SCHEDULE MEETING OF THE WEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY by liuhongmei

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									                                     SCHEDULE

                              MEETING OF THE
            WEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION

                                 February 21, 2003

                                 Embassy Suites
                             Charleston, West Virginia




8:30 A.M.    Continental Breakfast
             Salon C

9:00 A.M.    Academic Policy Committee
             Salon A

             Finance Committee
             Salon C

*10:30 A.M. Full Commission Meeting
            Salon C




* Time approximate, depending upon length of committee meetings




Academic Policy Committee:                               Finance Committee:
Elliot Hicks, Chair                                      John Hoblitzell, Chair
R. Ken Hall                                              Mary Clare Eros
David Stewart                                            Kay Goodwin
Shawn Williams                                           Terry Sammons

                               J. Thomas Jones, Chair
                                   MEETING OF FEBRUARY 21, 2003

                                              Embassy Suites
                                          Charleston, West Virginia

                                                       AGENDA

I.     Call to Order

II.    Approval of Minutes....................................................................................................pg 1

III.   Executive Committee Report

IV.    Academic Policy Committee

       A.     Preliminary Authorization for Future Generations to Operate as Higher
              Education Institution in West Virginia ........................................................ pg 21

       B.     Approval of Institutional Compact Updates ............................................... pg 33

       C.     Acceptance of Report on College Courses for High School Students .. pg 62

V.     Finance Committee

       A.     Approval of WVU Institute of Technology Master Plan ........................... pg 79

       B.     Approval of Bluefield State College Master Plan....................................... pg 80

       C.     Bonding Resolution for Refinancing Bonds................................................ pg 82

VI.    Committee of the Whole

       A.     Expanding the Educational Pipeline with Rural Residency Training ....pg 146

       B.     Review of Rule on Funding of Intercollegiate Athletics ..........................pg 147

       C.     West Virginia Council for Community and Technical College Education
              Involvement in the Selection of Community and Technical College
              Administrative Heads ...................................................................................pg 162

       D.     Approval of Report on Distance Learning.................................................pg 163

       E.     Draft Report to LOCEA on Non-classified Staff Salary Levels ..............pg 196

VII.   Chancellor’s Report

       A.     Legislative Update

       B.     HEPC Transition Plan
VIII.   Possible Executive Session under the authority of WV Code §6-9A-4 for
        personnel Items

        A.   Chancellor’s Evaluation

        B.   Appointment of Representative to Glenville Presidential Search

IV.     Additional Board Action and Comments

X.      Adjournment
                                        MINUTES

                     HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION

                                  December 13, 2002


A meeting of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission was held on
December 13, 2002, at 8:30 a.m., at Embassy Suites in Charleston, West Virginia.
Present at the meeting were Policy Commission members: Mary Clare Eros, Kay
Goodwin, R. Ken Hall, John Hoblitzell, J. Thomas Jones, Terry Sammons, David Stewart
and Shawn Williams. Absent: Elliot Hicks. Also in attendance were Chancellor J. Michael
Mullen, institutional presidents, higher education staff, legislative staff, members of the
news media and others.

Chairman Jones called the meeting to order.

1.    Approval of Minutes

      Ms. Goodwin moved the approval of the minutes of the November 15, 2002
      meeting of the Commission as amended.
      Mr. Hall seconded the motion. Motion carried.

2.    Executive Committee Report

      Vice Chair Eros reported that the Committee met by conference call on December
      6, 2002 at 9:00 a.m. to review the agenda for the December 13, 2002 meeting of
      the Policy Commission.

Consent Items

      Ms. Goodwin moved the adoption of the following consent items:

3.    LOCEA Reports

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      approves the following reports for submission to the Legislative Oversight
      Commission on Education Accountability: A Plan for the Delivery of Community
      and Technical College Education in the Advantage Valley Region of West
      Virginia and A Plan for the Delivery of Postsecondary Education in the Beckley
      Area.

4.    Final Approval of Series 41, Health Sciences Scholarship

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      approves the proposed procedural rule: Series 41, Health Sciences Scholarship
      Program.



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5.   Collaboration in Criminal Justice at WVSC and WVU-P

     RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
     accepts the report on implementation of the collaborative offering of the West
     Virginia State College B.S. in Criminal Justice by West Virginia State College
     and West Virginia University at Parkersburg at the WVU-P center in Ripley, West
     Virginia.

6.   Revision of Retirement Plan Recommendations

     RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
     accepts the revised recommendation that all employees presently contributing to
     403(b) vendors be grandfathered and be allowed to continue to make
     contributions to their present vendors. All new enrollees to all retirement
     programs will continue to be limited to the approved vendors, which at this time,
     are TIAA-CREF and Great-West.

7.   Approval of Capital Financing Plan at Shepherd College

     RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
     approves Shepherd College’s Capital Bonding Project for Creative Arts Center
     Addition, Parking Building Infrastructure Improvements, Athletics Facility, and the
     Financing/Bond Resolution.

     FURTHER RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy
     Commission authorizes the Chancellor to sign, on the Commission’s behalf, the
     Financing/Bond Resolution and other documents required by bond counsel to
     facilitate the Financing Plan.

8.   Refer to Executive Committee Selection of Investment Banking Firm and
     Bond Counsel

     RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
     authorizes the Executive Committee to approve the selection of an investment
     banking firm and bond counsel at a special meeting in January 2003.

9.   Transfer of Gilmer County Properties to Glenville Board of Governors

     RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
     approves the request of the Glenville State College Board of Governors to
     transfer certain real properties owned by the Policy Commission and located in
     Gilmer County to the Glenville State College Board of Governors.

     FURTHER RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy
     Commission authorizes the Chancellor to sign the deeds and other associated
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      documents, on the Commission’s behalf, after the Chancellor is satisfied with the
      documentation presented to support the transfer.

10.   Revision of Series 5, Guidelines for Governing Boards in Employing and
      Evaluating Presidents.

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      approves Series 5, Guidelines for Governing Boards in Employing and
      Evaluating Presidents or Other Administrative Heads of Institutions.

11.   Approval of HEPC Meeting Schedule for 2003

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission adopts
      the proposed schedule for commission meetings for the 2003 calendar year.

12.   Report of the WV Financial Aid Coordinating Council

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      endorses the recommendations of the West Virginia Financial Aid Coordinating
      Council as constituted in House Bill 4534.

      Ms. Williams seconded the motion. Motion carried.

Committee of the Whole

      With agreement from the Commission, the following item was removed from the
      agenda: Report on Determining Salary Levels for Non-Classified Employees.

13.   FY 2003 and FY 2004 Budget Reductions

      Mr. Hall moved the adoption of the following resolution:

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      approves the guidelines for implementation of the FY 2003 budget reductions, and
      directs the Institutional Governing Boards to implement campus specific plans to
      meet the reductions as ordered by the Governor.

      Mr. Sammons seconded the motion. Motion carried.

14.   Institution Specific Budget Requests for FY 2004

      Mr. Hall moved the adoption of the following resolution:

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      approves the prioritization of the projects as shown in Attachment B and the
      submission of the project listing to the Legislature in January 2003.
                                                                                      3



                                                                                          3
      Mr. Sammons seconded the motion. Motion carried.

      (See Attachment B)

15.   Capital Project Budget Requests for FY 2004

      Mr. Hoblitzell moved the adoption of the following resolution:

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      approves the prioritized capital project list and bond funding recommendations for
      Fiscal Year 2004 as reported.

      Mr. Sammons seconded the motion. Motion carried.

      (See Attachment)

16.   Tuition and Fee Policy

      Action on this item was deferred until the Chancellor and his staff have an
      opportunity to review the policy based on comments received during the meeting.

17.   Tuition and Fee Legislation

      Action on this item was deferred until the Chancellor and his staff have an
      opportunity to revise the proposed legislation based upon comments received
      during the meeting. It is anticipated that a special meeting of the Commission will
      be called within the next thirty days to review the updated legislative proposal. In
      the interim period, the Commission directed the Chancellor to begin conversations
      with the Governor and the Legislature regarding the proposed revisions in the
      tuition and fee legislation.

18.   WVU Athletics Facilities

      Mr. Hoblitzell moved the adoption of the following resolution:

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      approves projects to upgrade the coliseum, the soccer complex, the football
      stadium, and the Puskar Center based on funding availability from the Athletics
      Department’s existing operating fund, private donations, and bond sales.

      Ms. Williams seconded the motion. Motion carried.

19.   Presentation by Deloitte and Touche of the FY 2002 Audit

      Mr. Hoblitzell moved the adoption of the following resolution:
                                                                                        4



                                                                                             4
      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission accepts
      the filing of the audited financial reports for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2002.

      Mr. Hall seconded the motion. Motion carried.

20.   Proposed West Virginia Center for Nursing

      Dr. Cynthia Persily, Chair of the Nursing Center Task Force, introduced proposed
      legislative language for the creation of the West Virginia Center for Nursing. The
      creation of the Center was recommended by the Nursing Shortage Study
      Commission which was directed by the Legislature in February 2002 to collect and
      analyze data on an expected nursing shortage.

      Ms. Goodwin moved the adoption of the following resolution:

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission accepts
      the report of the Nursing Center Task Force and asks the Chancellor to work with
      Dr. Persily and the Task Force on its proposal for the West Virginia Center for
      Nursing.

      Mr. Hall seconded the motion. Motion carried.

21.   Consultant Report on HEPC Functions

      Mr. Hoblitzell moved the adoption of the following resolution:

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission accepts
      the consultants’ report and directs the chancellor to prepare for its February
      meeting recommendations on the reorganization of the Policy Commission Office
      and recommendations on functions that can be transferred to the institutional
      Boards of Governors.

      Ms. Williams seconded the motion. Motion carried.

Chancellor’s Report

22.   Report on Physical Plant Job Family

      Mr. Hoblitzell moved the adoption of the following resolution:

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      approves the recommendations of the Job Evaluation Committee on changes to
      the physical plant job family for implementation effective July 1, 2003. Changes in
      salaries shall be determined by the institutional salary policies approved by the
      Board of Governors consistent with the guidance provided by Series 8.
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        FURTHER RESOLVED, that the employees whose pay grades were lowered as a
        result of the reclassification shall realize no change in their salary.

        Ms. Williams seconded the motion. Motion carried.

        Ms. Eros and Ms. Goodwin voted against the motion, noting that changes in
        salaries should be determined by institutional salary policies and not the
        Commission.

23.     WV Higher Education Report Card 2002

        Mr. Sammons moved the adoption of the following resolution:

        RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
        delegates to the Executive Committee the approval of the West Virginia Higher
        Education Report Card 2002 at its January meeting.

        Ms. Williams seconded the motion. Motion carried.

24.     WV Rural Health Education Partnerships Annual Report

        Hilda Heady, Executive Director of WV Rural Health Education Partnerships,
        presented highlights from the State Recruitment and Retention Annual Report.
        The report reflected a 19 percent increase in sites that train health professionals in
        rural underserved areas of the state.

Additional Board Action and Comments

        W. Joseph Wyatt, Professor of Psychology at Marshall University, addressed the
        Commission regarding the representation of a student, faculty and staff member
        on the Commission.



There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.



      ____________________________                        Chairman
            J. Thomas Jones



      _____________________________                       Secretary
           Elliot G. Hicks

                                                                                            6



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                                                                                               Attachment B

Summary Rankings For Complete Listing of Special Project Funding Requests
For FY 2004
Updated December 9, 2002                                                                           Fits
                                                                 Institutional   Amount of    Prioritization HEPC
Notes                        Institution/Project                   Ranking        Request        Criteria    Rank
       SWVC&TC - APPALREAD                                            NA              $25,000       1
       SC - Civil War Center                                          NA              $60,000       1
       CC - Geographic Alliance                                       NA            $100,000        1
       SC - Gateway                                                   NA            $100,000        1
       WVU - Classroom Construction and Completion Beckley Prog.      NA            $100,000        1
       WVU - Independent Entrepreneurial Study                        NA            $100,000        1
       WVU - Strategic Plan for Sheep Industry                        NA            $153,000        1
       MU - Autism Training Center Satellite Center                   NA            $200,000        1
       SC - Technical Preparation Program                             NA            $200,000        1
       SWVC&TC - Tech Prep Programs                                   NA            $300,000        1
       FSC - E-learning Clusters and Services                         NA            $501,800        1
       WVUHS - Eastern Rural Health Initiative                        NA          $1,000,000        1
         Subtotal                                                                 $2,839,800

        EWVC&TC - Multipoint Distance Learning @ Eastern                1          $132,000         2          1
        SC - High Tech Classrooms                                       2           $150,000        2          2
 1, 2   WVNCC - Science Laboratory Renovation/Furnishings               2           $248,776        2          3
        FSC - Combined Online Catalog for Libraries                     2           $327,075        2          4
        MU - Distributed Education Network Proposal                     2         $1,000,000        2          5
        WVUP - Health Science Lab Project                               3            $35,958        2          6
        WLSC - Enhancing Classroom Technology for Instruction           3            $75,000        2          7
        WVSC - "Sage: Student Acad. for Grad. Education” Initiative     3          $100,000         2          8
        EWVC&TC - Brokered Services Model: College to College           3          $112,500         2          9
        GSC - Students Internet Infrastructure                          4            $55,000        2         10
        WVNCC - Classroom Technology Presentation Equipment             4          $180,950         2         11
        SWVC&TC - Business/OIT Lab-Williamson Campus                    5            $34,900        2         12
        WVSC - Charleston Connecting People to Job Partnership          5            $52,600        2         13
        WVNCC - Internet Protocol Video                                 5          $300,000         2         14
        WVSC - L.E.A.R.N.                                               6            $12,675        2         15
        WVNCC - Criminal Justice Program Expansion                      6            $20,000        2         16
        SWVC&TC - Transitional Studies Computer/Lab Furniture           7            $52,856        2         17
        SWVC&TC - Southern’s Family Literacy Summit                     8            $25,000        2         18
        SWVC&TC - Computer Equipment Replacement                        9          $210,000         2         19
        WVU - West Virginia University Benedum Collaborative/Center S   10          $325,000        2         20
         Subtotal                                                                 $3,450,290

  1     WLSC - Lighting and Pedestrian Walkway                          1           $250,000        3         21
  1     CC - Mold Remediation                                           1           $550,000        3         22
 1, 2   WVUP - Classroom Tower Subsidence Issues                        1          $160,000         3         23
        GSC - ADA Accessibility for Clark Hall                          2           $140,000        3         24
  1     SC - Ikenberry Hall Elevator                                    3           $230,000        3         25
        BSC - Library and Conley Hall Access                            3           $450,000        3         26
  1     PSC - Administration Bldg. and Academy Hall ADA Improve.        4          $400,000         3         27
  1     PSC - Memorial Hall Renovations                                 5           $200,000        3         28
        WLSC - Renovations to ADA Requirements                          5          $250,000         3         29
        WVUIT - Campus-Wide Fire Marshall Code Issues                   5          $985,000         3         30
  1     PSC - Student Union Basement Renovation                         6           $200,000        3         31
        WLSC - Smoke Detectors in Residence Hall Rooms                  7          $150,000         3         32
         Subtotal                                                                 $3,965,000




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                                                                                                     Attachment B

Summary Rankings For Complete Listing of Special Project Funding Requests
For FY 2004
Updated December 9, 2002                                                                                Fits
                                                                       Institutional   Amount of   Prioritization HEPC
Notes                       Institution/Project                          Ranking        Request       Criteria    Rank
       SC - Blue Ridge Center – CTC of Shepherd                               1           $150,000        4        33
  2    BSC - Expansion of Raleigh County Campus                               1           $350,000       4         34
       WVSOM - Clinical Faculty for Curricular and Elderly Needs              1           $400,000       4         35
       WVUHS - Eastern Rural Health Initiative                               1           $500,000        4         36
       WVSC - Land-Grant                                                     1          $2,000,000       4         37
       MU - Graduate Access Through Collaboration                            3            $500,000       4         38
       WVUHS - School of Pharmacy – Enrollment Expansion                      3         $1,050,000        4        39
       WVSC - Employment Workforce and Ec. Dev. Center                       4             $62,549       4         40
       EWVC&TC - Community Education Regional Network                        4            $120,000       4         41
       WVU - Eng. Part. to Support Revital. of the State Chemical Ind.       4            $250,000       4         42
       MU - Southern Clinical Campus                                          4           $985,000       4         43
       WVU - Support Mine Foreman Certification Trng to Aid Work.            5             $75,000       4         44
       MU - Hanshaw Geriatric Center Outreach                                5            $250,000       4         45
       WVUHS - Health Sciences & Technology Academy (HSTA)                    7           $595,621       4         46
       WVU - Community Service Learning Partnerships                         8            $300,000       4         47
       WVU - Appalachian Hardwood Center Expansion                           9            $220,000       4         48
       WVUHS - Health Careers Opportunity Program                            11            $28,612       4         49
         Subtotal                                                                       $7,836,782

        EWVC&TC - Electronic Records Mngt. System                            2             $36,615        5         50
        WVSC - Educational Network (EDNET)                                  2            $150,000         5         51
        WLSC - Replacement of Telephone Switch                              2            $275,000         5         52
   1    GSC - PBX – Telephone System                                         3            $650,000        5         53
        SWVC&TC - Document Imaging                                          4            $120,000         5         54
        SWVC&TC - Telephone Equipment Upgrade                               11           $126,000         5         55
         Subtotal                                                                       $1,357,615

 1, 3   WVNCC - B&O Building Mechanical System Renovation                    1            $260,000        7         56
 1, 3   SWVC&TC - HVAC replacement – Williamson Campus                       1           $451,302         7         57
 1, 3   SWVC&TC - Roof Replacement-Logan Campus                              2           $150,000         7         58
  1     WVUIT - Engineering Lab Building Roof                                2            $300,000        7         59
 1, 3   SWVC&TC - Roof Replacement –Williamson Campus                        3            $150,000        7         60
  1     PSC - Roof Replacement Project                                       3           $400,000         7         61
        WLSC - Resurfacing of Tennis Courts                                  4           $175,000         7         62
         Subtotal                                                                       $1,886,302

        GSC - Library Enhancement and Renovation                             1            $100,000        8         63
   1    FSC - Feaster Center Utilization Upgrade                             1            $350,000        8         64
   1    WVUIT - Orndorff and COBE Air Quality                                1           $602,000         8         65
   1    CC - White Hall Renovation                                           1          $2,500,000        8         66
        WVUP - Learning Center Relocation and Renovation                     2             $96,850        8         67
  1     PSC - Computer Lab Upgrades                                          2            $300,000        8         68
 1, 3   BSC - Elevator Upgrades                                              2            $400,000        8         69
        FSC - Kennedy Barn/Colonial Apartments Rehabilitation                3            $150,000        8         70
 1, 3   WVNCC - Hazel-Atlas VVT Zoning System                                3            $180,000        8         71
  1     WVUIT - Old Main                                                     3           $975,000         8         72
        WVUIT - Community College Learning Laboratories                      4            $750,000        8         73
        GSC - Telephone Infrastructure Identification and Security           5             $32,250        8         74
        BSCR&D - Wade School Renovation Project                              5          $2,000,000        8         75
        GSC - Fine Arts Center Lighting & Sound                              6             $40,000        8         76




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                                                                                                         Attachment B

Summary Rankings For Complete Listing of Special Project Funding Requests
For FY 2004
Updated December 9, 2002                                                                                   Fits
                                                                Institutional             Amount of   Prioritization HEPC
Notes                       Institution/Project                   Ranking                  Request       Criteria    Rank
       SWVC&TC - Learning Environment Renovation                       6                      $43,156       8         77
       WLSC - Renovation of Arnette Hall, Room 202                    6                     $200,000        8         78
  1    WVUHS - Renovation of Dental School Facilities                  6                   $1,538,175       8         79
       WVUIT - National Printing/Publishing Innovation Center          7                    $983,450        8         80
       PSC - Student Parking Improvements                             8                       $75,000       8         81
       SWVC&TC - Arts Center Completion                               10                    $250,000        8         82
         Subtotal                                                                         $11,565,881

 1, 3   MU - Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology/Science Center                        1           $1,442,000           9      83
  1     PSC - Library Annex: Information Center                                 1           $2,300,000           9      84
        WVU - Dev. of a Facility to Support Nanotechnology R&D                  2             $500,000           9      85
        WVUP - Caperton Center Vehicular and Ped. Traffic Provisions            4              $96,750           9      86
        BSC - Land Acquisition                                                  4             $300,000           9      87
        WVUIT - Research Laboratory – Green Energy R&D Center                   6            $739,000            9      88
  1     PSC - Physical Education Annex                                          7           $1,000,000           9      89
         Subtotal                                                                          $6,377,750

        GRAND TOTAL                                                                        $39,279,420

Notes
    1 Project is duplicated in the special project list and the capital project list.
    2 Project code has been changed.
    3 If not funded as a capital project, recommended priority would reclassify to Prioritization Criteria #2.




                                                                                                                             9
INSTITUTION SUMMARY OF CAPITAL PROJECT PRIORITIES
FOR FY 2004

FINAL - REVISED DECEMBER 9, 2002                                                                                                                                                                                                                             $125 Million
                                                                                                                                                                                           Internal                                         Recommend        Recommend
                                                                        Total        HEPC                 HEPC           Funded              Funded           Funding      Federal         & Other         Auxiliary           Net           for Bond          for Bond
           Inst                                                        Project       Project   Project    Project     (all sources)       (all sources)       Needed       Funding         Funding         Funding          Remaining        Funding           Funding
 Inst      Pr #                      Project Name                       Cost        Category   Status      Class       in FY2002           in FY2003           FY04+        FY04+           FY04+           FY04+          Funds Needed      Last Year         FY 2004
Column 1 Column 2                       Column 5                       Column 6     Column 8   Column 9   Column 10     Column 11           Column 12         Column 13    Column 14       Column 15       Column 16         Column 17       Column 18         Column 19


BSC        1        Greenbrier Community College Center Relocation        205,000      a          3          C              100,000             105,000                                                                                 0
BSC        2        ADA Issues/Sidewalk Replacement Phase I               580,000      e          3          A              475,000             105,000                                                                                 0
BSC        3        Renovation of Hatter Hall                             625,000      a          3          C               75,000             550,000                                                                                 0          50,000
BSC        4        Campus Master Plan Update                              50,000      e          2          D                5,000              45,000                                                                                 0
BSC        5        Security System Replacement                           250,000      f          1          A              250,000                                                                                                     0
BSC        6        Boiler Replacement - Dickason and Conley              175,000      e          3          B                                  175,000                                                                                 0
BSC        7        Fire Alarm Replacement (Conley, Mahood, Library       300,000      a          1          A                20,000            280,000                                                                                 0
BSC     **8         **Elevator Upgrade (Basic Science & Mahood)           400,000      a          2          A                                   25,000          375,000                                                          375,000        250,000           375,000
BSC        9        Athletic Field Upgrade                                350,000      g          2          D                                  103,000          247,000                     247,000                                    0
BSC       10        Dickason Hall Exterior Finish                         150,000      b          2          B                                    5,000          145,000                                                          145,000                          150,000
BSC       11        Parking Lot - Hatter Hall                             300,000      g          1          D                                                   300,000                                                          300,000
BSC       12        Student Housing                                     6,000,000      g          1          D              100,000                            5,900,000                                    5,900,000                   0
BSC       13        Repaving/Sealing Parking Lots, Roadways, Signage      150,000      f          1          B               50,000                              100,000                                                          100,000
BSC       14        Railroad Property - Upgrade Roadway                 1,300,000      f          1          C              300,000                            1,000,000                                                        1,000,000                        1,000,000
BSC       15        Electrical/Mechanical Upgrade Mahood Hall             400,000      a          1          B                                                   400,000                                                          400,000        400,000
BSC       16        Mahood Hall Renovations & Refurbishing                250,000      a          1          C                                                   250,000                                                          250,000        250,000
BSC       17        Phase II - Conley Hall Renovation                     400,000      a          1          C                25,000              25,000         350,000                                                          350,000                          350,000
BSC       18        Electrical/Mechanical PE Building                     575,000      d          1          B                                                   575,000                                                          575,000
BSC       19        Phase II - ADA Access & Parking Improvement           750,000      f          1          A                                                   750,000                                                          750,000        750,000           750,000
BSC       20        Equipment Needs Electronic Classrooms                 400,000      b          1          C                                                   400,000                                                          400,000
BSC       21        Renovation College Library                          1,000,000      b          1          C                                                 1,000,000                                                        1,000,000
BSC       22        Lease of Gas Company Lot, Parking Upgrade             400,000      g          1          D                                                   400,000                                                          400,000
BSC       23        Student Center Elevator                               200,000      g          1          C                                                   200,000                                      200,000                   0
BSC Total                                                              15,210,000                                         1,400,000           1,418,000       12,392,000               0     247,000        6,100,000           6,045,000       1,700,000         2,625,000

CC         **1      **Science Hall Mold Remediation (SEE NOTE)           550,000       a          3          A                                 550,000                                                                                  0
CC         **1      **White Hall Renovations                            9,000,000      a          2          C            1,900,000                            7,100,000   2,500,000                                            4,600,000      2,500,000         4,600,000
CC          2       ADA Sidewalk Repairs                                  285,000      a          3          A               85,000                              200,000                                                          200,000                          200,000
CC          3       GYM 2, Dance Studio, Class Room Roofs                 165,000      d          1          C                    0                              165,000                                                          165,000
CC          4       Marsh Hall Roof                                       100,000      a          1          C                    0                              100,000                                                          100,000
CC          5       Sarvey Hall Renovation                                800,000      g          1          C                    0                              800,000                                     800,000                    0
CC          6       Admin & Science Bldg Floor Replacement                125,000      a          1          C                    0                              125,000                                                          125,000
CC          7       Centennial Hall Handball Court                        100,000      d          1          C                    0                              100,000                                                          100,000
CC          8       Stadium Painting Project                              280,000      g          1          C                    0                              280,000                                                          280,000
CC Total                                                               11,405,000                                         1,985,000             550,000        8,870,000   2,500,000                   0      800,000           5,570,000       2,500,000         4,800,000

EWVCT 1 Classroom/Laboratory/General Support Facility                   4,920,000      a          1          D                                                 4,920,000                                                        4,920,000
EWVCTC Total                                                            4,920,000                                                     0                   0    4,920,000               0               0               0        4,920,000                0                  0

FSC         1       Engineering Technology Building                     9,500,000      a          1          D                                                 9,500,000                                                        9,500,000      9,500,000         9,500,000
FSC         2       Performance Arts Center                            15,000,000      a          1          D                                                15,000,000                                                       15,000,000
FSC          3      Hunt Haught Hall - Elevator/Entrance                1,000,000      c          1          C                                                 1,000,000                                                        1,000,000      1,000,000         1,000,000
FSC         4       Musick Library Reno. & Inner Campus Improvemen      2,000,000      b          2          D                                                 2,000,000                                                        2,000,000      2,000,000         2,000,000
FSC          5      Hardway Hall - Restoration                            950,000      e          1          A                                   76,000          874,000                                                          874,000                          874,000
FSC          6      Byrd NAEC Expansion                                 7,800,000      a          1          D                                7,800,000                                                                                 0
FSC          7      Land Acquisition                                    4,500,000      f          3          D            1,500,000           1,500,000        1,500,000                                                        1,500,000
FSC          8      College Entrances - East Garden & Bryant Street     3,500,000      f          2          C                                2,000,000        1,500,000                                                        1,500,000
FSC          9      Infrastructure Updates                              5,500,000      f          2          B                                3,500,000        2,000,000                                                        2,000,000
FSC         10      Parking Garage                                     10,000,000      g          3          D                                6,000,000        4,000,000                                    4,000,000                   0
FSC         11      Student Activity Center                            24,000,000      g          1          D                                  800,000       12,000,000                                   12,000,000                   0
FSC        **12     **Feaster Center - Seating                            300,000      g          1          C                                                   300,000                                                          300,000


              Capital Priorities FY04 FINAL REVISED 12-9-2002                                                                                                                                                                                                     Page 1 of 6



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                10
INSTITUTION SUMMARY OF CAPITAL PROJECT PRIORITIES
FOR FY 2004

FINAL - REVISED DECEMBER 9, 2002                                                                                                                                                                                                                      $125 Million
                                                                                                                                                                                        Internal                                      Recommend       Recommend
                                                                          Total        HEPC                 HEPC           Funded           Funded        Funding       Federal         & Other         Auxiliary        Net           for Bond         for Bond
          Inst                                                           Project       Project   Project    Project     (all sources)    (all sources)    Needed        Funding         Funding         Funding       Remaining        Funding          Funding
 Inst     Pr #                        Project Name                        Cost        Category   Status      Class       in FY2002        in FY2003        FY04+         FY04+           FY04+           FY04+       Funds Needed      Last Year        FY 2004
Column 1 Column 2                         Column 5                       Column 6     Column 8   Column 9   Column 10     Column 11        Column 12      Column 13     Column 14       Column 15       Column 16      Column 17       Column 18        Column 19


FSC       13        New Residence Halls                                  26,000,000      g          1          D                               200,000    10,000,000                                    10,000,000                0
FSC       14        Feaster Center - Steps & Elevators                      300,000      a          1          A                 4,000           6,000       290,000                                                        290,000                         290,000
FSC       15        Windows - Library                                       150,000      a          1          A                                 4,000       146,000                                                        146,000
FSC       16        President's House - Renovations/Remodeling              400,000      g          2          C                 4,000         200,000       196,000                                                        196,000
FSC       17        Colebank Roof                                           250,000      a          1          B                                             250,000                                                        250,000
FSC       18        Feaster Center - Interior Painting - Retton Arena       125,000      g          1          B                                             125,000                                                        125,000
FSC Total                                                               111,275,000                                         1,508,000       22,086,000    60,681,000                0               0   26,000,000       34,681,000      12,500,000       13,664,000

GSC       2         Science Hall - Renovation                             5,000,000      a          1          C                                           5,000,000                                                      5,000,000      5,000,000        5,000,000
GSC     **3         **Telephone / Data System                               650,000      f          2          C                               650,000                                                                            0
GSC       1         Nicholas County Center Purchase & Renovation          2,200,000      a          1          C                             2,200,000                                                                            0
GSC       4         Heflin Student Union Renovation                       3,500,000      g          2          C                50,000                      3,450,000                                    3,450,000                0
GSC       5         Physical Education Building                          10,000,000      d          1          D                                          10,000,000                                                    10,000,000
GSC       6         Louis Bennett Hall Renovation                           500,000      e          1          C                                              500,000                                                       500,000
GSC Total                                                                21,850,000                                           50,000       2,850,000     18,950,000             0               0       3,450,000      15,500,000       5,000,000        5,000,000

MU          1       Biotechnology Science Center                         40,380,000      c          2          D           35,380,000                      5,000,000                     1,600,000                        3,400,000      1,110,200        3,400,000
MU          2       Harris Hall ADA Upgrade                                 250,000      a          1          A                               250,000                                                                            0
MU          3       Community College ADA Upgrade                           200,000      a          1          A                                             200,000                      200,000                                 0
MU          4       Smith Hall Life Safety Upgrade                          800,000      a          1          A                                             800,000                      400,000                           400,000        800,000          400,000
MU          5       Communication Building Sprinklers                       200,000      a          1          A                                             200,000                                                        200,000                         200,000
MU          6       Smith Hall Asbestos Abatement                         1,400,000      a          3          A              200,000          200,000     1,000,000                                                      1,000,000      1,400,000        1,000,000
MU          7       Biotechnology Development Ctr.                        8,200,000      c          1          D                             6,000,000     2,200,000                                                      2,200,000                       2,200,000
MU          8       Morrow Library Renovation (2nd Floor)                   750,000      b          1          C                                             750,000                                                        750,000                         750,000
MU          9       Harris Hall HVAC Upgrade                              3,200,000      a          1          B                                           3,200,000                                                      3,200,000                       3,200,000
MU         10       Smith Hall HVAC Upgrade                               4,600,000      a          1          B                                           4,600,000                                                      4,600,000      4,600,000        4,600,000
MU         11       Campus Wiring Infrastructure                          1,900,000      f          2          C                                           1,900,000                                                      1,900,000                       1,900,000
MU-PP      12       MOVC Science Addition                                 1,500,000      a          1          D                                           1,500,000                                                      1,500,000
MU         13       Marching Band Building                                  300,000      g          1          D                                             300,000                                                        300,000
MU         14       Medical Center Elevator Addition                        350,000      b          1          C                                             350,000                                                        350,000                         350,000
MU         15       Medical Education HVAC Improvements                     500,000      e          1          C                                             500,000                                                        500,000                         500,000
MU-SC      16       Ctr. For Econ. Dev/Distance                           7,000,000      a          1          D                                           7,000,000                                                      7,000,000
MU-SC      17       Teays Center                                          2,400,000      a          1          D                                           2,400,000                                                      2,400,000
MU         18       Visual Arts Center                                   16,000,000      a          1          D                                          16,000,000                     8,000,000                        8,000,000                       1,100,000
MU         19       Student Center Renovation                             4,200,000      g          1          C                                           4,200,000                                     4,200,000                0
MU         20       Land Purchase Parking                                 1,000,000      g          1          D                                           1,000,000                                                      1,000,000
MU         21       Student Health & Wellness Ctr.                       17,000,000      g          1          D                                          17,000,000                                    17,000,000                0
MU         22       Residence Housing/Parking Complex                    44,000,000      g          3          D           44,000,000                                                                                             0
MU         23       Old Main Renovation                                   1,300,000      e          3          C            1,300,000                                                                                             0
MU         24       Erickson Alumni Center                                3,000,000      g          2          D                                           3,000,000                     3,000,000                                0
MU         25       Medical Center Clinical Addition                      7,000,000      a          1          D                                           7,000,000                                                      7,000,000
MU         26       Facilities Building Add/Ren                           4,000,000      g          1          D                                           4,000,000                                     4,000,000                0
MU-SC      27       Staunton School Add/Demo                                500,000      f          1          D                                             500,000                                                        500,000
MU                  Community College Facilities                         13,000,000      a                     D                                                N/A                                                            N/A      13,000,000
MU Total                                                                171,930,000                                        80,880,000        6,450,000    84,600,000                0   13,200,000      21,200,000       46,200,000      20,910,200       19,600,000

SC          1       Scarborough Library Expansion and Renovation         15,600,000      b          3          D           12,600,000        3,000,000                                                                            0
SC          2       Frank Arts Center Renovation/Addition                 2,844,000      a          2          D                                           2,844,000                                                      2,844,000      2,250,000        2,250,000
SC          3       Sports Facilities Center                              1,804,000      g          2          D              500,000                      1,304,000                                                      1,304,000
SC          4       West Campus Parking Lot and Roadwork                  1,075,000      g          1          D                                           1,075,000                                                      1,075,000                         875,000
SC          5       Boiler Replacements/Lighting Systems Phase I            500,000      f          1          C                                             500,000                                                        500,000                         500,000


                Capital Priorities FY04 FINAL REVISED 12-9-2002                                                                                                                                                                                            Page 2 of 6



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         11
INSTITUTION SUMMARY OF CAPITAL PROJECT PRIORITIES
FOR FY 2004

FINAL - REVISED DECEMBER 9, 2002                                                                                                                                                                                                                       $125 Million
                                                                                                                                                                                      Internal                                         Recommend       Recommend
                                                                      Total        HEPC                 HEPC           Funded              Funded        Funding      Federal         & Other         Auxiliary           Net           for Bond         for Bond
           Inst                                                      Project       Project   Project    Project     (all sources)       (all sources)    Needed       Funding         Funding         Funding          Remaining        Funding          Funding
 Inst      Pr #                      Project Name                     Cost        Category   Status      Class       in FY2002           in FY2003        FY04+        FY04+           FY04+           FY04+          Funds Needed      Last Year        FY 2004
Column 1 Column 2                       Column 5                     Column 6     Column 8   Column 9   Column 10     Column 11           Column 12      Column 13    Column 14       Column 15       Column 16         Column 17       Column 18        Column 19


SC          6       Campus Entrances and Border Definition              250,000      g          1          D                                                250,000                                                          250,000                         250,000
SC         **7      **Ikenberry Hall elevator per ADA requirements      230,000      e          1          A                                                230,000                                                          230,000                         230,000
SC          8       Classroom Building                                8,000,000      a          1          D                                              8,000,000                                                        8,000,000      8,000,000        8,000,000
SC          9       Visual Arts Building                              8,000,000      a          1          D                                              8,000,000                                                        8,000,000
SC         10        Reynolds Hall Renovation                           300,000      a          1          C                                                300,000                                                          300,000
SC         11       Frank Center Roofing Replacement                    300,000      a          1          C                                                300,000                                                          300,000
SC         12       Stutzman Slonaker Hall Renovations                  445,000      a          1          C                                                445,000                                                          445,000
SC         13       Snyder Hall-Renovation Phase III                    530,000      a          1          C                                                530,000                                                          530,000                         530,000
SC         14       Campus Infrastructure Water/ Sewer/Electric       3,500,000      f          1          C                                              3,500,000                                                        3,500,000
SC         15       Sara Cree Hall Renovations                          365,000      g          1          C                                                365,000                                                          365,000
SC         16       Boiler Replacements/Lighting Systems Phase II     2,200,000      f          1          B                                              2,200,000                                                        2,200,000
SC         17       ID Card Infrastructure                              150,000      b          1          D                                                150,000                                                          150,000
SC         18       Snyder Annex Renovation                             300,000      e          1          C                                                300,000                                                          300,000
SC         19       Butcher Swimming Pool Addition                    4,000,000      d          1          D                                              4,000,000                                                        4,000,000
SC         20       Maintenance and Service Center                    2,700,000      e          1          D                                              2,700,000                                                        2,700,000
SC         21       Popodicon Renovation                                200,000      e          1          C                                                200,000                                                          200,000
SC         22       New West Campus Residence Complex                18,000,000      g          1          D                                             18,000,000                                   18,000,000                   0
SC         23       Baseball Field Relocation and New Parking Lot       825,000      g          1          D                                                825,000                                                          825,000
SC         24       West Residence Hall Renovation                    2,000,000      g          1          C                                              2,000,000                                    2,000,000                   0
SC         25       Parking Structure                                 4,800,000      g          1          C                                              4,800,000                                    4,800,000                   0
SC         26       College Center Renovation                         6,850,000      g          1          C                                              6,850,000                                    6,850,000                   0
SC         27       East Residence Hall Renovation                   12,000,000      g          1          C                                             12,000,000                                   12,000,000                   0
SC         28       Miller Hall Renovation                            1,400,000      g          1          C                                              1,400,000                                    1,400,000                   0
SC Total                                                             99,168,000                                        13,100,000                        83,068,000               0               0             0         38,018,000      10,250,000       12,635,000

SWVCTC **1 **Williamson Campus HVAC                                     751,302      a          2          B                                  300,000       451,302                                                          451,302        751,302          450,000
SWVCTC **2 **Williamson Roof Repairs/Replacement                        150,000      a          1          B                                                150,000                                                          150,000                         150,000
SWVCTC **3 **Logan Roof Repairs/Replacement                             150,000      a          1          B                                                150,000                                                          150,000                         150,000
SWVCTC 4 Downtown Mercantile Building                                   330,000      e          2          D                                    12,000      318,000                    318,000                                     0
SWVCTC 5 Logan Campus Parking Expansion                                 225,000      f          1          C                                                225,000                                                          225,000
SWVCTC 6 Williamson Elevator                                            115,000      a          1          C                                                115,000                                                          115,000                         115,000
SWVCTC 7 Technology Center                                            3,600,000      a          1          D                                              3,600,000                                                        3,600,000      3,150,000
SWVCTC Total                                                          5,321,302                                                     0                     5,009,302               0     318,000                   0        4,691,302       3,901,302          865,000

WLSC   **1          **Upgrade of Lighting on Campus                     600,000      e          3          C                                    15,000      585,000                                                          585,000                         585,000
WLSC    2           Access Control to Buildings                         500,000      f          1         A/B                                        0      500,000                                                          500,000                         500,000
WLSC    3           Communication Wing on FA Bldg                     4,000,000      a          1         B/C                                             4,000,000                                                        4,000,000
WLSC    4           Residence Hall Roof Replacements                  1,011,551      g          1          C                                    70,000      941,551                                      941,551                   0
WLSC    5           Renovation of Curtis Hall                         2,500,000      g          1          C                                              2,500,000                                    2,500,000                   0
WLSC    6           Roadways, Sidewalks & Site Imprv.                 5,000,000      f          1         A/C                                   50,000    4,950,000                                                        4,950,000                       2,000,000
WLSC    7           Renovation of Residence Halls                     6,800,000      g          1          C                                              6,800,000                                    6,800,000                   0
WLSC    8           Targeted Technology Renovations                     938,000      b          1          C                                                938,000                                                          938,000
WLSC    9           Elevator Replacement in Dorms                       800,000      g          1          A                                                800,000                                     800,000                    0
WLSC   10           Fine Arts Building Structural                     2,000,000      a                     C                                                   N/A                                                              N/A       2,000,000
WLSC   11           Technology Building Construction                  5,000,000      a                     D                                                                                                                    N/A       5,000,000
WLSC Total                                                           22,149,551                                                     0         135,000    22,014,551               0               0               0       10,973,000       7,000,000        3,085,000

WVNCC 1 Purchase CSX Property                                           220,000      f          3          D                14,520                          190,960                     190,960                                    0
WVNCC 2 Purchase Woolashan Property                                      65,000      f          3          D                                     6,500       58,500                      58,500                                    0
WVNCC **3 **Replace HVAC - B & O Building                             1,200,000      a          2          B                                              1,200,000                                                        1,200,000      1,200,000        1,200,000
WVNCC **4 **Add automated controls, HVAC, Hazel Atlas Bld               180,000      a          2          B                                                180,000                                                          180,000        300,000          180,000


              Capital Priorities FY04 FINAL REVISED 12-9-2002                                                                                                                                                                                               Page 3 of 6



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          12
INSTITUTION SUMMARY OF CAPITAL PROJECT PRIORITIES
FOR FY 2004

FINAL - REVISED DECEMBER 9, 2002                                                                                                                                                                                                                           $125 Million
                                                                                                                                                                                          Internal                                         Recommend       Recommend
                                                                       Total        HEPC                 HEPC           Funded              Funded           Funding      Federal         & Other         Auxiliary           Net           for Bond         for Bond
          Inst                                                        Project       Project   Project    Project     (all sources)       (all sources)       Needed       Funding         Funding         Funding          Remaining        Funding          Funding
 Inst     Pr #                      Project Name                       Cost        Category   Status      Class       in FY2002           in FY2003           FY04+        FY04+           FY04+           FY04+          Funds Needed      Last Year        FY 2004
Column 1 Column 2                       Column 5                      Column 6     Column 8   Column 9   Column 10     Column 11           Column 12         Column 13    Column 14       Column 15       Column 16         Column 17       Column 18        Column 19


WVNCC **5 **Science Laboratory Renovation Hazel-Atlas                    174,000      a          2          B                                                   174,000                                                          174,000                         174,000
WVNCC 6 Replace Windows/Doors in B & O Building                          800,000      a          2          C                                                   800,000                                                          800,000        800,000          800,000
WVNCC 7 Plaza/Lights B & O Building                                      600,000      f          1          C                                                   600,000                                                          600,000
WVNCC Total                                                            3,239,000                                             14,520                           3,203,460               0     249,460                   0        2,954,000       2,300,000        2,354,000

WVSOM 1 Center for Technology and Rural Medicine                       4,511,000      a          1          D                                                 4,511,000                                                        4,511,000      4,101,000        4,000,000
WVSOM 2 Main Building/Quad HVAC Upgrade                                  515,000     a, f        1         B, C                                          0      515,000                                                          515,000                         515,000
WVSOM Total                                                            5,026,000                                                     0                        5,026,000               0               0               0        5,026,000       4,101,000        4,515,000

WVSC    1           Multipurpose Building                             25,000,000      a          2          D                                                25,000,000                                                       25,000,000        350,000
WVSC    2           Accademic Technology Building (addition new)       3,000,000      a          1          D                                                 3,000,000                                                        3,000,000
WVSC    3           Infrastructure Roof Repairs                          580,000      a          1          B                80,000                             500,000                                                          500,000        700,000          500,000
WVSC    4           Infrastructure Repair - Water Tower                  175,000      e          1          B                                                   175,000                    175,000                                     0
WVSC    5           Capitol Ctr. Roof, Weatherproofing, HVAC Upgrad      250,000      a          3          B                                                   250,000                                                          250,000                         250,000
WVSC    6           Visitor's Center                                      50,000      g          2          D                                                    50,000                                                           50,000
WVSC    7           Window Replacement                                   100,000      e          1          B                                                   100,000                                                          100,000                         100,000
WVSC    8           Infrastructure Upgrade - Campus Steam Line           350,000      f                     C                                                      N/A                                                              N/A         250,000
WLSC    9           Infrastructure Upgrade - Campus Water Lines          500,000      f                     B                                                      N/A                                                              N/A         450,000
WVSC Total                                                            29,155,000                                             80,000                          29,075,000               0     175,000                   0       28,900,000       1,750,000          850,000

