
ANTH508-09B (HAM) Medical Anthropology (30 points)
Dr Judith Macdonald
This paper will look at health and sickness both from the micro level – the wellbeing of the individual
– and the macro level – health systems and the hegemonic role they play in the political and religious
structures of a society. Because not all students in this paper have an undergraduate background in
anthropology, some time will be devoted to the broader discipline out of which medical anthropology
has grown and to a political and social history of medicine generally.

ANTH509-09B (Ham) Ethnographic Writing (15 points)
Dr Michael Goldsmith
This half paper investigates ethnographic writing, including issues of rhetoric and poetics, genre and style,
and the politics of representation.

ANTH510-09A (HAM) Poststructuralism/Post Colonialism (15 points)
Dr Tom Ryan
This half paper discusses several leading figures in the poststructural and postcolonial traditions, and their
relationship to contemporary debates in anthropology.

ANTH513-09B (HAM) Culture as Property (15 points)
Dr Michael Goldsmith
This half paper addresses a number of ‘property’ issues arising from, or accompanying, processes of ethnic
boundary construction, such as the ownership of culture, cultural differences in the understanding of
ownership, and debates surrounding cultural and intellectual property.

ANTH514-09A (HAM) Ethnic and Indigenous Minorities (15 points)
Dr Keith Barber
The world appears beset by ethnic conflicts and battles over cultural identity. This half paper examines the
role of ethnic and cultural identity in political conflicts in the world today.

ANTH515-09A (HAM) Ethnographic Research (15 points)
Dr Michael Goldsmith
This half paper concentrates solely on ethnographic approaches to research, with a particular focus on
‘participant observation’.

ANTH560-09A (HAM) Special Topic (15 points)
Dr Wendy Cowling
The special topic being offered in 2009 will be Material Culture and Performance in Oceania.




                                                                                                                43
A


    ANTHROPOLOGY
    ANTH589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

    ANTH590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)

    SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.

    SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.


    Master’s Only
    ANTH592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    ANTH593-09C (HAM) Anthropology Thesis (90 points)

    ANTH594-09C (HAM) Anthropology Thesis (120 points)


    ANTHROPOLOGY CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF SOCIETIES AND CULTURES
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Judith Macdonald
    Room: J.2.02A
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8282
    Email: jmac@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/anthropology/




44                     FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                           SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                 A


APPLIED LINGUISTICS
www.waikato.ac.nz/ling/

Linguistics is the scientific study of language. Applied Linguistics is the application of
the theories, methods or findings of linguistics to the solution of practical problems
associated with language. Studying Applied Linguistics at graduate level leads to interesting
academic and professional careers in language education generally and second language
teaching in particular.


Postgraduate Diploma (Second Language Teaching)
(PGDip(SLT)) Admission and Programme Requirements
The Postgraduate Diploma (Second Language Teaching) (PGDip(SLT)) is a one-year programme of full-time
study. This qualification can also be taken part-time, by on-campus classes, or in distance/block [BLK]
mode. The primary focus in the PGDip(SLT) is the theory and practice of second language teaching.
A limited number of papers are also offered in NET mode.
Distance/block [BLK] papers are run over the full academic year, commencing in March and concluding
at the end of Semester B. Attendance is required at one on-campus week per BLK paper. Dates for BLK
courses in 2009 will be advised. Assignments are spaced over the entire duration of these papers.
NET papers are semesterised and are taught entirely online, with audio and text material support.
To qualify for admission to the PGDip(SLT), candidates will normally hold a university degree, preferably
in Linguistics, Education, or some related area, though applications from graduates in any discipline are
welcome. Of advantage would be some experience in language teaching.
Students whose first language is not English must have an IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with no band lower
than 6.0, or a TOEFL (paper-based) score of 600 including a Test of Written English of 5. All applications are
studied by the Department, which may ask applicants for an interview and/or an essay.
To complete the PGDip(SLT), students must gain 120 points (6 papers worth 20 points each) at 500 level
or above, including the compulsory papers APPL551, APPL554 and APPL555.


Papers Offered for the PGDip(SLT) in 2009
APPL551-09C (BLK) Linguistics for Language Teaching (20 points)
Dr Roger Barnard
At the end of the course students should be able to relate fundamental concepts in the areas of
morphology, phonology, syntax etc. to the language classroom.

APPL552-09B (HAM) Language Assessment and Evaluation (20 points)
Dr Ian Bruce
In this paper, students will be introduced to approaches to language assessment and evaluation for
second/foreign language teaching and learning. Particular attention will be paid to the development and
implementation of classroom language testing.




                                                                                                            45
A


    APPLIED LINGUISTICS
    APPL553-09A (HAM) Social and Psychological Aspects of Language Teaching and Learning (20 points)
    Dr James McLellan
    This paper introduces students to a range of issues associated with social and psychological factors
    affecting second language teaching and learning: these include theories of first and second-language
    acquisition, learner language, learning styles and strategies, sociocultural theories, communicative
    competence and bilingual education.

    APPL554-09A (HAM) The Language Programme: Design, Materials and Methodology (20 points)
    Dr Diane Johnson
    In this paper, students will study issues in curriculum planning, syllabus and materials design and
    teaching methodologies.

    APPL555-09A (HAM) Language Teaching: Observation and Practice 1 (20 points)
    Dr Diane Johnson
    In this paper students will prepare, teach, observe and evaluate language lessons under supervision.
    APPL555 should normally be taken at the same time as, or after, APPL554.

    APPL556-09B (HAM) Language Teaching: Observation and Practice 2 (20 points)
    Dr Diane Johnson
    This paper builds upon APPL555 in the areas of second language programme planning, preparation, delivery
    and evaluation. Students may not enrol in this paper without first having passed APPL555.

    APPL557-09C (NET) Reflective Practice in Language Teaching (20 points)
    Lucy Campbell
    The course aims to offer students with various but relevant teaching backgrounds an opportunity to
    understand perspective’s relating to reflective teaching and to develop experience in its practice.

    APPL558-09B (NET) Issues in Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) (20 points)
    Lucy Campbell
    Students will analyse and discuss information that pertains to CALL. Topics will include history of CALL,
    software evaluation, concepts and applications of multimedia and computer-mediated communication in
    the language classroom.

    APPL559-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09C (HAM) Special Topic (20 points)

    APPL561-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09C (HAM) Directed Study (20 points)
    Students wishing to undertake a Directed Study should obtain the agreement of a potential supervising
    staff member and negotiate a topic before applying to enrol.




46                      FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                           SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                 A



Master of Arts (Applied) (MA(Applied)) Admission and
Programme Requirements
The Master of Arts (Applied) (MA(Applied)) is designed for students who wish to further their study of
issues in Second Language Teaching and Applied Linguistics. The MA(Applied) involves one year of full time
study, or the equivalent part-time, which can also be taken part-time or in distance/block [BLK] mode.
A limited number of papers are offered in NET (fully online) mode.
Distance/block [BLK] papers run over the full academic year, commencing in April and concluding at
the end of Semester B. Attendance is required at one on-campus week per BLK paper. Dates for BLK
courses will be advised. Assignments are spaced over the entire duration of these papers. NET papers are
semesterised and are taught entirely online, with audio and text material support.
To qualify for admission to the MA(Applied), candidates will normally hold a university degree or Diploma
of Teaching, plus a Waikato PGDip in Second Language Teaching PGDip(SLT) (or equivalent). Students
generally need to achieve a B+ average in the Postgraduate Diploma (or equivalent) in order to proceed
to the MA(Applied).
Students whose first language is not English must have an IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with no band
lower than 6.0, or a TOEFL (paper-based) score of 600 including a Test of Written English of 5.
To complete the MA(Applied), students must gain 120 points at 500 level or above, including the
compulsory paper APPL501. Students may apply to replace up to 90 points with a dissertation.


Papers Offered for the MA (Applied) in 2009
APPL501-09B (HAM) Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (30 points)
Dr Ian Bruce
The overall aims of this course are twofold: first to provide students with a critical awareness of theoretical
issues related to planning research in applied linguistics and, secondly to enable students to develop skills
in collecting, analysing and reporting data, using the methods most relevant to research studies in
applied linguistics.

APPL504-09B (HAM) Language Analysis (30 points)
Dr Diane Johnson
The overall aim of the paper is to provide students with a critical awareness of a range of issues associated
with different approaches to the analysis of language, as well as an ability to apply and assess these in the
field of second language teaching and learning. The purpose is to enhance professional practice through an
ability to apply material from this course in the language teaching classroom.

APPL520-09C (BLK) Second Language Classroom & Curriculum Issues (30 points)
Dr James McLellan
This paper will examine current developments related to the concepts of input, interaction and output. Within
this framework the paper covers the application of pedagogic grammar, syllabus and coursebook design and
evaluation, patterns of interaction in language classrooms, error analysis and corrective feedback.



                                                                                                             47
A


    APPLIED LINGUISTICS
    APPL530-09A (HAM) Discourse Analysis and the Language Classroom (30 points)
    Dr Diane Johnson
    The overall aim of the course is to provide students with a critical awareness of a range of approaches to
    the construction and analysis of texts, both written and oral, within the field of discourse analysis, as
    well as an awareness of the ways in which human beings process, analyse and interpret text as discourse.
    The purpose of the course is to enhance professional practice through an ability to apply material from this
    course in the language teaching classroom.

    APPL571-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Research Writing for ESL Graduate Students (15 points)
    Dr Diane Johnson/, Anthea Fester, Dr Ian Bruce
    This paper aims to provide an advanced level course designed to support the writing of English academic
    discourse relevant to the needs of ESL students engaged in postgraduate study.

    APPL580-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09C (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)

    APPL581-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Special Topic (15 points)

    APPL590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09C (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)

    APPL591-09C (HAM) Dissertation (30 points)

    APPL592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    APPL593-09C (HAM) Applied Linguistics Thesis (90 points)

    APPL594-09C (HAM) Applied Linguistics Thesis (120 points)

    Students wishing to undertake a Directed Study, Dissertation or Thesis should obtain the agreement of
    a potential supervising staff member and negotiate a topic before applying to enrol.


    APPLIED LINGUISTICS CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Ian Bruce
    Room: J.3.18
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6375
    Email: ibruce@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/ling/




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                                                         SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                               C


CHINESE
www.waikato.ac.nz/chinese/

Pursuing graduate studies in Chinese enables students to develop their language and
research skills. It offers the opportunity to work with a variety of original source materials
and gain a deeper understanding of particular aspects of Chinese culture and society.
Staff research interests include:
» Social and cultural developments in modern and contemporary China;
» Comparative East-West philosophy;
» The political and economic modernisation of Chinese-speaking Asia;
» The visual arts in China;
» Chinese language teaching; and
» Modern Chinese literature.


Admission and Programme requirements
To be admitted to the PGCert(CHIN), PGDip(CHIN) or BA(Hons) in Chinese, students must have majored
in Chinese in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B grade average in either the best three of
their 300 level Chinese papers or all of their undergraduate Chinese papers.
To be admitted to the MA in Chinese, students must have completed a BA(Hons) (or equivalent) in
Chinese and have gained a B+ average in their Honours level Chinese papers.
To complete a MA in Chinese, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis and 30 points
from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points in approved 500 level papers.
Students contemplating graduate studies should consult the Convenor of Chinese.


Papers Offered in 2009
CHIN501-09A (HAM) Advanced Chinese Language Acquisition (30 points)

CHIN503-09A (HAM) Advanced Research into Modern & Contemporary Chinese Society (30 points)

CHIN504-09B (HAM) Readings in Modern Chinese Literature (30 points)

CHIN507-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)

CHIN508-09A (HAM) Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language (30 points)

CHIN590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)




                                                                                                           49
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    CHINESE
    Master’s Only
    CHIN592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    CHIN593-09C (HAM) Chinese Thesis (90 points)

    CHIN594-09C (HAM) Chinese Thesis (120 points)


    CHINESE CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Maria Galikowski
    Room: I.3.03B
    Tel: +64 7 838 4210
    Email: mariag@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/chinese/




50                  FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                          SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                D


DEMOGRAPHY
www.waikato.ac.nz/demogandpopstud/

Population problems are among the most serious challenges that humanity faces
in the twenty-first century. The developed and developing countries are facing
contrasting population problems. While most developed countries are experiencing
below-replacement level fertility, many developing countries are experiencing very high
birth rates and their governments are attempting to reduce fertility. In addition, many
developed countries are hosting a growing number of legal and illegal migrants, while many
developing countries face a brain-drain of highly skilled workers.
These and other population issues have implications for the environment, employment, work and family,
health, population distribution, urbanisation, migration patterns, old age security and refugee movements.
It is therefore important that integrated approaches to population and economic problems are advanced
by population research, and that policy makers and planners pay serious attention to population trends,
their causes and their implications.
The graduate programme in Demography at The University of Waikato is based in the Department of
Societies and Cultures. This programme provides core material in the discipline of Demography and
emphasises an integrated approach to population studies in a multi- and interdisciplinary context.
It is, therefore, of interest and relevance to students from a wide range of backgrounds, such as Sociology,
Economics and Geography. Students have opportunities to engage in individual directed studies and to
undertake research for a Masters or higher degree on a population-related subject. The programme is
of interest to graduates who seek careers in research, teaching, policy-making, administration and
evaluation in central, regional or local government service, in international and community organisations,
and in the private sector.


Scholarships
The Population Studies Centre (www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/populationstudiescentre/) is a research unit
based in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. The Centre is the only such unit in New Zealand that
generates and co-ordinates research in population studies. Through research grants and other sources of
funding, the Centre is able to make available some Masters scholarships for students wishing to undertake
research in population studies. For further details contact Professor Richard Bedford (Population Studies
Centre, Email: rdb@waikato.ac.nz).




                                                                                                               51
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    DEMOGRAPHY
    Admission and Programme Requirements
    Entry to the BSocSc(Hons) and MSocSc in Demography is open to suitably qualified graduates in any
    discipline who have at least one undergraduate Population Studies paper. For those students without this
    prerequisite, arrangements can be made for a qualifying programme.
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BSocSc(Hons) in Demography, a student should have
    at least a B average in the best three of their 300 level papers from their undergraduate major and should
    have a significant research methods component (normally two papers) in that degree.
    To complete a BSocSc(Hons) in Demography, students must gain 120 points at 500 level or above,
    including POPS507, POPS509, SSRP504 and a minimum of 15 points selected from GEOG507, POPS508,
    POPS589, SOCP506 and SOCP507.
    Entry to the MSocSc in Demography is open to suitably qualified candidates who have completed a
    BSocSc(Hons) including the core papers for Demography.
    To complete a MSocSc in Demography, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis
    and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved
    500 level papers. Students are strongly encouraged to take the option of a 120 point thesis at Master’s level.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    GEOG507-09B (HAM) International Migration Issues (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG516-09B (HAM) Advanced Development Studies (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG520-09A (HAM) Human Dimensions of Environmental Change (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    POPS507-09A (HAM) Family Formation and Dissolution (15 points)
    Lecturer to be advised.
    This paper looks at patterns of family formation and their contemporary determinants. The New Zealand
    experience is compared with other developed countries to explore the policy implications of family
    formation changes.

    POPS508-09A (HAM) Population Health and Health Planning (15 points)
    Lecturer to be advised.
    The recent reduction of the ‘development gap’ [between developed and less developed regions] with
    respect to length of life, ranks with the foremost instances of international convergence in any major social
    or economic sphere of behaviour. This paper will investigate how the convergence has come about, its
    planning and policy implications.




52                     FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                       SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                        D



POPS509-09B (HAM) Quantitative Analysis in the Social Sciences (15 points)
Lecturer to be advised.
This paper reviews the major techniques of analysis employed in demography. Students gain a sound
understanding of how to formulate and apply these methods to current substantive problems.

POPS589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

POPS590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)

SOCP506-09B (HAM) Social Policy: Comparative Approaches (15 points)
For full details see Social Policy.

SOCP507-09A (HAM) Social Policy and Ageing (15 points)
For full details see Social Policy.

SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
For full details see Social Science Research.


Master’s Only
POPS592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

POPS593-09C (HAM) Demography Thesis (90 points)

POPS594-09C (HAM) Demography Thesis (120 points)


DEMOGRAPHY CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIETIES AND CULTURES
Graduate Adviser: Dr Ted Ninnes
Room: K.2.26
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6829
Email: leninnes@waikato.ac.nz
Subject Advice: Dr Jo Barnes
Room: K.2.26
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6826
Email: jobar@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/demogandpopstud/




                                                                                                    53
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    ECONOMICS
    www.mngt.waikato.ac.nz

    The Department of Economics is based in the Waikato Management School, but Economics
    is available as a major subject in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.
    The graduate programme in Economics is both challenging and rewarding. It is designed to prepare
    economists for a wide range of careers in the business world, central and regional government, and
    research. The qualifications offered develop skills in economic analysis, the ability to critically evaluate
    economic arguments and policy initiatives, and build research skills. The programme is flexible and allows
    specialisation within the subject.
    Students completing a graduate programme in economics have gone on to careers such as:
    » Business analysts
    » Financial analysts
    » Economic and business consultants
    » Policy analysts in government and the private sector
    » Private and public sector research economists
    » University academics
    » Commercial or business lawyers (in association with qualifications in law)
    Our specialty is Applied Economics. The Department trains people to think sensibly and carefully about
    business issues and government policy. Staff members teach, undertake research and provide research
    supervision in the following areas:
    » Business and Financial Economics
    » Macro and Monetary Economics
    » Quantitative Economics and Econometrics
    » Development and International Economics
    » Public Economics and Policy Analysis
    » Regional, Environmental and Natural Resource Economics


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    Students enrolling in 500 level Economics papers should normally have majored in Economics in their
    undergraduate degree and have a minimum of a B average in their undergraduate Economics papers, with
    no less than that in 300 level and 400 level Economics papers.
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences students commencing an Honours or Masters degree or a Postgraduate
    Diploma in Economics must have included in their undergraduate degree at least one paper from each of
    the following three groups of papers:
    Microeconomics Group: ECON202, ECON313, ECON314, ECON318, ECON413, ECON414
    Macroeconomics Group: ECON200, ECON201, ECON301, ECON401
    Econometrics Group: ECON204, ECON304, ECON308, ECON404, ECON408


54                    FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                         SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                E



Students who have completed their undergraduate programme at another university will need to have
completed equivalent papers.
To complete a BSocSc(Hons) in Economics, students complete at least one of ECON541, ECON542 or
ECON543, or the full paper counterpart of these half papers (i.e. ECON501, ECON502 or ECON504).
To complete a MSocSc in Economics, students complete, prior to, or during their degree, at least two of
ECON541, ECON542 or ECON543, or the full paper counterpart of these half papers (i.e. ECON501,
ECON502 or ECON504).


Papers Offered in 2009
ECON501-09B (HAM) Macroeconomic Analysis (30 points)
Mr Brian Silverstone
This paper covers selected aspects of macroeconomic theory, policy and evidence. Most of the topics are
centred directly or indirectly on a stylised production function. They include economic growth, business
cycles, employment, rational expectations, money and price behaviour and economic policy.
Prerequisite(s): either ECON301, ECON401, ECON541, or at least 40 points at 300 level or above in Economics
Internal assessment/examination ratio: 1:1

ECON502-09A (HAM) Microeconomic Analysis (30 points)
Assoc Prof John Tressler
The paper is comprehensive, covering the traditional mainline areas of consumer theory, risk and
information economics, the economics of production and costs, the theory of the firm and of markets, and
general equilibrium theory. Key mathematical concepts will be developed or reviewed. Applications and
more advanced topics will be considered on a more ad hoc basis.
Prerequisite(s): ECON202 and either ECON204 or at least 40 points at 300 level or above Economics

ECON504-09B (HAM) Econometric Analysis (30 points)
Prof Mark Holmes
The purpose of this paper is to provide students with theoretical skills in econometrics that should enable
them to carry out a wide range of applied economic analyses. Topics covered are: Maximum Likelihood
Estimation; Generalised Method of Moments Estimation; Discrete Choice Models; Limited Dependent
Variable Models; Econometric Issues for Panel & Survey Data; Cointegration; Rational Expectations Models;
Systems of Regression Equations.
Prerequisite(s): either ECON304, ECON404, ECON543 or equivalent




                                                                                                           55
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    ECONOMICS
    ECON517-09A (HAM) Applied Regional and General Equilibrium Analysis (30 points)
    Dr Anna Strutt
    The computable general equilibrium section of the paper will focus on global trade modelling. It will
    introduce students to an operational framework (including theory, software and data), giving them the
    opportunity to use real-world data and sophisticated computer models in their assignments. The regional
    analysis section will focus on spatial economic issues which have direct policy implications within
    New Zealand. Students will deal with real policy decisions and dilemmas faced by the NZ regional
    economic planning authorities.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON202

    ECON526-09A (HAM) Law and Economics (15 points)
    Dr Anna Strutt
    This half paper focuses on a range of contemporary policy issues. It applies economic analysis to selected
    issues in property law, contact law, tort, criminal law and international law.

    ECON528-09A (HAM) Econometric Topics: Forecasting and Finance (15 points)
    Assoc Prof Warren Hughes
    This half paper reviews basic statistical analysis of share prices, exchange rates and how to model these
    and other economic time series, the use of ARIMA models in forecasting, deterministic chaos theory
    as applied in forecasting financial and other economic time series, firm modelling for forecasting
    financial performance.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON204

    ECON530-09B (HAM) Topics in Development Economics (15 points)
    Dr Michael Cameron
    This paper applies economic analysis to current issues in development economics. It presents theoretical
    and applied techniques to investigate the evolution of developing economies, trade liberalisation impacts
    and poverty alleviation strategies, as well as a range of selected macro and microeconomic topics.

    ECON531-09B (HAM) International Trade: Theory and Policy Issues (15 points)
    Dr Sayeeda Bano
    This half paper analyses international trade theory, policy and evidence in the contemporary world
    environment. Topics covered include positive and normative theories of international trade, the theory of
    trade policy, effective protection, customs unions and the new world economic order.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON202 or at least 40 points at 300 level or above in Economics




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                                                          SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                             E



ECON532-09B (HAM) International Finance (15 points)
Prof Mark Holmes
This half paper provides a systematic analysis of financial relationships among nations and related policy
issues. Topics to be discussed include the foreign exchange market, exchange rate determination, the
balance of payments, the international monetary system and adjustment and policy co-ordination.
Prerequisite(s): ECON204 and at least 40 points at 300 level or above in Economics and/or Finance

ECON541-09B (HAM) Macroeconomics: Directed Reading (15 points)
Brian Silverstone
An introductory paper for students who are enrolled for master’s degrees or postgraduate diplomas and
who have not completed an upper level paper in macroeconomics. Although it is a directed reading paper,
students are expected to attend the classes in ECON301/ECON401 as a basis for their reading.
Restriction(s): ECON201, ECON301 and ECON401
Prerequisite(s): ECON200

ECON542-09A (HAM) Microeconomics: Directed Reading (15 points)
Assoc Prof John Tressler
An introductory graduate half paper in core microeconomic theory for students who have not included an
advanced paper in microeconomics in their undergraduate degree. This module acquaints students with
the techniques of modern positive economics and to the critical evaluation of core economic theory.
Restriction(s): ECON502
Prerequisite(s): ECON202 and either ECON204 or at least 40 points at 300 level or above in Economics

ECON543-09A (HAM) Econometrics: Directed Reading (15 points)
Prof Ric Scarpa
An introductory graduate half paper in econometrics for students who have not included an advanced
paper in econometrics in their undergraduate degree.
Restriction(s): ECON304 and ECON404
Prerequisite(s): ECON204 and equivalent and at least 40 points at 300 level or above in Economics
and/or Finance




                                                                                                            57
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    ECONOMICS
    ECON544-09A (HAM) Research Methods in Economics and Finance (15 points)
    Steven Lim
    This paper considers methodology and research methods in economics and finance. It is designed for
    graduate students who are required to undertake research in these subjects as part of their programme
    and/or those who will undertake research in economics or finance as part of their professional careers.
    Restriction(s): ACCT501, MNGT501, MCOM530, SCEN503, MSYS551, MKTG507 and TOMG506
    Prerequisite(s): 60 points at 300 level or above in Economics or Finance

    ECON589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)
    Co-ordinator: Dr Anna Strutt
    Students have the opportunity to pursue a topic of their own interest under the guidance of academic staff.
    Internal assessment/examination ratio: 1:0

    ECON590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09C (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
    Co-ordinator: Dr Anna Strutt
    Students have the opportunity to pursue a topic of their own interest under the guidance of academic staff.
    Internal assessment/examination ratio: 1:0


    Master’s Only
    Students enrolling in a dissertation or thesis should have a B+ grade average or better. Please consult the
    Graduate Convenor, Dr Anna Strutt, for details.
    ECON591-09C (HAM) Economics Dissertation (30 points)
    ECON592-09C (HAM) Economics Dissertation (60 points)
    ECON593-09C (HAM) Economics Thesis (90 points)
    ECON594-09C (HAM) Economics Thesis (120 points)
    ECON599-09C (HAM), 09D (HAM), 09E (HAM) & 09F (HAM) Report of an Investigation (30 points)
    FINA506-09A (HAM) Finance Theory (15 points)
    MNGT501-09S (HAM) Research Methods in Management Studies (30 points)


    ECONOMICS CONTACT INFORMATION
    WAIKATO MANAGEMENT SCHOOL
    Graduate Convenor: Dr Anna Strutt
    Room: MSB.3.26
    Tel: +64 7 838 4958
    Email: astrutt@waikato.ac.nz
    www.mngt.waikato.ac.nz/



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                                                             SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                             E


EDUCATION STUDIES
www.soe.waikato.ac.nz

Education Studies involves critical inquiry into the social, political, cultural, economic and
personal theories and practices of lifelong education. Although its origins are in humanities
and social science disciplines such as History, Philosophy, Psychology and Sociology,
Education Studies today has close affinities with contemporary interdisciplinary fields
exploring issues of social policy, culture, gender, work and leisure. Since education is as
much concerned with who we might become as who we already are, it is relevant to all
our collective and personal decision-making on questions of justice, rights and freedom.
Because of their disciplinary and interdisciplinary origins, Education Studies papers can
combine well with other subjects in the humanities and social sciences.
Students should refer to the regulations for the qualification concerned for details of the specific
requirements. Papers offered for these qualifications are set out below. Not all papers will be offered
in any one-year.
Note: The (NET) offerings may include an on-campus component.

