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					CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
ACADEMIC SENATE
Bovee University Center 108
Web Site: http://academicsenate.cmich.edu
E-mail: acadsen@cmich.edu
Phone: 774-3350

Membership: Jeff Angera, Mahmood Bahaee, Joyce Baugh, Brigitte Bechtold, Steve Berglund, Elaine Betts,
Michelle Bigard, Tim Boudreau, Dave Breed, Pat Burdell, Elizabeth Campbell, Debasish Chakroborty, Roger Coles,
Mark Cox, Ian Davison, Brian DeJong, John Dinan, Maureen Eke, Brian Elder, Lauren Elias, Donna Ericksen,
Michael Fields, Sandy Folsom, Ray Francis, Mark Freed, Solomon Getahun, Bryan Gibson, Dana Gingrich, Denise
Green, Merodie Hancock, Tim Hartshorne, Philip Hertzler, Jim Jones, Aaron Kalloch, Elizabeth Kirby, Diane
Krider, Vern Kwiatkowski, Mark Lehman, Thomas Masterson, James McDonald, Mark Minelli, Thomas Moore,
Concha Neeley, Sean Nolan, Tracy Olrich, Leigh Orf, David Patton, Katrina Piatek-Jimenez, Dean Pybus, Stuart
Quirk, Michael Rao, Bruce Roscoe, John Scheide, Gary Shapiro, Suzanne Shellady, Brad Sjoquist, Karl Smart,
Andrew Spencer, Phil Squattrito, Robert Stecker, Michael Stinson, Julia Wallace, Glen Williams, Patty Williamson

                                            CMU ACADEMIC SENATE
                                                  April 28, 2009
                                               Minutes of Meeting
                                              Ray Francis, Presiding

                                                 Summary of Actions

1.   Approved new members to various committees as recommended by the Committee on Committees.
2.   Approved new program, English: Children‟s/Young Adult Literature Concentration, BA, BS degrees.
3.   Approved curricular changes to Human Development Minor.
4.   Approved curricular changes to Interior Design Major, BA, BAA, BS degrees.
5.   Approved curricular changes to Master of Science in Experimental Psychology degree.
6.   Completed revisions to A Plan for Revising the General Education Program, Writing and Writing Intensive
     Courses in the University Program.

Present: 53 of 64 members

Absent: Brigitte Bechtold, Michelle Bigard, John Dinan, Maureen Eke, Lauren Elias, Mark Freed, Dana Gingrich,
Thomas Moore, Dean Pybus, Michael Rao, Julia Wallace
______________________________________________________________________________________

1.   Announcements
     Francis – we will be meeting next Tuesday at 4:00 p.m. Refreshments are available from the office of
     Institutional Diversity.
          A.       Strategic Plan for Advancing Diversity (SPAD) and KPI presentation – Denise Green: Diversity
                   context – We must continue to recognize that MI is one of the most segregated states in the nation,
                   and a high level of reported hate crimes across the state. Incoming Freshmen attended H.S.‟s and
                   lived in neighborhoods with fewer non-white race or ethnicity than others of their age. In
                   addition, their socialization with others of a different race is less than their peers. However, 75%
                   of the faculty reporting that they work to enhance knowledge of and appreciation for other
                   racial/ethnic groups. In addition, the incoming freshmen view this as important. Strategic Plan
                   for Advancing Diversity (SPAD) – tried to address a variety of questions, and address a number of
                   Key Performance Indicators (KPI‟s). Climate – It‟s important to keep an eye on the number and
                   type of incidents reported to the Affirmative Action office. A goal is to establish annual climate
                   measures to report and monitor climate. A goal for the workforce is to increase the representation
                   of underrepresented groups among faculty and staff. Also, a goal is for search chairs to go
                   through an Affirmative Action training session. For students, a goal is to increase enrollment, and
                   improve the 6 year graduation rate to levels of white students. Curriculum – A goal is to increase
                   participation in Study Abroad. Also, to have a baseline for faculty diversity education. Hold the
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 2
                Date – 11/10/09, for a theatrical presentation of diversity issues. Intergroup dialogue program –
                funded through 2010 funds. The Intergroup Dialogue Course will enroll at least 250 students by
                2015, and that they will be well versed in discussing these topics. Diversity Successes – Greater
                recognition of the importance of diversity; cultural competency recognition; Isabella County
                Human Rights Committee; Students are reporting progress in climate issues; and an increase in
                participation in diversity programs. Data on attendance were presented. The Excellence Through
                Inclusion Program won awards for the posters developed and distributed across campus. Next
                steps – The implementation team will resume in the fall and look more closely at our KPI‟s.
                Disseminate information to the campus community. Begin or continue conversations with
                departments and units, to encourage each unit to have their own goals. Finally, our goal is to
                successfully prepare CMU students for a culturally diverse world.

Hartshorne moves to set aside the agenda for a resolution in honor of Ray Francis, seconded by McDonald.
Resolution passed unanimously.