WVU     1 Infrastructure Downtown                                     25,200,000      f          1          C                                5,200,000       20,000,000                                                       20,000,000     10,000,000       10,000,000
WVUIT **2 **Replace roof - Engineering Lab                               225,000      a          1          C                                                   225,000                                                          225,000                         225,000
PSC    **3 **Roof Replacements                                           300,000      a          2          B                                  150,000          150,000                                                          150,000                         150,000
WVUP **4 **Main Building Subsidence Issues                               124,500      a          2          A               10,000                              114,500                                                          114,500        114,500          114,500
WVU     5 Jackson's Mill Fire Training Academy                        10,000,000      g          2          D              265,000           4,735,000        5,000,000                                                        5,000,000                       3,772,500
WVUIT   6 ADA Access - Engineering Lab                                   200,000      a          1          A                                                   200,000                                                          200,000                         200,000
WVU     7 Engineering Sciences Brick Façade                            7,360,000      a          3          A            1,860,000                            5,500,000                                                        5,500,000      5,500,000        5,500,000
WVUIT   8 Fire Marshall Repairs - Old Main, Engineering                1,400,000     a/e         1          A                                                 1,400,000                                                        1,400,000                       1,400,000
PSC    **9 **Library Annex - Information Ctr. (Addition & Re           7,999,000      b          1          D                                    12,000       7,987,000                                                        7,987,000
WVUP   10 Campus Facilities Master Plan                                  105,000      e          2          C                 7,000              50,000          48,000                                                           48,000
WVUIT 11 Waterproof & Correct Draining Problems - Davis                  400,000      a          1          B                                                   400,000                                                          400,000
WVU    12 Brooks Hall Renovation                                      17,940,000      a          1          C                                         0      17,940,000                                                       17,940,000     17,500,000       17,500,000
WVU    13 Campus Wide Emergency Phone                                    200,000      f          3          A                20,000              80,000         100,000                                                          100,000
WVUIT 14 Street and sidewalk repairs - Campus                            250,000      f          1          B                                                   250,000                                                          250,000
PSC    15 Farm Improvements                                            1,500,000      a          2          C                                  200,000        1,300,000                                                        1,300,000                         160,000
WVUP   16 Programmatic Space Renewal                                     652,875      a          1          C                36,500             15,000          601,375                                                          601,375
WVU    17 Replace Evansdale High Voltage Feeder Cable                  1,350,000      f          1          B                     0                           1,350,000                                                        1,350,000
WVUIT 18 ADA compliance - Campus                                         250,000      f          1          A                                                   250,000                                                          250,000                         250,000
WVU    19 WVU HSC Classrooms                                             375,000      a          2          C                        0                          375,000                                                          375,000
WVUIT **20 **Ventilation & High Humidity Problems - Orndorf              300,000      a          1          B                                                   300,000                                                          300,000
PSC   **21 **Administration Building and Academy Hall ADA                250,000      e          2          A                                                   250,000                                                          250,000                         250,000
WVUP   22 Building Systems Renewal                                       473,000      e          2          B               42,600               95,000         335,400                                                          335,400                         335,000
WVU    23 Jackson's Mill General Accounting                            1,054,499      g          3          B              554,499                              500,000                                                          500,000
WVUIT 24 Underground Cables & PCB Transformers                           500,000      f          1          B                                                   500,000                                                          500,000
WVU    25 Research Park                                                  500,000      c          1          D                        0                          500,000                                                          500,000
WVUIT 26 Replace roof - Vining Library                                   150,000      b          1          C                                                   150,000                                                          150,000                         150,000
PSC   **27 **Computer Lab Upgrades                                       300,000      b          3          C                                                   300,000                                                          300,000        300,000          300,000
WVUP   28 Façade Renewal and Internal Efficiencies                     2,219,500      e          1          D                 4,500                           2,215,000                                                        2,215,000      1,167,000        1,200,000
WVU    29 Oglebay Hall Renovation                                     15,000,000      a          1          C                     0          1,000,000       14,000,000                                                       14,000,000     15,000,000       14,000,000
WVUIT 30 Enviro. & Electrical Upgrade - Engineering Lab                  900,000      a          1          C                                                   900,000                                                          900,000
WVU    31 Evansdale Tennis Court Reconstruction                          150,000      g          1          B                        0                          150,000                                                          150,000


              Capital Priorities FY04 FINAL REVISED 12-9-2002                                                                                                                                                                                                   Page 4 of 6



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              13
INSTITUTION SUMMARY OF CAPITAL PROJECT PRIORITIES
FOR FY 2004

FINAL - REVISED DECEMBER 9, 2002                                                                                                                                                                                                                   $125 Million
                                                                                                                                                                                         Internal                                   Recommend      Recommend
                                                                         Total        HEPC                 HEPC           Funded              Funded           Funding      Federal      & Other      Auxiliary        Net           for Bond        for Bond
          Inst                                                          Project       Project   Project    Project     (all sources)       (all sources)       Needed       Funding      Funding      Funding       Remaining        Funding         Funding
 Inst     Pr #                       Project Name                        Cost        Category   Status      Class       in FY2002           in FY2003           FY04+        FY04+        FY04+        FY04+       Funds Needed      Last Year       FY 2004
Column 1 Column 2                        Column 5                       Column 6     Column 8   Column 9   Column 10     Column 11           Column 12         Column 13    Column 14    Column 15    Column 16      Column 17       Column 18       Column 19


WVUIT      32       Environmental & lighting Upgrade - Engineering         550,000      a          1         B                                                    550,000                                                 550,000
WVU        33       Mountainlair Cooling Tower                             200,000      g          1         C                         0                          200,000                               200,000                 0
WVUIT      34       Temp. Controls & HVAC System - Vining Library          500,000      b          1         C                                                    500,000                                                 500,000
WVU        35       Mountainlair Generator Replacement                     150,000      g          1         B                         0                          150,000                               150,000                 0
WVUIT     **36      **Electrical & HVAC Upgrades - Old Main              1,750,000     a/e         1         C                                                  1,750,000                                               1,750,000
WVUP       37       Site Renewal                                           683,500      e          2         C                 72,500              25,000         586,000                                                 586,000
PSC       **38      **Memorial Hall Renovation                             400,000      a          1         C                                                    400,000                                400,000                0        400,000
WVU        39       Mountainlair Parking Garage                          6,240,000      g          1         C               120,000                            6,120,000                              6,120,000                0
WVUIT      40       Replace Carpet - Vining Library                        150,000      b          1         B                                                    150,000                                                 150,000
WVU        41       Replace CAC Mechanical/Ventilation Sys.              2,200,000      a          1         C                         0                   0    2,200,000                                               2,200,000
WVUIT      42       Remove Asbestos - Davis, Old Main, Vining Lib.       2,300,000    a/b/e        1         B                                                  2,300,000                                               2,300,000
WVU        43       Colson Hall Renovation                               3,150,000      a          1         C                         0                        3,150,000                                               3,150,000
WVUIT      44       Renovate Auditorium - Davis                            900,000      a          1         C                                                    900,000                                                 900,000
WVUP       45       New Library                                          5,050,000      b          1         D                         0                        5,050,000                                               5,050,000
PSC       **46      **Physical Education Annex                           1,000,000      d          1         D                                                  1,000,000                                               1,000,000
WVU        47       Evansdale Computer Center                            2,400,000      b          1         D                         0                        2,400,000                                               2,400,000
WVUIT      48       ADA access - Maclin Hall                               200,000      g          1         A                                                    200,000                                                 200,000
WVU        49       DPS Relocation                                       1,400,000      e          1         D                         0                        1,400,000                                               1,400,000
WVUIT      50       Roof replacement - Maclin Hall                         250,000      g          1         C                                                    250,000                                                 250,000
WVU        51       Jackson's Mill Dining Hall Add/Renovation              572,000      g          1         C                         0                          572,000                                                 572,000
WVUIT      52       Interior & Exterior Renovation - President's Res.      250,000      e          1         C                                                    250,000                                                 250,000
PSC        53       Campus Site Improvements                             1,900,000       f         1        ABC                                                 1,900,000                                               1,900,000
WVUP       54       Sheng Campus Center                                    100,000      a          2         D                  9,349                              90,651                                                  90,651
WVU        55       Jackson's Mill Multipurpose Facility                 5,000,000      g          1         D                      0                           5,000,000                                               5,000,000
WVU        56       Jackson's Mill Cottage Renovations                   3,459,000      g          2         C                      0                           3,459,000                                               3,459,000
WVU        57       CRRED                                               67,000,000    a,b,c        1         D                      0            600,000       66,400,000                                              66,400,000
WVU        58       Jackson's Mill Lodge Renovation                      1,258,000      g          1         C                      0                           1,258,000                                               1,258,000
WVU        59       Law Center Abatement                                   150,000      a          1         A                      0                             150,000                                                 150,000
WVU        60       Entrance Monuments                                     400,000       f         1         D                      0                             400,000                                                 400,000
WVU       **61      **HSC Dentistry Facility & Equipment Upgrade         2,538,176      a          2         C                      0                           2,538,176                                               2,538,176
WVU        62       HSC Expansion of MBR Cancer Center                  30,000,000      c          1         D                                                 30,000,000                                              30,000,000
WVU        63       HSC Deferred Maintenance                             2,250,000       f         1         B                                                  2,250,000                                               2,250,000
WVU        64       HSC Infrastructure Upgrades                          3,000,000       f         3         C                                 1,450,000        1,550,000                                               1,550,000
WVU        65       Downtown Parking                                     2,500,000      g          1         D             1,100,000             900,000          500,000                                500,000                0
WVUP       66       Jackson County Center Expansion                        500,000      a          2         D                     0             500,000                0                                                       0        600,000
PSC       **67      **Student Union Basement Renovation                    200,000      g          1         C                                                    200,000                                200,000                0
PSC        68       Student Recreation Center                            3,600,000      g          1         D                                                  3,600,000                              3,600,000                0
WVU        69       Choral Recital Hall & Concert Theatre                6,750,000      a          2         C               250,000           6,500,000                0                                                       0
WVU        70       B. Rockefeller Neuroscience Center                  38,000,000      c          1         D                     0                   0       38,000,000   18,000,000   20,000,000                             0
PSC        71       Addition to Lough Gym                                2,270,000      g          1         D                                                  2,270,000                              2,270,000                0
PSC        72       Student Housing                                      6,750,000      g          1         D                                                  6,750,000                              6,750,000                0
WVU        73       HSC Eastern Panhandle Campus                         4,665,000      a          1         D                      0          2,915,000        1,750,000                 1,750,000                             0
WVU        74       National Education & Tech. Ctr. (HSC Library)       11,900,000      e          1         D                      0         11,900,000                0                                                       0
WVUIT      75       Reconfigured Telephone System - Campus                 515,000      e          2         C                 44,585             58,040          412,375                  412,375                              0
WVUIT      76       Fire Marshall Repairs - Residence Halls                565,000      g          1         A                                                    565,000                                565,000                0
WVUIT      77       Upgrade enviromental sys./controls - Res. Halls      2,000,000      g          1         B                                                  2,000,000                              2,000,000                0
WVU        78       Stadium Turf Replacement                               600,000      g          1         C               600,000                                    0                                                       0
WVUIT      79       Exterior Building Repairs - Coed Hall                  800,000      g          1         C                                                    800,000                                800,000                0
WVUIT      80       ADA access - Student Union                             300,000      g          1         A                                                    300,000                                300,000                0
WVUIT      81       Upgrade electrical system - Residence Halls            500,000      g          1         C                                                    500,000                                500,000                0
WVUIT      82       Asbestos Removal - Residence Halls                     750,000      g          1         B                                                    750,000                                750,000                0


              Capital Priorities FY04 FINAL REVISED 12-9-2002                                                                                                                                                                                           Page 5 of 6



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      14
INSTITUTION SUMMARY OF CAPITAL PROJECT PRIORITIES
FOR FY 2004

FINAL - REVISED DECEMBER 9, 2002                                                                                                                                                                                                                     $125 Million
                                                                                                                                                                                           Internal                                   Recommend      Recommend
                                                                         Total        HEPC                   HEPC           Funded            Funded            Funding       Federal      & Other      Auxiliary        Net           for Bond        for Bond
          Inst                                                          Project       Project     Project    Project     (all sources)     (all sources)        Needed        Funding      Funding      Funding       Remaining        Funding         Funding
  Inst    Pr #                      Project Name                         Cost        Category     Status      Class       in FY2002         in FY2003            FY04+         FY04+        FY04+        FY04+       Funds Needed      Last Year       FY 2004
Column 1 Column 2                       Column 5                        Column 6      Column 8    Column 9   Column 10     Column 11         Column 12          Column 13     Column 14    Column 15    Column 16      Column 17       Column 18       Column 19


WVUIT 83 Kitchen Renovations - HiRise                                     500,000        g           1          B                                                  500,000                                 500,000                0
WVUIT 84 Neal D. Baisi Athletic Center Renovation                       5,475,000       d/g          2          C                80,000                          5,395,000                               5,395,000                0
WVU     85 Agriculture Research Service                                49,000,000        c           1          D                     0                    0    49,000,000   49,000,000                                           0
WVUIT 86 Replace windows - Residence Halls                                900,000        g           1          C                                                  900,000                                 900,000                0
WVUIT 87 Reno. Martin Field Lights,Bleachers & Concession                 400,000        g           1          C                                                  400,000                                 400,000                0
WVUIT 88 HVAC renovation - Student Union                                  200,000        g           1          C                                                  200,000                                 200,000                0
WVUIT 89 Painting for all buildings - Campus                              200,000        e           1          B                                                  200,000                                 200,000                0
WVU     90 WVU Student Housing                                         42,000,000        g           1          D                                               42,000,000                              42,000,000                0
WVUIT 91 Student Housing                                                6,750,000        g           1          D                                                6,750,000                               6,750,000                0
WVU     92 Puskar HVAC Upgrade                                          1,551,878        a          123         C                     0          204,055         1,347,823                               1,347,823                0
WVU     93 Soccer Grand Stands                                            951,000        g           2          D                     0          250,000           701,000                                 701,000                0
WVU     94 Puskar Upgrade, Lobby and Public Areas                       1,274,000        g           1          C                     0           62,400         1,211,600                               1,211,600                0
WVU     95 Coliseum Locker Room Renovations                             1,894,000        g          123         C                     0          120,050         1,773,950                               1,773,950                0
WVU     96 Jerry West Lounge Renovation                                   150,000        g           2          C                     0          150,000                 0                                                        0
WVU     97 Women's Basketball Offices                                     131,000        g           2          C                     0           20,000           111,000                                 111,000                0
WVU     98 Stadium Suites                                               7,900,000        g           2          C                     0          379,685         7,520,315                               7,520,315                0
WVU     99 Coliseum Club Seating                                        1,025,750        g           1          C                     0          120,000           905,750                                 905,750                0
WVU    100 Parking at Evansdale Water Tower                               250,000        g           1          D                     0          250,000                 0                                                        0
WVU    101 Parking expansion and paving lot 81                            800,000        g           3        B,C,D             800,000                0                 0                                                        0
WVU    102 Parking expansion and paving lot 80                            330,000        g           2        B,C,D                   0          330,000                 0                                                        0
WVUP       Infrastructure                                                 453,500        f                      C                                                     N/A                                                      N/A         453,500
WVU & REGIONAL CAMPUSES TOTAL                                         450,280,178                                             5,876,533       38,271,230       405,678,915   67,000,000   22,162,375    95,021,438      221,495,102     51,035,000      55,507,000

GRAND TOTAL                                                          950,929,031                                          104,894,053        71,760,230        743,488,228   69,500,000   36,351,835   152,571,438     424,973,404     122,947,502     125,500,000

NOTES:
    1 Concord College will seek supplemental funding in FY 2003 to reimburse it for Mold Renediation in the Science Building
    2 Projects marked with a double asterisk are also included in the Special Projects request, either with the same or a different dollar amount requested.




              Capital Priorities FY04 FINAL REVISED 12-9-2002                                                                                                                                                                                             Page 6 of 6



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        15
                                        MINUTES

                     HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION

                                     January 3, 2003


A meeting of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission was held on January
3, 2003, at 10:30 a.m., at the Higher Education Central Office in Charleston, West Virginia
and by Conference Call. Present at the meeting were Policy Commission members: Mary
Clare Eros, Kay Goodwin, R. Ken Hall, Elliot Hicks, John Hoblitzell, J. Thomas Jones,
Terry Sammons, and Shawn Williams. Absent: David Stewart. Also in attendance were
Chancellor J. Michael Mullen, institutional presidents and representatives, higher
education staff, and members of the news media.

Chairman Jones called the meeting to order.

1.     Tuition and Fee Policy

      The Commission discussed proposed changes and directed the Chancellor and
      staff to bring a final version of the policy to the Commission at its February 21, 2003
      meeting.


2.     Tuition and Fee Legislation

      Mr. Hoblitzell moved to approve the draft Tuition and Fee Legislation as amended
      and directed the Chancellor to submit it to the Legislature with the understanding
      that he share a final version with the Commission. Mr. Hall seconded the motion.
      Motion carried.


3.    WV Higher Education Report Card 2002

      Ms. Williams moved that the West Virginia Higher Education Report Card 2002 be
      approved as amended and directed staff to file it with the Legislative Oversight
      Commission on Education Accountability. Mr. Sammons seconded the motion.
      Motion carried.


4.     Health Sciences and Rural Health Education Partnerships Report Card 2002

      Ms. Eros moved that the Health Sciences and Rural Health Education Partnerships
      Report Card 2002 be approved and the staff directed to file it with the Legislative
      Oversight Commission on Education Accountability. Mr. Hicks seconded the
      motion. Motion carried.




                                                                                                16
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.



   ____________________________                      Chairman
         J. Thomas Jones



   _____________________________                     Secretary
        Elliot G. Hicks




                                                                 17
                                       MINUTES

                    HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                            EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

                                   January 10, 2003

A conference call meeting of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Executive Committee was held on January 10, 2003, at 9:00 a.m. Present were Policy
Commission members: Mary Clare Eros, Elliot Hicks, John Hoblitzell, and J. Thomas
Jones. Also in attendance were Commissioner Kay Goodwin, Chancellor J. Michael
Mullen, institutional presidents and representatives, higher education staff, and
members of the news media.

Chair Jones called the meeting to order.

1.    Selection of Investment Banking Firm and Bond Counsel

      Mr. Hoblitzell moved the adoption of the following resolution:

      RESOLVED, That the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
      Executive Committee approves hiring Salomon Smith Barney as the Senior
      Investment Banking Manager and Spilman Thomas and Battle, PLLC as Bond
      Counsel for refunding of current capital bond debt and possible issuance of new
      bonds, and authorizes the Executive Committee to move forward with the
      alternative service provider in case final negotiations cannot be completed
      satisfactorily with these initial firms.

      FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Executive Committee is authorized to move
      forward with the addition of one or more underwriting co-managers if it is
      determined to be in the best interest of the higher education system.

      Mr. Hicks seconded the motion. Motion carried.

      NOTE: Ms. Eros recused herself from discussing or voting on this item as her
            firm had bid on the proposal.

2.    Budget

      Chancellor Mullen updated the Committee on the proposed FY 04 budget and
      other budget-reduction measures. There was discussion with the Presidents
      about impact of the proposed cuts on the institutions and students.

3.    Comments

      Commissioner Goodwin expressed her support for Chancellor Mullen and urged
      the Commission to join her in her support for him.




                                                                                        18
4.   Adjournment

     There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.


     ____________________________                        Chair
            J. Thomas Jones


     _____________________________                       Secretary
            Elliot G. Hicks




                                                                     19
                                      MINUTES

                    HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                            EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

                                   February 7, 2003

A conference call meeting of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Executive Committee was held on February 7, 2003, at 9:00 a.m. Present were Policy
Commission members: Mary Clare Eros, Elliot Hicks, John Hoblitzell, and J. Thomas
Jones. Also in attendance were Commissioner Kay Goodwin, Chancellor J. Michael
Mullen, institutional presidents and representatives, and higher education staff.

Chair Jones called the meeting to order.


1.    Review of the February 21, 2003 Commission Agenda

      The proposed agenda for the February 21, 2003 meeting was reviewed and
      approved.

2.    Legislative Update

      Chancellor Mullen informed the Committee that one of the proprietary schools
      has submitted new comments on the proposed rule Series 35,
      Correspondence, Business, Occupational, and Trade Schools. Although the
      Commission has adopted the rule, LOCEA has not acted on it.                    The
      Committee asked that the Chancellor confirm with LOCEA that they do not
      intend to take action on this rule during the session. That being the case, the
      rule will be reopened for public comment and all comments received will be
      considered. The rule will then be resubmitted to LOCEA.

      It was suggested that a joint meeting of the State Board of Education and the
      Policy Commission be planned for a date following the conclusion of the
      legislative session.

3.    Adjournment

      There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.


      ____________________________                          Chair
             J. Thomas Jones


      _____________________________                         Secretary
             Elliot G. Hicks




                                                                                           20
           WEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                      ACADEMIC POLICY COMMITTEE

                              MEETING OF FEBRUARY 21, 2003
                                       9:00 A.M.

                                                AGENDA



A.   Preliminary Authorization for Future Generations to Operate as Higher Education
     Institution in West Virginia............................................................................. pg 21

B.   Approval of Institutional Compact Updates ................................................... pg 33

C.   Acceptance of Report on College Courses for High School Students........... pg 62
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                     Preliminary      Authorization for  Future
                                          Generations to Operate as Higher Education
                                          Institution in West Virginia

COMMITTEE:                                Academic Policy Committee

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                   Resolved, That the West Virginia Higher
                                          Education    Policy   Commission   extends
                                          preliminary state authorization for Future
                                          Generations to operate as an institution of
                                          higher education in West Virginia.

STAFF MEMBER:                             Bruce C. Flack

BACKGROUND:

Future Generations is a non-profit organization seeking authorization to operate as an
institution of higher education in West Virginia. Future Generations is proposing to offer
a single master's degree program in Applied Conservation and Development. This
program proposes to train community development practitioners and professionals to
lead communities as they seek to respond proactively to the growing challenges of
global change. Residential instruction will take place in the United States, Peru, India
and Tibet, China. The new institution will have its headquarters in Franklin, West
Virginia.

The process for gaining this authorization is outlined in Series 20, Authorization of
Degree Granting Institutions. As provided in Series 20, representatives of Future
Generations met with the Commission's Academic Affairs personnel. This meeting
focused on the application process which initially calls for preliminary state authorization
by the Higher Education Policy Commission. This preliminary authorization is provided
once the institution demonstrates fulfillment of criteria associated with a) familiarity with
accreditation, b) statement of mission, c) institutional organization, d) degrees and
academic programs, e) admission policies, and f) financial resources.                    The
documentation provided by Future Generations satisfies these criteria.

The granting of preliminary authorization enables Future Generations to apply to the
Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association for regional accreditation.
When the documentation submitted to the Higher Learning Commission is deemed
complete and satisfactory, the HEPC may then grant Future Generations a Category IV
state authorization, "Making Reasonable and Timely Progress toward Accreditation."
The institution maintains Category IV status until final action is taken by North Central




                                                                                                21
Association’s Higher Learning Commission. Once the Higher Learning Commission
extends accreditation to Future Generations, the HEPC may award final authorization.

The information on the pages which follow provides background data on the institution
and its goals, mission and curriculum.




                                                                                        22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                      Approval of Institutional Compact Updates

INSTITUTIONS                               All

COMMITTEE:                                 Academic Policy Committee

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                    Resolved, That the West Virginia Higher
                                           Education Policy Commission approves the
                                           staff recommendations for acceptance of each
                                           of the institutional compact update reports for
                                           2002.

STAFF MEMBERS:                             Bruce C. Flack
                                           James L. Skidmore

BACKGROUND:

West Virginia public colleges and universities completed reports on their updated
compacts with submissions of narrative statements in November 2002 and data
compilations in December 2002. The HEPC staff reviewed the reports and recommend
approval of each of the institutional compact updates as indicated on the following
pages. Additionally, the West Virginia Council for Community and Technical College
Education reviewed and approved the narrative statements for the CTC compact
updates in December 2002.

The complete institutional compact updates, with narrative statements and data
compilations, are available on the HEPC website at the following address:
http://www.hepc.wvnet.edu/commission/compactmpinst.html.




                                                                                             33
                     Review of Institutional Compacts
            West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
                              January 2003


       West Virginia public colleges and universities completed reports on their updated
compacts with submissions of a narrative statement in November 2002 and a data
compilation in December 2002. These compact updates use 2001-02 as the base year
and 2006-07 as the final goal year. The reporting elements have been revised for 2001-
02 to focus on essential areas that effectively indicate institutional commitment to the six
statewide goals       preparation, participation, affordability, competitive workforce,
economic development, and accountability.


       The narrative statement for each institution addresses planning related to
institutional mission and vision, campus challenges and opportunities, and institutional
efforts in meeting the statewide goals.      The data compilation provides institutional
responses to the standard elements of the six statewide goals. While this year’s data
reports indicate activity for the 2001-2002 base year and projections for 2006-07, the
report for next year will also indicate progress each institution has made in moving from
the base year toward the 2006-07 goals.


       The following comments include Higher Education Policy staff observations on
the institutional narrative statements and data compilations. In the section on narrative
goals, several of the more significant institutional initiatives are referenced.       The
comments on the data compilations are either suggestions on how the institution may
want to revisit a goal projection or observations on particular strengths or challenges.
Some of the comments relate to the alignment of institutional goals with those in the
statewide compact, It All Adds Up. The concluding section is the staff recommendation
on approval of the institutional compact update.




                                                                                               34
                          BLUEFIELD STATE COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

     •    Expansion of collaborative efforts and partnerships with area public schools,
          including more course opportunities for high school students

     •    Participation as a “full partner” in development and implementation of the
          Beckley Region Higher Education Consortium

     •    Expansion in number of courses taught through distance learning modalities

     •    National accreditation of 16 programs of study (College wide)

Comments on Data Compilation

     •    Projects increase in size of freshman class (29 to 50) by 2006-07

     •    Six-year goal for number of students enrolled in remedial courses (66%) is
          excessively high and well above state goals; percentage is higher than that
          established for the BSC CTC

     •    Six-year goal for entering students who have completed the ACT core (27%)
          is too low

     •    Strong goal commitment to number of adult students enrolled annually (930
          to 1,080)

     •    Projection is for modest tuition increases by 2006-07

     •    Projected increase in the baccalaureate graduation rate (40% to 45%) by
          2006-07 is significant progress toward meeting the state goal

     •    Anticipates increase in pass rate on licensure exam for teachers to 85% for
          the six-year goal

     •    Bluefield State College meets the standards in the six areas of the compact

Recommendation

     •    Approval of the compact update with suggestion that in next year's compact
          update the six-year goals relating to the number of students taking remedial
          courses and the number of entering students completing the ACT core be
          revised in order to be more closely aligned with the statewide compact




                                                                                          35
                        BLUEFIELD STATE COLLEGE
                    COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

     •    Plans to fully participate in activities of the Southeastern West Virginia Tech
          Prep Consortium

     •    Will meet all essential conditions for the delivery of community and technical
          college education at all sites with the exception of staffing mandates for
          Beckley

     •    Will establish the mechanism for an independently accredited community
          and technical college in Beckley by 2005

     •    Will continue to deliver value-added workforce development and customized
          training services throughout the service area

     •    Will utilize the results of a recently conducted environmental scan to
          establish new certificate and associate degree programs

Comments on Data Compilation

     •    The percentage increase goal (10%) for the number of degrees to be
          granted in the areas of math, science, computer science, health fields, and
          engineering and related technologies is less than the statewide goal to
          double degree production in those areas

     •    The goal for the percentage (65%) of associate degree graduates remaining
          in the State is less than the statewide goal (85%)

     •    The goal of 80% of developmental education participants successfully
          completing the developmental education sequence exceeds the state-level
          goal of 75%

     •    The percentage goal (93%) for licensure exam passage rate exceeds the
          state-level goal (90%)

     •    There are no plans to increase community and technical college tuition and
          fees over the planning period

     •    The percentage goal increase (10.5%) in the number of adult student credit
          hours generated, the number of adults enrolled (9.3%) and the increase in
          the number of adult student graduates (17%) are significant percentages but
          equates to a small increase in total numbers




                                                                                            36
Recommendation

     •    Approval of the CTC compact update with a recommendation for the next
          update submission to align goals in those areas that are not consistent with
          state-level goals and re-examine the goals for adult student participation


                                  CONCORD COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   Projections for growth in graduate education, but a modest decline in
          undergraduate enrollment

      •   Active involvement in the “Beckley Regional Higher Education Consortium”

      •   Implement a master’s degree to provide for in-field programming for
          teachers and plan possible collaborative graduate offerings with Marshall
          University (MBA) and Marshall University and West Virginia State College
          (Social Work)

      •   Employ technology and academic personnel creatively to reduce what
          remains as an unacceptably high student/instructor ratio

      •   Comment: The projected growth in graduate education and lessening of
          emphasis on undergraduate education may have fiscal implications and may
          constitute an alteration in institutional mission

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   Projects decline of freshman class (646 to 600) from 2001-02 to 2006-07

      •   Six-year goal calls for an increase in number of students transferring from a
          2-year institution (17 from current year to 40)

      •   Anticipates an increase in the number of bachelor’s degrees in math,
          science, engineering and health related fields by 25% in 2006-07 (39 to 50)

      •   Goal projection for 2006-07 provides for no increase from the 2001-02
          percentage of students (40%) who have completed the ACT core

      •   Projected undergraduate tuition increase from 2001-02 to 2006-07 is from
          $2,738 to $3,300

      •   Projection for pass rate on licensure exam for teachers is 90%, a slight
          increase from the current Praxis II percentage




                                                                                          37
      •   Projection of a baccalaureate graduation rate (40%) by 2006-07 is a
          significant increase from the 30% in 2001-02, but still below the statewide
          goal of 50%

      •   Anticipated increase in the number of courses delivered electronically from 2
          to 25 by 2006-07

      •   Concord College meets the standards in the six areas of the compact

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with the suggestion that in next year's
          compact update that the six year goals relating to the baccalaureate
          graduation rate and to the percentage of students completing the ACT core
          be revised in order to be more closely aligned with the statewide compact


                          EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA
                     COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   Plans to maintain the lowest tuition fee rate in the state

      •   Plans to operate seven Access Eastern @ Centers throughout the service
          district

      •   Will continue to broker distance education courses from the June Harless
          Center, Marshall University; Salem International University; Virginia
          Community College System; and the Kentucky Community and Technical
          College System

      •   Will implement cooperative Industrial Maintenance programs at the Mineral
          County Technical Center and the South Branch Career and Technical
          Center

      •   Will continue to develop skill sets to meet workforce needs

Comments on Data Compilation

     •    The credit hours delivery goal over the planning period is to increase from
          1,688 to 6,480

     •    The full-time equivalent enrollment goal is to increase from 55.6 to 432




                                                                                          38
     •    The goal of student credit hours delivered to adults call for a significant
          increase (888 to 3,500) with the number of adults enrolling increasing by 417
          over the period

     •    The tuition and fees are expected to increase a total of 15.2% over the
          period

     •    The six-year goal calls for a 38% increase in the number of participants in
          non-credit workforce education programs

     •    The goal for retaining certificate (90%) and associate degree (90%)
          graduates exceeds the state-level goal of 85%

     •    The goal (75%) for students successfully completing the developmental
          education sequence is consistent with the state-level goal

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with the notation that Eastern WVCTC is a
          developing institution with most categories indicating growth that exceeds
          state-level goals


                           FAIRMONT STATE COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

     •    Expanded effort in graduate education, including implementation of master’s
          degree in Middle Childhood Education and development of collaborative
          master’s level offering with Marshall University in criminal justice and master
          of arts in teaching

     •    School of Business and Economics and School of Fine Arts are working to
          achieve accreditation from the American Collegiate Business Schools and
          Programs (ACBSP) and the National Association of Schools of Music,
          respectively

     •    Recent establishment of the Foundation Center for Teaching Excellence to
          promote professional development opportunities by faculty

     •    Substantial increase in the number of courses delivered electronically and
          employment of a director of learning technologies

     •    Continued expansion of the college assessment of learning program




                                                                                            39
     •   Comment: The above goals, particularly the ones relating to expansion of
         graduate education and use of electronic technologies for instruction may
         have significant fiscal implications

Comments on Data Compilation

     •   Projects an increase in size of freshman class from 661 in 2002-03 to 700 by
         2006-07

     •   Projects significant reduction in percentage of students requiring
         remediation, though a six-year goal (45%) is substantially higher than the
         state goal

     •   Projection of a baccalaureate graduation rate (37.5%) for 2006-07 is
         significantly below the statewide goal of 50%

     •   Anticipates a 25% increase in the number of students enrolled in degree
         programs in math, science, computer science, and technology fields by
         2006-07

     •   Projects a modest growth in the number of graduates working in West
         Virginia one-year following graduation to 80% by 2006-07

     •   Establishes six-year goal of increase in freshman to sophomore retention of
         five percent (to 72%)

     •   Projects increase in pass rate of students completing the Praxis II exam
         above the current 82%

     •   Fairmont State College plans to change its Carnegie Classification status
         from the current Baccalaureate Colleges – General to Master's Colleges and
         Universities II by 2006-07. (Stipulation with this classification is that the
         institution is committed to graduate education and will award 20 or more
         master's degrees annually)

     •   Fairmont State College meets the standards in the six areas of the compact

     •   Comment: The change to Master's Colleges and Universities II will likely
         impact peer selection

Recommendation

     •   Approval of the compact update with the suggestion that in next year's
         compact update the six-year goals relating to the number of students taking
         remedial classes and to the baccalaureate graduation rate be revised in
         order to be more closely aligned with the statewide compact




                                                                                         40
                        FAIRMONT STATE COLLEGE
                    COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   The North Central Associate Accreditation Team Visit for the community
          and technical college is scheduled for April 2003

      •   Weekend College has been expanded to include offerings at the Gaston
          Caperton Center in Clarksburg

      •   Associate degree nursing courses are available via a televised link to the
          Gaston Caperton Center

      •   Plans to continue converting non-credit training offered to business and
          industry to college credit

      •   A downtown Fairmont location focusing on community and lifelong learning
          has been established

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The goal for increasing the number of adults in for-credit programs is 10%,
          and the goal for increasing the number of adult student graduates is 10%

      •   The percentage goal increase for the number of degrees granted in the
          areas of math, science, computer science, health fields and engineering and
          related technologies is 32%, which is less than the state-level goal to double
          the awards in these areas

      •   The six-year goal for increasing the number of participants in workforce
          education programs is 68%, which exceeds the state-level goal of 25%

      •   The percentage goal for retaining certificate and associate degree graduates
          in West Virginia is 80% of those graduating, an increase from 74% and 73%
          respectively

      •   The percentage goal for participants successfully completing developmental
          education courses is 60%, which is less than the state-level goal of 75%

      •   The associate degree program licensure exam passage rate is 94% with the
          six-year goal being to continue improving on this rate which now exceeds
          the state-level goal




                                                                                           41
      •   The goal (200%) for increasing the number of credit hours generated
          through electronic delivery indicates a strong commitment to developing on-
          line and other electronic delivery systems

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the CTC compact update with the recommendation that goals be
          evaluated to determine the feasibility of aligning with state-level goals for the
          next update submission and increase the goals for adult participation


                           GLENVILLE STATE COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

     •    Build a regional college for 2000 students

     •    Focus on preparation of professionals in fields of education, business,
          human resources, land resources, and technology

     •    Partners (brokers) with West Virginia University and Marshall University to
          provide needed graduate degree programs in central West Virginia

     •    Reassign additional faculty and staff to CTC component

     •    Seek national accreditation for all professional and technical programs

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   Projects stable freshman enrollment from 2002 to 2006

      •   Projects modest decrease (five percent) in percentage of students needing
          remediation to 47% by 2008-09

      •   Anticipates modest increase in tuition from $2488 in 2001-02 to $3000 by
          2006-07

      •   Substantial decline in the number of graduates with degrees (associate and
          baccalaureate) in math, science, computer technology and technology
          related fields is projected by 2006-07

      •   Significant increase in percentage of graduates who remain in West Virginia
          following graduation (71 to 85 percent) is projected by 2006-07

      •   Projection for a baccalaureate graduation rate (35%) by 2006-07 is
          substantially below the statewide goal of 50%




                                                                                              42
      •   Substantial increase in pass rate in licensure exams for teachers (90%) and
          nurses (100%) is projected by 2006-07

      •   Glenville State College meets the standards in the six areas of the compact

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with the suggestion that in next year's
          compact update the six-year goals relating to the number of students taking
          remedial courses and to projected graduation rates be revised in order to be
          more closely aligned with the statewide compact


                        GLENVILLE STATE COLLEGE
                    COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   Developed and implemented a weekend college program

      •   Will develop additional courses focused on specific workforce development
          needs

      •   Plans to conduct a needs assessment to determine if the range of services
          provided by the college meets the needs of the service area

      •   Plans to utilize the Institutional Community and Technical College Advisory
          Council to guide decision making for the community and technical college

      •   Discussions have occurred with WVU-Tech to share programming in
          forestry, printing, engineering technology and criminal justice

      •   Plans to implement a new program in Licensed Practical Nursing that will
          transfer into an associate degree nursing program

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   There is a six-year goal to keep the community and technical college tuition
          at the current level

      •   The goal for increasing the number of adults in for-credit programs over the
          planning period is less than 10%, and the goal for the number of adult
          student graduates is up from 46 to 60
      •   The goal (140%) for increasing the number of certificate and associate
          degree graduates in the areas of math, science, computer science,




                                                                                         43
          engineering and related technologies will result in 65 additional graduates in
          these areas

      •   The goal for retaining associate degree graduates in West Virginia is a 10%
          increase to 75%, but is less than the state-level goal of 85%

      •   The goal for participants successfully completing developmental courses is
          consistent with the state-level goal of 75%

      •   The goal (45%) for the graduation rate of associate degree seeking students
          is below the state-level goal (50%)

      •   The percentage goal (86%) for licensure exam passage rate is an increase
          of 60% over the planning period, but is slightly less than the state-level goal
          (90%)

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the CTC compact update with the recommendation that goals for
          adult participation rates be increased and other goals be evaluated to
          determine consistency with state-level goals for the next submission update


                                   MARSHALL UNIVERSITY

Narrative Goals

      •   Access to higher education has been enhanced through activities such as:

                  a) Federal grants designed to work with adults and 7-12 public school
                     students to reduce dropouts and pursue postsecondary education
                  b) Graduate program offerings in 35 counties and graduate courses in
                     all 55 counties
                  c) More than eighty web-based graduate courses

      •   In collaboration with the State Board of Education, a conference was held on
          Strengthening the Senior Year

      •   A capstone experience is required for all undergraduate degrees

      •   The June Harless Center for Rural Education Research and Development
          provides opportunities through partnerships and distance delivery of
          programs

      •   A strong contribution to the economic development of West Virginia is
          evidenced through such initiatives as the Rahall Transportation Institute and




                                                                                            44
         the Robert C. Byrd Institute which has provided technical manufacturing
         assistance to more than 800 manufacturers

Comments on Data Compilation

     •   Strong commitment to providing credit opportunities to high school students
         as evidenced by the six-year goal of delivering 4,000 student credit hours to
         high school students

     •   The enhanced delivery of entire programs off-site is an ambitious goal at the
         undergraduate (6 programs) and graduate (25 programs) level

     •   Six-year goal for students who have completed the ACT core (54%) is too
         low for a baccalaureate institution with selective admission standards

     •   Strong commitment to research provides six year goals that will increase
         funded dollars by more than 160% while doubling the number of academic
         activities with external funding

     •   Marshall University plans to change its Carnegie Classification status from
         the current Master’s Colleges and Universities I to Doctoral/Research
         Universities-Intensive by 2006-07 (Stipulation with this classification is that
         the institution is committed to graduate education through the doctorate and
         will award at least ten doctoral degrees per year across three or more
         disciplines or at least 20 doctoral degrees per year overall)

     •   A graduation rate goal of 40% is below the state goal of 60% for selective
         colleges and universities

     •   Student credit hours generated through electronic delivery will increase to
         25,000 (41%)

     •   Marshall University meets the standards in the six areas of the compact

     •   Comment: The change to Doctoral/Research Universities-Intensive will
         likely impact peer selection

Recommendation

     •   Approval of the compact update with the suggestion that in next year's
         compact update the goals relating to graduation rates and percentage of
         students admitted who have completed the ACT core should be revised in
         order to be more closely aligned with the statewide compact




                                                                                           45
                         MARSHALL UNIVERSITY
                    COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   Continues to work towards achieving independent accreditation and meeting
          the essential conditions for the delivery of community and technical college
          education

      •   Has conducted additional activities to attract more adults to the college

      •   Has participated in the Advantage Valley Community College Network
          initiatives for adult students

      •   Developed three new one-year certificate programs

      •   Developed a non-credit CISCO certification program for working adults that
          may be converted to credit towards a degree

      •   Has increased workforce development efforts by developing an on-line
          management degree option for Call Center Supervision, and an Inland
          Waterway Academy that will include radar and captain’s training

      •   Continues to participate in the Seamless Curriculum and WV Edge programs
          with county school systems

      •   Plans to develop strategic enrollment plans and activities for adult and high
          school students and participants in workforce development programs

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The goal for increasing the number of adult students enrolled in for-credit
          courses over the planning period is 50%, an increase of 773 adult students,
          and the goal for increasing the number of adult student graduates is 30%

      •   The goal for community and technical college tuition fee increases over the
          period is to be no more than 9%

      •   The goal for increasing the number of certificate and associate degree
          graduates in the areas of math, science, computer science, health fields,
          and engineering and related technologies is 123 students, an increase of
          100% over the planning period

      •   The percentage goal (6.5%) for increasing workforce education programs is
          less than the state-level goal of 25%




                                                                                          46
      •   The goal for retaining associate degree graduates in West Virginia is
          consistent with the state-level goal of 85%

      •   The goal for participants successfully completing developmental courses is
          at the state-level goal of 75%, an increase of 25%

      •   There is a goal to increase the percentage of degree-seeking students
          graduation/enrollment rate from 36% to the state-level goal of 50%

      •   All programs requiring a licensure exam will have a passage rate of 91% by
          the end of the six-year period which is consistent with the state-level goal

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the CTC compact update with the recommendation that all goals
          be evaluated for alignment with state-level goals for the next update
          submission


                           POTOMAC STATE COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   Has experienced an increase in enrollment over the past two years

      •   The College will receive a $2 million Federal allocation to build an
          Information Technology Center addition to the library

      •   As a result of the NCHEMS review sponsored by the HEPC, the College
          plans to reorganize the existing student assessment structure

      •   Plans to pursue a Title III grant to establish a bridge program for non-
          traditional aged students

      •   The College is offering an AA in Business Administration in Morgantown
          through a partnership with the WVU Division of Extended Learning

      •   The College has now employed a full-time director of workforce development

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The goal of delivering 3,000 student credit hours to high school students
          indicates a strong commitment to this effort




                                                                                         47
      •   The goal for increasing the number of adult student credit hours generated is
          111%, the number of adult students enrolled (10.4%) and the number of
          degrees granted to adults increases 42%, from 21 to 30

      •   The goal for increasing the number of certificate and associate degree
          graduates in the areas of math, science, computer science, health fields,
          and engineering and related technologies is 28%, which is less than the
          state-level goal of doubling the awards in these areas

      •   The goal (10%) for increasing the number of participants served by
          workforce education programs is less than the state-level goal of 25%

      •   The goal for participants successfully completing developmental education
          courses is consistent with the state-level goal of 75%

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with the recommendation that local goals be
          evaluated for alignment with state-level goals for the next update submission


                                  SHEPHERD COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   Continued emphasis on developing graduate programs either collaboratively
          or independently

      •   Continue to target growth programs at the undergraduate level including
          Computer and Information Sciences, Environmental Studies and Recreation
          and Leisure Studies

      •   Seek accreditation for the undergraduate program in Business

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The six-year goal of the entering class with more than six institutional credit
          hours before entry (28.4%) exceeds the state goal

      •   Six-year goal for entering students with ACT core (35%) is too low

      •   Given the programs targeted for growth (computer sciences and
          environmental studies), the six-year goal is low for the number of degrees
          granted in math, science, computer science, engineering and related
          technologies and health related fields




                                                                                            48
      •   The six-year goal for graduation rate (43%) is showing steady progress in
          meeting the statewide goal of 50 percent

      •   Shepherd College meets the standards in the six areas of the compacts

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with the suggestion that in next year's
          compact update the six-year goal relating to the number of entering students
          completing the ACT core be revised in order to be more closely aligned with
          the statewide compact



                          SHEPHERD COLLEGE
                    COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   The Community and Technical College will re-locate to the Dunn Building
          within the former Blue Ridge Center complex

      •   The College is partnering with Beckley County Schools in the delivery of
          adult basic education programs

      •   Plans to increase the community and technical college education
          participation rate to 3% of the service area population