Admission and Programme Requirements
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in graduate Education Studies papers, a student should
normally have majored in Education Studies in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B average
in either the best three of their 300 level Education Studies papers or all of their undergraduate Education
Studies papers.
To complete a BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons), students must include DSOE557 or HIST502, or both SSRP503
and SSRP504. Not all papers will be offered in any one year.
To complete a MA or MSocSc in Education Studies, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point
thesis and one approved 30 point 500 level paper, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points in approved
500 level papers.


Papers Offered in 2009
DSOE557-09A (HAM), 09B (NET) & 09C (HAM) Educational Research Methods (30 points)
Course taught by: Teams of staff. For further information, contact School of Education Graduate Office.
A paper that introduces students to the major research paradigms and methodologies appropriate to
collecting data in schools, action research, literature reviews, critiquing research, and report writing. It
includes consideration of ethical issues in research.
Note: 09A (HAM) and 09C (HAM) are taught partially online.

DSOE590-09C (HAM), 09C (NET), 09D (HAM) & 09D (NET) Directed Study (30 points)

LBST541-09A (HAM) Labour, Education and Training 1: Issues and Policies (15 points)
For full details see Labour Studies.



                                                                                                               59
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    EDUCATION STUDIES
    LBST542-09B (HAM) Labour, Education and Training 2: Applied Research Project (15 points)
    For full details see Labour Studies.

    LBST543-09B (HAM) Learning, Fashion, Women and Work (15 points)
    For full details see Labour Studies.

    PCSS501-09A (HAM) Power and Possibility in Education (30 points)
    Dr Deb Hill
    This paper provides students with the opportunity to examine the work of Michel Foucault and the
    influences upon his thinking.

    PCSS502-09B (BLK) Kaupapa Māori Research (30 Points)

    PCSS503-09B (HAM) Indigenous and Post-Colonial Perspectives in Education (30 points)

    PCSS506-09B (HAM) & 09B (NET) Critical Perspectives in Social Science Education (30 points)
    Paul Keown
    A paper for those interested in Social Studies as a curriculum subject. It critically examines current
    and likely future trends in Social Studies education. There is a focus on the way in which recent policy,
    curriculum, assessment and technological developments relate to the learning and teaching of Social
    Studies in classrooms.

    PCSS508-09B (HAM) Educational Policy (30 points)
    Assoc Prof Greg Lee
    Selected issues in educational policy will be examined with reference to Aotearoa/New Zealand education.

    PCSS511-09A (HAM) Curriculum Policy and Possibilities (30 points)
    Philippa Hunter
    This paper examines and critiques theoretical perspectives of curriculum conceptions, design and policy.
    Participants engage with case studies of New Zealand curriculum development and implementation
    including national and school-based curriculum and related teacher professional development initiatives
    and issues.

    PCSS530-09A (HAM) Foundations of Adult, Community and Tertiary Education (30 points)
    Assoc Prof Joyce Stalker
    This paper provides students with a strong, critical foundation for their practice in areas of adult,
    community, and tertiary education. Throughout, the emphasis is on revealing and understanding the
    circumstances, philosophies, policies, and realities which daily confront educators who work with adults.




60                      FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                        SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                               E



PCSS532-09Y (HAM) Advanced Seminar in Adult Education and Training (30 points)
Assoc Prof Joyce Stalker
This paper identifies and critiques major educational trends in adult education and training sites in
Aotearoa/New Zealand. Students undertake a critical investigation of one adult education organisation,
institution or agency. This locates their advanced theoretical understandings of the government-employer-
education-union negotiations and relationships in the day-to-day occurrences of the paid workplace.

PCSS551-09B (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)
For details see School of Education Graduate Programmes PCS551.

SOCP506-09B (HAM) Social Policy: Comparative Approaches (15 points)
For full details see Social Policy.

SOCP507-09A (HAM) Social Policy and Ageing (15 points)
For full details see Social Policy.

SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
For full details see Social Science Research.

SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
For full details see Social Science Research.


Master’s Only
PCSS592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

PCSS593-09C (HAM) Education Studies Thesis (90 points)

PCSS594-09C (HAM) Education Studies Thesis (120 points)


EDUCATION STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF POLICY, CULTURAL AND SOCIAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION
School of Education
Graduate Adviser: Dr Deb Hill
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6170
Email: deb.hill@waikato.ac.nz
www.soe.waikato.ac.nz/




                                                                                                            61
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    ENGLISH
    www.waikato.ac.nz/english/

    Pursuing graduate study in English (for Honours, Masters, MPhil and PhD Degrees) enables
    students to explore aspects of the subject in greater depth and to extend themselves
    through papers available only at the advanced level. We aim to show students the pathway
    to various kinds of research areas, and, across all the Honours and Masters courses, offer
    the opportunity to fine-tune writing skills. This is the particular focus of ENGL556 Write/
    Edit/Text, which many students elect to take in their first semester of Honours work.
    The wide-ranging research interests and expertise of the department staff include:
    » Textual studies
    » Medieval studies, including Middle Scots literature
    » Colonial and Postcolonial literatures in English
    » Shakespeare and Renaissance literature, and their after lives
    » American literature
    » New Zealand literature and cultural history
    » Eighteenth Century literature
    » Scottish literature
    » Modern Jewish writing
    » Women’s writing
    » Literary theory


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    To gain admission into the BA(Hons) in English, students must have majored in English for their
    undergraduate degree and have gained a B average in their best three 300 level English papers.
    To complete a BA(Hons) in English, students must complete 120 points at 500 level. Students are highly
    recommended to include ENGL590 ‘Directed Study’ in their programme of study. For 590 topics and
    supervisors, please consult the graduate adviser in English.
    To gain admission into the MA in English, students must have completed their BA(Hons) with a B+ average
    across all 500 level papers.
    To complete a MA in English, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis and 30 points
    from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved 500 level papers.




62                      FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                          SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                 E



Resources for Graduate Students
The Department of Humanities provides graduate students with study space and tea and coffee-making
facilities. Graduates are also welcome to use the small Departmental Reference Library in the English foyer.
Here you will also find copies of dissertations and theses produced by our students. You cannot borrow
these copies, but are most welcome to read them in the Library, to gain a working idea of the kinds
of projects people undertake in English, and the standard of excellence some have achieved.
Honours and Masters students are frequently employed as Sessional Assistants to help with the
teaching of undergraduate courses. Some space, computing and printing facilities are also available.
There are three prizes for which graduate students are eligible: the Elizabeth Bisley Memorial Prize, awarded
annually to the best Honours or Masters student; the AUP Prize for Excellence in First Year Graduate Study
in English; and the biennial Arthur Sewell Prize for English, awarded alternately with the University of
Auckland in the area of Shakespeare and Milton studies.


Papers Offered in 2009
ENGL504-09B (HAM) Eighteenth Century Novel (30 points)
Assoc Prof Norman Simms
How and why did the novel begin, and what was novel about it? An exploration of several of the key
factors shaping the development of a new prose narrative that is inward-turning, subversive of rhetorical
norms, and indeterminate in the creation of characters and events. A few representative novels of the 18th
century will be examined closely in their intellectual, social, and psychological contexts, books such as
Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, Sarah Fielding’s David Simple, and Sterne’s Tristram Shandy.

ENGL508-09A (HAM) American Literature: Problems of Identity (30 points)
Assoc Prof Jan Pilditch
This paper looks at Nineteenth Century America, the Civil war and the struggle to become American
– to garner a national identity. Investigate how American identity was constructed through writing. What is
national identity? How does it work? Is it a matter of shared cultural memories? Who lies within and who
lies without? This paper will concentrate on the literature of the American Renaissance as they struggle to
become “American”.

ENGL530-09A (HAM) Special Topic: Early Women Writers (30 points)
Prof Alexandra Barratt
Women were implicated in the written culture of later medieval and early modern England in various ways,
as writers, patrons, translators and readers. This paper will provide the opportunity to explore a wide range
of texts, ranging from the writings of the visionaries Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe through early
diarists and letter writers to the novels and plays of Aphra Behn.




                                                                                                           63
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    ENGLISH
    ENGL546-09A (HAM) Creative Writing (30 points)
    Lecturer to be advised.

    ENGL556-09B (HAM) Write/Edit/Text (30 points)
    Dr Mark Houlahan
    This paper is designed for students who wish to produce any form of non-fiction writing designed for
    publication, whether in the form of academic research or other environments where writing skills are
    required. It will equip students with drafting, revising, editing, copy-editing and proof-reading skills and
    give them experience in different types of non-fiction. Students will work on citation styles, writing
    reviews, columns and producing “proofs” of debated propositions. The paper is work intensive. Assessment
    is based on a portfolio of weekly writing and research tasks, which students produce and revise through
    the semester.

    ENGL590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
    In the Directed Study, students nominate a field of study (e.g. an author or a specific theme or topic) and
    proceed to cover it by their own reading and research under the personal direction of an appropriate staff
    member. Admission is at the discretion of the Convenor of English.


    Master’s Only
    ENGL592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    ENGL593-09C (HAM) English Thesis (90 points)

    ENGL594-09C (HAM) English Thesis (120 points)


    ENGLISH CONTACT INFORMATION:
    DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES
    Graduate Adviser: Mark Houlahan
    Room: I.3.20B
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8910
    Email: maph@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/english/




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                                                          SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                 E


ENGLISH STUDIES
www.waikato.ac.nz/englishstudies/

Pursuing graduate study in English (for Honours, Masters, MPhil and PhD Degrees) enables
students to explore aspects of the subject in greater depth and to extend themselves
through papers available only at the advanced level. We aim to show students the pathway
to various kinds of research areas, and, across all the Honours and Masters courses,
offer the opportunity to fine-tune writing skills. This is the particular focus of ENGL556
Write/Edit/Text, which many students elect to take in their first semester of Honours work.
The wide-ranging research interests and expertise of the department staff include:
» Textual studies
» Medieval studies, including Middle Scots literature
» Colonial and Postcolonial literatures in English
» Shakespeare and Renaissance literature, and their after lives
» American literature
» New Zealand literature and cultural history
» Eighteenth Century literature
» Scottish literature
» Modern Jewish writing
» Women’s writing
» Literary theory


Admission and Programme Requirements
Students enrolling in the BCS(Hons) in English Studies should normally have majored in English Studies
in their undergraduate degree and have a B+ or better average in English Studies or a B+ or better average
in 200 or 300 level papers credited towards the Bachelor of Communication Studies.
To complete a BCS(Hons), students must pass 120 points at 500 level, including ENGL556.


Resources for Graduate Students
The Department of Humanities provides graduate students with study space and tea and coffee-making
facilities. Graduates are also welcome to use the small Departmental Reference Library in the English foyer.
Here you will also find copies of dissertations and theses produced by our students. You cannot borrow
these copies, but are most welcome to read them in the Library, to gain a working idea of the kinds
of projects people undertake in English, and the standard of excellence some have achieved.
Honours and Masters students are frequently employed as Sessional Assistants to help with the
teaching of undergraduate courses. Some space, computing and printing facilities are also available.
There are three prizes for which graduate students are eligible: the Elizabeth Bisley Memorial Prize, awarded
annually to the best Honours or Masters student; the AUP Prize for Excellence in First Year Graduate Study
in English; and the biennial Arthur Sewell Prize for English, awarded alternately with the University of
Auckland in the area of Shakespeare and Milton studies.


                                                                                                           65
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    ENGLISH STUDIES
    Papers Offered in 2009
    ENGL504-09B (HAM) Eighteenth Century Novel (30 points)
    For full details see English.

    ENGL508-09A (HAM) American Literature: Problems of Identity (30 points)
    For full details see English.

    ENGL530-09A (HAM) Special Topic: Early Women Writers (30 points)
    For full details see English.

    ENGL546-09A (HAM) Creative Writing (30 points)
    For full details see English.

    ENGL556-09B (HAM) Write/Edit/Text (30 points)
    For full details see English.

    ENGL590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
    For full details see English.


    ENGLISH STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION:
    DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES
    Graduate Adviser: Mark Houlahan
    Room: I.3.20B
    Email: maph@waikato.ac.nz
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8910
    www.waikato.ac.nz/englishstudies/




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                                                           SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                 E


ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
www.waikato.ac.nz/rep/

Environmental Planning is an interdisciplinary subject that provides the knowledge and
skills necessary for sustainable management of the natural environment. The subject
offers three qualifications at graduate level, namely: the Postgraduate Certificate in
Environmental Planning (PGCert(EnvPlan)), the Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental
Planning (PGDip(EnvPlan)), and the Master of Environmental Planning (MEP). The three
qualifications provide for different competencies and are aimed at incoming students with
different levels of knowledge, background experience, and career ambition.


Admission and Programme Requirements
Postgraduate Certificate (Environmental Planning) (PGCert(EnvPlan))
The PGCert(EnvPlan) is designed for people with a University of Waikato Bachelor’s degree or equivalent
and relevant background in environment- or planning-related papers to undertake a short, concentrated
period of study (one semester). The programme will appeal to people who require rapid up-skilling for
planning-related work in the workforce.
To complete a PGCert(EnvPlan) students must complete 60 points from ENVP504, ENVP506, ENVP507
and GEOG505.

Postgraduate Diploma (Environmental Planning) (PGDip(EnvPlan))
The PGDip(EnvPlan) is a programme of study comprising a core of three compulsory papers on planning
theory, planning law and environmental evaluation, complemented with specialised planning papers that
include Māori planning and resource management, planning processes and policy formulation, resource
consent processing and a planning specialty (the topic depends on the availability of staff in any year).
Graduates of the programme will have a thorough grounding in the conceptual and ethical dimensions of
environmental planning as well as sound technical knowledge of planning processes and legislative and
administrative frameworks. They will be qualified to work competently as planners in the workforce and
also, will be well prepared for progression to study at Master’s level, a degree that is recognised by the New
Zealand Planning Institute for professional accreditation. The PGDip(EnvPlan) will appeal to candidates
who have completed the undergraduate programme of Environmental Planning, as well as to people
who have been or are currently in planning-related fields in the workforce and wish to consolidate their
technical knowledge and conceptual understanding in order to progress further in their career.
Students applying to enrol in a PGCert(EnvPlan) or PGDip(EnvPlan) should normally have a bachelor’s
degree, with a major in Environmental Planning or Resources and Environmental Planning (REP)
(or equivalent), and have a B average or better in their 300 level papers.




                                                                                                            67
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    ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
    Note: If you do not meet these criteria you may, in exceptional circumstances, be considered for admission
    based on academic merit and relevant work experience. In such cases, you are advised to seek advice from
    the Director of Resources and Environmental Planning to plan your programme of study. This may require
    completing a Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma that includes GEOG206 and GEOG306.
    To complete a PGDip(EnvPlan) students must complete 120 points at 500 level, comprising ENVP503,
    ENVS521 and GEOG505, and a further 45 points from ENVP504, ENVP505, ENVP506, ENVP507,
    ENVP508 or ENVP590.

    Master of Environmental Planning (MEP)
    The Master of Environmental Planning is a programme accredited by the New Zealand Planning Institute,
    which has been designed specifically to be undertaken in the workforce. It comprises at least one
    6-month practicum based on experience in the workplace, plus a research thesis equivalent to two papers
    (60 points) and one other 30 point paper of relevance to planning, or a research dissertation equivalent
    to 3 papers (90 points). The practicums involve reading and reflection on weekly practice in a workplace
    setting. The dissertation must involve research on a planning topic. The programme is the equivalent of a
    year’s normal graduate study, but because candidates will normally be employed full-time while studying
    for the MEP, it is expected that the normal period for completion is likely to be 18 months to 2 years.
    Students applying to enrol in the MEP, must have graduated in one of the following, with at least
    a B+ grade average:
    » BSocSc(Hons) in Resources and Environmental Planning (REP), or
    » MSc in REP, or
    » PGDipSc in REP, or
    » PGDip(EnvPlan), or
    » An approved qualification including, or together with, approved graduate papers in the field
      of resources and environmental planning, and evidence of at least two years’ work experience
      in a relevant field.
    To complete a MEP, students must complete at least one of the two 500 level Practicum papers ENVP501
    and ENVP502 andENVP592. ENVP501 or ENVP502 may, at the discretion of the Chairperson of
    Department or the Director of Environmental Planning, be replaced with an approved elective at 500 level
    that can be demonstrated to be relevant to planning, or by a research dissertation equivalent to 3 papers
    worth 90 points. Students should note the prerequisite papers ENV521, GEOG505 and ENVP503.




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                                                           SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                               E



Papers Offered in 2009
ENVP503-09A (HAM) Legal Principles and Processes for Planners (15 points)
Pippa Wallace
This paper aims to familiarise students with law relevant to resource management and planning practice.
Students are introduced to legal principles relevant to planning, case law relevant to planning, and how to
use legal information sources. Students are required to make a polished presentation of the implications
for planning of a case law example.

ENVP504-09B (HAM) Planning Policies and Processes (15 points)
Dr Mairi Jay
This paper aims to introduce students to the skills that are necessary for the evaluation and formulation of
effective policies, objectives and methods related to public policy planning. The paper may include one or
more field trips.

ENVP505-09B (HAM) Māori Planning and Resource Management (15 points)
Angeline Greensill
This paper aims to familiarise planning students with concepts, principles and methods relevant to
Māori planning and resource management. Students who complete the paper will be expected to show
an understanding of Māori perspectives (values and beliefs) in relation to resource and environmental
planning, knowledge of Māori social institutions relevant to resource and environmental planning, and be
aware of the diversity within the Māori world. They will be expected to demonstrate communication skills
necessary for effective bicultural planning. The paper includes one or more field trips.

ENVP507-09C (BLK) Special Topic (15 points)
The purpose of the paper is to enable the introduction or exploration of new content and/or pedagogical
methods in relation to topics relevant to environmental planning.

ENVP508-09C (BLK) Plan Interpretation and Consent Processing (15 points)
Pippa Wallace
This paper is designed to provide students with practical insight and skill in the area of processing of
resource consents under the Resource Management Act 1991 (“The RMA”). It aims to:
» Ensure students are familiar with the resource consent process established under the RMA
» Familiarise students with the process of auditing a resource consent, and preparing a planner’s report in
  relation to a consent;
» Accustom students with decision-making processes under the RMA and with the role of the planner in
  presenting planning reports and providing expert evidence in RMA proceedings.




                                                                                                              69
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    ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
    ENVP590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09C (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
    Research on a planning topic.

    ENVS521-09Y (HAM) Environmental Evaluation (30 points)
    Dr Megan Balks (Earth Sciences Department) and Dr Mairi Jay
    This paper aims to give students insight into the environmental, technical, economic, social and political
    considerations involved in assessing environmental effects of human activities on the natural environment.
    It focuses on the context of resource consent applications and environmental monitoring procedures under
    the Resource Management Act 1991.

    ENVS522-09A (HAM) Climate Change Adaptation (30 points)
    For full details see the School of Science & Engineering.

    GEOG505-09A (HAM) Environmental Planning Theory (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG517-09Y (HAM) Advanced Geographic Information Systems (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG518-09A (HAM) Advanced Cartographic Theory and Practice (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG520-09A (HAM) Human Dimensions and Environmental Change (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    POLS537-09A (HAM) Environmental Politics and Public Policy (30 points)
    For full details see Political Science.




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                                                         SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                               E



Master’s Only
ENVP501-09C (HAM) Environmental Planning: Practicum 1 (30 points)
This paper is conducted in the workplace with supervision from University staff and a workplace supervisor
or mentor. The purpose of the paper is to encourage the student to make links between planning practice
and the principles and theories of planning. The paper involves regular reflection on, and reporting of,
workplace experience in the light of planning principles. Students are required to make at least one
presentation of their experience to a wider graduate audience on campus.
Note: ENVP501 may, at the discretion of the Chairperson of Department or Director of the REP Programme,
be replaced with an approved elective at 500 level that can be demonstrated to be relevant to planning.
Details of the optional 500 level Environmental Planning papers: ENVP504, ENVP505, ENVP506 and
ENVP507, can be found under PGDip(EnvPlan).

ENVP502-09C (HAM) Environmental Planning: Practicum 2 (30 points)
This paper is conducted in the workplace with supervision from University staff person and a workplace
supervisor or mentor. The aims of the paper are to broaden the student’s practical planning experience,
so that they develop confidence and sound judgment as autonomous planning professionals. Students
who complete this paper will be expected to take responsibility for the quality and accuracy of their
professional work; exercise independent professional judgment; be able to give valid, sound, and expert
advice on planning matters, to councils at a council hearing, or to the Environment Court; demonstrate
a practical understanding of the role of ‘expert witness’ in front of the Environment Court or a council
hearing. The paper involves a final written and an oral examination.

ENVP592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

ENVP593-09C (HAM) Environmental Planning Thesis (90 points)


ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY, TOURISM AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
Graduate Adviser: Dr Mairi Jay
Room: HI.2.01
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8834
Email: mairij@waikato.ac.nz
Graduate Adviser: Pippa Wallace
Room: I.2.18
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6199
Email: pwallace@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/rep/




                                                                                                           71
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    FRENCH
    www.waikato.ac.nz/french/

    The French Section of the Department of Humanities offers graduate papers in language,
    literature, linguistics and translation, although not all papers are offered in the same year.
    Staff research interests include:
    » The history, demography and linguistics of the colonial French Caribbean;
    » French-New Zealand historical links.
    » The work of André Gide (1869-1951);
    » The work of Amélie Nothomb (1967- );
    » Seventeenth and eighteenth-century French society;
    Every year one graduate student of French takes part in The University of Waikato’s graduate exchange
    with the University of Avignon in the south of France. The exchange allows the student to work as a
    teaching assistant in the English Department there for two semesters, while taking courses offered by
    the University of Avignon and carrying out research for graduate papers commenced at Waikato.


    Admission and Programme requirements
    To be admitted to the PGCert(FREN), PGDip(FREN) or BA(Hons) in French, students must normally have
    majored in French in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B grade average in either the best
    three of their 300 level French papers or all of their undergraduate French papers.
    To be admitted to the MA in French, students must have completed a BA(Hons) (or equivalent) in French
    and have gained a B+ average in their Honours level French papers.
    To complete a MA in French, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis and 30 points
    from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points in approved 500 level papers.




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                                                         SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES               F



Papers Offered in 2009
FREN501-09A (HAM) French Language 5 (30 points)
Dr Nathalie Philippe

FREN502-09A (HAM) A Special Topic in French Literature: Amélie Nothomb (30 points)
Dr William Jennings

FREN510-09A (HAM) Advanced Methodology of Translation (30 points)
Dr Nathalie Philippe

FREN524-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09C (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)
Dr William Jennings
Usually taken by the student on exchange at the University of Avignon, this paper involves
research carried out in France.

