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Environmental Health and Safety Manual

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					 Environmental
Health and Safety
    Manual
                    1
TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. POLICIES
   A. Environmental Policy Statement
   B. Safety Policy Statement

II. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAMS
    A. Building Code Administration Program
     1.    Purpose
     2.    Definitions
     3.    Responsibilities
     4.    Program
     5.    Disputes and Resolutions
     6.    Board of Appeals
     7.    Fees
     8.    References
  B. Fire Alarm Response and Maintenance Program
     1.    Purpose
     2.    Definitions
     3.    Responsibility
     4.    Procedures
     5.    Recordkeeping
     6.    References
  C. Asbestos Management Program
      1.   Purpose
      2.   Overview
      3.   Asbestos Contact Person
      4.   Asbestos Consultant
      5.   Asbestos Survey
      6.   Asbestos Operations and Maintenance Plan
      7.   Project List
      8.   Abatement Procedures
      9.   Removal of Asbestos Roofing Material
     10.   Removal of Vinyl Asbestos Floor Tile
     11.   Lists of Consultants and Contractors
     12.   Insurance
     13.   Conflict of Interest
     14.   References
  D. Management and Disposal of Hazardous Wastes Program
     1.    Purpose
     2.    Definitions
     3.    Responsibility
     4.    Procedures
     5.    Waste Minimization
     6.    Training
     7.    Emergency Notification Response
     8.    References
     9.    Appendix I – List of Emergency Contacts
  E. Management and Disposal of Hazardous Wastes from
     Construction and Renovation Sites Program
      1.   Purpose
      2.   Definitions
      3.   Responsibility
      4.   Procedures
      5.   References
     6A.   Appendix A – Examples of Hazardous Wastes Generated
     6B.   Appendix B – Assessment Checklist for Demolition and Renovation Projects
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  6C. Appendix C – Hazardous Waste Training Form
  6D. Appendix D – Contractors’ Certification Form
  6E. Appendix E – RCRA in Focus
F. Bloodborne Pathogens and Biohazardous Materials
   Management
   1.   Purpose
   2.   Definitions
   3.   Responsibility
   4.   Hepatitis B Vaccination
   5.   Exposure Prevention
   6.   Exposure Management
   7.   Research and/or Production Laboratories
   8.   Training
   9.   Assessment Monitoring, Review and Update
  10.   Universal Precautions Policy
  11.   Disinfection and Sterilization Procedures
  12.   Biological Waste Disposal Policy
  13.   Packaging and Shipping of Biological Materials
  14.   Recordkeeping
  15.   References
G. Chemical Hygiene Plan
   1.   Purpose
   2.   Definitions
   3.   Responsibility
   4.   Training
   5.   Practices Having Prior Approval
   6.   Standard Operating Procedures
   7.   General Chemical Safety Procedures
   8.   Control Measures and Safety Equipment
   9.   Exposure Assessment
  10.   Medical Consultation
  11.   Recordkeeping
  12.   References
 13A.   Appendix A – Guidelines for Preparing Laboratory Specific SOP
 13B.   Appendix B – Individual Laboratory Specific SOP
 13C.   Appendix C – OSHA Standards, Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals
 13D.   Appendix D – Laboratory Chemical Inventory Form
 13E.   Appendix E – Laboratory Safety Inspection Form
H. Personal Protective Equipment Program
   1.   Purpose
   2.   Definitions
   3.   Scope
   4.   Responsibilities
   5.   Training
   6.   References
   7.   Regulations
  8A.   Appendix A – Hazard Assessment and Personal Protective Equipment Selection
  8B.   Appendix B – Eye and Face Protection
  8C.   Appendix C – Head Protection
  8D.   Appendix D – Foot Protection
  8E.   Appendix E – Hand Protection
  8F.   Appendix F – Protective Clothing and Body Protection
  8G.   Appendix G – Fall, Hearing, Respiratory and Electrical Protection
  8H.   Appendix H – Glove Selection Chart for Chemical Compatibility
  8I.   Appendix I – Who Pays for PPE?
I. Machine Guarding Program
   1.   Purpose
   2.   General Requirements
   3.   Machines used for both Wood-Working and Metal-Working
   4.   Metal-Working Machines

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   5. Wood-Working Machines
J. Hearing Conservation Program
   1.   Purpose
   2.   Definitions
   3.   Responsibility
   4.   Hearing Conservation Program
   5.   Noise Exposure Monitoring
   6.   Audiometric Testing Program
   7.   Hearing Protectors
   8.   Training
   9.   Recordkeeping
  10.   References
K. Fall Protection Program
   1.   Purpose
   2.   Responsibility
   3.   Definitions
   4.   Fall Protection Program
   5.   Training
   6.   Fall Protection Systems
  7A.   Appendix A – Personal Fall Arrest System Inspection
L. Ladder Safety Program
   1.   Purpose
   2.   General Requirements
   3.   Ladder Usage
  4A.   Appendix A – Ladder Guideline
  4B.   Appendix B – Ladder Safety Guidelines
M. Utility Cart Safety Program
   1.   Purpose
   2.   Responsibility
   3.   Definitions
   4.   Cart Safety Program
   5.   Training
  6A.   Appendix A- National Highway Safety and Traffic Administration Standard 500
  6B.   Appendix B – Slow-Moving Vehicle Reflective Triangle
   7.   References
N. Tent Installation Program
   1.   Purpose
   2.   Responsibility
   3.   Definitions
   4.   Tent Installation Program
   5.   References
  6A.   Appendix A – Tent Installation Form
O. Lock-Out/Tag-Out Program
   1.   Purpose
   2.   Definitions
   3.   Scope of this policy
   4.   Contacts
   5.   General Policy Provisions
   6.   Regulated Equipment
   7.   Sequence of Lock Out or Tag Out System Procedures
   8.   Restoring Machines or Equipment to Normal Operations
   9.   Acquiring New or Modifying Old Equipment
  10.   Equipment LOTO: When More Than One Person is Involved
  11.   Requirements for LOTO Devices
  12.   Training
  13.   Enforcement
  14.   Affected Unit Procedures
  15.   Responsibilities
  16.   Outside Contractors
  17.   References
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P. Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan
        I. Introduction
       II. Professional Engineer Certification
      III. Facility Identification and Manager Certification
       IV. Oil Spill History
        V. Petroleum Storage Equipment
       VI. Recommendations
      VII. Spill Response Equipment
      VIII. Emergency Procedures – Spill Response
Appendix A – Facility Inspection Checklist
Appendix B – Building Photos


I. POLICIES

A. Environmental Policy Statement

REFERENCES: 40 CFR (US EPA Regulations); Florida Environmental Statutes; FAC Ch. 62.