      •   Has recently hired a director of workforce development and continuing
          education

      •   Plans to achieve independent accreditation for the community and technical
          college by 2004

      •   Plans to increase the number of full-time community and technical college
          faculty to a range of 15-20 and rely less on part-time faculty to deliver high
          demand programs

      •   Plans to expand the delivery of non-credit workforce development offerings

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The goal for increasing adult student enrollment is 12%, an increase from
          1,129 to 1,264 over the planning period




                                                                                           49
      •   The goal for community and technical college tuition increases over the six-
          year period is 12.5%

      •   The goal for increasing the number of associate degree graduates in the
          areas of math, science, computer science, health fields, and engineering
          and related technologies is less than the state-level goal of doubling the
          awards in these areas

      •   The goal (17%) for increasing the number of participants in workforce
          education programs is less than the state-level goal of 25%, but the goal for
          vocational skill upgrades delivered is an increase of 35%

      •   The goal (91%) for licensure exam passage rates is consistent with the
          state-level goal

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the CTC compact update with the recommendation that goals be
          evaluated for alignment with state-level goals for the next update submission
          and the goal for adult student participation be increased



                        SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA
                    COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   The College plans to develop a Lincoln County Access Center as part of the
          consolidated high school to be constructed

      •   Plans to develop a master facilities plan to expand or renovate space to
          increase the capacity to deliver allied health, information technology and
          other career-technical programs

      •   Plans to be an active partner in the proposed Higher Education Center for
          Beckley

      •   Plans to increase enrollment in web-based courses offered through the West
          Virginia/Kentucky Community and Technical College System partnership

      •   Plans to implement an AAS degree in Individualized Career Studies in an
          effort to increase adult student enrollment

      •   Plans to maintain low tuition and fee rates to keep programs financially
          accessible




                                                                                          50
     •   Plans to increase the implementation of workforce development programs
         eligible for HEAPS funding

Comments on Data Compilation

     •   The percentage goal for increasing student credit hours for adults is a slight
         increase of 3.4% while the goal for increasing the number of adults enrolled
         is 6%

     •   The goal for tuition fee increases over the six-year period is 15.2%

     •   The percent goal (50%) for the number of degrees awarded to adults
         equates to an increase from 100 to 150 students

     •   The percentage goal for retaining associate degree graduates in West
         Virginia is an increase from 65% to 70%, but it is less than the state-level
         goal of 85%

     •   The percentage (50%) goal for increasing the number of certificates and
         associate degrees in the areas of math, science, computer science, health
         fields, and engineering and related technologies is significant but is less than
         the state-level goal

     •   The percentage goal (10%) for increasing workforce education program
         activity is less than the state-level goal of 25%

     •   The percentage goal (77%) of participants successfully completing
         developmental courses exceeds the state-level goal of 75%

     •   The goal for instructional cost per FTE student is to decrease the cost by 3%

     •   The goal of increasing the number of credit hours generated electronically by
         50% indicates a strong commitment to providing access through on-line and
         other electronic means

     •   The percentage goal for successful licensure exam passage rate is 100%
         which exceeds the state-level goal of 90%

Recommendation

     •   Approval of the compact update with the recommendation that goals be
         evaluated for alignment with state-level goals for the next update submission
         and that the goal for adult participation be increased




                                                                                            51
                            WEST LIBERTY STATE COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   Continued emphasis on providing graduate education opportunities in the
          Northern Panhandle through collaborative arrangements

      •   Continue to enhance the academic assessment program

      •   Continue West Liberty's commitment to coordinate higher education delivery
          by participating in such initiatives as the SMART Center, the
          Superintendents' Consortium of the Northern Panhandle and the Northern
          Regional Consortium for Science, Mathematics and Technology

      •   Economic development is enhanced through involvement in Leadership
          Wheeling, the Wheeling Area Chamber of Commerce and the Ohio Valley
          Industrial and Business Development Corporation

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The six-year goal for students who have completed the ACT core (30%) is
          too low

      •   The six-year goal for percent of class enrolling in remedial courses (28%) is
          above state goal and shows no change from base year

      •   The six-year goal for the percent of students successfully completing
          developmental courses (93%) is well above the state goal

      •   The six-year goal for the graduation rate (45%) is near the state goal and
          shows improvement over the base year

      •   The six-year goal on the number of courses taught through electronic
          delivery (six) is low and shows little increase from the base year

      •   West Liberty State College substantially meets the standards in the six areas
          of the compact

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with the suggestion that in next year's
          compact update the six-year goals be revised for the percentage of students
          completing the ACT core and instruction through distance education
          technology in order to achieve closer alignment with the statewide compact




                                                                                          52
              WEST VIRGINIA NORTHERN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   Continues to expand the development of the Center for Adult Learners/
          Developmental Education to better serve the adult learner

      •   Will expand professional development opportunities for faculty and staff

      •   Will continue partnerships with county school systems to jointly deliver
          technical education

      •   Plans to expand campus service hours into evenings and Saturdays to
          better serve students

      •   Created the Northern Panhandle Institute for Entrepreneurial and E-
          Business Skills Development

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The percentage goal for increasing the number of credit hours delivered to
          adult students is 10% with the total number of adult students to be increased
          by 10%

      •   The goal for tuition costs is to limit the increase to 18% over the planning
          period, which equates a total increase of $300.00

      •   The percentage goal (10.6%) for increasing the number of degrees granted
          in the areas of math, science, computer science, health fields, and
          engineering and related technologies is less than the state-level expectation
          of doubling the number of graduates in these areas

      •   The percentage increase (10.75%) in workforce education programs
          delivered is less than the state-level goal of a 25% increase

      •   The percentage goal (76.7%) for participants successfully completing
          developmental education courses exceeds the state-level goals of 75%

      •   The established goal (92%) for successful licensure exam passage rate is
          consistent with the state-level goal

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with the recommendation that the institution
          evaluate the feasibility of increasing those goals not consistent with state-
          level goals for the next update submission




                                                                                          53
                             WEST VIRGINIA STATE COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   Emphasis on developing independent graduate programs in Media Studies
          and Biotechnology and collaborative graduate programs in Humanities and
          Social Work

      •   Continue offering college courses for high school students

      •   Enhance student outcomes for at-risk students through initiatives such as
          the Academic Intervention Program and the College Mentoring program

      •   Undergraduate research opportunities are available through the Land-Grant
          program

      •   The College is developing research capacity oriented to state needs

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The six-year goal for students who have completed the ACT core (65%)
          shows significant improvement over the base year

      •   The six-year goal for percent of class enrolling in remedial courses (35%)
          shows improvement over the base year, but falls short of the statewide goal

      •   The six-year goals for research shows no increase in funded dollars

      •   West Virginia State College plans to change its Carnegie Classification from
          Baccalaureate Colleges-General to Master’s Colleges and Universities II by
          2006-07 (Stipulation with this classification is that the institution is committed
          to graduate education and will award 20 or more master’s degrees annually)

      •   The six-year goal for students successfully completing developmental
          courses (80%) exceeds the statewide goal

      •   The six-year goal for the baccalaureate graduation rate (28%) shows little
          improvement over the base year and is well below the statewide goal

      •   The six-year goal on the number of student credit hours generated through
          electronic delivery (1,936) is a significant increase over the base year

      •   West Virginia State College meets the standards of the six areas of the
          compact update




                                                                                               54
      •   Comment: The change to Master’s Colleges and Universities II will likely
          impact peer selection

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with a suggestion that in next year's
          compact update the six-year goals be revised for the graduation rate in order
          to achieve closer alignment with the statewide compact


                      WEST VIRGINIA STATE COLLEGE
                    COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   The College is facing the challenge of developing additional cooperative
          health care programs with other providers to offset the high cost of delivery
          and achieving accreditation for the programs

      •   The number of certificate and associate degrees awarded has increased
          46% over the previous year

      •   The College has partnered with WVU-Tech Community and Technical
          College, Carver Career Center and area hospitals to expand Respiratory
          Therapy education to non-traditional students

      •   Plans to increase dual credit programs and contract courses with the
          vocational-technical centers in the service region

      •   Plans to continue the development of on-line or web-assisted courses in the
          areas of marketing and developmental education

      •   The Community and Technical College plans to achieve independent
          accreditation by 2004

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The percentage goal for increasing adult student credit hours generated is
          8%, the number of adults enrolled by 7.8% and the number of degrees
          awarded to adults by 7.4%, an increase of eight additional graduates during
          the six-year period

      •   There is a goal to maintain tuition at the current level over the planning
          period




                                                                                          55
      •   The percentage goal increase for granting degrees in the areas of math,
          science, computer science, health programs, engineering and related
          technologies is 13.33%, which is less than the state-level goal of doubling
          the number of degrees awarded in these areas

      •   The percentage goal (3.5%) for increasing the delivery of workforce
          education programs is much less than the state-level goal of 25%

      •   The goal for retaining associate degree graduates in West Virginia increases
          from 68% to 75%, but the goal is less than the state-level goal of 85%
          retention
      •   The percentage goal (79%) for participants to successfully complete
          developmental education courses exceeds the state-level goal of 75%

      •   The goal of 50% of degree-seeking students having either graduated or
          continue enrollment in higher education is consistent with the state-level goal

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the CTC compact update with the recommendation that the
          goals for adult participation and the number of adult graduates be reviewed
          for possible increases and all goals reviewed to determine the feasibility of
          alignment with state-level goals for the next update submission


                           WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

Narrative Goals

      •   As the state’s only research/comprehensive doctoral granting institution,
          WVU graduated 146 students with doctoral degrees and received nearly
          $134 million in sponsored contracts and grants last year

      •   In fall 2002, West Virginia University admitted its largest ever freshman class

      •   Continued support for mathematics initiatives, including operation of the
          Institute for Math Learning which targets professional development for K-12
          teachers and offers introductory math courses

      •   With steady enrollment increases, including a large percent of non-resident
          students, the university is working to address the need for more on-campus
          housing

      •   Maintaining a strong research profile in face of tight budgets, is one of the
          greatest challenges for WVU, along with implementation of the research
          park




                                                                                            56
Comments on Data Compilation

      •   Projects a 2006-07 freshman class of 3,900 compared to 3,978 for the
          current year and 3,617 in 2001-02

      •   Anticipates a significant increase in number of entering students who have
          completed the ACT core

      •   Projects substantial increase in the number of students transferring from
          community colleges, in-state institutions, and out-of-state institutions by
          2006-07

      •   Tuition increases by 2006-07 will be consistent with HEPC policy for both
          undergraduate and graduate students

      •   Projects increases in number of bachelor’s degrees granted to adult
          students (2,115 to 2,300) and to persons completing programs in math,
          science, computer science, engineering and technology related fields (924 to
          950) by 2006-07

      •   Goal is to at least maintain the level of percentage of graduates working in
          WV after graduation (60.5% currently)

      •   Projects modest increase in the baccalaureate graduation rate (55% to
          57.5%) and delivery of instruction by electronic technologies by 2006-07

      •   Plan is to either maintain or to improve the pass rates on licensure exams in
          baccalaureate and professional fields, (typically at 90% or higher by 2006-
          07)

      •   West Virginia University meets the standards in the six areas of the compact

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update


           WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Narrative Goals

      •   Enhance and expand the offering of the graduate engineering program and
          further develop the range of graduate offerings




                                                                                          57
      •   Continue conversion of the curriculum to distance, web-based and web-
          assisted delivery

      •   Implement a fully integrated assessment program for learning outcomes in
          all programs

      •   Establish capstone assessment activities and advisory boards in all degree-
          granting programs

      •   Partner with several public and private institutions in the Beckley Region
          Higher Education Consortium to provide access to higher education

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The six-year goal for students who have completed the ACT core (70-80%)
          is good and shows significant improvement over the base year

      •   The six-year goal for percent of class enrolling in remedial courses (10-20%)
          shows strong movement toward the statewide goal

      •   The six-year goal for the number of undergraduate degrees granted in math,
          science, computer science, engineering, technology and health-related fields
          (180) is a significant increase from the base year

      •   The six-year goals on research evidence a commitment to greater research
          efforts

      •   The six-year goal on the number of courses taught through electronic
          delivery (28 to 100) shows projected increased activity

      •   West Virginia University Institute of Technology meets the standards in the
          six areas of the compact

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with a suggestion that in next year's
          compact update specific six-year goals be established in lieu of ranges


           WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
                  COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Narrative Goals

      •   The Community and Technical College is continuing the process of seeking
          independent accreditation




                                                                                          58
     •   An Adult Basic Education Center has been established within the community
         and technical college facility

     •   Has entered into five joint programs with vocational-technical centers to
         deliver technical programs

     •   Has increased the number of weekend and evening offerings of technical
         courses, both on-and off campus

     •   The College has been involved in three collaborative grants through the
         Advantage Valley Community College Network that addresses the training
         needs of employers in the region

     •   Industry has donated over $600,000 of equipment and supplies to the
         printing and engineering technology programs

     •   Plans to increase marketing efforts to attract more adults and additional
         women into technology programs

Comments on Data Compilation

     •   The goals for the percentage increase (30%) in the number of credit hours
         generated by adult students, the percentage increase (30%) of headcount
         enrollment for adults, and the percentage increase (70%) for degrees
         granted to adults are commendable

     •   The percentage goal for tuition increases over the planning period is 16.5%,
         an increase from $2,730 to $3,183

     •   The percentage goal (45%) for increasing the number of degrees granted in
         the areas of math, science, computer science, health fields, and engineering
         and related technologies is significant, but is less than the state-level goal of
         doubling the degrees awarded in these areas

     •   The percentage goal (80%) for retaining associate degree graduates in West
         Virginia is slightly less than the state-level goal of 85%

     •   The percentage goal for successful passage of licensure exams is 100%
         which exceeds the state-level goal of 90%

Recommendation

     •   Approval of the CTC compact update with the recommendation that for the
         next update submission goals be evaluated to determine if they are
         consistent with state-level goals




                                                                                             59
                  WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY AT PARKERSBURG

Narrative Goals

      •   The College has developed partnerships with four area hospitals to expand
          the nursing program and address critical shortages in other health care
          professions

      •   Has experienced growth in the number of high school students enrolled in
          college classes and the number of students participating in classes delivered
          through alternative means

      •   Has acquired a new facility at the Jackson County Center to accommodate
          enrollment growth in that region

      •   The number of Wood County high school students enrolled in programs
          through the Gaston Caperton Center has remained at maximum levels

      •   The Business, Industry and Development Services Division continues to
          increase the delivery of customized services to area employers

      •   Plans to further develop the ACT Center to provide skill-specific training
          modules, computer-delivered assessments and licensure testing

      •   Plans to pursue developing a research center on the Parkersburg campus in
          partnership with the Polymer Alliance Zone

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The percentage goal for tuition increases over the planning period is 16%,
          which equates to $248.00

      •   The percentage increase goals for the student credit hours generated by
          adult students is 7.5%, the increase in headcount enrollment of adults is
          10% and the number of adult student graduates at 5.3%

      •   The percentage increase goal (9.2%) for granting degrees in the areas of
          math, science, computer science, health fields, engineering and related
          technologies is less than the state-level goal of doubling the number of
          graduates in these fields

      •   The percentage goal increase (10%) for workforce education delivery is less
          than the state-level goal (25%)




                                                                                          60
      •   The percentage goal (73%) for retaining graduates in West Virginia is less
          than the state-level goal of 75% for baccalaureate-level graduates and 85%
          for associate degree graduates

      •   The percentage goal (75%) for participants successfully completing
          developmental education courses is consistent with the state-level goal

      •   The percentage goal (96%) for successful licensure passage rate exceeds
          the state-level goal

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update with the recommendation that adult student
          participation and graduation rates be evaluated for possible increases and
          for the next update submission conduct an evaluation of data elements to
          determine if they are aligned with state-level goals


             WEST VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

Narrative Goals

      •   Vision statement calls for WVSOM to develop a comprehensive pre- and
          post-doctoral training program designed for the needs of the elderly and
          comprehensive state-wide post-doctoral training campus

      •   Keep tuition at reasonable levels

      •   Develop more research without reducing importance of teaching

      •   Enhance programmatic support for special needs of the elderly

      •   Expansion of collaborative efforts with other state medical schools

Comments on Data Compilation

      •   The data elements for the six goal areas are generally not applicable to
          WVSOM and to the extent they are applicable are addressed in the narrative

Recommendation

      •   Approval of the compact update




                                                                                       61
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                    Acceptance of Report on College Courses for
                                         High School Students

INSTITUTIONS:                            All

COMMITTEE:                               Academic Policy Committee

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                  Resolved, That the West Virginia Higher
                                         Education Policy Commission accepts the
                                         report, College Courses for High School
                                         Students, 2001-2002.

STAFF MEMBER:                            Bruce C. Flack

BACKGROUND:

At its October 2002 meeting, the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
directed the staff to complete a study of the program of state college and university
offerings of college courses for high school students. In preparation of the study, the
institutions were asked to respond to a number of qualitative criteria that would indicate
the extent of compliance with HEPC policy. Additionally, the institutions provided
student enrollment information for 2001-2002, the last year for which an entire year’s
data were available.

The following report is a summary and analysis of the data.




                                                                                             62
College Courses for High School Students
              2001-2002
  A Report to the West Virginia Higher Education Policy
                      Commission

                     January 2003




                                                          63
     College Courses for High School Students
                   2001-2002
  A Report to the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
                            January 2003


Background
        At its October 2002 meeting, the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
charged the staff to complete a study of the state college and university offerings of courses for
high school students. In the preparation of this study, the institutions were asked to respond to
a number of qualitative criteria that would indicate institutional compliance with the HEPC policy,
Series 19, Guidelines for College Courses for High School Students (See Appendix A). These
indicators were topics such as program administration, selection of instructors, academic
standards, admission standards, fees assessed, and interaction with the high school.
        In addition, the institutions provided student enrollment information for 2001-2002, the
last year in which an entire year of data was available. The data include number of course
sections, course titles, student enrollment, type of course (dual credit or college credit only),
instructor characteristics (full-time, part-time, high school teacher), cooperating high school and
high school course title. The survey instruments are added as Appendix B in this report.

Goals
        The comprehensive effort to make college course opportunities available to qualified
high school students dates back to 1995 when the West Virginia Code was modified to provide
a higher education goal of providing “more opportunities . . . for advanced high school students
to obtain college credit prior to high school graduation.” Since that time most of the state
colleges and universities have developed and expanded course offerings for high school
students under the statewide policy. The program of college courses for high school students
accomplishes several goals. It gives qualified students a head start on college by completing
higher education courses while still in high school. It also provides cost savings for students
and their parents by enabling completion of a college degree program in a shorter time frame.
Further, it enables high school students to enjoy a fuller and more rigorous curriculum in the last
two years of high school and to combat “senior slump.” This program of college courses,
combined with companion efforts of support for College Board Advanced Placement courses
and West Virginia EDGE, has brought about substantial attainment of the legislative goals for




                                                                                                      64
higher education course opportunities for qualified high school students established seven years
ago.

Current Policy
       The current policy on college courses for high school students in West Virginia was
originally adopted in 1997 following extensive input from a diverse group of higher education
representatives. Major features of the policy are:
   •   College courses offered for high school students must meet the college or
       university's curricular standards.
   •   Only lower division undergraduate courses may be offered.
   •   All faculty employed must meet minimum faculty credential requirements at the
       institution granting the credit.
   •   Any high school teachers teaching college credit-bearing courses are to be
       assigned adjunct part-time faculty status and meet an institution's standards for
       employment as faculty.
   •   High school students enrolled in college courses must meet the institutional
       admission requirements.
   •   Each institution may seek Commission approval for a special tuition/fee structure
       for courses offered for high school students in the high schools.
   •   Any special tuition/fee assessment shall be, at a minimum, at ¾ the rate of the
       lowest regular off-campus rate charged by any WV public institution. For 2002-
       03, the rate is $48.00 per credit hour.
   •   An institution may not use its own resources, such as tuition/fee waivers to pay
       any student's assessed tuition/fees. Third party tuition/fee waivers are, however,
       permitted.
   •   The college or university offering a course taught by a resident high school
       teacher during the school day may reimburse the high school for the instructor's
       time.
   •   Student credit hours awarded will accrue to the institution granting the credit.
   •   Each institution must maintain records of its activities and submit an annual
       report.




                                                                                                   65
Growth of Program
       Since the inception of the statewide initiative of college courses for high school students
in 1997, growth has been steady and substantial. In 1997, student enrollments were 2,620 and
for the 2001-2002 academic year total enrollments (duplicated headcount) were 8,302. The
number of undergraduate course offerings has also increased. In 1999, 295 sections were
offered statewide. That number grew to 328 for the 2001 fall semester and to 340 for fall 2002.
A table of course sections and enrollments for 2001-2002 is in Appendix C of this report.
       Institutions with the largest programs in terms of number of course offerings are Marshall
University, Fairmont State College, and West Virginia Northern Community College.             Other
programs with substantial enrollments and number of courses are those at Potomac State
College, Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, and West Virginia
University at Parkersburg. All the state colleges and universities with undergraduate programs
offer college courses in the high schools for qualified students, but two institutions, West Liberty
State College and West Virginia University offer only a few. West Virginia University, however,
has implemented a new program, ACCESS (Attaining College Credit and Experience while in
Secondary School).      The ACCESS program provides advanced high school students the
opportunity to enroll in WVU courses offered on the main campus or other locations throughout
the state. For 2001-2002, 118 students were enrolled on the main campus and 131 students at
other sites in a total of 112 course titles.    West Virginia University has also expanded its
outreach in the 2002 fall semester with course offerings in mathematics and journalism in six
high schools.
       Student enrollments for courses offered by Concord College in high schools in 2001-
2002 are not included in this report. The Concord enrollments were for students in Advanced
Placement courses. Under Higher Education Policy Commission rules, Advanced Placement
courses and course enrollments are not eligible for inclusion as college enrollments.

Administration
       At higher education institutions with component community colleges, the community and
technical college typically administers the program. This arrangement is a natural one in that all
college offerings for high school students are lower-level undergraduate courses. An exception
to the administrative pattern is Marshall University where the School of Extended Education
administers the program for both baccalaureate and community colleges.             Each individual
college at Marshall, including the CTC, approves and hires instructors and approves course




                                                                                                       66
offerings. West Virginia State College and West Virginia University Institute of Technology
operate their programs through the baccalaureate units.

Selection of Instructors
       Faculty chosen to teach colleges courses in the high schools are largely part-time
adjuncts. Most often adjuncts employed are high school instructors who teach the course for
dual credit at the high school. Two institutions rely primarily on full-time faculty. Three-fourths
of the faculty teaching college courses in the high schools for West Virginia University at
Parkersburg are full-time. All of the on-line West Virginia University courses were taught by full-
time faculty with the assistance of on-site facilitators. The pattern of adjunct usage is as follows:

                              Nearly all adjuncts (90% or higher)

         Bluefield State College                              Fairmont State College
         Concord College                                      Glenville State College
         Eastern WV CTC                                       Southern WV CTC
                                                              West Liberty State College

                            Preponderantly adjuncts (50% to 89%)

         Marshall University                                    WV Northern CC
         Potomac State College                                  WV State College
         Shepherd College                                       WVU-Tech

                                    Primarily full-time faculty

         West Virginia University at Parkersburg
         West Virginia University

Standards for Selection of Faculty

       The Higher Learning Commission (North Central Association) expectation is that
institutions granting primarily baccalaureate degrees or associate degrees with transfer courses
should have 75% of faculty who hold graduate degrees.             All of the West Virginia higher
education institutions offering college courses for high school students meet this HLC general
institutional requirement. Policies at each institution call for employment of adjunct faculty with
at least a master’s degree. The degree is to be in-field or for a substantial portion of the
graduate coursework to be in the subject area taught. In some instances, particularly with
adjuncts who are high school teachers, the instructor has a master’s degree is in education, but
with some coursework in the subject area. Some colleges prescribe that a designated number
of hours, typically 15 to 18 or about one-half of the total coursework for the degree, be in-field.




                                                                                                        67
A number of the campuses stipulate that the academic department in which the course is taught
must approve adjunct faculty hiring.
       Professional development opportunities for adjunct faculty vary among the institutions.
There is usually some kind of mentoring program or orientation for adjunct faculty. While the
orientation and mentoring activities at most campuses are targeted primarily to adjuncts on their
initial employment, some provide more extensive support. Several institutions mentor adjunct
faculty throughout the semester and include classroom visitations as part of the process. One
institution assigns members of the academic administration to work with adjuncts in providing
needed support.
Assessment and evaluation
       The state colleges and universities with programs of college courses for high school
students employ similar approaches to assessment of learning and instruction and to course
evaluation. Each institution, in accordance with Higher Learning Commission requirements, has
developed a comprehensive program for assessment of learning.            Assessment of learning
procedures for the college courses in high schools are the same as those used for courses
offered in campus settings.
       The other side of the assessment coin is evaluation. Fundamental to any program of
assessment of learning and instruction is evaluation of the course. Procedures for evaluation of
college courses for high school students are essentially the same as those used in on-campus
courses. Most West Virginia public colleges report use of a combination of student evaluation of
instruction, classroom observation, and supervisor evaluation. A few of the institutions report
varied applications. One has its academic department review research papers assigned by
adjunct faculty. Another calls for final exams to be approved by the respective department. Still
another has its English and history faculty review major elements of student work (papers and
exams).
Student Eligibility
       Eligibility requirements for enrollment in college courses are similar at the state colleges
and universities, but some variations do exist. Major elements in admission are:
   •   Student enrollment is restricted to juniors and seniors, though courses are
       targeted primarily to seniors.   Potomac State College requires a 3.5 GPA for
       juniors.
   •   Students admitted hold provisional admission status. Variant terms for this status
       are provisional; early admission; special, non-degree seeking; and high school
       student.




                                                                                                      68
    •   The normal GPA requirement is 3.00 (“B” average), but Marshall Community and
        Technical College uses 2.5 and West Virginia University at Parkersburg uses 2.8.
    •   Written parental permission.
    •   Written approval of high school principal and/or counselor.
    •   Enrollment in courses in English and mathematics require the HEPC minimum
        placement standard (ACT, SAT-1, or other placement instrument).

Course Sections Offered
          The college courses offered in high schools are for lower-level undergraduate credit.
Most courses are the beginning or introductory courses in areas of general education, though
some are in computer science, business, and allied health fields.               A breakdown of course
sections offered in 2001-2002 follows:
                    # Course
   Institution      Sections                            Sections of Course Areas
                                  Business, computer science, allied health, engineering technology,
Bluefield               40
                                  science
                                  (General education: English, history, science, mathematics, foreign
Concord              (Fall '02)
                                  language)
Eastern                  8        (General education: history, science, sociology); computer science
                                  (General education: English, history, psychology, economics,
Fairmont                82
                                  mathematics, sociology)
Glenville               25        (General education: English, history, mathematics); computer science
                                  (General education: English, foreign language, history, speech
Marshall               100        communications, mathematics, science, psychology, sociology);
                                  keyboarding, word processing, allied health
                                  (General education: English, history, mathematics, psychology, speech
Potomac                 59
                                  communications)
                                  (General education: English, history, foreign language, mathematics,
Shepherd                37
                                  science); computer science
Southern                          (General education; English, economics, psychology, foreign language,
                        69
WVCTC                             fine arts appreciation; political science); computer science, business
West Liberty             3        English, health
                                  (General education: English, history, fine arts appreciation,
WV Northern CC          80        mathematics, psychology, political science, speech communications);
                                  computer science, health
                                  (General education: English, fine arts appreciation, history, science,
WV State                39
                                  sociology); criminal justice
WVU                      3        Mathematics
                                  (General education: English, history, psychology, political science,
WVU-P                   61
                                  sociology)
                                  (General education: English, history, mathematics. psychology,
WVU-Tech                41
                                  science); business, computer science




                                                                                                           69
Dual Credit
       This report has addressed the various goals for establishment of a statewide program of
college courses offered in the high schools for advanced secondary school students.            The
Higher Education Policy Commission and its predecessor agencies, the State College and
University Systems of West Virginia, have formulated policy that calls for the institutions to offer
bona fide college courses in the schools. The coursework made available to high schools is to
be the same as that offered on the campuses. The policy recognizes the practice of dual credit,
but leaves the application and implementation of dual credit to the respective high school.
       Dual credit, or concurrent enrollment as it is sometimes called, has become a significant
development in American higher education. It is an attractive and effective way to enable
advanced high school students to make the transition from secondary school to college more
readily and to complete basic undergraduate courses prior to graduation. In West Virginia, the
practice has been to allow the local high school to determine whether or not a college course is
offered for high school credit and to determine the appropriate high school course title if
students exercise a dual credit option. While most of the college offerings in the high schools
are available to students for concurrent high school credit, not all courses are so designated.
For 2001-2002, the percentage of courses offered for high school dual credit was 86%.
       The titles used for the dual credit option courses in the high schools vary from school to
school. For example, a college Introduction to Biology course may carry titles such as College
Biology, Advanced Biology, or Biology Elective. A course in Freshmen English Composition
may have titles such as College English, English 12, or Honors English. Each high school has
the discretion of applying what it considers to be the most appropriate course title to meet its
curricular needs.

A Note on Advanced Placement
       West Virginia high schools and public colleges and universities participate collaboratively
in the Advanced Placement program of the College Board. Participating high schools offer high
school Advanced Placement courses for qualified students. The College Board AP program
provides students the opportunity to take exams in more than 30 academic areas. Under this
program, students successfully completing the exams may qualify for college credit.           West
Virginia’s public higher education institutions, through HEPC policy, fully embrace the AP
program. The important distinction with Advanced Placement, however, is that the credential for
college course credit is successful completion of an AP exam and not enrollment in a high
school course designated as Advanced Placement.           HEPC policy does not permit a West




                                                                                                       70
Virginia public college to award credit for completion of an AP course, the rationale being that
an AP course is a high school course, albeit a very good one, and not a course that is part of a
college’s curriculum. Prior to the current year, one institution, Concord College, was awarding
college credit to high school students for successful AP course completion. Concord College
reports that it is now in compliance with HEPC policy in regard to the acceptance of Advanced
Placement credit and the offering of college courses for high school students. The Concord
College practice of awarding credit for completion of coursework in the high schools is,
however, still under study.
       From a policy perspective, the other state colleges and universities are fully aware of the
statewide policies on credit for Advanced Placement and the offering of college courses in the
high schools and are adhering to the policy standards.

Future Directions
       Most of the state colleges and universities anticipate a modest growth in their efforts to
provide opportunities for advanced high school students to complete college coursework while
still in high school. The numbers of courses offered and students enrolled have grown steadily
over the last five years. It is likely that this growth will continue, though at a slower rate, as long
as financial resources permit. This is a statewide program which has obvious benefits for the
high schools, the colleges, and most importantly the affected students. Its continued success
will reside in larger part on the institutions’ adherence to the qualitative standards in HEPC
policy as well as an adequate financial resource base.




                                                                                                          71
                                         APPENDIX A



                                   TITLE 133
                               PROCEDURAL RULE
              WEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION

                                   SERIES 19
               GUIDELINES FOR THE OFFERING OF COLLEGE COURSES
                          FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

1. GENERAL

     1.1     Scope:                 This policy establishes guidelines for West Virginia public
                                    colleges and universities for the offering of college courses
                                    for high school students.

     1.2     Authority:             W. Va. Code ' 18B-1-1A; 18B-1B-4

     1.3     Filing Date -          July 2, 2002

     1.4     Effective Date -       August 1, 2002

     2. PURPOSE

     2.1     Legislative goals established for West Virginia state colleges and universities
             provide that higher education in West Virginia should contribute fully to the
             growth, development and quality of life of the state and its citizens. Among these
             goals is a statutory provision (W. Va. Code '18B-1-1A) which states that more
             opportunities should be available for advanced high school students to obtain
             college credit prior to high school graduation.

             Currently, most of the state colleges and universities offering undergraduate
             programs offer some college courses in high schools for high school students.
             The purpose of this policy is to provide guidance to the institutions in matters of
             curriculum, selection of faculty, quality control, admission, and setting tuition/fees
             as they continue to offer and expand the number of college courses for high
             school students.

3. CURRICULUM

     3.1     Any off-campus credit instruction must meet the same rigorous standards as
             required for on-campus instruction. Such standards are essential for maintaining
             institutional accreditation by the North Central Association. Thus, any college
             course offered for high school students must meet the standard of a campus-
             based college course. Each course needs to include the equivalent syllabus,
             text, assignments, assessments, evaluation of students, and evaluation of faculty
             as the campus course.




                                                                                                      72
             The curriculum will be limited to lower division undergraduate courses which are
             jointly agreed upon by the cooperating college or university and high school.

4. CREDIT

     4.1     In cooperation with a local school system, an institution may offer an
             undergraduate college course in a high school for advanced high school students
             who qualify for college admission. At the discretion of the high school, the
             course may be offered for high school credit, i.e. the student will be awarded high
             school credit as well as college credit for successful completion of a course.

5. CORRELATION WITH ADVANCED PLACEMENT

     5.1     The College Board Advanced Placement program shall continue to be
             encouraged, and the credential for granting college credit shall remain student
             performance on the Advanced Placement exam. No credit will be awarded for
             College Board Advanced Placement courses based solely on successful course
             completion.

6. FACULTY

     6.1     All faculty serving as instructors for college credit-bearing courses offered to
             advanced level high school students, whether on the college or the high school
             campus, must meet the minimum faculty credential requirements for instructional
             rank at the college which will grant the credit.

             6.1.1   Credentials of faculty who serve as instructors for college credit-bearing
                     courses must be approved by the chief academic officer of the college
                     and/or university and the department which will grant the credit.

     6.2     The institution granting credit shall assign adjunct part-time faculty status to high
             school teachers who teach such courses. Employment of any adjunct part-time
             faculty must be consistent with any commission and/or institutional standards on
             employment of adjunct, part-time faculty.

7. ADMISSIONS

     7.1     High school students desiring to enroll in a college credit-bearing course must
             apply for an admission status and meet all admission requirements for the
             institution which is offering the college credit course. Additionally, students must
             meet all course requirements and prerequisites. In addition to meeting these
             requirements, all students who enroll must have the approval of the high school
             principal.

8. TUITION/FEES

     8.1     High school students enrolled in college courses in the high schools will be
             assessed tuition/fees consistent with the institution=s approved fee structure.
             Alternatively, to make college courses more accessible to high school students,
             an institution may, establish a special tuition fee structure for high school
             students as provided in Section 8.2 of this rule.




                                                                                                     73
     8.2    Special tuition/fees for high school students established by any West Virginia
            public higher education institution must be set, at a minimum, at three-fourths of
            the rate of the lowest regular off-campus rate established by any West Virginia
            public higher education institution. All high school students must be charged the
            special tuition/fee rate or the regular tuition/fees approved for the institution
            granting the credit. The credit-granting institution may not use its own resources
            to pay any student=s assessed tuition/fees. Except for tuition/fee waivers in third
            party sponsored agreements, no tuition/fee waivers are to be granted.

9. SCHOOL REIMBURSEMENT AND CREDIT HOUR ACCURUAL

     9.1    College courses offered to high school students in the high schools will be taught
            by either regular or adjunct part-time faculty members of the institution granting
            the college credit. In the special circumstances of a high school teacher who
            teaches the course during the regular school day, the college granting the credit
            may      reimburse      the    high     school for   the   instructor=s   service.
     9.2    Consistent with Higher Education Policy Commission policies, student credit
            hours generated by high school students registered in college classes will accrue
            to the institution granting the credit.

10. ACCOUNTABILITY

     10.1   Each college or university offering college courses for high school students may
            in accordance with provisions of this policy make arrangements for award of dual
            credit with the participating high school.

     10.2   Each college or university which offers college-level courses for or in West
            Virginia high schools must maintain a record of the courses and enrollments for
            such courses and submit any reports of college courses for high school students
            as deemed necessary.




                                                                                                  74
                                          APPENDIX B
                                                                                November 2002
                              SURVEY OF COLLEGE COURSES
                                         FOR
                                HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS


The purpose of this survey is to assess the program of college courses for high school students
offered by West Virginia’s public colleges and universities. This program is designed to include
courses which are offered primarily for qualified high school students. Typically, these are
courses offered in the high schools, but occasionally are taught in some other venue. The first
part is intended to illustrate present practice. The questions on qualitative standards, selection
of instructors, student eligibility, and other policy consideration should be answered in the
context of institutional policy and practices as of November 2002.

The second portion of the survey includes quantitative data which is based on the fall 2001 and
spring 2002 semesters.

I.     QUALITATIVE INDICATORS

           Administration
                  (For institutions which have component community colleges)

               1.     Which administrative unit, baccalaureate administration or community
                      college, administers the program?

           Selection of Instructors

               2.     Are instructors full-time faculty or adjunct? What percentage (estimate) of
                      each?

               3.     What standards do you use for selection of adjunct faculty, including high
                      school teachers?

               4.     Minimal degree required?

               5.     Must the degree be in-field or may it be in a cognate field, e.g. M.Ed. with
                      significant coursework in the subject area?

               6.     What are the minimum number of graduate hours required in the subject
                      area?

               7.     What kinds of professional development are offered or required for
                      adjunct faculty? Any mentoring?

           Qualitative Standards

               8.     How do you monitor and assess qualitative standards in the course
                      offerings?




                                                                                                     75
   9.     When adjunct faculty are instructors, do you utilize any special practices,
          e.g. review of student work and grading of papers by full-time faculty?

   10.    What assessment of learning practices do you employ?

   11.    What are your practices in evaluating instruction?

   12.    What are institutional practices for eligibility for student enrollment?
          GPA? Principal=s permission? ACT or SAT? Any other criteria?

   13.    What are high school grade levels for enrolling students?

   14.    What is the admission status of the high school student?

Student Fees

   15.    What student fees (per credit hour) did you employ for 2001-02?

Reimbursement of school for instructor=s service

   16.    When the instructor is a high school teacher and the course is offered for
          dual credit, what is your institutional practice in reimbursing the school for
          the instructor’s service? Amount of payment to the school for a course?

Dual Credit

   17.    Which courses are listed by the cooperating high school for high school
          credit? List for each cooperating high school.

   18.    List the high school course designation and title for each of the “dual
          credit” courses.

   19.    Do students enroll in a college course for high schools students which is
          listed as a “dual credit” course for high school credit only. If so,
          approximately what percentage of the students enrolled exercise this
          option.

   20.    Does the institution have an articulation agreement with the high school
          for determining the dual credit arrangement? If yes, explain.

Future Directions

   21.    Do you anticipate any change or expansion in the number of college
          courses offered for high school students in the next few years?

   22.    Will course offerings be limited to local high schools in your area? Or to
          other locations?

   23.    Are you offering or likely to offer college coursework primarily for high
          school students through instructional technology, e.g. Web-based




                                                                                           76
                     courses?

             24.     What is your overall assessment of your institution=s effort and
                     commitment in offering college courses for high school students?


II.   QUANTITATIVE INDICATORS

      The HEPC office of Planning and Policy Analysis has prepared for each institution a
      listing of course sections that had at least one high school student enrolled in fall 2001 or
      spring 2002. This course listing includes enrollment, course, and instructor information
      obtained from the HEPC data files, and three blank columns for additional information
      that we are requesting for these course sections.

      We are asking that the following things be done with this course listing:

             1.      First, review the data in the “Dual Credit” column for accuracy and
                     correct any errors. This field is supposed to indicate whether or not a
                     course is taught “primarily for high school students” and whether the
                     students receive college credit only or dual credit. We have had
                     significant problems with data quality in this field. Three values are
                     possible: Regular Course, Dual Credit, and College Credit Only. “Regular
                     Courses” are typical on-campus courses available to any student.
                     Courses taught “primarily for high school students” should be designated
                     as “Dual Credit” or “College Credit Only.” You should pay particular
                     attention to courses with high percentages of high school students
                     enrolled that have been designated as “Regular” courses. A “Regular”
                     course with 100% high school enrollment has almost certainly been
                     miscoded.

             2.      For “Dual Credit” and “College Credit Only” courses (based on corrected
                     values), indicate whether the instructor is a high school teacher in the “HS
                     Teacher?” column. When the instructors can be identified from the HEPC
                     data files, information about their FT/PT status has been placed in the
                     “Type” column. Please fill in the “HS Teacher?” column even if the
                     instructor has not been identified from the HEPC files. It is very possible
                     that in many of those cases, the instructor is in fact a high school teacher,
                     not regular college faculty.

             3.      For “Dual Credit” courses (based on corrected values), fill in all three
                     blank columns for those courses: HS Teacher? (Yes/No), Cooperating HS
                     (if none, indicate “None”), and HS Course Title.

             4.      For “College Credit Only” courses, fill in the “HS Teacher” and
                     “Cooperating HS” columns.




                                                                                                      77
                                          APPENDIX C
                        WEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION

                       COLLEGE COURSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
                          Course Sections and Enrollments, 2001-2002

                                                   Fall Semester                             Spring Semester
                                      # Course          # High   Enrollme             # Course     # High  Enrollme
          Institution                 Sections         Schools      nt                Sections    Schools     nt

Bluefield State College                   18                3             208              4               2        10

Concord College                            -                -               -               -              -         -

Eastern WV CTC                             3                3              41              5               2        23

Fairmont State College                    48               14             732              34             12       444

Glenville State College                   13                7             222              12              7       179

Marshall University                       54               13             530              46             11       477

Potomac State College                     31               10             527              28             10       427

Shepherd College                          19                5             211              20              6       222

Southern WV CTC                           30               10             266              39              9       296

West Liberty State College                 3                1              20               -              -         -

WV Northern CC                            41               12             591              39             12       489

WV State College                          17                3             419              22              5       423

WVU*                                       1                1              20              2               2        76

WVU-Parkersburg                           30                8             475              31             10       452

WVU-Tech                                  20               10             233              21             10       281

           TOTALS                        328                             4,495            303                      3,807

* Not included in West Virginia University numbers are students enrolled in the ACCESS (Attaining College Credit
  and Experience while in Secondary School) program. The ACCESS program provides advanced high school
  students the opportunity to enroll in WVU courses offered either on the main campus or other locations
  throughout the state. For 2001-2002, 118 students were enrolled on the main campus and 131 students at
  other sites.




                                                                                                                           78
     WEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                     FINANCE COMMITTEE

                    MEETING OF FEBRUARY 21, 2003
                             9:00 A.M.

                                    AGENDA


A.   Approval of WVU Institute of Technology Master Plan ......................... pg 79

B.   Approval of Bluefield State College Master Plan .................................. pg 80

C.   Bonding Resolution for Refinancing Bonds .......................................... pg 82
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                   Approval of Master Plan

INSTITUTION:                            West Virginia University Institute of Technology

COMMITTEE:                              Finance Committee

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                 Resolved, That the West Virginia Higher
                                        Education Policy Commission approves the ten
                                        year update to the Campus Development Plan
                                        and West Virginia University Institute of
                                        Technology’s Five Year Capital Implementation
                                        Plan as provided in Series 12, Capital Project
                                        Management. The approval of this Campus
                                        Development Plan is based upon the current
                                        mission of West Virginia University Institute of
                                        Technology. In the event a substantial change
                                        occurs in the mission of West Virginia
                                        University Institute of Technology as a result of
                                        future legislative action or implementation of
                                        recommendations included in the studies of all
                                        higher education institutions as required by the
                                        LOCEA resolution dated May 21, 2002, the
                                        Campus       Development      Plan    may     be
                                        reconsidered.

STAFF MEMBERS:                          James A. Winter

BACKGROUND:

It is requested the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission approve West
Virginia University Institute of Technology’s updated ten year Campus Development
Plan and it’s Five Year Capital Implementation Plan. This plan updates and replaces
the 1992 West Virginia Institute of Technology Campus Master Plan and it has been
approved by the WVU Institute of Technology Board of Advisors and the West Virginia
University Board of Governors.

The plan is designed to provide guidelines for the future maintenance, renovation,
demolition, construction and effective use of the physical facilities on the campus from
2002 through 2012. The ten year total for recommended maintenance, renovation and
new construction is approximately $29.43 million, broken down into a multi-year phasing
plan. Over the next five years, WVUIT hopes to accomplish over $16.95 million in
improvements as outlined in its Five Year Implementation Plan.

The complete Campus Development Plan is available on the HEPC website at the
following address: http://www.hepc.wvnet.edu/commission/WVUITCCDP2002.pdf



                                                                                            79
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                    Approval of Master Plan

INSTITUTION:                             Bluefield State College

COMMITTEE:                               Finance Committee

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                  Resolved, That the West Virginia Higher
                                         Education Policy Commission approves the ten
                                         year update to Bluefield State College’s
                                         Campus Development Plan for the Main
                                         Campus, the plan for the Greenbrier
                                         Community College Center, the Beckley
                                         Center      and   its   Five     Year     Capital
                                         Implementation Plan as provided in Series 12,
                                         Capital Project Management. The approval of
                                         this Campus Development Plan is based upon
                                         the current mission of Bluefield State College.
                                         In the event a substantial change occurs in the
                                         mission of Bluefield State College or its branch
                                         campuses as a result of future legislative
                                         action or implementation of recommendations
                                         included in the studies of all higher education
                                         institutions as required by the LOCEA
                                         resolution dated May 21, 2002, the Campus
                                         Development Plan may be reconsidered.