                 RESOLUTION TO COMMEND RAYMOND FRANCIS FOR HIS SERVICE AS
                              ACADEMIC SENATE CHAIR, 2008-2009

WHEREAS, Raymond Francis, known as Ray to his colleagues and friends, came forward in the 9th hour and
offered his name in candidacy for Academic Senate Chair, a position he has held with great patience, humility, and
calm,

AND WHEREAS, he has led the Senate through the painstaking process of resolving the finer and even finer points
and issues of General Education,

AND WHEREAS, he still made time for introducing and addressing other issues such as Cultural Competency,
revisions to the Curricular Authority Document and the Academic Integrity Policy, and the creation of Certificate
programs,

AND WHEREAS, he has gently led the Senate through many of the finer points of parliamentary procedure, and
overcome a number of parliamentary objections,

AND WHEREAS, he was a model of decorum at all times while chairing Senate meetings,

AND WHEREAS, he presided over the hiring of another in a long line of outstanding Senate secretaries,

AND WHEREAS, through patience and perseverance he was able to fill positions on the Executive Committee, and
other committees requiring Senate nominations,

AND WHEREAS, he has looked high and low for a Senate meeting place for next year, and been successful in
identifying an indoors location,

AND WHEREAS, he continually reminded us that the actions we have taken were “wonderful!”

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Academic Senate of Central Michigan University expresses its sincere
appreciation to Ray Francis for his dedicated service to Central Michigan University during the 2008-2009 academic
year.

2.   Approval of Minutes from April 14, 2009
     Jones – point on these minutes, on corrections to the previous minutes: I wanted to add that the provost agreed
     to present in the fall the outcome of the settlement with the past soccer coach. Approved as presented.

3.   President’s and Provost’s Reports -- None
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 3

4.   Elections

         A.       Committee on Committees Minutes, April 9, 2009, III. A.-I.:
                  Francis – We had a person from the last meeting who was already on the committee, who came up
                  for the same committee. This person was dropped from the current slate.

                  The nomination list was presented to the Senate. No additional nominations were proposed.
                  Motion to close nominations and approve listed nominees by acclimation. Motion passed.

         III.     Committee Vacancies Approved by the Academic Senate:
                  A.     Assessment Council
                         Kumar Yelamarthi (E&T) 2009-12 At Large

                  B.       Degrees, Admissions, Standards, and Honors Committee
                           Betsy Gurecki                    2009-10 Student
                           Jessica Meredith                 2009-10 Student
                           Katelyn Preisel                  2009-10 Student

                  C.       FACIT-AC Learning Management Systems Subcommittee
                           Paul Visich (HSC)          2009-12 CHP

                  D.       General Education Subcommittee
                           Laura Cochrane (SASW)         2009-12 CHSBS
                           Ksenia Ustinova (PT)          2009-12 CHP
                           William Rick Sykes (BCA)      2009-12 CCFA

                  E.       Library Committee
                           Sarah Stout                         2009-10 Student

                  F.       Multicultural Diversity Education Council
                           Chelena Eli                      2009-10 Student

                  G.       Professional Education Assessment Committee
                           Reid Skeel (PSY)                2009-12 CHSBS

                  H.       Professional Ed. Selection, Admission, and Retention Committee
                           Deb Bailey (HEV)                 2009-12 CEHS
                           Johanna Paas (ART)               2009-12 CCFA
                           Ben Rollenhagen                  2009-10 Student

                  I.       Speaker Series Committee
                           Alecia Smith                        2009-10 Student

5.   General Education Program –

     A. A Plan for Revising the General Education Program
     B. Writing Intensive Courses in the University Program
        1.       Writing Component Proposal

           Jones – because students can take one course outside the UP, I would like to move that in line 36 the
language be amended to reflect the possibility that in a foreign language course, the writing can be in that language.
Motion to alter the language, Jones, seconded by Ericksen. Motion passed. Breed – Proposes an amendment to the
language starting on line 14, to state that students must take at least 2 writing intensive courses in the UP.
Seconded by Hertzler. Betts – asked for clarification. Why downgrade it to 2 rather than 3. Breed – by limiting it
to just 2 in the UP it allows for more flexibility to complete the writing requirements. Hertzler – also the current
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 4
language omits group II. This would alter that. Lehman – so this would allow students to take both courses within
the same subgroup? Yes. Motion passed. Piatek-Jimenez – I think there is an error in line 31. I believe we had
agreed on 70% rather than 50%. After a check of the minutes, this was confirmed, so what read „50%‟ was changed
to „70%‟. Francis – are there objections to voting on the question. Patton – the rationale would have to be
rewritten…does that need to be taken care of now? Francis – No. There were no objections to voting on the motion
as presented. Motion passed. We have a new Gen Ed program…glory be! Baugh – don‟t we have to vote on the
whole thing now? Francis – no we do not. Last year there was a motion to divide the question, which passed. In
the past, we have voted on the first section, the second section, and today, we voted on the third section. All
sections are now completed. We‟ve now finished our work on the Gen Ed program. It now will go back to the Gen
Ed Council which will implement it. I will bring a revised and updated version of Gen Ed with me to the next
meeting.

6.   Curricular Items

     A. Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Minutes, March 25, 2009

         I.A.     Motion to approve new program English: Children’s/Young Adult Literature Concentration, BA,
                  BS degrees.

Jones – It seemed to me that 4 courses is a pretty small concentration for what they‟re claiming on the rationale.
Nolan – The concentration appears to be 18 credits. Jones – my point is that only 4 of them have to do with
children‟s literature. Alton – I wrote most of the concentration. We created this to be parallel to other
concentrations in our department. Motion passed.