FREN580-09A (HAM) Directed Research Project (30 points)

FREN590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09C (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)


Master’s Only
FREN592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

FREN593-09C (HAM) French Thesis (90 points)

FREN594-09C (HAM) French Thesis (120 points)


FRENCH CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES
Graduate Adviser: Dr William Jennings
Room: I.3.03D
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8446
Email: wjen@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/french/




                                                                                             73
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    GEOGRAPHY
    www.waikato.ac.nz/geography/

    The Department of Geography, Tourism and Environmental Planning deals with a wide range
    of social, environmental and cultural topics in an integrated manner. The department offers
    papers in seven overlapping areas of study: human and cultural geography, development
    studies, environmental geography and resource management, technology in geography
    including Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Māori geography, tourism studies,
    and migration studies. Graduate study in the Department of Geography, Tourism and
    Environmental Planning at Waikato allows considerable flexibility. Students may develop
    their specialist interests by taking one or two graduate papers in other subjects such as:
    Anthropology, Biology, Demography, Earth Sciences, Economics, English, History, Māori,
    Social Science Research or Sociology. Geography as a programme of study at the University
    of Waikato is unique in New Zealand for its strength in human and cultural dimensions and its
    focus on contemporary geographic perspectives and critical social theory.


    Kaupapa Māori
    Te Whanga Aro Whenua encourages Māori students to participate in its academic programmes. Māori
    students are encouraged to include ideas, perspectives and concepts rooted in tikanga Māori into their
    research work.


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in Geography, a student
    should normally have majored in Geography in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B average in
    either the best three of their 300 level Geography papers or all of their undergraduate Geography papers.
    To complete a BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in Geography, students must complete 120 points at 500 level.
    Students may take a maximum of 60 points from another subject or subjects at 500 level.
    To gain admission to a MA or MSocSc in Geography, students must have completed a BA(Hons) or
    BSocSc(Hons) or equivalent, in Geography with a B+ average across all 500 level papers.
    To complete a MA or MSocSc in Geography, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis
    and 30 points from approved Geography papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved
    500 level papers.
    Following are some common BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) programmes of study for the various graduate
    specialisations in Geography.
    Graduate papers for Resources and Environmental Planning are listed on page 126
    (and for Tourism Development on page 147).
    Contemporary Geographic Perspectives: GEOG501, GEOG504, GEOG519, GEOG520, GEOG590;
    Development Studies: GEOG501, GEOG516, GEOG520, GEOG590;




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                                                          SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                          G



Geographic Information Systems: GEOG517, GEOG518, GEOG590, two other Geography graduate papers;
Māori Geography: GEOG515, GEOG590, two other graduate papers, one in Geography and one in Māori;
Resources and Environmental Planning: ENVS521, GEOG505, GEOG512, GEOG515.


Papers Offered in 2009
ENVP503-09A (HAM) Legal Principles and Processes for Planners (15 points)
For full details see Environmental Planning.

ENVP504-09B (HAM) Planning Policies and Processes (15 points)
For full details see Environmental Planning.

ENVP505-09B (HAM) Māori Planning and Resource Management (15 points)
For full details see Environmental Planning.

ENVP507-09C (BLK) Special Topic (15 points)
For full details see Environmental Planning.

ENVP508-09C (BLK) Plan Interpretation and Consent Processing (15 points)
For full details see Environmental Planning.

ENVS521-09Y (HAM) Environmental Evaluation (30 points)
For full details see Environmental Planning.

ENVS522-09A (HAM) Climate Change Adaptation (30 points)
For full details see Environmental Planning.

GEOG501-09A (HAM) Contemporary Geographical Thought (30 points)
Dr Russell Kirkpatrick
This paper is structured around a set of geographical themes – cultural, feminist, social, postmodern,
postcolonial, development, environment and resources, GIS, Māori – in order to comment on and
complement the geographical knowledge of the Department.

GEOG504-09A (NET) Geographies of Education (30 points)
Assoc Prof Lex Chalmers and Paul Keown
This paper deals with issues in geographical education across the curriculum, from primary to tertiary
levels. It explores the changes that have occurred in Aotearoa/New Zealand, against international
commentaries on the evolution and status of geography.




                                                                                                         75
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    GEOGRAPHY
    GEOG505-09A (HAM) Environmental Planning Theory (30 points)
    Dr Mairi Jay
    A core planning paper for the BSocSc(Hons) in REP. The aims are to extend conceptual and analytical skills
    in relation to planning and to encourage critical thinking about socially and environmentally sustainable
    development and the way society makes decisions about environmental resources.

    GEOG507-09B (HAM) International Migration Issues (30 points)
    Dr Colin McLeay, Dr Elsie Ho and Prof Dick Bedford
    This paper examines recent population movements between countries in the contexts of transnationalism,
    the competition for “talent”, the blurring of the boundaries between “migration for settlement” and
    “migration for work and temporary residence”, and the massive increase in asylum seeking.

    GEOG512-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)

    GEOG515-09B (HAM) Māori Geography (30 points)
    Angeline Greensill
    This paper reviews Māori theoretical perspectives in geography. Research issues are developed regarding
    Māori relationships to natural resources such as land and water. Included is a review of Waitangi Tribunal
    processes. Discourses associated with the impact of Treaty Settlement processes upon Māori are examined.

    GEOG516-09B (HAM) Advanced Development Studies (30 points)
    Dr Colin McLeay and Elaine Bliss
    This paper deals with development theory and development practice in less developed countries.
    The paper explores the notion of development and the causes of underdevelopment and examines
    changing perspectives such as dependency theory and the contemporary crisis of development.

    GEOG517-09Y (HAM) Advanced Geographic Information Systems (30 points)
    Dr Lars Brabyn and Assoc Prof Lex Chalmers
    The aim of this paper is to enable students to be proficient in GIS use and be well placed for employment
    as GIS analysts in industry and for use of GIS in research. Proficiency in GIS use is based on an
    understanding of the scientific and social context in which GIS is embedded.

    GEOG518-09A (HAM) Advanced Cartographic Theory and Practice (30 points)
    Dr Russell Kirkpatrick
    The purpose of this paper is to equip students with advanced cartographic techniques based on
    cartographic theory. It is designed to service students coming through the Geographic Information
    Systems (GIS), Resources and Environmental Planning (REP), Geography and Tourism streams as well as
    from the private sector. Underpinning this practical teaching will be a broad theoretical base. Students will
    be exposed to cartographic communication theory, including process theory, gestalt theory and semiotics.
    Particular emphasis will be placed on developing methods to illustrate the human dimensions
    of geography.




76                       FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                            SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                           G



GEOG519-09A (HAM) Crossing Boundaries (30 points)
Prof Robyn Longhurst
The paper aims to introduce students to the study of embodiment within geography. Students are
encouraged to think ‘critically’ and to ‘cross boundaries’ in order to reconceptualise the discipline of
geography in ways that address unequal power relations.

GEOG520-09A (HAM) Human Dimensions of Environmental Change (30 points)
Assoc Prof John Campbell
In this paper we examine the increasing risks imposed on human communities by global
environmental change such as global warming and the occurrence of so-called natural disasters.
The paper establishes a platform for the critical analysis of these processes by introducing students to
important theoretical developments including the role of culture-nature dualisms in geography, theories
on population-environment relationships, political ecology, new approaches to the study of disasters,
and the increasingly important concept of vulnerability.

GEOG521-09B (HAM) Advanced Tourism Research (30 points)
Assoc Prof Lynda Johnston
This paper will introduce students to some of the critical social theories being applied to tourism, in
particular postmodernism, poststructuralism, postcolonialism and feminism, which emphasise sensitivity to
sustainable tourism project implementation. The paper includes a field trip within New Zealand for
the duration of the mid-semester break. A research project based on the field trip is an important part
of the required assessments.

GEOG590-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
Elaine Bliss and Staff
The primary objective of the paper is to give students personal experience of the design and conduct
of research in human geography. Students are required to prepare a 2000 word Research Proposal,
an 8000 word Research Report, and a brief seminar presentation on their research to staff and students
within the department.


Master’s Only
GEOG592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)
GEOG593-09C (HAM) Geography Thesis (90 points)
GEOG594-09C (HAM) Geography Thesis (120 points)


GEOGRAPHY CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY, TOURISM AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
Graduate Adviser: Assoc Prof John Campbell
Room: I.2.19C
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8089
Email: jrc@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/geography/


                                                                                                           77
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    GERMAN
    www.waikato.ac.nz/german/

    The German Section of the Department of Humanities currently offers papers in Deutsch
    als Fremdsprache (DaF), which may be of particular interest to students from Germany who
    are studying DaF or Germanistik at home.
    Graduate students have the chance to work as assistant teachers in Germany or to apply for one of several
    DAAD scholarships to help with their studies.


    Admission and Programme requirements
    To be admitted to the PGCert(GERM), PGDip(GERM) or BA(Hons) in German, students must normally
    have majored in German in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B grade average in either
    the best three of their 300 level German papers or all of their undergraduate German papers. Papers
    with (DaF) after the title are concerned with the teaching and learning of German as a foreign language
    (Deutsch als Fremdsprache).
    To be admitted to the MA in German, students must have completed a BA(Hons) (or equivalent) in
    German and have gained a B+ average in their Honours level German papers.
    To complete a MA in German, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis and 30 points
    from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points in approved 500 level papers.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    GERM522-09A (HAM) Praktikum (DaF) (30 points)

    GERM590-09A (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)


    Master’s Only
    GERM592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    GERM593-09C (HAM) German Thesis (90 points)

    GERM594-09C (HAM) German Thesis (120 points)


    GERMAN CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Norman Franke
    Room: I.3.11
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8361
    Email: franke@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/german/




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HEALTH DEVELOPMENT AND POLICY
www.waikato.ac.nz/healthdev/

This graduate programme provides a unique opportunity to pursue studies in health
development and policy within the critical perspectives provided by the social sciences.
It is an interdisciplinary programme designed to prepare students for professional careers in
health development, policy analysis and research, or for further studies at the doctoral level.


Admission and Programme Requirements
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BSocSc(Hons) in Health Development and Policy,
a student should normally have completed an undergraduate degree and have at least a B average in the
best three of their 300 level papers or all of their undergraduate major.
To complete a BSocSc(Hons) in Health Development and Policy, students must include HDVP504,
HDVP505, HDVP506 and one of SSRP503 or SSRP504 in their programme of study.
Entry to the MSocSc in Health Development and Policy is open to suitably qualified students who have
completed a BSocSc(Hons) (or equivalent) including the core papers for Health Development and Policy.
To complete a MSocSc in Health Development and Policy, students must take either a 120 thesis, a
90 point thesis and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points
from approved 500 level papers.


Papers Offered in 2009
ANTH508-09B (HAM) Medical Anthropology (30 points)
For full details see Anthropology.

DEVS501-09B (NET) Strategic Planning for Iwi and Hapu Development (30 points)
For full details see the School of Māori and Pacific Development.

GEOG519-09A (HAM) Crossing Boundaries (30 points)
For full details see Geography.

HDCO501-09A (HAM) Ageing and Society (30 points)
For full details see Human Development.

HDVP504-09A (HAM) Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Health Development and Policy:
Frameworks for Analysis (15 points)
Lecturer to be advised.
This paper introduces students to a range of social and critical frameworks that are used to
conceptualise health/sickness at the global, national and micro/community levels. The paper
comprises four, three-session modules: alternative paradigms to health development; social epidemiology;
global contexts of health and disease; and, introduction to health policy issues, including health Policy
in New Zealand.


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    HEALTH DEVELOPMENT AND POLICY
    HDVP505-09B (HAM) Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Health Development and Policy:
    Systems for Health Delivery (15 points)
    Lecturer to be advised.
    This paper builds on HDVP504. It introduces students to issues in health delivery and the policies
    affecting health systems. The paper comprises four, three-session modules: health systems and institutions;
    diversity frameworks and health policy; case studies of health and health systems, both international and
    from New Zealand.

    HDVP506-09B (HAM) Methods in Health Policy Analysis (15 points)
    Lecturer to be advised.
    This paper introduces students to methods for undertaking policy analysis relevant to the health sector.
    The topics include demographic tools, evaluation, and health impact assessment.

    HDVP589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

    HDVP590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)

    HIST508-09B (HAM) Sickness and Health in History: Approaches to Writing and
    Researching in Medical History (15 points)
    For full details see History.

    PCSS502-09B (BLK) Kaupapa Māori Research (30 points)
    For full details see Education Studies.

    PHIL540-09B (HAM) Introduction to Health Ethics (15 points)
    For full details see Philosophy.




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                                                 SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                 H



POLS501-09A (HAM) The Policy Processes and Policy Analysis: Theoretical Perspectives
(30 points)
For full details see Political Science.

POLS531-09B (HAM) Issues in Public Policy and Administration (30 points)
For full details see Political Science.

POPS507-09A (HAM) Family Formation and Dissolution (15 points)
For full details see Demography.

POPS508-09A (HAM) Population Health and Health Planning (15 points)
For full details see Demography.

PSYC510-09Y (HAM) Evaluation Research (30 points)
For full details see Psychology.

PSYC582-09B (BLK) Community Health Psychology (15 points)
For full details see Psychology.

PSYC583-09A (BLK) Foundations of Community Psychology (15 points)
For full details see Psychology.

SOCP507-09A (HAM) Social Policy and Ageing (15 points)
For full details see Social Policy.

SOCY514-09B (HAM) Child, Youth and Family (15 points)
For full details see Sociology.

SOCY578-09B (HAM) Contemporary Issues in Health and Illness (15 points)
For full details see Sociology.




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    HEALTH DEVELOPMENT AND POLICY
    SPLS502-09A (NET) Health Related Fitness: Contemporary Issues (30 points)
    For full details see the School of Education.

    SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.

    SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.

    TIKA503-09B (HAM) Culture, Gender and Sexuality: Mana Wahine, Mana Tāne,
    Mana Tangata (30 points)
    For full details see Tikanga Māori.

    TIKA509-09A (HAM) Te Mahi Rangahau: Māori and Pacifika Research Methods (30 points)
    For full details see Tikanga Māori.

    WGST505-09B (HAM) New Natures: Gender, Culture and New Technologies (15 points)
    For full details see Women’s and Gender Studies.


    Master’s Only
    HDVP592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    HDVP593-09C (HAM) Health Development and Policy Thesis (90 points)

    HDVP594-09C (HAM) Health Development and Policy Thesis (120 points)


    HEALTH DEVELOPMENT CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF SOCIETIES AND CULTURES
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Ted Ninnes
    Room: K.2.25
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6829
    Email: leninnes@waikato.ac.nz
    Subject Advice: Dr Rachel Simon-Kumer
    Room: K.2.05A
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8255
    Email: rachelsk@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/healthdev/




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HISTORY
www.waikato.ac.nz/history/

The History Department graduate programme emphasises the intellectual and
methodological concerns of twenty-first century historians, in the context of changes that
are occurring in the discipline. These issues are also studied in specific areas of historical
enquiry. There is considerable opportunity for students to pursue research projects within
taught papers and by undertaking a directed study. The mix of 30 point and 15 point papers
within the programme has been developed to broaden the range of possible research fields.
Graduate students form a sociable and enabling group as they develop their own research culture,
and their contribution to the intellectual life of the Department is highly valued. There is some
opportunity (enrolment numbers and qualifications permitting) for employment as sessional assistants
in undergraduate papers. Graduates gain advanced research, analytical and communication skills, all of
which can be applied in a variety of jobs: policy analysis, teaching, journalism, tourism, administration,
applied research, and as professional historians, both within the academy and in other institutions such as
museums and heritage organisations.


Admission and Programme Requirements
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in a BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in History, a student should
normally have majored in History in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B average in their
best three 300 level History papers.
To complete a BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in History, students must complete 120 points at 500 level.
HIST506 is compulsory for all students taking more than two papers in History. All History Honours
students are recommended to include HIST590 Directed Study in their programme of study.
To be admitted to MA or MSocSc in History, students must have completed a BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons)
(or equivalent) in History and have gained a B+ average across all their 500 level papers.
Please also check the University Calendar for 2009. For further information visit:
www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/subjects/history/gradinfo/


Papers Offered in 2009
Some papers may require text books and/or a book of readings to be purchased from Waikato Print.
Please see the History website for details.
HIST501-09B (HAM) Oral History (15 points)
Nepia Mahuika
This paper is an integral part of the History Department’s training in methodology at postgraduate level.
The course is divided into two parts. In the first, students are introduced to practical interviewing skills and
procedures, including ethics and informed consent, interactive interviewing, transcribing and archiving. The
second part of the course is devoted to the extensive critical interpretive literature on oral life narratives.
Students put these skills and interpretive capabilities into practice as part of the course assessment. At the
end of the course they will be able to conduct ethically sound and competent oral history interviews, and
write interpretive analyses drawing upon contemporary oral history theory.



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    HISTORY
    HIST506-09A (HAM) History and Theory (30 points)
    Dr Rowland Weston
    This paper is a critical consideration of major theories of historical knowledge and how these inform,
    implicitly or explicitly, accounts of the past constructed by historians. Theoretical positions examined in
    the paper include empiricism, gender, poststructuralism, and postmodernism, and important approaches
    such as “history from below”, the work of the Annales school, history of mentalities, and postcolonial
    perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to read and report upon classic or influential modern
    works of history which incorporate in a significant and exemplary fashion these theories and approaches.
    Note: Students undertaking a History major (including a double major) must include in their programme
    HIST506 History and Theory, preferably in their first year of graduate study.

    HIST508-09B (HAM) Sickness and Health in History: Approaches to Writing and Researching in
    Medical History (15 points)
    Dr Catharine Coleborne
    This paper covers the broad themes within the social history of medicine. It is designed to offer students
    a background in the international scholarship in this field, to provide them with a solid background in
    New Zealand historical research around health and medicine, and to stimulate their interest in researching
    topics in health and medicine from an historical point of view. It does this through an exploration of
    methodological approaches to the histories of health and medicine and through exposure to the relevant
    historiography. It also enables students to create a small research project in this field. The paper will
    explore how the meanings of ‘sickness’ and ‘health’ have changed over time, and how medicine has come
    to assume a central place in contemporary (Western) societies, with particular attention to the themes
    of disease and its meanings, the identification of patient populations, patient experiences and narratives,
    institutions, and historical understandings of the body.

    HIST510-09Y (HAM) Presenting the Past: Public Histories (30 points)
    Prof Giselle Byrnes
    This paper provides an overview of public history; its definition, evolution and philosophy. It will consider
    public history, its development and theoretical assumptions, and examine the uses to which the past
    has been put in New Zealand and overseas. The paper will consider why the quest for ‘usable pasts’ has
    become so significant in recent times. Students will engage with the current literature and debates in
    public history and consider how public history differs from academic history, the philosophical and ethical
    issues it presents, and the particular problems that face public historians working in the public domain.
    The paper will explore how the past is presented as well as why. There will be a strong emphasis on the
    various methodological approaches used by public historians in a range of contexts as well as the different
    media through which their work is communicated to public audiences. The paper will therefore have a
    strong ‘practical’ and applied focus and will provide students with opportunities for hands on experience.




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HIST590-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
Students enrolled in this paper work on a focused piece of research and are individually supervised.
The research is written up as an essay of 7,000 – 7,500 words, and must be completed within the same
time frame as normal taught courses.
There are two established approaches that may be taken to the research for a directed study (although
these are not mutually exclusive):
» An historiographical approach, drawing primarily upon published, secondary literature
» Research based substantially upon oral and/or documentary archival sources
See the History website for the detailed description of what a proposal involves
www.waikato.ac.nz/wfass/subjects/history/gradinfo/590-guidelines.shtml
Note: It is possible to include only one HIST590 Directed Study within your Honours programme and a formal
enrolment cannot be completed without prior approval by the Chairperson of Department.
Interested students should talk to the Graduate Adviser and potential supervisors about topic areas well
before formally enrolling for the HIST590. It will be important to allow adequate time for checking the
availability of vital research materials and to apply for any necessary ethical permission before the official
study period commences. Proposals should be agreed to in principle and the application form submitted
a week before the first day of the semester of study.
The History Graduate Handbook contains advice and information about topics, resources and supervision.
It is available from the History Department office and the History website.


Master’s Only
HIST592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

HIST593-09C (HAM) History Thesis (90 points)

HIST594-09C (HAM) History Thesis (120 points)


HISTORY CONTACT INFORMATION
HISTORY DEPARTMENT
Graduate Adviser: Dr Rowland Weston
Room: J.3.10
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 4487
Email: rweston@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/history/




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    HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
    www.soe.waikato.ac.nz

    Human Development is available as a major and graduate level subject in the Faculty of
    Arts and Social Sciences. Papers in this subject are offered by the Department of Human
    Development and Counselling in the School of Education. It is recommended that students
    majoring in Human Development take both HDCO503 and HDCO504. Students majoring
    in other Social Sciences disciplines for their BSocSc(Hons) and MSocSc may also consider
    taking one or two Human Development papers with particular relevance to their major
    subject: for instance, Psychology majors may be interested in Mediation and Facilitation,
    Working with Groups, or Counselling and Contexts, Sociology majors in Ageing and Society,
    and Psychology or Social Policy majors with a critical bent might consider taking Human
    Development in Contemporary New Zealand Society and Rethinking Human Development:
    Conceptual Challenges for the 21st Century.
    Details of requirements and deadlines for thesis proposals, and information about what is required in a
    thesis in Human Development, are set out in the School of Education’s handbook for research students.
    The handbook also explains support systems for students, policies on assessment and other issues relating
    to education papers at Master’s and Honours levels. This is available from the Centre for Graduate Studies
    in the School of Education.


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BSocSc(Hons) in Human Development, a student
    should normally have majored in Human Development in their undergraduate degree and have at least
    a B average in the best three of their 300 level Human Development papers or all of their undergraduate
    Human Development papers. Students who have taken an undergraduate major in Psychology will
    normally be considered to meet the criteria for entry to graduate study in Human Development. Admission
    requirements vary, so students should consult the Graduate Adviser directly. Students who are intending
    to go on to a MSocSc in Human Development must include an approved research methods paper in their
    BSocSc(Hons) programme.
    To be admitted to the MSocSc in Human Development, students must have completed a BSocSc(Hons)
    (or equivalent) in Human Development and have gained a B+ average across all their 500 level papers.
    To complete a MSocSc in Human Development, students must take either a 120 thesis, a 90 point thesis
    and one 30 point 500 level paper, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points in approved 500 level papers.
    MSocSc students who have not completed an approved research methods paper in their honours degree
    (or its equivalent) must include an approved research methods paper in their masters programme.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    ALED520-09A (NET) Language, Cognition and Learning (30 points)

    DSOE557-09A (HAM), 09B (NET) & 09C (HAM) Educational Research Methods (30 points)
    For full details see Education Studies.



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DSOE590-09C (HAM), 09C (NET), 09D (HAM) & 09D (NET) Directed Study (30 points)
For full details see Education Studies.

HDCO501-09A (HAM) Ageing and Society (30 points)
Prof Bevan Grant
This paper examines how ageing is constituted in both social and political discourses, and how the
resulting messages influence the everyday experiences of older people.

HDCO502-09B (HAM) Educational Transitions (30 points)

HDCO503-09A (HAM) Human Development in Contemporary New Zealand Society
(30 points)
Assoc Prof Monica Payne
This paper provides a forum for investigating and interrogating the operation and influence of
psychological ideas about human development within familial, educational, and broader social contexts in
contemporary Aotearoa New Zealand.

HDCO504-09B (HAM) Rethinking Human Development: Conceptual Challenges for the 21st
Century (30 points)
Assoc Prof Wendy Drewery
This paper involves an evaluation and critique of selected major theoretical and conceptual frameworks in
lifespan development, with a view to developing understanding of the role and potential of developmental
concepts in a post-industrial, late capitalist society. This paper is taught partially online.

HDCO510-09A (HAM) Advancing Learning (30 points)
Assoc Prof Deborah Fraser
This paper provides advanced study in human behaviour and experience in relation to learning. A range of
learning theories will be critically examined related to effective teaching, creativity, the nature of wisdom,
and collaborative learning.

HDCO521-09C (BLK) Contemporary Issues in Special Education (30 points)
Assoc Prof Angus Macfarlane
This paper will examine a range of current issues in special education and will include topics such
as assessment and programme planning, professional collaboration, cultural diversity, and
motivational psychology.

HDCO527-09B (BLK) Risk and Resilience in Childhood and Adolescence (30 points)
Lecturer to be advised.
This paper examines theory, research and current practice in the human development field of risk and
resilience. The paper is taught partially online with attendance required on three Saturdays in Tauranga.




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    HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
    *HDCO540-09B (BLK) Working with Groups (30 points)
    Dr Elmarie Kotzé
    This paper explores the nature of group processes with selected kinds of groups. Students will develop
    leadership roles through observation, participation, and evaluation in an experiential workshop format and
    in a community setting. This paper is taught partially online with a required 5 day on campus block.