STAFF MEMBERS:                           James A. Winter

BACKGROUND:

It is requested that the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission approve
Bluefield State College’s updated ten year Campus Development Plan for the Main
Campus, the plan for the Greenbrier Community College Center, the Beckley Center
and its Five Year Capital Implementation Plan. It was approved by the Board of
Governors in December 2002.

The plan identifies issues regarding the college’s site and facilities, states planning
objectives and develops recommended strategies for implementation over the next ten
years. The major planning objectives are to support and enhance the college’s mission
with site and facilities improvements, to improve pedestrian safety and access to
facilities, improve parking and vehicular circulation, improve the college’s image, and to
respect and revitalize the college’s culture and heritage. For the Main Campus, the




                                                                                             80
college has identified twenty improvement projects to implement over the next ten years
totaling approximately $24.6 million. At the Greenbrier Community College Center in
Lewisburg, the recommendation is to acquire an adjacent facility to accommodate
expansion and growth. In Beckley, a determination needs to be made regarding the
disposition of the proposed Center for Higher Education and Workforce Development
before plans can be made on how to best accommodate growth and future
development.




                                                                                          81
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                     Bonding Resolution for Refinancing Bonds

INSTITUTIONS:                             All

COMMITTEE:                                Finance Committee

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                   Resolved, That the West Virginia Higher
                                          Education Policy Commission approves the
                                          attached resolutions relating to the refinancing
                                          of system-wide bond issues.

STAFF MEMBER:                             James A. Winter

BACKGROUND:

The Executive Committee at a meeting on January 10, 2002, approved the selection of
Salomon Smith Barney as senior investment banking manager and Spilman Thomas &
Battle, PLLC to serve as bond counsel. These firms are being employed to assist the
Commission to reduce debt service costs on outstanding debt by refunding existing
bonds. These firms will also explore the possibility of issuing new bonds to fund new
capital projects at the institutions. The Executive Committee also authorized the
addition of co-managing investment banking firms if deemed appropriate, and after
further analysis the firms of Crews & Associates and Ferris Baker Watts have been
asked to participate in the proposed bond issues.

A committee consisting of institutional Chief Financial Officers and Policy Commission
staff is working with our investment bankers and bond counsel to finalize
recommendations on these matters. The Committee has recommended that we
proceed with the documents necessary to implement the refinancing bond issue, and at
a subsequent time pursue the potential issue of new bonds if the required approvals are
granted by the Legislature. The refinancing could potentially be completed by April 1st.

The initial analysis on the bond refinancing indicates a potential present value savings
of between $7.5 million and $10.2 million. Based upon current rates, the larger savings
would result from the use of derivatives, using an interest rate swap to convert variable
rates bonds to a fixed rate cost. There is still much work to be done to determine the full
viability of this approach, both from a financial and legal perspective.

Separate resolutions are attached for the State College System bonds and the
University System bonds. The resolutions authorize the Commission Chair or Vice-
Chair to approve and sign the necessary documents to implement the refinancing of
certain system-wide bonds. Additional details on the proposed transaction will be
presented at the Commission meeting.




                                                                                              82
______________________________________________________________________________




                   FOURTH SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTION


                                  Authorizing


                        STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
                 HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                          Revenue Refunding Bonds
                           (State College Facilities)
                                 2003 Series B



                           Adopted: February 21, 2003



______________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                 83
                                        STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
                                 HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                                         Revenue Refunding Bonds
                                          (State College Facilities)
                                                2003 Series B

                                     FOURTH SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTION

                                                          Table of Contents


                                                                                                                                           Page
                                      ARTICLE I
                    DEFINITIONS AND OTHER PROVISIONS OF GENERAL
                  APPLICATION; DESIGNATION OF AUTHORIZED OFFICERS

Section 1.01. Definitions.................................................................................................................5
Section 1.02. Interpretation.............................................................................................................8
Section 1.03. Designation of Authorized Officers..........................................................................8

                                     ARTICLE II
                    AUTHORIZATION AND TERMS OF 2003 SERIES B BONDS

Section 2.01.       Authorization of 2003 Series B Bonds .....................................................................9
Section 2.02.       Terms ........................................................................................................................9
Section 2.03.       Certificate of Determination .....................................................................................9
Section 2.04.       Book Entry System for 2003 Series B Bonds...........................................................9
Section 2.05.       Form of 2003 Series B Bonds.................................................................................11
Section 2.06.       2003 Series B Bonds on Parity with Prior Bonds ...................................................11
Section 2.07.       Conditions Precedent to Delivery of 2003 Series B Bonds ....................................11

                                  ARTICLE III
            PROVISIONS RELATING TO THE 2003 SERIES B BONDS REQUIRED
                               BY BOND INSURER

Section 3.01. Provisions Required by Bond Insurer .....................................................................14

                             ARTICLE IV
    FUNDS AND ACCOUNTS; APPLICATION OF 2003 SERIES B BOND PROCEEDS

Section 4.01.       Funds and Accounts................................................................................................15
Section 4.02.       Application of 2003 Series B Bond Proceeds.........................................................15
Section 4.03.       Flow of Funds .........................................................................................................15
Section 4.04.       Disbursements.........................................................................................................16
Section 4.05.       Arbitrage Covenant.................................................................................................16
Section 4.06.       Tax Certificate ........................................................................................................16




                                                                                                                                                      84
                                          ARTICLE V
                             GENERAL COVENANTS OF THE COMMISSION

Section 5.01. General....................................................................................................................17
Section 5.02. Covenants................................................................................................................17

                               ARTICLE VI
           APPROVAL OF DOCUMENTS AND APPOINTMENT OF FIDUCIARIES

Section 6.01. Approval of Bond Documents ................................................................................18
Section 6.02. Approval of Distribution of Preliminary Official Statement
              and Official Statement ............................................................................................18
Section 6.03. Appointment of Fiduciaries ....................................................................................18
Section 6.04. Continuing Disclosure Agreement..........................................................................18

                                                         ARTICLE VII
                                                       MISCELLANEOUS

Section 7.01.       General Resolution..................................................................................................19
Section 7.02.       Incidental Action.....................................................................................................19
Section 7.03.       Severability .............................................................................................................19
Section 7.04.       Governing Law .......................................................................................................19
Section 7.05.       Notices ....................................................................................................................19
Section 7.06.       Binding Effect.........................................................................................................20
Section 7.07.       Effective Date .........................................................................................................21

Exhibit A – Form of 2003 Series B Bond




                                                                       ii

                                                                                                                                                     85
                              STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
                       HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                               Revenue Refunding Bonds
                                (State College Facilities)
                                      2003 Series B

                    FOURTH SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTION OF THE
                      HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION

               SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE
               ISSUANCE OF NOT TO EXCEED $40,000,000
               AGGREGATE    PRINCIPAL  AMOUNT        OF THE
               COMMISSION’S REVENUE REFUNDING BONDS (STATE
               COLLEGE FACILITIES) 2003 SERIES B; AND
               SUPPLEMENTING THE GENERAL RESOLUTION OF THE
               COMMISSION ADOPTED SEPTEMBER 9, 1992.

                WHEREAS, the Board of Directors of the State College System (the “Board”) on
September 9, 1992, adopted a General Resolution (the “General Resolution”) pursuant to which
it is authorized to issue one or more series of its revenue bonds (the “Bonds”);

                WHEREAS, the Higher Education Policy Commission (the “Commission”) is an
agency of the State of West Virginia (the “State”), is the successor to the Board and is
empowered and authorized to issue bonds pursuant to the Act, among other things, in furtherance
of the public purposes as found and determined by the Legislature of West Virginia as set forth
in Section 5 of the Act, to refund the Bonds To Be Refunded;

              WHEREAS, all capitalized terms used herein and not otherwise defined shall
have the meanings ascribed thereto in the General Resolution;

               WHEREAS, the General Resolution establishes the basic provisions regarding the
structure of and security for all Bonds to be issued thereunder, and further provides that each
Series of Bonds to be issued from time to time is to be individually authorized by a Supplemental
Resolution setting forth the principal amount of such Series of Bonds, the terms and provisions
of such Series of Bonds, provisions required by any Credit Provider for such Series of Bonds and
any other provisions which may be specific to such Series of Bonds;

              WHEREAS, pursuant to the First Supplemental Resolution (the “First
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on September 9, 1992, the Board issued its first
Series of Bonds under the General Resolution, being its $46,825,000 aggregate principal amount
State College System Revenue Refunding Bonds, Series 1992, dated November 1, 1992 (the
“1992 Bonds”);

             WHEREAS, pursuant to the Second Supplemental Resolution (the “Second
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on January 15, 1993, the Board made a minor



                                               3

                                                                                                    86
amendment to the First Supplemental Resolution, ratifying a change of the date of the 1992
Bonds from September 1, 1992 to November 1, 1992;

              WHEREAS, pursuant to the Third Supplemental Resolution (the “Third
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on October 21, 1997, the Board issued its
second Series of Bonds under the General Resolution, being its $9,920,000 aggregate principal
amount State College System Revenue Bonds (College Improvement Projects) 1997 Series A,
dated November 20, 1997 (collectively with the 1992 Bonds, the “Prior Bonds”);

             WHEREAS, as of the date of adoption of this Fourth Supplemental Resolution by
the Commission, no Bonds other than the Prior Bonds have been issued by the Commission;

               WHEREAS, pursuant to the Act, the Commission is authorized to issue certain
Additional Bonds to refund all or a portion of the Prior Bonds (the “Bonds To Be Refunded”)
and Costs of Issuance and otherwise to carry out its purposes under the Act;

              WHEREAS, the Commission deems it desirable and in keeping with its purposes
under the Act, to issue its Revenue Refunding Bonds (State College Facilities) 2003 Series B
(the “2003 Series B Bonds”), for the purposes of refunding the Bonds To Be Refunded and
paying Costs of Issuance of the 2003 Series B Bonds;

                WHEREAS, all of the requirements set forth in Section 2.03 of the General
Resolution for issuance of Bonds and in Section 2.04 of the General Resolution for issuance of
Additional Bonds in the manner and in the amount set forth herein have been met or will be met
prior to the date of issuance and delivery of the 2003 Series B Bonds;

               WHEREAS, the Commission therefore wishes to take all necessary actions to
issue the 2003 Series B Bonds for the purposes set forth herein;

                WHEREAS, there will be presented to the Chairman or Vice Chairman, the
following documents (the “Bond Documents”), to be executed in connection with the issuance
and sale of the 2003 Series B Bonds:

              (1)     A Bond Purchase Agreement to be dated the date of acceptance thereof by
       the Chairman or Vice Chairman of the Commission, by and between Salomon Smith
       Barney, Inc., Ferris, Baker Watts, Inc., and Crews and Associations, Inc., as
       representatives of the original purchasers of the 2003 Series B Bonds (collectively, the
       “Original Purchasers”) and the Commission, pursuant to which the 2003 Series B Bonds
       are proposed to be purchased; and

              (2)    A Continuing Disclosure Agreement (as defined herein), to be dated the
       Closing Date; and

               (3)     A Preliminary Official Statement (the “Preliminary Official Statement”),
       relating to the 2003 Series B Bonds (which when executed in final form as provided in
       Section 6.02 hereof, the “Official Statement”); and



                                              4

                                                                                                  87
                 (4)    A Tax Certificate (the “Tax Certificate”), to be dated the Closing Date;
          and

                 (5)    An Insurance Commitment; and

                 (6)    A Rule l5c-2-12 Certificate; and

                 (7)    An Escrow Agreement; and

                  (8)    Any other documents deemed necessary or desirable to aid or effectuate
          the issuance and sale of the 2003 Series B Bonds, including documents relating to hedge
          transactions and investments of the proceeds.

                WHEREAS, the Commission desires to take all steps necessary for the issuance
of the 2003 Series B Bonds and the refunding of the Bonds To Be Refunded at the earliest
practicable date;

               WHEREAS, the Commission wishes to delegate to the Chairman or Vice
Chairman, the authority to approve which of the Prior Bonds are to be refunded, the final terms
of the 2003 Series B Bonds, including the exact principal amount, interest rates, redemption
provisions, maturities, purchase price and other terms of the 2003 Series B Bonds, the terms and
provisions relating specifically to a Bond Insurance Policy and the final terms and provisions of
the Bond Documents, without the requirement of further official action by the Commission;

                WHEREAS, Section 10.01 of the General Resolution provides that the
Commission may adopt, execute and deliver a Supplemental Resolution without notice to or
consent of the Owners of Bonds to modify, alter, amend or supplement the General Resolution in
any manner which in the opinion of Bond Counsel does not materially adversely affect the
interest of the Owners of the Bonds or any Credit Provider; and

          NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE MEMBERS OF THE
HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION, AS FOLLOWS:

                                            ARTICLE I

                   DEFINITIONS AND OTHER PROVISIONS OF GENERAL
                 APPLICATION; DESIGNATION OF AUTHORIZED OFFICERS

                 Section 1.01. Definitions. All capitalized terms and definitions contained in the
 General Resolution shall, unless defined differently herein, have the same meanings herein, and
 in addition to the words and terms defined elsewhere in this Fourth Supplemental Resolution,
 the following words, terms or phrases shall have the following respective meanings all unless
 the context clearly indicates a different meaning:

                 “Authorized Officer” means the person designated pursuant to Section 1.04
hereof.



                                                 5

                                                                                                     88
              “Bond Documents” means the documents described in the 12th recital hereto.

             “Bond Insurance Policy” means the policy of municipal bond insurance insuring
the payment when due of the principal of and interest on the 2003 Series B Bonds as provided
therein.

              “Bond Insurer” means the insurance carrier which issues the Bond Insurance
Policy.

             “Bond Purchase Agreement” means the Bond Purchase Agreement between the
Commission and the Original Purchasers pertaining to the sale of the 2003 Series B Bonds.

              “Bond Year” means, with respect to the 2003 Series B Bonds, the period
commencing July 1 in each year and ending on June 30 of each subsequent calendar year during
the term of the 2003 Series B Bonds, except that the first Bond Year shall commence on the
Closing Date and end on June 30, 2003 (unless a different period is permitted or required by the
Code).
              “Bonds” means collectively, the 2003 Series B Bonds, the Prior Bonds other than
the Bonds To Be Refunded, and any other Additional Bonds or Refunding Bonds hereafter
issued pursuant to the General Resolution.

             “Certificate of Determination” means the certificate executed by the Chairman or
Vice Chairman setting forth the final terms and provisions of the Bonds, the Bond Purchase
Agreement and the Bond Documents as provided in Section 2.03 hereof.

               “Closing Date” means the date upon which the 2003 Series B Bonds are
delivered to the Original Purchasers upon payment of the purchase price set forth in the Bond
Purchase Agreement.

              “Continuing Disclosure Agreement” means a Continuing Disclosure Agreement
between the Commission and the Original Purchasers, to be dated the Closing Date.

               “Event of Default” means any one or more of those events set forth in Section
9.01 of the General Resolution.

              “Fourth Supplemental Resolution” means this Fourth Supplemental Resolution as
it may be amended or supplemented, and includes all exhibits and schedules thereto.

               “Escrow Trustee” means Bank One, West Virginia, National Association, or its
successors, designated as escrow trustee for the 2003 Series B Bonds.

               “2003 Series B Bonds” means the Commission's Revenue Refunding Bonds
(State College Facilities) 2003 Series B, in such aggregate principal amount (not to exceed
$40,000,000) as shall be set forth in the Certificate of Determination.




                                               6

                                                                                                   89
               “2003 Series B Escrow Fund” means the fund by that name established pursuant
to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “2003 Series B Costs of Issuance Fund” means the fund by that name established
pursuant to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “2003 Series B Interest Account” means the account by that name established in
the 2003 Series B Bond Fund pursuant to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “2003 Series B Principal Account” means the account by that name established in
the 2003 Series B Bond Fund pursuant to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “2003 Series B Redemption Account” means the account by that name
established pursuant to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “Official Statement” means the Official Statement to be dated the date of
execution of the Bond Purchase Agreement, prepared and distributed in connection with the sale
of the 2003 Series B Bonds and approved by the Commission.

                “Paying Agent” means such banking institution with offices in West Virginia or
its successors, designated as a paying agency or place of payment for the 2003 Series B Bonds in
the Certificate of Determination.

              “Preliminary Official Statement” means the Preliminary Official Statement to be
prepared and distributed in connection with the sale of the 2003 Series B Bonds.

               “Record Date” means 15 days before the interest payment dates of April 1 and
October 1.

               “Registrar” means such banking institution with offices in West Virginia or its
successors, designated as registrar for the 2003 Series B Bonds in the Certificate of
Determination.

                “Representation Letter” means the DTC Blanket Letter of Representations in form
satisfactory to DTC, previously delivered to DTC in connection with the issuance and delivery of
the 2003 Series B Bonds.

              “Resolution” means (unless the context clearly indicates otherwise) collectively,
the General Resolution and this Fourth Supplemental Resolution as they may be amended or
supplemented.

              “Tax Certificate” means the Tax Certificate of the Commission to be dated as of
the Closing Date, as it may be amended or supplemented.

               “Trustee” means such banking institution with offices in West Virginia or its
successors, designated as trustee for the 2003 Series B Bonds in the Certificate of Determination.



                                                7

                                                                                                     90
                Section 1.02. Interpretation. A. Any reference herein to the Commission, or any
officer thereof shall include those succeeding to their functions, duties or responsibilities
pursuant to or by operation of law or who are lawfully performing their functions.

               B.      Unless the context otherwise indicates, words importing the singular shall
include the plural and vice versa and the use of the neuter, masculine, or feminine gender is for
convenience only and shall be deemed to mean and include the neuter, masculine and feminine
gender.

              C.    Any terms not defined herein but defined in the General Resolution, shall
have the same meanings herein.

               D.     Headings or articles and sections herein and the table of contents hereof
are solely for convenience of reference, do not constitute apart hereof and shall not affect the
meaning, construction or effect hereof.

                E.     Words importing the redemption of a 2003 Series B Bond or the calling of
a 2003 Series B Bond for redemption do not mean or include the payment of a 2003 Series B
Bond at its stated maturity or the purchase of a 2003 Series B Bond.

                 Section 1.03. Designation of Authorized Officers. The Commission hereby
designates the Chancellor and the Director of Finance and Facilities as Authorized Officers of
the Commission with respect to the 2003 Series B Bonds. Each of such Authorized Officers
shall file a specimen of his signature with the Trustee.




                                               8

                                                                                                    91
                                           ARTICLE II

              AUTHORIZATION AND TERMS OF 2003 SERIES B BONDS

                Section 2.01. Authorization of 2003 Series B Bonds. In order to refund the
Bonds To Be Refunded and to pay Costs of Issuance thereof, the Commission hereby authorizes
the issuance of the 2003 Series B Bonds, which shall constitute a “Series of Bonds” and
“Additional Bonds” as such terms are defined in the General Resolution, and shall be issued and
sold as directed by the Commission in accordance herewith.

                Section 2.02. Terms. The 2003 Series B Bonds shall be issued in fully
registered form as herein provided, in denominations of $5,000 and integral multiples thereof, in
an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $40,000,000. The 2003 Series B Bonds shall be
numbered from R-1 upward in order of maturity. Interest accruing on the 2003 Series B Bonds
on and prior to the maturity date thereof shall be payable by check or draft mailed by the Paying
Agent to the Registered Owner thereof as of the applicable Record Date (15 days before the
interest payment dates of April 1 and October 1) at the address of such Registered Owner as it
appears on the registration books of the Commission maintained by the Registrar, or, at the
option of any Registered Owner of at least $1,000,000 in aggregate principal amount of Bonds,
by wire transfer in immediately available funds to the bank account number on file with the
Paying Agent on or prior to the applicable Record Date. Principal and premium, if any, shall be
paid when due upon presentation and surrender of this Bond for payment at the principal
corporate trust office of the Paying Agent in Charleston, West Virginia.

                 Section 2.03. Certificate of Determination. The Chairman or Vice Chairman
shall have the power and authority to execute and deliver the Certificate of Determination, which
may include, without limitation, provisions (i) fixing the aggregate principal amount of 2003
Series B Bonds to be issued, not to exceed $40,000,000, (ii) fixing the maturity schedule for the
2003 Series B Bonds, including the amounts of serial bonds and term bonds, such maturities to
be not after April 1, 2027, (iii) fixing interest rates or yields for such 2003 Series B Bonds, such
rates or yields not to exceed an average interest cost of six percent (6%) per annum, (iv) fixing
the amounts and times of mandatory redemption for the 2003 Series B Bonds, (v) fixing optional
redemption provisions for the 2003 Series B Bonds, including times and redemption prices (not
to exceed 102% of the principal amount), (vi) fixing the purchase price for the 2003 Series B
Bonds, which may include an underwriting and an original issue discount or premium, (vii)
dating such 2003 Series B Bonds, (viii) completing and finalizing the provisions of the Bond
Purchase Agreement and the other Bond Documents, (ix) completing and finalizing the terms of
the purchase of the Bond Insurance Policy, provided that the cost thereof does not exceed one
percent (1%) of the principal amount of the 2003 Series B Bonds, and (x) designating the
Trustee, Registrar and Paying Agent for the 2003 Series B Bonds.

                Section 2.04. Book Entry System for 2003 Series B Bonds.

              (a)     Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions of this Article II, the 2003
Series B Bonds shall initially be issued in the form of one fully-registered bond for the aggregate
principal amount of the 2003 Series B Bonds of each maturity, which 2003 Series B Bonds shall



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                                                                                                       92
be registered in the name of Cede & Co., as nominee of DTC. Except as provided in paragraph
(g) below, all of the 2003 Series B Bonds shall be registered in the registration books kept by the
Registrar in the name of Cede & Co., as nominee of DTC; provided that if DTC shall request that
the 2003 Series B Bonds be registered in the name of a different nominee, the Registrar shall
exchange all or any portion of the 2003 Series B Bonds for an equal aggregate principal amount
of 2003 Series B Bonds registered in the name of such nominee or nominees of DTC. No person
other than DTC or its nominee shall be entitled to receive from the Issuer or the Registrar either a
2003 Series B Bond or any other evidence of ownership of the 2003 Series B Bonds, or any right
to receive any payment in respect thereof unless DTC or its nominee shall transfer record
ownership of all or any portion of the 2003 Series B Bonds on the registration books maintained
by the Registrar, in connection with discontinuing the book entry system as provided in
paragraph (g) below or otherwise.

                (b)     So long as the 2003 Series B Bonds or any portion thereof are registered in
the name of DTC or any nominee thereof, all payments of the Principal or Redemption Price of
or interest on such 2003 Series B Bonds shall be made to DTC or its nominee in Federal funds
on the dates provided for such payments under this Resolution or as set forth in the 2003 Series
B Bonds. Each such payment to DTC or its nominee shall be valid and effective to fully
discharge all liability of the Issuer or the Registrar with respect to the Principal or Redemption
Price of or interest on the 2003 Series B Bonds to the extent of the sum or sums so paid. In the
event of the redemption of less than all of the 2003 Series B Bonds Outstanding of any maturity,
the Registrar shall not require surrender by DTC or its nominee of the 2003 Series B Bonds so
redeemed, but DTC (or its nominee) may retain such 2003 Series B Bonds and make an
appropriate notation on the 2003 Series B Bond certificate as to the amount of such partial
redemption; provided that DTC shall deliver to the Registrar, upon request, a written
confirmation of such partial redemption and thereafter the records maintained by the Registrar
shall be conclusive as to the amount of the 2003 Series B Bonds of such maturity which have
been redeemed.

                (c)    The Issuer and the Registrar may treat DTC (or its nominee) as the sole
and exclusive Owner of the 2003 Series B Bonds registered in its name for the purposes of
payment of the Principal or Redemption Price of or interest on the 2003 Series B Bonds,
selecting the 2003 Series B Bonds or portions thereof to be redeemed, giving any notice
permitted or required to be given to Bondholders under this Resolution, registering the transfer
of 2003 Series B Bonds, obtaining any consent or other action to be taken by Bondholders and
for all other purposes whatsoever; and neither the Issuer nor the Registrar shall be affected by
any notice to the contrary. Neither the Issuer nor the Registrar shall have any responsibility or
obligation to any participant in DTC, any person claiming a beneficial ownership interest in the
2003 Series B Bonds under or through DTC or any such participant, or any other person which is
not shown on the registration books of the Registrar as being a Bondholder, with respect to
either: (1) the 2003 Series B Bonds; or (2) the accuracy of any records maintained by DTC or
any such participant; or (3) the payment by DTC or any such participant of any amount in
respect of the Principal or Redemption Price of or interest on the 2003 Series B Bonds; or (4) any
notice which is permitted or required to be given to Bondholders under this Resolution; or (5) the
selection by DTC or any such participant of any person to receive payment in the event of a




                                                10

                                                                                                       93
partial redemption of the 2003 Series B Bonds; or (6) any consent given or other action taken by
DTC as Bondholder.

             (d)    So long as the 2003 Series B Bonds or any portion thereof are registered in
the name of DTC or any nominee thereof, all notices required or permitted to be given to the
Bondholders under this Resolution shall be given to DTC as provided in the Representation
Letter.

                (e)    In connection with any notice or other communication to be provided to
Bondholders pursuant to this Resolution by the Issuer or the Registrar with respect to any
consent or other action to be taken by Bondholders, DTC shall consider the date of receipt of
notice requesting such consent or other action as the record date for such consent or other action,
provided that the Issuer or the Registrar may establish a special record date for such consent or
other action. The Issuer or the Registrar shall give DTC notice of such special record date not
less than 15 calendar days in advance of such special record date to the extent possible.

                (f)     At or prior to settlement for the 2003 Series B Bonds, the Issuer and the
Registrar shall execute or signify their approval of the Representation Letter. Any successor
Registrar shall, in its written acceptance of its duties under this Resolution, agree to take any
actions necessary from time to time to comply with the requirements of the Representation
Letter.

                (g)     The book-entry system for registration of the ownership of the 2003 Series
B Bonds may be discontinued at any time if either: (1) DTC determines to resign as securities
depository for the 2003 Series B Bonds; or (2) the Issuer determines that continuation of the
system of book-entry transfers through DTC (or through a successor securities depository) is not
in the best interests of the Issuer. In either of such events (unless in the case described in clause
(2) above, the Issuer appoints a successor securities depository the 2003 Series B Bonds shall be
delivered in registered certificate form to such persons, and in such maturities and principal
amounts, as may be designated by DTC, but without any liability on the part of the Issuer or the
Registrar for the accuracy of such designation. Whenever DTC requests the Issuer and the
Registrar to do so, the Issuer and the Registrar shall cooperate with DTC in taking appropriate
action after reasonable notice to arrange for another securities depository to maintain custody of
certificates evidencing the 2003 Series B Bonds.

               Section 2.05. Form of 2003 Series B Bonds. The definitive 2003 Series B Bonds
shall be in substantially the form set forth in Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporated by
reference herein, with such necessary and appropriate omissions, insertions and variations as are
approved by those officers executing such 2003 Series B Bonds on behalf of the Commission.
Execution thereof by such officers shall constitute conclusive evidence of such approval.

              Section 2.06. 2003 Series B Bonds on Parity with Prior Bonds. The 2003 Series
B Bonds shall be on a parity with the Prior Bonds with respect to sources of and security for
payment and in all other respects.




                                                 11

                                                                                                        94
              Section 2 .07. Conditions Precedent to Delivery of 2003 Series B Bonds. The
2003 Series B Bonds shall be delivered upon receipt by the Registrar of the following:

                A.     A copy of the General Resolution and the Fourth Supplemental Resolution
certified by the Secretary of the Commission, pursuant to which the terms of the 2003 Series B
Bonds are specified;

                   B.   A Bond Counsel’s Opinion to the effect that (i) this Fourth Supplemental
Resolution has been duly and lawfully adopted and is in full force and effect; (ii) the General
Resolution has been duly and lawfully adopted and is valid and binding upon, and enforceable
against, the Commission (except to the extent that the enforceability thereof may be limited by
the operation of bankruptcy, insolvency and similar laws affecting rights and remedies of
creditors); (iii) the General Resolution creates the valid pledge which it purports to create of the
Revenues, and moneys and securities on deposit in any of the Funds established thereunder
(other than a Purchase Fund, if any) subject to the application thereof to the purposes and on the
conditions permitted by the General Resolution; and (iv) upon the execution and delivery
thereof, the 2003 Series B Bonds will have been duly and validly authorized and issued in
accordance with the General Resolution;

              C.   A written order as to the authentication, registration and delivery of the
2003 Series B Bonds and the application of the proceeds thereof, signed by an Authorized
Officer; and

               D.      A Certificate of the Commission to the effect that:

                       (i)    all payments into the respective funds and accounts provided for in
                the General Resolution and any Related Supplemental Resolution respecting
                Bonds theretofore issued and then Outstanding have been made in full to the date
                of issuance and delivery of the 2003 Series B Bonds and no Event of Default
                under the General Resolution or any Related Supplemental Resolution is now
                existing; and

                      (ii)   the Revenues of the type set forth in subsection (i) of the definition
                of “Revenues” in Section 1.02 of the General Resolution, collected by the
                Commission for the last Fiscal Year preceding the date of issuance of such
                Additional Bonds shall have not been not less than 120% of the largest amount
                of Debt Service due in any Fiscal Year thereafter on such Additional Bonds and
                any Bonds then Outstanding (other than Bonds to be refunded by such
                Additional Bonds) or;

                      (iii) (a) the Revenues (excluding proceeds of any Bonds and earnings
                thereon) collected by the Commission for the last Fiscal Year preceding the date
                of issuance of such Additional Bonds, plus Projected Revenues (as defined
                below) shall have been not less than 120% of the largest amount of Debt Service
                due in any Fiscal Year thereafter on such Additional Bonds and any Bonds then
                Outstanding (other than Bonds to be refunded by such Additional Bonds); (b) the



                                                12

                                                                                                       95
Revenues of the type set forth in subsection (i) of the definition “Revenues” in
Section 1.02 of the General Resolution collected by the Commission for the last
Fiscal Year preceding the date of issuance of such Additional Bonds shall have
been not less than 100% of the largest amount of Debt Service due in any Fiscal
Year thereafter on such Additional Bonds and any Bonds then Outstanding
(other than Bonds to be refunded by such Additional Bonds); and (c) Projected
Revenues have not been greater than 20% of the largest amount of Debt Service
due in any Fiscal Year thereafter on such Additional Bonds and any Bonds then
Outstanding (other than Bonds to be refunded by such Additional Bonds). For
the purposes of this subsection (iii), Projected Revenues may include any
Revenues which were not in effect or which were not pledged under the General
Resolution during the last Fiscal Year, but which have been adopted, charged
and pledged prior to or contemporaneously with the issuance of Additional
Bonds.




                              13

                                                                                   96
                                         ARTICLE III

                           PROVISIONS RELATING TO THE
                 2003 SERIES B BONDS REQUIRED BY BOND INSURER

               Section 3.01. Provisions Required by Bond Insurer. All provisions and terms
required by the Bond Insurer for the 2003 Series B Bonds shall be set forth separately in a
schedule to the Certificate of Determination. In the event any provision of the Certificate of
Determination, including such schedule relating to the Bond Insurance Policy, conflicts with any
terms and provisions of the Resolution, the terms and provisions of the Certificate of
Determination, including such schedule, shall control.




                                              14

                                                                                                   97
                                        ARTICLE IV

                       FUNDS AND ACCOUNTS; APPLICATION OF
                           2003 SERIES B BOND PROCEEDS

              Section 4.01. Funds and Accounts. (A) There are hereby created by the
Commission and ordered established with the Trustee the following funds and accounts in
connection with the 2003 Series B Bonds;

              (i)     2003 Series B Bond Fund, and therein;

                       (a)   2003 Series B Interest Account; and

                       (b)   2003 Series B Principal Account; and

                       (c)   2003 Series B Redemption Account.

                (B) There are hereby created by the Commission and ordered established with the
Trustee the following funds in connection with the 2003 Series B Bonds;

              (i)     2003 Series B Bond Proceeds Fund; and

              (ii)    2003 Series B Escrow Fund; and

              (iii)   2003 Series B Costs of Issuance Fund.

               Section 4.02. Application of 2003 Series B Bond Proceeds. The net proceeds of
the sale of the 2003 Series B Bonds shall initially be deposited in the 2003 Series B Bond
Proceeds Fund to be held by the Trustee. Thereafter, such proceeds or portions thereof shall be
applied by the Trustee as follows:

                     (i)     All amounts, if any, paid as accrued interest on the 2003 Series B
              Bonds from their date to the date of delivery of the 2003 Series B Bonds shall be
              deposited in the 2003 Series B Interest Account;

                      (ii)   A sum equal to the Costs of Issuance of the 2003 Series B Bonds
              shall be deposited in the 2003 Series B Costs of Issuance Fund;

                     (iii)   A sum equal to the premium for purchase of the Municipal Bond
              Insurance Policy, if any, shall be paid directly to the Insurer; and

                      (iv) The balance of the proceeds of the 2003 Series B Bonds shall be
               deposited in the 2003 Series B Escrow Fund.

              Section 4.03. Flow of Funds. So long as any 2003 Series B Bonds are
Outstanding, amounts deposited and to be deposited in the funds and accounts established by



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                                                                                                  98
Section 4.01 hereof shall be applied by the Trustee in the manner and order of priority as set
forth herein and in Article VII of the General Resolution.

                Section 4.04. Disbursements. The proceeds of the 2003 Series B Bonds
deposited in the 2003 Series B Escrow Fund shall be disbursed immediately to the Escrow
Trustee. The proceeds of the 2003 Series B Bonds deposited in the 2003 Series B Costs of
Issuance Fund with the Trustee shall be disbursed to the Escrow Trustee solely to pay the Costs
of Issuance of the 2003 Series B Bonds. The funds in the 2003 Series B Cost of Issuance Fund
shall be disbursed upon requisition by an Authorized Officer. Any funds remaining in the 2003
Series B Costs of Issuance Fund 180 days after the initial issuance of the 2003 Series B Bonds
shall be transferred to the 2003 Series B Optional Redemption Interest Account.

               Section 4.05. Arbitrage Covenant. Neither the Trustee nor the Commission shall
use or direct or permit the use of any moneys of the Commission in its possession or control in
any manner which would cause any 2003 Series B Bond to be an “arbitrage bond” within the
meaning of such term in Sections 103 and 148 of the Code.

                 Section 4.06. Tax Certificate. Notwithstanding any provision of the Resolution,
the Commission shall observe its covenants, representations and agreements contained in the Tax
Certificate. In the event any provision of the Resolution conflicts with any provision of the Tax
Certificate, the provisions of the Tax Certificate shall govern.




                                               16

                                                                                                    99
                                         ARTICLE V

                       GENERAL COVENANTS OF THE COMMISSION

               Section 5.01. General. Except to the extent amended or modified by Section 1.03
hereof, the covenants contained in Article VI of the General Resolution are hereby continued,
approved, ratified and confirmed, shall apply fully to the 2003 Series B Bonds, and are
incorporated herein by reference as a part hereof.

                Section 5.02. Covenants. All covenants, stipulations, obligations and agreements
of the Commission contained herein and contained in the Resolution shall be deemed to be the
special and limited covenants, stipulations, obligations and agreements of the Commission to the
full extent permitted by law, and such covenants, stipulations, obligations and agreements shall
be binding upon the Commission and its successors from time to time and upon any Commission
or body to which any powers or duties, affecting such covenants, stipulations, obligations and
agreements, shall be transferred by or in accordance with law. Except as otherwise provided
herein, all rights, powers and privileges conferred and duties and liabilities imposed upon the
Commission or the officials thereof by the provisions hereof and by the Resolution shall be
exercised or performed by the Commission or by such officers, Commission or body as may be
required or permitted by law to exercise such powers and to perform such duties.

                No covenant, stipulation, obligation or agreement herein contained or contained
in the 2003 Series B Bonds or the Bond Documents shall be deemed to be a covenant stipulation,
obligation or agreement of any officer, agent or employee of the Commission in his or her
individual capacity and neither the member of the Commission nor any officer executing the
2003 Series B Bonds shall be liable personally on the 2003 Series B Bonds or be subject to any
personal liability or accountability by reason of the issuance thereof.




                                              17

                                                                                                   100
                                            ARTICLE VI

                    APPROVAL OF DOCUMENTS AND APPOINTMENT
                                 OF FIDUCIARIES

                Section 6.01. Approval of Bond Documents. The Bond Documents shall be and
the same are hereby approved in all respects. The Chairman of Vice Chairman of the
Commission shall execute and deliver the Bond Documents with such terms and conditions as
may be approved by the Chairman or Vice Chairman. The Secretary of the Commission is
hereby authorized and directed to affix the seal of the Commission to the Bond Documents and
attest the same. The execution of the Bond Documents by said Chairman or Vice Chairman shall
be conclusive evidence of any approval required by this Section.

                 Section 6.02. Approval of Distribution of Preliminary Official Statement and
Official Statement. The distribution of the Preliminary Official Statement is hereby approved.
The Chairman, Vice Chairman or the Secretary is hereby authorized and directed to execute and
deliver a final Official Statement on behalf of the Commission, which shall be in substantially
the form of the preliminary official statement with such terms and conditions as may be required
to reflect the terms of the sale of the Bonds and as the Chairman, Vice Chairman or Secretary, as
the case may be, may approve. The execution of the Official Statement by the Chairman, Vice
Chairman or Secretary, as the case may be, shall be conclusive evidence of such approval.
Copies of the Official Statement are hereby authorized to be prepared and furnished to the
Original Purchasers for distribution. The distribution by the Original Purchasers of the
Preliminary Official Statement (which is a “deemed final” official statement in accordance with
SEC Rule 15c2-12), substantially in the form submitted to this meeting is hereby ratified and
approved.

               Section 6.03. Appointment of Fiduciaries. The Certificate of Determination shall
appoint and designate the Trustee, Registrar and Paying Agent for the 2003 Series B Bonds.

                Section 6.04. Continuing Disclosure Agreement. So long as any of the 2003
Series B Bonds remain Outstanding, the Commission shall provide certain annual financial
information and material events notices regarding the Commission as described in paragraph
(b)(5)(i) of SEC Rule 15c2-12 promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission. The
Issuer authorizes and directs the Director of Finance and Facilities to take all actions with respect
to this undertaking as prescribed, by the Continuing Disclosure Agreement.




                                                 18

                                                                                                        101
                                          ARTICLE VII

                                       MISCELLANEOUS

               Section 7.01. General Resolution. This Fourth Supplemental Resolution is
supplemental to the General Resolution and all provisions of said General Resolution, unless
clearly inapplicable or altered hereby, shall apply to the 2003 Series B Bonds, this Fourth
Supplemental Resolution and matters relating thereto as if set forth verbatim herein. In the event
of any conflict between the General Resolution and this Fourth Supplemental Resolution, this
Fourth Supplemental Resolution shall control. This Fourth Supplemental Resolution, the General
Resolution and the Certificate of Determination, to the extent applicable, shall and must be read
as a single document and shall supersede all prior resolutions, orders and understandings, both
written and oral, by the Commission, with respect to the subject matter hereof.

                Section 7.02. Incidental Action. The execution and delivery of the 2003 Series B
Bonds and the execution, delivery and due performance of the Bond Documents and the Official
Statement are hereby in all respects approved, authorized, ratified and confirmed including all
acts heretofore taken in connection with the issuance of the 2003 Series B Bonds, and it is hereby
ordered that the Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary and other members and officers of the
Commission execute and deliver such other documents, certificates, agreements and instruments,
and take such other Action as may be required or desirable to carry out the purposes of this
Fourth Supplemental Resolution, the 2003 Series B Bonds and the aforesaid instruments,
including, but limited to, execution and delivery or any commitment for bond insurance.

               Section 7.03. Severability. If any one or more sections, clauses, sentences or
parts hereof shall for any reason be questioned in any court of competent jurisdiction and shall be
adjudged unconstitutional or invalid, such judgment shall not affect, impair or invalidate the
remaining provisions hereof, or the 2003 Series B Bonds issued pursuant hereto, but shall be
confined to the specific sections, clauses, sentences and parts so adjudged.

              Section 7.04. Governing Law. This Fourth Supplemental Resolution and the
2003 Series B Bonds are contracts made under the laws of the State of West Virginia and shall
be governed and construed in accordance with such laws.

               Section 7.05. Notices. (A) Unless otherwise expressly specified or permitted by
the terms hereof, all notices, consents or other communications required or permitted hereunder
shall, be deemed sufficiently given or served if given in writing, mailed by registered or certified
mail, postage prepaid or by overnight courier service and addressed as follows:

                       (i)     IF TO THE COMMISSION, ADDRESSED TO:

                               West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
                               1018 Kanawha Boulevard, East
                               Charleston, West Virginia 25301
                               Attention: Director of Finance and Facilities




                                                19

                                                                                                       102
                      (ii)    IF TO THE TRUSTEE, REGISTRAR OR PAYING AGENT
                              ADDRESSED TO:

                              Bank One, West Virginia, National Association
                              707 Virginia Street E.
                              Charleston, West Virginia 25301

                      (iii)   IF TO THE OWNER OF A 2003 SERIES B BOND,
                              ADDRESSED TO: Such Holder at the address shown
                              on the books of the Registrar kept pursuant hereto.

                      (iv)    IF TO THE ORIGINAL PURCHASERS, ADDRESSED TO:

                              Salomon Smith Barney, Inc.
                              500 Lee Street, East
                              Suite 300
                              Charleston, WV 25301

                              Ferris, Baker Watts, Inc.
                              100 Laidley Tower
                              Charleston, WV 25301

                              Crews & Associates, Inc.
                              300 Summers Street, Suite 930
                              Charleston, WV 25301

                      (v)     IF TO BOND INSURER, ADDRESSED TO: As its address may
                              appear in the Bond Insurance Policy


                (B)    The Commission, the Trustee, the Registrar, the Paying Agent, the
Original Purchasers or the Bond Insurer may from time to time by notice in writing to the others
designate a different address or addresses for notice hereunder.

              (C)    In connection with any consent required to be obtained from any Owner of
2003 Series B Bonds, the Commission shall establish a record date to determine the ownership of
any 2003 Series B Bonds for purposes of obtaining such consent, and shall give Depository Trust
Company at least 15 calendar days advance notice of the record date so established.

               (D)    Any notice required to be given by the Commission pursuant to any
provision of the Resolution shall also be given to the Bond Insurer.

               Section 7.06. Binding Effect. This Fourth Supplemental Resolution shall inure to
the benefit of and shall be binding upon the Commission and its respective successors and
assigns subject to the limitations contained herein.




                                               20

                                                                                                   103
              Section 7.07. Effective Date. This Fourth Supplemental Resolution shall take
effect immediately upon adoption.

             Adopted this 21st day of February, 2003.


                                          __________________________________________
                                          Chairman


                                          _________________________________________
                                          Secretary




243389




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                                                                                             104
                                         EXHIBIT A

                             FORM OF 2003 SERIES B BOND

                            UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
                              STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
                       HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION.
                            REVENUE REFUNDING BOND
                                (State College Facilities)
                                      2003 Series B

No. R-________                                                                     $________

INTEREST RATE                     MATURITY DATE              BOND DATE             CUSIP NO.

_______________                   ________________           ____________          __________

REGISTERED OWNER:             Cede & Co.

PRINCIPAL AMOUNT:             $_______________________________

        KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS that the HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY
COMMISSION (the “Commission”), an agency of the state of the State of West Virginia (the
“State”), created and existing under the Constitution and laws of the State, for value received,
hereby acknowledges itself obligated to, and promises to pay, but only out of the sources pledged
for that purpose as hereinafter provided, and not otherwise, to the Registered Owner stated
above, or registered assigns, on the Maturity Date stated above, the Principal Amount stated
above, and to pay interest on the unpaid balance of said Principal Amount from the Interest
Payment Date (as described below) preceding the date of authentication hereof or, if
authenticated after the Record Date (as hereinafter defined) but prior to the applicable Interest
Payment Date or on said Interest Payment Date, from said Interest Payment Date or, if no
interest has been paid, from the Bond Date stated above, at the Interest Rate per annum stated
above, on April 1, 2003, and semiannually thereafter on April 1 and March 1 of each year (each
an “Interest Payment Date”), until maturity or until the date fixed for redemption if this Bond is
called for prior redemption and payment on such date is provided for. Capitalized terms used
and not defined herein shall have the meanings ascribed thereto in the hereinafter described
Resolution.

        Interest accruing on this Bond on and prior to the Maturity Date hereof shall be payable
by check or draft mailed by __________, as paying agent (in such capacity, the “Paying Agent”),
to the Registered Owner hereof as of the applicable Record Date (15 days before the interest
payment dates of April 1 and October 1) at the address of such Registered Owner as it appears on
the registration books of the Commission maintained by      ____________, as registrar (in such
capacity, the “Registrar”), or, at the option of any Registered Owner of at least $1,000,000 in
aggregate principal amount of Bonds, by wire transfer in immediately available funds to the bank
account number on file with the Paying Agent on or prior to the applicable Record Date.



