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					     IEP
 Development
 and Service
   Models
Division of Students with
Disabilities and English
Language Learners

Summer 2010

Maura Basile, Larry Buckman,
Nancy Frost and Paula
Magdalena

SWD Support Specialists
Division of Students
with Disabilities and
English Language
Learners
                                    AGENDA
                        IEP Development and Service Models

•   Welcome and Introduction
•   Phase 1 Connections: Creating a Common Language
•   Engaging Parents
•   IEP Development and Service Models
         New Recommendations
         Amending the IEP after the Annual Review
         Students Entering New York City from a New York State School District
         Students Entering New York City from Another State
•   Case Studies
•   Intake Procedures
A Two-Year Phase-in Process Focusing
on the Advancement of Student Learning
and Achievement


 The Goal

 Students with disabilities will be considered as individual students who
 have instructional plans that facilitate their participation in the general
 education curriculum, attending the school they would attend if they did
 not have an IEP. We will move away from focusing on groups of
 students with disabilities – e.g., 10, 12, 15 – with the group as a
 substitute for instructional planning.
Guiding Principles

1. Every school should educate and embrace the overwhelming
   majority of students with disabilities. A cohort of students with low-
   incidence disabilities or highly specialized needs will continue to be
   clustered in specialized instructional programs in community and/or
   specialized schools.
2. Hold all schools and students with disabilities accountable for goals
   that are standards-based. IEPs should reflect New York State
   learning standards and emphasize long-term educational outcomes.
3. All schools should have the curricular, instructional, and scheduling
   flexibility needed to meet the diverse needs of students with
   disabilities with accountability outcomes.
4. School accountability measures, funding formulas, and enrollment
   policies and practices will be aligned with the foregoing principles.
5. Schools must be active partners with parents of students with
   disabilities.
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOUR
SCHOOLS?


Your school, in collaboration with parents, and through the
  IEP process will refine instructional programs by taking a
  fresh look at the strengths and needs of students with
  disabilities.
The school will also strengthen its systems for analyzing
  student progress to make necessary adjustments for
  performance.
Three Important Considerations

1.   What are the student’s long term educational goals?
2.   Does each student with disabilities have access to the
     general education curriculum and is she/he educated
     alongside general education peers as much as possible?
3.   Does each IEP include a focused recommendation for
     services targeted to student achievement?
In the past….


We made program recommendations and if that placement
  was not available in the school, parents would have been
  sent to the Office of Student Enrollment for another
  placement.
We have been accustomed to thinking of special education
  services as a “class” or a “place.”
Now….


If student is zoned for a school, the school has the flexibility
    to develop a personalized plan, within the law, to support
    student achievement and success.
Services can be used for different parts of the school day
  and in combination using the full flexibility of the
  continuum.
  What does using the “Full Flexibility of
          the Continuum” mean?


A student may have multiple program recommendations.
   For example, a student may receive intensive reading
   instruction in a self contained setting and spend the rest of
   the day in a general education class with, or without
   support services.
Schools will be utilizing a wider array of special education
  service options.
Engaging Parents
How do we share this information with the school community/
  parents?
• A letter was sent to all parents and members of the school
  community from Laura Rodriguez, the Deputy Chancellor
  for the Division of Students with Disabilities and English
  Language Learners. Ms. Rodriguez highlighted the
  upcoming improvements to instructional programs for
  students with disabilities.
• The DOE is currently holding workshops for Parent
  Coordinators in all boroughs.
How Do We Support a Unified Approach?

