FOLIO by wuxiangyu

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									                            FOLIO

          PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR INSTRUCTIONAL
                         LEADERSHIP

                    SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT
                         ALL GRADES

                    CERTIFICATION PROGRAM


FEBRUARY 2002




                 EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

          DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION,

                    LEADERSHIP, AND RESEARCH
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

                   WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY




                                                       Edited 8/03



Preface
based economy, educated and skilled and motivated graduates" (in Thomson, 1992, p.v).


         All school leaders for America's public schools face new challenges and opportunities

 daily as the nation moves forward in the information age. For example, "As Alvin Toffler makes

 clear in Power Shift, schools now generate the basic commodity critical to a knowledge-

Furthermore, Thomson (1992) states, "As public expectations for schools rise ... the citizenry

looks increasingly at principals and superintendents for answers" (p. v). "As premium players

in a suddenly high-stakes game, ...(success) requires ... different preparation and certification

programs than typically can be found today, programs that focus on leadership skills and

change processes and quality classroom instruction and problems of practice, as well as

accountability for outcomes" (Thomson, 1992, pp. v-vi). Attempting to meet these techniques,

and clearer and higher standards to develop a new generation of students for a new millennium.

       The diverse population being served requires capacity for providing instructional

programs appropriate for addressing an increasingly global setting. As Wallace (1992) states

"comprehensive, multicultural education programs will be required to motivate poor and

minority students to achieve at a higher level of educational, civic, and political

leadership..."(p. 9). Additionally, he calls for many of the shifts currently underway in schools

such as articulation of vision centered on specific actions and outcomes, use of diversified

assessment, community and businesses through partnerships and increased communication

collaborations for comprehensive youth services across school and agency lines, the continued

need of adequate and equitable financial funding, and a change to dynamic interchanges of

leadership that involve all employees (Wallace, 1992).



The culture of the traditional school, with its layers of bureaucratic organization and centralized
locus of control, is not suited to the -task at hand. Rather, a new culture has emerged. One


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which examines carefully and reframes, as needed, the basic assumptions and beliefs about
people and organizations, which heretofore guided decision making in public schools. Such
culture shifts require leaders who understand the mission of the revised school and its role in a
changing nation. Similarly, Deal (1992) describes this as a needed change in the frames of
leadership from managerial to leadership by shifting from human resources and structural
frames to the use of political and symbolic frames. He discusses the need to shift from roles as
servants, or catalysts, or social architects to roles as advocates, prophets, negotiators, and
coalition builders.
Leaders also must become " Change Masters," to use Canter's term (1983). They must have a
clear command of the change process if appropriate and adequate leadership guides the
initiation, implementation, and institutionalization of productive change (Hall & Hord, 1987).
Leaders according to Thomson (1992) can "...understand change as well as manage it" (p. vi). .
Deal (1990) maintains that symbolic structures and patterns cannot be reformed. Schools will
have to be transformed into more open, inclusive, democratic, and problem-solving
organizations. This task can best be accomplished by "leaders and followers [who] raise one
another to higher levels of morality and motivation" (Burns, 1978, p. 20). These
transformational leaders work at the micro level as they influence individuals and at the macro
level as they mobilize power to change the organization (Yukl, 1989). It is this ability to
transform that undergirds the programs of Educational Leadership at Western Kentucky
University.




I. Conceptual Framework

A. Statement of Conceptual Framework
       All programs in educational administration in the Department of Educational

Administration, Leadership and Research in the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences

at Western Kentucky University (WKU) are designed to develop and train transformational

leaders. These standards-based programs of study are designed to prepare high quality

educational administrators who have demonstrated a significant degree of commitment to the

profession and desire an opportunity to develop and enhance their leadership skills. These

leaders base all decisions and actions on effects related to the improvement of student success

viewed holistically. Successful completion of program requirements are intended to develop

transformational leaders who:


(1)    Interpret and utilize data and to improve instruction and performance.


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(2)    Demonstrate knowledge of and commitment to issues of equity

       and ethics in a pluralistic world.

       (3) Facilitate an inclusive, collaborative culture including all such community
       stakeholders in the promotion of creativity and optimal performance.
(4)    Influence and lead individuals through systemic reform of their context.

       The educational administration preparation programs in the Department of Educational

Administration, Leadership and Research at Western Kentucky University are closely aligned

to and in concurrence with the standards for educational administrators as adopted by the

Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board (KYEPSB), Interstate School Leaders

Licensure Consortium (ISLLC), and National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education

NCATE). These standards define course outcomes, influence instructional delivery, and

provide a basis for assessment. Upon successful completion of the standards-based pro-ram,

students will be transformational leaders who are: (1) leaders in instructional matters, (2)

communicators in positive, promotional, and pro-active ways, (3) organizational leaders

grounded in legal and ethical foundations and, (4) building and plant managers practicing

sound financial activities.

       Integral to the success of any transformational leader in educational settings is the

ability to effectively choose and use technological tools and information systems in their role as

instructional leader, communicator, and organizational manager. Today's leader must be

cognizant of and capable in the use of technologies such as computer-assisted instruction, CD

ROMs, the internet, interactive video, and other communication and information retrieval

systems. This is only the beginning of requisite and emerging knowledge needed to lead

schools into and through the information age of the twenty-first century. Even now the state of

technology and information systems require integration within and across media and all other

functions of the leader; therefore, each program of study uses a continuously updated -

integrated technological approach in the preparation of transformational leaders.




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        Wallace (1992) contends,” comprehensive, multicultural education programs will be

required to motivate poor and minority students to achieve at a higher level than is typically

found... (therefore) school leaders must exhibit a higher level of educational, civic, and political

leadership..." (p. 9) The discipline and the programs at WKU require students to incorporate

diversity throughout course work and assessments. To demonstrate, as Thomas (1992)

describes, an understanding of the "role of school administrators in promoting the common

good... (through a) keen sense of distributive justice ... equity... access.... act(ing) on the basis

of justice and fairness.... (with a) commitment to informing decisions" (pp. 48-49). In the WKU
programs of study students will gain an understanding of the need for varied teaching and

learning styles and specific student needs based on gender, ethnicity, culture, social class, and

exceptionalities. Further, as McCleary (1992) describes, leaders need an "understanding, of

how schools and schooling came to be as they are and where they can make a difference in the

lives of children and youth.... (through) education policy and change..." Because of this need

for strong social science knowledge primary consideration in the design of courses emphasizes

philosophical, sociological, and historical foundations, democratic values, geographic

locations, and changing conditions.

        Instructional delivery for these standards-driven programs are focused on three

hierarchical levels of knowledge attainment identified as knowledge acquisition, knowledge

development, and knowledge utilization. Each level is defined by a variety of instructor

responsibilities, student responsibilities, learning opportunities, and assessments. During the

last two levels there are clinical experiences embedded in classes rather than tagging on

separately at the end of coursework. This is a preferred method as demonstrated by Thomson

(1992) when he states, "Executive functions of the school administrator must be defined,

taught, observed, and practiced by candidates rather than simply presented to them" (p. vii).

Additionally, Deal (1992) suggests field administrators feel "mentoring novices (is) ... more
effective... than trying to make work for part-time interns or practicum participants" (p. 6).

Deal also suggests that novices "need formal opportunities to reflect" and that the "process of

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learning (should) ... move from lecture and recall to case studies, films, simulations" (p. 6)

These experiences according to Deal (1992) "should develop self-knowledge ...

(understandings of the) political and symbolic aspects of the context... and a broad

understanding of the past, present, and future social and economic forces..." (p. 6). Forsyth

(1992) suggests, "It seems reasonable that preparation for the practice of school administration

should gradually give candidates authority and responsibility for problem finding, and

intervention in increasingly realistic settings until an individual is licensed to practice

independently" (p. 26). These positions and assumptions are the basis for the three level
hierarchical approach at WKU in the educational administration programs of study.


B. Relationship to the Conceptual Framework

All programs in educational administration in the Department of Educational Administration,
Leadership, and Research in the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences at Western
Kentucky University (WKU) are designed to develop and train transformational leaders. These
standards-based programs of study are designed to prepare high quality educational
administrators who have demonstrated a significant degree of commitment to the profession
and desire an opportunity to develop and enhance their leadership skills. Upon successful
completion of the program, students will be transformational leaders who are: (1) leaders in
instructional matters, (2) communicators in positive, promotional, and pro-active ways, (3)
organizational leaders grounded in legal and ethical foundations and, (4) building and plant
managers practicing sound financial activities. These leaders base all decisions and actions on
effects related to the improvement of student success viewed holistically. Successful
completion of program requirements are intended to develop transformational leaders who:
 (1) promote and utilize research in the field of educational administration.
 (2) demonstrate knowledge of and commitment to issues of equity and ethics in a
(3) facilitate organizational cultures, which promote creativity

   and optimal performance.

(4) lead complex social and educational institutions through productive

   change initiatives.

       Each program is integrated into the overall schema provided by the School of

Integrative Studies in Teacher Education, College of Educational and Behavioral Sciences at




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WKU, related to the mission of developing quality educators. Quality programs are built on

infrastructures keyed to history, philosophy, theory, research, and practical applications.

Each certification program in educational administration at WKU is based on and is integrated
into the overall schema provided by the School of in Teacher Education, College of
Educational and Behavioral Sciences at WKU, related to the mission of developing quality
educators. Quality programs are built on infrastructures keyed to history, philosophy, theory,
research, and practical applications.
        Each certification program in educational administration at WKU is based on The

Standards for School Leaders Developed by the Interstate School Leaders Licensure

Consortium (ISLLC) within the council of Chief State School Officers (1996) and adopted by

the Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board in May of 1998




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                   THE SIX ISLLC STANDARDS ARE AS FOLLOWS:

STANDARD I

       A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students

by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of

learning that is shared and supported by the school community.

STANDARD II

       A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students

by advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive

to student learning and staff professional growth.

STANDARD III

       A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students

by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and

effective learning environment.

STANDARD IV

       A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students

by collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community

interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.

STANDARD V

       A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students

by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.




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STANDARD VI

       A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students

by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal,

and cultural context.

See Appendix J, Page 104, ISSLC Standards

II.    PROGRAM EXPERIENCES
       Candidates aspiring to complete and obtain the Professional Certificate for Instructional

Leadership--School Superintendent must have completed both Level I and Level II preparation

and certificates for one of the positions of early elementary school principal, middle school

principal, secondary school principal, or supervisor of instruction. These facets comprise the

basis for the program components: General Education, Specialty Area and Professional Studies.
A.      GENERAL EDUCATION
       The General Education components are based on the undergraduate background and the

master's degree or graduate background as identified in the Western Kentucky University

Graduate Catalog. The General Education requirements and components are basically the same

for all programs. Specifics are identified in the Admission requirements in Section IV of the

Folio.
B.     SPECIALTY AREA
       The Specialty Area is based on the courses required in the Level I and Level II

programs for principal and supervisor of instruction [course descriptions may be found in

Appendix B]. The certification program for School Superintendent is a twelve [12] semester

hour program. The following, specific courses are required for all students who aspire to

obtain the Professional Certificate for Instructional Leadership School Superintendent:
EDAD 639 The Superintendency - Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and two years of
school administrative experience. Function, role, and responsibilities of the school
superintendent. Topics include politics and education; superintendent's relationships with the



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school board, central office staff, and with the state department of education; the budget
process; strategic planning; and curriculum leadership.
EDAD 649 School System Administration – Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. School
systems operations including finances, auxiliary services human resources, federal and state
programs, facilities, and curriculum and instruction.
EDAD 659 Strategic Planning In Education - Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
Examination of planning processes used by leaders to direct educational change and
improvement. Includes strategic planning approaches designed to address macro and micro
organizational goals.
EDAD 598 Field-Based Experience in Educational Administration. - Clinical experiences
with practitioners in the field to acquaint the prospective administrator/supervisor with the
realities of educational organizations.
C.       PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
       The professional studies component is based on the certification for teaching,

principalship and/or supervisor of instruction, master's degree, and the years of educational

experience. The emphasis for this program is found in the Specialty Area component.
D.     FIELD AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCES
       The program for School Superintendent gives emphasis to field and clinical experiences

requiring a practicum with the course EDAD 639, The Superintendency. The practicum

involves a minimum of twenty-five [25] clock-hours. Under the direction of the cooperating

administrator, the student must work in at least ten and may work in all twelve activity areas

identified. The activities listed under each area are representative of the types of experiences,

which may be included in the field-based experiences. These may be found in Appendix C,

page 30.
E.     EXPLICIT PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
       The School Superintendent (all grades) serves as chief administrator of the school

organization. As an effective instructional leader, the school superintendent shares decision

making when appropriate; involves parents and other citizens in the school/community

partnership; serves as a resource in professional development; staff supervision, curriculum

planning, and instructional program management for the school; develops and promotes the

school's common vision within the district and the community; and creates common vision

within the district and the community; and creates positive human relations and a productive
climate within the school.