Policy/Purpose: To articulate New College of Florida (NCF) policy concerning the adoption of Environmental
Health and Safety Standards toward the protection of environmental resources, preservation of the campus natural
areas as appropriate, and compliance with state and federal environmental laws and regulations.

New College (NCF) is committed to a learning and employment environment where faculty, staff, and students are
protected from the risk of injuries as a result of being exposed to health hazards associated with exposures to
adverse environmental factors and non-compliance with applicable regulations. The U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA), the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), and other state and local jurisdictions
have the authority to enforce environmental compliance on the New College campus.

To establish and maintain a system of Environmental Health and Safety rules, the leadership of New College will
develop procedures, and oversee compliance via inspections, program development, and training. It is a condition
of employment that supervisors and employees abide by the New College Adopted Standards in carrying out
assigned duties on a daily basis. Training and information will be provided by the respective College departments.
Mechanisms for reporting hazards, auditing incidents, and performing corrective actions will be established and
aggressively utilized. The NCF Department of Environmental Health and Safety will assist the applicable
departments by overseeing the proper implementation of the NCF Adopted Standards and assisting in enforcement
of the policies.



B. Safety Policy Statement

AUTHORITY: Governor’s Executive Order 2000-292, September 25, 2000; Florida Statutes, Chapter 284.50(1)(a);
Florida Statutes, Chapter 440.1025.

REFERENCES: 29 CFR 1910 (OSHA) General Industry Standards (Current revision)
29 CFR 1926 (OSHA) Construction Standards (Current revision)
NIOSH/CDC (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health/Centers for Disease Control) Research and
Information Publications

Policy/Purpose: To articulate New College of Florida (NCF) policy concerning the adoption of Safety Standards.

New College of Florida is committed to a learning and employment environment where faculty, staff and students
are protected from the risk of injuries as a result of being exposed to health and safety hazards. A fundamental
precept of the health and safety discipline is to eliminate, where possible, exposure of staff and students to
hazards. Where hazards still exist, worksite hazard assessments shall be conducted and minimum safety standards
developed to allow employees to carry out assigned tasks and avoid injury.

Currently, the minimum health and safety standards are the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) standards. In Florida, as well as all of the United States, OSHA enforces occupational standards and
demands compliance by private sector employers. By its own rules, OSHA is prohibited from enforcing its standards
in state public sector entities. To establish and maintain a system of Environmental Health and Safety rules, the
leadership of New College of Florida adopts the current Federal OSHA General Industry Standards, 29 CFR 1910,
and OSHA Construction Standards, 29 CFR 1926, where applicable, and implements a program of seeking
compliance with those rules. For clarity, these standards will be referred to as “NCF Adopted Safety Standards.” It

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is a condition of employment that supervisors and employees abide by the NCF Adopted Safety Standards in
carrying out assigned duties on a daily basis. Appropriate training, tools, and protective equipment will be provided
by the respective College Departments. Mechanisms for reporting hazards, auditing incidents, and performing
corrective actions will be established and aggressively utilized. The NCF Department of Environmental Health and
Safety will assist the applicable departments by overseeing the proper development and implementation of the NCF
Adopted Safety Standards and assisting in enforcement of the policies.




II. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAMS
A. Building Code Administration Program

    1. Purpose

    Florida law and regulations require that all new buildings constructed, as well as modifications to existing
    buildings, be reviewed and inspected for compliance with building codes and standards. To meet this mandate,
    the College has established a Building Code Administration Program. The code inspection and enforcement
    program is based on the most recently adopted version of the Florida Building Code and the Building Officials
    Association of Florida (BOAF) Model Administrative Code, 2006. While the intent of the Florida Building Code is
    well known and needs no further explanation, the BOAF Model Administrative Code intent is not so well known.
    The BOAF Model Administrative Code was developed as the industry recognized tool that facilitates the uniform
    and consistent application of administrative provisions within the Florida Building Code.

    Therefore, based on the Florida Statues, which are implemented through the Florida Building Code and BOAF
    Model Administrative Code, no renovation, remodeling, or construction can begin until appropriate building
    permits are issued. This policy ensures that New College of Florida will meet the necessary mandates under
    Florida law and regulation. Therefore, all plans and specifications for construction and renovations on College
    property must be submitted at least two weeks in advance of the expected construction commencement date
    for review by the Building Code Administrator (BCA). Under these guidelines, permits will be required for all
    projects regardless of scope or cost, with the exception of routine maintenance (such as painting, carpet
    replacement, and minor equipment repairs performed by qualified College employees.)


    2. Definitions

    Building Code Administrator – Individual charged with the responsibility for direct regulatory administration or
    supervision of plan review, enforcement, or inspection of building construction, erection, repair, addition,
    remodeling, demolition, or alteration projects that require permitting indicating compliance with building,
    plumbing, mechanical, electrical, gas, fire prevention, energy, accessibility, and other construction codes as
    required by state law or municipal or county ordinance. Synonymous with CBO or Building Official.

    Building Inspector - any of those employees of local governments or state agencies with building construction
    regulation responsibilities who themselves conduct inspections of building construction, erection, repair,
    addition, or alteration projects that require permitting indicating compliance with building, plumbing,
    mechanical, electrical, gas, fire prevention, energy, accessibility, and other construction codes as required by
    state law or municipal or county ordinance.

    Plans Examiner - person who is qualified to determine that plans submitted for purposes of obtaining building
    and other permits comply with the applicable building, plumbing, mechanical, electrical, gas, fire prevention,
    energy, accessibility, and other applicable construction codes. A person may be qualified in building,
    mechanical, gas, electrical, or a combination of the four.

    Employee – means any person engaged in any employment under any appointment or contract of hire or
    apprenticeship, express or implied, oral or written, whether lawfully or unlawfully employed and includes, but
    is not limited to, aliens and minors.