    *HDCO544-09C (BLK) Discourse and Counselling Psychologies (30 points)
    Dr Elmarie Kotzé
    This paper offers a social constructionist perspective on counselling and related psychological practices,
    and includes consideration of the major psychological theories which have influenced the development
    of counselling practice. Students will be introduced to concepts which enable analysis of therapeutic
    conversations. The paper is taught partially online and includes a required 5-day marae component.
    Weeks taught 8–27.

    *HDCO546-09B (BLK) Mediation and Facilitation (30 points)
    Dr John Winslade
    This paper recognises that professionals frequently engage in the skills of facilitative and generative
    conversation in contexts where the words mediation, consultation, and facilitation describe the nature
    of the interaction. Such contexts might include dispute resolution situations, public meetings, and
    situations where professionals need to negotiate their professional roles rather than being given them.
    A narrative perspective will feature strongly in the paper. This paper is taught partially online with a
    required 5 day on campus block.

    *HDCO549-09S (BLK) Counselling and Contexts (30 points)
    Dr Kathie Crocket
    This paper provides an overview of counselling practice and its contexts, offering a focused investigation of
    selected areas of practice and teaching the skills of a generic problem-solving model. This paper is taught
    partially online with a required 5 day on campus block.

    HDCO551-09A (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)

    HDCO565-09A (NET) Restorative Practices in Education
    Assoc Prof Wendy Drewery
    This paper examines restorative practices and considers their role in education settings. It is taught online
    with optional meetings to be arranged.

    MSTE502-09A (HAM) & 09A (TGA) Acquiring Numeracy: How Children’s Thinking
    Develops (30 points)
    For full details see School of Education Graduate Programmes.

    PCSS530-09A (HAM) Foundations of Adult Community and Tertiary Education (30 points)
    For full details see Education Studies.



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                                                         SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                       I



SSRP505-09A (HAM) Issues in Social Science Research (15 points)
For full details see Social Science Research.
*Designates an optional paper in the Counselling Programme. Other graduates who have relevant
background and experience may apply to the Centre for Graduate Studies in the School of Education
for entry, or find the special application form on our web site.


Master’s Only
HDCO592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

HDCO593-09C (HAM) Human Development Thesis (90 points)

HDCO594-09C (HAM) Human Development Thesis (120 points)


HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTACT INFORMATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Graduate Adviser: Assoc Prof Monica Payne
Room: TT.5.07
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8289
Email: monicap@waikato.ac.nz
www.soe.waikato.ac.nz




INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS AND
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
www.waikato.ac.na/irandhrm/

Students who have majored in IR & HRM in their undergraduate degree and who have
adequate grades may undertake interdisciplinary graduate programmes focusing on
IR & HRM by enrolling in the Labour Studies BSocSc(Hons) or MSocSc programmes.
See the Labour Studies entry for information on papers offered (page 94).




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    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND
    SECURITY STUDIES PROGRAMME
    www.waikato.ac.nz/politics/

    New Zealand depends for its security and well-being on an ordered world. Relations
    between states and the other major actors in the international arena impact significantly
    on New Zealand society and politics. International Relations and Security Studies offers
    students the opportunity of advanced study in security and strategic matters, or in issues
    of trade and globalization. There is also the possibility of focusing particularly on the
    legal, economic or defence implications of contemporary developments in the
    international arena.


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the PGDip(IRSSt) a student must have successfully
    completed a Bachelors degree with a major in Political Science of or another appropriate subject, or an
    equivalent qualification from another university. Candidates without this prerequisite may be allowed
    admission to the Diploma under certain conditions. These may include a requirement to take specific
    papers prior to enrolment.
    To complete a PGDip(IRSSt), students must complete at least 120 points in the 500 level papers listed
    below, including at least two of HIST530, LAWS576, POLS502, POLS506, POLS514 and POLS527.
    Entry to the MA in International Relations and Security Studies is open to suitably qualified candidates
    who have completed either a Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations and Security Studies or
    bachelors degree with honours (first or upper second class).
    To complete a MA in International Relations and Security Studies, students must complete at least
    120 points from the papers listed below. All candidates must take at least two of HIST530, LAWS576,
    POLS502, POLS506, POLS514 or POLS527 (unless these have already been taken as part of an earlier
    qualification) and complete either a dissertation or a thesis.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    ANTH514-09A (HAM) Ethnic and Indigenous Minorities (15 points)
    For full details see Anthropology.

    ECON531-09B (HAM) International Trade: Theory and Policy Issues (15 points)
    For full details see Economics.

    ECON532-09B (HAM) International Finance (15 points)
    For full details see Economics.

    GEOG507-09B (HAM) International Migration Issues (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.




90                     FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                  SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES          I



LAWS531-09B (HAM) International Environmental Law (30 points)
For full details see Law.

POLS502-09B (HAM) Security Issues in South East Asia (30 points)
For full details see Political Science.

POLS506-09A (HAM) International Relations (30 points)
For full details see Political Science.

POLS527-09B (HAM) Strategic Issues in the Middle East (30 points)
For full details see Political Science.

POLS537-09A (HAM) Environmental Politics and Public Policy (30 points)
For full details see Political Science.

POLS590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
For full details see Political Science.


Master’s Only
POLS592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

POLS593-09C (HAM) Political Science Thesis (90 points)

POLS594-09C (HAM) Political Science Thesis (120 points)


INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND SECURITY STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE & PUBLIC POLICY
Director, International Relations and Security Studies Programme: Dr Ron Smith
Room: J.2.14
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8468
Email: rjsmit@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/politics/




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    JAPANESE
    www.waikato.ac.nz/japanese/

    Pursuing graduate studies in Japanese enables students to develop their language and
    research skills. It offers the opportunity to work with a variety of original source materials
    and gain a deeper understanding of particular aspects of Japanese culture and society.
    Staff research interests include:
    » The history of Oceania-Japan links;
    » Japanese socio-linguistics, particularly the connection between human relationships
      and communication;
    » Japanese socio-linguistics, especially the use of lying to deal with undesirable situations; and
    » Ethics in society.


    Admission and Programme requirements
    To be admitted to the PGCert(JAPA), PGDip(JAPA) or BA(Hons) in Japanese, students must have majored in
    Japanese in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B grade average in either the best three of their
    300 level Japanese papers or all of their undergraduate Japanese papers.
    To be admitted to the MA in Japanese, students must have completed a BA(Hons) (or equivalent) in
    Japanese and have gained a B+ average in their Honours level Japanese papers.
    To complete a MA in Japanese, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis and 30 points
    from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points in approved 500 level papers.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    JAPA501-09A (HAM) General Japanese for Graduate Study (30 points)
    The aim of this paper is to enable students to develop their Japanese language skills at an advanced level.

    JAPA502-09B (HAM) Japanese for Academic Research (30 points)
    This paper will utilise primary sources as a basis for Japanese studies.

    JAPA520-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)

    JAPA590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)




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                                                 SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES   J



Master’s Only
JAPA592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

JAPA593-09C (HAM) Japanese Thesis (90 points)

JAPA594-09C (HAM) Japanese Thesis (120 points)


JAPANESE CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES
Graduate Adviser: Dr Ken McNeil
Room: I.3.03A
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8374
Email: japn0149@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/japanese/




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    LABOUR STUDIES
    www.waikato.ac.nz/labourstudies/

    The graduate programme in Labour Studies is flexible and involves a wide range of
    papers related to work and employment. Graduate students may focus on either Labour,
    Work and Society or Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management (IR&HRM).


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BSocSc(Hons) in Labour Studies, a student should
    normally have completed an undergraduate degree and have at least a B average in the best three of their
    300 level papers or in their major in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management (IR & HRM),
    Labour Studies, or another subject considered appropriate by the Chairperson of Department of Societies
    and Cultures. Students should also have included LBST201 and either LBST301 or LBST331 in their
    undergraduate degree.
    Graduate students can focus on either Labour, Work, and Society or IR & HRM. Those focusing on Labour,
    Work and Society must include at least one theory half paper (LBST521 or LBST522), one employment
    relations half paper (LBST531 or LBST532) in their degree; and at least two additional taught half papers
    in Labour Studies selected from LBST521, LBST522, LBST531, LBST532, LBST541, LBST542, LBST543,
    SOCY576, and SOCY577.
    Those focusing on IR&HRM must include in their degree at least one theory half paper (LBST521 or
    LBST522), both employment relations half papers (LBST531 and LBST532) and both education and training
    half papers (LBST541 and LBST542). Other papers must be selected from appropriate papers in Education
    Studies (Adult Education), Human Resource Management, Labour Studies and Psychology.
    Entry to the MSocSc in Labour Studies is open to suitably qualified candidates who have completed a
    BSocSc(Hons) including the core papers for Labour Studies.
    To complete a MSocSc in Labour Studies, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis
    and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved
    500 level papers.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    HIST506-09A (HAM) History and Theory (30 points)
    For full details see History.

    LBST521-09A (HAM) Labour and the Third Way: Theory and Policy (15 points)
    Mr Michael Law
    This paper provides a theoretical understanding of the contemporary theory that informs the labour
    movement and labour parties and governments in countries such as the United Kingdom and New Zealand.




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LBST522-09B (HAM) Labour and the Future: A Political Sociological Perspective (15 points)
Dr David Neilson
This paper encourages students to examine future theoretical models for the labour movement and labour
parties beyond the ‘third way’.

LBST531-09A (HAM) Advanced Employment Relations 1: The Employment Relations
Framework (15 points)
Dr Paul Harris
Students are expected to analyse and to discuss the Employment Relations Act in its social and economic
context and also to focus on specific issues such as good faith bargaining.

LBST532-09B (HAM) Advanced Employment Relations 2: Current Policies
and Practices (15 points)
Dr Paul Harris
Employee privacy, occupational health and safety, industry training, pay equity and equal opportunities
form core contents of this half paper. Students will gain an understanding of the relevance of these issues
in the contemporary workplace.

LBST541-09A (HAM) Labour, Education and Training 1: Issues and Policies (15 points)
Mr Michael Law and Dr Joyce Stalker
This half paper explores issues related to the restructuring of tertiary education in New Zealand.
Students will gain a thorough understanding of current issues in adult education and training and
become familiar with a range of contemporary policy documents.

LBST542-09B (HAM) Labour, Education and Training 2: Applied Research Project (15 points)
Mr Michael Law and Dr Joyce Stalker
Students will undertake a supervised piece of applied research into an aspect of the interface between
adult education and training and the labour market. They will complete a written report to graduate
(consultant) standard and prepare a research based paper/presentation that can be submitted to an
appropriate academic conference. Students wishing to take this half paper will need to have completed
a literature review as part of an appropriate paper taken prior to this one

LBST543-09B (HAM) Learning, Fashion, Women and Work (15 points)
Dr Joyce Stalker and Dr Paul Harris
The intersection between fashion and work is an important site of women’s learning. Students will be
able to: identify and critique the historical development of the major discourses surrounding fashion;
understand the ways in which women learn their identities, including orientalism and femininity; discuss
critically the social, political, and economic forces that shape the fashion industry, including exploitation
and struggle in the sweated trades; exhibit an advanced understanding of contemporary issues in the
production and marketing of fashion; deconstruct the role of fashion as an exemplar of the sociology of
consumption; discuss future directions for women and work in relation to fashion.




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    LABOUR STUDIES
    LBST589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

    LBST590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)

    SOCY576-09B (HAM) Sociology of Consumption (15 points)
    For full details see Sociology.

    SOCY577-09B (HAM) Sociology of Production (15 points)
    For full details see Sociology.

    SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research

    SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.


    Master’s Only
    LBST592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    LBST593-09C (HAM) Labour Studies Thesis (90 points)

    LBST594-09C (HAM) Labour Studies Thesis (120 points)


    LABOUR STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF SOCIETIES AND CULTURES
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Ted Ninnes
    Room: K.2.25
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6829
    Email: leninnes@waikato.ac.nz
    Subject Advice: Mr Michael Law
    Room: K.2.03A
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6838
    Email: m.law@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/labourstudies/




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MATHEMATICS
www.math.waikato.ac.nz

Mathematics provides groups of closely related and consistent languages and theories of
great beauty and logical power. It also provides a framework and structure for observation
and prediction in the natural, physical and management sciences. It facilitates aesthetic
and effective designs in engineering and technology. It leads to truth and certainty through
deduction and proof. Mathematics is fundamental for computing, statistics, physics,
chemistry and engineering, as well as biological and social sciences, management studies
and technology.
Career opportunities include teaching, research, planning, cryptography, econometrics, financial modelling,
technology, industrial and applied mathematics, engineering, industrial design, optimization, scientific
modelling, mathematics education, hydrology and meteorology, among many others. With a good
background in mathematics any career, and this is most, requiring planning or analysis, should be available.


Admission and Programme Requirements
Most of the papers listed below correspond to papers taught at 400 level. Students attend the same
lectures, but additional assessment may be prescribed for 500 level students. Candidates for graduate
degrees in Mathematics select their papers in consultation with Assoc. Professor Kevin Broughan, the
Mathematics Graduate Student Adviser. Full information on graduate papers in Mathematics, including
details of assessment, required books and staffing, are in the latest edition of the Mathematics Graduate
Handbook. Please contact Glenys Williams, the Administrative Secretary for a copy.
To gain admission into the BA(Hons) in Mathematics, students must have majored in Mathematics for
their undergraduate degree and have gained a B average in their best three 300 level Mathematics papers.
To complete a BA(Hons) in Mathematics, students must complete 120 points at 500 level.
To gain admission into the MA in Mathematics, students must have completed their BA(Hons) with a
B+ average across all 500 level papers.
To complete a MA in Mathematics, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis and
30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved
500 level papers.


Papers Offered in 2009
MATH501-09B (HAM) Metric Spaces (15 points)

MATH511-09A (HAM) Advanced Algebra (15 points)

MATH513-09A (HAM) Finite Groups (15 points)

MATH515-09B (HAM) Topic in Pure Mathematics (15 points)

MATH520-09Y (HAM) Report of an Investigation (45 points)



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    MATHEMATICS
    MATH536-09Y (HAM) Fluid Mechanics (30 points)

    MATH541-09A (HAM) Partial Differential Equations 1 (15 points)

    MATH542-09B (HAM) Partial Differential Equations 2 (15 points)

    MATH564-09A (HAM) Special Relativity (15 points)

    MATH565-09B (HAM) General Relativity (15 points)

    MATH581-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Special Topic in Mathematics 1 (15 points)

    MATH582-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Special Topic in Mathematics 2 (15 points)


    Master’s Only
    MATH591-09C (HAM) Dissertation (30 points)

    MATH592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    MATH593-09C (HAM) Mathematics Thesis (90 points)

    MATH594-09C (HAM) Mathematics Thesis (120 points)


    MATHEMATICS CONTACT INFORMATION
    SCHOOL OF COMPUTING AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES
    Graduate Student Adviser: Associate Professor Kevin Broughan
    Room: G.3.22
    Tel: +64 7 838 4423
    Email: kab@waikato.ac.nz
    Department Administrative Secretary: Glenys Williams
    Room: G.3.19
    Tel: +64 7 838 4713
    Email: glenys@waikato.ac.nz or maths@waikato.ac.nz
    www.scms.waikato.ac.nz




98                  FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                        SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                              M


MEDIA STUDIES
www.waikato.ac.nz/music/

Media Studies provides students with a broad knowledge of the roles which the media
perform in modern society, as well as providing a solid understanding from which to
critique and analyse media messages in terms of their production, distribution,
content and audience reception.


Admission and Programme Requirements
To be admitted to the BCS(Hons) in Media Studies, students must have completed a Bachelor of
Communication Studies degree with a major in Media Studies at the University of Waikato (or equivalent),
and should normally have a B average or better in Media Studies and a B+ average or better in 200 and
300 level papers credited to the Bachelor of Communication Studies.
To complete a BCS(Hons) in Media Studies students must pass 120 points at 500 level, including at least
60 points from the papers listed below.




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    MEDIA STUDIES
    Papers Offered in 2009
    SMST501-09A (HAM) & 09A (NET) Researching the Media (30 points)
    For full details see Screen and Media Studies.

    SMST502-09B (HAM) Creative Theory (30 points)
    For full details see Screen and Media Studies.

    SMST503-09B (HAM) & 09B (NET) Mobile Mediated World (30 points)
    For full details see Screen and Media Studies.

    SMST508-09B (HAM) & 09B (NET) Teaching NCEA Media Studies (30 points)
    For full details see Screen and Media Studies.

    SMST511-09A (HAM) Images of Aotearoa/New Zealand (30 points)
    For full details see Screen and Media Studies.

    SMST512-09A (HAM) & 09A (NET) Media and Creative Industries (30 points)
    For full details see Screen and Media Studies.

    SMST550-09B (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)
    For full details see Screen and Media Studies.

    SMST590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
    For full details see Screen and Media Studies.


    MEDIA STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF SCREEN AND MEDIA STUDIES
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Ann Hardy
    Room: I.4.26
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6223
    Email: yhdra@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/film/




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MUSIC
www.waikato.ac.nz/music/

Graduate study in Music can be undertaken in four main areas: musicology, performance,
composition/digital music and sonic art. Students specialising in musicology should enrol
for the BA(Hons) and MA, while those specialising in performance take the BMus(Hons)
and MMus. Students specialising in composition may take either the BMus(Hons) and
MMus or the BA(Hons) and MA.
Musicology students will take taught papers for the Honours year, then for the Master’s either write a
thesis or take a combination of a dissertation and taught papers. Staff research interests and expertise
cover a wide range including Baroque music, New Zealand music, 20th century popular music, aesthetics
and sonic art/electroacoustic music.
Performance teaching will primarily involve individual lessons, but will also include chamber music group
tuition (at Honours level), orchestral playing, choral singing, operatic productions. Lecturers include some
of the country’s leading performing artists.
Composition/Digital Music/Sonic Art students will develop portfolios of original pieces and composers will
have their works performed, realised and discussed.
The Music Department has a number of respected composers on its staff who work across several
styles and media, ranging through operas and symphonies to advanced computer technology works.
The conjunction of composition, technology and musical performance offers very stimulating possibilities
for imaginative young composers.


Admission and Programme Requirements
Bachelor of Arts with Honours (BA(Hons)) in Music
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BA(Hons) in Music, a student should normally hold
a BA degree and have at least a B average in either the best three of their 300 level Music papers
or all of their undergraduate Music papers.
To complete a BA(Hons) in Music, students must gain 120 points at 500 level including at least
60 points in Music.
Note: MUSI528 Performance Studies is not normally available for the BA(Hons).




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    MUSIC
    Bachelor of Music with Honours (BMus(Hons))
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BMus(Hons), a student should normally hold a BMus
    degree and have at least a B average in their 300 level Music papers in the area of intended graduate
    specialisation or all their undergraduate Music papers.
    To complete a BMus(Hons), students must gain 120 points at 500 level, specialising in either composition
    or in performance.

    Master of Arts (MA) in Music
    A MA can be taken in music history and analysis or in composition. Candidates for the MA in Music should
    normally have completed a BA(Hons) majoring in Music and have a B+ average pass across all 500 level
    papers. Acceptance into the MA is subject to availability of a suitable supervisor and overall approval
    from the Chairperson of Department.
    To complete a MA in Music, students must take either a 120 point thesis or a composition portfolio, or
    a 90 point thesis and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points
    from approved 500 level papers.
    Note: MUSI524 Advanced Performance is not normally available for the MA.

    Master of Music (MMus)
    Candidates for the MMus should normally have successfully completed the BMus(Hons) with a minimum
    B+ average pass in the area of intended further study. Acceptance into the MMus is subject to availability
    of a suitable supervisor and overall approval from the Chairperson of Department.
    The MMus is taken in either Composition or Performance. Students are required to take one of
    MUSI514 or MUSI524.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    Honours only
    MUSI501-09Y (HAM) The Aesthetics of Music (30 points)
    Martin Lodge, Michael Williams
    A critical examination of key philosophical issues in music, including an historical survey of mainstream
    Western thought about music from the ancient Greeks to the present.

    MUSI503-09Y (HAM) The History of Popular Song (30 points)
    William Dart
    This paper gives students the opportunity to investigate and analyse aspects of the popular songs
    during the 20th century.




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MUSI511-09Y (HAM) Sonic Art (30 points)
Martin Lodge, Ian Whalley
The supervised development and exploration of an individual portfolio of electroacoustic and/or
soundscape art to an advanced standard.

MUSI522-09Y (HAM) Acoustic and Electroacoustic Composition Studies (90 points)
Martin Lodge, Ian Whalley, Michael Williams
The supervised development of an individual portfolio of original music, completed to an
advanced standard.

MUSI528-09Y (HAM) Performance Studies (90 points)
Katherine Austin, James Tennant, Lara Hall, David Griffiths
This paper offers individual tuition in voice or instrument, along with experience in chamber music,
orchestral and choral work and/or involvement in the annual operatic production, to an advanced standard.
Note: MUSI528 Performance Studies is not normally available for the BA(Hons).

MUSI560-09Y (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)
Co-ordinator: William Dart
This paper involves advanced study in a subject agreed upon by the student and lecturer(s) involved.
Note: Entry is at the discretion of the Chairperson of Department.

MUSI590-09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
Co-ordinator: William Dart
This paper involves advanced study in a subject or creative project agreed upon by the student and
lecturer(s) involved.
Note: Entry is at the discretion of the Chairperson of Department.

PGDipMus only
MUSI504-09C (HAM) Professional Performance Practice (120 points)
Katherine Austin, Lara Hall, James Tennant, David Griffiths
An extension of performance skills at postgraduate level, this paper provides a platform for advanced
students to focus intensively on performance and to develop the necessary associated skills for an
emerging concert career.
Note: Entry is subject to successful audition and/or at the discretion of the Chairperson of Department




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    MUSIC
    MUSI505-09C (HAM) Composition Project (120 points)
    Martin Lodge, Michael Williams, Ian Whalley
    An extension of composition skills at postgraduate level; advanced students will focus intensively
    on a major composition project or series of projects appropriate for the development of a
    professional career in music.
    Note: Entry is by selection based on a submitted portfolio of previous compositions. Final decisions
    or exceptions on entry at the discretion of the COD Music.


    Master’s Only
    MUSI514-09C (HAM) Acoustic and Electroacoustic Composition Portfolio (120 points)
    Martin Lodge, Ian Whalley, Michael Williams
    The supervised writing of a substantial portfolio of original music and/or sonic art, completed to a
    professional standard.

    MUSI524-09C (HAM) Advanced Performance (120 points)
    Katherine Austin, James Tennant, David Griffiths, Lara Hall
    This paper offers individual tuition in voice or instrument, along with experience in chamber music,
    orchestral and choral work and/or involvement in the annual operatic production. This advanced paper
    is tailored to the particular student with a major emphasis on recital work and/or opera performance
    to a professional standard.
    Note: MUSI524 Advanced Performance is not normally available for the MA.

    MUSI592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    MUSI593-09C (HAM) Music Thesis (90 points)

    MUSI594-09C (HAM) Music Thesis (120 points)
    Co-ordinator: William Dart
    Students will pursue a course of study on a topic of their choice and investigate issues arising from that
    study in a written dissertation or written thesis.


    MUSIC CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
    Graduate Adviser: Assoc Prof Ian Whalley
    Room: I.1.06C
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8084
    Email: musik@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/music/




104                    FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                          SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                             P


PHILOSOPHY
www.waikato.ac.nz/philosophy/

Graduate study in Philosophy enables students to extend and deepen their understanding
of philosophical issues and texts and to develop their own research interests. With a focus
on Philosophy undertaken in the analytic tradition, staff members have wide-ranging
research interests and expertise and (subject to staffing levels) can offer supervised
research projects in addition to offering the taught papers detailed here. Students are
encouraged to pursue research projects in collaboration with staff and to present their work
at conferences in New Zealand and overseas. All thesis students are expected to present a
paper at the Department seminar series. Students in the programme form a friendly group
that acts co-operatively rather than competitively. They have excellent access to staff
and their contribution to the Department’s intellectual life is highly valued. Desk space,
computers and limited internet access are usually available. Staff research interests and
expertise include:
» Aesthetics
» Applied Ethics, particularly environmental ethics, health care ethics, engineering ethics
  and professional ethics
» Artificial Intelligence
» Cognitive Science
» Epistemology and Metaphysics
» Ethical Theory
» Philosophy of Biology
» Philosophy and Gender
» Philosophy of Language
» Philosophy of Mind
» Philosophy of Religion
» Philosophy of Science
» Pragmatism
» Wittgenstein


Admission and Programme Requirements
Students who have not majored in Philosophy in their undergraduate degree may need to take a Graduate
Diploma in Philosophy (GradDip(Phil)) before proceeding to graduate study. See the Bridging Qualifications
to Graduate Study section in this handbook (page 38).