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   1. The program objectives for the school superintendent program are:

   2. To provide basic understanding of the theoretical, legal, and conceptual underpinnings

   of educational administration;

   3. To provide background information and useful techniques in curriculum, supervision,

   related social sciences, and research;

   4. To provide information about administering special programs --special education,

   counseling, gifted, vocational, etc.;

   5. To familiarize students with school business affairs and other specialized administrative

   areas;

To provide an understanding of the functions of the superintendent as an educational

    leader,

To provide through a supervised internship "hands on" experience;

   6. To provide opportunity to develop professionally in areas of particular interest;

To develop an understanding of evaluation and assessment concepts for personnel and

   students;

To develop an understanding of evaluation and assessment concepts for academic

   programs;

   7. To provide the students an understanding of the big picture in educational

       administration as to how the local school district relates to the community, region, state,

       and nation;

To develop an in-depth understanding of the financing of schools from various sources and the
allocation of resources;
    8. To study the superintendency both in course work and through a supervised internship

       at the central office level;



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   9. To provide information concerning school plant management, development and

       planning. Explicit program objectives related to this role may be found in Appendix A '

       The following, competencies for School Superintendent were identified by the

       Kentucky Department of Education:

       1. The ability to communicate accurately and effectively.
       2. An understanding of the overall program of the school system and the role it plans

           as a subsystem of the community.

       3. The ability to evaluate school programs in terms of purposes, which have been

   cooperatively developed.
       4. A knowledge of all levels of school curriculum, K- 1 2.

        5. A knowledge of educational and psychological tests and their application to school
        programs.
 The ability to interpret the school district programs to students, parents, and
community.
The ability to monitor, evaluate, and coach administrative and staff personnel
   effectively.
The ability to organize and lead school personnel in effective short and long-range
    planning.
       9. The ability to provide leadership in the areas of staff development and in service.

       10. An understanding of the role of support services in the school district program.

       11. The ability to utilize modem technological tools in the administrative processes

    [i.e., computers].
        12. The ability to manage school facilities including knowledge of financing, design,

           construction, and maintenance of schools.

       13. The ability to effectively budget and manage fiscal resources.
       14. An understanding of the legal problems encountered in school administration.
       15. The ability to utilize the skills and resources of faculty, parents, and community by
             seeking and using input from them in the management process.
          16. The ability to provide leadership in the area of personnel management.
The ability to establish and maintain good public relations with the community and
    other constituencies.
       17. An understanding, of the role of the superintendent as the executive officer of the




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     board of education, the business manager of the system, and the educational leader
     of the school district.
 III.    THEMES

See Appendix L, Page 132, Matrix of NCATE Themes.

        Conceptual Framework The Department of Educational Administration, Leadership,
and Research’s goal to develop and train transformational leaders is imbedded throughout the
department’s programs. These standards-based programs of study are built upon the six ISLLC
Standards. Additionally, the core courses reflect the level at which the standards are addressed:
(1) knowledge acquisition, (2) knowledge development, and (3) knowledge utilization.
        Diversity The Administrative Leadership Institute, a joint endeavor of Western
Kentucky University’s Department of Educational Administration, Leadership, and Research
and the Kentucky Department of Education, is addressing the need for greater ethnic and racial
diversity among the state’s instructional leaders. The program, now in its fourth year, has
established a successful record in preparing minority students for leadership roles. Also, more
focused upon the P-12 studies, the department offers seminars in curriculum development, and
school and community which are sensitive to and appropriate for a diverse body of leaders.
Intellectual Vitality The focus of instruction is the preparation of educational practioners. This
is accomplished from a strong theoretical/conceptual base which moves directly into practice.
This is realized in part by the use of real-life scenarios and case studies. Courses are designed
to move students from knowledge/comprehension, to application/analysis, and ultimately to
synthesis/evaluation.
Technology Mulit-media presentations are commonplace not only in instructor presentations
but also in student presentations. Additionally, distance learning occurs through interactive
television to three off-campus sites. Many courses have web-enhanced components through
the use of Course Info.
Professional Community Resources outside the university community are actively sought.
Such include, but are not limited to, the Kentucky Department of Education Resource staff,
superintendents, attorneys, principals and district administrative/instructional staff. Internships
and practicums also include numerous stakeholders in the community.
Evaluation and Performance Assessment Continuous assessment is detailed in Appendix J,
Continuous Assessment. In summary, it includes ongoing assessment tools, integrated
assessment mechanisms in program development, and assessment systems with monitoring and
feedback with results in on-going program and course refinements/revisions. Included are
follow-up surveys of our graduates, input from the Green River Regional Education
Cooperative (GRECC) Board (consisting of regional superintendents), and creation of an
advisory group designed and operational zed using the guidelines of the Southern Regional
Education Board (SREB).
IV      CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT

               See Appendix K page, 127, Continuous Assessment

     Students pursuing the Professional Certificate for Instructional Leadership- School
  Superintendent (all grades) must meet the following admission/retention criteria:
ADMISSION CRITERIA:



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A.     Western Kentucky University Criteria:

1.     The candidate must have earned a grade point average of 3.2 or above [4.0 scale] in all
graduate work attempted.
2.      The candidate must have earned an acceptable score on the GRE, MAT, or NTE.
3.      The candidate must present three positive recommendations from colleagues or
superiors who are familiar with the candidate's potential for a leadership position in the schools.
   4. The candidate must receive favorable consideration from the admissions review
committee, which shall be composed, of faculty teaching in the program and practicing
administrators in the public schools.
B.      The candidate must have completed three [3] years of full-time teaching and two [2]
years of administrative experience.
C.      The candidate must have completed the master's degree.
D.      The candidate must have been issued a Standard Teaching Certificate valid for regular
classroom teaching, in grades K-4, 5-8, or 9-12.
E.      The candidate must have completed both Level I and Level 11 preparation and
certification for any principal, or supervisor of instruction. For specifics on each of these
programs refer to the respective Folio.
RETENTION CRITERIA:

      In order to remain in good standing in the program, the student will be expected to earn

      a grade point average 3.0 (A=4.00) and exhibit satisfactory performance as identified

      through the ISLLC Standards.




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       V. Program Faculty

     Name           Degree         Specialty          Responsibility           Load

   Ron Adams        Ed. D.   Research, Eval Method.     Instructor       Optional Retired

 Vickie Basham      Ed. D.       Principal, Inst        Instructor            Visiting

  Dwight Cline      Ed. D.      Change, Inst Ldr        Instructor       Optional Retired

  Gayle Ecton       Ed. D.       Supt., Finance         Instructor      Fulltime to Program

  Jeanne Fiene      Ph. D.      SCR, Curriculum         Instructor      Fulltime to Program

  Lois Jircitano    Ph. D.            Law               Instructor      Fulltime to Program

 Mary O’Phelan      Ph. D.     Research, Testing        Instructor      Fulltime to Program

William Schlinker   Ed. D.     Instruction Leaders      Instructor            Visiting

  Sharon Spall      Ed. D.          Research            Instructor      Fulltime to Program

   Jim Stone        Ph. D.     Instruction Leader       Instructor      Fulltime to Program

  Chris Wagner      Ph. D.     Principal, Inst Ldr      Instructor      Fulltime to Program

JianLiang Wang      Ed. D.          Research            Instructor      Fulltime to Program

   Sam Evans        Ph. D.    C & I-Secondary Ed        Instructor     FT to Inst. PT to Prog.

  John Moore        Ed. D.      C&I-Middle Ed           Instructor     FT to Inst. PT to Prog.

   Judy Pierce      Ed. D.    C&I-Elementary Ed         Instructor     FT to Inst. PT to Prog.

   J.B. Skaggs      Ed. D.         Leadership           Instructor     Part-time to Program

   John Settle      Ed. D.      Leadership, Law         Instructor     Part-time to Program

    Bill Stout      Ed. D.      Special Ed., Law        Instructor     Part-time to Program

 Duane Tenant       Ed. D.     Philosophy, Leader       Instructor     Part-time to Program




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 COURSES TAUGHT BY FACULTY FALL 2001

  FACULTY                          COURSES

   Ron Adams                       EdFn 500

 Vickie Basham           EdAd 590, EdAd 682, & EdFn 576

  Dwight Cline                     EdAd 585

  Gayle Ecton                EdAd 598, & EdAd 639

  Jeanne Fiene           EdAd 596, EdAd 597, & EdAd 598

  Lois Jircitano         EdAd 677, EdFn 548, & EdAd 630

 Mary O’Phelan                EdFn 500, & EdFn 501

William Schlinker            EdAd 683, & EdAd 684

  Sharon Spall                EdAd 500 & EdAd 597

   Jim Stone                  EdAd 684, EdAd 686

  Chris Wagner                EdAd 690, EdAd 597

 Jianliang Wang                    EdFn 500

   Sam Evans                        SEC 545

  John Moore                        SEC 580

   Judy Pierce                      LED 503

   J.B. Skaggs                     EdAd 585




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       VI.     CURRICULUM GUIDESHEETS

The guidesheet for the program for Professional Certification for Instructional Leadership-
School Superintendent (all grades) are found in Appendix H. The following facets are
identified:


       Department and University

       Certification for School Superintendent

       Program Prerequisites

       Courses required

       Advisor and Advisee Signatures

       Date

       Required Tests




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APPENDICES


APPENDIX A – Explicit Program Objectives For School Superintendent

APPENDIX B – Course Description

APPENDIX C – Activity Areas for Field and Clinical Experiences – School

        Superintendent

APPENDIX D – Matrices For Explicit Program Objectives For School Superintendent

APPENDIX E – Matrices For Kentucky Competencies For School Superintendent

APPENDIX F – Matrices For AASA Competences and Skills

APPENDIX G – Matrices For ASCD Guidelines

APPENDIX H – Curriculum Guidesheet – Superintendent – All Grades

APPENDIX I – Modification of Program Approval By Education Professional Standards

               Boards

APPENDIX J – ISLLC Standards – Knowledge, Dispositions, and Performances

APPENDIX K – Continuous Assessment

APPENDIX L – Matrix for NCATE Themes

APPENDIX M – Matrix for KERA Initiatives




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APPENDIX A
EXPLICIT PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT




                              19
                                    APPENDIX A
                          EXPLICIT PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
                            SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT


The school superintendent serves as chief administrator of the school organization. As an
effective instructional leader, the school superintendent shares decision-making when
appropriate; involves parents and other citizens in the school/community partnership; serves as
a resource in professional development, staff supervision, curriculum planning, and
instructional program management for the school; develops and promotes the school's common
vision within the district and the community; and creates positive human relations and a.
productive climate within the school. Explicit program objectives related to this role are:

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION:

1.     Demonstrate an understanding of the history and philosophy of education.
2.     Demonstrate an understanding or trends and issues in education.
3.     Demonstrate an understanding of principles of educational and social psychology.
4.     Demonstrate an understanding or principles or learning, theories and the learning
process.
5.     Apply ethical principles to education practices and populations.
6.     Demonstrate an understanding of the role of communication and communication skills
in education.
7.     Demonstrate major concepts or educational research.
8.     Interpret educational research.
9.    Demonstrate an understanding of the proposal writing process.
EDUCATIONAL GOVERNANCE:

Demonstrate an understanding of the organizational structure and functions of
     educational governance at the federal, state, and local levels.
Demonstrate an understanding of the organizational structure and functions of
            educational governance at the state level in Kentucky.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of accreditation in Kentucky.

Demonstrate an understanding of interrelationships between school boards and
     superintendents.
  2. Analyze ways to establish and maintain positive school-parent relations.

   3. Demonstrate an understanding of student rights and responsibilities.

   4. Demonstrate an understanding of the maintaining and use of student records.

   5. Analyze procedures and standards for student discipline.




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   6. Demonstrate an understanding of types, purposes, and functions of student

        organizations and activities.

Demonstrate an understanding of school couseling and psychological services available
     to students.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of special student populations and their needs.

Demonstrate an understanding of causes of students' social problems and methods of referral to
outside agencies.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of multicultural education and its value.

   9. Demonstrate an understanding, of the political environment of school board meetings.

   10. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and functions of local board of

        education.

ORGANIZATIONAL ADINISTRATION:


Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of organizational theory.
  1.     Apply principles of organizational theory and practice.

   2.      Demonstrate an understanding of theories of leadership and leadership styles.

   3.      Demonstrate an understanding of the function planning.

   4.      Demonstrate an understanding of the principles and techniques of decision-making

Demonstrate an understanding of the goal-development and goal-implementation process.
  5.     Demonstrate an understanding of the principles or public school finance.

   6.      Demonstrate an understanding of school-budget development process.

   7.      Demonstrate an understanding of fiscal management.

   10. Demonstrate an understanding or facility planning and management.

Demonstrate an understanding of procedures for purchasing, storing, and distributing
equipment and supplies.
   11. Demonstrate an understanding of factors involved in school public relations.

   12. Demonstrate an understanding of the political environment of the school organization.

PERSONNEL SUPERVISION:



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1.      Demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics involved in effective interpersonal
relations.
2.      Analyze the principles and procedures related to administering personnel policies.
3.    Identify characteristics and functions of employee organizations.
4.    Apply counseling, concepts, techniques, and procedures refuted to management.
5.    Apply concepts and skills associated with team management.
6.      Apply concepts and skills associated with group facilitating.
7.    Identify the rights and responsibilities of teachers.
8.    Identify procedures for recruiting, interviewing, selecting, and assisting staff.
  9. Identify causes and procedures for suspending, non-renewing, and dismissing staff.

10.    Demonstrate in understanding of staff development programs and procedures.
11.    Analyze the relationship between administrative supervision and staff development.

12.    Demonstrate an understanding of procedures for assessing staff performance.

INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP:

1.     Demonstrate an understanding of curriculum development and planning.
2.     Demonstrate an understanding of principles of curriculum design.
3.     Identify reasons and strategies for implementing new or revised curricula.
4.     Demonstrate an understanding of curricular programs designed to address the needs of

special populations.