         Rationale: The B.A. and B.S. degrees in English Language and Literature afford students the opportunity
         to master the interrelated skills of critical thinking, reading, and writing through immersion in courses in
         linguistics, composition, and literature. All English majors must take 21 hours of core courses and 18 hours
         of restricted and unrestricted electives for a total of 39 hours. This concentration enables students to focus
         their unrestricted electives on the study of Children‟s/Young Adult Literature and parallels existing
         concentrations in Creative Writing and World Literature.

         The Children‟s/Young Adult Literature faculty in the English Department represent one of the largest
         interest groups in the department and one of the largest concentrations of such faculty in the country,
         offering a wide variety of courses in children‟s and young adult literature on a regular basis. The courses
         needed to complete this concentration already exist, and no additional resources will be needed.

         Children‟s/Young Adult Literature is a rapidly growing field in high demand. Those with bachelor‟s
         degrees in English language and literature with a concentration in Children‟s/Young Adult literature will be
         well prepared to pursue graduate studies or enter related fields, such as publishing, librarianship, or
         teaching.

         Requested Bulletin copy (Show as requested to appear in the Bulletin.)

Owning Department or Council:       English Language and Literature

Degrees under which this program is offered:
   BA        Bachelor of Arts
   BS-A1     Bachelor of Science, Pln A1 Maj, Opt Min
   BS-B1     Bachelor of Science, B All Maj:Sel Min

CURRENT PROGRAM:

See the General statements that apply to English majors at the beginning of this section.
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 5
Core Courses I (9 hours)

ENG 234 - Introduction to Literary Analysis 3(3-0)
ENG 349 - Shakespeare 3(3-0)
ENG 460 - Senior Seminar: Current Issues in English 3(3-0)

Core Courses II (3 hours)

Select one of the following:
ENG 175 - The Nature of Language 3(3-0)
ENG 271 - Modern Grammar 3(3-0)
ENG 375 - Introduction to Linguistics 3(3-0)
ENG 379 - History and Development of the English Language 3(3-0)
ENG 545 - Chaucer 3(3-0)
ENG 570 - Old English 3(3-0)

Core Courses III (3 hours)

Select one of the following:
ENG 251 - American Literature: Colonial Through the Romantic Period 3(3-0)
ENG 252 - American Literature: Realistic Period to the Present. 3(3-0)

Core Courses IV (3 hours)
Select one of the following:
ENG 235 - English Literature: Beginning to Romantic Period 3(3-0)
ENG 236 - English Literature: Romantic Period to Present 3(3-0)

Core Courses V (3 hours)
Select one of the following:
ENG 261 - Masterpieces of Ancient Literature 3(3-0)
ENG 262 - Masterpieces of European Literature 3(3-0)

Children’s and Young Adult Literature Concentration

Required Courses I (3 hours)

Select one of the following:
ENG 321 – 20th Century British and American Poetry 3(3-0)
ENG 332 – Contemporary Literature and Thought 3(3-0)
ENG 333 – Literatures of Non-Western Cultures 3(3-0)
ENG 336 – Early Modern English Literature 3(3-0)
ENG 339 – Victorian Literature and Thought 3(3-0)
ENG 340 – Modern British Literature 3(3-0)
ENG 351 – American Literature: Colonial and Early National Periods 3(3-0)
ENG 352 – American Literature: Romantic Period 3(3-0)
ENG 353 – American Literature: Realistic Period 3(3-0)
ENG 354 – American Literature: Modern Period 3(3-0)
ENG 362 – Literature of the Medieval World 3(3-0)
ENG 455 – The American Novel 3(3-0)

Required Courses II (3 hours)

Select one of the following:
ENG 334 – Literary and Cultural Theory 3(3-0)
ENG 345 – Studies in Authors 3(3-0)
ENG 435 – Studies in Texts 3(3-0)
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 6

Required Courses III (3 hours)

ENG 381 – Children‟s Literature 3(3-0)

Required Courses IV (9 hours)

Select three of the following:
ENG 385 – Poetry for Children and Young Adults 3(3-0)
ENG 481 – International Literature for Children and Young Adults 3(3-0)
ENG 482 – Fantasy for Youth 3(3-0)
ENG 580/LMT 580 – Literature for Young Adults 3(3-0)
ENG 581 – The History of Children‟s Literature 3(3-0)
ENG 582 – Cultural Pluralism in Young Adult and Children‟s Literature 3(3-0)
ENG 583 – The Heroic Tradition and Children‟s Literature 3(3-0)

Total: 39 semester hours

Note: One of the courses chosen from Literature or the Linguistics courses in the core must cover a literary period
prior to 1800.

         IMPLEMENTATION DATE: Spring 2010
         [Reference: HSBS CCC, 1/12/09, I.B.a.(1)]


         I.B.     Motion to approve curricular change in Human Development Minor. Motion passed.

         Rationale: The Department of Human Environmental Studies has created designators that represent the
         diverse individual programs within the department. As such, an independent study course and a special
         topics course have been created for each of the new designators and will replace the original HEV
         designators. In this case, HDF 490 will replace HEV 490; and HDF 497 will replace HEV 497. There is
         no change to the total number of credit hours on the human development minor.