                                               22

                                                                                                     105
Principal and premium, if any, shall be paid when due upon presentation and surrender of this
Bond for payment at the principal corporate trust office of the Paying Agent in Charleston, West
Virginia.

        This Bond is one of an issue of a Series of Bonds in the aggregate principal amount of not
to exceed $40,000,000 (the “Bonds”) authorized and issued to provide funds to be expended,
together with other moneys available therefor, for refunding of certain outstanding revenue
bonds issued by the predecessor of the Commission and paying Costs of Issuance of the 2003
Series B Bonds, all pursuant to a General Resolution adopted by the Commission on September
9, 1992, and an Fourth Supplemental Resolution adopted by the Commission on February 21,
2003 (collectively, the “Resolution”). The Bonds are issued under the authority of and in full
compliance with the Constitution and statutes of the State of West Virginia, including
particularly, Chapter 18, Articles 12B and Chapter 18B, Articles 1, 2 and 10 of the West Virginia
Code of 1931, as amended, and Refunding Act (collectively, the “Act”).

         This Bond and all Bonds of this issue are payable solely, equally and ratably from the
Revenues (as such term is defined in the Resolution) on a parity in all respects with the Prior
Bonds described below. Reference is hereby made to the Resolution as the same may be further
amended and supplemented from time to time, for a description of the rights, limitations of
rights, obligations, duties and immunities of the Commission and the Registered Owners of the
Bonds and any subsequently issued Additional Bonds. Certified copies of the Resolution are on
file at the office of the Commission in the City of Charleston, West Virginia.

        This Bond is a special obligation of the Commission, payable together with the Prior
Bonds hereinafter described and any Additional Bonds which may hereafter be issued, solely
from the sources pledged under the Resolution. The bonds of the series of which this Bond is
one, as to both principal and interest, shall not constitute a debt or a pledge of the faith and credit
or taxing power of the State of West Virginia or of any county, municipality or any other
political subdivision of said State, and the owners thereof shall have no right to have taxes levied
by the Legislature or the taxing authority of any county, municipality or any other political
subdivision of said State for the payment of the principal thereof or interest thereon, but the
Bonds, together with any Additional Bonds which may subsequently be issued on a parity
therewith, shall be payable equally and ratably solely from the sources pledged under the
resolution.

      The Bonds are issued on a parity in all respects with the Commission’s outstanding “Prior
Bonds” (as defined in said Fourth Supplemental Resolution) and other Additional Bonds which
may hereafter be issued pursuant to the General Resolution.

       The Bonds of this issue are subject to redemption prior to, their stated maturity dates, as
provided in the Resolution and as set forth in the following lettered paragraphs:

        The Bonds maturing on ________, (the “Term Bonds”), are subject to mandatory
redemption prior to maturity in part at a Redemption Price equal to 100% of the principal amount
thereof, plus accrued interest to the Mandatory Redemption Date, beginning on _____________




                                                  23

                                                                                                          106
respectively, for the Term Bonds, and on each ___________1 thereafter, in annual principal
amounts as follows:

               For the Term Bonds maturing on _________________:

                              Year                           Amount



               For the Term Bonds maturing on ________________:

                              Year                           Amount



               For the Term Bonds maturing on _________________:

                              Year                          Amount




       The principal amount of the Bonds delivered to or purchased by the Paying Agent shall
reduce pro tanto the principal amount of such series of Term Bonds to be redeemed on the
Mandatory Redemption Date with respect to such maturity next following such delivery or
purchase.

       Beginning on ___________, the Bonds maturing on and after __________, shall be
subject to redemption prior to maturity, at the option of the Issuer, in whole, or in part, on any
Business Day, by series and in order of maturity selected by the Issuer and by lot within a
maturity in multiples of $5,000, at the Redemption Prices (expressed as a percentage of the
principal amount to be redeemed) set forth below, plus accrued interest to the date fixed for
redemption:

                       Redemption Periods
                        (Dates Inclusive)                       Redemption Prices




       In the event of any redemption of less than all outstanding Bonds, the maturities to be
redeemed shall be selected by the Registrar at the direction of the Commission, and Bonds to be
redeemed shall be selected by lot within a maturity, or in such other manner deemed appropriate
by the Registrar. If less than all the Bonds are to be redeemed, the Bonds to be redeemed shall



                                               24

                                                                                                     107
be identified by reference to the Series designation, date of issue, CUSIP numbers and maturity
dates. Notice of the call for any redemption, unless waived by the Registered Owner, shall be
given by the Registrar, by mailing a redemption notice, postage prepaid, at least 30 days and not
more than 60 days prior to the date fixed for redemption to the Registered Owner of any Bond or
portions of Bonds to be redeemed in whole or in part at the address shown on the registration
books of the Commission maintained by the Registrar, for registration and transfer of the Bonds
under the Resolution, and as otherwise prescribed in the Resolution, provided, however, that
failure to give such notice by mailing, or any defect therein, shall not affect the validity of any
proceedings for the redemption of Bonds.

        The holder of this Bond shall have no right to enforce the provisions of the Resolution or
to institute an action to enforce the covenants thereof, or to take any action with respect to a
default hereof or to institute, appear in or defend any suit or other proceedings with respect
thereto, except as provided in the Resolution.

       Additional Bonds may be issued under the Resolution, and reference is made to the
Resolution with respect to the requirements for the issuance of Additional Bonds which shall be
equally and ratably secured under the Resolution with the Bonds.

       Modifications or amendments of the Resolution may be made to the extent and in the
circumstances permitted by the Resolution to which reference is hereby made.

        This Bond must be registered in accordance with the provisions hereof, and may, singly
or with other Bonds of this issue, be surrendered to the Registrar and exchanged for other fully
registered bonds, upon the terms set forth in the Resolution. Neither the Commission nor the
Registrar shall be required to register or transfer this Bond or exchange other Bonds for this bond
during the period beginning on a Record Date and ending on an Interest Payment Date.

       IT IS HEREBY FURTHER CERTIFIED, RECITED AND DECLARED that all acts,
conditions and things required to exist, to happen and to be performed precedent to and in the
issuance of this Bond have existed, have happened and have been performed in due form, time
and manner as required by law.

        All provisions of the Resolution and the statutes under which this Bond is issued shall be
deemed to be a part of the contract evidenced by this Bond to the same extent as if written fully
herein.




                                                25

                                                                                                      108
                 IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, the Commission has caused this Bond to be
executed by and on its behalf by the manual or facsimile signature of the Authorized Officer of
the Commission, and has caused this Bond to be authenticated by the manual signature of an
authorized officer of the Registrar, without which authentication this Bond shall not be valid nor
entitled to the benefits of the Resolution, all as of the Bond Date stated above.



                                       WEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY
                                       COMMISSION



                                          By: ______________________________________
                                              Its: Authorized Officer



                                       BANK ONE, WEST VIRGINIA, NATIONAL
                                       ASSOCIATION



                                            By: ______________________________________
                                                Its: Authorized Officer




                                               26

                                                                                                     109
                    REGISTRAR’S AUTHENTICATION CERTIFICATE

               The undersigned Registrar hereby certifies that this is one of the 2003 Series B
Bonds described in the within-mentioned Resolution and has been duly registered in the name of
the Registered Owner set forth above, as of the date set forth below. Attached hereto is the
complete text of the opinion of Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC, bond counsel, signed originals
of which are on file with the Registrar, delivered and dated on the date of the original delivery of
and payment for such Bonds.

               Date of Authentication: ____________________________________

                                         ___________________________________, as Registrar



                                          By: _____________________________________
                                              Its Authorized Officer




                                                27

                                                                                                       110
                                STATEMENT OF INSURANCE

               ________ Insurance Corporation (the “Insurer”) has issued a policy containing
the following provisions, such policy being on file at (Trustee's Name and Address).

                The Insurer, in consideration of the payment of the premium and subject to the
terms of this policy, hereby unconditionally and irrevocably guarantees to any owner, as
hereinafter defined, of the following described obligations, the full and complete payment
required to be made by or on behalf of the Issuer to (Trustee’s Name) or its successor (the
“Paying Agent”) of an amount equal to (i) the principal of (either the stated maturity or by any
advancement of maturity pursuant to a mandatory sinking fund payment) and interest on the
Obligations (as that term is defined below) as such payments shall become due but shall not be
so paid (except that in the event of any acceleration of the due date of such principal by reason
of mandatory or optional redemption or acceleration resulting from default or otherwise, other
than any advancement of maturity pursuant to a mandatory sinking fund payment, the payments
guaranteed hereby shall be made in such amounts and at such times as such payments of
principal would have been due had there not been any such acceleration); and (ii) the
reimbursement of any such payment which is subsequently recovered from any owner pursuant
to a final judgment by a court of competent jurisdiction that such payment constitutes an
avoidable preference to such owner within the meaning of any applicable bankruptcy law. The
amounts referred to in causes (i) and (ii) of the preceding sentence shall be referred to herein
collectively as the “Insured Amounts.” “Obligations” shall mean:


                                     State of West Virginia
                              Higher Education Policy Commission
                                  Revenue Refunding Bonds
                                    (State College Facilities)
                                          2003 Series B


Upon receipt of telephonic or telegraphic notice, such notice subsequently confined in writing by
registered or certified mail, or upon receipt of written notice by registered or certified mail, by
the Insurer from the Paying Agent or any owner of an Obligation the payment of an Insured
Amount for which is then due, that such required payment has not been made, the Insurer on the
due date of such payment or within one business day after receipt of notice of such nonpayment,
whichever is later, will make a deposit of funds, in an account with ____________, or its
successor, sufficient for the payment of any such Insured Amounts which are then due. Upon
presentment and surrender of such Obligations or presentment of such other proof of ownership
of the Obligations, together with any appropriate instruments of assignments to evidence the
assignment of the Insured Amounts due on the Obligations as are paid by the Insurer, and
appropriate instruments to effect the appointment of the Insurer as agent for such owners of the
Obligations in any legal proceeding related to payment of Insured Amounts on the Obligations,
such instruments being in a form satisfactory to __________________, shall disburse to such
owners or the Paying Agent payment of the Insured Amounts due on such Obligations, less any
amount held by the Paying Agent for the payment of such Insured Amounts and legally available



                                                28

                                                                                                      111
therefor. This policy does not insure against loss of any prepayment premium which may at any
time be payable with respect to any Obligation.

                As used herein, the term “owner” shall mean the registered owner of any
Obligation as indicated in the books maintained by the Paying Agent, the Issuer, or any designee
of the Issuer for such purpose. The term owner shall not include the Issuer or any party whose
agreement with the Issuer constitutes the underlying security for the Obligations.

               Any service of process on the Insurer may be made to the Insurer at its offices
located at ________________ and such service of process shall be valid and binding.

               This policy is non-cancellable for any reason. The premium on this policy is not
refundable for any reason including the payment prior to maturity of the Obligations.




                                              29

                                                                                                   112
                                         ASSIGNMENT

Social Security or Other Identifying Number of Assignee
______________________________________________________________________________



                 FOR VALUE RECEIVED, the undersigned hereby sells, assigns and transfers
unto__________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
____________________________the within Bond and does hereby irrevocably constitute and
appoint
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
_____ to transfer the said Bond on the books kept for registration thereof with full power of
substitution in the premises.

               Dated: ________________, _______.




_____________________________________________

SIGNATURE GUARANTEED:


____________________________________________
(Bank, Trust Company or Finn)


____________________________________________
(Authorized Officer)

              NOTICE: The Assignor's signature to this Assignment must correspond with the
name as it appears upon the face of the within Bond in every particular, without alteration or any
change whatever.




                                               30

                                                                                                     113
______________________________________________________________________________




                   EIGHTH SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTION


                                  Authorizing


                        STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
                 HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                          Revenue Refunding Bonds
                            (University Facilities)
                               2003 Series A



                           Adopted: February 21, 2003



______________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                 114
                                        STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
                                 HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                                         Revenue Refunding Bonds
                                           (University Facilities)
                                              2003 Series A

                                     EIGHTH SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTION

                                                          Table of Contents


                                                                                                                                          Page
                                     ARTICLE I
                   DEFINITIONS AND OTHER PROVISIONS OF GENERAL
                 APPLICATION; [AMENDMENTS TO GENERAL RESOLUTION]

Section 1.01. Definitions.................................................................................................................6
Section 1.02. Interpretation.............................................................................................................8
Section 1.03. Designation of Authorized Officers..........................................................................9

                                     ARTICLE II
                    AUTHORIZATION AND TERMS OF 2003 SERIES A BONDS

Section 2.01.       Authorization of 2003 Series A Bonds ...................................................................10
Section 2.02.       Terms ......................................................................................................................10
Section 2.03.       Certificate of Determination ...................................................................................10
Section 2.04.       Book Entry System for 2003 Series A Bonds.........................................................10
Section 2.05.       Form of 2003 Series A Bonds.................................................................................12
Section 2.06.       2003 Series A Bonds on Parity with Prior Bonds...................................................12
Section 2.07.       Conditions Precedent to Delivery of 2003 Series A Bonds....................................12

                                  ARTICLE III
            PROVISIONS RELATING TO THE 2003 SERIES A BONDS REQUIRED
                               BY BOND INSURER

Section 3.01. Provisions Required by Bond Insurer .....................................................................15

                             ARTICLE IV
    FUNDS AND ACCOUNTS; APPLICATION OF 2003 SERIES A BOND PROCEEDS

Section 4.01.       Funds and Accounts................................................................................................16
Section 4.02.       Application of 2003 Series A Bond Proceeds.........................................................16
Section 4.03.       Flow of Funds .........................................................................................................16
Section 4.04.       Disbursements.........................................................................................................17
Section 4.05.       Arbitrage Covenant.................................................................................................17
Section 4.06.       Tax Certificate ........................................................................................................17




                                                                                                                                                     115
                                          ARTICLE V
                             GENERAL COVENANTS OF THE COMMISSION

Section 5.01. General....................................................................................................................18
Section 5.02. Covenants................................................................................................................18

                               ARTICLE VI
           APPROVAL OF DOCUMENTS AND APPOINTMENT OF FIDUCIARIES

Section 6.01. Approval of Bond Documents ................................................................................19
Section 6.02. Approval of Distribution of Preliminary Official Statement
              and Official Statement ............................................................................................19
Section 6.03. Appointment of Fiduciaries ....................................................................................19
Section 6.04. Continuing Disclosure Agreement..........................................................................19

                                                         ARTICLE VII
                                                       MISCELLANEOUS

Section 7.01.       General Resolution..................................................................................................20
Section 7.02.       Incidental Action.....................................................................................................20
Section 7.03.       Severability .............................................................................................................20
Section 7.04.       Governing Law .......................................................................................................20
Section 7.05.       Notices ....................................................................................................................20
Section 7.06.       Binding Effect.........................................................................................................21
Section 7.07.       Effective Date .........................................................................................................22

Exhibit A – Form of 2003 Series A Bond




                                                                       ii

                                                                                                                                                     116
                              STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
                       HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                               Revenue Refunding Bonds
                                 (University Facilities)
                                    2003 Series A

                     EIGHTH SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTION OF THE
                       HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION

               SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE
               ISSUANCE OF NOT TO EXCEED $80,000,000
               AGGREGATE    PRINCIPAL   AMOUNT       OF   THE
               COMMISSION’S   REVENUE    REFUNDING      BONDS
               (UNIVERSITY FACILITIES) 2003 SERIES A; AND
               SUPPLEMENTING THE GENERAL RESOLUTION OF THE
               COMMISSION ADOPTED SEPTEMBER 9, 1992.

                WHEREAS, the University of West Virginia Board of Trustees (the “Board”) on
September 9, 1992, adopted a General Resolution (the “General Resolution”) pursuant to which
it is authorized to issue one or more series of its revenue bonds (the “Bonds”);

                WHEREAS, the Higher Education Policy Commission (the “Commission”) is an
agency of the State of West Virginia (the “State”), is the successor to the Board and is
empowered and authorized to issue bonds pursuant to the Act, among other things, in furtherance
of the public purposes as found and determined by the Legislature of West Virginia as set forth
in Section 5 of the Act, to refund the Bonds To Be Refunded;

              WHEREAS, all capitalized terms used herein and not otherwise defined shall
have the meanings ascribed thereto in the General Resolution;

               WHEREAS, the General Resolution establishes the basic provisions regarding the
structure of and security for all Bonds to be issued thereunder, and further provides that each
Series of Bonds to be issued from time to time is to be individually authorized by a Supplemental
Resolution setting forth the principal amount of such Series of Bonds, the terms and provisions
of such Series of Bonds, provisions required by any Credit Provider for such Series of Bonds and
any other provisions which may be specific to such Series of Bonds;

              WHEREAS, pursuant to the First Supplemental Resolution (the “First
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on September 9, 1992, the Board issued its first
Series of Bonds under the General Resolution, being its $101,505,000 aggregate principal
amount State University System Revenue Refunding Bonds, Series 1992, dated November 1,
1992 (the “1992 Bonds”);

             WHEREAS, pursuant to the Second Supplemental Resolution (the “Second
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on January 15, 1993, the Board made a minor



                                               3

                                                                                                    117
amendment to the First Supplemental Resolution, ratifying a change of the date of the Prior
Bonds from September 1, 1992 to November 1, 1992;

             WHEREAS, pursuant to the Third Supplemental Resolution (the “Third
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on February 23, 1996, the Board issued its
Revenue Refunding Bonds, Series 1996 (Marshall University Library/Information Center) (the
“1996 Bonds”);

             WHEREAS, pursuant to the Fourth Supplemental Resolution (the “Fourth
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on October 31, 1997, the Board issued its
Revenue Refunding Bonds (University Improvement Projects) 1997 Series A (the “1997
Bonds”);

               WHEREAS, pursuant to the Fifth Supplemental Resolution (the “Fifth
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on April 3, 1998, the Board issued its
University System Revenue Bonds (West Virginia University Projects), 1998 Series A, dated
April 1, 1998 (the “1998 Bonds”);

              WHEREAS, pursuant to the Sixth Supplemental Resolution (the “Sixth
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on May 22, 2000, the Board issued its
University System Revenue Bonds (West Virginia University Projects) 2000 Series A (the “2000
Series A Bonds”);

                WHEREAS, pursuant to the Seventh Supplemental Resolution (the “Seventh
Supplemental Resolution”) adopted by the Board on May 22, 2000, the Board issued its
University System Revenue Bonds (Marshall University Medical Center) 2000 Series B (the
“2000 Series B Bonds” and collectively with the bond issues described in the preceding six
recitals, the “Prior Bonds”);

             WHEREAS, as of the date of adoption of this Eighth Supplemental Resolution by
the Commission, no Bonds other than the Prior Bonds have been issued by the Commission;

               WHEREAS, pursuant to the Act, the Commission is authorized to issue certain
Additional Bonds to refund all or a portion of the Prior Bonds (the “Bonds To Be Refunded”)
and Costs of Issuance and otherwise to carry out its purposes under the Act;

               WHEREAS, the Commission deems it desirable and in keeping with its purposes
under the Act, to issue its Revenue Refunding Bonds (University Facilities) 2003 Series A (the
“2003 Series A Bonds”), for the purposes of refunding the Bonds To Be Refunded and paying
Costs of Issuance of the 2003 Series A Bonds;

                WHEREAS, all of the requirements set forth in Section 2.03 of the General
Resolution for issuance of Bonds and in Section 2.04 of the General Resolution for issuance of
Additional Bonds in the manner and in the amount set forth herein have been met or will be met
prior to the date of issuance and delivery of the 2003 Series A Bonds;




                                              4

                                                                                                 118
               WHEREAS, the Commission therefore wishes to take all necessary actions to
issue the 2003 Series A Bonds for the purposes set forth herein;

                WHEREAS, there will be presented to the Chairman or Vice Chairman, the
following documents (the “Bond Documents”), to be executed in connection with the issuance
and sale of the 2003 Series A Bonds:

              (1)     A Bond Purchase Agreement to be dated the date of acceptance thereof by
       the Chairman or Vice Chairman of the Commission, by and between Salomon Smith
       Barney, Inc., Ferris, Baker Watts, Inc., and Crews and Associations, Inc., as
       representatives of the original purchasers of the 2003 Series A Bonds (collectively, the
       “Original Purchasers”) and the Commission, pursuant to which the 2003 Series A Bonds
       are proposed to be purchased; and

              (2)    A Continuing Disclosure Agreement (as defined herein), to be dated the
       Closing Date; and

               (3)     A Preliminary Official Statement (the “Preliminary Official Statement”),
       relating to the 2003 Series A Bonds (which when executed in final form as provided in
       Section 6.02 hereof, the “Official Statement”); and

              (4)     A Tax Certificate (the “Tax Certificate”), to be dated the Closing Date;
       and

              (5)     An Insurance Commitment; and

              (6)     A Rule l5c-2-12 Certificate; and

              (7)     An Escrow Agreement; and

               (8)    Any other documents deemed necessary or desirable to aid or effectuate
       the issuance and sale of the 2003 Series A Bonds, including documents relating to hedge
       transactions and investments of the proceeds.

                WHEREAS, the Commission desires to take all steps necessary for the issuance
of the 2003 Series A Bonds and the refunding of the Bonds To Be Refunded at the earliest
practicable date;

               WHEREAS, the Commission wishes to delegate to the Chairman or Vice
Chairman, the authority to approve which of the Prior Bonds are to be refunded, the final terms
of the 2003 Series A Bonds, including the exact principal amount, interest rates, redemption
provisions, maturities, purchase price and other terms of the 2003 Series A Bonds, the terms and
provisions relating specifically to a Bond Insurance Policy and the final terms and provisions of
the Bond Documents, without the requirement of further official action by the Commission;




                                               5

                                                                                                    119
                WHEREAS, Section 10.01 of the General Resolution provides that the
Commission may adopt, execute and deliver a Supplemental Resolution without notice to or
consent of the Owners of Bonds to modify, alter, amend or supplement the General Resolution in
any manner which in the opinion of Bond Counsel does not materially adversely affect the
interest of the Owners of the Bonds or any Credit Provider; and

          NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE MEMBERS OF THE
HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION, AS FOLLOWS:

                                           ARTICLE I

                 DEFINITIONS AND OTHER PROVISIONS OF GENERAL
               APPLICATION; DESIGNATION OF AUTHORIZED OFFICERS

                 Section 1.01. Definitions. All capitalized terms and definitions contained in the
 General Resolution shall, unless defined differently herein, have the same meanings herein, and
 in addition to the words and terms defined elsewhere in this Eighth Supplemental Resolution,
 the following words, terms or phrases shall have the following respective meanings all unless
 the context clearly indicates a different meaning:

               “Authorized Officer” means the person designated pursuant to Section 1.04
hereof.

               “Bond Documents” means the documents described in the 17th recital hereto.

             “Bond Insurance Policy” means the policy of municipal bond insurance insuring
the payment when due of the principal of and interest on the 2003 Series A Bonds as provided
therein.

               “Bond Insurer” means the insurance carrier which issues the Bond Insurance
Policy.

             “Bond Purchase Agreement” means the Bond Purchase Agreement between the
Commission and the Original Purchasers pertaining to the sale of the 2003 Series A Bonds.

              “Bond Year” means, with respect to the 2003 Series A Bonds, the period
commencing July 1 in each year and ending on June 30 of each subsequent calendar year during
the term of the 2003 Series A Bonds, except that the first Bond Year shall commence on the
Closing Date and end on June 30, 2003 (unless a different period is permitted or required by the
Code).
              “Bonds” means collectively, the 2003 Series A Bonds, the Prior Bonds other than
the Bonds To Be Refunded, and any other Additional Bonds or Refunding Bonds hereafter
issued pursuant to the General Resolution.




                                                6

                                                                                                     120
             “Certificate of Determination” means the certificate executed by the Chairman or
Vice Chairman setting forth the final terms and provisions of the Bonds, the Bond Purchase
Agreement and the Bond Documents as provided in Section 2.03 hereof.

               “Closing Date” means the date upon which the 2003 Series A Bonds are
delivered to the Original Purchasers upon payment of the purchase price set forth in the Bond
Purchase Agreement.

              “Continuing Disclosure Agreement” means a Continuing Disclosure Agreement
between the Commission and the Original Purchasers, to be dated the Closing Date.

               “Event of Default” means any one or more of those events set forth in Section
9.01 of the General Resolution.

              “Eighth Supplemental Resolution” means this Eighth Supplemental Resolution as
it may be amended or supplemented, and includes all exhibits and schedules thereto.

               “Escrow Trustee” means Bank One, West Virginia, National Association, or its
successors, designated as escrow trustee for the 2003 Series A Bonds.

               “2003 Series A Bonds” means the Commission's Revenue Refunding Bonds
(University Facilities) 2003 Series A, in such aggregate principal amount (not to exceed
$80,000,000) as shall be set forth in the Certificate of Determination.

               “2003 Series A Escrow Fund” means the fund by that name established pursuant
to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “2003 Series A Costs of Issuance Fund” means the fund by that name established
pursuant to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “2003 Series A Interest Account” means the account by that name established in
the 2003 Series A Bond Fund pursuant to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “2003 Series A Principal Account” means the account by that name established in
the 2003 Series A Bond Fund pursuant to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “2003 Series A Redemption Account” means the account by that name
established pursuant to Section 4.01 hereof.

               “Official Statement” means the Official Statement to be dated the date of
execution of the Bond Purchase Agreement, prepared and distributed in connection with the sale
of the 2003 Series A Bonds and approved by the Commission.

                “Paying Agent” means such banking institution with offices in West Virginia or
its successors, designated as a paying agency or place of payment for the 2003 Series A Bonds in
the Certificate of Determination.



                                               7

                                                                                                   121
              “Preliminary Official Statement” means the Preliminary Official Statement to be
prepared and distributed in connection with the sale of the 2003 Series A Bonds.

               “Record Date” means 15 days before the interest payment dates of April 1 and
October 1.

               “Registrar” means such banking institution with offices in West Virginia or its
successors, designated as registrar for the 2003 Series A Bonds in the Certificate of
Determination.

                “Representation Letter” means the DTC Blanket Letter of Representations in form
satisfactory to DTC, previously delivered to DTC in connection with the issuance and delivery of
the 2003 Series A Bonds.

              “Resolution” means (unless the context clearly indicates otherwise) collectively,
the General Resolution and this Eighth Supplemental Resolution as they may be amended or
supplemented.

              “Tax Certificate” means the Tax Certificate of the Commission to be dated as of
the Closing Date, as it may be amended or supplemented.

               “Trustee” means such banking institution with offices in West Virginia or its
successors, designated as trustee for the 2003 Series A Bonds in the Certificate of Determination.

                Section 1.02. Interpretation. A. Any reference herein to the Commission, or any
officer thereof shall include those succeeding to their functions, duties or responsibilities
pursuant to or by operation of law or who are lawfully performing their functions.

               B.      Unless the context otherwise indicates, words importing the singular shall
include the plural and vice versa and the use of the neuter, masculine, or feminine gender is for
convenience only and shall be deemed to mean and include the neuter, masculine and feminine
gender.

              C.    Any terms not defined herein but defined in the General Resolution, shall
have the same meanings herein.

               D.     Headings or articles and sections herein and the table of contents hereof
are solely for convenience of reference, do not constitute apart hereof and shall not affect the
meaning, construction or effect hereof.

                E.     Words importing the redemption of a 2003 Series A Bond or the calling of
a 2003 Series A Bond for redemption do not mean or include the payment of a 2003 Series A
Bond at its stated maturity or the purchase of a 2003 Series A Bond.




                                                8

                                                                                                     122
                 Section 1.03. Designation of Authorized Officers. The Commission hereby
designates the Chancellor and the Director of Finance and Facilities, as Authorized Officers of
the Commission with respect to the 2003 Series A Bonds. Each of such Authorized Officers
shall file a specimen of his signature with the Trustee.




                                              9

                                                                                                  123
                                           ARTICLE II

              AUTHORIZATION AND TERMS OF 2003 SERIES A BONDS

                Section 2.01. Authorization of 2003 Series A Bonds. In order to refund the
Bonds To Be Refunded and to pay Costs of Issuance thereof, the Commission hereby authorizes
the issuance of the 2003 Series A Bonds, which shall constitute a “Series of Bonds” and
“Additional Bonds” as such terms are defined in the General Resolution, and shall be issued and
sold as directed by the Commission in accordance herewith.

                Section 2.02. Terms. The 2003 Series A Bonds shall be issued in fully
registered form as herein provided, in denominations of $5,000 and integral multiples thereof, in
an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $80,000,000. The 2003 Series A Bonds shall be
numbered from R-1 upward in order of maturity. Interest accruing on the 2003 Series A Bonds
on and prior to the maturity date thereof shall be payable by check or draft mailed by the Paying
Agent to the Registered Owner thereof as of the applicable Record Date (15 days before the
interest payment dates of April 1 and October 1) at the address of such Registered Owner as it
appears on the registration books of the Commission maintained by the Registrar, or, at the
option of any Registered Owner of at least $1,000,000 in aggregate principal amount of Bonds,
by wire transfer in immediately available funds to the bank account number on file with the
Paying Agent on or prior to the applicable Record Date. Principal and premium, if any, shall be
paid when due upon presentation and surrender of this Bond for payment at the principal
corporate trust office of the Paying Agent in Charleston, West Virginia.

                 Section 2.03. Certificate of Determination. The Chairman or Vice Chairman
shall have the power and authority to execute and deliver the Certificate of Determination, which
may include, without limitation, provisions (i) fixing the aggregate principal amount of 2003
Series A Bonds to be issued, not to exceed $80,000,000, (ii) fixing the maturity schedule for the
2003 Series A Bonds, including the amounts of serial bonds and term bonds, such maturities to
be not after April 1, 2016, (iii) fixing interest rates or yields for such 2003 Series A Bonds, such
rates or yields not to exceed an average interest cost of six percent (6%) per annum, (iv) fixing
the amounts and times of mandatory redemption for the 2003 Series A Bonds, (v) fixing optional
redemption provisions for the 2003 Series A Bonds, including times and redemption prices (not
to exceed 102% of the principal amount), (vi) fixing the purchase price for the 2003 Series A
Bonds, which may include an underwriting and an original issue discount or premium, (vii)
dating such 2003 Series A Bonds, (viii) completing and finalizing the provisions of the Bond
Purchase Agreement and the other Bond Documents, (ix) completing and finalizing the terms of
the purchase of the Bond Insurance Policy, provided that the cost thereof does not exceed one
percent (1%) of the principal amount of the 2003 Series A Bonds, and (x) designating the
Trustee, Registrar and Paying Agent for the 2003 Series A Bonds.

                Section 2.04. Book Entry System for 2003 Series A Bonds.

              (a)     Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions of this Article II, the 2003
Series A Bonds shall initially be issued in the form of one fully-registered bond for the aggregate
principal amount of the 2003 Series A Bonds of each maturity, which 2003 Series A Bonds shall



                                                10

                                                                                                       124
be registered in the name of Cede & Co., as nominee of DTC. Except as provided in paragraph
(g) below, all of the 2003 Series A Bonds shall be registered in the registration books kept by the
Registrar in the name of Cede & Co., as nominee of DTC; provided that if DTC shall request that
the 2003 Series A Bonds be registered in the name of a different nominee, the Registrar shall
exchange all or any portion of the 2003 Series A Bonds for an equal aggregate principal amount
of 2003 Series A Bonds registered in the name of such nominee or nominees of DTC. No person
other than DTC or its nominee shall be entitled to receive from the Issuer or the Registrar either a
2003 Series A Bond or any other evidence of ownership of the 2003 Series A Bonds, or any right
to receive any payment in respect thereof unless DTC or its nominee shall transfer record
ownership of all or any portion of the 2003 Series A Bonds on the registration books maintained
by the Registrar, in connection with discontinuing the book entry system as provided in
paragraph (g) below or otherwise.

                (b)     So long as the 2003 Series A Bonds or any portion thereof are registered
in the name of DTC or any nominee thereof, all payments of the Principal or Redemption Price
of or interest on such 2003 Series A Bonds shall be made to DTC or its nominee in Federal funds
on the dates provided for such payments under this Resolution or as set forth in the 2003 Series
A Bonds. Each such payment to DTC or its nominee shall be valid and effective to fully
discharge all liability of the Issuer or the Registrar with respect to the Principal or Redemption
Price of or interest on the 2003 Series A Bonds to the extent of the sum or sums so paid. In the
event of the redemption of less than all of the 2003 Series A Bonds Outstanding of any maturity,
the Registrar shall not require surrender by DTC or its nominee of the 2003 Series A Bonds so
redeemed, but DTC (or its nominee) may retain such 2003 Series A Bonds and make an
appropriate notation on the 2003 Series A Bond certificate as to the amount of such partial
redemption; provided that DTC shall deliver to the Registrar, upon request, a written
confirmation of such partial redemption and thereafter the records maintained by the Registrar
shall be conclusive as to the amount of the 2003 Series A Bonds of such maturity which have
been redeemed.

                (c)    The Issuer and the Registrar may treat DTC (or its nominee) as the sole
and exclusive Owner of the 2003 Series A Bonds registered in its name for the purposes of
payment of the Principal or Redemption Price of or interest on the 2003 Series A Bonds,
selecting the 2003 Series A Bonds or portions thereof to be redeemed, giving any notice
permitted or required to be given to Bondholders under this Resolution, registering the transfer
of 2003 Series A Bonds, obtaining any consent or other action to be taken by Bondholders and
for all other purposes whatsoever; and neither the Issuer nor the Registrar shall be affected by
any notice to the contrary. Neither the Issuer nor the Registrar shall have any responsibility or
obligation to any participant in DTC, any person claiming a beneficial ownership interest in the
2003 Series A Bonds under or through DTC or any such participant, or any other person which is
not shown on the registration books of the Registrar as being a Bondholder, with respect to
either: (1) the 2003 Series A Bonds; or (2) the accuracy of any records maintained by DTC or
any such participant; or (3) the payment by DTC or any such participant of any amount in
respect of the Principal or Redemption Price of or interest on the 2003 Series A Bonds; or (4)
any notice which is permitted or required to be given to Bondholders under this Resolution; or
(5) the selection by DTC or any such participant of any person to receive payment in the event of




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a partial redemption of the 2003 Series A Bonds; or (6) any consent given or other action taken
by DTC as Bondholder.

              (d)   So long as the 2003 Series A Bonds or any portion thereof are registered
in the name of DTC or any nominee thereof, all notices required or permitted to be given to the
Bondholders under this Resolution shall be given to DTC as provided in the Representation
Letter.

                (e)    In connection with any notice or other communication to be provided to
Bondholders pursuant to this Resolution by the Issuer or the Registrar with respect to any
consent or other action to be taken by Bondholders, DTC shall consider the date of receipt of
notice requesting such consent or other action as the record date for such consent or other action,
provided that the Issuer or the Registrar may establish a special record date for such consent or
other action. The Issuer or the Registrar shall give DTC notice of such special record date not
less than 15 calendar days in advance of such special record date to the extent possible.

                (f)     At or prior to settlement for the 2003 Series A Bonds, the Issuer and the
Registrar shall execute or signify their approval of the Representation Letter. Any successor
Registrar shall, in its written acceptance of its duties under this Resolution, agree to take any
actions necessary from time to time to comply with the requirements of the Representation
Letter.

                (g)     The book-entry system for registration of the ownership of the 2003 Series
A Bonds may be discontinued at any time if either: (1) DTC determines to resign as securities
depository for the 2003 Series A Bonds; or (2) the Issuer determines that continuation of the
system of book-entry transfers through DTC (or through a successor securities depository) is not
in the best interests of the Issuer. In either of such events (unless in the case described in clause
(2) above, the Issuer appoints a successor securities depository the 2003 Series A Bonds shall be
delivered in registered certificate form to such persons, and in such maturities and principal
amounts, as may be designated by DTC, but without any liability on the part of the Issuer or the
Registrar for the accuracy of such designation. Whenever DTC requests the Issuer and the
Registrar to do so, the Issuer and the Registrar shall cooperate with DTC in taking appropriate
action after reasonable notice to arrange for another securities depository to maintain custody of
certificates evidencing the 2003 Series A Bonds.

               Section 2.05. Form of 2003 Series A Bonds. The definitive 2003 Series A
Bonds shall be in substantially the form set forth in Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporated
by reference herein, with such necessary and appropriate omissions, insertions and variations as
are approved by those officers executing such 2003 Series A Bonds on behalf of the
Commission. Execution thereof by such officers shall constitute conclusive evidence of such
approval.

              Section 2.06. 2003 Series A Bonds on Parity with Prior Bonds. The 2003 Series
A Bonds shall be on a parity with the Prior Bonds with respect to sources of and security for
payment and in all other respects.




                                                 12

                                                                                                        126
              Section 2.07. Conditions Precedent to Delivery of 2003 Series A Bonds. The
2003 Series A Bonds shall be delivered upon receipt by the Registrar of the following:

                A.     A copy of the General Resolution and the Eighth Supplemental Resolution
certified by the Secretary of the Commission, pursuant to which the terms of the 2003 Series A
Bonds are specified;

                   B.   A Bond Counsel’s Opinion to the effect that (i) this Eighth Supplemental
Resolution has been duly and lawfully adopted and is in full force and effect; (ii) the General
Resolution has been duly and lawfully adopted and is valid and binding upon, and enforceable
against, the Commission (except to the extent that the enforceability thereof may be limited by
the operation of bankruptcy, insolvency and similar laws affecting rights and remedies of
creditors); (iii) the General Resolution creates the valid pledge which it purports to create of the
Revenues, and moneys and securities on deposit in any of the Funds established thereunder
(other than a Purchase Fund, if any) subject to the application thereof to the purposes and on the
conditions permitted by the General Resolution; and (iv) upon the execution and delivery
thereof, the 2003 Series A Bonds will have been duly and validly authorized and issued in
accordance with the General Resolution;

              C.   A written order as to the authentication, registration and delivery of the
2003 Series A Bonds and the application of the proceeds thereof, signed by an Authorized
Officer; and

               D.      A Certificate of the Commission to the effect that:

                       (i)    all payments into the respective funds and accounts provided for in
                the General Resolution and any Related Supplemental Resolution respecting
                Bonds theretofore issued and then Outstanding have been made in full to the date
                of issuance and delivery of the 2003 Series A Bonds and no Event of Default
                under the General Resolution or any Related Supplemental Resolution is now
                existing; and

                       (ii)   the Revenues of the type set forth in subsection (i) of the definition
                of “Revenues” in Section 1.02 of the General Resolution, collected by the
                Commission for the last Fiscal Year preceding the date of issuance of the 2003
                Series A Bonds have been not less than 100% of the largest amount of Debt
                Service due in any Fiscal Year thereafter on the 2003 Series A Bonds and the
                Prior Bonds; or

                       (iii) the Revenues (excluding proceeds of any Bonds and earnings
                thereon) collected by the Commission for the last Fiscal Year preceding the date
                of issuance of the 2003 Series A Bonds, plus Projected Revenues (as defined
                below) have been not less than 100% of the largest amount of Debt Service due
                in any Fiscal Year thereafter on the 2003 Series A Bonds and the Prior Bonds;
                and (b) Projected Revenues have not been greater than 20% of the largest
                amount of Debt Service due in any Fiscal Year thereafter on the 2003 Series A



                                                13

                                                                                                       127
Bonds and the Prior Bonds. For the purposes of this subsection (iii), Projected
Revenues may include any Revenues which were not in effect or which were not
pledged under the General Resolution during the last Fiscal Year, but which have
been adopted, charged and pledged prior to or contemporaneously with the
issuance of the 2003 Series A Bonds.




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                                                                                   128
                                         ARTICLE III

                           PROVISIONS RELATING TO THE
                 2003 SERIES A BONDS REQUIRED BY BOND INSURER

               Section 3.01. Provisions Required by Bond Insurer. All provisions and terms
required by the Bond Insurer for the 2003 Series A Bonds shall be set forth separately in a
schedule to the Certificate of Determination. In the event any provision of the Certificate of
Determination, including such schedule relating to the Bond Insurance Policy, conflicts with any
terms and provisions of the Resolution, the terms and provisions of the Certificate of
Determination, including such schedule, shall control.




                                              15

                                                                                                   129
                                        ARTICLE IV

                       FUNDS AND ACCOUNTS; APPLICATION OF
                           2003 SERIES A BOND PROCEEDS

              Section 4.01. Funds and Accounts. (A) There are hereby created by the
Commission and ordered established with the Trustee the following funds and accounts in
connection with the 2003 Series A Bonds;

              (i)     2003 Series A Bond Fund, and therein;

                       (a)   2003 Series A Interest Account; and

                       (b)   2003 Series A Principal Account; and

                       (c)   2003 Series A Redemption Account.

                (B) There are hereby created by the Commission and ordered established with the
Trustee the following funds in connection with the 2003 Series A Bonds;

              (i)     2003 Series A Bond Proceeds Fund; and

              (ii)    2003 Series A Escrow Fund; and

              (iii)   2003 Series A Costs of Issuance Fund.

               Section 4.02. Application of 2003 Series A Bond Proceeds. The net proceeds of
the sale of the 2003 Series A Bonds shall initially be deposited in the 2003 Series A Bond
Proceeds Fund to be held by the Trustee. Thereafter, such proceeds or portions thereof shall be
applied by the Trustee as follows:

                     (i)     All amounts, if any, paid as accrued interest on the 2003 Series A
              Bonds from their date to the date of delivery of the 2003 Series A Bonds shall be
              deposited in the 2003 Series A Interest Account;

                      (ii)   A sum equal to the Costs of Issuance of the 2003 Series A Bonds
              shall be deposited in the 2003 Series A Costs of Issuance Fund;

                     (iii)   A sum equal to the premium for purchase of the Municipal Bond
              Insurance Policy, if any, shall be paid directly to the Insurer; and

                      (iv) The balance of the proceeds of the 2003 Series A Bonds shall be
               deposited in the 2003 Series A Escrow Fund.

              Section 4.03. Flow of Funds. So long as any 2003 Series A Bonds are
Outstanding, amounts deposited and to be deposited in the funds and accounts established by



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                                                                                                  130
Section 4.01 hereof shall be applied by the Trustee in the manner and order of priority as set
forth herein and in Article VII of the General Resolution.

                Section 4.04. Disbursements. The proceeds of the 2003 Series A Bonds
deposited in the 2003 Series A Escrow Fund shall be disbursed immediately to the Escrow
Trustee. The proceeds of the 2003 Series A Bonds deposited in the 2003 Series A Costs of
Issuance Fund with the Trustee shall be disbursed to the Escrow Trustee solely to pay the Costs
of Issuance of the 2003 Series A Bonds. The funds in the 2003 Series A Cost of Issuance Fund
shall be disbursed upon requisition by an Authorized Officer. Any funds remaining in the 2003
Series A Costs of Issuance Fund 180 days after the initial issuance of the 2003 Series A Bonds
shall be transferred to the 2003 Series A Optional Redemption Interest Account.

               Section 4.05. Arbitrage Covenant. Neither the Trustee nor the Commission shall
use or direct or permit the use of any moneys of the Commission in its possession or control in
any manner which would cause any 2003 Series A Bond to be an “arbitrage bond” within the
meaning of such term in Sections 103 and 148 of the Code.

                 Section 4.06. Tax Certificate. Notwithstanding any provision of the Resolution,
the Commission shall observe its covenants, representations and agreements contained in the Tax
Certificate. In the event any provision of the Resolution conflicts with any provision of the Tax
Certificate, the provisions of the Tax Certificate shall govern.




                                               17

                                                                                                    131
                                         ARTICLE V

                       GENERAL COVENANTS OF THE COMMISSION

               Section 5.01. General. Except to the extent amended or modified by Section 1.03
hereof, the covenants contained in Article VI of the General Resolution are hereby continued,
approved, ratified and confirmed, shall apply fully to the 2003 Series A Bonds, and are
incorporated herein by reference as a part hereof.

                Section 5.02. Covenants. All covenants, stipulations, obligations and agreements
of the Commission contained herein and contained in the Resolution shall be deemed to be the
special and limited covenants, stipulations, obligations and agreements of the Commission to the
full extent permitted by law, and such covenants, stipulations, obligations and agreements shall
be binding upon the Commission and its successors from time to time and upon any Commission
or body to which any powers or duties, affecting such covenants, stipulations, obligations and
agreements, shall be transferred by or in accordance with law. Except as otherwise provided
herein, all rights, powers and privileges conferred and duties and liabilities imposed upon the
Commission or the officials thereof by the provisions hereof and by the Resolution shall be
exercised or performed by the Commission or by such officers, Commission or body as may be
required or permitted by law to exercise such powers and to perform such duties.

                No covenant, stipulation, obligation or agreement herein contained or contained
in the 2003 Series A Bonds or the Bond Documents shall be deemed to be a covenant stipulation,
obligation or agreement of any officer, agent or employee of the Commission in his or her
individual capacity and neither the member of the Commission nor any officer executing the
2003 Series A Bonds shall be liable personally on the 2003 Series A Bonds or be subject to any
personal liability or accountability by reason of the issuance thereof.