5.     Demonstrate an understanding of instructional management principles.
6.     Demonstrate an understanding of principles of program evaluation.
7.     Demonstrate an understanding of testing instruments and programs and their uses in

curriculum evaluation.

8.     Apply knowledge of statistical principles in testing and measurement.
9.     Demonstrate an understanding of student assessment methods and programs.




                                              22
APPENDICES B

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS




                      23
                                 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION
EdAd 583 Accounting for Pupil Personnel (3 hours) Emphasis the responsibilities of Directors
of Pupil Personnel, problems of personnel accounting, and records and reports related to the
Minimum Foundation Program.
EdAd 585 Fundamentals of School Administration (3 hours) Organization and administration
of American schools. Principles of effective leadership and the roles and responsibilities of
administrative supervisory positions.
EdAd 590 Administration of School Personnel (3 hours) Allocation of human resources to
accomplish the purposes of the school organization.
EdAd 594 Seminar on Leadership in Education (3 hours) Principles and practices of leadership
relative to community resources in the development and operation of education programs.
EdAd 596 Readings in Education (I to 3 hours) Prerequisite: Permission of major professor.
Reading and research in an area of individual interest. Supervised by the major professor.
EdAd 597 Problems in Administration and supervision ( to 3 hours) Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor. Identifying and attempting to solve administrative problems in the local school
setting.
EdAd 598 Field-Based Experience in Educational Administration (3 hours) Clinical
experiences with practitioners in the field to acquaint the prospective administrator/supervisor
with the realities of educational organizations.
EdAd 625 Practicum in the Administration of Special Education (3 hours) Supervised practice

           in educational organizations for persons preparing to become a Director of Special

           Education.

EdAd 630 Special Education Law and Finance (3 hours) Comprehensive study of existing

           school law codes, budgeting, and accounting for special education.

EdAd639 The Superintendency (3 hours) Function, role, and responsibilities of the school

           superintendent. Topics include politics and education; superintendent's

           relationships with the school board, central office staff, and with the state

           department of education; the budget process; strategic management; curriculum

           management.

EdAd 649 School System Administration (3 hours) – Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
School systems operations including finances, auxiliary services human resources, federal and
state programs, facilities, and curriculum and instruction.



                                                24
EdAd 659 Strategic Planning In Education (3 hours) - Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
Examination of planning processes used by leaders to direct educational change and
improvement. Includes strategic planning approaches designed to address macro and micro
organizational goals.
EdAd 674 Educational Technology for School Administrators (3 hours) Prerequisites: EdAd

           585, and either 691, 692, or 693. In special cases, permission of instructor would be

           required. Acquainting the prospective administrator with new and innovative

           technologies applicable to educational settings.

EdAd 676 Public School Finance (3 hours) School budgets and accounting for school money;

           unit costs and accounting; accounting for school property; insurance, business

           procedure, and office practice.

EdAd 677 School Law (3 hours) Clinical study of existing school code; judicial decision;

           administrative problems and school code.

EdAd 678 School Plant Administration (3 hours) Prerequisite: EdAd 585. Educational needs

           and building planning; architect service; standards of construction; building surveys.

EdAd 682 School-Community Relations (3 hours) Background, need, and techniques for

           establishing a wholesome working relationship with laymen, with emphasis on their

           involvement in school programs.

EdAd 683 Seminar in Curriculum Development (3 hours) Examination of factors influencing

           the curriculum development.

EdAd 684 Instructional Leadership (3 hours) Identification of practices and characteristics of

           supervisors and administrators, relative to curriculum and instruction, that have been

           shown to significantly improve student achievement.




                                               25
EdAd 690 The Early Elementary School Principalship (3 hours) Prerequisite: EdAd 585.

          Problems of instruction; classification, promotion, and guidance of pupils; custodial

          services; relationship with patrons and community.

EdAd 694 Seminar in Educational Administration (3 hours) Emphasis on current practices in

          administering special programs.

EdAd 695 School Surveys (3 hours) Gathering and interpreting data; evaluating educational

          programs and facilities; predicting future enrollment; and presenting results to

          school authorities.

EdAd 696 Advanced Theory in Education Administration (3 hours) Prerequisite:' Permission of

          instructor. Theoretical approaches to the study of education administration and

          leadership.

EdAd 697 Research in Administration and supervision (1 to 3 hours) Special projects in

          administration and supervision.

EdAd 698 Practicum in Administration and Supervision (3 to 6 hours) Prerequisite: Permission

          of instructor. Internship or other field experiences for administrators and

          supervisors.

EdAd 699 Specialist Project (6 hours)

EdAd 700 Maintaining Matriculation (1 to 6 hours)

EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS

EdFn 500 Research Methods (3 hours) Includes theory of research, experimental design,

          bibliographical and data gathering techniques, and interpretation of results.

EdFn 501 Educational Statistics (3 hours) Graphic and tabular arrangement of data, measures

          of central tendency and of relationship.




                                              26
EdFn 548 Research in curriculum and instruction (1 to 3 hours) Research in elementary
instructional problems in reading, mathematics, science, social studies, English, and in
elementary and secondary curriculum.
EdFn 57O Workshops in Education (1 to 3 hours) Special short courses on educational

           problems.

EdFn 576 Issues and Trends in Education (3 hours) Selected problems in American society,

           their impact on the educational system, and the possible role of that system in

           resolving such problems.

COURSES FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES:

CNS 550 Professional Orientation in Counseling (3 hours) the professional roles, functions,

         goals, and objectives of the counselor. Professional organizations, associations,

         history and trends. Ethical and legal standards, preparation standards and

         credentialing.

CNS 565 Elementary Guidance Services (3 hours) The organization, administration and

         delivery of Guidance on career services in the elementary school

CNS 566 Secondary Guidance Services (3) The organization, administration and delivery of

         graduate and career services in the secondary school.

CNS 663 Counseling the Exceptional Child and Parent (3 hours) General concepts of

         exceptionality, the needs of and effective counseling techniques for the exceptional

         child; referral, resources, staffing and coordination efforts of the counselor; the need

         for effective counseling techniques for the parent of the exceptional child.

PSY 511 Psychology of Learning (3 hours) Theories of learning including conditioning, social

         learning, reinforcement, problem solving, motivation and structure of the learning

         situation.




                                                27
ELED 503 Organization of the Elementary School Curriculum (3 hours) Principles and

          practices in elementary school curriculum construction. Emphasis on forces

          affecting curriculum, current innovations, and trends.

EXED 516 The Exceptional Child: Perspectives and Issues (3 hours) Characteristics, needs,

          and problems of children who are atypical in the mental, physical, sensory,

          emotional, and social areas of development.

MGE 45O Foundations of Middle Grades Instruction (3 hours) Philosophy, development,

          organization, and curriculum of middle grades education and introduces generic

          teaching skills related to effective teaching.

MGE 571 Middle School Curriculum (3 hours) Examination of programs designed for the

          young adolescent. Functions, organizations, planning, and evaluation of the

          curriculum. Includes special curricular areas.

LTCY 519 Foundations of Reading Instruction (3 hours)Analysis of the reading process with

          emphasis on the psychological and physiological foundations of the reading act.

SEC 580 The Curriculum (3 hours) Philosophy, principles and practices of curriculum

         improvement.




                                               28
APPENDIX C
ACTIVITY AREAS FOR FIELD AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCES
SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT




                               29
APPENDIX C
ACTIVITY AREAS FOR FIELD AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCES
NATURE AND SCOPE

Responsibilities of the school administrator in Kentucky public schools are continually
changing and demand competencies in may areas. To alert the prospective administrators of
the demands of the position and allow for actual management experiences, a practicum is
required. The Practicum Component in Educational Administration is for building level
experiences required for the public school principals program. The Practicum in District
Administration is in the central office setting for the supervisor's program and for the
superintendent’s program.
Practicum students are placed with approved cooperating educational systems to work under
the direct supervision of the selected school’s administrator. The student is required to keep a
daily log, which provides a comparative record in terms of the stated purposes and proposed
practicum activities. The practicum is an applied theory course; actual working administrative
experiences are required.




OBJECTIVES

The general objectives of the administrative practicum program are to provide the student with
an opportunity to participate in supervised on-the-job experiences which would better prepare
the student for an administrative career. Specifically, purposes of the instructional leadership
practicum are:
     To assist the sponsoring school or agency in training its administrative staff.

      To assist the sponsoring school or agency in maintaining an energetic administrative

       staff, stimulated by the practicum program to continue their professional growth.

      To provide the student with specific administrative area training while he/she gains an

       understanding of the total broad range of educational administration activities and

       responsibilities.

      To allow the student to apply administrative theory to practical administration.




                                               30
     To instill in the student an understanding of the Code of Ethics of the Education

      Profession and the Code of Ethics for School Administrators.

     To provide the student with a more comprehensive view of educational administration

      roles and responsibilities.

     To aid the student in gaining self-assurance in administrative decision-making through

      testing theories and ideas.

     To help the student in determining the area of educational administration in which

      he/she would be most competent.

     To assist the student in understanding and learning in a relatively short period of time

      from professional experiences of the cooperating administrator.



     To improve the student's skills in dealing with students, professional personnel, and

      community members.

     To help the student in making a gradual transition from teacher to administrator.

     To provide the student with the experiences needed to develop skills in the various

      techniques of leadership.

     To provide the student with the experiences needed to develop skills in the various

      techniques of evaluation programs, faculty, and staff.


REQUIREMENTS

     Hold a valid standard teaching certificate.

     Hold a master's degree.

     Have a minimum of three years of satisfactory teaching experience.




                                              31
      Secure commitment from the local school administrator or other agency for a practicum

       assignment with an appropriate cooperating administrator.

      Establish measurable objectives in conjunction with the cooperating administrator and

       with the approval of the university supervisor.

      Prepare a log of activities covering the practicum, drawing conclusions from the

       experiences gained in this endeavor, and making recommendations where warranted.

       Copies of the log should be submitted to the supervising professor. These copies should

       be dated and signed by the student and the cooperating administrator.

      Develop a major project (competencies) and the activities necessary to complete the

       project during the semester or develop a position paper on a contemporary educational

       administration problem/situation.

Attend any designated practicum meetings, which may be required.
THE COOPERATING ADMINISTRATOR

Each cooperating administrator works closely with the student, schedules conferences
regularly, and devotes a sufficient amount of time to assist the student in work assignments to
assure adequate opportunities for development. The cooperating administrator also evaluates
the student in consultation with the supervising professor.
THE UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR

The university supervisor performs four essential activities in the practicum: planning,
coordinating, supporting, and evaluating. The supervisor may periodically visit on the site
for consultation with the student and/or the cooperating administrator.
EVALUATION

      At the conclusion of the semester, the student will be evaluated by the supervising

professor.
     Evaluation will be made on the basis of the following:
Leadership ability expressed during the practicum period.
Ability to identify, define, and solve problems.
Adaptability to routine and schedule.

Understanding of the instructional program and philosophy of the school or agency.
Evidence of skill in human relations, communication, and decision-making.


                                               32
Level of maturity.

Quality of activity log.
Quality of projects or position paper.
Evidence of skill in evaluation of programs and personnel.
Timely submission of required reports.
Evaluation forms and data submitted by cooperating administrator.
Quality of written memos and letters.

ACTIVITY AREAS

Under the direction of the cooperating administrator, the student must work in at least ten and
may work in all twelve of the following activity areas. The activities listed under each area are
representative of the types of experiences, which may be included in the practicum.

ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION

          Study the administrative organization of the school district.

          Assist with the correspondence and suggest replies for letters.

          Prepare documents that are required in the cooperating administrator's office.

          Study administrative uses of the computer.


FINANCE

          Study the internal organization of the Business office and how it relates to the overall

           operation of the school.

          Study the budget planning process and prepare actual or mock budgets.

          Examine the purchasing and accounting procedures.

PERSONNEL

           Have knowledge of procedures used to employ and dismiss personnel, both

            professional and paraprofessional.

           Study the fringe benefits afforded personnel.

            Understand the various forms. and records kept in the personnel office.


                                                   33
           Learn procedures for hiring/training substitute teachers.

           Investigate and show understanding of the teacher evaluation process.

BUILDINGS AND MAINTENANCE

          Survey the building concerning the utilization of space and needed repairs.

          Study the equipment being used in the building and determine if more effective use

           might be made of the equipment.

          Devise custodial work schedules.

          Examine energy conservation measures.

SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS

          Attend parent-teacher organization meetings

          Attend various community meetings such as city council, zoning board, civic clubs, etc.

           in order to enhance the relationship of the school/school district to the community.

          Prepare news releases for the school to be printed in the local news media.

          Develop a plan whereby school and community relations might be improved.

CURRICULUM PLANNING AND SUPERVISION

          Study the curriculum in the school. Is it meeting the needs of the community?

          Make recommendations for curriculum change Determine the process for curricular

           change.

          Observe classrooms and evaluate performance in comparison to objectives, curriculum

           guides, and/or skills continuum. Examine the five-year plan of the school district.

          Study the computer usage in the instructional program and curriculum development.




                                                  34
TRANSPORTATION AND AUXILIARY SERVICES

     Survey the transportation program of the school district. Learn the operation of the

      school cafeteria, such as costs for food, labor, and the efficiency of the operation.

     Become familiar with other auxiliary services that may be a part of the school system.

EDUCATION AGENCIES AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

     Study various agencies that relate to the operation of the school such as the State

      Department of Education.

     Learn to know the professional associations that relate to the position in which you are

      doing your practicum. Become involved in these professional organizations.