    Contractor - An independent contractor means a person whose conduct is not subject to an employer’s control
    and direction. Contractors licensed to do business in the State of Florida are defined as described in F.S.
    Chapter 489.105(3).

    Building Permit - A Legal document issued by the Building Official allowing building construction, erection,
    repair, addition, or alteration projects to commence.




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Annual Facility Maintenance Permit - A Building Permit issued on a periodic basis, up to one year, that allows
employees of New College to perform minor maintenance and repairs, not to exceed $200,000 with minimal
recordkeeping.

3. Responsibilities

Program Operation – According to Florida statutes, school districts, community colleges, and the university
system may choose to operate their own building code inspection program using personnel licensed in
accordance with Florida Statutes, Chapter 468 Part XII. New College of Florida may thereby operate an
internal Code Enforcement Program or contract these services as deemed appropriate.

The BCA (or a certified designee) shall have the overall responsibility for reviewing all plans and specifications
for compliance with adopted codes and standards. The Certified Building Official program is a regulatory code
enforcement program designed to focus on compliance with Florida Statutes by enforcement of the adopted
technical codes. It is not a professional design services agency, but may assist in the resolution of code
deficiencies. Once the review is completed, the Building Code Administrator (BCA) will return appropriate
documents and references for corrections, if necessary, or issue a permit. If corrections are necessary, the
College or contractor personnel must make corrections and provide a finalized copy of all project documents to
the Building Code Administrator (BCA) before a permit will be issued.

College employees performing maintenance work within the scope of their employment do not have to be
licensed in order to obtain a permit. However, they are still required to fill out and maintain appropriate logs,
and obtain the necessary permits and inspections as required by statute. College employees may use the
annual facility maintenance permit to facilitate routine maintenance, emergency repairs, building
refurbishment, and minor renovations of systems or equipment, however, any work undertaken that results in
a change of floor plan or involves a potentially significant hazard as determined by the Building Code
Administrator, will require a separate permit. All work must be designed, installed, and constructed in
compliance with applicable Florida Statutes and Code governing such work. In the case of College employees
working without the necessary permits, the employee(s) will be asked to stop work, employee’s managers will
be notified, and appropriate permits must be obtained before continuing of work.

Contractors: All other contracted individuals and tradesmen contractors working on College construction
projects are required to obtain the necessary permits. In addition, contractors must be licensed, registered,
and insured in accordance with Florida law. There is no exception. Prior to receiving a permit, contractors are
required to provide plans, specifications, and construction documents, as well as proof of their state, county,
and/or city registration or licensing, general liability and worker’s compensation insurances to the Building
Code Administrator. This includes all trade disciplines from the general contractor, as well as individual
contractors for building, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, fire suppression, and irrigation that may be
responsible for obtaining permits. This also includes general contractors, who hire sub-contractors to work on
construction projects. The general contractor has the overall responsibility to ensure his subcontractors can
meet and comply with the College permitting requirements.
It is incumbent upon all contractors to schedule inspections, as a minimum as outlined in Chapter 1 of the
Florida Building Code, and the Building Officials Association of Florida (BOAF) Model Administrative Code, or as
directed by the College Certified Building Official. Inspectors have the authority to perform any additional
inspections, as they deem necessary to insure compliance with code requirements and project documents. This
includes all permits as well as the final Certificates of Occupancy or Completion. Prior to issuing to a CO, the
State Fire Marshal shall issue an authorization to occupy based on compliance with State Fire Codes.
Additionally, contractors shall not receive substantial or final payment from the College until a Certificate of
Occupancy or a Certificate of Completion has been issued.

Environmental Health and Safety shall have the program over site of the BCA program.

Facilities Planning and Physical Plant shall be responsible for compliance with the program, initiating
appropriate review of plans and inspections, and coordination with contractors to insure that they are in
compliance with the BCA program and Florida Statutes related to construction and renovation projects.



4. Program

    a. Building Code Administrator

    The Building Code Administrator (BCA) shall employ or contract qualified inspectors to conduct plans
    review and code inspections as required by the building inspection program.




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The BCA will have the overall responsibility in reviewing plans and specifications for compliance with
adopted codes and standards. After reviewing the documents, comments will be returned with appropriate
references.

The BCA will issue permits to contractors upon satisfactory completion of the application process and
receipt and review of all necessary documents.

The BCA, in conjunction with the general contractor or construction manager, will develop an inspection
schedule to facilitate appropriate inspections to coincide with the project construction schedule. The BCA
shall initiate construction inspections in accordance with the established inspection schedule at times
requested by the appropriate contractor(s). Inspectors shall be granted permission to perform any
additional inspections, as they deem necessary to insure compliance with code requirements and project
documents.

Upon completion of a new building, the BCA shall issue a Certificate of Occupancy (CO). The certificate
of occupancy will state the building is complete, constructed in accordance with the plans and
specifications, and meets the minimum code requirements at the time of issuance of the building permit.
The State Fire Marshal and other College entities must inspect and certify the building is substantially
complete prior to the BCA issuance of a Certificate of Occupancy and approved occupancy of the structure.

At the completion of a renovated building, The BCA shall issue a Certificate of Completion (CC). The
Certificate of Completion will state the renovated portions of the building are complete, constructed in
accordance with the plans and specifications, and meets the minimum code requirements at the time of
issuance of the building permit. The State Fire Marshal and other College entities must inspect and certify
the renovated portions of the building are substantially complete prior to the BCA issuance of a Certificate
of Occupancy and approved occupancy of the structure.

A Conditional Certificate of Occupancy (CCO) or Conditional Certificate of Completion (CCC) may be issued
by the Building Official at his/her discretion for a period not to exceed 60 days. If items have not been
completed after the 60 day conditional occupancy, the General Contractor may be subject to additional
inspection fees assessed by the Building Official.

b. Design Professionals

Design professionals shall be responsible for the design of the project in accordance with the appropriate
adopted codes and standards. The BCA shall review the design documents at the following times for major
projects: schematic design, advanced design, 50%, 100%, and final bid construction documents. A major
project shall be defined as a project with a construction cost greater than $1,000,000. All other projects
shall be reviewed at the 50%, 100% and final bid construction documents. The design professional shall
provide four sets of signed and sealed construction documents and specifications, to the BCA. One set of
these drawings will be issued to the General Contractor or Construction Manager, two sets will go to New
College Facilities Management, and the fourth set will be maintained by the BCA in accordance with Florida
Statues. Two additional sets of signed and sealed drawings and specifications shall be submitted to the
Office of the State Fire Marshal, Plans Review Section with the applicable fee included. If required, signed
and sealed copies will also be provided to DEP or Department of Health.