                                              18

                                                                                                   132
                                            ARTICLE VI

                    APPROVAL OF DOCUMENTS AND APPOINTMENT
                                 OF FIDUCIARIES

                Section 6.01. Approval of Bond Documents. The Bond Documents shall be and
the same are hereby approved in all respects. The Chairman of Vice Chairman of the
Commission shall execute and deliver the Bond Documents with such terms and conditions as
may be approved by the Chairman or Vice Chairman. The Secretary of the Commission is
hereby authorized and directed to affix the seal of the Commission to the Bond Documents and
attest the same. The execution of the Bond Documents by said Chairman or Vice Chairman shall
be conclusive evidence of any approval required by this Section.

                 Section 6.02. Approval of Distribution of Preliminary Official Statement and
Official Statement. The distribution of the Preliminary Official Statement is hereby approved.
The Chairman, Vice Chairman or the Secretary is hereby authorized and directed to execute and
deliver a final Official Statement on behalf of the Commission, which shall be in substantially
the form of the preliminary official statement with such terms and conditions as may be required
to reflect the terms of the sale of the Bonds and as the Chairman, Vice Chairman or Secretary, as
the case may be, may approve. The execution of the Official Statement by the Chairman, Vice
Chairman or Secretary, as the case may be, shall be conclusive evidence of such approval.
Copies of the Official Statement are hereby authorized to be prepared and furnished to the
Original Purchasers for distribution. The distribution by the Original Purchasers of the
Preliminary Official Statement (which is a “deemed final” official statement in accordance with
SEC Rule 15c2-12), substantially in the form submitted to this meeting is hereby ratified and
approved.

               Section 6.03. Appointment of Fiduciaries. The Certificate of Determination shall
appoint and designate the Trustee, Registrar and Paying Agent for the 2003 Series A Bonds.

                Section 6.04. Continuing Disclosure Agreement. So long as any of the 2003
Series A Bonds remain Outstanding, the Commission shall provide certain annual financial
information and material events notices regarding the Commission as described in paragraph
(b)(5)(i) of SEC Rule 15c2-12 promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission. The
Issuer authorizes and directs the Director of Finance and Facilities to take all actions with respect
to this undertaking as prescribed, by the Continuing Disclosure Agreement.




                                                 19

                                                                                                        133
                                          ARTICLE VII

                                       MISCELLANEOUS

               Section 7.01. General Resolution. This Eighth Supplemental Resolution is
supplemental to the General Resolution and all provisions of said General Resolution, unless
clearly inapplicable or altered hereby, shall apply to the 2003 Series A Bonds, this Eighth
Supplemental Resolution and matters relating thereto as if set forth verbatim herein. In the event
of any conflict between the General Resolution and this Eighth Supplemental Resolution, this
Eighth Supplemental Resolution shall control. This Eighth Supplemental Resolution, the General
Resolution and the Certificate of Determination, to the extent applicable, shall and must be read
as a single document and shall supersede all prior resolutions, orders and understandings, both
written and oral, by the Commission, with respect to the subject matter hereof.

                Section 7.02. Incidental Action. The execution and delivery of the 2003 Series A
Bonds and the execution, delivery and due performance of the Bond Documents and the Official
Statement are hereby in all respects approved, authorized, ratified and confirmed including all
acts heretofore taken in connection with the issuance of the 2003 Series A Bonds, and it is
hereby ordered that the Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary and other members and officers of
the Commission execute and deliver such other documents, certificates, agreements and
instruments, and take such other Action as may be required or desirable to carry out the purposes
of this Eighth Supplemental Resolution, the 2003 Series A Bonds and the aforesaid instruments,
including, but limited to, execution and delivery or any commitment for bond insurance.

               Section 7.03. Severability. If any one or more sections, clauses, sentences or
parts hereof shall for any reason be questioned in any court of competent jurisdiction and shall be
adjudged unconstitutional or invalid, such judgment shall not affect, impair or invalidate the
remaining provisions hereof, or the 2003 Series A Bonds issued pursuant hereto, but shall be
confined to the specific sections, clauses, sentences and parts so adjudged.

              Section 7.04. Governing Law. This Eighth Supplemental Resolution and the
2003 Series A Bonds are contracts made under the laws of the State of West Virginia and shall
be governed and construed in accordance with such laws.

               Section 7.05. Notices. (A) Unless otherwise expressly specified or permitted by
the terms hereof, all notices, consents or other communications required or permitted hereunder
shall, be deemed sufficiently given or served if given in writing, mailed by registered or certified
mail, postage prepaid or by overnight courier service and addressed as follows:

                       (i)     IF TO THE COMMISSION, ADDRESSED TO:

                               West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
                               1018 Kanawha Boulevard, East
                               Charleston, West Virginia 25301
                               Attention: Director of Finance and Facilities




                                                20

                                                                                                       134
                      (ii)    IF TO THE TRUSTEE, REGISTRAR OR PAYING AGENT
                              ADDRESSED TO:

                              Bank One, West Virginia, National Association
                              707 Virginia Street E.
                              Charleston, West Virginia 25301

                      (iii)   IF TO THE OWNER OF A 2003 SERIES A BOND,
                              ADDRESSED TO: Such Holder at the address shown
                              on the books of the Registrar kept pursuant hereto.

                      (iv)    IF TO THE ORIGINAL PURCHASERS, ADDRESSED TO:

                              Salomon Smith Barney, Inc.
                              500 Lee Street, East
                              Suite 300
                              Charleston, WV 25301

                              Ferris, Baker Watts, Inc.
                              100 Laidley Tower
                              Charleston, WV 25301

                              Crews & Associates, Inc.
                              300 Summers Street, Suite 930
                              Charleston, WV 25301

                      (v)     IF TO BOND INSURER, ADDRESSED TO: As its address may
                              appear in the Bond Insurance Policy


                (B)    The Commission, the Trustee, the Registrar, the Paying Agent, the
Original Purchasers or the Bond Insurer may from time to time by notice in writing to the others
designate a different address or addresses for notice hereunder.

              (C)    In connection with any consent required to be obtained from any Owner of
2003 Series A Bonds, the Commission shall establish a record date to determine the ownership
of any 2003 Series A Bonds for purposes of obtaining such consent, and shall give Depository
Trust Company at least 15 calendar days advance notice of the record date so established.

               (D)    Any notice required to be given by the Commission pursuant to any
provision of the Resolution shall also be given to the Bond Insurer.

               Section 7.06. Binding Effect. This Eighth Supplemental Resolution shall inure to
the benefit of and shall be binding upon the Commission and its respective successors and
assigns subject to the limitations contained herein.




                                               21

                                                                                                   135
              Section 7.07. Effective Date. This Eighth Supplemental Resolution shall take
effect immediately upon adoption.

             Adopted this 21st day of February, 2003.


                                          __________________________________________
                                          Chairman


                                          _________________________________________
                                          Secretary




242488




                                             22

                                                                                             136
                                          EXHIBIT A

                             FORM OF 2003 SERIES A BOND

                            UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
                              STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
                       HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION.
                            REVENUE REFUNDING BOND
                                 (University Facilities)
                                    2003 Series A

No. R-________                                                                      $________

INTEREST RATE                     MATURITY DATE               BOND DATE             CUSIP NO.

_______________                   ________________            ____________          __________

REGISTERED OWNER:             Cede & Co.

PRINCIPAL AMOUNT:             $_______________________________

        KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS that the HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY
COMMISSION (the “Commission”), an agency of the State of West Virginia (the “State”),
created and existing under the Constitution and laws of the State, for value received, hereby
acknowledges itself obligated to, and promises to pay, but only out of the sources pledged for
that purpose as hereinafter provided, and not otherwise, to the Registered Owner stated above, or
registered assigns, on the Maturity Date stated above, the Principal Amount stated above, and to
pay interest on the unpaid balance of said Principal Amount from the Interest Payment Date (as
described below) preceding the date of authentication hereof or, if authenticated after the Record
Date (as hereinafter defined) but prior to the applicable Interest Payment Date or on said Interest
Payment Date, from said Interest Payment Date or, if no interest has been paid, from the Bond
Date stated above, at the Interest Rate per annum stated above, on April 1, 2003, and
semiannually thereafter on April 1 and March 1 of each year (each an “Interest Payment Date”),
until maturity or until the date fixed for redemption if this Bond is called for prior redemption
and payment on such date is provided for. Capitalized terms used and not defined herein shall
have the meanings ascribed thereto in the hereinafter described Resolution.

        Interest accruing on this Bond on and prior to the Maturity Date hereof shall be payable
by check or draft mailed by __________, as paying agent (in such capacity, the “Paying Agent”),
to the Registered Owner hereof as of the applicable Record Date (15 days before the interest
payment dates of April 1 and October 1) at the address of such Registered Owner as it appears on
the registration books of the Commission maintained by       _____________, as registrar (in
such capacity, the “Registrar”), or, at the option of any Registered Owner of at least $1,000,000
in aggregate principal amount of Bonds, by wire transfer in immediately available funds to the
bank account number on file with the Paying Agent on or prior to the applicable Record Date.
Principal and premium, if any, shall be paid when due upon presentation and surrender of this



                                                23

                                                                                                      137
Bond for payment at the principal corporate trust office of the Paying Agent in Charleston, West
Virginia.

        This Bond is one of an issue of a Series of Bonds in the aggregate principal amount of not
to exceed $80,000,000 (the “Bonds”) authorized and issued to provide funds to be expended,
together with other moneys available therefor, for refunding of certain outstanding revenue
bonds issued by the predecessor of the Commission and paying Costs of Issuance of the 2003
Series A Bonds, all pursuant to a General Resolution adopted by the Commission on September
9, 1992, and an Eighth Supplemental Resolution adopted by the Commission on February 21,
2003 (collectively, the “Resolution”). The Bonds are issued under the authority of and in full
compliance with the Constitution and statutes of the State of West Virginia, including
particularly, Chapter 18, Articles 12B and Chapter 18B, Articles 1, 2 and 10 of the West Virginia
Code of 1931, as amended, and Refunding Act (collectively, the “Act”).

         This Bond and all Bonds of this issue are payable solely, equally and ratably from the
Revenues (as such term is defined in the Resolution) on a parity in all respects with the Prior
Bonds described below. Reference is hereby made to the Resolution as the same may be further
amended and supplemented from time to time, for a description of the rights, limitations of
rights, obligations, duties and immunities of the Commission and the Registered Owners of the
Bonds and any subsequently issued Additional Bonds. Certified copies of the Resolution are on
file at the office of the Commission in the City of Charleston, West Virginia.

        This Bond is a special obligation of the Commission, payable together with the Prior
Bonds hereinafter described and any Additional Bonds which may hereafter be issued, solely
from the sources pledged under the Resolution. The bonds of the series of which this Bond is
one, as to both principal and interest, shall not constitute a debt or a pledge of the faith and credit
or taxing power of the State of West Virginia or of any county, municipality or any other
political subdivision of said State, and the owners thereof shall have no right to have taxes levied
by the Legislature or the taxing authority of any county, municipality or any other political
subdivision of said State for the payment of the principal thereof or interest thereon, but the
Bonds, together with any Additional Bonds which may subsequently be issued on a parity
therewith, shall be payable equally and ratably solely from the sources pledged under the
resolution.

      The Bonds are issued on a parity in all respects with the Commission’s outstanding “Prior
Bonds” (as defined in said Eighth Supplemental Resolution) and other Additional Bonds which
may hereafter be issued pursuant to the General Resolution.

       The Bonds of this issue are subject to redemption prior to, their stated maturity dates, as
provided in the Resolution and as set forth in the following lettered paragraphs:

        The Bonds maturing on ________, (the “Term Bonds”), are subject to mandatory
redemption prior to maturity in part at a Redemption Price equal to 100% of the principal amount
thereof, plus accrued interest to the Mandatory Redemption Date, beginning on _____________
respectively, for the Term Bonds, and on each ___________1 thereafter, in annual principal
amounts as follows:



                                                  24

                                                                                                          138
               For the Term Bonds maturing on _________________:

                              Year                           Amount



               For the Term Bonds maturing on ________________:

                              Year                           Amount



               For the Term Bonds maturing on _________________:

                              Year                          Amount




       The principal amount of the Bonds delivered to or purchased by the Paying Agent shall
reduce pro tanto the principal amount of such series of Term Bonds to be redeemed on the
Mandatory Redemption Date with respect to such maturity next following such delivery or
purchase.

       Beginning on ___________, the Bonds maturing on and after __________, shall be
subject to redemption prior to maturity, at the option of the Issuer, in whole, or in part, on any
Business Day, by series and in order of maturity selected by the Issuer and by lot within a
maturity in multiples of $5,000, at the Redemption Prices (expressed as a percentage of the
principal amount to be redeemed) set forth below, plus accrued interest to the date fixed for
redemption:

                       Redemption Periods
                        (Dates Inclusive)                       Redemption Prices




       In the event of any redemption of less than all outstanding Bonds, the maturities to be
redeemed shall be selected by the Registrar at the direction of the Commission, and Bonds to be
redeemed shall be selected by lot within a maturity, or in such other manner deemed appropriate
by the Registrar. If less than all the Bonds are to be redeemed, the Bonds to be redeemed shall
be identified by reference to the Series designation, date of issue, CUSIP numbers and maturity
dates. Notice of the call for any redemption, unless waived by the Registered Owner, shall be



                                               25

                                                                                                     139
given by the Registrar, by mailing a redemption notice, postage prepaid, at least 30 days and not
more than 60 days prior to the date fixed for redemption to the Registered Owner of any Bond or
portions of Bonds to be redeemed in whole or in part at the address shown on the registration
books of the Commission maintained by the Registrar, for registration and transfer of the Bonds
under the Resolution, and as otherwise prescribed in the Resolution, provided, however, that
failure to give such notice by mailing, or any defect therein, shall not affect the validity of any
proceedings for the redemption of Bonds.

        The holder of this Bond shall have no right to enforce the provisions of the Resolution or
to institute an action to enforce the covenants thereof, or to take any action with respect to a
default hereof or to institute, appear in or defend any suit or other proceedings with respect
thereto, except as provided in the Resolution.

       Additional Bonds may be issued under the Resolution, and reference is made to the
Resolution with respect to the requirements for the issuance of Additional Bonds which shall be
equally and ratably secured under the Resolution with the Bonds.

       Modifications or amendments of the Resolution may be made to the extent and in the
circumstances permitted by the Resolution to which reference is hereby made.

        This Bond must be registered in accordance with the provisions hereof, and may, singly
or with other Bonds of this issue, be surrendered to the Registrar and exchanged for other fully
registered bonds, upon the terms set forth in the Resolution. Neither the Commission nor the
Registrar shall be required to register or transfer this Bond or exchange other Bonds for this bond
during the period beginning on a Record Date and ending on an Interest Payment Date.

       IT IS HEREBY FURTHER CERTIFIED, RECITED AND DECLARED that all acts,
conditions and things required to exist, to happen and to be performed precedent to and in the
issuance of this Bond have existed, have happened and have been performed in due form, time
and manner as required by law.

        All provisions of the Resolution and the statutes under which this Bond is issued shall be
deemed to be a part of the contract evidenced by this Bond to the same extent as if written fully
herein.




                                                26

                                                                                                      140
                 IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, the Commission has caused this Bond to be
executed by and on its behalf by the manual or facsimile signature of the Authorized Officer of
the Commission, and has caused this Bond to be authenticated by the manual signature of an
authorized officer of the Registrar, without which authentication this Bond shall not be valid nor
entitled to the benefits of the Resolution, all as of the Bond Date stated above.



                                       WEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY
                                       COMMISSION



                                          By: ______________________________________
                                              Its: Authorized Officer



                                       BANK ONE, WEST VIRGINIA, NATIONAL
                                       ASSOCIATION



                                            By: ______________________________________
                                                Its: Authorized Officer




                                               27

                                                                                                     141
                    REGISTRAR’S AUTHENTICATION CERTIFICATE

               The undersigned Registrar hereby certifies that this is one of the 2003 Series A
Bonds described in the within-mentioned Resolution and has been duly registered in the name of
the Registered Owner set forth above, as of the date set forth below. Attached hereto is the
complete text of the opinion of Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC, bond counsel, signed originals
of which are on file with the Registrar, delivered and dated on the date of the original delivery of
and payment for such Bonds.

               Date of Authentication: ____________________________________

                                         ___________________________________, as Registrar



                                          By: _____________________________________
                                              Its Authorized Officer




                                                28

                                                                                                       142
                                STATEMENT OF INSURANCE

               ________ Insurance Corporation (the “Insurer”) has issued a policy containing
the following provisions, such policy being on file at (Trustee's Name and Address).

                The Insurer, in consideration of the payment of the premium and subject to the
terms of this policy, hereby unconditionally and irrevocably guarantees to any owner, as
hereinafter defined, of the following described obligations, the full and complete payment
required to be made by or on behalf of the Issuer to (Trustee’s Name) or its successor (the
“Paying Agent”) of an amount equal to (i) the principal of (either the stated maturity or by any
advancement of maturity pursuant to a mandatory sinking fund payment) and interest on the
Obligations (as that term is defined below) as such payments shall become due but shall not be
so paid (except that in the event of any acceleration of the due date of such principal by reason
of mandatory or optional redemption or acceleration resulting from default or otherwise, other
than any advancement of maturity pursuant to a mandatory sinking fund payment, the payments
guaranteed hereby shall be made in such amounts and at such times as such payments of
principal would have been due had there not been any such acceleration); and (ii) the
reimbursement of any such payment which is subsequently recovered from any owner pursuant
to a final judgment by a court of competent jurisdiction that such payment constitutes an
avoidable preference to such owner within the meaning of any applicable bankruptcy law. The
amounts referred to in causes (i) and (ii) of the preceding sentence shall be referred to herein
collectively as the “Insured Amounts.” “Obligations” shall mean:


                                     State of West Virginia
                              Higher Education Policy Commission
                                  Revenue Refunding Bonds
                                     (University Facilities)
                                         2003 Series A


Upon receipt of telephonic or telegraphic notice, such notice subsequently confined in writing by
registered or certified mail, or upon receipt of written notice by registered or certified mail, by
the Insurer from the Paying Agent or any owner of an Obligation the payment of an Insured
Amount for which is then due, that such required payment has not been made, the Insurer on the
due date of such payment or within one business day after receipt of notice of such nonpayment,
whichever is later, will make a deposit of funds, in an account with ____________, or its
successor, sufficient for the payment of any such Insured Amounts which are then due. Upon
presentment and surrender of such Obligations or presentment of such other proof of ownership
of the Obligations, together with any appropriate instruments of assignments to evidence the
assignment of the Insured Amounts due on the Obligations as are paid by the Insurer, and
appropriate instruments to effect the appointment of the Insurer as agent for such owners of the
Obligations in any legal proceeding related to payment of Insured Amounts on the Obligations,
such instruments being in a form satisfactory to __________________, shall disburse to such
owners or the Paying Agent payment of the Insured Amounts due on such Obligations, less any
amount held by the Paying Agent for the payment of such Insured Amounts and legally available



                                                29

                                                                                                      143
therefor. This policy does not insure against loss of any prepayment premium which may at any
time be payable with respect to any Obligation.

                As used herein, the term “owner” shall mean the registered owner of any
Obligation as indicated in the books maintained by the Paying Agent, the Issuer, or any designee
of the Issuer for such purpose. The term owner shall not include the Issuer or any party whose
agreement with the Issuer constitutes the underlying security for the Obligations.

               Any service of process on the Insurer may be made to the Insurer at its offices
located at ________________ and such service of process shall be valid and binding.

               This policy is non-cancellable for any reason. The premium on this policy is not
refundable for any reason including the payment prior to maturity of the Obligations.




                                              30

                                                                                                   144
                                         ASSIGNMENT

Social Security or Other Identifying Number of Assignee
______________________________________________________________________________



                 FOR VALUE RECEIVED, the undersigned hereby sells, assigns and transfers
unto__________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
____________________________the within Bond and does hereby irrevocably constitute and
appoint
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
_____ to transfer the said Bond on the books kept for registration thereof with full power of
substitution in the premises.

               Dated: ________________, _______.




_____________________________________________

SIGNATURE GUARANTEED:


____________________________________________
(Bank, Trust Company or Finn)


____________________________________________
(Authorized Officer)

              NOTICE: The Assignor's signature to this Assignment must correspond with the
name as it appears upon the face of the within Bond in every particular, without alteration or any
change whatever.




                                               31

                                                                                                     145
           WEST VIRGINIA HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                        COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE

                                MEETING OF FEBRUARY 21, 2003

                                                   AGENDA



A.   Expanding the Educational Pipeline with Rural Residency Training ........... pg 146

B.   Review of Rule on Funding of Intercollegiate Athletics ............................... pg 147

C.   West Virginia Council for Community and Technical College Education
     Involvement in the Selection of Community and Technical College Administrative
     Heads.......................................................................................................... pg 162

D.   Approval of Report on Distance Learning ................................................... pg 163

E.   Draft Report to LOCEA on Non-classified Staff Salary Levels .................... pg 196
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                    Expanding the Educational Pipeline with Rural
                                         Residency Training

INSTITUTIONS:                            All

COMMITTEE:                               Committee of the Whole

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                  Information Item

STAFF MEMBER:                            Dr. Robert B. Walker, Professor and
                                         Chair, Department of Family and Community
                                         Health, Marshall University School of Medicine

BACKGROUND:

Research shows that most physicians practice near the location of their residency
training site. Since most residency programs are located in urban teaching hospitals,
their graduates are less likely to practice in rural areas. Rural communities have much
to gain by hosting rural residency training, but there have been significant barriers –
largely at the federal level – to developing these programs.

West Virginia now has resources to expand the educational pipeline to include rural
residency training, using the Rural Health Education Partnerships (RHEP)
infrastructure. In 2001, West Virginia received a $2.57 million federal grant through the
Area Health Education Center (AHEC) program to expand rural residency training for
physicians and expand graduate training for other health professionals. AHEC will also
expand health careers programs in public schools. In addition, the Higher Education
Policy Commission has received $200,000 for development of rural residency
programs. These programs are well situated to receive “Medicaid-matching” funds to
ensure access of rural Medicaid-eligible patients to high quality care.

Dr. Walker will discuss the critical need for additional rural physicians and how these
newly available resources can help to develop a rural health pipeline that identifies
candidates for rural practice early and nurtures their interests through career awareness
programs, RHEP rotations, financial incentives, and rural residency training.




                                                                                            146
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                     Procedure     19:   Funding    of   Intercollegiate
                                          Athletics

INSTITUTIONS:                             All

COMMITTEE:                                Committee of the Whole

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                   Resolved: That the West Virginia Higher
                                          Education Policy Commission directs the
                                          Chancellor to draft a rule, consistent with the
                                          discussions of the Commission, to replace
                                          Procedure 19 of the State College System
                                          Board of Directors

STAFF MEMBER:                              James A. Winter

BACKGROUND:

 The State College System Board of Directors adopted Procedure 19: Funding of
Intercollegiate Athletics effective July 30, 1991. This Procedure placed limits on athletic
expenditures by the colleges then under the jurisdiction of the Board of Directors. At its
April 19, 2002 meeting the Policy Commission abolished all the old Procedures of the
Board of Directors except Series19, which was to be retained through June 30, 2003.

Attached to this agenda item are the following documents for discussion purposes:
   • Procedure 19, Funding of College Athletics
   • Original Instructions for the Annual Survey of Funding for Intercollegiate Athletics
   • Sample form of the Survey of Intercollegiate Athletics
   • Draft of Additional Guidance for Completing Athletic Surveys

A survey of intercollegiate athletics was conducted for FY 2002. The completion of the
surveys prompted a number of questions on the consistency of reporting between
campuses that must be resolved if a rule on intercollegiate athletics is to be continued.
Further discussion of the intercollegiate athletics funding rule and the surveys could also
lead to further simplification.

The staff recommends that the Commission approve the intent to continue a modified
rule on intercollegiate athletics, and the staff with the assistance of the institutions will
draft a rule based upon the discussions of the Commission, and bring it back for
consideration at a later meeting.




                                                                                                147
                     State College System of West Virginia

                                     Procedure No. 19
                                     Effective July 30, 1991

                                     FUNDING of
                             INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS


Opportunities for students to participate in intercollegiate athletics have been provided for many
years by the four-year institutions in the State College System of West Virginia. Involvement in
athletics can contribute to the total growth and development of students by promoting leadership
skills, physical fitness, sportsmanship, teamwork, and discipline. Athletic participation can also
help students grow physically, mentally, socially, and emotionally.

In addition to the benefits derived by the student participants, college athletic programs can also
generate recognition and support for the institution in its local community, throughout the State,
and regionally or nationally. College athletics can also serve as an important focal point for
student life on campus and can help build loyalty and commitment to the institution by students
and alumni. Because athletes are often highly visible, those who project a positive image can
help establish a positive image of the institution by the general public.

In recent years, however, numerous problems have been created in American higher education
by the over-emphasis on intercollegiate athletics at many colleges and universities. These
problems include the diversion of scarce institutional resources from academics to athletics.

The State College System Board is committed to avoiding these abuses by maintaining
intercollegiate athletics at an amateur level for the benefit of students at the four-year colleges in
the System. The following policies established by the Board are designed to limit funding of
intercollegiate athletics in order to accomplish this goal:


Two-Year Colleges

       Southern West Virginia Community College and West Virginia Northern Community
       College shall not sponsor intercollegiate athletics.


Four-Year Colleges

       Beginning with the 1992-93 fiscal year, the policies described in this section apply to the
       funding of intercollegiate athletics at Bluefield State College, Concord College, Fairmont
       State College, Glenville State College, Shepherd College, West Liberty State College,
       West Virginia Institute of Technology, and West Virginia State College. The limits


                                                 1
                                                                                                         148
     which are specified are maximum limits, and any institution may operate its
     intercollegiate athletic program at levels below the maximum limited allowed.


1.   Revenues

     Funding for intercollegiate athletics shall be limited to the following three revenue
     sources:

     a.    Student Athletic Fees

           Each institution may impose a Student Athletic Fee. It is the responsibility of the
           college president to recommend the amount of this fee each year for approval by
           the State College System Board.

           The president's recommendation shall be developed after consulting with an
           institutional committee created specifically for the purpose of providing advice to
           the president on student fee levels. This committee shall include at least three
           student members.

           The Student Athletic Fee shall be limited at each institution each year to a
           specified percentage of the total undergraduate tuition and fees charged to resident
           (in-state) students at that institution for that year. The percentage limitation shall
           be based on the institution's FTE enrollment in the previous year as shown below:

                                      Precentage of Total Regular Undergraduate
                 Previous Year                Tuition and Fees Allowed
                FTE Enrollment                 for Student Athletic Fee
                Over 4, 800          8%
                2,800 to 4,800       9%
                2,200 to 2,799       10%
                2,000 to 2,199       11%
                Below 2,000          12%



b.   State Appropriated Funds

     The amount of state appropriated funds that may be expended by each institution each fiscal
     year for intercollegiate athletics should be limited to 2% of the average state appropriation
     for that fiscal year for the eight four-year colleges.

c.   Revenues Generated By Intercollegiate Athletics

     Funds may be used to support intercollegiate athletics that are generated by gate receipts,
     concessions, program sales, game guarantees, tournament and post season income,

                                             2
                                                                                                     149
     foundations, booster clubs, private gifts, sports camps, and other revenue - producing
     activities directly related to intercollegiate athletics.

2.   Expenditures for Salaries and Benefits

     The total amount of salaries and benefits for coaches, athletic department administrators and
     staff, and other college employees whose total job responsibilities are related to the
     intercollegiate athletic program shall be paid from the budget for intercollegiate athletics
     generated from revenue sources identified in section 1. The salary and benefit cost for each
     employee whose responsibilities are split between the intercollegiate athletic program and
     the academic or general institutional support programs of the institution shall be paid on a
     pro-rated basis, with the percentage of the employee's work devoted to athletics paid from
     the budget for intercollegiate athletics generated from the revenue sources listed in section
     1. For coaches or athletic administrators who also have teaching responsibilities as a
     portion of their jobs, the annual pro-rated share paid from non-athletic funds shall be 1/8 for
     each three-hour course taught for those on an academic-year contract and 1/10 for each
     three-hour course taught for those on a twelve-month contract.


3.   Tuition Waivers

     State law allows each state institution of higher education to grant tuition waivers to no
     more than 5% of the institution's undergraduate full-time equivalent enrollment. By
     adoption of this policy, the State College System Board establishes the following additional
     restrictions for the four-year colleges in the System:

     During the 1992-93 year, the number of tuition waivers designated for students participating
     in intercollegiate athletics at each institution shall be limited to no more than 55 waivers or
     40% of the total number of waivers allowed for that institution, whichever number is less.
     In future years, the percentage limitation shall remain at 40% and the number limitation
     shall be increased or decreased each year by the percentage change over the previous year in
     the total FTE enrollment of the eight four-year colleges as a group.


4.   Equal Opportunity

     Each institution shall insure that its intercollegiate athletic program adheres to or exceeds
     the requirements of all state and federal laws, especially the mandates of equal opportunity
     and affirmative action. Institutions and other organizations in the State College System
     shall not discriminate in intercollegiate athletics on the basis of any protected class.




                                              3
                                                                                                       150
5.   Annual Reports

     Beginning on September 1, 1993, the president of each four-year institution in the State
     College System shall provide to the chancellor by September 1 of each year the financial
     information requested on the attached report form for the previous fiscal year. The
     chancellor shall review the annual reports to assure compliance with the policies set forth in
     this document and shall inform the Board if problems exist.




                                              4
                                                                                                      151
                   STATE COLLEGE SYSTEM OF WEST VIRGINIA

                    ANNUAL SURVEY OF FUNDING FOR
                     INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

            INSTRUCTIONS FOR SURVEY COMPLETION

General

The attached survey is to be completed annually and submitted to the chancellor of the State
College System on or before September 1st of each year for the preceding fiscal year. Each
institution's president and athletic director shall review the survey and certify to its accuracy and
completeness, as well as to the institution's compliance with the State College System's Policy on
Funding of Intercollegiate Athletics. In addition to the specific information required in the survey
form, each institution may include such explanatory notes and/or additional information as it
deems appropriate to insure accurate and complete disclosure.


                                               Part I
Receipts and Disbursements

Report in this section all actual receipts and disbursements directly related to the operation of the
intercollegiate athletics program. Do not include receipts and disbursements associated with
intramural athletic programs, bands, or other activities that are not intercollegiate athletics. Do not
include indirect cost allocations associated with athletics unless such amounts are actually assessed
and recovered by the institution, in which case these should be reported under the Expenditures
section as Other Operating Expenses. Indicate in the appropriate column of the survey whether
funds are received and expended through accounts in the State Treasury, or private funding
accounts.

Amounts are to be reported on the basis of cash receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year
period of July 1 - June 30. Amounts reported for the State Appropriated Account and the Athletic
Operating Account(s) in the State Treasury should match the State Auditor's report of receipts and
disbursements for such accounts.

State Appropriated Funds

Report amounts allocated and expended in support of intercollegiate athletics from funds
appropriated by the Legislature and allocated to the institution by the State College System Board
of Directors. Include funds allocated from both General Revenue and Lottery appropriations.

Student Athletic Fees


                                                 5
                                                                                                          152
Report the total amount of collections from the Athletic Fee portion of regular student fees, as
approved by the State College System Board of Directors for each fiscal year. Only the Athletic
Fee component may be used in support of athletics.

Generated Revenues

Report amounts generated from the normal operations of the intercollegiate athletics program in
the most appropriate category listed.

Private Contributions & Fund Raising

Report amounts received from private contributions and/or fund raising activities, including funds
expended for scholarships and student aid if the primary purpose of such aid is athletic in nature.
Do not include student financial aid which is need-based, unless participation in intercollegiate
athletics is required or expected at the time of award.

Salaries

Report the amount of compensation paid to full-time and part-time employees in support of the
intercollegiate athletic program. Include the proportionate share of salaries for individuals whose
positions include both teaching and/or general administrative responsibilities as well as
intercollegiate athletics.

For an individual with responsibilities for both teaching and intercollegiate athletics who is
employed on an academic year appointment (9-10 months), exclude from the reported amount
one-eighth (1/8) of the total salary for each three credit hour course taught. For such individuals
with fiscal year appointments (11-12 months) exclude one-tenth for each three hour course taught.
The allocation of salaries for individuals with both general administrative and athletic
responsibilities should be prorated based upon the average number of hours devoted to each
activity on a monthly basis.

Employee Benefits

Include actual employer matching and premium costs associated with FICA, retirement, health and
life insurance, worker's compensation, unemployment compensation, and other direct employee
benefit programs. For employees with split responsibilities, report benefit costs on a pro rata basis
with salary amounts.

Operating Expenses

Report amounts expended in support of the operations of the intercollegiate athletics program in
the most appropriate category listed.


Scholarships & Student Aid



                                                6
                                                                                                        153
Include amounts actually expended for support of student athletes, including fees, room and board
charges, books, and other normal matriculation or living expenses. Do not include the value of fee
waivers reported in Part III, student aid which is need-based, or for which athletic participation is
not required or expected.


                                              Part II

Athletic Fee Waivers

Report in this section the total number and value of fee waivers awarded by the institution under
the statutory five percent waiver program. Report the number and value of such waivers allocated
to participants in the institution's athletic programs, subject to the limitations imposed by the
attached policy. For reporting purposes, a waiver should be considered athletic in nature if sports
participation is required or expected at the time the waiver is granted.

If partial waivers are granted, the pro rata share attributable to intercollegiate athletics should be
reported based upon a total of thirty credit hours for each full waiver, including summer session
courses. Calculate waiver values by multiplying the regular full-time resident and non-resident
student fee rates by the number of students in each residency classification for each semester,
including summer sessions.


                                             Part III
Athletic Department Staffing

Report in this section all full-time and regular part-time employees whose job responsibilities
include intercollegiate athletics.       Identify individuals only by position title, such as
"Coach-Football". Indicate the percent of total effort devoted to athletics from each funding
source. For part-time positions, include only those of a regular continuing nature. Do not include
casual labor or part-time student assistants. Use the guidelines provided under "Salaries" above to
allocate portions of individuals with split job assignments.




                                                7
                                                                                                         154
Athletic Surveys – Procedure 19
Additional Guidance for Completing Athletic Surveys
(Draft for Discussion - As of February 5, 2003)

The following information in question and answer format is designed to provide
additional guidance for the completion of the Athletic Surveys as required under
Procedure 19. This information is designed to address issues raised regarding the
consistency of the reports as filed by the institutions for FY 2002. Policy and reporting
issues regarding intercollegiate athletics for future periods will be addressed in the next
several months.


Scholarships & Student Aid – There is inconsistent treatment in the reporting of
scholarships and other student aid in the reports as submitted. Some institutions included
all athletic scholarships regardless of funding source, while others included only
scholarships that were funded out of the athletic accounts.

       •   Part I, Receipts and Disbursements, should include all payments for athletic
           scholarships, regardless of the funding source. The columns on the report
           provide for the reporting of payments as either from General Revenue, Other
           E&G Revenue, Athletic Accounts, and Private Funding. Private Funding
           should also include both the revenue and expenditure for athletic scholarships
           funded by foundations. As noted in the instructions, exceptions are provided
           for student aid which is need-based, or for which athletic participation is not
           required or expected.


Housing Waivers – The reports as submitted by the institutions generally exclude any
housing waivers for athletes. However, some institutions are currently granting athletic
housing waivers and others are contemplating the use of housing waivers in the future.

       •   Part I, Receipts and Disbursements, specifically excludes the reporting of the
           cost of tuition waivers, as these are specifically restricted and reported under
           Part II, Athletic Fee Waivers. As housing waivers are not included in the
           limits on tuition waivers, and the description of Scholarships and Student Aid
           in the report description specifically references room and board charges, the
           implicit cost of any housing waivers should be included in Part I under
           Scholarships and Student Aid, under the column Athletic & Other Auxiliary
           Operating Accounts.


Expenditures for Contractual Guarantees – Several institutions reported no expenditures
in this category, while others reported significant expenditures. It appears that this is
simply a classification difference between Contractual Guarantees and Other
Expenditures.




                                                                                              155
       •   For consistency, report all payments that would normally fall under the FIMS
           expenditure category of 25, Contractual & Professional. In addition, include
           all payments for event contractual guarantees even if they have been charged
           to another account within FIMS.


Travel – Expenditures for travel vary widely among the institutions, from a low of $8,001
to a high of $159,282. It appears that this is a classification issue between travel and
other operating expenses.

       •   All payments for team travel as well as any travel related to the athletic staff
           should be included in this category for consistency purposes. Generally these
           should be payments processed under the FIMS expenditure category 26.


Staffing – Part-time Student Assistants – A question has been raised concerning the
reporting of student assistants.

       •   Part I of the survey, Receipts and Disbursements, requests the amount of
           compensation paid to all full-time and part-time employees in support of the
           intercollegiate athletics program. These payments should include student
           assistants where their activities are used in the intercollegiate athletic
           program. Part III, Athletic Department Staffing, provides an exception to
           simplify this section of the report, and does not require a detailed listing of
           casual labor or part-time student assistants. This exclusion only relates to the
           completion of the staffing listing in Part III, and does not preclude the
           reporting of these salaries in Part I.


Facilities Related Expenditures – Generally very minimal amounts of facilities related
expenditures are incorporated in the reports as submitted. Specifically excluded are debt
service payments, budget digest receipts, and general facilities expenditures.

       •   The original reporting survey under Procedure 19 does not specifically
           mention the inclusion of debt service and capital improvements. The report
           does specifically request the amount expended on facilities and equipment
           maintenance. Payments related to major capitalized improvements and debt
           service should be excluded from this report, but the direct costs of maintaining
           intercollegiate facilities and equipment should be reported.


Indirect Cost Allocations – No indirect cost allocations for services such as accounting,
human resources, etc. are allocated to athletics or to any other auxiliary.




                                                                                              156
       •   Report instructions in the past have indicated that these indirect allocations
           should be excluded from the intercollegiate athletic expenditures unless such
           amounts are actually assessed and recovered by the institution. If the policy is
           continued into the future, the report instructions should be modified so that
           indirect allocations should be included as part of the operating costs of the
           intercollegiate athletics programs, regardless of actual assessment and
           payment.


Staffing Allocations for Recruitment – There is some question in regard to the allocation
of staff that is involved in recruitment of athletes, as to whether this is an athletics related
activity or general student enrollment activities.

       •   All athletics staff with a recruitment time allocation that is solely for the
           purpose of athletic recruitment should be included in the time allocation and
           charged as intercollegiate athletics expenditures.         Staffing allocations
           involving recruitment for other than athletics should be excluded.


Staffing Allocations for Academics versus Athletics – Most institutions indicated that the
staffing allocations for individuals with responsibilities for both teaching and
intercollegiate athletics were allocated based upon an academic load of 12 hours per
semester. Thus an individual teaching six hours of classes in a semester would report an
allocation to academics for 50% of their salary and benefit cost.

       •   The allocation methodology should be consistent with the campus approved
           workload policy, and the calculation should be based upon the activities for
           the full length of the appointment.


Staffing Allocations – Other Activities – It was noted that there is no definitive
methodology on the allocation of salaries for other activities, and that the methodology
may vary by institution.

       •   The policy states that the allocation of salaries and benefits for individuals
           with both general administrative and athletic responsibilities should be
           prorated based upon the average number of hours devoted to each activity on
           a monthly basis. In the determination of this percentage, all activities that
           impact the athletic program should be included in the athletic responsibilities.
           In addition to direct program activities, other indirect activities that are
           performed only for the benefit of the athletic program should be included.
           Such indirect activities could include supervision of athletic facilities,
           recruitment of athletes, etc. The percentage of time allocated to activities not
           directly or indirectly related to athletics should be excluded.




                                                                                                   157
EADA and NCAA Reports – The institutions annually file other reports on intercollegiate
athletics, including EADA reports and NCAA reports. A request was made to substitute
these reports in lieu of the filing of reports required under Procedure 19.

       •   An initial review indicates that these reports do not include several critical
           pieces on information, such as a breakdown of revenues including the amount
           of state support, the number of tuition waivers, and the allocation of staff.
           The expenses and revenues required in the EADA report generally appear to
           be consistent with those included in the survey required by Procedure 19, and
           so the total reported in both reports should be the same. Additional review of
           the reporting requirements will be made and considered as part of any possible
           future revamping of the policy and reporting requirements.


Calculation of 2% of Average State Appropriation Limit – Procedure 19 limits the
expenditures for intercollegiate athletics from state appropriations to 2% of the average
state appropriation for that fiscal year for the eight four-year colleges. Additional details
concerning this calculation were requested.

       •   The calculation of the average state appropriation for the eight four-year
           colleges should include both general revenues and lottery revenues of a
           recurring base-budget nature, but should exclude appropriations of a special or
           one-time nature. As the level of state appropriated funds at the time the policy
           was developed included component community colleges, the current
           calculation of the 2% limit should be based upon the total institution
           appropriation level. These limits should be modified for the exclusion of
           component community college appropriations if the policy is continued for
           future periods.




                                                                                                158
                               WV HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                             SURVEY OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS FUNDING


   INSTITUTION:                                                              FISCAL YEAR:


                                 PART I: RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS


                                              State           E&G             Athletic &       Private
                                             General         Operating        Other Aux.       Funding
                                             Funds            Funds           Operating        Accounts       TOTAL
                                                                              Accounts
Beginning Balance July 1,                                                                                             0

PLUS RECEIPTS
State Appropriated Funds                                                                                              0
College Work Study                                                                                                    0
Student Athletic Fees                                                                                                 0

GENERATED REVENUES
Gate Receipts/Game Guarantees                                                                                         0
Concessions/Programs/Sales                                                                                            0
Media/Tournament/Post Season                                                                                          0
Other Income (Interest, camps, etc.)                                                                                  0

Private Contributions and Fund Raising                                                                                0

Total Receipts                                           0               0                 0              0           0

Total Available Funds                                    0               0                 0              0           0

LESS: EXPENDITURES
Salaries                                                                                                              0
Employee Benefits                                                                                                     0
Office Expenses & Printing                                                                                            0
Travel                                                                                                                0
Insurance                                                                                                             0
Medical Costs                                                                                                         0
Contractual Guarantees                                                                                                0
Facilities & Equipment Maintenance                                                                                    0
Equipment Purchases                                                                                                   0
Other Operating Expenses                                                                                              0
Scholarships & Student Aid                                                                                            0

Total Expenditures                                       0               0                 0              0           0

Ending Balance June 30,                                N/A           N/A                   0              0           0




                                                                                                                          159
                   WV HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                 SURVEY OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS FUNDING

INSTITUTION:                                                                   FISCAL YEAR:




                        PART II: ATHLETIC FEE WAIVERS

                                             Number of Waivers              Value of Waivers

Total Available to Institution

Number Used for Athletics
  In-State
  Out-of-State




Note: Waivers are limited to 40% of total number available to institution
or 55 waivers, whichever is less.




                                                                                               160
                        WV HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY COMMISSION
                      SURVEY OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS FUNDING

    INSTITUTION:                                                                            FISCAL YEAR:


                         PART III: ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT STAFFING

                                      % State           %E&G            % Athletic &          % Private
                                      General          Operating        Other Aux.            Funding
     Position Title                   Funds             Funds          Operating Accts.       Accounts         TOTAL %

                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %
                                                %                  %                    %                  %                 %




CERTIFICATION:
I hereby certify that the Survey of Intercollegiate Athletics Funding is accurate and complete, and in compliance with the
WV Higher Education Policy Commission's policy on limiting State support of athletics.




                                                                          Athletic Director




                                                                            President




                                                                                                                                 161
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                      West Virginia Council for Community and
                                           Technical College Education Involvement in
                                           the Selection of Community and Technical
                                           College Administrative Heads

INSTITUTIONS:                              Community and Technical Colleges

COMMITTEE:                                 Committee of the Whole

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                    Resolved, That the West Virginia Higher
                                           Education Policy Commission accepts the
                                           recommendation of the West Virginia Council
                                           for Community and Technical College
                                           Education regarding Council involvement in the
                                           selection process of community and technical
                                           college administrative heads.

STAFF MEMBER:                              Jim Skidmore

BACKGROUND:

Under the powers and duties of the West Virginia Council for Community and Technical
College Education described in Senate Bill 703 (18B-2B-6), the Council is to participate
in the selection of administrative heads of community and technical colleges as directed
by the Higher Education Policy Commission. During the meeting of December 18,
2002, the Council passed a motion recommending to the Commission the following:

        “At the point that three final candidates are identified, a committee of three
        Council members will be appointed to interview the candidates and make
        a recommendation to the appropriate individual or organization. The Vice
        Chancellor for Community and Technical College Education and
        Workforce Development may be involved in the process.”