         FROM:

         As of: 09/01/2009                   MAJOR/MINOR INFORMATION                        MN-HD
                                             Human Development Minor

         Existing Information From SAP
            Module Group:         MN-HD
            SAP Title:         Human Development Minor

         Owning Department or Council:       Human Environmental Studies

         Degrees under which this program is offered:
                            BA         Bachelor of Arts
                             BAA       Bachelor of Applied Arts
                             BFA2 Bachelor of Fine Arts, General Option
                             BMUS Bachelor of Music
                             BS-A1 Bachelor of Science, Pln A1 Maj, Opt Min
                             BS-B2 Bachelor of Science, B Sel Maj:All Min
                             BSBA Bachelor of Science in Business Admin
                             BSEE Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engr
                             BSET Bachelor of Science in Engineering Tech
                             BSME Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engr
                             BSW       Bachelor of Social Work
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 7


       CURRENT PROGRAM:

       The minor is designed to complement a wide variety of majors selected by students interested in working
       with individuals in family and human service settings. Due to the variability in students' goals for
       completing the minor, all students are encouraged to see an advisor prior to beginning the course work. The
       minor is authorized by a designated advisor in the Department of Human Environmental Studies.
       Enrollment in HDF 100 and a minimum GPA of 2.0 are required for authorization of the minor.

       Admission Requirements, Retention & Termination Standards
         1. Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 to sign the Human Development minor.
         2. Students must have a minimum program GPA of 2.5 in order to graduate with this minor.

       Required Courses I (6 hours)
         Growth and Development
         HDF 100 - Human Growth and Development: Lifespan 3(3-0)
         HDF 308 - Human Growth and Development: Theory 3(3-0)

       Required Courses II (3 hours)
         Growth and Development

       Select at least one of the following courses:
         HDF 302 - Human Growth and Development: Infancy 3(3-0)
         HDF 303 - Human Growth and Development: Early Childhood 4(3-2)
         HDF 306 - Human Growth and Development: Adolescence 3(3-0)
         HDF 418 - Family Development in Late Life 3(3-0)
         HDF 516 - Family Development: Early Adulthood/Middle Age 3(3-0)

       Required Courses III (3 hours)
         Family within a Developmental Context

       Select at least one of the following courses:
         HDF 211 - Marriage and Family Perspectives 3(3-0)
         HDF 291 - Human Environmental Studies: Family Ecology 3(3-0)
         HDF 307 - Human Growth and Development: Parent-Child Relations 3(3-0)

       Required Courses IV (3 hours)
         Diversity within a Developmental Context

       Select at least one of the following courses:
         HDF 110 - Oppression: Roots and Impact on Human Development in the United States 3(3-0)
         HDF 212 - The Family in Cultural Perspective 3(3-0)
         HDF 318 - Indigenous Families and Survival: A Global Perspective 3(3-0)
         SPE 126 - Introduction to Special Education 3(3-0)
         SPE 550 - Teaching Culturally Diverse Students 3(3-0)
         Note: You may count either SPE 126 OR SPE 550, not both.

       Electives I (0-3 hours)
         Any course not used from above list to fulfill requirements may be used for elective credit. Additionally
         approved electives include:
         CDO 130 - Normal Speech and Language Acquisition 3(3-0)
         CDO 230 - Introduction to Speech, Language, and Hearing Disorders 3(3-0)
         ENG 381 - Children's Literature 3(3-0)
         FNS 370 - Nutrition 3(3-0)
         GRN 247 - Introduction to Gerontology 3(3-0)
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 8
           HDF 213/WST 213 - Introduction to Human Sexuality 3(3-0)
           HDF 315 - Family Management Theory 3(3-0)
           HDF 506 - Human Growth and Development: Practicum in Parent Involvement 3(2-2)
           HDF 508 - Human Growth & Development: Preschool Administration 3(3-0)
           HDF 510 - Human Growth and Development: Seminar 3(3-0)
           HEV 490 - Independent Study 1-6(Spec)
           HEV 497 - Special Topics 1-15(Spec)
           HSC 205 - Responding to Emergencies 2(1-2)
           HSC 519 - Death Education and Suicide Prevention 3(3-0)
           HST 221/WST 221 - Growing Up in America 3(3-0)
           IET 232 - Technology for Children 2(1-2)
           PSY 322 - Psychology of Infancy and Early Childhood 3(3-0)
           PSY 324 - Childhood and Adolescence 3(3-0)
           PSY 325 - Psychology of Aging 3(3-0)
           REL 334 - Death and Dying: Religious Dimensions 3(3-0)
           RPL 206 - Recreation Activities Leadership 3(3-0)
           SOC 222 - Juvenile Delinquency 3(3-0)
           SOC 320 - Sociology of Aging and Retirement 3(3-0)
           SOC 412 - Sociology of Adolescence 3(3-0)
           TAI 373 - Oral Interpretation for Children 3(3-0)
           TAI 585 - Creative Dramatics 3(2-2)
           Note: Select only one of: CDO 130 OR 230; GRN 247 OR PSY 325 OR SOC 320; PSY 322 OR 324;
           SOC 222 OR 412; TAI 373 OR 585.