If the level of work requires the involvement of a design professional as described in Chapter
471 and Chapter 481 of the Florida Statutes, the construction documents and specifications
must be signed and sealed by the architect and engineers of record.

c. Contractor/Construction Manager

The general contractor/construction manager (GC/CM) shall apply for the permit. At the time of
application for a permit, the GC/CM shall provide a completed permit application as provide by the BCA,
list of subcontractors and a letter of authorization as necessary. A building permit will be issued after
these items, along with the plans and specifications have been reviewed and approved by the Building
Code Administrator. One of the submitted sets of plans and specifications will be returned with the
building permit and shall be stamped by the BCA stating "Reviewed for Code Compliance". This set of
documents shall be kept on site for use by the inspectors.

The GC/CM shall meet with the Building Code Administrator, or designee, to develop a building inspection
plan. The GC/CM shall be responsible for scheduling all required inspections in accordance with the plan
developed. Subsequent construction may not proceed until the previous inspection has been completed

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    and approved. When the GC/CM believes the project is complete, the GC/CM shall request a Certificate of
    Completion or Certificate of Occupancy be issued.

    d. BCA Standard Operating Procedures
         1)   Architects, engineers, and College design professionals shall prepare documents in accordance
              with the requirements of the Florida Building and Technical Codes and the Life Safety Codes. In
              the case of conflicts, the most stringent shall apply.
         1)   The A/E or Facilities Design office, as appropriate, shall forward the construction documents to
              the BCA for review.
         2)   The BCA shall review the construction documents for code compliance. The BCA will return
              comments to the submitting agency.
         3)   The GC/CM or department shall apply for the building permit.
         4)   The BCA will review the building permit application and issue the permit if all information supplied
              is acceptable and complete.
         5)   The BCA and the GC/CM shall develop an inspection plan.
         6)   The GC/CM shall call and request an inspection in accordance with the inspection plan. The BCA
              shall perform inspections at the request of the appropriate contractor.
         7)   The Office of the State Fire Marshal shall be required to inspect all renovation and constructions
              at the 50%, 100%, and additionally as the type of work requires. In addition, inspections may
              also be required by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), the Department of
              Health, or local jurisdictions.
         8)   After the building is substantially complete and all required inspections have been performed,
              including final inspection by the Office of the State Fire Marshal, the building official will issue the
              appropriate certificate of completion or certificate of occupancy.


5. Disputes and Resolutions

For the first offense, contractors, which include both the general contractors and subcontractors, found
working without permits or proper licensing will be asked to stop working in that area and obtain the necessary
documentation and permit. On the second offense, the general contractor or subcontractor will be dismissed
by the Building Code Administrator, or designee, from the job site until the contractors takes the necessary
corrective action and obtains a permit. In addition, the contractor may be subjected to an additional permitting
fee equal to 100% of the original permit fee. On the third offense, the contractor will be dismissed, an
additional permit fee equal to 100% of the original fee may be charged, and a complaint maybe filed with the
Construction Industry Licensing Board.


6. Board of Appeals

In the event of conflict with interpretations of the local BCA, plans reviewers and inspectors, a contractor may
appeal to the BCA’s established Board of Appeals. Their decision will be considered final and binding all parties.
However, if it is necessary to appeal the board’s decision, it may be appealed through the Florida Building
Commission, pursuant to section 120.569 Florida Statues regarding the local government actions.

7. Fees

Permitting fees shall be borne by the appropriate New College construction or maintenance PECO, CIF, or
Bonded Accounts. These accounts will be billed or assessed fees as appropriate to cover the cost of program
operation. Other accounts (E&G, Auxiliary, Grant, etc.) and projects shall be charged permitting fees based on
an established fee structure or other appropriate means. Fees for work without permits will be billed directly to
the contractor.


8. References

Florida Statutes, Section 1013.371; 553.80(6); 553.79; 468.604; 471.003; 481.229; BOAF Model
Administrative Code, 2006; Florida Building Codes.




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B. Fire Alarm Response and Maintenance Program

  1. Purpose

  Provide guidelines, and procedures for the installation and operation of the New College fire alarm systems,
  and to insure uniformity and maintenance compatibility throughout the College Campus.

  2. Definitions

  Fire Alarm - The highest priority on the system indicating that smoke or fire has been detected. The alarm
  system will be in full activation including, horns, strobes, and emergency force notification. The monitoring
  company will receive the alarm and immediately notify the Fire Department. The panel will have to be reset
  after an all clear is given.

  Supervisory Alarm – The second highest priority on the system indicating that one or more critical fire
  protection devices is indicating a problem with the input circuit. This could result form a number of causes
  such as sprinkler tamper switch or a dorm room smoke detector. A local “Panel Alarm” will sound and the
  monitoring company will receive a “supervisory signal”. The fire department will NOT be called, but on-call NCF
  personnel will be contacted. The alarm system will continue to operate. The panel will have to be reset once
  the problem is identified.

  Trouble Alarm – This is the lowest priority on the system. This condition indicates an electrical or device
  malfunction such as a wiring fault, phone line problem, or device problem. A local “Panel Alarm” will sound
  and the monitoring company will receive a “trouble signal”. The fire department will NOT be called, but on-call
  NCF personnel will be contacted. The system will continue to operate. The panel will have to be reset one the
  problem is identified.