                                                                                            162
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                   Approval of Report on Distance Learning

COMMITTEE:                              Committee of the Whole

INSTITUTIONS:                           All

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                 Resolved, That the West Virginia Higher
                                        Education Policy Commission approves the
                                        following report, The Status of Online Learning
                                        in    West    Virginia   Institutions  Including
                                        Recommendations for Further Expansion, for
                                        submission to the Legislative Oversight
                                        Commission on Education Accountability.

STAFF MEMBER:                           Tom Blevins

BACKGROUND:

This particular study is one of the nineteen study reports required by LOCEA. It is
submitted to the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission for review and
approval prior to submission to LOCEA. This study contains a report from the Southern
Regional Education Board’s (SREB) Distance Learning Policy Lab (DLPL), which in the
words of LOCEA “reviews and assesses levels of online instruction and provides
recommendations for policy changes and other specific actions that would expand
access for West Virginians to high quality learning environments ….” The authors of
this report, James R. Mingle and Bruce N. Chaloux, who work with distance learning
issues for the SREB, have collected statewide and institutional data related to distance
learning initiatives in West Virginia.

Major recommendations are that the Higher Education Policy Commission should 1)
terminate its support of SATNET, 2) continue its strategy of importing curriculum from
out-of-state providers, and 3) develop a proposal for a West Virginia Virtual Learning
Network to carry out important statewide functions.




                                                                                           163
Distance Learning Policy Laboratory


                                         The Status of Online Learning in West Virginia Institutions
                                            Including Recommendations for Further Expansion.


                                                    A Report Prepared for the West Virginia
                                                     Higher Education Policy Commission




                                                                    James R. Mingle
                                                                    Bruce N. Chaloux




                                      Southern Regional Education Board                 January 2003


                                                                                                       164
                              TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.      Charge, Scope of Work, Process                                             1
II.     West Virginia Goals and the Relevance of Technology-based Instruction      1
III.    Progress to Date in Distance Learning                                      3
        a. Table 1: Distance Education Courses by Institution and
            Modality, Spring 2003                                                  6
        b. Table 2: Distance Learning Degree Programs Available to
            West Virginia Citizens, 2002-03                                        7
IV.     Role of Statewide Coordinating Boards                                      9
V.      Issues Relevant to the Current and Future Role
        of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission                    10
VI.     Programmatic Needs                                                         11
VII.    Recommendations                                                            12
VIII.   Appendices
        a. West Virginia participation in the Electronic Campus and                15
            Academic Common Market/Electronic Campus Programs, 2002-03
        b. Marshall University: Distributed Delivery of Professional Development
            Special Project                                                        17
        c. West Virginia University: Technology-Enhanced Outreach Efforts          21




                                                                                        165
             The Status of Online Learning in West Virginia Institutions
                Including Recommendations for Further Expansion

I. Charge, Scope of Work, Process

In October 2002, the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission contracted with the
Southern Regional Education Board to conduct a study to “review and assess levels of online
instruction and provide recommendations for policy changes and other specific actions that would
expand access for West Virginian’s to high quality learning opportunities…” SREB agreed to
undertake this study through the staff of the Distance Learning Policy Laboratory (DLPL). James R.
Mingle, director of DLPL, and Bruce N. Chaloux, director of SREB’s Electronic Campus are the
authors of the report.

The commission study is in response to two of the goals outlined by the Legislative Oversight
Commission on Education Accountability in its request to the commission of May 21, 2002. Goal
#5 calls upon the Commission to expand the use of technology for instructional delivery and
distance learning. Goal #7 requests that the Commission develop “an effective and efficient plan to
foster greater use of online instruction.”

Other studies called upon by the Legislative Oversight Commission which are relevant to this work
include #13 (examination of current and projected capacity relative to demand) and #14 (measures
to align capacity with demand). These studies were not reviewed by the authors of this report and
thus may not be adequately reflected in this work regarding online learning.

The SREB staff has conducted this study through data collection from the West Virginia Higher
Education Policy Commission and selected colleges and universities; through personal interviews
with Commission staff and institutional representatives at a meeting held in Charleston on October
30, 2002; and with subsequent follow-up communications. The recommendations also reflect the
recently completed study by the Distance Learning Policy Laboratory sponsored by the U.S.
Department of Education (see www.electroniccampus.org).

The report reviews not only online learning but also the broader category of “distance learning”
through a variety of technology delivery modes.

The views expressed in this report are those of the authors, and not necessarily those of the Southern
Regional Education Board and its officers.


II. West Virginia Goals and the Relevance of Technology-based Instruction

Technology enhanced instructional delivery is not an end in itself, but a means for students to
achieve their personal and professional goals. For West Virginia, information and communications
technologies can make important contributions to the economic and social well-being of the state.
In 2002, the Commission established the “Compact for the Future of West Virginia” which
delineated six specific goals for higher education and a number of benchmarks against which
progress could be measured. The goals include: 1) preparation; 2) participation; 3) affordability;


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                                                                                                          166
4) competitive workforce; 5) economic development; and 6) accountability. Within each of these six
areas, ambitious benchmarks are set for improvement.

In reviewing these goals, we find that technology-based instruction and distance learning can make
important contributions in each area. Indeed, the goals may not be achievable without greater
utilization of technology.

   1. Preparation: The resources now available via the Internet can make important contributions
      in improving the quality of preparation, particularly among high school students. The
      ability for high school students, especially in rural areas, to enroll in distance learning
      programs offered by West Virginia higher education institutions and virtual high schools in
      other states (e.g. Florida) will significantly enhance the quality of curriculum. Outreach
      efforts by institutions aimed at improving the skills of teachers will also make a significant
      contribution to this goal.

   2. Participation: The Commission has established ambitious goals for increasing both the
      participation rate of recent high school graduates and adults in higher education.
      Technology provides the opportunity to deliver high quality interactive instruction in
      convenient and flexible ways, whether to the desktop at the office or at home. Further, by
      utilizing other outlets, including public libraries, schools, and hospitals and community
      centers, technology will make it possible to reach many more West Virginians and will be an
      important component of the Commissions strategy.

   3. Affordability: The Commission has defined affordability in terms of “net tuition and fees as
      a percent of personal disposable income.” However, students incur other, even more
      substantial costs – most notably “foregone income.” Further, with the increasing number of
      older students entering higher education many face the cost of child-care and transportation
      to attend traditional campus-based programs. Costs to institutions and communities can
      include increased need for transportation infrastructure, parking, and subsequent
      environmental factors. Distance learning reduces or eliminates many of these costs, even if
      tuition and fees rise.

   4. Competitive Workforce: A competitive workforce will “learn as they work” and that means
      within a rich technological environment. No field of human endeavor is exempt from the
      global impact of information storage, dissemination, and knowledge creation. Every student
      will need to be “technologically literate” in order to be prepared for entrance into the
      workforce of the future. Moreover, they will need to continue to learn throughout their lives
      to remain competitive in the changing workplace. Establishing a model of “lifelong
      learning” will require greater technology utilization.

   5. Economic Development: The Commission’s report emphasizes job creation and retention of
      graduates in the state. The state’s ability to retain its graduates is critical to increasing the
      quality of the workforce and to sustained economic development. Economic development in
      the “information age” means access to information. An important component is a well-
      developed, easily accessible library information system available to citizens and businesses.

   6. Accountability: High quality distance learning can add to the success of students by
      providing access, convenience and a satisfying learning experience. Technology-based


Final Report January 2003                                                                            2

                                                                                                          167
        instruction and related online services can help to ensure that educational activities are
        effective and student achievement, against defined standards, is achieved. Students, for
        example often find the level of interaction with faculty greater than in traditional courses and
        numerous studies have indicated that learning via technology equates with that in the
        traditional classroom.

In 2002 the Southern Regional Education Board also adopted an ambitious set of goals for the
coming years, noting that providing affordable access both for traditional-age college students and
adults seeking retraining has become an economic necessity. Indeed, SREB’s Goals for Education:
Challenge to Lead complements the Commission’s goals and have been integrated into a broader
effort by the state to ensure the development of both elementary/secondary and higher education
(see http://www.sreb.org/main/Goals/2002GoalsReport.asp).

“It is hard to imagine that we can reach our education goals without more fully utilizing technology”
concluded Mark Musick, president of SREB, at the national meeting where the results of an
extensive study of policy challenges in distance learning were presented. (The summary report of
can be found at http://www.electroniccampus.org/policylab/index.asp.)


III. Progress to Date in Distance Learning

The most recent assessment of West Virginia’s distance learning capacity was conducted in July,
2000 by Hezel Associates. The review, which follows, provides an update on that report based on
data provided by the Commission staff and institutional representatives.

An Important Caveat on Data: The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission has yet to
establish consistent reporting standards for distance learning. In large part, this reflects the rapidly
changing standards of practice at the institutional level. The data that follows attempts to count
unique courses (not sections), offered in the various modalities discussed. If the figures provided in
the text and tables appear to be low when compared to other data collections, it may reflect the
difference between counting unique “courses” rather than separate sections of the same course. It
may also omit courses not listed on web sites. In short, the figures provided should be considered
rough estimates, not precise counts.

Satellite Delivery: Located at the West Virginia State College Campus, the Satellite Network of
West Virginia (SATNET) provides uplinks servicing over 300 downlink sites across the state.
Initiated in the late 1980’s, SATNET enrollments and course offerings have been stagnant for a
number of years, with average class sizes dropping significantly.

These courses are delivered live to cohort groups of students located at higher education institutions
and other public facilities around the state. The one-way video and two-way audio format provides
opportunities for faculty-to-student and student-to-student interaction. Downlink or receive sites
require physical facilities, maintenance, and personnel support and because they are site-based, offer
no flexibility for students, who must attend on-site at specific times. Further, the system uses analog
technology, which is being phased out and replaced with digital technology. The future availability,
at reasonable rates, for analog satellite time is in question and the cost of replacing existing
equipment prohibitive. The Hezel Report noted this need to significantly upgrade to digital



Final Report January 2003                                                                              3

                                                                                                           168
capacity in the near future and estimated the cost of that upgrade at $1 million in 2000. Current
estimates would likely be higher.

In Fall 2002, the Commission signaled its intent to phase out this delivery mode, using the
appropriated dollars to fund a statewide WebCT contract aimed at increasing Internet courses.
Only West Virginia University will remain on the satellite with its special education program. This
program also will be phased out during the coming academic year.

Public Broadcast: The West Virginia Higher Education Instructional Television Consortium
(HEITV) started operations in 1976 and serves as the distributor of Public Broadcasting Service
(PBS) telecourses to public television stations in the state. Most courses also have a live “face-to-
face” component, which requires students to meet professors on campus. Typically, West Virginia
public institutions offer 16-20 telecourses per year. Currently about 1,400 students are enrolled in
these programs. Similar to SATNET, course offerings and enrollments were in decline in the 90’s
from its peak in 1983-84. In 2002, however, enrollments turned up again as PBS began
broadcasting more academic programming.

Interactive Video (IVIN): This delivery-mode uses compressed video over landlines to deliver
synchronous instruction to off-campus sites. (In some cases, these “live” classes may be video taped
and replayed). West Virginia institutions will offer 173 courses in this format in Spring 2003. (See
Table 1).

Online (Internet-based) Instruction: Hezel estimated that in calendar year 1999, 106 courses were
offered online by five different institutions with approximately 1,100 students enrolled.

Our best estimate is that the current number of online courses offered in Spring 2003 by West
Virginia Institutions is approximately 343, a dramatic increase over three years ago. Assuming an
average enrollment of 10 students over two semesters (10 x 343 x 2) this would put annual
enrollments at about 6,800 students, or more than a six-fold increase since 1999-2000.

Mixed Mode Delivery (T-Courses): Increasingly institutions are developing a mixed mode of
delivery of Internet instruction, with some asynchronous component and some face-to-face. The
Commission has established an 80% threshold for these courses to be categorized in this modality.

We have no statewide estimate of courses or numbers in this modality; however Marshall University,
the largest developer of such courses reported that 62 Internet courses with an average class size of 15
were offered in Spring 2002.

Imported Programs from Other States: In 2002, the Commission took an important step in
expanding access to distance learning programs available to West Virginians by creating formal
arrangements to import offerings by institutions outside the state. The most important of these
agreements is with Kentucky Virtual University (KYVU) and the Kentucky Community and
Technical College System to provide opportunities for up to 400 West Virginia students to enroll in
the KYVU associate degree courses and programs offered over the Internet. As of Fall 2002, 220
West Virginia students had enrolled in one or more of the courses available (KYVU offers in excess
of 200 courses to West Virginia residents). Students in West Virginia pay Kentucky in-state tuition
rates plus 20%, an amount that is still lower than rates at West Virginia institutions. In addition,
the Commission pays KYVU $5,000 per year for student access to the Kentucky Virtual Library


Final Report January 2003                                                                               4

                                                                                                            169
In a similar vein, West Virginia higher education officials have entered into an agreement with the
Virginia Community College System to provide both interactive video and online courses.
Participating institutions include Eastern West Virginia Community College and Bluefield State
College’s Greenbrier Community College Center. At the time this report was prepared, there were
no course enrollments or activities to report from this arrangement.

Statewide Courses and Programs: Like other states, the availability of full academic programs that
can be taken predominantly “at a distance” is much more limited than the availability of individual
courses. Significant progress in West Virginia, however, has been made in the past year.

By our estimate, there are now 11 academic degree programs and an additional four certificates or
areas of emphasis fully available statewide via distance learning. In addition, there are two programs
at Marshall University, which are nearly complete or scheduled to be complete in the near future
(See Table 2). Also included in this table is the partnership with Kentucky Virtual University for an
associate degree curriculum described earlier.

As for total courses, an estimated 563 asynchronous Internet courses are now available in West
Virginia each semester. About 40% of these will be provided through the arrangement with
Kentucky Virtual University. (This may be a somewhat inflated percentage if the listings from KVU
include multiple sections from the same course.)

If the commission counts both the imported courses and those available from Kentucky institutions,
we estimate that about 3.7 percent of all course offerings (15,000) are currently in an online format.
If the Commission counts only those available from West Virginia institutions, the percentage drops
to 2.3. (If the 15,000 figure includes multiple sections of the same course, these percentages are too
low.)

The West Virginia Virtual Learning Network currently lists approximately 180 courses from seven
West Virginia Institutions, with more than half of these being delivered from one institution:
Marshall University. Since the criteria for listing these courses is that slots will be available to
students outside the college or university, this may be a more realistic number of courses available to
“distant learners” than the figures in Table 1. Without additional information however, it is
impossible to know how many potential spaces may be available.




Final Report January 2003                                                                             5

                                                                                                          170
                                                 Table 1

               Distance Education Courses by Institution and Modality
                                   Spring 2003
                       Prepared December 13, 2002; revised January 16, 2003


                             Interactive Internet   SATNET      Instructional           Total
                                                                     TV
                               Video      Online        or           PBS                Course
                                or          or                        or
Institution                    IVIN        Web      Satellite     HEITV         Total    Offerings All
                                           CT                                               Types
Marshall University             59         32           5            7          103
West Virginia University        39         108          8            11         166
Bluefield State College         20          9           1             6          36
Concord College
WV Northern Community            0          18          0            2           20
College
WVU Tech                        42          46                       4           92
Fairmont State College           0          27          0            9           36
SWCC                                         6          1                         7
WVU – P                                     57                                   57
Potomac State College
West Liberty State College
EWVCC                           13          31                                   44
WVSC
Glenville State College                     9                                    9
Shepherd College


Total Courses by Modality       173        343          15           39         570     15,000 (est.)




Notes:
   1. The numbers provided in this table are a result of reviewing college web sites, their Spring 03
       schedules, distance learning pages, and catalogs. They reflect distinct course offering, not
       sections, and may vary from institutional counts for this and other reasons such as adding,
       dropping or updating spring schedules. In some cases, institutions may not be listing all
       distance-learning courses on their web site. The Dean of Extended Learning provided
       corrected figures for WVU. Institutions that have blank columns showed no results in the
       search for distance learning courses.
   2. The total number of course offerings (15,000) was provided by Commission staff and may
       include multiple sections of some courses. If so, the number may be inflated when compared
       to the distinct course offerings by modality.


Final Report January 2003                                                                                6

                                                                                                             171
                                       Table 2
                    Distance Learning Degree Programs Available to
                                West Virginia Citizens
                                       2002-03

 Name or Type of Program         Certificate or Degree      Participating Institutions
Information                              A.A.S              13 Two-year institutions
Technology(WVEXcITE)
General Education                    A.A. & A.S.           Kentucky Virtual University
PBS “Going the Distance”             A.A. & A.S.               4 State Institutions
Special Education                       M.A.                          WVU
Physical Education (Teacher             M.A.                          WVU
Education)
Software Engineering                    M.S.                         WVU
Integrated Marketing                  Certificate                    WVU
Communication
Software Engineering                 Certificate                     WVU
Nursing                          R.N/BSN &M.S.N                      WVU
Rehabilitation Counseling               M.S.                         WVU
Foreign Languages               Teaching Endorsement                 WVU
Professional Writing              Area of Emphasis                   WVU
Occupational Therapy              B.S. Completion                    WVU
Education Leadership                    M.A.                         MU
Studies*
University Regents BA                    B.A.                         MU
General Studies **                       A.A.                         MU

Notes:
   1. Some WVU programs require onsite component. All are majority distance learning.
   2. *Available in T Courses (at least 80% online).
   3. ** Expected to be fully online in Fall 2004.




Final Report January 2003                                                                7

                                                                                             172
WV Participation in SREB Initiatives: West Virginia has been an active participant in a number of
SREB’s distance learning initiatives. Representatives from West Virginia initially helped SREB staff
and other state representatives frame the policies and procedures for participation in the program.
Subsequently they have promoted participation in the SREB’s Electronic Campus (EC), have
reviewed, and approved current programs and courses for inclusion in the EC. Nearly 100 courses
and three degree programs are currently listed in the Electronic Campus.

When SREB launched its Academic Common Market/Electronic Campus (ACM/EC) initiative,
West Virginia selected five online programs from other SREB states, making those online programs
not otherwise available from West Virginia’s colleges and universities, available to West Virginia
residents at in-state tuition rates. A summary of the current involvement of West Virginia
institutions in the EC is included in Appendix A.

Finally, West Virginia has recently initiated an effort to expand “West Virginia Mentor” to include
all public colleges and universities. WVMentor is a statewide system that makes available from one
integrated site (www.wvmentor.org) information about West Virginia’s colleges and universities,
financial aid information, career development tools, online applications for admission and financial
aid, and a variety of other services. West Virginia joins 11 other SREB states in making Mentor
systems available to residents of their states. SREB is building on to Mentor systems an adult and e-
learning dimension. Dubbed “Ways In™,” this regional “learning network” will link, through
Ways In Mentor, existing Mentor sites and provide greater access to e-learning opportunities and
services.

Other Institutional Initiatives: Appendices B and C outline a number of other important
technology related initiatives underway at the state’s two largest institutions: West Virginia
University and Marshall University. (Other institutions may have similar programs). Particularly
noteworthy are the variety of externally funded programs to work with school districts and teachers
by both West Virginia University and Marshall University.


Summary of Current Offerings and Capacity

Full and accurate data are not yet available in West Virginia as to the number of courses, programs,
and enrollments in distance learning. (A common problem in other states as well). Given the data
available however, we can draw some tentative conclusions.

       Online learning is growing rapidly as other modalities remain stagnant or decline.
       Kentucky Virtual University accounts for a significant component of online learning in the
       state.
       West Virginia institutions will offer an estimated 343 fully-asynchronous Internet based
       courses in Spring 2003.
       In Fall 2002, eleven complete degree programs and another four certificates were available in
       a distance learning modality.
       Online learning delivery is estimated at about 2.3 percent of all course offerings in the state;
       and about 3.7 percent of all offerings if imported courses from Kentucky Virtual University
       are included.


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                                                                                                           173
IV. The Role of Statewide Coordinating Boards in Technology-based Instruction

Coordinating Boards like the West Virginia Commission typically do not have direct governing or
fiduciary responsibility for campuses. Nor do they often directly oversee educational activities or
services in which students directly participate. Nevertheless, their powers and responsibilities are
substantial. As the primary agency charged with planning and coordination, they can exercise
substantial influence on the goals, objectives, and activities of the state’s postsecondary system. In
addition, they exercise significant control over institutional priorities through budgetary powers and
regulatory authority.

Most importantly, coordinating boards like the West Virginia Commission have played a central
role in developing statewide goals for extended accessed and improved quality. In this regard, they
play the role of both student advocate and institutional change agent.

In the area of information technology, their role in many states is substantial and growing. Either
alone, or in cooperation with other state agencies and the private sector they have been involved in
the following:

       The development of statewide telecommunications networks.
       The initiation and funding of virtual libraries that provides widespread citizen access to
       information resources regardless of the user location.
       The organization and management of “virtual universities” whose functions can range from
       simple electronic catalogues, to the provision of student services (e.g. help desks and
       tutoring) to academic course development and marketing.
       The negotiation of statewide licensing agreements for information databases, course
       management software, and other technology related tools.
       The development or participation in joint purchasing cooperatives on behalf of institutions.
       The determination of critical state needs that can be met by technology-based instruction,
       research and service activities.
       The brokering of agreements with out-of-state systems and institutions for the importation
       of curriculum.
       The development of tuition and fee policies (e.g. electronic rates that are independent of the
       location of the learner).
       The funding of faculty and curriculum development efforts that is technology-related.
       The opening of markets to institutions outside the state, which are ready to serve the needs
       of state residents.




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                                                                                                           174
V. Issues Relevant to the Current and Future Role of the West Virginia Higher Education
   Policy Commission (HEPC)

In our review of documents and our personal interviews with Commission staff and institutional
representatives, the following issues surfaced relative to the role of the Commission and its funding
policies.

   1. Determining the Appropriate Role for Providers and Receivers of Distance Learning: In many
      states there has been a rush from too many institutions to enter the distance learning market.
      The Commission is supporting a more limited approach, however – a strategy which we
      support. The ability to compete in a global market of providers will require significant
      resources, not only for curriculum, but also for student services and back-office operations.
      In setting its policies, the Commission will need to distinguish between the technological
      needs that all campuses have to support their operations, and those special needs required of
      institutions that are going to provide programs statewide and beyond. At the same time,
      financial incentives are needed to support the important role of local receiver.

   2. The Role and Functions of the West Virginia Virtual Learning Network (WVVLN): This
      nascent effort is a consortium of the state’s public higher education institutions whose
      purpose is to support the development and delivery of online courses to the state’s citizens.
      Its activities to date have focused on the development of a web site listing available courses
      and programs (expected to be operational by Spring 2003). In addition, there are proposals
      to better define “articulated pathways” to degrees targeted at non-traditional learners and the
      development of a “tiered network” of learning centers across West Virginia to provide
      technical access.

   3. The financing of enrollment growth: Under the current “peer institution” approach to
      funding, there are no explicit incentives for institutions to expand enrollments either on-
      campus or through distance learning – except those provided by the generation of tuition
      revenue. Given that nearly half of the current tuition and fees is dedicated to bond
      retirement, even this financial incentive is relatively weak. While it is beyond the scope of
      this study to offer recommendations for changing the overall funding system, we do believe
      that the current system should be reexamined in light of the aggressive goals for increasing
      participation.

   4. Local Support of Distance Learning Students: Community colleges participating in the
      contract program with the Kentucky Virtual University believe that students participating in
      these programs are in need of local support. This may take the form of technical or
      academic assistance or merely “hand holding” to build student confidence in undertaking
      this new mode of education. Currently there is no financial support either from the state or
      through tuition to pay for these costs. Some institutions have dedicated operational funds to
      this purpose; others have not.

   5. Statewide Student Services: Services provided distant learners are primarily an institutional
      responsibility in West Virginia. However, in November 2002, the Commission took an
      important step in collaborating with West Virginia Mentor a service that will provide
      information and admissions applications for West Virginia’s degree-granting public and


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       independent colleges and universities. From this “portal” students will be able to explore
       learning opportunities, visit (virtually) colleges and universities, make application online via
       WVApply, and apply for financial aid. Access to the WVMentor system is provided free of
       charge. The service is supported by Xap, a California based corporation and is underwritten
       by American Education Services, a division of the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance
       Authority, a student loan guarantor agency.

   6. Relationship with other state agencies and entities: One of the most important functions of
      statewide coordinating boards relates to the “border” functions with other entities. In other
      states, this function has led to important collaborative efforts with state departments of
      education, state and local library systems, and state economic development efforts. In the
      section that follows and in our recommendations we suggest some specific cooperative
      initiatives for the Commission.

   7. Accountability measures: The Commission has established a number of concrete benchmarks
      against which the state plans to measure its progress. Distance learning should be expected
      to make its contribution toward the achievement of these goals. In addition the
      Commission has established an “informal” goal of having 25% of its course offerings
      statewide available online.

   8. Statewide Coordination: The Commission has moved to secure important infrastructure
      needed for distance learning by negotiating a statewide licensing agreement with a vendor for
      a course management system. In addition, the Commission is playing an active role in the
      coordination of statewide course offerings and the negotiation of payment and revenue
      sharing policies. We believe these are important steps in the development of a statewide
      distance learning effort.


VI. Programmatic Needs

In the course of our interviews, a number of critical statewide needs were identified and discussed.
Others may emerge from parallel studies in response to the May 2002 legislative mandates.

Teacher Education: The legislative mandate calling for a study of online education explicitly
mentions the field of teacher education. According to institutional representatives there is a
widespread belief among legislators and policymakers that a shortage of qualified teachers exists in
the state. This is not supported however by the data provided on teacher education graduates and
employed teachers from the State Department of Education. This agency reports that only 1,240
teachers out of a workforce of 24,253 in the 2000-2001 school year did not have certifications in
their field.

Commission staff note, however, that future demands are likely to change this picture as high school
graduation requirements are increased in the years ahead. And current shortages already exist in
such sub-specialties as special education, math, science, and foreign languages.

We would also note that the full impact of recent federal legislation (No Child Left Behind) is likely
to put considerable pressure on school districts, particularly rural ones, to upgrade their staffs. For



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example, by 2006, all teacher aides in Title I schools are expected to have an associate degree or its
equivalent.

Workforce Development Programs: While the shortage of information technology (IT) workers has
been largely alleviated because of overcapacity in the telecommunications sector, this demand will
likely return over the long term and is already being stimulated by government contracts related to
homeland security. Other fields, including many in the public sector (e.g. criminal justice and
health care fields such as nursing) may well emerge in the Commission’s studies. Many of the
“applied” programs are notably short in online learning resources, although a number of new
nursing programs have emerged in other states during the past year.

Adult Literacy: West Virginia has set ambitious goals for increasing adult literacy. We believe that
technology can play an important role in achieving these goals. As in most states, the primary
responsibility for adult education and ESL instruction rests with the state department of education
and is supported primarily by federal funds. The Commission may want to examine strategies
undertaken in Kentucky. Joint efforts between higher education, the K-12 sector, and the state
economic development office have been aimed at using technology to increase the number of literacy
tutors and the sophistication of learning tools.


VII. Recommendations

The recommendations below are offered with full understanding of the current fiscal situation in
West Virginia. It is unlikely, that some of the more expansive initiatives recommended can be
undertaken in the near future. But we believe the intent of the legislative mandate to the
Commission was to develop a long-range plan to better utilize technology. Thus we have offered
both recommendations that can be undertaken immediately and those that may need to wait for an
up-turn in state revenues. We congratulate policymakers and institutional leaders, faculty, and staff
on the commitments already demonstrated.

Our recommendations are as follows:

      1. The Commission should terminate its support of SATNET. We support the recent decision
         of the Chancellor to phase out support of SATNET. A number of reasons can be cited for
         this action: a) the emergence of asynchronous delivery to the desktop as the primary mode
         of delivery for distance learning courses; b) the declining enrollment and high cost of
         delivery of the current system; c) the necessity for upgrading the current system; and d) the
         need for reallocation, given the current fiscal climate.

      2. The Commission should continue its strategy of importing curriculum from out-of-state
         providers. We find this to be an all-to-rare occurrence in state policy and applaud the
         Commission’s vision and leadership for undertaking the contract with Kentucky Virtual
         University. This arrangement is good for Kentucky and good for the citizens of West
         Virginia. Further, it reduces development costs and utilizes existing, high quality
         resources. We encourage exploration of similar opportunities for contracting for courses,
         particularly in those fields identified as critical shortage areas.




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     3. The Commission should initiate its proposal for a West Virginia Virtual Learning Network to
        carry out important statewide functions including a) a public portal of distance learning
        offerings; b) negotiation of statewide contracts with vendors (including providers of courses
        and curriculum); and better articulation of degree-credit among institutions.

       In the long term, whether under this structure or another, we urge the Commission to
       consider an even broader set of services aimed at improving the quantity and quality of
       offerings and to gain economies of scale. These should include:

               Promoting the statewide development and utilization of technology in teaching and
               learning on college and university campuses;
               Building upon the current West Virginia Mentor™ program to include online
               applications, access to online library resources and services, financial aid information
               and access, and career development tools;
               Encouraging faculty development efforts in technology use;
               Developing collaborative degree programs;
               Ensuring the quality of e-learning programs, courses and services delivered by West
               Virginia colleges and universities;
               Encouraging strategic initiatives and partnerships to provide a breadth and depth of
               services for West Virginians; and
               Promoting lifelong learning opportunities for West Virginians.

     4. The Commission, in cooperation with the State Department of Education, should initiate a
        significant new effort aimed at adult literacy. This effort is too important to be left to a
        single agency. It will take a cooperative effort to meet the goals of the state and expand the
        program. Technology can play a role in training teachers and improving the effectiveness
        of student learning.

     5. The Commission, the State Librarian, and other appropriate groups, initiate a comprehensive
        “virtual library” initiative. This can be done initially within a statewide portal (suggested
        above) by providing access to existing collections. Over time, such a statewide initiative
        could realize real savings by negotiating contacts for access to online collections. The goal
        should be widespread free or low cost access to the information resources of the state’s
        libraries to all citizens regardless of their location.

     6. The Commission, in cooperation with the State Department of Education and local school
        districts, identify the needs for continuing education of teachers and staff, particularly in
        response to the requirement of the new federal legislation on schools found in “No Child Left
        Behind” (NCLB). This initiative can build upon the already substantial efforts of West
        Virginia institutions. As noted earlier we expect the continuing education needs of
        employed teachers to grow.

     7. The Commission should provide special funding through appropriations and/or student fees for
        the provision of local tutoring support for distance learners, particularly those served by imported
        programs. Both as an incentive for institutions to participate and as a way of meeting the
        real needs of students for local support, we recommend the Commission examines its
        current contractual relationship with KYVU and its tuition and fee policy. The goal


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         should be to adequately fund the costs of student support at any state receive site or
         location where services are provided.

     8. The Commission should establish accountability measures for monitoring progress in online
        education, which recognizes the role of both provider and receiver roles. The first task will be
        to establish definitions and reporting standards that are more consistent and
        understandable so that progress can be accurately measured. Secondly, given that we
        estimate that only about 2 percent of existing class offerings are online, the current goal of
        providing up to 25 percent in this category may need to be adjusted. A more appropriate
        goal may be to establish numerical benchmarks for year-to-year growth in enrollments and
        offerings, making sure to include “imported” courses.

     9. The Commission should expand its participation in a number of SREB initiatives, specifically
        the Electronic Campus, the Academic Common Market/Electronic Campus (ACM/EC)
        initiative, and the new regional “Ways In Mentor.” The ACM/EC program could make
        additional online degree programs available at in-state rates and, by doing so; expand
        opportunities for West Virginians significantly. West Virginia’s commitment to
        establishing its own statewide Mentor™ system can be expanded dramatically by linking
        to and coordinating efforts and services through the regional Ways In Mentor system
        currently being developed.




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                                       Appendix A
    West Virginia Participation in the Electronic Campus and the Academic Common
               Market/Electronic Campus for Academic Year 2002-2003


                          Distance Learning Courses in the Electronic Campus
2      Bluefield State College         2 Undergraduate                              1 Internet,
                                                                                    1 Videotape
42     Marshall University            40 Undergraduate                              42 Internet
                                      2 Graduate
2      Southern West Virginia         2 Undergraduate                               2 Internet
       Community and Technical
       College
10     West Virginia Northern         10 Undergraduate                              10 Internet
       Community College
1      West Virginia State College    Undergraduate                                 1 Satellite
35     West Virginia University       22 Graduate                                   27 Internet, 8
                                      13 Undergraduate                              Satellite,
                                                                                    1 Audio
6      West Virginia University       6 Undergraduate                               3 Internet,
       Institute of Technology                                                      3 CD-Rom
98

                       Distance Learning Programs in the Electronic Campus
       West Virginia University     Master of Science in Education – Special        Satellite
                                    Education
       West Virginia University     Master of Science in Software Engineering       Internet
       West Virginia University     Master of Science in Physical Education         Internet
                                    Teacher Education

                 Programs Available to West Virginia Residents through the ACM/EC
AL     Jacksonville State University  Bachelor of Science in Emergency Management   Internet
AL     Jacksonville State University  Master of Public Administration /Emergency    Internet
                                      Management
FL     Florida State University       Master of Science in Information Science,     Internet
                                      Library and Information Studies
TN     University of Tennessee –      Master of Science in Information Science      Internet
       Knoxville
VA     Virginia Commonwealth          PhD in Health Related Science                 Internet
       University




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                                    Appendix B
                                Marshall University
          Distributed Delivery of Professional Development Special Project

ARSI: http://www.arsi.org/
The Appalachian Rural Systemic Initiative is a program designed to improve the performance of K-
12 students in mathematics and science by strengthening the knowledge and skills of teachers.
During 2002, Marshall University has been and continues to be involved in several ARSI projects
and initiatives. One such project is the partnership Marshall has formed with ATEC (Appalachian
Technology Education Consortium), which focuses on the importance of technology and providing
online technology training to teachers.

IBM Learning Village:
IBM has awarded the West Virginia Department of Education and Marshall University a $1.5
million grant designed to drive higher-quality training for West Virginia teachers by creating a first-
of-its-kind collaboration between teacher education programs and the public schools they serve. The
technology-based initiative will link the West Virginia Department of Education with Marshall
University, where student teachers as well as veteran teachers will learn to use IBM Learning Village
-- new Web-based educational tools designed to drive higher student achievement. IBM's $1.5
million commitment to West Virginia is part of a $15 million Reinventing Education grant program
will pave the way for teachers at more than 20 leading schools of education in nine states to receive
new levels of quality training and professional development that help meet the requirements of the
President’s No Child Left Behind Act.

The West Virginia Department of Education was awarded one of the first IBM school reform grants,
where its success in raising student achievement in grades 7 through 11 is documented by
independent evaluation. This latest IBM grant will build on the success of Reinventing Education
in West Virginia. “With the No Child Left Behind Act in full swing this fall, this grant comes at a
perfect time to assist us in meeting some of the new mandates,” said Brenda Williams, Executive
Director for the Office of Instructional Technology. “Based on the historical positive partnerships
with IBM and Marshall University, this experience will allow us to provide our educators a powerful
form of professional development.”

For pre-service teachers, IBM Learning Village tools will be integrated into Marshall University's
methods classes and field experiences. For in-service teachers, the project plans to create IBM
Learning Village training modules that will include lesson plan development, assessment activities,
portfolio development and mentoring. The project also will provide teacher-training tools for all
state teachers through the eight Regional Educational Service Agencies.

Infinity Project:
The Infinity Project is a nationally recognized partnership between leading research universities,
industry, government, and K-12 educators to help school districts incorporate modern engineering
and technology into their high school curricula. CITE (College of Information Technology and
Engineering) at Marshall University has committed to help Kanawha County Schools (KCS) in its
adoption of the Infinity Project. In July 2002, CITE conducted a professional development
workshop for math, science, and technology teachers who are responsible for delivering the Infinity



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Project courses in KCS during the year. CITE will follow-up with several more online professional
development sessions for the KCS teachers throughout the remainder of this year.

June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development:
Two components of the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development at
Marshall University, the June Harless Center for Reading Excellence and the Center for Innovative
Learning Strategies, are currently working together to provide online professional development for
public school teachers. On December 18, a pilot program begins which focuses on Writing Across
the Curriculum for the staff at four Wayne County middles schools. In January, an online
professional development program will begin at five Wayne County elementary schools and one
Mingo County elementary school, which will focus upon best reading practices and strategies for
elementary teachers. http://www.marshall.edu/coe/june.harless/

Project ACCLAIM: http://www.marshall.edu/acclaim/
The Appalachian Collaborative Center for Learning, Assessment, and Instruction in Mathematics
(ACCLAIM) is a collaboration among Marshall University, the University of Tennessee, the
University of Kentucky, the University of Ohio, the University of Louisville, and the Appalachian
Rural Systemic Initiative. The Center was funded in 2002 for five years by a $5 million grant from
the National Science Foundation. Marshall University is responsible for ACCLAIM’s teacher
education initiative. This initiative includes delivering professional development for postsecondary
faculty, which can be delivered via online learning.

Project MERIT: http://webpages.marshall.edu/~blevins/merit.htm &
http://wvde.state.wv.us/projectmerit/
Project MERIT: Mathematics Education Reform Initiative for Teachers," a five-year Teacher
Enhancement project, continues and expands a prior NSF-supported planning project to address the
established need of middle school mathematics teachers to improve knowledge of the content of
mathematics and how students learn mathematics. MERIT builds capacity for change through
professional development by nurturing a mathematics leadership team (MLTs) and 125 mentor
teachers (MMTs), one or more from each of the 55 county school systems in West Virginia. Using
the NSF-supported MathScape instructional materials as the vehicle for change, MERIT provides
for the systematic delivery of instruction in the pedagogical content knowledge of mathematics to
more than 950 middle grades mathematics teachers. Over the life of the project, the 35-member
mathematics leadership team (MLTs) participates in 36 days of formal professional development; the
125 mentor teachers (MMTs), 45 days; the approximately 950 middle grades mathematics teachers,
18 days; school/county administrators, 9 days; and higher education faculty and administrators, 10
days.
Project evaluation includes both student and teacher components. Evaluation of student
achievement is made using the Stanford Achievement Test-9 (SAT-9) and ACT Explore. The
teacher component assesses growth in teacher content knowledge, pedagogical skills, and classroom
implementation strategies. The project is a collaborative effort among the W. Va. Department of
Education, the University and State College Systems of W. Va., the W. Va. Council of Teachers of
Mathematics, and the W. Va. Mathematics and Science Coalition.
Marshall is involved with several online algebra projects:

1. Evelyn Pupplo-Cody chairs the Mathematics Electronic Course Committee on the Marshall
campus. The committee is currently developing four online courses: College Algebra (MTH 130E),


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College Algebra with Business Applications (MTH 123E), Math for Liberal Arts Majors (MTH
121E), Statistics (MTH 225E). Those are the generic names; MU course titles differ slightly. These
courses are also being developed as dual-credit high school offerings. The MTH 130E course is
ready, and is being piloted this fall at St. Joseph High School by Francie Martin.

2. Marshall is also involved with Project MERIT, a statewide effort to update the mathematics skills
of middle school teachers. This project is headed by Dr. Elizabeth (Libby) Frye at Fairmont State
College. The courses are developed by a partnership between WVU & MU and are distance
learning courses with a few face-to-face meetings. The Algebra course began last year and is being
offered again this year. Lead on that course is Bob Mayes (WVU). The Geometry course is offered
this fall for the first time. Lead on that course is Karen Mitchell (MU). Statistics & Calculus
courses will follow next year under the leadership of Nancy Wilson (MUGC) & Bob Mayes. I chair
the Marshall group that is working on this, and we have five other faculty members.

Accomplished Teachers Project:
The West Virginia/Marshall University Accomplished Teacher Project (ATP) is designed to build
upon the successes of the past and create new initiatives to recruit and support National Board
Certified Teachers (NBCT) on a statewide and regional basis. This effort is technology based and
will emphasize recruiting and supporting NBCT candidates from every county (school system) in
the state. A special emphasis will be placed on recruiting and supporting candidates in school
systems with no NBCTs, low achieving schools and low achieving school systems. The project will
also seek to develop partnerships and coordinate NBCT candidate recruitment and support
initiatives with other states and agencies throughout the Appalachian region.

In 2000-01, there were 20,845 classroom teachers employed in West Virginia schools. The number
of teachers per school district ranged from 80 in Clay County to more than 2,000 in Kanawha
County. The number of National Board Certified Teachers grew from one in 1997 to two in 1999
to 23 in 2000 (19 from the same school district) and, finally, to 54 National Board Certified
Teachers in West Virginia in 2001. During the 2001 cycle, the Marshall University Accomplished
Teacher Project enrolled 16 participants from 11 different school districts.

The West Virginia Accomplished Teacher Project is now in its third year of operation. The project
has been small but successful. Thirteen of the 16 candidates completing the program in 2000-01
achieved national certification. Resources currently available and committed to the project include:

•      Full candidate fee support currently provided by the West Virginia Legislature upon
       completion of the NBCT process; (legislation passed in 1999 and is retroactive to 1998);
•      Candidates who are banking have funds available to pay for retakes (2001);
•      Candidates who certify currently are reimbursed up to $600 for materials and expenses;
•      Marshall University’s technology capacity and infrastructure are in place to continue to
       support the online components of the initiative;
•      Facilities and equipment for training have been provided by RESA III and Marshall
       University;
•      Marshall University is committed to housing and facilitating statewide and regional
       coordination for the project; and
•      A successful track record with the current candidate support program (ATP).



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                                        Major Project Activities
The major activities for each of the three project components are described below:

Candidate Recruitment Component
Major recruitment activities include:
•      Conduct three-day summer institutes at selected sites throughout the state; these institutes
       are designed to immerse candidates in the National Board process;
•      Recruit and disseminate National Board information at statewide professional conferences
       (math, science, middle level, superintendents, PTA, etc.); district staff development sessions;
       faculty senates and Boards of Education; and
•      Conduct statewide public information initiatives such as newspaper advertising, statewide
       web site, recruitment brochure distribution, and development/distribution of candidate
       information packets.

Candidate Support Component
Because of the demonstrated success of the Accomplished Teaching Project (ATP) through Marshall
University to both recruit and support candidates in rural districts, this proposal is focused on
providing support for the continuation and expansion of the ATP model. The major components of
this model are online support using WebCT as the instructional platform, monthly face-to-face
candidate meetings, mentor support, and a graduate credit coursework option for portfolio
development. Since all of West Virginia is included in the Appalachian region, the goal is to expand
the ATP to develop regional site locations (RESA based cohorts). During 2002-2003 the goal is to
make four sites operational (based on geographic distribution of 2002-03 candidates). In 2003-04,
the goal is to make all eight sites operational.




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                           Outreach Projects at Marshall University
Marshall University has numerous ongoing outreach projects and programs. The following table
shows the number of approximate people in the community, which are served by some of Marshall's
outreach projects. Check back to watch the "Total Population Served" number grow as more and
more outreach projects at Marshall are included in the below listing. Development projects that are
distributed are highlighted in yellow.

                                                                                     Population
                              Outreach Project/Program
                                                                                       Served
ACCLAIM                                                                                  TBD
AROPCNC—Appalachian Rural Outreach Primary Care Nursing Center                            600
ARSI--Appalachian Rural Systemic Initiative                                             17,874
Autism Training Center                                                                    600
Careers in Coal                                                                            7
CBER—Center for Business and Economic Research                                          10,000
Child Care Academy                                                                        406
Children's & Teens' College                                                               500
Circle of Friends Preschool                                                               15
Cisco Networking Academy                                                                  80
CITE--Center                                                                              684
Computer Learning Center                                                                  800
Deckhand Training                                                                         36
Discover Program                                                                         TBD
Drop-In Workshop Series (Drinko Library)                                                 6200
Dual Credit                                                                               950
Ebenezer Outreach Clinic                                                                 1900
EMI--Environmental Management Incubator                                                   540
Enterprise Project                                                                       TBD
EntrePREP                                                                                 24
HOSTS Program                                                                            TBD
IMPACT--Implementing Model Practices to Assure Competent Teachers                         35
International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades                                   400
ITCAP--Information Technology Career Advancement Program                                  60
June Harless Center                                                                      2100
June Harless Distance Learning Program                                                    47
K-12 Summer Enrichment Program                                                            300
Larry Joe Harless Community Center                                                       TBD
LIP--Leadership Intern Program                                                            12
Lego Camp                                                                                 160
Library Associates                                                                        300



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Marshall University Leadership Academy                  30
Military Program (SEE)                                 TBD
Mini-Society                                            25
Marshall University Forensic Science Center           3,000+
Marshall University Psychology Clinic                  100
MUGC Community Clinical Services Center               5,000+
Performing Arts Program                               11,000
Project MUST                                           TBD
RTI--Rahall Transportation Institute                   3,733
Robert C. Byrd Institute for Flexible Manufacturing   37,000+
Read Aloud Project                                      42
RuralNet                                               6,200
S.C.O.R.E.S.                                           3,000
School of Extended Education                           4,000
Small Business Development Center                      315
Speech and Hearing Center                              920
TLP--Teacher Lecture Program                           200
Toyota's Science on Wheels                             3000
Upward Bound                                            70
WebCT Conference                                       100
Westmoreland School Project                             90
WV Prevention Resource Center                         1,000+
WVEDucation2                                           TBD
Total Population Served                               123,455




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                                        Appendix C
                               WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY
                            Technology-Enhanced Outreach Efforts

                Distance Education Degree Programs and Special Projects
Libraries
WVU Libraries offers services to distance education students and off-campus WVU employees via
their web site at www.libraries.wvu.edu/distance. Distant students have access to the same databases
and research sources as on-campus students and librarians will e-mail articles or mail books to
students via the U.S. Postal Service. Campus lectures are also available online. The library staff has
just completed digitizing the videotapes of the Benedum Scholar Lectures and they will be available
on the web site. The library also has other initiatives to help scholars and historians. WVU and
Carnegie Mellon are participating in a National Science Foundation-funded digital information
project. WVU will contribute digitized materials from an archive of coal miners and mining
including speeches of John L. Lewis and other oral history of labor organizing in West Virginia.
Other digitization projects of unique West Virginia materials are planned. WVU regularly posts
online exhibits from varied collections at www.libraries.wvu.edu/exhibits/. WVU Libraries web site,
including the MountainLynx online catalog, is also available to anyone with an Internet connection.