       Total: 24-25 semester hours


       TO:
                        MAJOR/MINOR INFORMATION                       MN-HD
                        Human Development Minor

       Existing Information From SAP
          Module Group:         MN-HD
          SAP Title:         Human Development Minor

       Owning Department or Council:      Human Environmental Studies

       Degrees under which this program is offered:
                          BA         Bachelor of Arts
                           BAA       Bachelor of Applied Arts
                           BFA2 Bachelor of Fine Arts, General Option
                           BMUS Bachelor of Music
                           BS-A1 Bachelor of Science, Pln A1 Maj, Opt Min
                           BS-B2 Bachelor of Science, B Sel Maj:All Min
                           BSBA Bachelor of Science in Business Admin
                           BSEE Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engr
                           BSET Bachelor of Science in Engineering Tech
                           BSME Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engr
                           BSW       Bachelor of Social Work

       CURRENT PROGRAM:

       The minor is designed to complement a wide variety of majors selected by students interested in working
       with individuals in family and human service settings. Due to the variability in students' goals for
       completing the minor, all students are encouraged to see an advisor prior to beginning the course work. The
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 9
         minor is authorized by a designated advisor in the Department of Human Environmental Studies.
         Enrollment in HDF 100 and a minimum GPA of 2.0 are required for authorization of the minor.

        Admission Requirements, Retention & Termination Standards
          1. Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 to sign the Human Development minor.
          2. Students must have a minimum program GPA of 2.5 in order to graduate with this minor.

        Required Courses I (6 hours)
          Growth and Development
          HDF 100 - Human Growth and Development: Lifespan 3(3-0)
          HDF 308 - Human Growth and Development: Theory 3(3-0)

        Required Courses II (3 hours)
          Growth and Development

        Select at least one of the following courses:
          HDF 302 - Human Growth and Development: Infancy 3(3-0)
          HDF 303 - Human Growth and Development: Early Childhood 4(3-2)
          HDF 306 - Human Growth and Development: Adolescence 3(3-0)
          HDF 418 - Family Development in Late Life 3(3-0)
          HDF 516 - Family Development: Early Adulthood/Middle Age 3(3-0)

        Required Courses III (3 hours)
          Family within a Developmental Context

        Select at least one of the following courses:
          HDF 211 - Marriage and Family Perspectives 3(3-0)
          HDF 291 - Human Environmental Studies: Family Ecology 3(3-0)
          HDF 307 - Human Growth and Development: Parent-Child Relations 3(3-0)

        Required Courses IV (3 hours)
          Diversity within a Developmental Context

        Select at least one of the following courses:
          HDF 110 - Oppression: Roots and Impact on Human Development in the United States 3(3-0)
          HDF 212 - The Family in Cultural Perspective 3(3-0)
          HDF 318 - Indigenous Families and Survival: A Global Perspective 3(3-0)
          SPE 126 - Introduction to Special Education 3(3-0)
          SPE 550 - Teaching Culturally Diverse Students 3(3-0)
          Note: You may count either SPE 126 OR SPE 550, not both.

        Electives I (0-3 hours)
          Any course not used from above list to fulfill requirements may be used for elective credit. Additionally
          approved electives include:
          CDO 130 - Normal Speech and Language Acquisition 3(3-0)
          CDO 230 - Introduction to Speech, Language, and Hearing Disorders 3(3-0)
          ENG 381 - Children's Literature 3(3-0)
          FNS 370 - Nutrition 3(3-0)
          GRN 247 - Introduction to Gerontology 3(3-0)
          HDF 213/WST 213 - Introduction to Human Sexuality 3(3-0)
          HDF 315 - Family Management Theory 3(3-0)
          HDF 506 - Human Growth and Development: Practicum in Parent Involvement 3(2-2)
          HDF 508 - Human Growth & Development: Preschool Administration 3(3-0)
          HDF 510 - Human Growth and Development: Seminar 3(3-0)
          HEV 490 - Independent Study 1-6(Spec)
          HDF 490 – Independent Study in Human Development & Family Studies 1-6(Spec)
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 10
           HEV 497 - Special Topics 1-15(Spec)
           HDF 497 – Special Topics in Human Development & Family Studies 1-15(Spec)
           HSC 205 - Responding to Emergencies 2(1-2)
           HSC 519 - Death Education and Suicide Prevention 3(3-0)
           HST 221/WST 221 - Growing Up in America 3(3-0)
           IET 232 - Technology for Children 2(1-2)
           PSY 322 - Psychology of Infancy and Early Childhood 3(3-0)
           PSY 324 - Childhood and Adolescence 3(3-0)
           PSY 325 - Psychology of Aging 3(3-0)
           REL 334 - Death and Dying: Religious Dimensions 3(3-0)
           RPL 206 - Recreation Activities Leadership 3(3-0)
           SOC 222 - Juvenile Delinquency 3(3-0)
           SOC 320 - Sociology of Aging and Retirement 3(3-0)
           SOC 412 - Sociology of Adolescence 3(3-0)
           TAI 373 - Oral Interpretation for Children 3(3-0)
           TAI 585 - Creative Dramatics 3(2-2)
           Note: Select only one of: CDO 130 OR 230; GRN 247 OR PSY 325 OR SOC 320; PSY 322 OR 324;
           SOC 222 OR 412; TAI 373 OR 585.

        Total: 24-25 semester hours

        IMPLEMENTATION DATE: Spring 2010
        [Reference: EHS CCC, 2/16/09, II.A.4.b.]


        I.C.     Motion to approve curricular change in Interior Design Major, BA, BAA, BS degrees. Motion
                 passed.

        Rationale: A new course (IND 155) was created specifically for interior design students. The course
        replaces AMD 155 in the Interior Design major and does not change the total number of credits for the
        Interior Design major.