BOARD-SUPERINTENDENT-PRINCIPAL RELATIONS

     Attend school board meetings and administrative conferences.

     Read board policy and handbooks.

     Understand the job description of the position at all levels.

STUDENT PERSONNEL

     Be familiar with the grading system and be able to give data supporting the system.

     Review the existing student behavior policy. Set up list of alternatives for handling
      discipline.

     Learn accounting and records systems used for students.

     Review current student handbooks.

RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL STUDY

     Visit other schools to compare programs.

     Read professional journals to stay current and stimulate thinking.



OTHER SUITABLE ACTIVITIES


                                               35
This category may include other areas as assigned by the cooperating administrator or
university professor.
ADDITIONAL SUGGESTED PRACTICUM ACTIVITIES

        The Practicum lists suggested activities under each of the twelve general competency
areas to give the student an idea of the type of activities in which he/she can actively
participate. Here are some additional activities which are appropriate for the student under the
supervision of the cooperating administrator.

ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION

          Originate office memos.

          Duplicate blank principal reports and complete.

          Locate textbooks and be responsible for textbook count for all grades in your school.

    Compile textbook requisitions.
FINANCE

Learn procedures, prepare and follow requisitions and purchase orders through channels--
including receiving and accepting the order.
      Tour business office to learn functions and procedures and to meet office personnel.

           Set up activity fund and show knowledge of keeping these accounts.

           Visit the tax collector and become familiar with duties, procedures, and circumstances

            confronted in this area.




                  PERSONNEL

Show ability to use due process procedures pertaining to knowledge of student and teacher
rights.
       Confer with teachers and staff members.

           Conduct faculty meeting.

BUILDING AND MAINTENANCE

           Solicit requests from teachers on summer repairs to be completed in rooms.


                                                  36
           Prepare and process a work order through its completion.

           Survey the school plant to determine its effect on the instructional program.

           Survey to determine if hazards exist in and around the school.

 SCHOOL-COMMUNITY RELATIONS

          Participate in parent-teacher conference.

          Schedule speaking engagements at community functions, radio, TV, etc.

          Employ the community members as resource specialists.

          Describe how you are communicating with the public through various public
           organizations.

          Study teachers' attitudes about the school-community in which they serve.

          Plan school activities in observation of Public School Week, American Education

           Week, Education-Business Day or similar observances.

CURRICULUM PLANNING AND SUPERVISION

          Show knowledge of special education programs, vocational programs, and other

           programs with specific emphasis.

          Meet with department heads to coordinate educational programs and to coordinate co-

           curricular activities.

TRANSPORTATION AND AUXILIARY SERVICES.

Plan the transportation, including requisition requests for buses, for at least one activity.

Be familiar with attendance services, health services, student activities, and community
services of your school.

EDUCATION AGENCIES AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

          Attend professional organization meetings or workshops




                                                  37
     Visit state agencies to find out what services are available to your school district/utilize

      their services.

BOARD-SUPERINTENDENT-PRINCIPAL RELATIONS

     Attend principals' meetings--if allowed by your district.

     Understand the role and function of all Central Office personnel.

     Learn the responsibilities and duties of each area in the Central Office.

STUDENT PERSONNEL

     Register new students; record student accounting information, observe parent

      conferences, Admission and Release Committee (ARD), discipline cases, etc.

     Work with the counselor in setting up a guidance program for students.

     Develop and implement attendance policies.




APPENDIX D
MATRICES


                                               38
EXPLICIT PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT




                              39
APPENDIX D
MATRICES
EXPLICIT PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT

The school superintendent serves as chief administrator of the school organization. As an
effective instructional leader, the school superintendent shares decision-making when
appropriate; involves parents and other citizens in the school/community partnership, serves as
a resource in professional development, staff supervision, curriculum planning, and
instructional program management for the school; develops and promotes the school’s common
vision within the district and the community; and creates positive human relations and a
productive climate within the school. Explicit program objectives related to this role are:

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION:

1      Demonstrate an understanding of the history and philosophy of education.
2.     Demonstrate an understanding of trends and issues in education.

3.     Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of educational and social psychology.
4.     Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of learning theories and the learning
process.
5.     Apply ethical principles to education practices and populations.
6.     Demonstrate an understanding of the role of communication and communication skills
in education.
7.     Demonstrate an understanding of major concepts of educational research.
8.     Interpret educational research.
9.       Demonstrate an understanding of the proposal writing process.




                                              40
                 MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND
                SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES
FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION:
COURSES                 COMPETENCY NUMBER
           01   02   03   04    05   06   07    08   09
EDAD 583
EDAD 585   X    X    X    X     X    X    X     X    X
EDAD 588
EDAD 590
EDAD 594                             X
EDAD 596
EDAD 597
EDAD 598
EDAD 639   X    X    X    X     X    X    X     X    X
EDAD 649
EDAD 674
EDAD 676
EDAD 677
EDAD 678
EDAD 679
EDAD 682                             X
EDAD 683
EDAD 684
EDAD 686
EDAD 690
EDAD 694
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697
EDAD 698
EDAD 699




                               41
                          MATRIX OF COURSES
FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION:

COURSES                    COMPETENCY NUMBER
           01   02   03      04    05   06    07   08   09
CNS 550                                 X
EXED 516
LTCY 519
EDFN 500                                      X    X    X
EDFN 576   X
EDFN 577   X    X
PSY 510              X       X          X
PSY 511              X       X          X
ELED 503                           X
MGE 450                            X
SEC 580                            X




                                  42
EDUCATIONAL GOVERNANCE

Demonstrate an understanding of the organizational structure and functions of educational
governance at the federal, state, and local levels.
   1. Demonstrate an understanding of the organizational structure and functions of

       educational governance at the state level in Kentucky.

   2. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of accreditation in Kentucky.

   3. Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships between school boards and

       superintendents.

   5. Analyze ways to establish and maintain positive school-parent relations.

   6. Demonstrate an understanding of student rights and responsibilities.

   7. Demonstrate an understanding of the maintenance and use of student records.

   8. Analyze procedures-and standards for student discipline.

   9. Demonstrate an understanding of types, purposes, and functions of student

       organizations and activities.

   10. Demonstrate an understanding of school counseling and psychological services

       available to students.

   11. Demonstrate an understanding of special student populations and their needs.

   12. Demonstrate an understanding of causes of students' social problems and methods of

       referral to outside agencies.

   13. Demonstrate an understanding of multi-cultural education and its value.

   14. Demonstrate an understanding of the management of school board meetings.

Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and functions of the local board of education.
MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL
ADMINISTRATION COURSES

COMPETENCIES 1 – 15


                                              43
    EDUCATIONAL GOVERNANCE:
    COURSES                              COMPETENCY NUMBER
           01   02   03   04   05   06   07        08   09   10   11   12   13   14   15
EDAD 583
EDAD 585   X    X    X    X    X    X    X         X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 588
EDAD 590
EDAD 594
EDAD 596
EDAD 597
EDAD 598
EDAD 639   X    X    X    X    X    X    X         X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 649
EDAD 659
EDAD 674
EDAD 676
EDAD 677   X    X    X    X    X    X    X         X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 678
EDAD 679
EDAD 682   X    X    X    X    X    X    X         X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 683
EDAD 684
EDAD 686             X                             X         X
EDAD 690                                           X         X
EDAD 694                                           X         X
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697
EDAD 698
EDAD 699




                                MATRIX OF COURSES
    FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES

    COMPENTENCIES 1-15
    EDUCATIONAL GOVERNANCE:



                                              44
  COURSES                             COMPETENCY NUMBER

           01   02   03   04    05     06   07        08   09   10   11   12   13   14   15

CNS 550                                     X                   X

EXED 516

LTCY 519

EDFN 500

EDFN 576

EDFN 577

PSY 510

PSY 511

ELED 503

MGE 450

SEC 580




                               MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES

                                     MATRIX OF COURSES
  FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
  COMPETENCIES 1 – 15                            EDUCATIONAL GOVERNANCE



                                                 45
  COURSES                                             COMPETENCY NUMBER

           01    02   03    04   05    06   07    08    09   10   11   12    13   14   15

CNS 550                                      X               X

EXED 516

LTCY 519

EDFN 500

EDFN 576

EDFN 577

PSY 510

PSY 511

ELED 503

MGE 450

SEC 580




  ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION:

  Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of organizational theory.
    1. Apply principles of organizational theory and practice.

  Demonstrate an understanding of theories of leadership and leadership styles.


                                                 46
   2. Demonstrate an understanding of the function of planning.

   3. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles and techniques of decision making.

   4. Demonstrate an understanding of the goal-development and goal-implementation

       process.

Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of public school finance.
Demonstrate an understanding of the school-budget development process.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of fiscal management.

Demonstrate an understanding of facility planning and management.
Demonstrate an understanding of factors involved in student services management.
Demonstrate an understanding of procedures for purchasing, storing, and distributing
equipment and supplies.
Demonstrate an understanding of factors involved in school public relations.
Demonstrate an understanding of the political environment of the school organization.




                                              47
MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES
AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

COMPETENCIES 1 – 14                      ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION
COURSES                                  COMPETENCY NUMBER
           01   02   03   04   05   06   07        08   09   10   11   12   13   14
EDAD 583
EDAD 585   X    X    X    X    X    X    X         X    X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 588                                 X         X    X
EDAD 590
EDAD 594             X         X    X
EDAD 596
EDAD 597
EDAD 598
EDAD 639   X    X    X    X    X    X    X         X    X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 649
EDAD 659
EDAD 674
EDAD 676                                 X         X    X              X
EDAD 677   X    X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 678
EDAD 679                                                                    X    X
EDAD 682
EDAD 683
EDAD 684
EDAD 686
EDAD 690
EDAD 694
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697
EDAD 698
EDAD 699




                               MATRIX OF COURSES



                                              48
                                 FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES *
    COMPETENCIES 1 – 14              ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

  COURSES                              COMPETENCY NUMBER

             01   02   03   04    05   06   07    08   09   10   11   12   13   14
CNS 550
EXED 516
LTCY 519
EDFN 500
EDFN 576
EDFN 577
PSY 510
PSY 511
ELED 503
MGE 450
SEC 580




    DOES NOT APPLY

    *The organizational administration competencies are addressed in School Administration
    courses only.




          PERSONNEL SUPERVISION:


                                                 49
Demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics involved in effective interpersonal relations.
  1. Analyze the principles and procedures related to administering personnel policies.

   2. Identify characteristics and functions of employee organizations.

   3. Apply counseling concepts, techniques, and procedures related to management.

   4. Apply concepts and skills associated with team management.

   5. Apply concepts and skills associated with group facilitating.

   6. Identify the rights and responsibilities of teachers.

   7. Identify procedures for recruiting, interviewing, selecting, and assigning staff.

   8. Identify causes of and procedures for suspending, non-renewing, and dismissing staff.

   9. Demonstrate an understanding of staff development programs and procedures.

   10. Analyze the relationship between administrative supervision and staff development.



   12. Demonstrate an understanding of procedures for assessing staff performance




                                               50
                     MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES
  AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

  COMPETENCIES 1 – 12                      PERSONNEL SUPERVISION
  COURSES                                  COMPETENCY NUMBER
           01   02    03   04   05   06    07   08   09   10   11   12
EDAD 583
EDAD 585   X    X                    X                         X
EDAD 588
EDAD 590   X    X     X    X    X    X     X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 594
EDAD 596
EDAD 597
EDAD 598
EDAD 639   X    X     X    X    X    X     X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 649
EDAD 659
EDAD 674
EDAD 676
EDAD 677                                   X         X
EDAD 678
EDAD 679
EDAD 682
EDAD 683
EDAD 684   X    X     X    X    X    X     X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 686                                             X    X    X    X
EDAD 690
EDAD 694
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697
EDAD 698
EDAD 699




  MATRIX OF COURSES

                           FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES


                                      51
  COMPETENCIES 1 – 12                       PERSONNEL SUPERVISION

COURSES                                     COMPETENCY NUMBER

           01   02   03   04   05    06   07    08   09    10      11    12

CNS 550    X              X     X

EXED 516

LTCY 519

EDFN 500

EDFN 576

EDFN 577

PSY 510

PSY 511

ELED 503

MGE 450

SEC 580




  INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP:

  Demonstrate an understanding of curriculum development and planning.


                                               52
Demonstrate an understanding of principles of curriculum design.
Identify reasons and strategies for implementing new or revised curriculum.
Demonstrate an understanding of curricular programs designed to address the needs of special
populations.
Demonstrate an understanding of instructional management principles.
Demonstrate an understanding of principles of program evaluation.
Demonstrate an understanding of testing instruments and programs and their uses in curriculum
evaluation.
Apply knowledge of statistical principles in testing and measurement.
Demonstrate an understanding of student assessment methods and programs.




MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES
AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION-COURSES

COMPETENCIES 1 – 09                 INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP
COURSES                                  COMPETENCY NUMBER
                01      02     03      04      05      06     07      08     09
 EDAD 583
 EDAD 585
 EDAD 588
 EDAD 590
 EDAD 594       X       X       X      X       X       X       X      X      X
 EDAD 596
 EDAD 597
 EDAD 598
 EDAD 639       X       X       X      X       X       X       X      X      X
 EDAD 649
 EDAD 659



                                             53
  EDAD 674
  EDAD 676
  EDAD 677
  EDAD 678
  EDAD 679
  EDAD 682
  EDAD 683        X        X         X         X                  X        X
  EDAD 684                                               X
  EDAD 686        X        X         X         X         X        X        X        X    X
  EDAD 690        X        X         X         X         X        X        X        X    X
  EDAD 694        X        X         X         X         X        X        X        X    X
  EDAD 695
  EDAD 696
  EDAD 697
  EDAD 698
  EDAD 699




                                         MATRIX OF COURSES

                                    FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
 COMPETENCIES 1 – 9                     INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP

COURSES                                    COMPETENCY NUMBER

             01       02       03         04       05        06       07       08   09

 CNS 550

 EXED 516                                 X

 LTCY 519                                 X

 EDFN 500                                                                      X    X

 EDFN 576




                                                        54
EDFN 577

PSY 510

PSY 511                                     X   X

ELED 503   X   X   X   X   X        X   X   X   X

MGE 450    X   X   X   X   X        X   X   X   X

SEC 580    X   X   X   X   X        X   X   X   X




                               55
APPENDIX E
             MATRIX FOR KENTUCKY COMPETECIES FOR
                    SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT




                             56
APPENDIX E
                  MATRIX FOR KENTUCKY COMPETEXCIES FOR
                          SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT


To address the competencies for the preparation of educational administrators as identified by

the Kentucky Department of Education, matrices identify the competencies and the courses.


Two sets of matrices are provided:

1)     for courses in educational administration;

2)     for courses in other disciplines which support the programs in educational

administration.




                                              57
COMPETENCIES FOR SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT

   1. The ability to communicate accurately and effectively.

   2. An understanding of the overall program of the school system and the role it plays as a

       subsystem of the community.

   3. The ability to evaluate school programs in terms of purposes, which have been

       cooperatively developed.

   4. A knowledge of all levels of school curriculum, K-12.

   5. A knowledge of educational and psychological tests and their application to school

       programs.

   6. The ability to interpret the school district programs to students, parents, and community.

   7. The ability to monitor, evaluate, and coach administrative staff personnel effectively.

   8. The ability to organize and lead school personnel in effective short and long-range

       planning.

   9. The ability to provide leadership in the areas of staff development and in-service.

   10. An understanding of the role of support services in the school district program.

   11. The ability to utilize modern technological tools in the administrative processes

       (i.e., computers].
   12. The ability to manage school facilities including knowledge of financing, design,

       construction, and maintenance of schools.

The ability to effectively budget and manage fiscal resources.

An understanding of the legal problems encountered in school administration.

The ability to utilize the skills and resources of faculty, parents, and community by seeking and
using input from them in the management process.
The ability to provide leadership in the area of personnel management.




                                               58
  13. The ability to establish and maintain good public relations with the community and

     other constituencies.

  14. An understanding of the role of the superintendent as the executive officer of the board

     of education, the business manager of the system, and the educational leader of the

     school district.




MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES



                                             59
     AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

     COMPETENCIES 1 – 18                          SUPERINTENDENT
     COURSES                                      COMPETENCY NUMBER
           01   02   03   04   05   06   07   08   09   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18
EDAD 583   X
EDAD 585   X    X    X                                                                X
EDAD 588   X                                                           X
EDAD 590   X                                                                          X
EDAD 594   X    X    X                                                           X              X
EDAD 596   X
EDAD 597   X                                                                     X
EDAD 598   X
EDAD 639   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X     X   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 649   X
EDAD 659   X
EDAD 674   X                                                 X
EDAD 676   X
EDAD 677   X    X                                                           X
EDAD 678   X                                                      X         X
EDAD 682   X    X    X              X                                            X         X
EDAD 683   X              X
EDAD 684   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X     X   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X
EDAD 686   X
EDAD 690   X
EDAD 694   X
EDAD 695   X         X         X
EDAD 696   X
EDAD 697   X    X
EDAD 698   X
EDAD 699   X




                                    MATRIX OF COURSES



                                                   60
                                FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
COMPETENCIES 1 - 18


COURSES                        COMPETENCY NUMBER


           01   02   03   04   05   06   07   08        09   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18

CNS 550

EXED 516

LTCY 519

EDFN 500

EDFN 576

EDFN 577        X

PSY 510

PSY 511

ELED 503                  X

MGE 450                   X

SEC 580                   X




                                                   61
                 APPENDIX F

                MATRICES FOR

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS




                     62
                                    APPENDIX F
                                   MATRICES FOR
                            AASA COMPETENCIES AND SKILLS

The following components for the preparation of educational administrators come from the

guidelines for the preparation of educational leaders as developed by the American Association

of School Administrators. The following matrices are for all preparation programs in

educational administration at Western Kentucky University.


The seven (7) areas are:

School climate Improvement Program

                           1. Political Theory and Skills

                           2. Systematic School Curriculum

                           3. Instructional Management System

                           4. Staff-Development and Evaluation Systems

                           5. Allocating Resources

                           6. Using Research




                                                 63
SCHOOL CLIMATE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

Designing, implementing, and evaluating a school climate improvement program, which
includes mutual efforts by staff and students to formulate and attain school goals. This
competency includes:.
human relations, organizational development, and leadership skills;
collaborative goal setting and action planning;
organizational and personal planning and time management;
participative management, variations in staffing;
climate assessment methods and skills;
improving the quality of relationships among staff and students to enhance learning;
multi-cultural and ethnic understanding;
group process, interpersonal communication, and motivation skills.




                                              64
                  MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES
AND EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

1. SCHOOL CLIMATE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
COURSES        COMPETENCY LETTER
           A        B   C    D     E        F   G   H
EDAD 583
EDAD 585   X        X   X    X              X   X   X
EDAD 588
EDAD 590                     X                  X
EDAD 594   X        X   X    X              X   X   X
EDAD 596                                    X   X   X
EDAD 597
EDAD 598
EDAD 639                           X        X   X
EDAD 649
EDAD 659
EDAD 674
EDAD 676
EDAD 677   X        X   X    X     X        X   X   X
EDAD 678
EDAD 682
EDAD 683
EDAD 684   X        X   X    X     X        X   X   X
EDAD 686   X            X    X     X        X   X   X
EDAD 690   X        X   X    X     X        X   X   X
EDAD 694   X        X   X    X     X        X   X   X
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697
EDAD 698
EDAD 699




MATRIX OF COURSES


                            65
                            FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
1. SCHOOL CLIMATE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM


COURSES             COMPETENCY LETTER
                A       B       C   D        E       F   G   H

 CNS 550        X   X       X       X        X       X   X   X

 EXED 516                                        X       X

 LTCY 519

 EDFN 500

 EDFN 576                                                X

 EDFN 577                                                X

 PSY 510    X                                            X   X

 PSY 511    X                                            X   X

 ELED 503               X                                X

 MGE 450                X                                X

 SEC 580                X                                X




                                        66
POLITICAL THEORY AND SKILLS

Understanding political theory and applying political skills in building local, state, and national
support for education. This competency includes:
school/community public relations, coalition building, and related public service activities;
           a. politics of school governance and operations;

           b. political strategies to pass bond, tax, and other referenda;

           c. lobbying, negotiating, collective bargaining, power, policy development, and

               policy maintenance skills to assure successful educational programs;

           d. communicating and projecting an articulate position

role and function of mass media in shaping and forming opinions;
           e. conflict mediation and the skills to accept and cope with inherent controversies




                                                67
                  MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES
AND EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

2. POLITICAL THEORY AND SKILLS
COURSES COMPETENCY LETTER
           A     B        C           D     E   F   G
EDAD 583
EDAD 585   X     X        X           X     X   X   X
EDAD 588
EDAD 590                              X             X
EDAD 594   X     X        X           X     X   X   X
EDAD 596
EDAD 597
EDAD 598
EDAD 639   X     X        X           X     X   X   X
EDAD 649
EDAD 659
EDAD 674
EDAD 676                  X
EDAD 677   X     X        X           X     X   X   X
EDAD 678
EDAD 682   X     X        X           X     X   X   X
EDAD 683
EDAD 684   X     X        X           X     X   X   X
EDAD 686
EDAD 690   X     X        X           X     X   X   X
EDAD 694   X     X        X           X     X   X   X
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697
EDAD 698
EDAD 699




                                 68
                          MATRIX OF COURSES
                        FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
  2. POLITICAL THEORY AND SKILLS


   COURSES                   COMPETENCY LETTER
             A      B       C       D     E          F   G

CNS 550                                                  X

EXED 516     X

LTCY 519

EDFN 500

EDFN 576                                         X       X

EDFN 577                                                 X

PSY 510                                                  X

PSY 511                                                  X

ELED 503

MGE 450

SEC 580




                                   69
SYSTEMATIC SCHOOL CURRICULUM

3.      Developing a systematic school curriculum that assures both extensive cultural
enrichment activities and mastery of fundamental as well as progressively more complex skills
required in advanced problem solving, creative, and technological activities. This competency
includes:
        a       planning/futures methods to anticipate occupational trends and their educational
implications;
b.      taxonomies of instructional objectives and validation procedures for curricular
units/sequences;
        c.      theories of cognitive development and the sequencing/structuring of curricula;
        d.      development/application of valid and reliable performance indicators for
instructional outcomes;
        e.      use of computers and other technologies as instructional aids;
        f.       development/use of available cultural resources.




                                               70
                        MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES

     AND EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

     3. SYSTEMATIC SCHOOL CURRICULUM

       COURSES   COMPETENCY LETTER
                   A     B     C          D   E   F
EDAD 583           X
EDAD 585           X                              X
EDAD 588
EDAD 590           X
EDAD 594           X                      X       X
EDAD 596
EDAD 597
EDAD 598
EDAD 639           X
EDAD 649
EDAD 659
EDAD 674           X                          X
EDAD 676           X
EDAD 677           X
EDAD 678           X
EDAD 682           X
EDAD 683           X     X     X          X   X   X
EDAD 684                 X     X          X   X   X
EDAD 686                 X                X   X
EDAD 690           X     X                X   X   X
EDAD 694                                  X   X
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697
EDAD 698
EDAD 699




                                     71
                              MATRIX OF COURSES
                         FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
  3. SYSTEMATIC SCHOOL CURRICULUM


   COURSES               COMPETENCY LETTER
             A       B    C       D        E      F

CNS 550                                           X

EXED 516             X    X       X        X      X

LTCY 519             X    X       X        X      X

EDFN 500         X                X        X

EDFN 576                                          X

EDFN 577     X            X                       X

PSY 510                   X

PSY 511                   X

ELED 503     X       X    X       X        X      X

MGE 450      X       X    X       X        X      X

SEC580       X       X    X       X        X      X




                                      72
INSTRUCTIONAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

4.     Planning and implementing an instructional management system, which includes
learning objectives, curriculum design, and instructional strategies and techniques that
encourage high levels of achievement. This competency includes:
       a.      curriculum design and instructional delivery strategies;

       b.     instructional and motivational psychology;

       c.     alternative methods of monitoring and evaluating student achievement;

       d.     management of change to enhance the mastery of educational goals;

       e.     applications of computer management to the instructional program;

       f.     use of instructional time and resources;

       g.     cost-effectiveness and program budgeting.




                                              73
                  MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES

           AND EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

4. INSTRUCTIONAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
COURSES                COMPETENCY LETTER
           A     B     C     D       E   F   G
EDAD 583
EDAD 585   X     X
EDAD 588
EDAD 590                                     X
EDAD 594   X
EDAD 596
EDAD 597   X     X     X     X
EDAD 598
EDAD 639
EDAD 649
EDAD 659
EDAD 674   X                         X   X
EDAD 676                                     X
EDAD 677   X           X                 X
EDAD 678
EDAD 682
EDAD 683   X     X     X     X       X   X
EDAD 684   X     X     X     X       X   X
EDAD 686   X     X     X     X       X   X
EDAD 690   X     X     X     X       X   X   X
EDAD 694   X     X     X     X           X   X
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697
EDAD 698
EDAD 699




                             74
                        MATRIX OF COURSES

  FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
4. INSTRUCTIONAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

COURSES                     COMPETENCY LETTER
            A       B   C      D        E   F   G

 CNS 550

 EXED 516   X           X

 LTCY 519   X           X

 EDFN 500       X       X               X

 EDFN 576                      X

 EDFN 577                      X

 PSY 510        X                       X

 PSY 511        X                       X

 ELED 503   X           X      X        X   X   X

 MGE 405    X           X      X        X   X   X

 SEC 580    X           X      X        X   X   X




                                   75
 STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION SYSTEMS

5.     Designing staff development and evaluation systems to enhance effectiveness of

educational personnel. This competency includes:

       a.      system and staff needs assessment to identify areas for concentrated staff
development and resource allocation for new personnel;
       b.      use of system and staff evaluation data in personnel policy and decision-making;
       c.      appraisal of the effectiveness of staff development programming as it affects
professional performance;
       d.      using clinical supervision as a staff improvement and evaluation strategy;
       e.      assessment of individual and institutional sources of stress and developing of
methods for reducing that stress.