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    PHILOSOPHY
    Bachelors with Honours Degrees, Postgraduate Diploma
    and Postgraduate Certificate
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BA(Hons), BSocSc(Hons), PGDip, or PGCert in
    Philosophy, a student should normally have majored in Philosophy in their undergraduate degree and
    have at least a B average in either the best three of their 300 level Philosophy papers or all of their
    undergraduate Philosophy papers. Students must also have passed the core papers in the Waikato
    University Philosophy major (PHIL102 Introduction to Logic or PHIL103 Critical Reasoning, PHIL250
    Knowledge and Reality and PHIL350 Recent Analytical Philosophy).
    Students who wish to pursue graduate study in philosophy but whose undergraduate programme did not
    include all these papers should consult the graduate adviser.
    Students who do not have a philosophy major may be admitted to individual papers on a case by case basis.
    There are no compulsory papers for students majoring in Philosophy for their BA(Hons), BSocSc(Hons)
    or PGCert(Phil) or PGDip(Phil).
    To complete a BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in Philosophy, students must gain 120 points at 500 level,
    of which at least 60 points must be gained in Philosophy. To complete a PGDip(Phil), students must gain
    120 points at 500 level, of which at least 90 points must be gained in Philosophy. To complete
    a PGCert(Phil), students must gain 60 points at 500 level in Philosophy.

    Master of Arts (MA) and Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc)
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the MA or MSocSc in Philosophy, students must
    have successfully completed an Honours degree in Philosophy with at least a B+ average in their
    Philosophy papers.
    To complete a MA or MSocSc in Philosophy, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis
    and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved
    500 level papers.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    PHIL533-09B (HAM) Moral and Political Philosophy (15 points)
    Dr Liezl van Zyl
    This paper focuses on contemporary theories of justice, such as libertarianism, liberal egalitarianism and
    communitarianism, and inquires whether these theories allow us to resolve ethical questions that arise
    within the context of globalization.

    PHIL534-09A (HAM) The Philosophy of Language (15 points)
    Dr David Lumsden
    This paper will focus primarily on Grice’s theory of conversational implicature, which concerns how a
    speaker can mean something different from what they are literally saying.




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                                                          SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                P



PHIL536-09A (HAM) The Philosophy of Mind (15 points)
Dr David Lumsden
This paper will focus on philosophical accounts of consciousness, especially the views of John Searle
and Daniel Dennett.

PHIL540-09B (HAM) Introduction to Health Ethics (15 points)
Dr Liezl van Zyl
This paper introduces students to topics in health ethics, such as genetic counselling, reproductive
technologies, psychiatric ethics, medical futility, informed consent, medical paternalism, euthanasia and
abortion. It focuses on the principles of patient autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice,
and examines whether the four principles-approach allows us to solve moral dilemmas that arise within
multicultural societies.

PHIL541-09B (HAM) Chosen Philosopher: Wittgenstein (15 points)
Dr Tracy Bowell
This paper gives students the opportunity to undertake an intensive study of the work of one important
and influential philosopher.

PHIL544-09B (HAM) Philosophy of Biology (15 points)
Dr Justine Kingsbury
This paper will cover some of the major issues in contemporary Philosophy of Biology, including the units
of selection debate, the nature of species, the nature of biological functions, the status of evolutionary
psychology, and whether or not there are laws of biology in the same sense in which there are laws of
physics. Students need not have any prior knowledge of biology.

PHIL552-09A (HAM) Epistemology and Metaphysics 2 (15 points)
Dr Cathy Legg
This paper explores issues in epistemology and metaphysics based on the following indicative list of topics:
naturalism, natural kinds, universals, time, identity, causation.

PHIL589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed study (15 points)
Students undertake a research exercise, which normally comprises a written paper or a series of related
pieces of work, under the supervision of a lecturer with a particular interest in the area of study.

PHIL590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
Students undertake a research exercise, which normally comprises a written paper or a series of related
pieces of work, under the supervision of a lecturer with a particular interest in the area of study.




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    PHILOSOPHY
    Master’s Only
    PHIL592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    PHIL593-09C (HAM) Philosophy Thesis (90 points)

    PHIL594-09C (HAM) Philosophy Thesis (120 points)


    PHILOSOPHY CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES
    Graduate Adviser: Dr David Lumsden
    Room: I.4.13
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 ext 6574
    Email: phil0075@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/philosophy/




108                FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                           SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                                 P


POLITICAL SCIENCE
www.waikato.ac.nz/politics/

The Department of Political Science and Public Policy offers graduate teaching and
supervision in the many areas of the discipline, particularly in the areas of international
relations (including security, defence and strategic studies) and public policy (including
environmental policy).
The Department offers a friendly and stimulating atmosphere in which to work, with students from
New Zealand and many countries around the world. The Department has graduate study rooms.
Many graduate students, particularly those working for doctorates, are employed as tutors on
undergraduate papers, thereby building up valuable teaching experience.
The Faculty offers a range of graduate qualifications in Political Science and Public Policy as well more
specialised qualifications in the interdisciplinary International Relations and Security Studies programme.


Admission and Programme Requirements
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BA(Hons) or the BSocSc(Hons) in Political Science,
students must have majored in Political Science, or in Public Policy, for their undergraduate degree and
should normally have at least a B average in either the best three of their 300 level Political Science papers
or all of their undergraduate Political Science papers.
The BA(Hons) and BSocSc(Hons) may be taken in Political Science; the BSocSc(Hons) is also available
in Public Policy. To complete the BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in Political Science, students must gain
120 points at 500 level, including at least 60 points from the following papers.
Applicants for Master’s degrees are expected to have successfully completed at least a Bachelors degree
with honours (first or upper second class) in either Political Science or in Public Policy.
The MA and MSocSc degrees may be taken in Political Science; the MSocSc is available in Public Policy.
To complete a MA or MSocSc in Political Science, students must take either a 120 point thesis,
a 90 point thesis and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points
from approved 500 level papers.


Papers Offered in 2009
LBST521-09A (HAM) Labour and the Third Way: Theory and Policy (15 points)
For full details see Labour Studies.

LBST522-09B (HAM) Labour and the Future: A Political Sociological Perspective (15 points)
For full details see Labour Studies.

PHIL533-09B (HAM) Moral and Political Philosophy (15 points)
For full details see Philosophy.




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    POLITICAL SCIENCE
    POLS501-09A (HAM) The Policy Process and Policy Analysis: Theoretical Perspectives (30 points)
    Dr Patrick Barrett
    This paper introduces students to theoretical perspectives on policy analysis and the policy process
    providing a conceptual tool-kit for the practice of, and higher level research in, public policy.

    POLS502-09B (HAM) Security Issues in South East Asia (30 points)
    Dr Mark G. Rolls
    After a brief conceptual and historical introduction to security in the region, the paper goes on to consider
    a range of contemporary security issues. These include ethnic conflict, militant Islam, maritime security,
    and relations with the major extra-regional powers.

    POLS506-09A (HAM) International Relations (30 points)
    Dr Alan Simpson
    International relations today goes far beyond the study of interstate relations. While of considerable
    importance, interstate relations are but one element in the contemporary world of peoples and cultures,
    connections and disconnections, conflict and peace, wealth and poverty, environmental deterioration and
    renewal. This paper examines recent literature on international relations, particularly the implications for
    sovereignty, the political reactions to the many social and political movements, alternative approaches,
    and other developments in the study of international relations.

    POLS527-09B (HAM) Strategic Issues in the Middle East (30 points)
    Prof Dov Bing
    This paper familiarises students with the most important strategic issues in the Middle East. It offers a
    critical inquiry into the origins and dynamics of strategic issues in the Middle East. In this way the paper
    analyses the Iran-Iraq War; the Gulf War; the Sinai Campaign; the Six Day War; the Yom Kippur War as well
    as the Israel-Arab conflict, the Israel-Palestinian conflict, the war in Iraq and Terrorism.

    POLS531-09B (HAM) Issues in Public Policy and Administration (30 points)
    Prof Dov Bing
    The paper aims to provide an understanding of key issues in the structure and operation of modern
    government. Several interrelated concepts and concerns are identified and discussed with reference to
    relevant developments in New Zealand. Examples and lessons are drawn from such areas as health, public
    transport, economic development, tertiary education and the environment.

    POLS537-09A (HAM) Environmental Politics and Public Policy (30 points)
    Dr Priya Kurian
    This paper introduces students to the complexities and challenges of environmental policy processes, and
    develops skills in scholarly research on environmental policy making. A significant focus of the paper is on
    analysing and understanding the complex intersections of institutions, culture, science and technology, and
    systems of governance that shape the way modern societies attempt to cope with environmental
    and natural resource problems.




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POLS590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
Approved Supervisor
Each student enrolled in a Directed Study undertakes an independent research project under the
supervision of a member of the academic staff. A student intending to enrol in one of these papers must
discuss their proposed topic with a suitable prospective supervisor.


Master’s Only
POLS592-09C Dissertation (60 points)

POLS593-09C Political Science Thesis (90 points)

POLS594-09C Political Science Thesis (120 points)


POLITICAL SCIENCE CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE & PUBLIC POLICY
Graduate Adviser: Dr Mark G. Rolls
Room: J.2.16
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6154
Email: markgr@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/politics/




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    PSYCHOLOGY
    www.waikato.ac.nz/psychology/

    The Department of Psychology offers a wide range of papers at graduate level across a
    range of areas, including research methods, organisational psychology, kaupapa Māori and
    psychology, human experimental psychology, human factors, the experimental analysis of
    behaviour, community psychology, clinical psychology, applied social psychology, applied
    behaviour analysis, and animal behaviour and welfare. It has a number of research facilities,
    which include an animal behaviour laboratory (located off campus), human experimental
    laboratories and computer laboratories. The Māori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU)
    provides a catalyst and support network for enhancing Māori focussed psychological
    research. The Department also works in collaboration with The Psychology Centre which
    provides some of the practical training for the Department’s Clinical training programme.
    Below is a brief description of the minimum entry requirements for graduate qualifications in
    Psychology. Students should refer to the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook for more
    detailed information.


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    Bachelor of Arts with Honours (BA(Hons)) or
    Bachelor of Social Sciences with Honours (BSocSc(Hons))
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in Psychology, a student
    should normally have completed a bachelors degree with a major in Psychology, and have gained at least a
    B average either over 300 level Psychology papers to a value of 60 points or Psychology papers to a value
    of 120 points. Students must also have passed PSYC307.
    Students who did not include a Psychology major in their undergraduate degree, but wish to advance to
    graduate studies in Psychology, may take a Diploma in Social Sciences in Psychology as a way of
     meeting the above requirements. Details of the requirements of the Diploma may be obtained from
    the Psychology Department.
    Note: No 300 level Directed Study can be included in the calculation of a grade average.

    Master of Arts (MA) or Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc)
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the MA or MSocSc in Psychology, a student must have
    successfully completed an honours degree in Psychology and have at least at B+ average over the papers
    which make up the honours degree. Students must have obtained, prior to acceptance into the degree, the
    consent of a suitable supervisor in the Department for their research thesis or dissertation.




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Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Psychology (PGDipPsych(Clin)) and
Postgraduate Diploma in Community Psychology (PGDipPsych(Com))
These are specialist qualifications leading to registration as a psychologist. Both involve a three-year
programme, usually taken concurrently with the MSocSc or PhD. In each case, the programme involves four
professional papers and a twelve-month supervised internship. Entry to these programmes is by application
only, and applications must be received by 1 October and 15 November respectively in the year preceding
entry. The number of students accepted into both programmes is limited, and short-listed applicants are
interviewed in November/December. Contact the Department for more information.

Master of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)
This is a two-year programme that can be taken in Organisational Psychology, Behaviour Analysis or
Community Psychology. To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the MAppPsy, a student should
normally have completed an undergraduate degree with a major in psychology and have gained at least
a B+ average either over the papers taken for the Psychology major or over 300 level Psychology papers to
a value of 60 points. Students must also have passed PSYC307 and the relevant qualifying papers, namely:
» For the Behaviour Analysis specialisation, PSYC314
» For the Community Psychology specialisation, PSYC301
» For the Organisational Psychology specialisation, PSYC317.
Note: That no 300 level Directed Study can be included in the calculation of a grade average.
Students who did not include a Psychology major in their undergraduate degree, but wish to advance
to graduate studies in Psychology, may take a Diploma in Social Sciences in Psychology as a way of
meeting the above requirements. Details of the requirements of the Diploma may be obtained from
the Psychology Department.

Organisational Psychology
Students in the MAppPsy in Organisational Psychology must pass the equivalent of 240 points comprising
105 points from the compulsory papers (LBST532*,PSYC579*, PSYC539, PSYC568, PSYC572, PSYC573,
PSYC585) and a 120 point thesis (PSYC594) or a 90 point thesis (PSYC593) or a 60 point dissertation
(PSYC592) and 45-75 points from the following optional papers in Human Resource Management, Labour
Studies and Psychology: HRMG541, HRMG543, HRMG544, HRMG545, LBST531, , LBST541, LBST542,
PSYC557. Optional papers should be selected in consultation with the Organisational Psychology
Programme Convenor.
* Subject to CUAP approval PSYC506 is replaced by PSYC579 & LBST532




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    PSYCHOLOGY
    Behaviour Analysis
    Students in the MAppPsy in Behaviour Analysis must pass the equivalent of 240 points comprising the
    compulsory papers (PSYC538, PSYC560, PSYC561, PSYC577) a 15 or 30 point Directed Study in a relevant
    area, a 60 point dissertation (PSYC592), or a 90 point thesis (PSYC593) or a 120 point thesis (PSYC594)
    and a further 45 to 105 points selected from the optional psychology papers: PSYC540, PSYC559,
    PSYC564, PSYC575 and PSYC581. In addition, students with appropriate academic backgrounds may select
    either a 500 level Education paper or the Biological Sciences paper (BIOL533). Optional papers should be
    selected in consultation with the Behaviour Analysis Programme Convenor.

    Community Psychology
    Students in the MAppPsy in Community Psychology must pass the equivalent of 240 points comprising
    75 points from the compulsory papers (PSYC510, PSYC575, PSYC582, PSYC583), a 60 point dissertation
    (PSYC592) or a 90 point thesis (PSYC593) or a 120 point thesis (PSYC594), and 45 to 105 points from
    optional papers in Anthropology, Development Studies, Geography, History, Human Development,
    Political Science, Population Studies, Public Policy, Psychology, Screen and Media Studies, Sociology,
    Women’s & Gender Studies. Optional papers should be selected in consultation with the Community
    Psychology Programme Convenor.

    Postgraduate Diploma in the Practice of Psychology (PGDipPracPsych)
    This twelve-month programme of study has three streams: Organisational Psychology, Applied Behaviour
    Analysis and Community Psychology. It follows the completion of a Masters degree in the same
    specialisation and is designed to meet the requirements for registration as a psychologist under the
    Health Practitioners Competency Assurance Act.
    Entry to the PGDipPracPsych is subject to the approval of the Chairperson of Psychology, and subject to
    the availability of a suitable academic supervisor. You must be working (paid or unpaid) in a relevant area
    of psychology in an organisation which provides you with the opportunity to practice significantly in the
    relevant specialisation. This requirement will be determined by the Chairperson of Psychology from the
    candidate’s job description.
    Note: Students may take up to 60 points in papers outside of the Department of Psychology for their
    BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) degree, with the approval of the COD, provided the papers are related to their
    overall course of study. However, to be eligible for registration as a Psychologist, those papers must have a
    substantial psychology component and fall within the guidelines set by the New Zealand Psychologists Board
    for accreditation, under the Health Practitioners Competency Assurance Act.
    The Department of Psychology reserves the right to restrict enrolments in graduate papers to 25,
    in order of application to enrol, in the interest of protecting the quality of the learning experience
    for students.




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Papers Offered in 2009
LBST532-09B (HAM) Advanced Employment Relations 2: Current Polices and Politics (15 points)
For full details see Labour Studies.

PSYC510-09Y (HAM) Evaluation Research (30 points)
Bridgette Masters
Provides a theoretical and practical grounding in programme evaluation, with an emphasis on producing
useful and user-friendly evaluations, qualitative methods, evaluation in Māori settings, collaborative
approaches and evaluation as a strategy of incremental social change. As part of the paper, students carry
out an evaluation of a social service or health programme.

PSYC516-09B (HAM) Violence in Family and Society (30 points)
Prof Jane Ritchie
Reviews theories about the incidence of behaviours that are labelled violent. Topics include the violent
person (such as violent offenders), violence in the family (such as wife beating and child abuse) and
violence in society (such as television, sports, political style, gangs).

PSYC517-09B (HAM) The Social Psychology of Anti-Social Behaviour (15 points)
Dr Cate Curtis
The paper builds upon undergraduate courses, in particular social and community psychology, and current
research to explore anti-social behaviours such as the bystander effect, bullying and group deviance
through to genocide. The paper will introduce the latest research and apply this to concrete examples that
will have relevance to students’ lives and/or to current events. Material on specific forms of anti-social
behaviour drawing on both foundational theories and current research will be included.

PSYC538-09B (HAM) Applications of Behaviour Analysis (15 points)
Lecturer to be advised.
Provides a depth of coverage on applying behaviour principles to interventions in applied settings.
The objective is to examine and critique recent applications of the methods and theories of behaviour
analysis in a range of settings to both prevent and change problems.

PSYC539-09A (HAM) Graduate Research Methods in Psychology (15 points)
Dr John Perrone
This paper gives students the opportunity to broaden their knowledge and skills base in research methods
in Psychology. Its focus is on assisting students to understand, critique and conduct and report on
research in experimental and quasi-experimental designs, multivariate/correlational designs, meta-analysis.
The paper provides a broad background in graduate-level research methods that can be applied in
conducting these, as well as in research positions within employment settings.

PSYC540-09B (NET) Behavioural and Perceptual Development (15 points)
Dr James McEwan
This paper addresses the two fundamental questions in developmental psychology: what develops and
how it develops? This is done by integrating the views of dynamical systems concepts with a behavioural
view of development with its focus on the constant reciprocal interactions between nature and nurture.



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    PSYCHOLOGY
    PSYC556-09A (HAM) Advanced Topics in Abnormal Adult Psychology (15 points)
    Dr Jo Thakker
    This paper builds on PSYC338 Abnormal Psychology and is a core paper for students in the Clinical
    Diploma Programme. It explores the various manifestations of adult psychopathology and covers the key
    areas of diagnosis, assessment, treatment and theories of etiology. It also investigates issues associated
    with psychopathology, such as stigmatisation, psychiatric nosology and concepts of abnormality.

    PSYC557-09A (HAM) Human Performance Research: Theories and Practice (15 points)
    Dr Robert Isler
    Seeks to develop an understanding of psychological and physiological factors that can influence human
    performance in applied settings such as a driving simulator. The paper includes a section on methods of
    analysing eye movement and psychophysiological variables.

    PSYC559-09A (BLK) Animal Behaviour and Welfare Research (15 points)
    Prof Mary Foster and Assoc Prof William Temple
    Surveys research in animal behaviour and welfare. Topics include various definitions of appropriate welfare
    and the limitations and implications of these. Ways of assessing welfare are examined.

    PSYC560-09A (HAM) Applied Behaviour Analysis: Theory and Issues (15 points)
    Prof Mary Foster and Dr James McEwan
    Considers the conceptual theory behind, and the issues raised by, the implementation of behavioural
    programmes across a wide range of applied areas, such as clinical, educational, and health psychology and
    intellectual disability. The design and implementation of such programmes in practice is considered, and
    topics currently under debate are included. The paper aims to help students understand current thinking in
    behavioural psychology and the methodology used in behavioural research. It also provides a framework
    within which students can understand, study and work practically with behaviour.

    PSYC561-09A (HAM) Behaviour Analysis Research and Theory (15 points)
    Lecturer to be advised.
    Covers theory and research in several selected areas relevant to the understanding of behaviour and
    provides students with:
    » An understanding of the theoretical/conceptual principles underlining the research;
    » The ability to examine and critique research in the area; and
    » An understanding of how theories, techniques and research in the Experimental Analysis of Behaviour
      are relevant to the understanding of behaviour and behaviour change.
    Topics covered will include choice and preferences in humans and animals (including self-control)
    psychophysics, memory, and behavioural economics.




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PSYC562-09A (HAM) Theories of Clinical Psychology (15 points)
Assoc Prof Douglas Boer
This paper surveys the prominent systems of therapy in order to provide students with knowledge of
how each type of therapeutic school conceptualizes the processes used to describe personal problems,
relevant change mechanisms, and treatment modalities. Students are encouraged to develop knowledge
of an integrative model to use as an intellectual framework for using the effective components of various
therapeutic methods in the treatment of psychological problems.

PSYC564-09B (HAM) Child Psychopathology (15 points)
Dr Carrie Barber
Considers research on major childhood syndromes including conduct disorder, autism, attention deficit
hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), adolescent problems and childhood anxiety.

PSYC568-09A (HAM) Human Factors Psychology (15 points)
Dr Samuel Charlton
Familiarises students with current methods and theories in human factors psychology. Students have an
opportunity to apply these theories and methods to the design and analysis of a human factors project.

PSYC572-09B (HAM) Personnel Selection (15 points)
Dr Donald Cable
Blends personnel selection theory, research and practice, including job analysis and the most prevalent
selection methods: interviews, references, application blanks, paper and pencil tests, assessment centres
and work samples. This course is particularly relevant for students interested in organisational psychology,
and others interested in psychological assessment within organisational settings.

PSYC573-09B (HAM) Personnel Training and Development (15 points)
Dr Donald Cable
Focuses on the development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes. This paper is
particularly relevant for students interested in organisational psychology, as well as those interested
in developing training or workshop-based interventions to improve professionals’ knowledge, skills
or work behaviour.

PSYC574-09B (HAM) Principles and Theories of Cognitive/Behaviour Therapy (15 points)
Dr Jo Thakker
Explores the theoretical and conceptual basis of modern cognitive-behaviour therapy. This is not a paper
on how to practise or implement these therapeutic methods, but addresses the research literature on
process and outcome, and the extension of underlying principles from basic behavioural and cognitive
psychology. The paper considers the application of cognitive theories for a variety of psychopathologies.




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    PSYCHOLOGY
    PSYC575-09A (HAM) Psychological Applications and the Treaty of Waitangi (15 points)
    Dr Linda Waimarie Nikora
    Covers topics relevant to students intending to work as psychologists in applied settings. The paper
    focuses on clinical, community and institutional settings and applied psychological research. Themes
    include developing a Treaty analysis, implications of the Treaty for psychologists, Treaty policies and
    implementation, working with Māori people and organisations, and cultural safety.

    PSYC577-09B (HAM) Recent Research in Behaviour Analysis (15 points)
    Assoc Prof William Temple
    This paper covers a range of topics in the applications of laboratory-derived principles to the understanding
    of, and attempts to change, human behaviour. Students will be brought up to date with the recent research
    in these areas and will learn to read, understand and critically evaluate the literature which attempts to
    apply the laboratory findings to human behaviour change. Topics included are: animal analogues of human
    problem behaviours (e.g., activity anorexia), behavioural momentum and its relation to behaviour change,
    classical conditioning and the development of emotional reactions, equivalence relations and verbal
    behaviour, leaning and eating (including problem eating), learning and physiology (e.g., of the immune
    system, and of pain), and psychopharmacology (including drug-conditioning and drug-seeking behaviour).

    PSYC579-09A (HAM) Advances in Organisational Psychology (15 points)
    Prof Michael O’Driscoll
    This paper covers theories, research and applications in organisational psychology. The focus is on critical
    appraisal of areas such as work attitudes and motivation, job stress, and organisational processes.

    PSYC580-09B (HAM) The Psychology of Criminal Conduct (15 points)
    Assoc Prof Douglas Boer (for contact on-campus) and Glen Kilgour (Lecturer)
    Over recent years correctional psychology has been developing into a specialised discipline with
    strong career paths for clinicians and researchers. This paper is designed to introduce individuals to
    the theory and practice of psychology applied to the analysis, prevention, assessment, and treatment
    of criminal behaviour.

    PSYC581-09A (HAM) Psychological Assessment (15 points)
    Dr Nicola Starkey
    This paper provides the knowledge required to evaluate psychological assessment. It includes coverage
    of the administration and interpretation of psychometric instruments and of behavioural assessment
    in the New Zealand context.