FROM:

        As of: 09/01/2009        MAJOR/MINOR INFORMATION                       MJ-ID
                                 Interior Design Major

Existing Information From SAP
   Module Group:         MJ-ID
   SAP Title:         Interior Design Major

Owning Department or Council:      Human Environmental Studies

Degrees under which this program is offered:
   BA        Bachelor of Arts
   BAA        Bachelor of Applied Arts
   BS-A1       Bachelor of Science, Pln A1 Maj, Opt Min
   BS-B1       Bachelor of Science, B All Maj:Sel Min

CURRENT PROGRAM:

The Interior Design Program at CMU approaches the detailed design of interiors by drawing on diverse knowledge
from various disciplines emphasizing an integrated approach that relates interior design to its larger social and
architectural context. Students in the program are prepared to excel in a wide range of careers including commercial
and residential design as well as other related areas. A sequence of creative design studios is supported by both
theoretical and technical courses and students learn both traditional and digital visual presentation formats.
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 11

 Admission Requirements, Retention & Termination Standards
  1. A portfolio of visual work including 2-d design, 3-d design and freehand drawing;

  OR

    Twelve credit hours in Art selected from ART 105 (3); 115 (3); 118 (3); 135 (3); 160 (3); 185 (3); OR 285 (3);
    prior to beginning studio coursework in the Interior Design Program.

  OR

     a combination of portfolio work and art coursework.

   2. An Interior Design Program Application form, plus: a) transcript showing completion of ART course
     requirements; OR b) a portfolio of visual work OR a transcript and portfolio must be submitted to the
     Department of Human Environmental Studies in Wightman 205 for review.

   3. Students will be notified of their admissions status by Interior Design faculty and must be formally admitted to
      the program before taking studio courses (IND 131, 138, 337, 339, 437) or any course requiring studio courses
      as prerequisites.

   4. Students are permitted to begin selected courses in the Interior Design Program, including: AMD 155, IND
      139, IND 238, IND 332 prior to formal admission into the program.

   5. A limit of 12 credit hours of 100 and 200 level courses in Interior Design may be transferred to CMU. A
      visual review of student work is required.

   6. Students must achieve a C or better in all required courses to graduate with this major.

   7. Students must achieve a 2.7 program GPA or better to graduate with this major.

Required Courses (57 hours)
  AMD 155 - Introduction to Textiles 3(2-2)
  IET 357 - Residential Architectural Graphics 3(1-4)
  IND 131 - Interior Design Studio I: Introduction 3(1-4)
  IND 138 - Visual Communication for Interior Design 3(1-4)
  IND 139 - Interior Design Drafting 3(2-2)
  IND 238 - Design History and Precedent 3(3-0)
  IND 328 - Design History and Criticism 3(3-0)
  IND 332 - Human Shelter and Environment 3(3-0)
  IND 334 - Computer-Aided Design for Interiors 3(2-2)
  IND 336 - Materials and Components of Interior Design 3(3-0)
  IND 337 - Interior Design Studio II: Residential 3(1-4)
  IND 338 - Internship Preparation for Interior Design 1(Spec)
  IND 339 - Interior Design Studio III: Special User Groups 3(1-4)
  IND 432 - Seminar in Interior Design 3(3-0)
  IND 433 - Professional Practices in Interior Design 3(3-0)
  IND 434 - Advanced CAD for Interiors 3(2-2)
  IND 436 - Lighting and Other Mechanical Systems 3(2-2)
  IND 437 - Interior Design Studio IV: Contract 3(1-4)
  IND 438 - Interior Design Internship 2(Spec)
  IND 439 - Interior Design Studio V: Senior Thesis 3(1-4)

Total: 57 Semester hours
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 12
The Interior Design program has the right to request any student's work for display, publication or permanent use.
The department provides minimal supplies and equipment. Students are expected to purchase most of their personal
project materials.

Suggested Minors (20-24 hours): Art, Art History, Business Administration, Foodservice Administration,
Gerontology, History, Hospitality Services Administration, Industrial Technology, Journalism, Management,
Marketing, Psychology, Retailing, Sociology.

TO:
                            MAJOR/MINOR INFORMATION                       MJ-ID
                            Interior Design Major

Existing Information From SAP
   Module Group:         MJ-ID
   SAP Title:         Interior Design Major

Owning Department or Council:        Human Environmental Studies

Degrees under which this program is offered:
   BA        Bachelor of Arts
   BAA        Bachelor of Applied Arts
   BS-A1       Bachelor of Science, Pln A1 Maj, Opt Min
   BS-B1       Bachelor of Science, B All Maj:Sel Min

CURRENT PROGRAM:

The Interior Design Program at CMU approaches the detailed design of interiors by drawing on diverse knowledge
from various disciplines emphasizing an integrated approach that relates interior design to its larger social and
architectural context. Students in the program are prepared to excel in a wide range of careers including commercial
and residential design as well as other related areas. A sequence of creative design studios is supported by both
theoretical and technical courses and students learn both traditional and digital visual presentation formats.

 Admission Requirements, Retention & Termination Standards
  1. A portfolio of visual work including 2-d design, 3-d design and freehand drawing;

 OR

      Twelve credit hours in Art selected from ART 105 (3); 115 (3); 118 (3); 135 (3); 160 (3); 185 (3); OR 285 (3);
      prior to beginning studio coursework in the Interior Design Program.

  OR

       a combination of portfolio work and art coursework.