  3. Responsibility

      a.   The Director of Facilities Planning, in consultation with the Director of Physical Plant and the Director
           of Environmental Health and Safety, has the authority for establishing a fire alarm system that meets
           the needs of the New College Campus, is expandable and compatible with other systems as
           necessary, and above all must meet recognized listings (such as UL or FM), and is applicable with
           NFPA and State Fire Codes for the applications intended.

      b.   The Director of Environmental Health and Safety, as the designated Fire Safety Officer of the College,
           will develop policy and procedure for the maintenance of fire alarm systems and response to fire
           alarms, and serve as liaison with the Office of the State Fire Marshal and the Sarasota Fire
           Department.

      c.   The Director of Physical Plant is responsible for and has the authority to maintain the College Fire
           alarm systems in all E&G buildings.

      d.   The Director of Housing and Residence Life, or designee, is responsible for and has the authority to
           maintain the College fire alarm systems in all Residence Hall facilities.

      e.   The Director of Physical Plant is responsible for approving the installation of all new fire alarm systems
           and the modification of existing systems in existing E&G buildings.

      f.   The Director of Facilities Planning shall be responsible for the design and installation of all fire alarm
           systems in new construction and renovated buildings, including E&G, Auxiliary, and Residence Life.

      g.   All alarm systems shall be installed by a Florida licensed alarm contractor or Unlimited Electrical
           Contractor, per Florida Statutes.

      h.   All plans for new or replacement alarm systems shall be designed by a Florida Licensed Electrical
           Engineer and submitted for review to the Office of Review, Office of the State Fire Marshal.

      i.   All plans shall be submitted, reviewed, and approved by the Building Code Official for New College.

      j.   The Director of Physical Plant shall be responsible for maintaining a current contract with a contractor
           licensed in Florida to perform maintenance on all NCF Fire Alarm Systems.

      k.   The Director of Physical Plant shall report to and request authority for its actions from the Vice
           President for Finance and Administration.


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   l.   The Director of Housing and Residence Life shall report to and request authority for its actions from
        the Dean of Students.

4. Procedures
   a. Building Fire Alarms

        1)   All requests for expansion and additional system capabilities in all buildings shall be reviewed and
             approved by the Director of Facilities Planning.
        2)   All projects for new or upgraded fire alarm systems shall be designed by an engineer registered
             in the State of Florida reviewed by the Director of Facilities Planning, and submitted to the State
             Fire Marshal for approval.
        3)   Approved Plans shall be submitted to the NCF Building Code Official for review and approval.
        4)   Replacement of existing fire alarm system components may be performed by a licensed alarm
             contractor or qualified in-house personnel as appropriate and permitted by codes.
        5)   All work performed on systems must be documented in the Fire Alarm Panel log book attached to
             each panel. Work requiring recertification of the panel can only be performed by individuals who
             are qualified by the State Fire Marshal.

   b. Fire Alarm Preventive Maintenance

   It shall be the responsibility of the Director of Physical Plant to arrange for necessary preventive
   maintenance contracts for all New College Fire Alarm Systems. Inspections and preventative maintenance
   shall be done, at a minimum, in accordance with the National Fire Protection Association Code (NFPA)
   Chapter 72 as adopted by the State of Florida, and adopted Florida Administrative Codes. Only contractors
   licensed in Florida to perform maintenance and service on fire alarm systems, or in-house personnel
   knowledgeable about the operation of the systems, as permitted by NFPA 72 and State Fire Codes, may
   work on these systems. To insure continuity of the system, New College Housing and Residence Life and
   other Auxiliary Departments shall utilize the same licensed contractor.

   c. Testing of the System

   The testing of fire alarm systems shall be conducted as required by NFPA 72, Chapter 10 and FAC 69A-48
   by licensed contractors or qualified in-house personnel approved by the State Fire Marshal.

   d. Fire Alarm Malfunctions

        1)   In the event of an alarm system malfunction that cannot be reset by Campus Police, Housing and
             Residence Life, or Physical Plant, the alarm system contractor shall be contacted by the
             appropriate alarm system maintenance for response within 24 hours.
        2)   In any event that a fire alarm system is rendered inoperable for greater than 4 hours in an
             occupied building, a fire watch must be established on that building and the Office of the State
             Fire Marshal notified.
        3)   Housing and Residence Life shall be responsible for responding to the affected Residence Life
             Buildings within four hours, contacting the on-call contracted alarm company, an establishing a
             fire watch in all occupied buildings if conditions are expected to exist longer than 24 hours.
        4)   Physical Plant shall be responsible for responding to the affected E&G Buildings within four hours,
             contacting the on-call contracted alarm company, an establishing a fire watch in all occupied
             buildings if conditions are expected to exist longer than 24 hours.
        5)   The Campus Police Department responding to any fire alarm-related call shall maintain records
             by assigning a case number to each alarm caused by system. Any malfunctions or causes of false
             alarms shall be noted.

   e. Response to Fire Alarms

   Response to a fire alarm in a New College facility shall take the highest priority and immediate response.
   Most fire alarm systems report their locations directly to a Central Off-site Monitoring Station. Campus
   Police have the ability to monitor the alarm locations and respond to the location.

   f. Fire Alarms

        1)   When a Fire Alarm is activated all occupants are required to evacuate the building in accordance
             with NFPA 1, Chapter 10.5.1.
        2)   The NCF Monitoring Company shall immediately notify Sarasota Fire Rescue to respond to the
             scene.
        3)   NCF Campus Police shall immediately respond to the scene upon knowledge of the alarm.
        4)   The Monitoring Company will also notify the appropriate NCF maintenance personnel (Housing or
             Physical Plant) to respond as well.
                                                                                                                11
        5)  If first on the scene, NCF Police shall determine if the fire is real and if so assist with evacuations.
        6)  If smoke or fire is not evident, Campus Police shall try to determine the cause of the alarm.
        7)  Read the annunciator panel to determine what device activated.
        8)  If possible, determine the specific cause of the activation. (Smoke from cooking, dust, someone
            activated a pull station, sprinkler flow switch, etc.)
        9) Once Sarasota Fire Department has arrived, they will be in charge of the scene. Assist as
            requested.
        10) Once the Fire Department has inspected the building, and there is no fire, Campus Police or
            Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant* may silence and reset the panel.
        11) Once the Fire Department has released the scene or left the premises, the University Police have
            authority to release the scene, silence and reset alarms, or authorize the silence and reset of
            alarms, as deemed appropriate.
        12) If an actual fire caused the alarm and property damage occurred, secure the scene and notify the
            Office of the State Fire Marshal for an investigation in accordance with F.S. 633.03. Should the
            Office of the State Fire Marshal choose not to investigate the cause, Campus Police having law
            enforcement jurisdiction, shall initiate an investigation as appropriate.