    PSYC582-09B (BLK) Community Health Psychology (15 points)
    Dr Darrin Hodgetts
    This paper provides an introduction to community health psychology and the theoretical and practical
    dilemmas faced by psychologists working with participative approaches within the health arena. Central
    topics include: the history of community psychology, models of health and illness, core areas of research
    and practice within community health psychology, social determinants of health, ‘lay beliefs’ of health
    and illness, and the use of participative methods to promote health.


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PSYC583-09A (BLK) Foundations of Community Psychology (15 points)
Dr Neville Robertson
This paper emphasises the application of community psychology in Aotearoa/New Zealand, especially
in relation to its emergence as a bicultural nation. Students are strongly recommended to also enrol in
PSYC575, which deals specifically with the Treaty of Waitangi.

PSYC584-09B (HAM) Media Psychology (15 points)
Dr Darrin Hodgetts
This course provides an overview of media psychology and the theoretical and practical dilemmas faced
by professionals working in this arena. Central themes include: the history of media psychology and its
relevance today; core areas of research and practice within media psychology; the ethics of practicing
psychology through the media; methodological issues; how psychology can inform our understandings
of social issues and new media technologies; the intersection of psychological and media and
communications research.

PSYC585-09A (HAM) Organisational Development and Change (15 points)
Dr Donald Cable
This paper focuses on the processes and outcomes of organisational change management, and the
knowledge and skills required of organisational psychologists who function as organisational consultants.

PSYC588-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

PSYC589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

PSYC590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
Students who are interested in a particular area of graduate study, which is not covered in the papers
offered above, may be permitted to follow their own paper of study for 15 or 30 points credit. Students
must obtain prior approval from a member of staff who is willing to act as a supervisor for the paper. It is
possible to enrol in two 15 point directed studies involving different areas of study. In this event, students
should enrol in PSYC588 and PSYC589, and not in two papers with the same paper code.
Further information regarding directed studies can be obtained on a handout sheet available from
the Department.
Note: Not all staff are available to supervise directed studies over the summer period. Students should first
determine staff availability.


Master’s Only
PSYC592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)
PSYC593-09C (HAM) Psychology Thesis (90 points)
PSYC594-09C (HAM) Psychology Thesis (120 points)




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    PSYCHOLOGY
    Clinical Diploma Papers
    PSYC700-09C (HAM) Clinical Internship (60 points)
    PSYC701-09Y (HAM) Professional Issues in Clinical Practice (20 points)
    PSYC702-09Y (HAM) Bicultural Approaches to Clinical Practice (20 points)
    PSYC703-09Y (HAM) Clinical Practicum 1 – Fundamental Clinical Skills (20 points)
    PSYC704-09Y (HAM) Clinical Practicum 2 – Advanced and Specialist Skills (20 points)


    Community Diploma Papers
    PSYC710-09C (HAM) Community Internship (60 points)
    PSYC711-09Y (HAM) Professional Practice (20 points)
    PSYC712-09Y (HAM) Community Practicum (20 points)
    PSYC713-09Y (HAM) Research Practicum (20 points)
    PSYC714-09Y (HAM) Professional Skills (20 points)


    Papers for the Postgraduate Diploma in the Practice of
    Psychology (PGDipPracPsych)
    PSYC720-09C (HAM) The Practice of Psychology (60 points)
    PSYC721-09C (HAM) Case Study Analysis in Applied Psychology (40 points)
    PSYC722-09C (HAM) Professional Issues in Psychology (20 points)

    These papers are taken concurrently on either a full-time or part-time basis.


    PSYCHOLOGY CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
    Graduate Adviser: Assoc Prof Samuel Charlton
    Room: K.1.09
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6534
    Email: samiam@waikato.ac.nz
    Departmental Administrator: Sue Carnaby
    Room: K.1.22
    Tel: +64 7 838 4032
    Email: carnabys@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/psychology/




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PUBLIC POLICY
www.waikato.ac.nz/politics/

The Department of Political Science and Public Policy offers graduate teaching and
supervision in the many areas of the discipline, including public policy. (See page 94
for further details about the department and its other programmes.)


Admission and Programme Requirements
BSocSC(Hons)
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BSocSc(Hons) in Public Policy, a student should
normally have majored in Public Policy in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B average in
either the best three 300 level Public Policy papers or all of their undergraduate Public Policy papers.
To complete a BSocSc(Hons) in Public Policy, students must complete 120 points at 500 level, including
the compulsory papers POLS501 and POLS531, and a further 60 points chosen from the papers listed
below. Students may be permitted to substitute a maximum of 60 points with another subject or subjects.
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the Postgraduate Diploma in Public Policy, a student must
have a Bachelors degree with a major in a relevant discipline. Candidates without this prerequisite may be
allowed admission to the diploma programme, subject to their passing specific papers prior to enrolment.
To complete Postgraduate Diploma in Public Policy, students must complete 120 points at 500 level,
including POLS501 and POLS531, and a 60 further points at 500 level from papers listed below.
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the MSocSc in Public Policy, a student must have completed a
BSocSc(Hons) in Public Policy (or equivalent) with at least a B+ average in their 500 level Public Policy papers.
To complete a MSocSc in Public Policy, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis
and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved
500 level papers.


Papers Offered in 2009
DEVS504-09A (NET) Comparative State Policies on Indigenous Development (30 points)
For full details see the School of Māori and Pacific Development.

GEOG507-09B (HAM) International Migration Issues (30 points)
For full details see Geography.

LBST521-09A (HAM) Labour and the Third Way: Theory and Policy (15 points)
For full details see Labour Studies.

LBST522-09B (HAM) Labour and the Future: A Political Sociological Perspective (15 points)
For full details see Labour Studies.




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    PUBLIC POLICY
    PCSS508-09B (HAM) Educational Policy (30 points)
    For full details see Education Studies.

    POLS501-09A (HAM) The Policy Process and Policy Analysis: Theoretical Perspectives (30 points)
    For full details see Political Science.

    POLS531-09B (HAM) Issues in Public Policy and Administration (30 points)
    For full details see Political Science.

    POLS537-09A (HAM) Environmental Politics and Public Policy (30 points)
    For full details see Political Science.

    POLS590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
    For full details see Political Science.

    POPS508-09A (HAM) Population Health and Health Planning (15 points)
    For full details see Demography.

    SOCP506-09B (HAM) Social Policy: Comparative Approaches (15 points)
    For full details see Social Policy.

    SOCP507-09A (HAM) Social Policy and Ageing (15 points)
    For full details see Social Policy.

    SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.

    SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.

    WGST506-09A (HAM) Theorising Gender (15 points)
    For full details see Women’s and Gender Studies.

    WGST507-09B (HAM) Gender, Policy and Development (15 points)
    For full details see Women’s and Gender Studies.




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Master’s Only
POLS592-09C Dissertation (60 points)

POLS593-09C Political Science Thesis (90 points)

POLS594-09C Political Science Thesis (120 points)


PUBLIC POLICY CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY
Graduate Adviser: Dr Mark G. Rolls
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6154
Email: markgr@waikato.ac.nz
Director of Graduate Public Policy: Professor Dov Bing
Tel: +64 7 838 4533
Email: dovbing@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/politics/




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    RELIGIOUS STUDIES
    www.waikato.ac.nz/religiousstudies/

    Religion is a significant factor in the shaping of people’s lives and the determining of
    political and social outcomes. The study of religion involves learning about religious
    phenomena, and a quest for insight and understanding of human life and history.
    Religious studies papers provide a stimulating complement to a large number of other
    graduate subject areas.
    Religious Studies is not currently a subject for the BA(Hons). Students may, however, count the equivalent
    of up to two 500 level papers (or 60 points) in Religious Studies towards their BA(Hons) in another subject.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    RELS560-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)
    Assoc Prof Douglas Pratt
    A selected contemporary topic or topics in the field of Religious Studies.

    RELS590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
    Students undertake a supervised exercise, which normally comprises a written paper or a series of related
    pieces of work in a selected area of study.


    RELIGIOUS STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES
    Convenor of the Religious Studies Programme: Assoc Prof Douglas Pratt
    Room: I.4.04
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8146
    Email: dpratt@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/religiousstudies/




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RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
www.waikato.ac.nz/rep/

This programme deals with planning and management of natural and physical resources
to ensure that they are wisely used and that the quality of the environment is improved.
It provides an understanding of the interaction of people and their environment and ways of
finding answers to the challenge of sustainable development. To sustainably use resources
such as a forest or river, we must know about their physical and natural characteristics as well
as their importance to people. The subjects contributing to this interdisciplinary programme
are Biological Sciences, Earth and Ocean Sciences, Economics, Geography and Politics.
The Department of Philosophy contributes a compulsory paper, Environmental Ethics.
REP is available at the undergraduate level only as a specialisation of the Environmental Planning major.
It remains as a subject for the BSocSc(Hons) REP at the graduate level for those students who have
completed an undergraduate REP programme and wish to continue their study at graduate level or for
students who wish for greater flexibility than is allowed by the Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental
Planning (PGDip(EnvPlan)). Students who have completed an undergraduate REP programme may choose
to enter the graduate REP programme or transfer to the PGDip(EnvPlan). Because the BSocSc(Hons)
REP allows a wider range of choice than the PGDip(EnvPlan) it is more suited for students who wish to
continue with resources and environment but do not anticipate a planning career in New Zealand.


Admission and Programme Requirements for BSocSc(Hons)
in Resources and Environmental Planning (REP)
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BSocSc(Hons) in REP, students should normally have a
minimum B+ average in their best three 300 level papers in their undergraduate degree, and should have
completed the requirements for a major in REP, Environmental Planning or an equivalent programme of
interdisciplinary study.
Students are required to take the two core REP papers listed below, plus two 500 level papers from the
subjects Biological Sciences, Earth Sciences, Economics, Geography, or Political Science.




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    RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
    Papers Offered in 2009
    Core REP Papers
    ENVS521-09Y (HAM) Environmental Evaluation (30 points)
    Dr Megan Balks (Earth Sciences Department) and Dr Mairi Jay
    This paper aims to give students insight into the environmental, technical, economic, social and political
    considerations involved in assessing environmental effects of human activities on the natural environment.
    It focuses on the context of resource consent applications and environmental monitoring procedures under
    the Resource Management Act 1991.

    GEOG505-09A (HAM) Environmental Planning Theory (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.


    REP CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY, TOURISM AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Mairi Jay
    Room: HI.2.01
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8834
    Email: mairij@waikato.ac.nz
    Graduate Adviser: Pippa Wallace
    Room: I.2.18
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6199
    Email: pwallace@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/rep/




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                                                            SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                         S

SCREEN AND MEDIA STUDIES /
AKORANGA WHAKAATA PURONGO
www.waikato.ac.nz/film/

The Department of Screen and Media Studies combines critical and creative approaches to
the study of media. We are committed to a curriculum relevant to the 21st century. We also
are aware that media histories are vital to the development of new media. As New Zealand’s
number one media research department (2007 PBRF rating) we are a centre for innovative
teaching and learning, integrating hands-on creative work and the intellectual challenge
of critical thinking. Students can choose to focus on specialised areas of study such as
creative industries, video art, media policy, audience research, games, animation, media
and religion, new media and democracy, and media literacy.
Our emphasis is on combining hands-on instruction with critical thinking, so graduates may work
independently or as a team in many areas of the media, as well as in a range of occupations where an
understanding of the modern media of public communication will be valued.
We encourage applications from Māori and Pacific Island students and students with previous
professional experience.
Facilities include broadcast-quality digital camera and editing facilities for teaching and research;
dedicated media and game labs; campus television (Big TV).
For details of the Media Studies programme for the Bachelor of Communication Studies with Honours
(BCS(Hons)) see page 28.


Admission and Programme Requirements
for Screen and Media Studies
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in graduate study in Screen and Media Studies, a student
should normally have majored in Screen and Media Studies in their undergraduate degree and have at
least a B average in undergraduate papers, particularly 300 level Screen and Media papers.
The GradDip(SMSt) is available for students who have not included the subject Screen and Media Studies
at an advanced level in their first degrees.
To complete a GradDip(SMSt), students must gain 120 points above 100 level, including SMST207,
SMST214, SMST302, SMST305 and a further 40 points at 300 level in papers offered by Screen and Media
Studies or approved by the Chairperson of Department.
To complete a PGDip(SMSt), students must complete 120 points at 500 level in Screen and Media Studies,
comprising the compulsory paper SMST501 plus three 500 level papers.
To complete a BA(Hons) in Screen and Media Studies, students must complete 120 points at 500 level
of which at least 60 points must be from Screen and Media Studies papers listed below. A maximum of
60 points may be taken from another subject or subjects.




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    SCREEN AND MEDIA STUDIES /
    AKORANGA WHAKAATA PURONGO
    To be eligible to be considered for a MA in Screen and Media Studies, a student must have completed
    a BA(Hons) in Screen and Media Studies (or equivalent) with at least a B+ average in their 500 level
    Screen and Media Studies papers.
    To complete a MA in Screen and Media Studies, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point
    thesis and at least 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from
    approved 500 level papers.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    PSYC584-09B (HAM) Media Psychology (15 points)
    For full details see Psychology.

    SMST501-09A (HAM) & 09A (NET) Researching the Media (30 points)
    Prof Dan Fleming
    This paper is designed to provide an advanced understanding of screen research methods and outcomes.
    It identifies constraints and freedoms in research and places a strong emphasis on explaining how research
    can be understood as an intellectual and theoretical activity. Students are required to develop and work on
    their own theoretically-based research projects in consultation with the lecturer.
    Note: Highly recommended for BA(Hons) students majoring in Screen and Media Studies. This paper is
    compulsory for the PGDip.

    SMST502-09B (HAM) Creative Theory (30 points)
    Dr Bevin Yeatman
    This paper concentrates on contemporary approaches to media focusing on new ideas of time and space.
    We will investigate theory as a method to create opportunities to perceive the media and the roles we
    play as both producers and audiences in innovative ways.
    Note: Highly recommended for BA(Hons) students majoring in Screen and Media Studies.

    SMST503-09B (HAM) & 09B (NET) Mobile Mediated World (30 points)
    Lecturer to be advised.
    From ‘smart mobs’ organising themselves for street protests to ‘viral’ marketing organising consumers in
    new ways, the media landscape is changing. Digital nomads roam this landscape, a new creative class of
    mobile entrepreneurs views the world as their creative studio and the old tension between the local and
    the global is being reimagined. This paper will ask what’s happening.

    SMST507-09B (HAM) Scriptwriting (30 points)
    Dr Virginia Pitts
    Through intensive workshop-based teaching, and student-led critical and creative work, this paper further
    develops knowledge of scriptwriting processes and practices taught on the undergraduate scriptwriting
    paper. Students must discuss their initial script idea at the first session, after which teaching and
    assessments are tailored to the requirements of the particular scripts being written by the students.




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                                                          SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                              S



SMST508-09B (HAM) & 09B (NET) Teaching NCEA Media Studies (30 points)
Assoc Prof Geoff Lealand
This course is designed for graduate students contemplating a teaching career or teachers beginning the
media teaching experience in New Zealand schools. It engages with the theory and practice of teaching
NCEA media studies and much of the course can be delivered online.

SMST511-09A (HAM) Images of Aotearoa/New Zealand (30 points)
Dr Lisa Perrott
A workshop-based paper during which students produce a short piece of original work in either the video or
multimedia formats. The work should reflect the experience of being a resident of Aotearoa/New Zealand
and must be situated in relationship to the student’s previous and ongoing studies in both theory and
production. Prospective students will be asked to submit a proposal and, once accepted, will normally be
assigned two supervisors: one in the production area, the other providing guidance on academic matters.

SMST512-09A (HAM) & 09A (NET) Media and Creative Industries (30 points)
Lecturer to be advised.
This paper has been designed for students interested in pursuing a career within a creative industry such
as the arts, media, leisure, film and television. Marketing and Creative Industries provides students with
the opportunity to critically analyse and reflect on the complexities associated with applying marketing
thinking to creative ventures.

SMST518-09B (HAM) Theory and Practice of Digital Cinemas (30 points)
Dr Virginia Pitts
Students will explore the creative and theoretical developments in contemporary digital cinema as
a springboard to the production of their own short digital films, and will analyse their own creative
intentions in oral and written presentation.

SMST550-09B (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)
Dr Ann Hardy

SMST589-09B (HAM) Directed Study in the Psychology of Media (15 points)
Dr Gareth Schott
This paper provides an opportunity for students to develop their understanding of various domains of
psychology and the media through independent research and/or practical application. Central themes of
study might include: the ethics of practicing psychology through the media; developments in the design,
implementation and evaluation of public communication initiatives; how psychology can inform our
understandings of new media technologies; the intersection of psychological and media
and communications research.

SMST590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
Dr Stan Jones
Admission to all papers involving individual programmes and direction will be subject to and at the
discretion of the Chairperson. Research proposal forms may be obtained from the Department Office.



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    SCREEN AND MEDIA STUDIES /
    AKORANGA WHAKAATA PURONGO
    Master’s Only
    SMST592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    SMST593-09C (HAM) Screen and Media Studies Thesis (90 points)

    SMST594-09C (HAM) Screen and Media Studies Thesis (120 points)


    SCREEN AND MEDIA STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF SCREEN AND MEDIA STUDIES
    Department Graduate Adviser: Dr Ann Hardy
    Room: I.4.26
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6352
    Email: yhdra@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/film/




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                                                          SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                         S


SOCIAL POLICY
www.waikato.ac.nz/socialpolicy/

The graduate programme in Social Policy provides students with an understanding of social
policy issues: 1) encourages the development of strong research skills and 2) enhances
students’ abilities in the critical analysis of contemporary policy issues.
Graduates in Social Policy find employment in central, local and regional government agencies,
non-governmental organisations, iwi organisations, and, increasingly, the private sector.


Admission and Programme Requirements
Entry to the BSocSc(Hons) programme in Social Policy is open to students who have majored in Social
Policy in their undergraduate degree and who have gained a B average in SOCP302 and two other 300
level Social Policy papers. Students must include SOCP506, SOCP507, SSRP503 and SSRP504 in their
graduate programme.
Entry to the MSocSc is open to students who have a BSocSc(Hons) in Social Policy (or equivalent) and
have gained a B+ average in their 500 level papers.


Papers Offered in 2009
DEVS504-09A & 09A (NET) Comparative State Policies on Indigenous Development (30 points)
For full details see the School of Māori & Pacific Development.

HDCO501-09A (HAM) Ageing and Society (30 points)
For full details see Human Development.

LBST531-09A (HAM) Advanced Employment Relations 1: The Employment Relations
Framework (15 points)
For full details see Labour Studies.

LBST532-09B (HAM) Advanced Employment Relations 2: Current Policies and Practices (15 points)
For full details see Labour Studies.

LBST541-09A (HAM) Labour, Education and Training 1: Issues and Policies (15 points)
For full details see Labour Studies.




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    SOCIAL POLICY
    PCSS508-09B (HAM) Educational Policy (30 points)
    For full details see Education Studies.

    POLS531-09B (HAM) Issues in Public Policy and Administration (30 points)
    For full details see Political Science.

    POLS537-09A (HAM) Environmental Politics and Public Policy (30 points)
    For full details see Political Science.

    POPS507-09A (HAM) Family Formation and Dissolution (15 points)
    For full details see Demography.

    POPS508-09A (HAM) Population Health and Health Planning (15 points)
    For full details see Demography.

    PSYC510-09Y (HAM) Evaluation Research (30 points)
    For full details see Psychology.

    PSYC516-09B (HAM) Violence in Family and Society (30 points)
    For full details see Psychology.

    SOCP506-09B (HAM) Social Policy: Comparative Approaches (15 points)
    Lecturer to be advised.
    This half paper provides a theoretical grounding and applied dimension to comparative perspectives in
    social policy and welfare, with a focus on families. Students will develop a critical awareness of diversity
    in policy relating to family.

    SOCP507-09A (HAM) Social Policy and Ageing (15 points)
    Dr Jo Barnes
    This half paper explores theoretical perspectives and contemporary social policy responses to the
    phenomena of population ageing with the purpose of fostering the critical analysis of social policy
    provisions in New Zealand and elsewhere.

    SOCP589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

    SOCP590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)

    SOCY514-09B (HAM) Child, Youth and Family (15 points)
    For full details see Sociology.

    SOCY578-09B (HAM) Contemporary Issues in Health and Illness (15 points)
    For full details see Sociology.


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                                                   SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                     S



SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
For full details see Social Science Research.

SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
For full details see Social Science Research.

WGST507-09B (HAM) Gender, Policy and Development (15 points)
For full details see Women’s and Gender Studies.


Master’s Only
SOCP592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

SOCP593-09C (HAM) Social Policy Thesis (90 points)

SOCP594-09C (HAM) Social Policy Thesis (120 points)


SOCIAL POLICY CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIETIES AND CULTURES
Department Graduate Adviser: Dr Ted Ninnes
Room: K.2.25
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6829
Email: leninnes@waikato.ac.nz
Subject Advice: Dr Maxine Campbell
Room: K.2.08B
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6115
Email: maxine@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/socialpolicy/




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    SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH
    www.waikato.ac.nz/socsciresearch/

    Social Science Research offers papers which teach the principles of effective design of
    social science research projects with both quantitative and qualitative approaches, the
    main issues relating to the collection and analysis of information for social research
    purposes, the principles of effective research reporting, and important philosophical,
    theoretical and ethical issues in social science research.
    Social Science Research is available as a subject for the BSocSc(Hons), the MSocSc and through the
    Postgraduate Diploma in Social Science Research (PGDip(SocScRes)). The postgraduate diploma is intended
    both for students seeking an additional qualification before joining the work force and for those already
    employed in work demanding research skills.
    The Honours programme will provide students with important practical research skills as well as a good
    critical and theoretical understanding of society. On completion, students should have a sound foundation
    for the practice of interdisciplinary social science research, whether in the setting of central and local
    government, private enterprise or community groups.


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in a BSocSc(Hons) in Social Science Research, a student
    should normally have at least a B average in all of their undergraduate Social Science Research papers. They
    should also have a significant research methods component (normally at least 40 points) in that degree.
    To complete a BSocSc(Hons) in Social Science Research, students must take 120 points at 500 level,
    including SSRP503 and SSRP504, SSRP589 or SSRP590, two of ANTH515, ECON544 or POPS509, at least
    15 points from the other papers listed below, and up to 30 points selected from a graduate programme of
    another BSocSc(Hons) subject.
    To complete a PGDip(SocScRes), students must take SSRP591, a further 60 points chosen from ANTH515,
    POPS509, SSRP503, SSRP504 and SSRP505, and up to 30 further points from approved 500 level papers.
    Enrolment for the Postgraduate Diploma must be for a minimum of one year, but may be spread over
    a longer period on a part-time basis. Further enquiries should be referred to the Convenor of the Social
    Science Research Programme.
    Entry to the MSocSc is open to candidates who have completed a BSocSc(Hons) core papers in Social
    Science Research.
    To complete a MSocSc in Social Science Research, students must take either a 120 point thesis,
    a 90 point thesis and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and
    60 points from approved 500 level papers.




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                                                           SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                               S



Papers Offered in 2009
Core Papers
ANTH515-09A (HAM) Ethnographic Research (15 points)
For full details see Anthropology.

POPS509-09B (HAM) Quantitative Analysis in the Social Sciences (15 points)
For full details see Demography.

SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
Dr John Paterson
This half paper provides an advanced investigation of the conduct of qualitative interviewing culminating
in students undertaking their own tape-recorded in-depth interviews.

SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
Dr Jo Barnes
This half paper provides an advanced investigation of the conduct of survey research, from design and data
collection through to analysis and reporting.

SSRP505-09A (HAM) Issues in Social Science Research (15 points)
Dr Jo Barnes
This half paper takes a critical and reflective stance of the conduct of social science research. As well as
covering a range of significant issues, the paper is intended to provide a forum for students to explore
issues of particular interest.

SSRP591-09C (HAM) Dissertation (30 points)
Co-ordinator: Dr John Paterson
This is a report on an original social research investigation conducted within a methodological, theoretical
and/or policy framework.
Note: The one-paper dissertation is available only for those students enrolled in the PGDip.

Optional Papers
ANTH509-09B (HAM) Ethnographic Writing (15 points)
For full details see Anthropology.

APPL501-09B (HAM) Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (30 points)
For full details see Applied Linguistics.

CHIN503-09A (HAM) Advanced Research into Modern and Contemporary Chinese Society (30 points)
For full details see Chinese.



                                                                                                              135
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    SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH
    DSOE557-09A (HAM), 09B (NET) & 09C (HAM) Educational Research Methods (30 points)
    For full details see Education Studies.