The Health Sciences Library is the state provider for the National Network for Libraries of Medicine.
It also provides extensive electronic document delivery services to rural healthcare providers statewide.

West Virginia Legal Education http://www.wvu.edu/~law/cle/
West Virginia Continuing Legal Education serves the legal profession by providing the highest quality
and most innovative programs, publications and services to enable West Virginia attorneys to practice
law competently, professionally and ethically. West Virginia Continuing Legal Education is a
cooperative effort of the West Virginia University College of Law and the West Virginia State Bar,
and is the most respected and most often relied upon source of continuing professional education for
West Virginia attorneys, providing live seminars, distance learning and online education
opportunities, and self-study resources through videotapes, audiocassettes, and compact discs. In
fiscal year 2001-2002, WVCLE enrolled 2,932 lawyers for its seminars, audio/visual and online
courses.

In order to provide members of the West Virginia Bar with an efficient, easy manner in which to
satisfy their mandatory continuing legal education requirements, West Virginia Continuing Legal
Education office began offering online CLE courses beginning in May 2002. Several programs from
recent seminars are available online through streaming video technology on the West Virginia
Continuing Legal Education web site. In the last six months, our online courses have been accessed
472 times for credit by attorneys licensed to practice law in West Virginia.

West Virginia Continuing Legal Education has taken advantage of advancements in distance learning
technology and extended its outreach through utilization of the statewide IViN distance learning
system. The IViN, (Interactive Video Network) network is an interactive video and audio network,
which utilizes numerous communication technologies to connect West Virginia University with other
campuses throughout the state. In 2002, WVCLE presented five continuing legal education seminars
using distance learning technology to reach attorneys in Charleston, Beckley, Keyser, Morgantown,


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Parkersburg, Shepherdstown, and Wheeling, enrolling 661 West Virginia attorneys for courses
addressing legal ethics, statutes of limitation, family law, and a general update on West Virginia law.
Additional programs planned for 2003 include damages and social security issues.

West Virginia Continuing Legal Education is the primary provider of current legal audio-visual
materials addressing West Virginia legal issues, and maintains the only lending library of continuing
legal education video courses in the country. In FY 2001-2002, West Virginia Continuing Legal
Education produced 15 new continuing legal education courses available on audio or video cassettes
and edited, duplicated, and shipped 782 copies of our audio and video course offerings. Additionally,
audiocassette courses were shipped to 62 attorneys who registered for courses but were unable to
attend in FY 2001-2002.

West Virginia Continuing Legal Education maintains a web site dedicated to Public Education Legal
Resources (http://www.wvu.edu/~law/cle/edlaw/edlawresources2.html). This web site, which
emphasizes resources pertaining to the delivery of special education services, provides attorneys and
parents throughout the state with a wealth of information including various state policies and
operations manuals, selected county policies and procedures, and an archive of administrative
investigations, including letters of findings and compliance monitoring reports issued to West
Virginia county schools by the West Virginia Department of Education Office of Special Education.
Links to federal resources provide access to detailed information on the Individuals with Disabilities
Education Act (IDEA) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Physical Education
The School of Physical Education offers the Master of Science degree in Physical Education Teacher
Education. The program is a 36-credit hour program with both on-site and distance education
components. Participants spend two weeks each summer on campus completing coursework and
return home for the school year and take courses via the Internet.

Human Resources and Education
The College of Human Resources and Education has offered the Master of Arts in Special Education
since 1989 using technology. The technologies have migrated from satellite delivery broadcasts to a
blended program incorporating web and streaming video technologies. This program is listed at
resident tuition and outreach through EC and hosts students from across the globe serving
approximately 150 students per course.

In January 2003, the College will offer a new online Master of Science degree in Rehabilitation
Counseling. WVU’s program is fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE)
and ranked as one of the top in the country. The Master of Science degree program of study in
rehabilitation counseling consists of 51 credit hours of study with a practicum and internship.
Graduates find employment in state vocational rehabilitation agencies, non-profit and private
rehabilitation agencies, rehabilitation centers, community or institutional mental health settings,
corrections, schools, hospitals and related areas that emphasize rehabilitation. The E-Campus
initiative will afford us the exciting opportunity to demonstrate the capacity of distributed learning in
the delivery of a graduate program in rehabilitation counseling. The coursework will be composed of
both distance education and face-to-face classes, which minimizes students’ time away from
employment and home, as well as cutting travel expenses. During e-campus sessions, students study
and participate in classes at their home/work site, using a carefully planned array of innovative



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learning technologies. The Internet, via the World Wide Web, will be the primary mode for
communicating during e-campus class sessions.

The E-Resource Center was established by faculty and staff of the Rehabilitation Counselor
Education Program at West Virginia University. It supports our commitment to education and
information dissemination that will enhance the lives of people with disabilities, in West Virginia and
throughout the country. The effort has expanded to address the need for A Healthier Future for All.
We specialize in communication and information services; training and technical assistance; and
graduate education.

The West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services New Counselor E-Training Project is part of
this site. It was developed to provide a consistent foundation for the orientation and training of new
rehabilitation counselors. The task is to provide training modules that will address specific
competency needs. The intent of this project is to provide this training in a more systematic
approach to adult learning, using multimedia design to enhance the training efforts.

The Department of Educational Theory and Practice is pressed to meet the demand for teachers
interested in pursuing an M.A. degree in Elementary Education. In addition, Senate Bill 653
obligated the College of Human Resources and Education (HR&E) to collaborate in the delivery of
graduate programs with other state colleges. With the passing of Senate Bill 653, demands for
courses in the M.A. Degree in Elementary Education program could easily exceed 100 students. Due
to the distances involved, traditional means of course delivery can no longer be the only option. The
College of Human Resources and Education has developed four online “core” courses as a foundation
of the Elementary Education Master of Arts degree.

The Appalachian Collaborative Center for Learning, Assessment, and Instruction in Mathematics
(ACCLAIM) is a collaboration among Marshall University, the University of Tennessee, the
University of Kentucky, the University of Ohio, and the University of Louisville, and the
Appalachian Rural Systemic Initiative. The Center was funded in 2002 for five years by a $5 million
grant from the National Science Foundation. WVU has been invited to become a full partner in this
collaboration to further the research capacity initiative in the year 2003-2004 and is an active
participant in ACCLAIM in 2002-2003.

Project MERIT: Mathematics Education Reform Initiative for Teachers, a five-year Teacher
Enhancement project, continues and expands a prior NSF-supported planning project to address the
established need of middle school mathematics teachers to improve knowledge of the content of
mathematics and how students learn mathematics. MERIT builds capacity for change through
professional development by nurturing a mathematics leadership team (MLTs) and 125 mentor
teachers (MMTs) one or more from each of the 55 county school systems in West Virginia. The
Institute for Math Learning has significant responsibilities for this effort (See Arts and Sciences).

Other special technology enhanced projects include RuralNet and Trek 21 which established a
“Technology Integration Center” that provides a central location for the knowledge base and capacity
building structures for integration of technology into teacher education curriculum, clinical teacher
education and teaching.




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Arts & Sciences
The Eberly College of Arts and Sciences has a myriad of classes and programs designed to meet the
off-campus demand for liberal arts education.

Due to state requirements that foreign language instruction be offered in the middle and high school
years, the Foreign Language Department has developed a series of online courses leading to a
teaching endorsement in a foreign language. These courses focus primarily on teaching methods and
culture and require previous credits or expertise in French or Spanish. Some state colleges are also
interested in using these courses to supplement their own language offerings. The final plan will likely
include summer courses on campus, summer courses abroad, evening courses at branches in the state.
Technology is in place for an online placement test procedure. By Spring 2003, we hope to offer
online language placement testing in high schools across the state. Students in French, German and
Spanish classes will be able to take the test, place appropriately and upon completing the appropriate
WVU course receive up to 15 hours of course-work for advanced language placement. A second
element of this project is to allow the possibility for teachers seeking new language certification to use
high school courses already in place around the state to develop skills that we teach on campus in our
elementary and intermediate courses. This opens up new doors to our online courses that are at the
more advanced level.

The English Department also offers an Area of Emphasis for Regents Bachelor of Arts candidates in
Professional Writing. This online program is targeted for adult learners working on an
undergraduate degree. The Center for Writing Excellence supports faculty, students, and staff in the
improvement of writing and the teaching of writing. To provide resources to students and teachers
beyond WVU, the Center is beginning to compile online resource pages for designing and
responding to writing assignments, and for links to national teaching and writing resources. These
can be found at www.as.wvu.edu/english/cwe/. Within the next two years, an online tutorial service
for writers around the state will be offered.

The Writing Heritage Project, supported by a W.K. Kellogg-WVU Expanding Community
Partnership Program Grant, used technology to begin recording the Scott’s Run community’s history
and cultural heritage. Faculty and students from the English Department’s Center for Writing
Excellence, Center for Literary Computing, and the West Virginia Dialect Project helped citizens of
the community assemble a rich set of materials about Scott's Run and put those materials on the web.
People ranging from local residents to international scholars now have web access to new resources
that help recognize and value Appalachian culture.

The Blue Ribbon Mathematics Partnership Committee is committed to organize and implement
projects targeted to improve mathematics education in Doddridge, Harrison, Hampshire, Marion,
Mineral, Monongalia, Preston, Randolph, Ritchie, Taylor, Upshur and Wood counties. The Blue
Ribbon web site provides professional development information and curriculum resources for
mathematics educators. For more information see: www.blueribbon.ws (curriculum materials are
located under the meetings selection).

WvEB Algebra is a college level mathematics course for high school students. The goal of the course
is to allow students a smooth transition into entry level college mathematics. Students enrolled in a
section hosted by WVU receive three college credits and possibly three credits of high school Algebra
III - if the participating high school chooses. The project is state sponsored and in its third year with


Final Report January 2003                                                                              25

                                                                                                             190
a 2002-2003 enrollment of approximately 200. The course has a University instructor of record and
high school teachers are provided professional development to act as facilitators for the course. For
more information see: www.wvebmath.ws

WvEB Trigonometry is a follow-up course to WVU's State WvEB Algebra course. WvEB
Trigonometry will be offered for the first time in the spring semester 2003 to a projected 70-80
students. Most of the students taking the trigonometry course will have completed the WvEB Algebra
course the semester before. High school teachers serve as trained facilitators, with students
completing units of video and power point presentations, java based computer laboratories, and on
line tests and laboratory reports using WebCT under the facilitators' direction. Students in the
course will receive a CD with course materials, and will be expected to have web access for testing and
laboratories. Material is coordinated with the on-campus trigonometry course, so students use the
same book, have to meet the same standard on tests, and complete the same course material to receive
academic credit. Course material for WvEB Trig is archived online at
http://jacobi.math.wvu.edu/~mays/WvEB128/WvEB128.htm and general information about the
WvEB Math project is at http://wvebmath.ws/index.shtml

The Institute for Mathematics Learning (IML) at West Virginia University, in cooperation with
Marshall University and the MERIT Project, is creating a professional development program for
middle school mathematics teachers in West Virginia. This program will provide a core of 24 credit
hours of MERIT courses that will be accepted by both WVU and MU as work towards a master’s
degree in Mathematics Education for in-service teachers. In addition, the courses can be used for K-8
grade teachers in other content areas to earn a mathematics teaching endorsement. The goal for 2002
and 2003 is to develop the third cadre of courses in this degree. These courses will be offered via
distance education, allowing teachers in their home RESA to participate in professional development
with mathematics content and pedagogical content knowledge focus. Such professional development
is essential in supporting improvement of learning and teaching in the critical middle school years.
The IML at West Virginia University took the lead in developing and offering the first cadre of
courses, MERIT Number and Algebra (4 hours credit) and MERIT Number and Algebra Teaching
(2 hours). A pilot section of this course was offered to a limited number of teachers in the spring and
summer of 2002. The Number and Algebra cadre of courses was offered statewide for the first time
the fall of 2002. In addition, Marshall University has taken the lead on the MERIT Geometry and
MERIT Geometry Teaching cadre of courses, which will offer pilot sections this year. The
development of these courses was supported by State Incentive Grants and the NSF-funded Project
MERIT.

Engineering
The College of Engineering and Mineral Resources (CEMR) offers a Master of Science in Software
Engineering online. Students may begin this degree as a 15-credit hour certificate program and
move credits into a full online master’s degree. This program is also listed by EC.




Final Report January 2003                                                                           26

                                                                                                          191
WVU’s Information Assurance/Biometrics 5 day class is taught to groups of 20 to 25 students. We
have had four course offerings, two more are scheduled, and we expect to be doing about 1 per
month.

The Lane Department of Computer Science will offer a college level discrete math class to high
school students in the fall semester 2003.

Extensive outreach throughout West Virginia is provided by CEMR’s Extension and Outreach
Department through its Mining and Industrial Extension Programs. Training covers mining and
manufacturing personnel to improve worker skills and licensure, and to help small businesses
increase productivity.

The Industrial Extension Program through its connection with the West Virginia Manufacturing
Extension Partnership served approximately 225 manufacturers. Some example projects are shown
with an asterisk below

       * A Fairmont manufacturer of power boilers and related accessories received help in
       expanding its market. The company had always relied on repeat customers, but to meet
       growth expectations, the firm needed to expand its customer base. Assistance provided by IE
       will allow the company to market to coal and coal by-product fired power generation
       facilities throughout the United States.

       * A firm in Huntington received assistance in planning and laying out a new manufacturing
       facility. Value adding and non-value adding processes were identified and process flow
       diagrams presented to determine how necessary production steps should be laid out in the
       most efficient manner. Employee ergonomics were improved, product quality increased, and
       overall productivity of the facility went up.

       * A steel processing firm in Benwood, WV required ISO 9000 quality certification in order
       to enter new markets and meet requirements of existing customers. A quality system was
       designed and implemented based on ISO 9000 guidelines, leading to full ISO 9000
       certification, a requirement for exporting industrial goods to many European markets.

       * A manufacturer of decorative wood accent pieces based in Upper Tract needed help in
       improving productivity to meet large customer orders and to continue growing. Training
       and implementation assistance were provided in manufacturing operations, cycle time
       reduction, work standards, quality, process flow, and other aspects of Lean Manufacturing.
       After completing each training activity the plant manager had the documents, techniques,
       and knowledge to apply the concepts to his operation, and had been through a live
       demonstration of how to implement the concepts.

CEMR co-sponsored the Annual Safety Day competitions with over 150 miners participating from
four states. The event included contests for mine rescue and benchmen (individuals who test mine
rescue breathing apparatus).

WVU Mining Extension professionals revised the West Virginia Surface Apprentice Program
materials in conjunction with the West Virginia Office of Miners' Health, Safety and Training.
Over 100 free CD ROMs were distributed to regulatory, industrial, and private instructors. CEMR


Final Report January 2003                                                                        27

                                                                                                      192
developed an assistance program to work with mining contractors in order to improve their health,
safety and regulatory compliance performance.

Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering sponsors an annual short course on recovering methane
from coal beds. This workshop gives Oil & Gas and Coal Industry professionals hands on
experience in the fundamentals & applications of Fracture Stimulation Technology to increase
production. The average attendance for the short course is 20 industry professionals.


Journalism
The School of Journalism currently has a 15-hour graduate Certificate in Integrated Marketing
Communication that is available online. The College is seeking institutional approval for a new
online Master’s degree in Integrated Marketing Communication. Both programs target working
professionals.

Health Sciences
The School of Nursing has moved the Registered Nursing (RN) to Bachelor of Science Nursing
(BSN) program to an online format to address the increased demand for nurses and to better
accommodate their shift schedules. The online format includes web lessons; library access; streaming
video - both synchronous and asynchronous; and CDs or blended technologies. The Master of
Science in Nursing (MSN) is also available in a blended format, migrating much instruction from
compressed video to synchronous streaming video.

The School of Medicine is also preparing a Bachelor of Science degree completion program in
Occupational Therapy. This program takes a blended approach with primarily online instruction
and three on-campus meetings. Students must have completed an Associate’s degree in
Occupational Therapy or Emergency Technicians Training. The program is scheduled to begin in
Summer 2003.

The School of Medicine connects with doctors daily through Mountaineer Doctor Television.
Services are rendered in 23 locations in three states. WVU physicians use the network to treat
patients, consult with other doctors, or provide continuing medical education through
teleconferencing.

Tele-Educational Programming is offering in pharmacy, nursing, continuing medical education,
grand rounds, Charleston Area Medical Center tumor conference, emergency medicine, integrative
medicine, medicine, pediatric surgery.

Business
The College of Business and Economics offers an Executive Master of Business Administration via
compressed video and web to nine cities around the state. This program is designed for working
professionals and can be completed in 2.5 years.

The Bureau of Business and Economic Research enables increasing numbers of West Virginians
access to our research, data and conference information via its web site at www.bber.wvu.edu.

Potomac State College of Parkersburg began offering an Associate’s Degree in business and
economics in Morgantown via the web.


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In Development
Programs in progress from the Davis College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Consumer Science
include a Master of Science in Wildlife Management & Fisheries/Natural Resource Recreation
Management and National Forest Lands Management - (partnership program) and an
undergraduate Area of Emphasis in Early Child Development.


              WVU - Internal Instructional Technology Grant Initiatives
                              2000 - Distance Education Initiative –
                   Funding of individual course development for online delivery.

Course                             College                        Faculty
English 205 - Business English     Arts & Sciences                T. Miles
J--- Direct Marketing              Journalism                     R. Hanson
English 122 - British Literature   Arts & Sciences                E. Junkett
Rel – American Religious           Arts & Sciences                B. Turley
History
Web Simulcasts - Spec. Ed.         Human Resources &              B. Ludlow
(MA)                               Education
Modern Physics                     Arts & Sciences                C. Rotter
Corporate Finance                  Business & Economics           P. Speaker
Statistics - Java Applets          Arts & Sciences                J. Harner
E-Commerce                         Business & Economics           S. Smith
Gen. Methods - Biology             Arts & Sciences                E. Keller
(Teachers)
Physical Education - Teacher       Physical Education             L. Housner
Educ.
Engineering 101                    Engineering & Mineral          S. Mohaghegh
                                   Resources
Total Investment $378,914          $178,457 matching funds        $178,457 Provost’s Office




Final Report January 2003                                                                     29

                                                                                                   194
                            2001- Entrepreneurial Learning Initiatives –
                            Develop a series of courses for online delivery.

Course                              College                          Faculty
English 101 & 102                   Arts & Sciences                  L. Brady
Composition & Rhetoric
(for adult learners)
Online Integrated Marketing         Journalism                       C. Martin
Communication Certificate
Elem. Ed. - 4 course sequenceHuman Resources &                       R. Wiesenmayer
                             Education
Software Engineering -       Engineering & Mineral                   C. Tanner
streaming video enhancement  Resources
Mathematical Foundations for Engineering & Mineral                   M. Henry
Software Systems Development Resources
Human Anatomy courses        College of Medicine                     J. Altemeus
Foreign Language Distance           Arts & Sciences                  F. Medley
Education Project - Teacher
Endorsement
Total Investment $567,122           $283,566 matching funds          $ 283,561 Provost Office




Final Report January 2003                                                                       30

                                                                                                     195
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
Meeting of February 21, 2003


ITEM:                                    Draft Report to LOCEA on Non-classified Staff
                                         Salary Levels

COMMITTEE:                               Committee of the Whole

INSTITUTIONS:                            All

RECOMMENDED RESOLUTION:                  For discussion only

STAFF MEMBER:                            J. Michael Mullen

BACKGROUND:

The resolution passed by the Legislative Oversight Commission on Education
Accountability (LOCEA) on May 21, 2002, called for a study of standardized methods
and criteria for determining salary levels of non-classified employees in the higher
education system. The attached report deals with two groups of non-classified
employees – those employed by institutions and those employed by the Higher
Education Policy Commission office. Since there is no statutory language that sets
standards for salaries for these employees, institutions and the HEPC office have used
various methods and criteria, which are summarized in this report.

The draft report and data are presented for discussion at this meeting. Although the
data in the report has been shared with the campuses for verification, the draft report
has not been circulated prior to this agenda. Staff would like to have further discussions
with the presidents before finalizing the recommendations.




                                                                                             196
        WEST VIRGINIA
    HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY
          COMMISSION




  EXAMINATION OF STANDARDIZED
      METHODS AND CRITERIA FOR
DETERMINING SALARY LEVELS FOR NON-
          CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEES




                           DRAFT
                      FEBRUARY 11, 2002




                          Report to the
  Legislative Oversight Commission on Education Accountability




                                                                 197
Examination of standardized methods and criteria for determining
           salary levels of non-classified employees


Resolution

The legislative charge given to the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission in
this study is:

       Examination of standardized methods and criteria for determining salary
       levels for personnel employed in the office of the policy commission and
       the state institutions of higher education in chief administrative, advisory,
       directorate and other policy and chief or operations level positions, and
       their deputies and executive assistants who are exempt from established
       salary schedules for faculty and classified staff.

Introduction

A non-classified employee is defined in West Virginia Code §18B-9-2 as follows:

       “an individual who is responsible for policy formation at the department or
       institutional level, or reports directly to the president, or is in a position
       considered critical to the institution by the president pursuant to policies
       adopted by the governing board: Provided, That the percentage of
       personnel placed in the category of “non-classified” at any given institution
       shall not exceed ten percent of the total number of employees of that
       institution who are eligible for membership in any state retirement system
       of the state of West Virginia or other retirement plan authorized by the
       state: Provided, however, That an additional ten percent of the total
       number of employees of that institution as defined in this subsection may
       be placed in the category of “non-classified” if they are in a position
       considered critical to the institution by the president. Final approval of such
       placement shall be with the appropriate governing board.”


There are some non-classified administrative positions whereby the incumbent also holds

faculty rank. Examples of such positions are Deans, Associate Deans, and Librarians.

Employees in this group, while having administrative duties, hold faculty rank and

generally receive salary increases based on faculty rank. While there are common titles

for these positions, such as Dean of Students, there are significant variations among the

campuses in the role, scope and salary that reflect historic trends as well as differences in

institutional mission, scope, and size.




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                                                                                                198
Historically, the source of individuals serving in these positions was the college faculty. It

was common for a senior faculty member to take on an administrative role for a period of

time and then return to the classroom or laboratory. This is still true at the departmental

chair level and, at many institutions, at the dean’s level. Because of the linkage to a

faculty member’s discipline, it is common for salary levels to vary widely reflecting the

long-standing market prices in high demand disciplines.



This report has been structured to focus on the Higher Education Policy Commission’s

staff and the administrators of the colleges and universities. The natures of these jobs are

very different, and the required qualifications and salary reflect these differences, as well

as institutional mission.



Policy Commission Staff

A review of history is necessary to establish the background for the current staffing levels

and salary structure of the HEPC’s staff. Recent changes to the governance structure

have not been completely implemented and some of the vestiges of the old governing

board systems remain. While that will be changed over the next two to three years, it is

important to understand how the current situation evolved over the last 40 years and

especially over the last 20 years.



With the passage of Senate Bill 420 in 1989, the previous Board of Regents’ staff office

began serving two chancellors and two governing boards.              With the exception of

additional support staff for the chancellors’ offices, the staffing level of the Board of

Regents remained at the same level and took on the additional responsibilities, which

included the guaranteed student loan program.




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                                                                                                 199
This new structure created the need to develop new staffing guidelines and salary

standards   that   balanced   the   need    to    serve   the   universities   and   the   state

college/community college functions. The two Chancellors began a dialog with members

of the two governing boards and established an ad hoc work group to begin analyzing

staffing and salaries of the central office. Several areas were examined:

   1. functions of the office and component divisions;

   2. funding for the office in relation to previous years;

   3. staffing levels in the office and component divisions;

   4. salary comparisons with WV colleges and universities and other state systems

       offices;

   5. responsibilities of the WV system office in relation to other states; and

   6. any additional positions that were viewed essential to the mission of the central

       office.

Classified employee positions and salaries were not an issue since they would remain

within the statutorily mandated classification system and be subject to rules adopted to

determine salary and job responsibilities. The non-classified positions had no such

structure or basis for salary or job responsibilities. The examination of salaries from other

state higher education offices around the country indicated that West Virginia’s salaries

were well below the average of other states. The comparison of central office

administrators with comparable functions in the public colleges and universities yielded

mixed results. Most salaries were well below those at WVU, below most of the positions at

Marshall University, and above some of the positions in the state colleges. There had

been a pattern of movement from the central staff to campus positions by key

administrative staff that was a concern of board members and the chancellors.




                                              4

                                                                                                   200
The working group determined that it was not reasonable to aspire to the salaries of

comparable administrators at WVU but that the salary averages of the state colleges

would not attract or maintain a quality staff to serve the two governing boards and

institutions. Of particular concern was the number of central office administrators who

were recruited and hired away from the central office by institutions inside and outside the

state, which could pay significantly higher salaries than the central office. This not only

degraded the central office’s ability to serve the governing boards, but also removed the

crucial institutional memory from the governing boards’ access. The following guideline

was established and used until the new governance structure was implemented in 2001.



       “Since salaries at Marshall University tend to be at levels between those at
       West Virginia University and the four-year state colleges, Marshall
       University salaries are used where there are generally comparable
       positions at Marshall. Where such comparable positions do not exist at
       Marshal University, the recommended salary average is the average for
       state-level governing and coordinating board offices in SREB states. Since
       good peer group comparisons were not readily available for assistant
       director level positions and for the Senior Administrator position,
       recommended equity adjustments for these positions are based on the
       average percentage increase for other positions where peers are more
       easily identified.”


As functions were added or removed from the central office, staffing levels were adjusted

and job functions and classifications were changed. With the implementation of SB 653,

the role and responsibility of the Higher Education Policy Commission changed to a mix of

traditional governing board functions and new policy or coordinating board functions.

Examples of governing board responsibilities that were retained are human resources,

purchasing, financial aid, financial policies and procedures, legal services, and a number

of academic and administrative oversight duties.. After two years, all of the old university

or state college rules and policies have been reviewed and many have been distributed to

the campuses for adoption and implementation.



                                             5

                                                                                               201
An internal analysis of all job functions was conducted in 2001 and related to the statutory

responsibilities of the agency and commission. An additional analysis was conducted with

the WVNET staff to identify opportunities for consolidation of functions between the two

organizations as an outgrowth of the budget reductions required in FY 2001 and 2002. A

detailed review of job functions and resource allocations by program was conducted in

advance of the consolidation of the financial aid offices in 2002. An external review of

HEPC and WVNET offices, functions and staffing was conducted during the fall of 2002

and a report and recommendations were presented to the HEPC by the consultants.

Additionally, a review of staff salaries and performance was conducted in preparation for

the budget reduction for FY 2003 and the salary increases authorized in the 2002

legislative session. All non-classified salary adjustments were based on the results of the

performance reviews. There were no across the board adjustments for non-classified

staff. Comparisons were made to salary averages and position salaries in other State

Higher Education Executive Offices (SHEEO) as well as the southern states.



The results of the analysis of HEPC salaries to national SHEEO averages and Marshall

University comparable positions will be presented at the meeting. Generally, the HEPC

salaries are competitive with SHEEO salaries and below the Marshall University

administrative average. The results may not reflect the new governance responsibilities

that the Chancellor and HEPC will be considering later this year. If additional

responsibilities are decentralized to some or all campuses, the level of staffing and salary

levels will need adjustment.




                                             6

                                                                                               202
Institutional Administrative Staff and Salaries

This analysis was limited by the lack of common terminology or classifications across

institutions. Some states have established coding and definitions that are similar, if not

identical, to the structure used by CUPA and the National Center for Educational Statistics

to create the national data base on college and university administrative and faculty

salaries. The very nature of non-classified positions is based on the unique qualifications

and responsibilities assigned, as well as the substantial differences in size, scope and

quality expectations among colleges and universities. Administrative structures are

different in a major research university and a community college, and they should be.

CUPA and the NCES attempt to accommodate these differences by using institutional

classification systems into their data and reports. For example, salaries and

responsibilities vary based on mission, size and form of control (public, private or

proprietary) and primary job responsibility. The categories do not match the peer

designations used in West Virginia or the terminology normally used by the HEPC but

they are useful in testing the reasonableness of institutional salaries.



Aside from the definition of “non-classified,” there is no additional statutory language or

Higher Education Policy Commission rule concerning the employment or salary of non-

classified employees. Each institution established its own salary structure with awareness

of salaries in other West Virginia colleges and universities and competitive salaries in

similar institutions in the Mid-Atlantic, southern or national markets. In response to market

conditions, most institutions expanded the number of non-classified positions, especially

in technology and computer-related job categories, but also critical positions in medical,

laboratory, or service functions. This is a typical response to the lack of flexibility in the

classified salary schedule or classification procedures.




                                              7

                                                                                                 203
At the April 19, 2002 meeting of the Higher Education Policy Commission, the

Commission approved the following salary guidelines for non-classified employees for

FY2000-03: “Non-classified employees shall be compensated based on the salary goals

established by the campus compact. Salary increases may be based on a mix of merit

and catch-up funding until the salary goal has been achieved. Not later than FY2005, all

or a substantial portion of salary increases shall be based on merit.” This action was

consistent with the guideline established for faculty salary adjustments and reflects the

nature of these positions. Neither the HEPC nor the preceding boards has established

categorical salary ranges or values for these positions. This responsibility rests with the

Board of Governors of each institution.


Recognizing that there is no statewide policy governing employment and salary

determination for non-classified employees, each institution was asked to provide

information as to the methods and criteria used for determining salary levels for non-

classified employees.    The data is summarized in Appendix A.          It appears that a

combination of information sources is used by the colleges and universities in establishing

and adjusting the salaries of non-classified employees, including the national data surveys

provided by CUPA and SREB; Equal Employment Opportunity standards; and informal

comparisons with other West Virginia institutions.



Appendix B provides a summary of the salary comparisons for selected administrative

titles using the CUPA mission and size of budget categories for each institution. In

general, the salaries of administrators in our colleges and universities are below the

averages of similar institutions. The difference in salaries is similar to the traditional

differences between West Virginia faculty salaries and national or regional peers. This

finding is consistent with the funding levels for all of higher education and reflects the



                                             8

                                                                                              204
reality that 70 to 75 percent of institutional budget are supporting salaries, wages and

related benefits.



There appears to be an inconsistency in the reporting of the “chief health professions

officer” or medical school dean. The CUPA data reflects all fund sources but the salaries

reported for all three of the medical schools is limited to state funding. There may be other

situations where foundation or other external funds have not been reported. This should

be a topic for discussion before the personnel data is collected for FY 2004.



All colleges and universities should begin their peer comparison with the CUPA data and

then incorporate additional data sources to meet local requirements. Additionally, the

HEPC and the institutions should develop a common set of definitions and titles for the

common administrative positions and incorporate these common titles into the personnel

reports in the future. No attempt should be made to force common duties or salaries since

it is clear that mission, scope, competition, and local situations are factors that the boards

of governors should consider in setting their goals and expectations of these key

administrators.



The Policy Commission has asked the Chancellor to develop guidelines for the boards of

governors to consider in determining salary adjustments for presidents. That

recommendation will be considered later in the year along with other policies and rules

scheduled for update or elimination.




                                              9

                                                                                                 205
                                               Appendix A

                       Criteria Used by Institutions for Salary Comparison
                                                 CRITERIA USED
                                  Inte rna l             In-Sta te /Pe e r
 Institution    CUPA      SREB     Equity      Me rit    Compa rision                      Othe r
Bluefield         X         X                                                          X - Chronicle
Concord                     X         X          X
EW VCTC                                                X (Northern, Southern)
Fairmont         X          X
Glenville        X                                                X
Marshall         X                    X          X
W VNCC                                           X
Shepherd         X                               X                                   X - Inflation Rate
SW VCTC                                                           X
W est Liberty                                    X
W V State                                                                          X - Campus Compact
W VSOM           X                                                X
W VU             X                    X                           X             X-SHRM;Mercer;Labor Statistics




                                                                                                                 206
                                                                                          HEPC Non-Classified Positions                                                                     Attachment B
                                                                                                   Compared to
                                                                                  College and University Professional Association
                                                                                              for Human Resources
                                                                                       Administrative Compensation Survey

                                                                                       Salary Comparison as of July 1, 2002
                                          Public Institutions
CUPA Title                                Median Salary            HEPC          WVNET          Bluefield       Concord     EWVCTC      Fairmont     Glenville    Marshall     Potomac
CEO System                                        224,250.00     252,500.00
CEO Doctoral                                      267,100.00                                                                                                     *219,596.00
CEO Single Unit                                   142,470.00                                  125,000.00 128,434.00 119,500.00 130,008.00 130,030.00                           114,120.00
Executive Vice President                          115,126.00     130,780.00      98,652.00                                                                        117,196.00
Chief Academic Officer                            111,303.00     118,976.00                                     98,555.00   68,163.00 103,920.00     92,000.00    117,196.00    75,000.00
Chief Health Prof. Officer                        223,200.00     228,800.00                                                                                       105,662.00
Dir. Institutional Research                        67,600.00      67,621.69                                                             68,928.00    64,900.00     66,052.00
Chief Research Officer                            150,000.00     110,000.00                                                                                       111,062.00
Chief Business Officer                            106,639.00     115,500.00      73,992.00                      91,448.00               97,500.00    76,900.00    117,196.00    57,300.00
General Counsel                                   110,489.00     109,300.46
Chief Personnel/HR Officer                         76,668.00      87,550.00      52,212.00                                              63,372.00    40,000.00     65,285.00
Chief Info. Systems Officer                        89,682.00      70,980.00                                                 53,308.00   95,568.00    60,000.00    102,098.00
Chief Phys Plant/Facilities Officer                74,861.00      66,585.48                                                             71,016.00    39,138.00     63,266.00
Chief Development Officer                          95,000.00                                                Vacant                      87,216.00    70,000.00     84,281.00
Chief Student Affairs Officer                      94,471.00                                    72,312.00    69,962.00      73,338.00   80,508.00    65,401.00     79,762.00    55,016.00


                                          Public Institutions
CUPA Title                                Median Salary       Shepherd SWVCTC West Liberty WVNCC          WVSOM WV State                              WVU          WVUIT        WVUP
CEO System                                        224,250.00
CEO Doctoral                                      267,100.00                                                                                        250,008.00
CEO Single Unit                                   142,470.00 144,200.00 118,000.00 136,620.00 120,000.00 184,900.00 133,488.00                                    118,152.00 113,316.00
Executive Vice President                          115,126.00                                                         81,965.00
Chief Academic Officer                            111,303.00 96,187.00 89,053.00 94,104.24 78,900.00 119,400.00 97,090.00                           176,496.00     94,164.00    79,784.00
Chief Health Prof. Officer                        223,200.00                                                                                        106,068.00
Dir. Institutional Research                        67,600.00 69,180.00 65,587.00 70,266.15 41,000.00                 58,254.00                      126,444.00     37,269.00    34,008.00
Chief Research Officer                            150,000.00                                                         78,129.00                       72,048.00     55,572.00
Chief Business Officer                            106,639.00 87,537.00 83,285.00 75,469.27 52,884.00 89,208.00 65,982.00                            147,984.00     66,280.00    66,360.00
General Counsel                                   110,489.00 78,980.00                                    70,896.00
Chief Personnel/HR Officer                         76,668.00 **59,179.00 63,504.00 44,572.48 **30,753.00 60,552.00 45,837.00                         89,148.00 **36,888.00 **52,164.00
Chief Info. Systems Officer                        89,682.00 81,000.00 66,828.00 68,588.10 73,334.62                 60,948.00                      136,032.00    61,596.00 **60,732.00
Chief Phys Plant/Facilities Officer                74,861.00 59,393.00 **49,726.00 52,137.06                         60,038.00                      122,488.00 **56,280.00    51,636.00
Chief Development Officer                          95,000.00 79,299.00 38,908.00 79,498.00 63,680.00 46,656.00                                       99,156.00    77,352.00 45,000.00
Chief Student Affairs Officer                      94,471.00 82,529.00 67,146.00 77,625.00 48,636.00                 69,496.00                      129,204.00    65,340.00 65,508.00

Marshall University - Executive Vice President and General Counsel are same individual.
*Marshall University is classified by CUPA as a comprehensive institution rather than a doctoral institution.
** Classifed Staff
Revised 2/10/2003




                                                                                                                                                                                                           207
                                                                                                                    HEPC Non-Classified Positions Compared to CUPA                                                                                                 Attachment B-2
                                                                                                                                for Human Resources
                                                                                                                     2001-2002 Administrative Compensation Survey

                                                                                                         Salary Comparison Based on Institutional Designation and Budget
                                                                                                                                  July 1, 2002




                                       Doctoral Institution             Comprehensive                        Gen. Baccalaureate                     Gen. Baccalaureate                            Gen. Baccalaureate
                                        with Budget of                   with Budget of                        with Budget of                         with Budget of                                with Budget of
CUPA Title                            $353 to $609 Million     WVU     $85 Million or More      Marshall     $49 Million or More      Fairmont      $29.3 to $49 Million    Shepherd    WV State $18.2 to $29.3 Million Bluefield    Concord    Glenville West Liberty   WVUIT
CEO Single Unit                                   $267,100    $250,008            $190,000          $219,596            $229,500           $130,008            $169,117       $144,200 $133,488              $143,200 $125,000       $128,434   $130,030    $136,620     $118,152
Executive Vice President                          $193,707                        $134,719          $117,196            $135,000                               $108,423                   $81,965              $83,955     $93,600
Chief Academic Officer                            $201,159    $176,496            $139,825          $117,196            $139,238           $103,920            $108,000         $96,187   $97,090              $95,000                $98,555    $92,000      $94,104     $94,164
Chief Health Prof. Officer                        $275,000    $106,068            $296,500          $105,662                  n/a                                     n/a                                            n/a
Dir. Institutional Research                        $81,667    $126,444             $67,257           $66,052             $66,400            $68,928             $51,330        $69,180    $58,254              $55,000                           $64,900      $70,266     $37,269
Chief Research Officer                            $159,840     $72,048            $104,402          $111,062                  n/a                                     n/a                 $78,129                    n/a                                                  $55,572
Chief Business Officer                            $165,251    $147,984            $128,680          $117,196            $143,087            $97,500            $106,997         $87,537   $65,982              $90,000     $91,416    $91,448    $76,900      $75,469     $66,280
General Counsel                                   $137,547                         $98,148                              $104,000                                $93,733        $78,980                               n/a
Chief Personnel/HR Officer                        $106,238     $89,148             $80,000           $65,285              $83,600           $63,272             $57,475     **59,179.00  **47,837              $51,500 **40,488.00               $40,000      $44,572    **$36,888
Chief Info. Systems Officer                       $158,000    $136,032            $104,500          $102,098            $102,284            $95,568             $80,125         $81,000   $60,948              $61,973     $87,144               $60,000      $68,588      $61,596
Chief Phys Plant/Facilities Officer               $115,000    $122,488             $84,439           $63,266              $88,958           $71,016             $69,628         $59,393   $60,038              $56,574                           $39,138      $52,137    **$56,280
Chief Development Officer                         $146,865     $99,156            $116,700           $84,281            $136,805            $87,216            $102,126         $79,299                        $86,877     $57,240     Vacant    $70,000      $79,498      $77,352
Chief Student Affairs Officer                     $140,000    $129,204            $112,726           $79,762            $110,900            $80,508             $85,000         $82,529   $69,496              $77,244     $73,312    $69,962    $65,401      $77,625      $65,340




                                      Two-Year Institution                                Two-Year Institution
                                        with Budget of                                      with Budget of                                                                Specialty
CUPA Title                            $12 to $19.7 Million SWVCTC            WVUP         $12 Million or Less      EWVCTC             Potomac             WVNCC            School       WVSOM
CEO Single Unit                                  $118,964 $118,000              $113,316             $110,125          $119,500           $114,120           $120,000       No          $184,900
Executive Vice President                          $90,850                                             $87,050                                                              CUPA
Chief Academic Officer                            $83,955   $89,053               $79,784             $78,145            $68,163            $75,000              $78,900 Comparision     $119,400
Chief Health Prof. Officer                              n/a                                                 n/a
Dir. Institutional Research                       $57,566   $65,587               $34,008             $49,300                                                    $41,000
Chief Research Officer                                  n/a                                                 n/a
Chief Business Officer                            $79,033    $83,285              $66,360             $69,255                               $57,300              $52,884                  $89,208
General Counsel                                         n/a                                                 n/a                                                                           $70,896
Chief Personnel/HR Officer                        $54,133    $63,504           **$52,164              $49,131                                                **30,753.00                  $60,552
Chief Info. Systems Officer                       $65,905   $66,828              **60,732             $55,666            $53,308                                $73,335
Chief Phys Plant/Facilities Officer               $54,000 **$49,726               $51,636             $47,099
Chief Development Officer                         $60,020    $38,908              $45,000             $57,398                                                    $63,680                  $46,656
Chief Student Affairs Officer                     $72,573    $67,146              $65,508             $64,217            $73,338            $55,016              $48,636




**Classified Staff

MU Salaries as of June 30, 2002

Revised 2/10/2003




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     208
                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Attachment C
                                                                         Non-Classified Staff and Faculty Rank

                                           HEPC               WVNET              Bluefield          Concord        EWVCTC                Fairmont           Glenville          Marshall           Potomac
                                                faculty            faculty            faculty            faculty           faculty            faculty            faculty            faculty              faculty
CUPA Title                            #         rank      #        rank      #        rank      #        rank      #       rank      #        rank      #        rank      #        rank      #          rank
CEO System                                  1
CEO Doctoral
CEO Single Unit                                                                   1X                 1                 1                  1X                 1X                 1                    1
Executive Vice President                                  1*
Chief Academic Officer                      1                                                        1X                                   1X                 1X                 1X                   1
Chief Health Prof. Officer                  1                                                                                                                                   1X
Dir. Institutional Research                                                                                                               1                                     1
Chief Research Officer                      1                                                                                                                                   1X
Chief Business Officer                      1                  1                  1                  1                                    1                  1                  1                    1
General Counsel                             1                                                                                                                                   1
Chief Personnel/HR Officer                  1                  1                  1             1**                                       1                  1                  1
Chief Info. Systems Officer                                                       1X                                   1                  1                  1                  1
Chief Phys Plant/Facilities Officer                                                                                                       1                  1                  1
Chief Development Officer                                                                            1                                    1                  1                  1
Chief Student Affairs Officer                                                                        1                 1                  1                  1X                 1                    1

                                          Shepherd        SWVCTC West Liberty                       WVNCC              WVSOM         WV State                WVU               WVUIT              WVUP
                                                faculty            faculty            faculty            faculty           faculty            faculty            faculty            faculty              faculty
CUPA Title                          #           rank      #        rank      #        rank      #        rank      #       rank      #        rank      #        rank      #        rank      #          rank
CEO System
CEO Doctoral                                                                                                                                                 1
CEO Single Unit                             1X                 1                  1X                 1                 1X                 1                                     1                    1X
Executive Vice President                                                                                                                  1
Chief Academic Officer                      1X                 1                  1X                 1X                1                  1                  1X                 1X                   1X
Chief Health Prof. Officer                                                                                                                                   1X
Dir. Institutional Research                 1X                 1                  1                  1                 1X                 1                                     1                    1
Chief Research Officer                                                                                                                    1
Chief Business Officer                      1                  1                  1                  1                 1                  1X                 1                  1                    1
General Counsel                             1                                                                          1                                     1
Chief Personnel/HR Officer                                     1                  1                  1                 1                  1                  1                  1             ***1
Chief Info. Systems Officer                 1                  1                  1X                 1                 1X                 1                                     1             ***1
Chief Phys Plant/Facilities Officer         1                  3                  1                                                       1                  1                  1                    1
Chief Development Officer                   1                  1                  1                  1                 1                  1X                                    1X                   1
Chief Student Affairs Officer               1                  1                  1                  1                                    1                  1                  1                    1
* Director
**Same as Chief Student Affairs Officer
*** Classified Staff




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  209

								
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