                                              76
                  MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES

           AND EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

  4. STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION SYSTEMS

COURSES                 COMPETENCY LETTER
           A        B       C        D      E
EDAD 583   X
EDAD 585   X        X                       X
EDAD 588   X
EDAD 590   X        X       X        X      X
EDAD 594   X
EDAD 596
EDAD 597
EDAD 598
EDAD 639   X        X       X        X      X
EDAD 649
EDAD 659
EDAD 674   X                                X
EDAD 676   X
EDAD 677   X
EDAD 678   X
EDAD 682   X
EDAD 683            X
EDAD 684   X        X       X        X      X
EDAD 686   X        X       X        X      X
EDAD 690   X        X       X        X      X
EDAD 694   X
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697   X
EDAD 698
EDAD 699   X




                                77
                         MATRIX OF COURSES
                       FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
5. STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION SYSTEMS


COURSES                COMPETENCY LETTER
             A     B       C     D     E

 CNS 550

 EXED 516    X

 LTCY 519    X

 EDFN 500

 EDFN 576

 EDFN 577

 PSY 510                               X

 PSY 511                               X

 ELED 503

 MGE 450

 SEC 580




                                 78
 ALLOCATING RESOURCES

6.     Allocating, human, material, and financial resources to efficiently, and in an
accountable manner, assure successful student learning. This competency includes:
       a.     facilities planning, maintenance, and operation;

       b.      financial planning and cash flow management;

       c.      personnel administration;

       d.      pupil personnel services and categorical programs;

       e.      legal concepts, regulations, and codes for school operation;

       f.      analytical techniques of management.




                                               79
                  MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES
           AND EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION COURSES


6. ALLOCATING RESOURCES
COURSES                   COMPETENCY LETTER
             A     B       C    D     E       F
EDAD 583     X                                X
EDAD 585     X     X       X    X     X       X
EDAD 588     X     X                  X       X
EDAD 590     X             X          X       X
EDAD 594     X                                X
EDAD 596
EDAD 597
EDAD 598
EDAD 639     X     X       X    X     X       X
EDAD 649
EDAD 659
EDAD 674     X     X            X             X
EDAD 676     X     X                          X
EDAD 677     X     X       X    X     X       X
EDAD 678     X     X                  X       X
EDAD 682     X
EDAD 683     X     X       X    X     X       X
EDAD 684     X             X    X     X       X
EDAD 686     X                                X
EDAD 690     X     X       X    X     X       X
EDAD 694     X                                X
EDAD 695
EDAD 696
EDAD 697
EDAD 698
EDAD 699




                               80
                          MATRIX OF COURSES
                    FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
6. ALLOCATING RESOURCES


COURSES             COMPETENCY LETTER
            A   B    C        D        E   F
 CNS 550                      X        X
 EXED 516   X                 X        X
 LTCY 519
 EDFN 500
 EDFN 576
 EDFN 577
 PSY 510
 PSY 511
 ELED 503
 MGE 450
 SEC 580




                                  81
USING RESEARCH

7.     Conducting research and using research findings in decision making to improve long
range planning, school operations, and student learning. This competency includes:
       a.     research designs and methods including gathering, analyzing and interpreting
data;

       b.     descriptive and inferential statistics;

       c.     evaluation and planning models and methods;

       d.     selection, administration, and interpretation of evaluation instruments.




                                                82
                    MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES
           AND EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION COURSES


7. USING RESEARCH
COURSES             COMPETENCY LETTER
             A         B        C       D
EDAD 583     X                          X
EDAD 585     X         X        X       X
EDAD 588     X         X                X
EDAD 590     X                          X
EDAD 594     X                  X       X
EDAD 596
EDAD 597                        X       X
EDAD 598     X                          X
EDAD 639     X         X        X       X
EDAD 649                        X       X
EDAD 659                        X       X
EDAD 674     X         X        X       X
EDAD 676               X        X       X
EDAD 677     X         X                X
EDAD 678               X                X
EDAD 682                                X
EDAD 683               X                X
EDAD 684                                X
EDAD 686                                X
EDAD 690     X         X        X       X
EDAD 694     X                  X       X
EDAD 695     X         X        X       X
EDAD 696                        X       X
EDAD 697
EDAD 698     X         X        X       X
EDAD 699     X         X        X       X




                              83
                          MATRIX OF COURSES
                        FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
7. USING RESEARCH


COURSES             COMPETENCY LETTER
                A        B        C        D
 CNS 550
 EXED 516
 LTCY 519
 EDFN 500   X       X             X        X
 EDFN 576
 EDFN 577
 PSY 510    X
 PSY 511    X
 ELED 503                                  X
 MGE 450                                   X
 SEC 580                                   X




                                  84
APPENDIX G

                  MATRICES FOR GUIDELINES

   ASSOCIATION FOR SUPERVISION AND CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT




                             85
ASSOCIATION FOR SUPERVISION AND CURRICULUM
DEVELOPMENT
       These guidelines address the minimal knowledge, interpersonal skills, and technical

skills requisite for educational administrators who are engaged in instructional leadership and

supervision. A subset of these administrators (labeled “advanced specialists in instructional

supervision’) devote full time to the supervision of instruction. An even larger group (labeled

“instructional leaders in schools”) hold designated leadership positions in which skills and

knowledge in instruction is integral to the responsibilities although the positions encompass a

wider range of administrative activities, e.g., principals, assistant principals, superintendents

and instructional specialists on the superintendent’s staff, and the emerging group of school-

based personnel designated as lead teachers or master teachers. The guidelines specify areas of

concentration that should be included in all preparation programs. In terms of concentration,

however, the groups would vary in the attention provided to the topics:

       Advanced specialists in instructional supervision: 30-36 hours of graduate study

beyond the master’s degree would be focused on specialization in:

                  organizational development and improvement

                  instructional development and improvement

                  direct assistance to teachers

                  staff development

                  curriculum development

                  instructional evaluation

                  reflective practice.




                                                   86
       Instructional leaders in schools: 15-18 hours of graduate study beyond the master’s

degree would be focused on the specialization noted above as instructional development and

improvement. Within the remainder of their graduate studies in administration, attention would

be paid to organizational development and reflective practice.




                                              87
SUPERVISION
  1. The instructional leadership program provides for knowledge, interpersonal, and

     technical skills in providing direct assistance to teachers which includes the following:

     1.1    Understanding the various purposes for observing and conferencing with

            individual teachers.

     1.2    Understanding the individual teachers needs as an adult learner.

     1.3    Knowing alternative instructional processes and designs for helping individual

            teachers

     1.4    Knowing various curriculums in terms of scope, sequence, and balance in order

            to understand the particular rationale as to the instructional content being used

            by an individual teacher.

     1.5    Being able to use different methods for observing classrooms.

     1.6    Being able to provide feedback on various dimensions of classroom interaction

            to individual teachers.

     1.7    Being able to present feedback in a manner, which helps individual teachers to

            think about present and future classroom actions.

     1.8    Communicating with individual teachers about instruction in ways that help

            promote teacher choice, responsibility, and autonomous professional decision-

            making




MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL


                                             88
ADMINISTATION COURSES
SUPERVISION:

      COURSES             COMPETENCY NUMBER
           01   02   03   04   05   06   07   08   09

EdAd583    X              X

EdAd585    X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 588

EdAd 590   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 594   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 596

EdAd 597

EdAd 598

EdAd 682

EdAd 683   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 684   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 690   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 694   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 696

EdAd 697

EDAd 698

EdAd 699

EdAd 700

EdAd 677

EdAd 686   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

                     \
                     MATRIX OF COURSES


                               89
                      FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES

SUPERVISION:

COURSES                     COMPETENCY NUMBERS

           01    02    03   04   05   06   07     08   09

CNS 550    X     X

EXED 516   X     X     X    X    X    X    X      X

LTCY 519   X     X     X    X    X    X    X      X

EdFn 500

EdFn 576

PSY 510

PSY 511

ELED 503   X     X     X    X    X    X    X      X

MGE 571    X     X     X    X    X    X    X      X

SEC 580    X     X     X    X    X    X    X      X




                INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF DEVELOPMENT




                                 90
2. The instructional leadership program provides for the knowledge, interpersonal, and

   technical skills to provide for staff development of schools faculty which includes the

   following

   2.1    Ways to involve staff in making decisions about instructional priorities and

          goals that shape staff development and in-service education.

   2.2    Understanding developmental difference in individual and group’s readiness and

          receptivity to particular staff development interventions.

   2.3    Being able to differentiate staff development according to individual and group

          needs.

   2.4    Using knowledge about and pedagogy in planning staff development sessions.

   2.5    Knowledge of a variety of staff development strategies and sequence related to

          particular educational purposes.

   2.6    Means for implementing long-term, comprehensive, and continuous staff

          development plans.

   2.7    Being able to differentiate staff development according to individual and group

          needs.

   2.8    Being able to identify and utilize material, fiscal, and human resources in

          implementing.

   2.9    Identifying and fostering opportunities among staff for leadership in staff

          development plans and programs.



   MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL ADMINSTRAITON

   INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF DEVELOPMENT:




                                          91
      COURSES             COMPETENCY NUMBER

           01   02   03   04   05   06   07   08   09

EdAd583    X              X

EdAd585    X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 588

EdAd 590   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 594   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 596

EdAd 597

EdAd 598

EdAd 682

EdAd 683   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 684   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 690   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 694   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 696

EdAd 697

EDAd 698

EdAd 699

EdAd 700

EdAd 677

EdAd 686   X    X    X    X    X    X    X    X




                               92
            MATRIX OF COURSES FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES

INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF DEVELOPMENT:

COURSES                   COMPETENCY NUMBERS

           01   02   03   04   05   06    07    08     09

CNS 550

EXC 516    X    X    X    X    X    X     X     X      X

LTCY519    X    X    X    X    X    X     X     X      X

EdFn 500

EdFn 576

PSY 510

PSY 511

ELED 503   X    X              X                X

MGE 571    X    X              X                X

SEC 580    X    X              X                X




                               93
INSTRUCTIONAL EVALUATION

  3. The instructional leadership program provides the student with a wide range of knowledge

  and skills in program evaluation, individual assessment, applied research on the teaching-

  learning process, and the interpretation and dissemination of the results of these data gathering

  efforts.

   3.1       Students are provided with information about alternative models for program

             evaluation

             and develop skill in matching models to varying evaluation tasks.

   3.2       Students become familiar with formative evaluation techniques and their uses in

             program improvement.

   3.3       Students are able to design summative evaluation studies to assess the instructional

             effectiveness of program and elements of programs.

   3.4       Students are introduced to the various instruments and techniques that can be used

             to assess student progress, teacher performance and student, teacher, and parent

             attitudes toward instructional programs.

   3.5       Students examine the variety of research techniques and strategies that have been

             used to conduct applied or action research on classroom and school practices. Ways

             to utilize interactive research and development strategies in designing cooperative

             studies of classroom practice by teachers and administrators are examined.


   3.6       Students are provided with skills in analyzing, interpreting, and disseminating the

             results of research and evaluation studies to a variety of concerned audiences, e.g.,

             parent’s teachers, students, other administrators.




                                                 94
3.7   Students have the opportunity to conduct research and evaluation studies in school

      settings.




                                        95
MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL ADMINISTATION

INSTRUCTIONAL EVALUATION:

      COURSES             COMPETENCY NUMBER
           01   02   03   04   05   06   07

EdAd583                                  X

EdAd585                                  X

EdAd 588                                 X

EdAd 590   X    X              X    X    X

EdAd 594   X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 596                       X         X

EdAd 597                       X    X    X

EdAd 598                                 X

EDaD 677                                 X

EdAd 682                                 X

EdAd 683   X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 684   X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 686   X    X    X    X    X    X    X

EdAd 690   X    X                   X    X

EdAd 694   X    X                   X    X

EdAd 696                       X         X

EdAd 697                       X         X

EDAd 698                       X         X

EdAd 699                       X         X

EdAd 700                                 X




                               96
MATRIX OF COURSES FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
INSTRUCTIONAL EVALUATION:

COURSES                   COMPETENCY NUMBERS

           01   02   03   04   05   06   07    08   09


CNS 550

EXED 516        X                        X

LTCY 519   X    X                        X

EdFn 500             X    X    X    X    X

EdFn 576

PSY 510

PSY 511

ELED 503   X    X                        X

MGE 571    X    X                        X

SEC 580    X    X                        X




                               97
                        ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

4. The instructional leadership program provides for students being able to understand and act

on schools as organizations, which would include the following:

4.1    Knowledge of the history of organizational studies.

4.2    Knowledge of the history and sociology of schools.

4.3    Understanding community, political, and economic influences on schools as

       organizations.

4.4    Understanding the role of leadership in organizations.

4.5    Ability to assess the norms, values, expectations, and cultural symbols of organizations.

4.6    Awareness of various organizations that reinforce traditional values versus

       reconstructing new values about education.

4.7    Acquiring group process skills in working with people in organizational development.




                                              98
      MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

      COURSES             COMPETENCY NUMBER

           01   02   03    04    05    06    07    08   09

EdAd 583   X

EdAd 585   X    X    X     X     X     X     X

EdAd 588

EdAd 590   X               X                 X

EdAd 594   X    X    X     X     X     X     X

EdAd 596

EdAd 597

EdAd 598

EdAd 677   X

EdAd 682             X     X           X     X

EdAd 683                   X     X

EdAd 684             X     X     X     X     X

EdAd 686             X     X     X     X     X

EdAd 690   X    X                      X     X

EdAd 694   X    X                      X     X

EdAd 696

EdAd 697

EDAd 698

EdAd 699

EdAd 700




                                 99
MATRIX OF COURSES FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES
ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION:

COURSES               COMPETENCY NUMBERS
           01   02   03   04   05    06    07

CNS 550                              X     X
EXED516    X         X    X    X     X     X
LTCY 519   X         X    X    X     X     X
EdFn 500
EdFn 576   X    X    X         X     X     X
PSY 510                   X    X
PSY 511                   X    X
ELED 503                       X     X     X
MGE 571                        X     X     X
SEC 580                        X     X     X




                               100
     APPENDIX H

CURRICULUM GUIDESHEET

SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT

     ALL GRADES




         101
                                                                                                  Form B-105
GRADUATE COLLEGE                                                                 CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FORM
                                                                                             SUPERINTENDENT

           ***Mailing label - please fill out completely                                          This program is for:

                                                                                        Certification Only             ________

                                                                                        Certification and Rank I _________

*** NAME                                                                        SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER: ___________
           Last                    First          Middle/Maiden
                                                                                GPA_________________________________
   ADDRESS:
                                                                                GRE APTITUDE _______________________
                  Street

                                                                                PHONE: ______________________________
                  City/State                     Zip Code


Undergraduate Degree Institution:                                                                                Date: ________

Graduate Degree Institution:                                                                                      Date: _______

Certification Held ________________________________________________________________________________________

CERTIFICATION BEING PURSUED: SUPERINTENDENT

STANDARD TEACHING CERTIFICATE REQUIRED
 EDUCATION COURSES                                          HRS    DATE    TR   SUBJECT MATTER                             HRS   DATE      TR
 PREREQUISITE
 Completion of Level I and II preparation                                       COMPLETED LEVEL II 1994
 requirements for administrative endorsement as
 principal or supervisor.