    ECON544-09A (HAM) Research Methods in Economics and Finance (15 points)
    For full details see Economics.

    ENGL556-09B (HAM) Write/Edit/Text (30 points)
    For full details see English.

    GEOG517-09Y (HAM) Advanced Geographic Information Systems (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG521-09B (HAM) Advanced Tourism Research (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    HIST501-09B (HAM) Oral History (15 points)
    For full details see History.

    LBST542-09B (HAM) Labour, Education and Training 2: Applied Research Project (15 points)
    For full details see Labour Studies.

    PCSS502-09B (HAM) Kaupapa Māori Research (30 points)
    For full details see Education Studies.

    PSYC510-09Y (HAM) Evaluation Research (30 points)
    For full details see Psychology.

    PSYC539-09A (HAM) Graduate Research Methods in Psychology (15 points)
    For full details see Psychology.

    SMST501-09A (HAM) & 09A (NET) Researching the Media (30 points)
    For full details see Screen and Media Studies.

    SPLS501-09A (NET) Researching Sport and Leisure (30 points)
    For full details see the School of Education.

    SSRP589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

    STER541-09A (HAM), 09B (NET) & 09C (HAM) Research Methods in Science, Mathematics
    and Technology Education (30 points)
    For full details see the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences.



136                     FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                      SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES            S



TIKA509-09A (HAM) Te Mahi Rangahau: Māori and Pasifika Research Methods (30 points)
For full details see Tikanga Māori.

TOMG506-09A (HAM) Research Methods in Tourism and Hospitality (30 points)
For full details see the Waikato Management School.


Master’s Only
SSRP592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

SSRP593-09C (HAM) Social Science Research Thesis (90 points)

SSRP594-09C (HAM) Social Science Research Thesis (120 points)


SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIETIES AND CULTURES
Department Graduate Adviser: Dr Ted Ninnes
Room: K.2.25
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6829
Email: leninnes@waikato.ac.nz
Subject Advice: Dr John Paterson
Room: K.2.09
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8433
Email: johnp@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/socsciresearch/




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    SOCIOLOGY
    www.waikato.ac.nz/sociology/

    The Sociology Programme offers core graduate papers in social theory and methodology,
    as well as in substantive areas of sociology such as the family, social policy, social justice,
    sociology of production and consumption and media, culture and society. Our staff provide
    teaching and supervision of the highest standard over a wide area of topics. Graduate
    students are encouraged to pursue their own research interests within the course structure.
    The strong graduate culture in the Sociology Programme continues to produce successful
    professional sociologists.


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in a BSocSc(Hons) in Sociology, a student should normally
    have majored in Sociology in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B average in either the best
    three of their 300 level Sociology papers or all of their undergraduate Sociology papers. Students must
    also have successfully completed the core papers of the undergraduate Sociology major.
    To complete a BSocSc(Hons) in Sociology, students must complete SOCY501, SSRP503 and either
    POPS509 or SSRP504.
    Entry to the MSocSc is open to suitably qualified candidates who have completed a BSocSc(Hons) in
    Sociology, including the core papers for Sociology, and have at least a B+ average in their 500 level papers.
    To complete a MSocSc in Sociology, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis and
    30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved
    500 level papers.


    Papers Offered in 2009
    POPS509-09B (HAM) Quantitative Analysis in the Social Sciences (15 points)
    For full details see Demography.

    SOCP506-09B (HAM) Social Policy: Comparative Approaches (15 points)
    For full details see Social Policy.

    SOCP507-09A (HAM) Social Policy and Ageing (15 points)
    For full details see Social Policy.

    SOCY501-09Y (HAM) Praxis (30 points)
    Dr Ted Ninnes
    This paper aims to provide students with a thorough grounding in theories of praxis.




138                     FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009
                                                           SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                             S



SOCY514-09B (HAM) Child, Youth and Family (15 points)
Dr Maxine Campbell
This paper aims to provide students with a theoretical grounded understanding of the conditions of
childhood, youth and parenthood in the developed world, with an emphasis on the Australasian context.
Students completing the paper will develop skills in relating the legal and political status of children
and youth to the wider social background, along with critical understanding of the ramifications of the
prevailing conditions of childhood for the parenting task.

SOCY576-09B (HAM) Sociology of Consumption (15 points)
Dr Paul Harris
Consumption is an important issue for contemporary sociology. The paper examines a range of theoretical
and practical issues and debates concerning consumption and its historical development. Students are
encouraged to engage with the course content in a critical fashion.
Objectives:
» To introduce students to contemporary debates on consumption and its social implications and effects.
» To provide a critical analysis of a range of issues relating to consumption.
» To relate consumption issues to wider theoretical debates, e.g. on modernity and postmodernity.

SOCY577-09B (HAM) Sociology of Production (15 points)
Dr David Neilson
The purpose of this half paper is to introduce students to new production processes. Students will develop
creative, deeply critical analytical skills informed by relevant sociological theory and research.

SOCY578-09B (HAM) Contemporary Issues in Health and Illness (15 points)
Dr Ted Ninnes
This half paper critically engages with contemporary issues in the sociology of health and illness.
It builds on the third year undergraduate paper SOCY304.

SOCY589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

SOCY590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)

SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
For full details see Social Science Research.

SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
For full details see Social Science Research.




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    SOCIOLOGY
    WGST505-09B (HAM) New Natures: Gender, Culture and New Technologies (15 points)
    For full details see Women’s and Gender Studies.

    WGST507-09B (HAM) Gender, Policy and Development
    For full details see Women’s and Gender Studies.


    Master’s Only
    SOCY592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)
    SOCY593-09C (HAM) Sociology Thesis (90 points)
    SOCY594-09C (HAM) Sociology Thesis (120 points)


    SOCIOLOGY CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF SOCIETIES AND CULTURES
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Ted Ninnes
    Room: K.2.25
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6829
    Email: leninnes@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/sociology/




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SPANISH
www.waikato.ac.nz/spanish/

Students may count the equivalent of up to two 500 level papers in Spanish towards
a BA(Hons) in another subject.
Staff research interests include:
» 20th Century Latin American literature;
» Golden Age literature;
» Hispanic linguistics;
» Translation;
» Contemporary Spanish literature;
» Language pedagogy


Papers Offered in 2009
SPAN502-09A (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)
SPAN590-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)


SPANISH CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES
Graduate Adviser: Dr Jay Corwin
Room: I.3.03
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6168
Email: jcorwin@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/spanish/




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    THEATRE STUDIES
    www.waikato.ac.nz/theatrestudies/

    For students who have successfully completed an undergraduate degree with a major in
    Theatre Studies (or an equivalent study approved by the Convenor of the Theatre Studies
    Programme), it is possible to undertake an academic graduate programme of study in
    this discipline. This includes studying for an Honours degree as well as for a Master of Arts
    in Theatre Studies.
    The graduate programme focuses on the theoretical study of theatre in performance. There are also
    practical studies that are designed to complement and inform the theory-analysis core of each of the
    taught papers, especially at Honours level.
    The design and content of the graduate programme closely reflects the Theatre Studies staff research
    interests. These include:
    » Theatre Anthropology
    » Laboratory Theatre
    » Mask performance
    » Solo Performance
    » Contemporary Performance Theory
    » Performance-as-Research
    » Theatre Directing
    » Contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand Theatre
    » Australian Theatre
    » Food and Performance
    » Reminiscence/Theatre Memory
    » Theatre Screen
    » Noh Theatre
    » Western Avant-garde


    Admission and Programme Requirements
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BA(Hons) in Theatre Studies, a student should
    normally have majored in Theatre Studies in their undergraduate degree and have at least a B average in
    their best three 300 level Theatre Studies papers.
    A BA(Hons) student will be required to complete a minimum of 90 points from those papers listed
    with the THST (Theatre Studies) code.
    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the MA in Theatre Studies, a student should have
    completed the requirements for a BA(Hons) in Theatre Studies (or equivalent) and have at least
    a B+ average in their 500 level papers.
    To complete a MA in Theatre Studies, students must take either a 120 point thesis, or a 90 point thesis
    and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved
    500 level papers.


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Papers Offered in 2009
THST544-09Y (HAM) Directing for Theatre (60 points)

THST545-09A (HAM) Theatre Anthropology: The Art of the Performer (30 points)

THST546-09B (HAM) Laboratory Theatre (30 points)

THST560-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Special Topic (30 points)

THST590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)


Master’s Only
THST592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

THST593-09C (HAM) Theatre Studies Thesis (90 points)

THST594-09C (HAM) Theatre Studies Thesis (120 points)


Facilities
Academy of Performing Arts / Te Whare Tapere
The WEL Energy Trust Academy of Performing Arts is situated besides the lakes on campus and contains
two main performance venues: a Concert Chamber for 350 people, and the Telecom Playhouse Theatre
for 170. It also contains a Dance Studio and a specialist Māori and Pacific Island Performing Arts space,
Te Whare Tapere Iti. There is also an outdoor, circular stage, over the surface of the lake which opens across
seating bleachers.
The Playhouse is an important development for the Theatre Studies programme. Together with the
New Place Theatre / Te Tapere Hou, it is the Programme’s base for academic research which is related
to performance studies. This is a specially designed, flexible venue that can be used in a variety of
configurations, e.g. in-the-round, end-on, or traverse. It is fully equipped with lighting gantries, a
demountable seating and rostra system, floor traps, and a full-size basement for storage and workshop
space. A full complement of state-of-the-art digital lighting and sound systems enhances its design
features. The Playhouse is also used for student productions, and technical and scene studies, and also
presents work from community groups and visiting professional companies and artists.




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    THEATRE STUDIES
    New Place Theatre / Te Tapere Hou
    Practical papers are taught in both the Playhouse Theatre and in the Theatre Studies’ Theatre Laboratory
    space, The New Place Theatre / Te Tapere Hou, situated apart from the Academy complex. This is a large,
    flat-floor laboratory space (13.5m x 15m). A flexible seating system for up to 100 people can be quickly
    and easily installed and arranged in a variety of ways to provide maximum flexibility for any style of
    production. A well-equipped lighting and sound system provides an excellent technical complement
    for teaching, performance, experimentation and academic research. Technical assistance is provided by
    a Theatre Manager/Technician.


    THEATRE STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES
    Graduate Adviser and Programme Convenor: Dr William Farrimond
    Room: I.3.10A
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 ext. 6130
    Email: williamf@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/theatrestudies/




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TIKANGA M ORI / M ORI CULTURAL STUDIES
www.waikato.ac.nz/smpd/

The graduate programme in Tikanga Māori offers students the opportunity to further their
studies in Māori culture.


Admission and Programme Requirements
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the BSocSc(Hons) in Tikanga Māori, a student should
normally have majored in Tikanga Māori in their undergraduate degree, and must have gained a B average
in their 300 level Tikanga Māori papers.
To be eligible to be considered for the MSocSc in Tikanga Māori, a student should have completed a
BSocSc(Hons) in Tikanga Māori (or equivalent) and have at least a B+ average in their 500 level papers.
To complete a MSocSc in Tikanga Māori, students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis
and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved
500 level papers.
Students may not include more than two of DEVS501, DEVS502, DEVS503, DEVS504 or DEVS505
in their programme of study.


Papers Offered in 2009
For information on graduate papers in Tikanga Māori, including details of assessment and required books,
please contact Krista Henare.
DEVS501-09B (NET) Strategic Planning for Iwi and Hapū Development (30 points)

DEVS502-09A (NET) Sustainable Resource Issues (30 points)

DEVS504-09A (NET) Comparative State Policies on Indigenous Development (30 points)

DEVS505-09B (NET) Governance and Nation Building (30 points)

MAOR506-09C (HAM) & 09D (HAM) Kaupapa Motuhake (30 points)

TIKA501-09A (HAM) Tikanga: An Avenue of Resistance and Resilience – Tū Rangatira,
Tū Kaha (30 points)

TIKA502-09B (HAM) Ngā Here Māori ki te Taiao (30 points)




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    TIKANGA M ORI / M ORI CULTURAL STUDIES
    TIKA503-09B (HAM) Culture, Gender and Sexuality: Mana Wahine, Mana Tāne,
    Mana Tangata (30 points)

    TIKA504-09B (HAM) Ngā Tikanga o te Marae (30 points)

    TIKA520-09A (HAM) Ngā Waiata me ngā Haka (30 points)

    TIKA590-09C (HAM) & 09D (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)


    Master’s Only
    TIKA591-09C (HAM) Dissertation (30 points)

    TIKA592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

    TIKA593-09C (HAM) Tikanga Māori Thesis (90 points)

    TIKA594-09C (HAM) Tikanga Māori Thesis (120 points)


    TIKANGA MĀORI CONTACT INFORMATION
    SCHOOL OF MĀORI AND PACIFIC DEVELOPMENT
    Graduate Convenor (School of Māori and Pacific Development): Rapata Wiri
    Room: A.1.23
    Tel: +64 7 838 4426
    Email: krista@waikato.ac.nz
    www.smpd.waikato.ac.nz




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TOURISM DEVELOPMENT
www.waikato.ac.nz/tourdev/

Tourism Development is available as a subject for the Honours programme in the
Bachelor of Tourism (BTour(Hons)).
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in graduate Tourism Development papers, students should
normally have majored in Tourism Development in their undergraduate degree and must have at least
a B grade average in their best three 300 level Tourism Development papers.
Candidates for the BTour(Hons) in Tourism Development must gain 120 points at 500 level or
above, comprising the compulsory paper GEOG521, 30 points in either Anthropology or Geography/
Environmental Planning and 60 further points from the papers listed for the qualification.

Papers Offered in 2009
ANTH513-09B (HAM) Culture as Property (15 points)
For full details see Anthropology.

ANTH514-09A (HAM) Ethnic and Indigenous Minorities (15 points)
For full details see Anthropology.

ANTH515-09A (HAM) Ethnographic Research (15 points)
For full details see Anthropology.

ANTH560-09A (HAM) Special Topic (15 points)
For full details see Anthropology.

ANTH589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)
For full details see Anthropology.

ANTH590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM), 09S (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
For full details see Anthropology.

DEVS504-09A (NET) Comparative State Policies on Indigenous Development (30 points)
For full details see the School of Māori and Pacific Development

ENVP504-09B (HAM) Planning Policies and Processes (15 points)
For full details see Environmental Planning.

ENVP505-09B (HAM) Māori Planning and Resource Management (15 points)
For full details see Environmental Planning.

GEOG505-09A (HAM) Environmental Planning Theory (30 points)
For full details see Geography.




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    TOURISM DEVELOPMENT
    GEOG507-09B (HAM) International Migration Issues (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG515-09B (HAM) Māori Geography (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG516-09B (HAM) Advanced Development Studies (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG521-09B (HAM) Advanced Tourism Research (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    GEOG590-09A (HAM) & 09B (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    SPLS503-09B (NET) Leisure, Adventure and the Outdoors (30 points)
    For full details see the School of Education.

    SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.

    SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.

    TOMG501-09A (HAM) International Tourism and Hospitality Marketing (30 points)
    For full details see the Waikato Management School.

    TOMG502-09B (HAM) Tourism Development and the Environment (30 points)
    For full details see Waikato Management School.

    TOMG504-09A (HAM) Special Interest Tourism (30 points)
    For full details see Waikato Management School.


    TOURISM DEVELOPMENT CONTACT INFORMATION
    DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY, TOURISM AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
    Graduate Adviser: Dr Colin McLeay
    Room: I.2.10
    Tel: +64 7 838 4466 ext.
    Email: geog1294@waikato.ac.nz
    www.waikato.ac.nz/tourdev/



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WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES
www.waikato.ac.nz/womensandgender/

At the University of Waikato, Women’s and Gender Studies specialises in the areas of
theory, policy and analysis, gender and development, and the gendered implications of
new technologies. Our taught papers address interesting and socially relevant topics, and
are designed to help prepare students for employment in public sector agencies, policy
units, non-government organisations and human service organisations in New Zealand or
overseas. We also offer eligible students the opportunity to undertake supervised research
projects by enrolling in a directed study, dissertation, MSocSc or PhD thesis.


Admission and Programme Requirements
To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in a BSocSc(Hons) in Women’s and Gender Studies, a student
should normally have majored in Women’s and Gender Studies in their undergraduate degree and have at
least a B average in either the best three of their 300 level Women’s and Gender Studies papers or all of
their undergraduate Women’s and Gender Studies papers. Students must also have successfully completed
the core Women’s and Gender Studies papers at undergraduate level.
To complete the BSocSc(Hons) in Women’s and Gender Studies, students must complete 120 points at
500 level, including the compulsory papers SSRP503, WGST505, WGST506 and WGST507.
Entry to the MSocSc is open to students who have completed the BSocSc(Hons) (or equivalent) in
Women’s and Gender Studies and gained at least a B+ average.
To complete the MSocSc in Women’s and Gender Studies, students must complete a 120 thesis,
a 90 point thesis and 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and 60 points
from approved 500 level papers.
The Graduate Certificate (GradCert(WomGenSt)) and Graduate Diploma (GradDip(WomGenSt)) are
available for graduates who have not included the subject at an advanced level in their undergraduate
degree. Each programme of study must include WGST209, WGST211, WGST301 and WGST302.




                                                                                                           149
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    WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES
    Papers Offered in 2009
    GEOG519-09A (HAM) Crossing Boundaries (30 points)
    For full details see Geography.

    HRMG574-09C (HAM) Women and Organisations (30 points)
    For full details see the Waikato Management School.

    LBST543-09B (HAM) Learning, Fashion, Women and Work (15 points)
    For full details see Labour Studies.

    SSRP503-09B (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Qualitative Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.

    SSRP504-09A (HAM) The Conduct of Social Science Research: Survey Research (15 points)
    For full details see Social Science Research.

    TIKA503-09B (HAM) Culture, Gender and Sexuality: Mana Wahine, Mana Tāne,
    Mana Tangata (30 points)
    For full details see Tikanga Māori / Māori Cultural Studies.

    WGST505-09B (HAM) New Natures: Gender, Culture and New Technologies(15 points)
    Dr Carolyn Michelle
    This half paper explores emerging biological, medical, reproductive, media and digital technologies
    in terms of how they reproduce, challenge and potentially transform normative categories of nature,
    gender, sexuality and the body.

    WGST506-09A (HAM) Theorising Gender (15 points)
    Dr Rachel Simon-Kumar
    This paper extends and enhances students’ engagement with current theoretical debates in
    contemporary feminist theory, with a focus on the linguistic, social, cultural and political construction
    of gendered subjectivities.




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                                                         SUBJECTS & PROGRAMMES                               W



WGST507-09B (HAM) Gender, Policy and Development (15 points)
Dr Rachel Simon-Kumar
Students undertaking this paper will acquire understandings of, and critical reflections on, policy and
practice relevant to gender and development, and will simultaneously enhance their skills in research
and gender analysis. They will engage with key debates in the emerging field of Gender and Development
Studies, and explore strategies for, and constraints on, the implementation of gender-sensitive approaches
to development policy. The paper also examines the roles of various agents in the development process,
including individual women and men, women’s groups, NGOs, government organisations, and international
development organisations.

WGST589-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09S (HAM) Directed Study (15 points)

WGST590-09A (HAM), 09B (HAM) & 09Y (HAM) Directed Study (30 points)


Master’s Only
WGST592-09C (HAM) Dissertation (60 points)

WGST593-09C (HAM) Women’s and Gender Studies Thesis (90 points)

WGST594-09C (HAM) Women’s and Gender Studies Thesis (120 points)


WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIETIES AND CULTURES
Graduate Adviser: Dr Judith Macdonald
Room: I.2.02A
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 8282
Email: jmac@waikato.ac.nz
Subject Advice: Dr Carolyn Michelle
Room: K.2.05C
Tel: +64 7 838 4466 Ext: 6828
Email: caro@waikato.ac.nz
www.waikato.ac.nz/womensandgender/




                                                                                                        151
 ACADEMIC STAFF RESEARCH INTERESTS
 General and Applied                                     Julie Barbour
                                                         BA Waikato, MA (Linguistics) (Hons) Auckland,
 Linguistics                                             CTEFLA RSA/Cambridge
 Professor Ray Harlow – Chairperson                      Research interest: Documentary linguistics; current
 MA(Hons) Otago, DPhil Zurich                            PhD research on the Neverver language which is
 Research Interests: Polynesian linguistics,             spoken on the island of Malakula, Vanuatu.
 especially the description, dialectology, historical    Lucy Campbell
 relationships of Māori Language planning and            BA(Hons), PGDipSLT, MA(Applied) Waikato,
 maintenance, especially with respect to the             CELTA RSA/Cambridge
 status of Māori.                                        Research Interests: Writing, academic literacy
 Dr Roger Barnard                                        and curriculum design for Non-English Speaking
 BEd Sussex, MA (Linguistics) Surrey,                    background students in tertiary education.
 MA (Education) London, PhD Southampton,                 Ms Anthea Fester
 DipTEFLA RSA/Cambridge                                  BA South Africa, PGDipSLT, MA(Applied) Waikato,
 Research Interests: Conceptual, linguistics and         DipEd, HDipEd Cape Town, CELTA RSA/Cambridge
 cultural challenges faced by second language            Research Interests: Teacher development,
 learners and their teachers and the design              materials design and academic writing. She is
 implementation and evaluation of appropriate            currently enrolled in a PhD looking at aspects of
 policies and practices to meet their needs and
                                                         discourse-based curriculum design.
 those of the institutions concerned; classroom
 interaction and associated teacher beliefs
 and attitudes.                                          Geography, Tourism and
 Dr Diane Johnson                                        Environmental Planning
 MA(Hons), PhD Waikato, DMEAV Nice,
 DipT Auckland, CTEFLA RSA/Cambridge                     Associate Professor Lynda Johnston
 Research Interests: Language teacher training,          – Chairperson
 language teaching materials development,                BA Otago, MSocSc, PhD Waikato
 language curriculum and syllabus design, language       Research Interests: Feminist, social and cultural
 and discourse analysis.                                 geography, and critical tourism studies.

 Dr Ian Bruce                                            Elaine Bliss MA Wisconsin
 BA Canterbury, MA(Applied) Waikato, PhD Waikato,        Research Interests: Social geography and
 DipSLT Massey, DipT Christchurch, KDS Munich,           gender/development.
 CTEFLA RSA/Cambridge
                                                         Dr Lars Brabyn BSc(Hons), BA(Hons), PhD Canterbury
 Research Interests: Discourse analysis and genre
                                                         Research Interests: Developing innovative
 studies with a view to helping to inform language
                                                         applications of Geographical Information
 curriculum development; the teaching of academic
                                                         Systems for a range of environmental and
 writing to students for whom English is an
                                                         social topics. These GIS applications include
 additional language.
                                                         landscape classification, biogeography, and
 Dr James McLellan BA, PGCE Cantab,                      population accessibility to services. Current
 MA (Applied Linguistics & ELT) York, PhD Curtin         research includes applications for Antarctica’s
 Research Interests: Language alternation (code          unique terrestrial ecosystems, mapping aquatic
 switching) of Malay and English, contrastive            habitats, use of remote sensing for habitat
 discourse analysis, minority language revitalisation.   identification in lakes.