A parent goes into his home zoned school in
  September with his child and his child’s IEP.
The IEP has a recommendation for a program
  the school does not have.
        What do we tell this parent?
         Suggestions for Welcoming
           Parents and Students
Form a team whose members may include :
• An Administrator
• Special Education Teacher
• Guidance Counselor
• An IEP Team Member
• Parent Coordinator
• Pupil Accounting Secretary
Be ready to discuss…..
“Our school is taking part in the first phase of an initiative
  which emphasizes student achievement, student success,
  and personalized support. In the past, we have thought of
  special education services as a “class” or “place” where
  students spend the school day, like Integrated Co-
  Teaching (ICT), Self-Contained, or Special Class (SC).
  Your child’s IEP may state he is recommended for a self
  contained class and here at PS XX we are servicing our
  children in a different manner. We will review your child’s
  IEP and see how we can best meet the needs of your
  child. If it is necessary to modify your child’s IEP in any
  way, we will invite you to attend an IEP meeting.”
STRESS THAT…..
The child will continue to receive high quality instruction
based on his/her individualized academic and behavioral
needs. This is called “flexible scheduling” and is meant to
give the child the services he needs according to his
individual needs. All services the child has been
recommended for will remain the same unless the parent is
contacted to discuss changes.
Try to avoid…..Having parents think “we don’t have a class
  for your child and therefore can not attend his zoned
  school.”
Come September….
    Schools may be faced with the following
                  situations:
• New recommendations (initials and reevaluations)
• Amending the IEP after the annual review
• Students entering from outside NYC with a NYS IEP
• Students entering from outside NYS with an IEP
New Recommendations
•   Based on an IEP meeting that was either an initial or reevaluation, the program on
    the IEP does not match the program in the Phase I school.
    Suggested Procedures:
•   IEP team MUST contact parent to schedule a reconvene meeting to discuss how
    services will be delivered in the Phase I school.
•   Hold an IEP meeting with all mandated members
•   Create an IEP using the full flexibility of the continuum based on students’ needs
•   Follow all Placement Procedures: Final Notice, Consent, Authorization
•   Begin to service the student
Amending the IEP after the Annual Review
Amendments to an IEP after the annual review may be made by the IEP Team at
  an IEP Team meeting, or by amending the IEP without an IEP Team meeting.
Before an IEP can be amended without an IEP Team meeting, the IEP Team must
   clearly describe all proposed changes on the Waiver of IEP Meeting to
   Amend IEP Form which must include a clear description of all proposed
   changes, and send the form to the parent. Additionally, the IEP Team
   designee must discuss with the parent any and all changes that are being
   considered. If the parent needs further information regarding the proposed
   change(s) or believes that a discussion with the IEP Team is necessary
   before deciding to amend the IEP, the parent does not have to agree to the
   request to amend the IEP. If the parent does not agree to the proposed
   changes, the changes cannot be made without an IEP team meeting.
Once the IEP Team receives the signed Waiver of IEP Meeting to Amend IEP, the
   team may make the changes to the IEP, indicating next to every change the
   date on which changes were agreed.
       Amending the IEP after the Annual Review
The parent and all staff responsible for implementing the IEP must be provided
   with a copy of the amended IEP immediately (i.e., The IEP must be sent or
   otherwise transmitted the following day.) and all staff responsible for
   implementing the changes in the IEP must be informed of their IEP
   implementation responsibilities.
Additionally, a copy of the signed Waiver of IEP Meeting to Amend IEP must be
   placed in the student’s special education file.

Please Note: An IEP may be amended only after an
   annual review IEP meeting.
Scenario: A student attending a self contained class has an annual review in the
   spring. The recommendation is to remain in the current program. In the fall,
   the school decides to use the full flexibility of the continuum and add ICT for
   Math and General Education with SETSS for Science to the existing self
   contained recommendation.
       Students Entering NYC from a New York State School District
When a student moves from a school district within New York State to New York City, and it has
   been reported that the student received special education services in the prior district of
   attendance, the Committee on Special Education Office must accept the eligibility
   determination as it was developed in accordance with New York State’s Regulations, and, in
   consultation with the parents, provide the student with services comparable to those received
   in the other district.
The student’s records, including the IEP, supporting documents, and any other records relating to
    the provision of special education services provided to the student from the previous school in
    which the student was enrolled must be obtained immediately (not longer than 5 days).
After meeting with the parent to discuss comparable services, the Authorization to Attend a
    Special Education Program as a Comparable Service is sent or provided to the parent. This
    Authorization Form, the student’s previous IEP, and clinical materials are sent to the
    receiving school. Copies of the letters are to be placed in the student’s official record.
Within 30 days of the student’s enrollment at the school, the IEP Team at the school must
   develop an IEP in accordance with procedures laid in out in this manual.
          Students Entering NYC from Another State
When a student moves from a school district in another state to New York City, and it has been
   reported that the student received special education services in another state, in consultation
   with the parents, the school must first provide such student with a free appropriate public
   education, including services comparable to those described in the previously developed IEP.