 EDUCATION COURSES                                          HRS    DATE    TR   SUBJECT MATTER                             HRS   DATE      TR
 EDAD 639                                                    3
 EDAD 649                                                    3
 EDAD 659                                                    3
 EDAD 598 (superintendent)*                                  3




STUDENT                                                                         CERTIFICATION OFFICER ______________ ________
                           (Signature)                            (Date)                                     (Signature)          (Date)



RANK I ADVISOR                                                                  GRADUATE DEAN ______________________________
                           (Signature)                            (Date)                           (Signature)                    (Date)



NOTE: (1) A 3.0 GPA is required for admission to the program.
       (2) Students must submit a comprehensive professional exit portfolio.




                                                                  102
                  EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION
 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION, LEADERSHIP, RESEARCH
                 WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY


        PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP

                              SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT


Proposed Program:

An applicant desiring to pursue this program must first meet the admission requirements of the
Office of Graduate Studies and Research and then be admitted to the Department.


PREREQUISITES:

   1.       Completion of Level I and II preparation requirements for administrative
            endorsement as principal or supervisor.
   2.       A 3.0 GPA or above on all graduate work.
   3.       An acceptable score on the GRE, MAT, or NTE.
   4.       Recommendation forms.

The professional certificate for school administration and supervision may be endorsed for the
position of school superintendent when the following conditions have been met:

   1.       Two years full-time experience in a school administrative position.
   2.       Completion of a minimum of sixty (60) semester hours graduate credit above the
            bachelor's degree in an approved certification program(s) including the following
            required courses:

                          EDAD 639           The Superintendency
                          EDAD 649           School System Administration
                          EDAD 659           Strategic Planning in Education
                          EDAD 598           Field Based Experience in Educational
                                             Administration -- Superintendency

Possession of this guide sheet does not imply a contract between the student and the University.
Students in Educational Administration Programs must have an approved program on file to
insure certification.

Questions regarding these requirements should be addressed to the student's advisor or to the
Coordinator of Educational Administration 270/745-4890.




                                              103
                     APPENDIX I
PROGRAM MODIFICATION APPROVAL EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL
                  STANDARDS BOARD
                  DECEMBER 18, 2000




                        104
       EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS BOARD
1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 225
Frankfort, Kentucky 40601
(502) 573-4606 * Toll Free (888) 598-7667 FAX (502) 573-1610




December 18, 2000



Dr. Sam Evans, Associate Dean
College of Education & Behavioral Studies Western Kentucky University
Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576

Dear Dr. Evans:

We have reviewed the submitted revisions of the program review document for the School
Superintendent certification program.

Upon review of this copy, we find that this program remains in compliance with state
certification guidelines. These revisions will be retained in your institutional program files and
no further action is necessary.

Thank you for the timely notification and organized structure of your program revisions. If you
have further questions or need additional assistance please contact me at (502) 573-4606.

Sincerely,


Allison Bell, Program Consultant
Division of Educator Preparation
and Internship


/atb




                                                  105
                         WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY
Office of the Dean
College of Education
and Behavioral Science
270-745-4662
FAX: 270-745-6474



                                              December 13, 2000


Allison Bell
Office of Teacher Education and Certification
Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board
1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite, 225
Frankfort, Kentucky 40601

Dear Allison,

We are requesting that the program for school superintendent certification previously submitted by
Western be modified as reflected in the attached documents. The modifications have been approved by
Western.

The program changes identified below are a result of the initiative to create a consistent, statewide
certification program for school superintendents. Descriptions of two new courses are attached along
with a request to change the course number of one of the existing courses and a sub-title addition to
another existing course. Also, a new student guide sheet and sample student contract are attached. The
new program is aligned to meet all ISLLC standards as supported by an attached matrix for each course
required.

Revised Program

EDAD 639           The Superintendency (new course number)
EDAD 649           School System Administration (new course)
EDAD 659           Strategic Planning in Education (new course)
EDAD 598           Field Based Experience in Educational Administration - Superintendency
(Sub-title addition)

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.




                                                    Sam Evans
Associate Dean for Administration
       and Graduate Studies

Dr. Gayle Ecton Dr. Elmer Gray Mr. Bobby Rascoe




                                                   106
APPENDIX J

ISLLC STANDARDS




                  107
                          STANDARDS MATRIX

STANDARD I: KNOWLEDGE

1.1   Learning goals in a pluralistic society

1.2   The principles of developing and implementing strategic plans

1.3   Systems theory

1.4   Information sources, data collection

1.5   Effective communication

1.6   Effective consensus-building and negotiations skills




                                      108
MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION
COURSES
ISLLC STANDARD I

COURSES                            COMPETENCY NUMBER

                1.1          1.2         1.3          1.4         1.5          1.6

EdAd 585         1            1           1           1            1            2

EdAd 588                      2           2           1

EdAd 590         1            2           2           1

EdAd 594         1            2           2           1            2            3

EdAd 597         1                                    3

EdAd 677         1                                    1                         1

EdAd 682         2                                    2            3            3

EdAd 683         2                                    1

EdAd 684         1                                    1                         2

EdAd 690         1            2           2           1            3            3

EdAd 694         2            3           3           2            3            3

EdAd 696         2            3           3           3

EdAd 694

EdAd 696

EdFn 500         1                        1

EdFn 576         3




Legend: 1-knowledge acquisition, 2-knowledge development, 3-knowledge utilization




                                           109
STANDARD I: DISPOSITIONS

  1. The administrator believes in, values, and is committed to:

                  A. The educability of all

                  B. A school vision of high standards of learning

                  C. Continuous school improvement

                  D. The inclusion of all members of the school community

                  E. Ensuring that students have the knowledge, skills, and values needed to

                      become successful adults

                  F. A willingness to continuously examine one’s own assumptions, beliefs,

                      and practices

                  G. Doing the work required for high levels of personal and organization

                      performance.




                                              110
STANDARD I: PERFORMANCES:

             A. The vision and mission of the school are effectively communicated to

                staff, parents, students, and community members.

             B. The vision and mission are communicated through the use of symbols,

                ceremonies, stories and similar activities.

             C. The core beliefs of the school vision are modeled for all stakeholders.

             D. The vision is developed with and among stakeholders.

             E. The contributions of school community members to the realization of

                the vision are recognized and celebrated.

             F. Progress toward the vision and mission is communicated to all

                stakeholders.

             G. The school community is involved in school improvement efforts.

             H. The vision shapes the educational programs, plans, and actions.

             I. An implementation plan is developed in which objectives and

                strategies to achieve the vision and goals are clearly articulated.

             J. Assessment data related to student learning are used to develop the

                school vision and goals.

             K. Relevant demographic data pertaining to students and their families are

                used in developing the school mission and goals.

             L. Barriers to achieving the vision are identified, clarified, and addressed.

             M. Needed resources are sought and obtained to support the

                implementation of the school mission and goal.

             N. Existing resources are used in support of the school vision and goals.




                                       111
O. The vision, mission, and implementation plans are regularly monitored,

   evaluated, and revised.




                        112
ISLLC STANDARD II: KNOWLEDGE

The administrator has knowledge and understanding of:

       2.1       Student growth and development.

       2.2       Applied learning theories.

       2.3       Applied motivational theories.

       2.4       Curriculum design, implementation, evaluation, and refinement.

       2.5       Principles of effective instruction.

       2.6        Measurement, evaluation, and assessment strategies.

       2.7        Diversity and its meaning for educational programs.

       2.8        Adult learning and professional development models.

       2.9       The change process for systems, organizations, and individuals.

       2.10     The role of technology in promoting student learning and professional growth.

       2.11      School cultures.




                                              113
  MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

ISLLC STANDARD II KNOWLEDGE

 COURSES                                COMPETENCY NUMBER

               2.1    2.2     2.3       2.4      2.5       2.6      2.7       2.8   2.9   2.10   2.11

EdAd 585                                          1         1        1        1     1     1      1

EdAd 588                                          3         2                              1

EdAd 590                       2                                     1        2            2          1

EdAd 594                                                             1        1     2     1       1

EdAd 596

EdAd 597                                          3         3        1        3            3          1

EdAd 598

EdAd 677                                                             1                     1          1

EdAd 682                                                    3        2                    2       2

EdAd 683                                 2                           2        2           1       2

EdAd 684                       2         1        3         3        2        2     2     1       2

EdAd 690                       2                  2         2        3        3     2      2      3

EdAd 694                                                             2              3      2         2

EdAd 696                       3                                     2        3            3          2

EdAd 697

EDAd 698

EdAd 699

EdAd 700

EdFN 500                                          3         3        1              1                1

EdFn 576                                                             3                                3


Legend: 1-knowledge acquisition, 2-knowledge development, 3-knowledge utilization




                                                 114
STANDARD II: DISPOSITION

       P. Student learning as the fundamental purpose of schooling

       Q. The proposition that all students can learn

       R. The variety of ways in which students can learn

       S. Life long learning for self and others.

       T. The benefits that diversity brings to the school community

       U. A safe and supportive learning environment

       V. Preparing students to be contributing members of society

       W. Professional development as an integral part of school improvement.




                                          115
STANDARD II: PERFORMANCES

       A. All individuals are treated with fairness, dignity, and respect.

       B. Professional development promotes a focus on student learning consistent with

          the school vision and goals.

       C. Students and staff feel valued and important.

       D. The responsibilities and contributions of each individual are acknowledged.

       E. Barriers to student learning are identified, clarified, and addressed.

       F. Diversity is considered in developing learning experiences.

       G. Life long learning is encouraged and modeled.

       H. There is a culture of high expectations for self, student, and staff performance.

       I. Technologies are used in teaching and learning.

       J. Student and staff accomplishments are recognized and celebrated.

       K. Multiple opportunities to learn are available to all students.

       L. The school is organized and aligned for success.

       M. Curricular, co-curricular, and extracurricular programs are designed,

          implemented, evaluated, and refined.

       N. Curriculum decisions are based on research, expertise of teachers, and the

          recommendations of learned societies.

       O. The school culture and climate are assessed on a regular basis.

       P. A variety of sources of information is used to make decisions.

       Q. Student learning is assessed using a variety of techniques.

       R. Staff and students use multiple sources of information regarding performance.

       S. A variety of supervisory and evaluation models is employed.




                                           116
T. Pupil personnel programs are developed to meet the needs of students and their

   families.




                                  117
STANDARD III: KNOWLEDGE

The administrator has knowledge and understanding of:

3.1    Theories and models of organizations and the principles of organizational development

3.2    Operational procedures at the school and district level

3.3    Principles and issues relating to school safety and security

3.4    Human resources management and development

3.5    Principles and issues relating to fiscal operations of school management

3.6   Principles and issues relating to school facilities and use of space

3.7    Legal issues impacting school operations

3.8    Current technologies that support management function.




                                              118
                   MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL
ADMINISTRATION COURSES
ISLLC STANDARD III

COURSES                            COMPETENCY NUMBER

             3.1   3.2     3.3     3.4     3.5      3.6     3.7     3.8    3.9

EdAd 585      1     1      2        1       1       1        1       1

EdAd 588                                    3       3        2       2

EdAd 590                            3                        3

EdAd 594      1     1                       3       3        2       1

EdAd 596

EdAd 597      2     2                       3                        1

EdAD 677                            3                        3

EdAd 682                   2

EdAd 683

EdAd 684            2      2

EdAd 690      2            3        2       2       2        2       2

EdAd 694      2

EdAd 696      3     3

EdFn 500

EdFn 576


Legend: 1-knowledge acquisition, 2-knowledge development, 3-knowledge utilization.




STANDARD III: DISPOSITIONS



                                           119
The administrator believes in, values, and is committed to:

         A.    Making management decisions to enhance learning and teaching.

         B.    Taking risks to improve schools.

         C.    Trusting people and their judgments.

         D.    Accepting responsibility.

         E.    High-Quality standards, expectations, and performances.

         F.    Involving stakeholders in management process.

         G.    A safe environment.




STANDARD III: PERFORMANCES




                                              120
The administrator facilitates processes and engages in activities ensuring that:

   A. Knowledge of learning, teaching, and student development is used to inform

       management decisions.

   B. Operational procedures are designed and managed to maximize opportunities for

       successful learning.

   C. Emerging trends are recognized, studied, and applied as appropriate.

   D. Operational plans and procedures to achieve the vision and goals of the school are in

       place.