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                                      ACADEMI C STA F F R E S E A R C H I N T E R E S T S




Associate Professor John R. Campbell                  Diana Porteous BSocSc, MSocSc Waikato
BA, MA Canterbury, PhD Hawaii                         Research Interests: Urban change, architectural
Research Interests: Natural Hazards, global           geography, tourism and resource management.
environmental change, Pacific Islands.
                                                      Dr Alister Scott BA(Hons), PhD Wales, Aberystwyth
Associate Professor A.I. (Lex) Chalmers               Research Interests: Planning of natural heritage,
BA, MA Auckland, PhD Bristol                          sustainable rural development, public perception.
Research Interests: Geographical education,
rural studies, remote sensing, GIS, the Rural         Pippa Wallace LLB Auckland, LLM(Hons) Waikato
Transformation Project.                               Research Interests: Environmental law, resource
                                                      management law, how the law relates to the
Dr Anne-Marie d’Hauteserre PhD Paris                  environment in general.
Research Interests: Impacts following the creation
of tourism destinations; sustainable development
of tourism destinations; social issues of tourism     History
development in the French Pacific; analysing
the geographic context within which tourism           Professor Giselle Byrnes – Chairperson
destinations are developed.                           BA, MA Waikato, PhD Auckland
                                                      Research Interests: Public history; history and
Dr Mairi Jay
                                                      heritage; history, theory and methodology;
BA Manitoba, MA (Anthropology) British Columbia,
                                                      Maori and iwi histories; the Treaty of Waitangi;
MA (Regional Planning and Resource Development)
Waterloo, PhD Waikato, MNZPI, MRSNZ                   histories of science, exploration and travel;
Research Interests: Planning Theory and practice;     histories of landscape; colonial ethnographies;
environmental planning; implications of climate       and New Zealand intellectual history.
change, conservation planning; rural geography;       Dr James Beattie BA(Hons), PhD Otago
urban sustainability and Agenda 21.                   Research Interests: Environmental history and the
Dr Russell Kirkpatrick MA(Hons), PhD Canterbury       history of science, trans-national and cross-cultural
Research Interests: Geographical theory and           exchanges of scientific, health and environmental
research methods, cultural geography, with special    ideas, particularly between Asia and elsewhere,
focus on social cartography.                          colonial landscape representations in art

Professor Robyn Longhurst                             Dr Catharine Coleborne
BSocSc, MSocSc, PhD Waikato                           BA(Hons), MA Melbourne, PhD La Trobe
Research Interests: Feminist, queer and               Research Interests: Social and cultural histories
poststructuralist theory, sex and gender studies      of medicine, including medicine and the museum,
including masculinity studies, qualitative            with special attention to psychiatry and gender
methodologies, the production of bodies and           history; law and history, Australian feminist history,
spaces, processes of social exclusion on the          legal history and the history of ‘madness’.
grounds of ‘difference’ from an unmarked
norm, and ‘culture’ (ie. cultures of workplaces,      Nēpia Mahuika
shopping mall culture, cultural landscapes in         BTchg/BA(Hons), MA Waikato
Aotearoa/New Zealand etc.).                           Research Interests: Oral History, Iwi/Māori History,
                                                      historical theory and methodologies.
Colin McLeay MSocSc Waikato
Research Interests: Culture and place, cultural       Dr Rosalind McClean
production, interface of economic and cultural        BA(Hons) Otago, PhD Edinburgh
processes, globalisation, music and geography,        Research Interests: Gender, religion and migration
urban governance.                                     in nineteenth-century Scotland and New Zealand.


                                                                                                          153
 ACADEMIC STAFF RESEARCH INTERESTS
 Dr Raymond Richards                                   English
 BA(Hons), DipT Waikato, MA Maryland, PhD California
 Research Interests: History of the United States,     Dr Sarah Shieff – Convenor of English,
 Comparative studies – USA and NZ, Mormonism.          New Zealand Studies MA, PhD Auckland
                                                       Research Interests: New Zealand literature and
 Dr Douglas Simes MA Canterbury, DPhil Oxford          cultural history, literary theory, writing by women,
 Research Interests: Nineteenth century British        contemporary Jewish writing and Gothic fiction.
 political history.
                                                       Professor Alexandra Barratt
 Dr Rowland Weston                                     MA Cambridge, MA Carleton, PhD Toronto
 BA(Hons), PhD James Cook, PGCert TT Waikato           Research Interests: Textual studies, with particular
 Research Interests: History of ideas and              reference to the editing of Middle English prose
 especially those of the ‘Long Eighteenth Century’,    texts; translation in theory and practice.
 Historiophoty – the filmic representation of
 historical phenomena.                                 Dr Mark Houlahan MA Auckland, PhD Toronto
                                                       Research Interests: Apocalypse, Shakespeare,
                                                       Renaissance drama, Milton, English Civil War print
 Humanities                                            culture, New Zealand print culture.

 Theatre Studies                                       Associate Professor Anne McKim
                                                       MA Dundee, MA Manitoba, PhD Edinburgh
 Dr William Farrimond – Chairperson and                Research Interests: Medieval Studies and
 Convenor of Theatre Studies                           Eighteenth-Century Literature.
 CertEd Oxford, Magisterkonferens/PhD Copenhagen
 Research Interests: Mask performance,                 Associate Professor Jan Pilditch
 theatre anthropology, the solo performer,             – Convenor of American Studies
 performance-as-research.                              BA Massey, MA, DPhil Waikato,
                                                       ALCM London College of Music
 John Davies MA Charles Sturt                          Research Interests: American literature, including
 Research Interests: Performance-as-research,          early American literature and nineteenth and early
 Theatre Aotearoa/New Zealand, Noh Theatre,            twentieth-century literature written by women.
 western avant-garde.
                                                       Dr Kirstine Moffat
 Ms Gaye Poole                                         BA, MA Waikato, PhD Wellington
 BA(Hons), MA(Hons) New South Wales,                   Research Interests: New Zealand social history
 PGCertTT Waikato                                      and culture as understood from New Zealand
 Research Interests: Australian Theatre; Food and      settlement and provincial writing, nineteenth
 Performance; Adaptations; Theatre/Screen; Film        and early twentieth century feminist writing, in
 Music; Reminiscence Theatre; Documentary Theatre.     particular the motif of music and what it conveys
                                                       about femininity.
 Chinese                                               Associate Professor Norman Simms
 Dr Maria Galikowski – Convenor of Chinese             BA Alfred, MA, PhD Washington
 BA(Hons), PhD Leeds                                   Research Interests: Middle English and Eighteenth-
 Research Interests: Social and cultural               Century literature, especially origins of the novel,
 developments in modern and contemporary China.        history of mentalities, and Jewish civilization
 Dr Xiaoning Wang
 BA Shanghai, MA, PhD Waikato
 Research Interests: Chinese language teaching and
 modern Chinese literature


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                                         ACADEMI C STA F F R E S E A R C H I N T E R E S T S




French                                                      Katherine Austin MMus Auckland
                                                            Research interest: Performance (piano).
Dr William Jennings – Convenor of French
BSc, MA, PhD Auckland                                       Dr William Dart MMus(Hons), PhD Auckland, MNZM
Research Interests: Focused most particularly in            Research Interests: New Zealand music,
literature and history, e.g. Creole Studies, French         music criticism.
colonial society, and writers such as Andre Gide
(1869-1951), and Amelie Nothomb.                            David Griffiths MMus Auckland
                                                            Research Interests: Performance (voice),
Dr Nathalie Philippe PhD Sorbonne                           acoustic composition.
Research Interests: Translation methodology;
curating of history exhibitions; New Zealanders             Dr Rachael Griffiths-Hughes
in France during World War One; Scottish                    MMus(Hons) Auckland, DMA New York State
immigration to New Zealand during 19th Century;             Research Interests: Conducting, harpsichord,
diaries and diarists.                                       organ performance.
                                                            Dr Lara Hall
German
                                                            DMA, MM Michigan, FTCL LRSM LMusA(Dist)
Dr Norman P. Franke – Convenor of German                    [Violin] AMusA ATCL [Piano]
MA Hamburg, Dr Phil Humboldt Berlin                         Research Interests: Performance (violin, viola).
Research Interests: German Romanticism,
the Enlightenment, Exile Literature, German                 Martin Lodge MMus Wellington, MA Waikato
as a Second Language, Culture Studies.                      Research Interests: Acoustic composition,
                                                            New Zealand music, music aesthetics.
Beate Jones Staatsexamen Munchen, MA Waikato
Research Interests: German Language, German as              James Tennant
a Foreign Language (DaF).                                   Research Interests: Performance (cello).

Japanese                                                    Associate Professor Ian Whalley
                                                            MSocSc Waikato, BA, BMus Wellington,
Dr Ken McNeil BSc Auckland, MSc, DPhil Waikato              APMT New South Wales, AIRMT NZ
Research Interests: Oceania-Japan links.                    Research Interests: Electroacoustic music
Fumiko Nishimura MA Hiroshima University                    composition, computer music, new technology.
Research Interests: Japanese socio-linguistics.

Spanish                                                     Philosophy and
Dr Jay Corwin – Convenor of Spanish                         Religious Studies
BA New York City, MA Hawaii, PhD Florida State
                                                            Associate Professor Douglas Pratt
Research Interests: Afro-Caribbean Orientated
                                                            – Chairperson and Director of Religious Studies
Literatures, 20th Century Latin American Literature,
                                                            BA Auckland and Waikato, MA Auckland, BD Otago,
Indigenous Latin American Literature, Golden Age
                                                            LTh(Hons) NZ, PhD St Andrews
Literature and Hispanic Linguistics.
                                                            Research Interests: Christian thought, Islam and
                                                            Christian-Muslim relations, religion and philosophy,
Music                                                       and inter-religious dialogue.

Michael Williams – Chairperson                              Margaret Coldham-Fussell
DipMus Melbourne, DipT, BA(Hons),                           BSocSc, DipRelStud, MA Waikato
MMus(Hons) Waikato                                          Research Interests: Eastern religions, ancient
Research Interests: Acoustic, acoustic/digital crossover.   mythologies, contemporary spiritual trends.


                                                                                                               155
 ACADEMIC STAFF RESEARCH INTERESTS
 Dr Tracy Bowell – Convenor of Philosophy              Dr Patrick Barrett BSW(Hons), PhD Massey
 BA(Hons) Sussex, MPhil Cambridge, PhD Auckland        Research Interests: Public and social policy,
 Research Interests: Philosophy of mind and            comparative policy studies, ageing and public
 language, feminist philosophy and ethics.             policy, employment policy.
 Associate Professor Alastair Gunn                     Professor Dov Bing
 BA(Hons) Sussex, DPhil Waikato                        BSocSc Jerusalem, MA, PhD Auckland
 Research interest: Applied ethics, particularly       Research Interests: New Zealand’s diplomatic,
 environmental ethics and the ethics of business,      trade and strategic relations with Asian countries;
 engineering and health care.                          political dimensions of race and ethnic relations
                                                       in New Zealand, New Zealand’s relations with
 Dr Justine Kingsbury                                  the EEC, Sino-Soviet and Sino-Japanese relations,
 BA(Hons), MA Wellington, PhD Rutgers                  strategic issues in the Middle East, public policy,
 Research Interests: Philosophy of mind, philosophy    tertiary education policy, high tech policy,
 of biology, aesthetics, informal logic.               Holocaust denial, the extreme right.
 Dr Catherine Legg                                     Associate Professor Priya Kurian
 BA(Hons) Melbourne, MA Monash,                        BA Madras, MA, PhD Purdue
 PhD Australia National                                Research Interests: Environmental policy and
 Research Interests: Philosophy of language,           politics, sustainability/sustainable development,
 metaphysics, epistemology, American philosophy,       gender and development/women, culture and
 logic, formal ontology, artificial intelligence,       development, race, gender and postcolonialism,
 philosophy of science, Wittgenstein.                  science and technology studies,
 Dr David Lumsden                                      public policy/policy analysis.
 BA(Hons) London, MA, PhD Princeton                    Dr Colm McKeogh
 Research Interests: Philosophy of language,           BA (Mod) Trinity College, MSc Wales, Aberystwyth,
 philosophy of mind, cognitive science.                PhD Trinity College
 Dr Liezl van Zyl BA(Hons,) MA, DPhil Stellenbosch     Research Interests: Moral, philosophic and
 Research Interests: Ethical theory, applied ethics,   religious attitudes to political violence,
 political philosophy and aesthetics.                  ‘Just war’ thought and pacifism.

 Dr Ruth Walker                                        Dr Mark Rolls MA Lancaster, PhD Hull
 BSocSc, MSocSc Waikato, PhD Auckland                  Research Interests: Indonesian politics and
 Research Interests: Business and professional         security policy, ASEAN and regional security,
 ethics, and philosophy of religion.                   New Zealand - Asia relations.
                                                       Dr Alan Simpson
                                                       MA Wellington, PhD University College, London
 Political Science                                     Research Interests: South-East Asian security
 and Public Policy                                     (particularly Indonesia, ASEAN, and arms
                                                       procurement), New Zealand’s relations with
 Dr Geoffrey Cupit – Chairperson                       East Asia.
 BA(Hons) Lancaster, PhD Liverpool
 Research Interests: Contemporary political            Dr Ron Smith
 philosophy, including the relationship between        BSc(Hons) Southampton, MA, DPhil Waikato
 political ideas and ethical theory.                   Research Interests: Moral issues to do with
                                                       the political use of violence, nuclear power and
                                                       security, war crimes and humanitarian law.



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Professor Dan Zirker BA, MA Montana, PhD Alberta        Dr Carol C Barber PhD Vanderbilt
Research Interests: Democratization, economic           Research Interests: Evaluation of the outcomes
development and civil-military relations in Brazil as   of intensive mental health services to children and
well as in Africa and Eastern Europe.                   adolescents, as well as social services to homeless
Professor Zirker is the Dean of the Faculty of Arts     youth; perinatal mental health and transition to
and Social Sciences.                                    parenting.
                                                        Associate Professor Douglas P. Boer
                                                        BSc, MSc, PhD Alberta
Population Studies                                      Research Interests: Clinical psychology particularly
Professor Richard Bedford                               experimental psychopathology, group and
– Director Population Studies Centre                    individual treatment of offenders, and the design
BA, MA Auckland, PhD Australia National                 of culturally-appropriate risk assessment methods
Research Interests: Migration studies, processes of     for Aboriginal offenders, violent offenders, and
population movement in the Asia-Pacific region.          intellectually disabled clients.

Professor Ian Pool                                      Dr Donald A J Cable
BA, MA Auckland, PhD Australia National                 BBS, DipSocSci, MA Massey, PGCertPracPsyc,
Research Interests: All areas in demography.            PhD Waikato
                                                        Research Interests: Psychological Work Contract,
Professor Jacques Poot                                  Career Development/Management, Personnel
Drs Amsterdam, PhD Wellington                           Selection.
Research Interests: All aspects of the economics
of population (such as migration, fertility, labour     Associate Professor Samuel G Charlton
force, and ageing) and especially the geographical      BA San Jose, MA, PhD New Mexico
dimension of these topics.                              Research Interests: Applied cognitive psychology
                                                        and human factors including transport psychology,
Dr Elsie Ho                                             aviation, forensic psychology, information
BSocSc(Hons), MSocSc Hong Kong, DPhil Waikato           representation, and human-machine interface design.
Research Interests: Cross-cultural transition
and adaptation of Asian immigrants and                  Dr Cate Curtis
international students.                                 BA Canterbury, BSocSc(Hons), PhD Waikato
                                                        Research Interests: Mental health and wellbeing
                                                        including the practical impacts of health policy,
Psychology                                              as it relates to mental illness and mental health
                                                        services, initiation and cessation of deliberate
Dr Neville R Robertson – Chairperson                    self-harm, especially in young women, resilience
BA Canterbury, MSocSc, DipPsych(Com),                   amongst young ‘at risk’ women.
PhD Waikato
Research Interests: Applied research on                 Professor Mary T Foster
community issues, particularly those in which           MSc, DipClinPsych, PhD Auckland
issues of social justice are at stake; programme        Research Interests: Applied behaviour analysis
evaluation - research which helps the development       and the experimental analysis of both human and
of social services and assesses their effectiveness;    animal behaviour, animal welfare.
institutional responses to violence against women;
child abuse, the prevention of family violence,
crime prevention, gender and cultural justice.




                                                                                                            157
 ACADEMIC STAFF RESEARCH INTERESTS
 Associate Professor Darrin J Hodgetts                 Dr Linda Waimarie Nikora
 BA, GradDipSocSc, PhD Massey                          MSocSc(Hons) DPhil Waikato
 Research Interests: Application of social/            Research Interests: Psychological areas that focus
 societal/community psychology, media and              on or involve Māori people. Specific interests
 communications, and medical sociology to analysis     are in the field of Māori development and how
 of the ways such social concerns are framed by        psychology can make a positive contribution to
 mass media, the views voiced by individuals, and      this direction.
 the ways in which these views are communally
 constructed communally.                               Professor Michael P O’Driscoll – Convenor of
                                                       Organisational Psychology program
 Dr Robert B Isler Dipl Natw. ETH, PhD ETH Zürich      BSc(Hons) Western Australia, PhD Flinders, FNZPsS
 Research Interests: Safety issues, and human          Research Interests: Employee well-being, including
 performance, eye movement behaviour, human            stress at work; work attitudes; motivation and
 information processing, psycho-physiology and         behaviour; the interface between job experiences
 psychophysics.                                        and life off the job (especially family commitments
                                                       and responsibilities); other areas within the field of
 Dr James McEwan PhD Waikato                           organisational psychology.
 Research Interests: Human operant, signal
 detection, and the ecological basis of perception.    Associate Professor John A Perrone
                                                       MSc, PhD Canterbury
 Dr Michelle Levy                                      Research Interests: Modelling aspects of human
 MSocSc, PGDipPsych(Com), PhD Waikato                  self motion estimation – current research involves
 Research Interests: Indigenous psychologies,          development and computer simulation of putative
 contribution of psychology to achieving               physiological motion processing in areas MT and
 Māori aspirations.                                    MST of primate visual cortex; testing people’s
 Bridgette Masters-Awatere                             ability to estimate their heading direction and to
 BSocSc, MSocSc, PGDipPsych(Comm) Waikato              extract depth information from image motion.
 Research Interests: Use of applied research           Professor Jane Ritchie
 methods towards developing culturally appropriate     MA Auckland, PhD Wellington, OBE, JP
 programme evaluation processes for Māori              Research Interests: Child rearing patterns and
 (specifically within the areas of public health -      the effects of parental use of physical punishment
 health promotion programmes).                         on children and young adults, violence in New
 Dr. Eric M. Messick                                   Zealand; body image and eating attitudes and
 BA Lafayette, MA West Virgina, PhD Waikato, Board     behaviours of girls and boys, women and men;
 Certified Behaviour Analyst                            topics related to violence in New Zealand.
 Research Interests: Behavioural economics,            Dr Nicola J Starkey
 behavioural models of choice, the inferior-good       BSc(Hons), PhD, Leeds
 effect, and the quantitative analysis of behaviour,   Research Interests: Behavioural pharmacology and
 multisystemic therapy, conduct disorder, autism,      animal behaviour and welfare; neuropsychology –
 challenging behaviour, reading and writing,           particularly executive function in relation to young
 precision teaching, fluency, direct instruction and    driver behaviour.
 other areas of applied behaviour analysis.




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                                      ACADEMI C STA F F R E S E A R C H I N T E R E S T S




Dr Ottilie Stolte                                       Dr. Ann Hardy
BSocSc, MSocSc, PhD Waikato                             MA Canterbury DipJourn, DipFilm & TV Production
Research Interests: Community development,              Middlesex, PhD Waikato
un(der)employment, disadvantage, the policy-            Research Interests: Intersections of religion and
community interface, local responses to social          the media; ethical implications of police/media
issues and human geographical and applied social        interactions in high-profile crime cases.
psychological perspectives.
                                                        Dr Craig Hight MA, PhD Waikato
Associate Professor William Temple                      Research Interests: Aspects of documentary
MSc, PhD Auckland                                       theory, including aspects of the production,
Research Interests: Experimental and applied            construction and reception of documentary hybrids
analysis of behaviour, both animal and human,           and the relationship of digital media technologies
animal welfare.                                         to documentary practice; documentary practice,
                                                        in particular mockumentary; audience theory and
Dr Jo Thakker                                           audience research; digital media, including games
BA(Hons), PhD, PGDipClinPsych Canterbury                studies.
Research Interests: Substance use and abuse,
cultural psychology, sexual offending, theoretical      Dr Stan Jones BA, PhD Hull
psychology, clinical psychology. Current research       Research Interests: Cross-cultural influence and
focuses on public attitudes to sexual offenders         identity questions in media, in the films of Wim
and how these influence clinical environments and        Wenders, European cinema, the reception of
ultimately treatment efficacy.                           New Zealand film in Germany, film synchronisation.
                                                        Virginia Pitts BA(Hons) London, DipArts Auckland
Screen and Media Studies                                Research Interests: National cinema, New Zealand
                                                        cinema, cross-cultural filmmaking, narrative
Dr Alistair Swale – Chairperson                         theories and practice, digital cinema, filmmaking
BA Canterbury, MA, PhD Kyoto                            practice.
Research Interests: Intellectual and cultural history
of early modern Japan, contemporary Japanese            Dr Gareth R Schott
politics and popular culture (in particular animated    Dip Social Science Research Methods, BSc(Hons)
cinema).                                                (First Class), PhD Wales, Cardiff
                                                        Research Interests: Interactive media, new media
Professor Dan Fleming                                   technologies, digital and electronic games, audience
BA(Hons) Ulster, PhD Stirling                           research, communities of practice, media fandom,
Research Interests: The relationships that              adolescence, media education, media literacy,
interconnect popular culture, critical pedagogy,        mediated communication and social networks,
social realities and communication technologies         critical theory, social psychology, ubiquitous
and in how the creative industries relate to these.     and pervasive technologies, media texts such as
                                                        machinima, gamics, comic books, graphic novels
Associate Professor Geoff R Lealand
MA(Hons) (First Class) Canterbury, PhD BGSU             Dr Bevin Yeatman MA, PhD Waikato
Ohio, DipHort Massey                                    Research Interests: The growing dominance of
Research Interests: Children/adolescents and            the audiovisual and how this might impact on
media, national cinema, television studies,             our social experience, both in terms of practice
journalism training, new media and regulation,          and theory.
Media Studies in New Zealand schools.




                                                                                                           159
 ACADEMIC STAFF RESEARCH INTERESTS
 Societies and Cultures                                    Michael Law – Convenor of Industrial Relations
                                                           and Human Resource Management
 Dr Jo Barnes – Chairperson                                BA Auckland, DipEdSt Waikato, EdM Rutgers
 BSc(Hons) Southampton, MSc Surrey, PhD Flinders           Research Interests: Union membership and
 Research Interests: Methodology, social deviance          workforce change in the dairy industry, union
 and crime, social welfare issues, ageing.                 organising models.
 Dr Maxine Campbell – Convenor of Social Policy            Dr David Neilson MA Canterbury, PhD East Anglia
 BSocSc(Hons), PhD Waikato                                 Research Interests: Political economy, social class,
 Research interest: Family sociology, with a focus         work, the labour market, the competition state,
 on the role, status and experiences of parents.           flexicurity and the neo-proletariat.
 Dr Ted Ninnes – Convenor of Sociology                     Dr Paul Harris BA Exeter, MA, PhD Lancaster
 MA(Hons) Dundee, MSc Stirling, PhD Edinburgh              Research Interests: Employment relations and the
 Research Interests: Social theory and philosophical       sociology of consumption.
 sociology, youth culture, social theory, the dialect,
 and the philosophical basis of the social sciences.       Dr Judith Macdonald – Convenor of
                                                           Anthropology MA, PhD Auckland
 Associate Professor David Swain                           Research Interests: Research methodology,
 BSc London, DPhil Waikato                                 gender studies, Pacific ethnography and health,
 Research Interests: Family sociology, methodology         in both local and cross-cultural contexts. Current
 and social policy, with current research in family        research focuses on Polynesian outliers and
 history and genealogy used to investigate social          women’s health issues.
 class, social mobility and intergenerational relations.
                                                           Dr Keith Barber MA, PhD Auckland
 Dr John Paterson                                          Research Interests: Ethnicity and economic
 – Convenor of Social Science Research                     anthropology, with a particular focus on
 BA(Hons) Otago, MPhil Waikato, PhD British Columbia       contemporary ethnic conflicts and rural/urban
 Research Interests: Social theory, social research        settlements in Papua New Guinea.
 methodology and ethics, and alternative agriculture.      Dr Wendy Cowling BA(Hons), PhD Macquarie
 Dr Rachel Simon-Kumar                                     Research Interests: Tonga, Samoa and the Cook
                                                           Islands, with a focus on people’s maintenance
 MA Kerala, MPhil New Delhi, COP, PhD Waikato
                                                           of tradition and identity in these nations and
 Research Interests: Health development and                in migrant communities as well as tourism
 public policy, women and health, women and work,          as a development strategy in Pacific nations;
 feminist theory, gender and policy development.           contemporary religious ideas and activities
 Dr Carolyn Michelle                                       in New Zealand.
 – Convenor of Women’s and Gender Studies                  Dr Mike Goldsmith BA Auckland, AM, PhD Illinois
 MSocSc, PhD Waikato                                       Research Interests: Language and power, social
 Research Interests: Gender and new technologies,          and anthropological theory, ethnographic research
 particularly human assisted reproduction and              methods, the Pacific in general (with a particular
 emerging biogenetic technologies; documentary             focus on missionary history and Pacific politics),
 representations of domestic violence, discursive          social and anthropological theory, welfare and
 constructions of ‘motherhood’ and ‘the family’.           citizenship issues.
                                                           Dr Tom Ryan MA(Hons), PhD Auckland
                                                           Research Interests: Pacific anthropology, social
                                                           theory, the history of anthropology, and industrial
                                                           anthropology, with a special interest in mining.



160                 FACULTY OF ARTS & SOCIAL SCIENCES | GRADUATE HANDBOOK 2009

								
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