   2. An Interior Design Program Application form, plus: a) transcript showing completion of ART course
     requirements; OR b) a portfolio of visual work OR a transcript and portfolio must be submitted to the
     Department of Human Environmental Studies in Wightman 205 for review.

   3. Students will be notified of their admissions status by Interior Design faculty and must be formally admitted to
      the program before taking studio courses (IND 131, 138, 337, 339, 437) or any course requiring studio courses
      as prerequisites.

   4. Students are permitted to begin selected courses in the Interior Design Program, including: IND 155, IND 139,
      IND 238, IND 332 prior to formal admission into the program.
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 13
   5. A limit of 12 credit hours of 100 and 200 level courses in Interior Design may be transferred to CMU. A
      visual review of student work is required.

   6. Students must achieve a C or better in all required courses to graduate with this major.

   7. Students must achieve a 2.7 program GPA or better to graduate with this major.

Required Courses (57 hours)
  AMD 155 - Introduction to Textiles 3(2-2)
  IND 155 – Introduction to Textiles 3(2-2)
  IET 357 - Residential Architectural Graphics 3(1-4)
  IND 131 - Interior Design Studio I: Introduction 3(1-4)
  IND 138 - Visual Communication for Interior Design 3(1-4)
  IND 139 - Interior Design Drafting 3(2-2)
  IND 238 - Design History and Precedent 3(3-0)
  IND 328 - Design History and Criticism 3(3-0)
  IND 332 - Human Shelter and Environment 3(3-0)
  IND 334 - Computer-Aided Design for Interiors 3(2-2)
  IND 336 - Materials and Components of Interior Design 3(3-0)
  IND 337 - Interior Design Studio II: Residential 3(1-4)
  IND 338 - Internship Preparation for Interior Design 1(Spec)
  IND 339 - Interior Design Studio III: Special User Groups 3(1-4)
  IND 432 - Seminar in Interior Design 3(3-0)
  IND 433 - Professional Practices in Interior Design 3(3-0)
  IND 434 - Advanced CAD for Interiors 3(2-2)
  IND 436 - Lighting and Other Mechanical Systems 3(2-2)
  IND 437 - Interior Design Studio IV: Contract 3(1-4)
  IND 438 - Interior Design Internship 2(Spec)
  IND 439 - Interior Design Studio V: Senior Thesis 3(1-4)

Total: 57 Semester hours

The Interior Design program has the right to request any student's work for display, publication or permanent use.
The department provides minimal supplies and equipment. Students are expected to purchase most of their personal
project materials.

Suggested Minors (20-24 hours): Art, Art History, Business Administration, Foodservice Administration,
Gerontology, History, Hospitality Services Administration, Industrial Technology, Journalism, Management,
Marketing, Psychology, Retailing, Sociology.

         IMPLEMENTATION DATE: Spring 2010
         [Reference: EHS CCC, 2/16/09, II.A.4.d.]



    B. Graduate Council Minutes, March 18, 2009

         I.1.     Motion to approve curricular changes to Master of Science in Experimental Psychology degree.

Francis – There was an issue with the lack of presented rationale. I do have the rationale now, and will put it on the
screen. The rationale focused on altering the required credit hours to 36 rather than 30-36, as this better reflects the
coursework listed as required. Jones – On page 3, it‟s supposed to add up to 36 hours. If you take all the
requirements, if I understood right, it would be 20 credits, and the electives are 10. Where do the thesis credits come
in? Hartshorne – it‟s listed in required courses. Jones – it still doesn‟t add up. Lehman – if it‟s lower in the cognate
it has to be higher in the electives. Francis – any other questions? Motion passed.
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 14

       MS – Experimental Psychology

       FROM:

       Existing Information From SAP
       Program of Study:        MS-PSY: EXP
       SAP Title:               MS-Experimental Psychology
       Bulletin Name:           Master of Science in Experimental Psychology
       Where Offered:           Main Campus Academic Units

       The Master of Science in Experimental Psychology program at Central Michigan University is a broad yet
       flexible program designed to develop individual scholarship. Students are exposed to a variety of content
       areas, while concentrating on a major area of study. Throughout their program, all students are expected to
       be actively involved in research with a faculty member. The program's primary emphasis is to prepare
       students for doctoral study or research positions in the public or private sector.

       Minimum Totals for Graduation 30 – 36 hours

       Experimental Psychology
       Admission Requirements, Retention & Termination Standards

       Application Deadline for all materials: February 1

       The Master of Science degree in Experimental Psychology is based upon the satisfactory completion of a
       minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate work.

       When applying for the Master of Science degree in Experimental Psychology, applicants must send three
       letters of reference and official GRE scores directly to the Department of Psychology. Fifteen semester
       hours of undergraduate psychology or the equivalent as determined by the department, and a 3.0 grade
       point average, are required for admission. Students who are deficient in certain subject areas such as
       statistics (PSY 211) or methodology (PSY 285, PSY 385) will be expected to make up these deficiencies in
       addition to the normally prescribed graduate course work for the degree. A maximum of nine credit hours
       earned during non-degree status may be applied toward the MS degree.

       Required Courses (14 hours)
               PSY 511 - Statistics in Psychology 3(3-1)
               PSY 609 - History and Systems of Psychology 3(3-0)
               PSY 690 - Research Seminar: Experimental Psychology 1-3(Spec)
               PSY 798 - Thesis 1-6(Spec)

                Note: 2 hours of PSY 690; 6 hours of PSY 798.