   E. Collective bargaining and other contractual agreements related to the school are

       effectively managed.

   F. The school plant, equipment, and support systems operate safely, efficiently, and

       effectively.

   G. Time is managed to manage to maximize attainment of organizational goals.

   H. Potential problems and opportunities are identified.

   I. Problems are confronted and resolved in a timely manner.

   J. Financial, human, and material resources are aligned to the goals of schools.

   K. The school acts entrepreneur ally to support continuous improvement.

   L. Organizational systems are regularly monitored and modified as needed.

   M. Stakeholders are involved in decisions affecting schools.

   N. Responsibility is shared to maximize ownership and accountability.

   O. Effective problem-framing and problem-solving skills are used.

   P. Effective conflict resolution skills are used.

   Q. Effective group-process and consensus building skills are used.




                                               121
R. Effective communication skills are used there is effective use of technology to manage

   school operations.

S. There is effective use of technology to manage school operations.

T. Fiscal resources of the school are managed responsibly, efficiently, and effectively.

U. A safe, clean, and aesthetically pleasing school environment is created and maintained.

V. Human resources functions support the attainment of school goals.

W. Confidentiality and privacy of school records are maintained.




STANDARDS IV: KNOWLEDGE




                                          122
  The administrator has knowledge and understanding of:

  4.1     Emerging issues and trends that potentially impact the school community

  4.2     The conditions and dynamics of the diverse school community

  4.3     Community resources

  4.4     Community relations and marketing strategies and processes

  4.5     Successful models of school, family, business, community, government and

          higher education partnerships.




MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES



                                           123
ISLLC STANDARD IV

COURSES                            COMPETENCY NUMBER

               4.1          4.2           4.3            4.4           4.5

EdAd 585        1            1             1             1             1

EdAd 588                                   2

EdAd 590        2            1

EdAd 594        2            1             1             1             2

EdAd 596

EdAd 597                     1

EdAD 677                     1

EdAd 682        3            2             3             3             2

EdAd 683                     2

EdAd 684        1            2

EdAd 690        2            3             3             2             2

EdAd 694                     2                           3             3

EdAd 696        3            2

EdFn 500                     1

EdFn 576                     3



Legend: 1-knowledge acquisition, 2-knowledge development, 3-knowledge utilization.




   STANDARD IV: DISPOSITIONS




                                           124
       A. Schools operating as an integral part of the larger community.

       B. Collaboration and communication with families.

       C. Involvement of families and other stakeholders in school decision-making

           processes.

       D. The proposition that diversity enriches the school.

       E. Families as partners in the education of their children.

       F. The proposition that families have the best interests of their children in mind.

       G. Resources of the family and community needing to be brought to bear on the

           education of students.

       H. An informed public.




STANDARD IV: PERFORMANCES
The administrator facilitates processes and engages in activities ensuring that:


                                               125
   A. High visibility, active involvement, and communication with the larger community are

       a priority.

   B. Relationships with community leaders are identified and nurtured.

   C. Information about family and community concerns, expectations, and needs is used

       regularly.

   D. There is outreach to different business, religious, political, and service agencies and

       organizations.

   E. Credence is given to individuals and groups whose values and opinions may conflict.

   F. The school and community serve one another as resources.

   G. Available community resources are secured to help the school solve problems and

       achieve goals.

   H. Partnerships are established with area businesses, institutions of higher education, and

       the community groups to strengthen programs and support school goals.

   I. Community youth family services are integrated with school programs.

   J. Community stakeholders are treated equitably.

   K. Diversity is recognized and valued

   L. Effective media relations are developed and maintained.

   M. A comprehensive program of community relations is established.

   N. Public resources and funds are used appropriately and wisely.

   O. Community collaboration is modeled for staff.

   P. Opportunities for staff to develop collaborative skills are provided.

STANDARD V: KNOWLEDGE
The administrator has knowledge and understanding of:


                                              126
    5.1    The purpose of education and the role of leadership in modern society.

    5.2    Various ethical frameworks and perspectives on ethics

    5.3    The values of the diverse school community

    5.4    The professional codes of ethics

    5.5    The philosophy and history of education.




MARIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

ISLLC STANDARD V



                                        127
COURSES                              COMPETENCY NUMBER

                  5.1          5.2          5.3           5.4       5.5

EdAd 585                        1            1            1

EdAd 588                        2                         2

EdAd 590                        3            1            3

EdAd 594                        1            1            1

EdAd 596

EdAd 597                        1            1            1

EdAD 677                        1            1            1

EdAd 682                        1            2            1

EdAd 683                        1            2            1

EdAd 684                        1            1            1

EdAd 690                        2            1            2

EdAd 694                        2            2            2

EdAd 696                        3            2            3

EdFn 500                        2            1            2

EdFn 576                        1            3            1


Legend: 1-knowledge acquisition, 2-knowledge development, 3-knowledge utilization.




STANDARD V: DISPOSITIONS

The administrator believes in, values, and is committed to:


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          A. The ideal of the common good.

          B. The principles in the Bill of Rights.

          C. The right of every student to a free, quality education.

          D. Bringing ethical principles to the decision-making process.

          E. Subordinating one’s own interest to the good of the school community.

          F. Accepting the consequences for upholding one’s principles and actions.

          G. Using the influence of one’s office constructively and productively in the

              service of all students and their families.

          H. Development of a caring school community.




STANDARD V: PERFORMANCES
The administrator:


                                               129
   A. Examines personal and professional values.

   B. Demonstrates a personal and professional code of ethics.

   C. Demonstrates values, beliefs, and attitudes that inspire others to higher levels of

       performance.

   D. Serves as a role model.

   E. Accepts responsibility for school operations.

   F. Considers the impact of one’s administrative practices on others.

   G. Uses the influence of the office to enhance the educational program rather than the

       personal gain.

   H. Treats people fairly, equitably, and with dignity and respect.

   I. Protects the rights and confidentiality of students and staff.

   J. Demonstrates appreciation for and sensitivity to the diversity in the school community.

   K. Recognizes and respects the legitimate authority of others.

   L. Examines and considers the prevailing values of the diverse school community.

   M. Expects that others in the school community will demonstrate integrity and exercise

       ethical behavior.

   N. Opens the school to public scrutiny.

   O. Fulfills legal and contractual obligations.

   P. Applies laws and procedures fairly, wisely, and considerately.




STANDARD VI: KNOWLEDGE
The administrator has knowledge and understanding of:



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     6.1   Principles of representative governance that under gird the system of American

           schools.

     6.2   The role of public education in developing and renewing a democratic society

           and an economically productive nation.

     6.3   The law as related to education and schooling.

     6.4   The political, social, cultural and economic systems and processes that impact

           schools.

     6.5   Models and strategies of change and conflict resolution as applied to the larger

           political, social, cultural and economic contexts of schooling.

     6.6   The dynamics of policy development and advocacy under our democratic

           political system.

     6.7   The importance of diversity and equity in a democratic society.




MATRIX FOR COMPETENCIES AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION COURSES

ISLLC STANDARD VI

COURSES                           COMPETENCY NUMBER



                                          131
               6.1         6.1          6.2          6.3           6.4    6.5        6.7

EdAd 585

EdAd 588

EdAd 590

EdAd 594

EdAd 596

EdAd 597

EdAD 677

EdAd 682

EdAd 683

EdAd 684

EdAd 690

EdAd 694

EdAd 696

EdFn 500

EdFn 576




Legend: 1-knowledge acquisition, 2-knowledge development, 3-knowledge utilization.




STANDARD VI: DISPOSITIONS

       A. Education as a key to opportunity and social mobility.

       B. Recognizing a variety of ideas, values, and cultures.



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       C. Importance of a continuing dialogue with other decisions makers affecting

           education.

       D. Actively participating in the political and policy-making context in the service of

           education.

       E. Using legal systems to protect students’ rights and improve student opportunities.




STANDARD VI: PERFORMANCES

The administrator facilitates processes and engages in activities ensuring that:




                                               133
A. The environment in which schools operate is influenced on behalf of students and

   their families.

B. Communication occurs among the school community concerning trends, issues, and

   potential changes in the environment in which schools operate.

C. There is ongoing dialogue with representatives of diverse community groups.

D. The school community works within the framework of policies, laws, and

   regulations enacted by local, state, and federal authorities.

E. Public policy is shaped to provide quality education for students.

F. Lines of communication are developed with decision makers outside the school

   community.




                                       134
APPENDIX K

             CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT




                      135
CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT

       Western Kentucky University Department of Educational Administration, Leadership

and Research has designed a system of integrated elements to provide ongoing assessment of

the certification programs offered within the unit to evaluate the interpretation of educational

theory into instructional practice. In that pursuit, the Department has initiated various

assessment techniques to provide continuous monitoring of program quality, receiving ongoing

input both internally and externally, which assists the unit to develop critical checkpoints and to

make routine adjustments in program content and delivery.



Ongoing Assessment Tools

   From the outset, the planning and design of Department programs relies heavily upon

    ISLLC standards as articulated in the state requirements for administrative certification in

    various programs of study. Course structures are internally reviewed by presenting faculty

    to ensure that continuous application of ISLLC standards are being addressed and adapted

    to evolving external circumstances.



   Syllabi are formulated around the ISLLC competencies and ethical rubric identified as

    essential to effective educational leadership. Both full and part time faculty submit copies

    of syllabi to the Department for evaluation of their sufficiency in meeting these standards.



   Faculty assessments administered to students on a semester basis evaluate critical elements

    of instructional knowledge and program delivery. Faculty receive copies of the aggregated

    results and anecdotal descriptions of the strengths and weaknesses inherent within the


                                               136
    course requirements, instructional skills and inter-personal components of services delivery

    which allows faculty to address areas of weakness in the improvement of program quality.



   University administration is similarly evaluated annually providing an opportunity for

    faculty to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the management group leading the

    Educational Leadership Programs. Results are shared with administration to encourage the

    reassessment of managerial skills and respond to areas of need within the department

    structure.



   An annual Graduate Survey receives input from students emerging from Department

    certification programs that rates the effectiveness, instructional capacity, and relevancy to

    administrative requirements in the field, and general strengths and weaknesses of the

    graduate experience. Students are given an opportunity to suggest changes to Department

    strategies to improve program quality. A compilation of results is prepared, shared and

    presented to faculty to encourage self-monitoring and individual efforts to improve course

    offerings.




                                               137
Integrated Assessment Mechanisms in Program Development



   Design and implementation of new program offerings has intermittently incorporated

    outreach and input from diverse stakeholders in local schools, community leadership,

    businesses, collateral educational institutions, social service agencies, University consortia

    and State Education Department representatives to maintain relevancy in the ability of

    programs to address the needs of school administration in the field.



   A permanent advisory group structure composed of representatives from multi-disciplined

    agencies, currently in the process of formation, will institutionalize the Department's

    capacity to continuously access input and feedback from stakeholders in the

    school/community for the purpose of assessing and improving program quality.



   From the overarching Advisory Group, small Focus Group Committees will assist the

    Department in executing ongoing assessment of program quality; and through continuous

    dialogue, will support the Department's responsiveness to changing needs in educational

    leadership responsibilities in conjunction with various disciplinary fields.



   Using the relationships with external organizations such as the Green River Regional

    Educational Cooperative (GRREC), the Department will identify, design and implement

    programs to develop administrative capacities in the field and will receive further assistance

    to continuously monitor the effectiveness of training modules existent in University course

    offerings.



                                               138
Assessment Systems With Monitoring Procedures



   Maintaining close relationships between district-based administrative supervisors,

    practicing interns and University faculty through the Alternative Certification Program

    provides for continuous monitoring systems to receive feedback on student performance;

    and allows modifications of program elements to address emerging needs in the field of

    educational leadership.



   Participation of the minority COHORT in the Kentucky Leadership Principal Program,

    funded by a State grant and operated by Western Kentucky University allows the

    Department to receive routine information on the quality of leadership preparation. This

    program offering also provides for the reception of data on the number of minority

    graduates successfully obtaining administrative employment, which results from

    programmatic certification in the State of Kentucky.



   Involvement in the SREB, and the concomitant site visit evaluations assessing program

    responsiveness to necessary changes for program improvement and progress made in that

    direction, offers the Department an opportunity to develop self-assessment checkpoints to

    monitor internal restructuring and external evaluation of program results.




                                              139
APPENDIX L

                                  SUPERINTENDENT

COURSES                           MATRIX FOR NCATE THEMES
                  1           2         3        4        5   6

EdAd 639         X            X          X         X      X   X
EdAd 649         X            X          X         X      X   X
EdAd 659         X            X          X         X      X   X
EdAd 598         X            X          X         X      X   X




  1. Conceptual Framework

  2. Diversity

  3. Intellectual Vitality

  4. Technology

  5. Professional Community

  6. Evaluation and performance assessment




                                        140
                                           APPENDIX M

                                       SUPERINTENDENT

      COURSE                                MATRIX FOR KERA INITIATIVES

              1        2      3        4         5     6   7   8    9     10

EdAd 639               X      X                  X                        X

EdAd 649      X        X      X        X         X     X   X   X    X     X

EdAd 659               X      X                  X                        X

EdAd 598      X        X      X        X         X     X   X   X    X     X




      1. Curriculum

      2. Assessment and accountability

      3. School-Based Decision Making

      4. Regional service center

      5. Professional development

      6. Primary school program

      7. Preschool program

      8. Family resource/youth service centers

      9. Extended school services

      10. Technology




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