The student’s records, including the IEP, supporting documents and any other records relating to the
    provision of special education services provided to the student from the previous school in which
    the student was enrolled must be obtained immediately (not longer than 5 days).


The school district must then determine whether it will adopt the most recent evaluation materials and
    IEP provided by the prior school district. Since each state has its own eligibility requirements, the
    student’s evaluation materials and IEP might not necessarily be consistent with standards
    established by New York State.


The IEP Team will review the current IEP and evaluation materials and determine if the student meets
    the New York State eligibility criteria. If the IEP Team agrees that the student needs special
    education services, the team will develop a new IEP. The IEP Team must provide the appropriate
    notice to the student’s parents and arrange for services in accordance with procedures laid out in
    this manual.
Students Entering NYC from Another State

In the meantime, comparable services must be determined in consultation with
    the parent and provided. Additionally, the Authorization to Attend Special
    Education Program as a Comparable Service must be provided to the parent.


If the IEP Team elects not to adopt the eligibility determination and the IEP from
     the previous state, the Team must evaluate the student without undue delay.
     The social worker must obtain parental consent immediately following the
     meeting. Arrangements must be made to immediately provide the student
     with services comparable to the previous IEP. The evaluation will be
     completed by the IEP Team at the school.
   Authorization to Attend a Special Education Program as a Comparable
                                  Service
{Please note: This letter is used only for students who are entering the New York City public school system from a
     special education program outside of New York City}
Date: ____________________________
Student Name:_____________________ DOB: ________________________________
NYC ID#: _________________________ CSE #: _______________________________
Home Address:____________________________________________________________
District:__________ School: ___________________________
Current Class/Program: _____________________________________________________
Dear Parent:
       After considering the information provided from your child’s last special education program and consulting with you, the
     IEP Team has determined that the program below offers services comparable to those your child last received:
Classification:_______________________ Program: _____________________________
Related Services:__________________________ Service Category:_________________
School Name and Address: __________________________________________________
School Phone: ____________________________________________________________
You have the right to visit this site before or after you provide consent. If you would like to arrange a site visit, please contact:
Contact Information
Name: ___________________________________
Phone:___________________________________
Address: _________________________________
You may bring your child to the program and school indicated above on_______________.
Please accompany your child to school on the first day to provide required information and to meet your child’s teacher who may
     answer any questions that you have. If busing has been requested for your child, the Office of Pupil Transportation will notify
     you shortly regarding the first day of service. In the meantime, you may bring your child to school.