    g. Supervisory Alarms

        1)   A Supervisory Alarm may be transmitted via the monitoring company or it may be heard and
             reported by an individual.
        2)   During normal business hours, Campus Police and Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant shall enter
             the building, locate the fire alarm control panel, and determine the cause of the supervisory
             alarm by reading the annunciator panel
        3)   After hours, Campus Police shall enter the building, locate the fire alarm control panel, and
             determine the cause of the supervisory alarm by reading the annunciator panel
        4)   Report the findings to the Physical Plant or Housing Maintenance personnel on call.
        5)   The Alarm monitoring company should also automatically identify the supervisory location and
             contact the appropriate maintenance staff contact (Housing or Physical Plant).
        6)   In the event this supervisory is the result of an activated Room Smoke Detector, Campus Police
             shall locate the room and determine if a fire exists.
        7)   If a fire is detected, Campus Police shall activate a pull station immediately, and if safe to do so,
             attempt to extinguish flames using a hand held fire extinguisher. Otherwise assist with
             evacuations.
        8)   If no fire is detected, and Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant has determined the cause, the
             panel may be silenced and reset by Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant or Campus Police. If no
             cause can be identified, Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant or Campus Police, as appropriate,
             shall reset the panel and closely monitor the system until the alarm system contractor can
             respond and trouble-shoot the system.
        9)   If necessary, Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant shall contact the alarm contractor to make
             necessary repairs.

    h. Trouble Alarms

        1)   A Trouble Alarm may be transmitted via the monitoring company or it may be heard and reported
             by an individual.
        2)   During normal business hours, Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant shall enter the building, locate
             the fire alarm control panel, and determine the cause of the trouble alarm by reading the
             annunciator panel.
        3)   After hours, Campus Police shall enter the building, locate the fire alarm control panel, and
             determine the cause of the trouble alarm by reading the annunciator panel. Campus Police shall
             report the findings to the Physical Plant or Housing Maintenance personnel on call.
        4)   The Alarm monitoring company should also automatically identify the trouble location and contact
             the appropriate maintenance staff contact (Housing or Physical Plant).
        5)   Once the trouble condition has been identified and reported, Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant
             or Campus Police may acknowledge or reset the panel as appropriate.
        6)   The alarm system contractor shall be contacted by Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant for follow
             up if necessary.

             o   Note – Housing Maintenance/Physical Plant refers to the maintenance entity responsible
                 for the building where the alarm is located. Physical Plant shall typically be responsible for
                 E&G buildings and Housing Maintenance for Residence Life facilities.

5. Recordkeeping

Test records of all fire alarm system shall be in accordance with NFPA 72, Chapter 10, and FAC 69A-49.
Reports shall be maintained in a readily available location near the Fire Alarm Panel. Any work, alarms,
supervisory, or trouble signals that are required to be documented shall be noted in the logs.
                                                                                                                 12
  Logs older than one year shall be maintained in permanent record in appropriate Housing Maintenance or
  Physical Plant offices.
  Electronic records (scanned copies of original documents, spread sheets, etc) are acceptable as long as they
  are readily available and stored on secure network drivers.
  Fire Alarm panels shall be tagged when placed in service and re-tagged by qualified personnel when serviced,
  tested, repaired, inspected, or improved as specified by FAC 69A-48.006.

  6. References

  NFPA 72, 2002 ed.; NFPA 1, Chapter 13; NFPA 101, Chapter 9.6; Florida Administrative Code (FAC), Chapter
  69A-48; F.S. Chapter 633.539; 541; 633.70; 701; 702; F.S. Chapter 1013.371(1) (a).



C. Asbestos Management Program

  1. Purpose

  The objective of this policy is to provide guidelines for managing asbestos in College facilities.

  2. Overview

  Asbestos abatement work must be conducted pursuant to approved procedures and requirements of
  appropriate regulating agencies as specified in Chapters 255 and 469, F.S., 40 CFR 763, and 40 CFR 61.
  All buildings containing asbestos materials are subject to monitoring and periodic inspections until all asbestos
  containing materials have been removed and the removal and required records are documented. A current
  approved asbestos survey for each building and a campus-wide Asbestos Operations and Maintenance (O&M)
  Plan must be maintained by the College, in accordance with state and federal regulations. Operations and
  Maintenance, or in-place management, is the primary method of managing asbestos-containing materials.
  Removal or other forms of response actions shall be required in advance of renovation/remodeling or
  demolition activities and in specific instances where O&M is deemed inappropriate. The scope of asbestos
  removal work shall include, to the extent reasonable, all friable and non-friable asbestos-containing materials
  within the area that is to be isolated during the removal process.

  3. Asbestos Contact Person
  The College shall appoint an asbestos contact person(s), who shall be responsible for administering asbestos
  projects and monitoring facilities containing asbestos materials. The Contact person shall be the Director of
  Environmental Health and Safety. The contact person(s) has the right to review and comment on all asbestos
  documents and abatement activities performed for the College by any contractor or consultant. Such review is
  to protect the College community's health by assuring best industry practices are utilized.

  4. Asbestos Consultant

  Each asbestos removal project shall be conducted under the direction of a Florida licensed asbestos
  consultant who shall be responsible for:

      a.   Developing project specific technical plans, specifications, & drawings for all jobs
      b.   Preparing asbestos surveys, O&M plans and bid documents
      c.   Evaluating the bidders' qualifications and bid prices
      d.   Enforcement of provisions in contract documents concerning and during asbestos removal
      e.   Air sampling and analysis including: work area, ambient, final clearance
      f.   Continuous on-site monitoring of project from initial disturbance of asbestos through final air
           clearance


  5. Asbestos Survey

  Asbestos surveys meeting current State of Florida and federal requirements shall be conducted prior to
  any building renovation/remodeling or demolition. The College Asbestos Contact Person may authorize
  abbreviated sampling of suspect material for projects of less than 160 square feet or 260 linear feet and
  asbestos response actions related to O&M activities. Partial or limited surveys prior to
  renovation/remodeling projects may be appropriate with the concurrence of the College Asbestos
  Contact Person and the licensed asbestos consultant.