                In addition to course work, a student must complete an oral examination over the thesis.

       Additional Requirement I (3 hours)
               Select one course from the following:
               PSY 611 - Research Design 3(3-0)
               PSY 612 - Applied Multiple Regression and Correlation 3(3-0)
               PSY 613 - Multivariate and Correlational Methods 3(3-0)

       Additional Requirement II (3 hours)
               Select one course from the following:
               PSY 587 - Physiological Psychology 3(3-0)
               PSY 687 - Physiological Foundations 3(3-0)
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 15
         Additional Requirement III (3 hours)
                 Select one course from the following:
                 PSY 589 - Cognitive Psychology 3(3-0)
                 PSY 680 - Learning 3(3-0)
                 PSY 681 - Sensation and Perception 3(3-0)

        Additional Requirement IV (3 hours)
                Select one course from the following:
                PSY 624 - Advanced Developmental Psychology 3(3-0)
                PSY 630 - Advanced Social Psychology 3(3-0)

        Cognate Courses (0-6 hours)
                To be chosen in consultation with an advisor.

        Electives (4-10 hours)
                 To be chosen in consultation with an advisor.

        Total: 30-36 semester hours


        TO:

        The Master of Science in Experimental Psychology program at Central Michigan University is a broad yet
        flexible program designed to develop individual scholarship. Students are exposed to a variety of content
        areas, while concentrating on a major area of study. Throughout their program, all students are expected to
        be actively involved in research with a faculty member. The program's primary emphasis is to prepare
        students for doctoral study or research positions in the public or private sector.

        Minimum Totals for Graduation 30 – 36 hours

        Experimental Psychology
        Admission Requirements, Retention & Termination Standards

        Application Deadline for all materials: February 1

        The Master of Science degree in Experimental Psychology is based upon the satisfactory completion of a
        minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate work.

        When applying for the Master of Science degree in Experimental Psychology, applicants must send three
        letters of reference and official GRE scores directly to the Department of Psychology. Fifteen semester
        hours of undergraduate psychology or the equivalent as determined by the department, and a 3.0 grade
        point average, are required for admission. Students who are deficient in certain subject areas such as
        statistics (PSY 211) or methodology (PSY 285, PSY 385) will be expected to make up these deficiencies in
        addition to the normally prescribed graduate course work for the degree. A maximum of nine credit hours
        earned during non-degree status may be applied toward the MS degree.

        Required Courses (14 hours)
                PSY 511 - Statistics in Psychology 3(3-1)
                PSY 609 - History and Systems of Psychology 3(3-0)
                PSY 690 - Research Seminar: Experimental Psychology 1-3(Spec)
                PSY 798 - Thesis 1-6(Spec)

                 Note: 2 hours of PSY 690; 6 hours of PSY 798.

                 In addition to course work, a student must complete an oral examination over the thesis.
Academic Senate Minutes
April 28, 2009
Page 16
         Additional Requirement I (3 hours)
                 Select one course from the following:

                  PSY 611 - Research Design 3(3-0)
                  PSY 612 - Applied Multiple Regression and Correlation 3(3-0)
                  PSY 613 - Multivariate and Correlational Methods 3(3-0)

         Additional Requirement II (3 hours)
                 Select one course from the following:

                  PSY 587 - Physiological Psychology 3(3-0)
                  PSY 687 - Physiological Foundations 3(3-0)

         Additional Requirement III (3 hours)
                 Select one course from the following:

                  PSY 589 - Cognitive Psychology 3(3-0)
                  PSY 680 - Learning 3(3-0)
                  PSY 681 - Sensation and Perception 3(3-0)

         Additional Requirement IV (3 hours)
                 Select one course from the following:

                  PSY 624 - Advanced Developmental Psychology 3(3-0)
                  PSY 630 - Advanced Social Psychology 3(3-0)

         Cognate Courses (0-6 hours)
                 To be chosen in consultation with an advisor.

         Electives (4-10 hours)
                  To be chosen in consultation with an advisor.

         Total: 30-36 semester hours

         IMPLEMENTATION DATE: Spring 2010
         [Reference: CST, 2/9/2009, II.B.1.a.]


7.        Senate Library Committee Letter: A copy of the letter was put on the overhead projector. Alton – I
wrote it as chair of the library committee. We resolved to ask the President and Provost for more support for the
library due to inflation in journal costs. Casey – Associate Dean of the Library. I want to thank Ann Alton for this
letter. We have been grateful for the support of the President and the Provost in the past few years. Ericksen –
seeing the debate in our department regarding the difficult task of cutting journals due to increased cost, I’d like to
move support for this letter. Jones – seconded. Motion passed.

8. Other: Jones – Perhaps you could share with everyone regarding the letter from the Provost. Francis – The
Provost has written a response to our past discussion regarding caps to class size. The Provost‟s interpretation of the
contract and the senates‟ role in this process is that she feels that the senate does not have the authority to limit class
size. We have not discussed this yet, because the information we were working on in Gen Ed were not finalized.
Now that we have finished that, it will come up again. There are processes to take care of such disagreements
between the faculty and administration.

9.   Adjournment: Moved by Nolan, seconded by Orf. Meeting adjourned at 4:25 pm.

Respectfully Submitted,
Bryan Gibson, Secretary