Please Note: This service may be temporary, as a New York City IEP must be developed in order to appropriately serve
     your child. You will receive notification regarding your input into this process.
ESSENTIAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR CASE
STUDIES
What are the student’s long term educational goals?
Does each student with disabilities have access to the general
  education curriculum and is she/he educated alongside general
  education peers as much as possible?
Does each IEP include a focused recommendation for services
  targeted to student achievement?
What do you know about student?
What can you do to support student and meet his/her needs in the
  classroom?
What program recommendations can you make?
CAROUSEL DIRECTIONS
Three case studies
Divide group into three groups
Five minutes to review each of the three case studies to determine
   appropriate program recommendation
Chart responses in carousel
Record recommendations on case study sheet
Discuss in whole group
                  CASE STUDIES
Case Study # 1: Michael, Grade 4
Student with a new recommendation
Case Study # 2: Weston, Grade 6
Student with a New York State IEP, outside of New York City
Case Study # 3: Lucy, Grade 10
Student with an IEP entering New York City from another state
CASE STUDY #1- Michael, Grade 4
Psycho-Educational Assessment: May 2010         Intellectual Functioning: Middle limits of the average
    range
Academic Achievement
Student demonstrated slow and steady progress in the following areas:
Visual motor and grapho-motor skills, Decoding skills and spelling skills close to grade level
Able to perform mathematic operations involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
Proficient in money and telling time concepts, Demonstrates ability to compose basic sentences
Student demonstrated deficiency in the following areas:
Reading comprehension skills: difficulty answering questions involving inference skills
Delays in vocabulary development
Difficulties writing a paragraph addressing a theme
Difficulties solving mathematical word problems
Functional Performance
Reading: Decoding: 3.5     Comprehension: 2.0
Instructional reading Level: 2.5 Math: Operations: 3.5 Problem Solving : 2.5
Instructional Math Level: 3.0
Student scored a low level 2 on the State ELA Test and a low level 3 on the State Math Test
Learning Characteristics
Is able to follow directions when sitting in close proximity to the teacher
Benefits from using manipulatives and visual cues to comprehend concepts
Displays artistic abilities, Benefits from graphic organizers to structure tasks and scaffold information,
     Difficulties in attending to details in order to derive meaning from text
Difficulties in processing information
Some distractible behaviors which interfere with ability to concentrate on academic tasks
Social Development
Cooperative , well mannered
Although student gets along well with peers, he can become defensive when teased.
Takes great pride when complimented for artistic abilities
Anxious about school-work and exhibits frustration as the complexity of tasks increase
CASE STUDY #2 – Weston, Grade 6
Psycho-Educational Assessment: May 2010 Intellectual Functioning: Higher limits of the average range
Language: Student is bilingual and speaks Spanish at home. He often translates for his parents.
Student demonstrated steady progress in the following areas:
Decoding skills on grade level
Well developed vocabulary
Strong comprehension skills and student is capable of answering inference questions when focused
Able to perform basic math operations in addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
Student demonstrated deficiency in the following areas:
Grapho-motor skills
Poor spelling skills interfere with student’s ability to express himself in writing
Difficulties performing math operations involving fractions, decimals and measurement
Difficulties solving mathematical word problems
Weston, Grade 6
Functional Performance
Reading: Decoding: 6.5     Comprehension: 6.0 Instructional Reading Level: 6.3
Math: Operations: 4.0 Problem Solving : 3.5 Instructional Math Level: 3.8
Student scored a Level 3 on the State ELA Test and a low Level 2 on the State Math Test
Learning Characteristics
Difficulties following directions
Highly disorganized and requires visual cues to remain on task
Proficient in computer skills
When motivated by reading selection, capable of attending to details in order to derive meaning and
   draw conclusions from text
Weston, Grade 6
Social Development
Can be verbally abusive to adults when he finds the assignments too difficult or boring
Will leave the classroom without permission
Demonstrates reactive behaviors and becomes involved in physical altercations with peers.
Rarely completes classroom assignments
Rarely communicates feelings or discusses issues that are of concern
Works more successfully with individualized attention and/or in mall groups
Self-esteem is enhanced when given the opportunity to use computer skills to assist classroom teacher
     in developing instructional materials and assignments.
CASE STUDY #3 - Lucy, Grade 10

Academic Achievement
Student demonstrated slow and steady progress in the following areas:
Ability to grasp key concepts
Note taking, time management, following directions
Concepts for money, telling time and simple operations
Using multiple meaning words to express feelings
Student demonstrated deficiency in the following areas:
Narrative, creative writing skills
Fine motor skills
Developmental language delays affecting receptive and expressive language, reading comprehension
Phonemic awareness and auditory discrimination
Semantic and inferential understanding
Lucy, Grade 10
Functional Performance
Reading: Fluency Grade 4 Comprehension: 6.0 Instructional Reading Level: Grade 3-4
Math: Operations: 4.0 Problem Solving : 3.5 Instructional Math Level: 3.8
Did not meet the Massachusetts State Performance Standards for 9th grade Math, ELA, Global Studies
     and Earth Science
Student achieved 17 out of 31 IEP objectives related to study skills, math, speech-language skills and
    motor development
Demonstrated improvement in some math and language skills
Standard scores on measures of reading remained the same.
Learning Characteristics
Uses graphic organizers to organize ideas
Difficulty remaining on task
Limited note taking and organization skills for written material, uses computer
Lucy, Grade 10
Learning Characteristics
Requires continued drill and practice
Self correction skills for reading and writing are simplistic


Social Development
Some increase in her ability to initiate appropriate interactions with peers
Modified deviant behaviors towards teachers and classroom aides
Quiet girl who is at ease in small structured settings
Difficulty attending and focusing
Lacks confidence in social situations
What is the Toolkit?
The toolkit is a website which can be searched using plain
  language, to provide answers to the most common questions
  principals and school teams have about Special Education
  processes and procedures.
Forms and supporting documents related to these questions may
   be accessed from the answer pages on the website.
www.achievementconnection.org
FORMS


Authorization to Attend a Special Education Program in a
  Comparable Service


Waiver of an IEP meeting to Amend IEP After Annual Review

				
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