                                                                                                                 13
6. Asbestos Operations and Maintenance Plan

The College shall develop, implement and maintain an Asbestos O&M Plan for asbestos containing
materials known or assumed to exist in the buildings as indicated by the asbestos survey. The O&M Plan
will apply to all facilities identified as having or assumed to have asbestos containing material and shall
be kept current and documented in accordance with state and federal requirements.

7. Project List

The College shall maintain a list of asbestos abatement projects. This list shall be updated as necessary.

8. Abatement Procedures
Abatement of asbestos-containing materials shall be undertaken by a Florida licensed asbestos abatement
contractor. All supervisors and workers shall be fully trained, qualified, and certified to perform the abatement
activities that they are contracted to perform.
Internal College personnel qualified to undertake asbestos abatement work should be DBPR (formerly EPA
accredited) accredited to conduct such work. All work undertaken by College personnel shall comply with the
approved O&M Plan and shall meet the same standards required of the licensed asbestos abatement
contractor. If the work is greater than 160 square feet or 260 linear feet, all applicable abatement contractor
licensing and monitoring requirements shall be followed. Work conducted by College personnel shall be
conducted in accordance with all federal and state requirements, including all notifications, training, monitoring
and documentation.
Procedures outlined in the regulations of Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the United States
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), and Florida
Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) and all other federal and state regulations shall be
adhered to throughout all asbestos projects.
In some cases, removal of asbestos containing materials may not be the best response action. In instances
where the risk of exposure is low and costs of complete removal are prohibitive (e.g. asbestos vinyl floor tiles
or asbestos roofing felt), the Florida licensed asbestos consultant shall present the findings to the College
Asbestos Contact Person, who shall determine what action is to be taken. In no case shall any asbestos
containing materials be disturbed without the EPA required asbestos survey. The College shall be responsible
for administration and management of its asbestos program in accordance with all applicable laws. The College
president or designee, given sufficient justification from qualified College personnel, may choose to exceed
the requirements of existing regulations, and this policy for any project the College deems appropriate.

9. Removal of Asbestos Roofing Material
All suspect roofing materials shall be sampled for asbestos content utilizing current State of Florida sampling
criteria prior to disturbance or removal of the material. The roofing condition shall be assessed by a licensed
Asbestos Consultant and a recommendation made to the College Asbestos Contact Person regarding
appropriate response actions and use of a Florida licensed asbestos abatement contractor or a Florida certified
roofing contractor. Bituminous resinous roofing materials are generally regarded as being less likely to release
asbestos fibers; therefore, Florida Statutes allow removal by Florida certified roofing contractors. Roofing
materials containing asbestos must be removed under the continuous inspection of an "on-site roofing
supervisor," in accordance with Chapters 255 and 469, F.S.

10. Removal of Vinyl Asbestos Floor Tile
Vinyl asbestos floor tile shall be removed in compliance with Chapters 255 and 469, F.S. 40 CFR 763, and 40
CFR 61, and at the discretion of the Asbestos Contact Person and the Consultant.

11. Lists of Consultants and Contractors

Names and addresses of Florida licensed Asbestos Consultants may be obtained by writing:
The Department of Business and Professional Regulations, Office of Listing and Labels, Northwood
Center
1940 North Monroe Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0755
A nominal printing and mailing fee will be required.




                                                                                                               14
  12. Insurance

  Prior to the College entering into any asbestos abatement contract, the College shall ensure compliance
  with Section 255.56, F.S.

  13. Conflict of Interest

  Before an asbestos contractor is hired, an asbestos consultant shall first be retained to design and
  prepare the abatement project specifications (under separate contract and independent of the influence
  from the asbestos contractor). There must be no conflict of interest between the contractor and
  consultant. Any changes to project specifications shall be provided in the form of addenda issued by the
  consultant after review and consultation with NCF the asbestos contact person.
  Pursuant to Section 255.558, Florida Statutes the contractor shall provide to the College asbestos
  contact person a notarized form indicating no conflict of interest.

  14. References

      1.   Florida Statutes 255.551 - 255.565, 469.001 - 469.014
      2.   40 CFR 763; EPA Worker Protection Standard
      3.   40 CFR 61; NESHAP



D. Management and Disposal of Hazardous Wastes Program

  1. Purpose

  New College of Florida (NCF) shall consistently strive to insure compliance with federal and state hazardous
  waste regulations through development of procedures, training, and understanding, for the need to protect the
  environment in which we live, work, and study. Under the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  (RCRA), New College is responsible for the hazardous waste generated by anyone who works, lives, and visits
  New College. This program is designed to help guide those who may generate that waste to manage it in a
  safe and legal manner.

  2. Definitions
  Solid Waste - For purposes of this program, a solid waste may be any solid, liquid, or containerized gas which
  no longer has an appropriate and legal intended use for the College. For a legal definition, refer to the Federal
  Solid Waste Disposal Act SWDA).

  Hazardous Waste - Any solid waste (as defined by the Federal Solid Waste Disposal Act) which possess
  hazardous characteristics, including flammability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxic characteristics (TCLP) as
  defined by the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 261).

  Acutely Hazardous Waste - Wastes listed in 40 CFR 261.33(e) often referred to as the "P" Listed wastes.
  Refer to Section III.

  Listed Hazardous Waste - Any chemical or product as listed in 40 CFR 261.31 - 261.33. Listed wastes are
  often referred to as "D", "F", "K", "U", and "P" wastes. Refer to Section III..

   Flammable Characteristic Waste - Any waste with a flash point of less than 140F (60C). Common
  flammable materials include acetone, toluene, methanol, ethers, isopropanol, duplicating fluids, rubber cement
  glue, paint thinner or mineral spirits, oil based paints and stains, rubbing alcohol, nail polish remover, any
  aerosol containers such as spray paints and adhesives, and solvent-soaked rags.

  Corrosive Characteristic Waste - Any liquid waste which has a pH of less than 2 (acidic) or greater than
  12.5 (basic), or corrodes steel at a rate specified by EPA. Corrosive wastes may include, sulfuric acid,
  hydrochloric acid (muriatic acid), sodium hydroxide, drain openers (Drano) and products which contain strong
  acids or bases, which include many cleaning products.

  Reactive Characteristic Waste - Any waste which is unstable, can readily undergo a violent change, reacts
  violently with water, is capable of detonation or explosive reaction, or contains sulfides or cyanides that have
  the potential for generating toxic fumes or vapors. Examples of reactive wastes include sodium and potassium
  metal, dry picric acid, compounds that form explosive peroxides, and cyanide plating operations.


                                                                                                                   15
Toxic Characteristic Waste (or TCLP) - a waste identified through an EPA method (Toxic Characteristic
Leachate Procedure) that has the potential of forming a leachate that may cause groundwater contamination.
If any product contains a constituent greater than a specified concentration as determined by the TCLP, it is a
hazardous waste. Examples are products that contain benzene (many petroleum based products), cadmium
(nickel cadmium batteries), lead (lead batteries and lead paints),silver (spent photofixer, silver nitrate),
chromium, mercury (mercury batteries, fluorescent light tubes), etc. Refer to Section II.

Storage Area - Area in which hazardous wastes are temporally stored for up to 180 days while awaiting
transport to a licensed disposal facility. This is a regulated area in which all containers must be labeled, dated,
and inspected weekly.

Satellite Accumulation Area - A temporary storage and collection area of hazardous waste, near the point
of generation, which is under direct control of the person or operator generating the waste. Waste in an
approved satellite accumulation area is exempt from the 180 day time limit if other requirements are met.
(NOTE: Subject to considerable interpretation and constraints by various regulators).

Small-Quantity Generator (SQG) - A generator of hazardous waste who generates between 100 kg and
1000 kg of waste (or less than 1 kg of acutely hazardous waste) in a calendar month. At no time can a SQG
have greater than 6000 kg of hazardous waste in storage. The College is considered a small quantity
generator.

Large-Quantity Generator (LQG) - A generator of hazardous waste who generates greater than 1000 kg (or
greater than 1 kg of acutely hazardous waste) in a calendar month.

3. Responsibility

NCF shall take every precaution against hazards normally associated with handling and disposal of hazardous
chemicals and wastes to avoid human and environmental exposure. The College is a Small Quantity Generator
(EPA ID # FLR 000 136 929) of hazardous waste and is thereby required to comply with Federal and State
regulations governing the management and disposal of hazardous wastes. These regulations mandate that the
College determine if any given waste is hazardous, and if so, manage and dispose of that waste strictly in
compliance with applicable standards.

The President of the College has the ultimate responsibility to insure that hazardous wastes and materials are
properly managed. That responsibility has been delegated, via appropriate vice presidents, deans, and
departmental chairs to insure that all users of hazardous materials properly manage hazardous wastes
generated by their operations. It shall be the responsibility of the departmental supervisor, instructor, principal
investigator and/or laboratory supervisor to ensure the proper management, and storage of all hazardous
wastes generated by their respective department, laboratory, or research operation. The instructor, principle
investigator, laboratory supervisor, or other departmental supervisor shall ensure that all hazardous wastes
are identified at the point of generation and properly labeled and dated. The Department of Environmental
Health and Safety shall insure that hazardous wastes are collected from various generators in a timely
manner, verify appropriate identification and labeling information, provide appropriate temporary storage, and
arrange for transportation and disposal of the waste in a safe and legal manner.


4. Procedures

All hazardous waste shall be identified at the source. A material does not become a waste until it can no longer
be used for its intended purpose. The words HAZARDOUS WASTE must be present on each container.

The Department of Environmental Health and Safety will provide appropriate labels for the identification of
hazardous wastes. See Section IV.

Insure that hazardous wastes are collected in appropriate containers which are compatible with the waste and
can be tightly capped. Do not use milk jugs.

All hazardous waste shall be clearly labeled with all known constituents. Be sure to include both the solvent(s)
and solute(s). Particular emphasis shall be placed on identifying listed and characteristic components.

Hazardous Waste shall be stored in dedicated, secure, and safe location within the generating area. Waste
shall not be placed in a location subject to accidental breakage or spillage.

In order to comply with 40CFR265.177(c), hazardous wastes shall be segregated by a physical barrier
according to hazard class, from the point of generation. Specifically, the following must be physically separate
at all times by a barrier or sufficient distance: acids; bases; flammables; oxidizers; reactives. A barrier has
been determined by DEP to be a cabinet, flammable storage cabinet, or a secondary containment capable of
being sealed (i.e. container with a lid). Reference Section VII for compatibility charts.
                                                                                                                 16
The START DATE shall be placed on the label on the date that waste is first added. Do not put a date in the
STORAGE DATE location. The storage date will be completed when the container is moved from the
generation point to the storage location.

Complete the other information requested on the label including department and/or research group, name of
individual/researcher/supervisor providing the information, and a phone number.

Contact the Department of Environmental Health and Safety when a container has been filled or a particular
project generating waste has been completed.


    a. DO's and DON'T's:

    Do use an appropriate size container for the waste generated. Under filled containers cost the same to
    dispose as a filled one.

    Do not overfill containers. Leave approximately a one to two inch air space at the top of the container.
    Over filled containers of volatile organics pressurize and leak in storage. Leaking containers are a violation
    of hazardous waste regulations and also eradicate the ink on labels.

    Do write legibly on the label with permanent ink. Write out chemical name(s) of the components. Avoid
    using chemical formulas. Please do not use water based felt tip markers.

    Do not mix metallic mercury (Hg) with any other chemicals.

    Do keep all organic and inorganic mercury compounds separate from other materials. Contact EH&S if a
    procedure uses mercuric compounds or generates a hazardous waste containing mercuric compounds.

    Do not mix radioactive materials with any hazardous waste.

    Do not mix biohazardous materials with any hazardous waste.

    Do not mix incompatible materials together. If unsure of any particular combinations, use a separate
    container.

    Do not store incompatible hazardous waste materials in the same cabinet, fume hood, etc.

    Do call the Office of Environmental Health and Safety if you have any questions or are not sure how to
    manage a particular substance.

    b. Procedures for the Natural Sciences Building & Chemical Storage:

        1.   All procedures listed in Section I above shall be followed.

        2.   Natural Sciences shall be responsible for managing hazardous waste from all Teaching
             Laboratories in Natural Sciences and Pritzker Marine Biology.

        3.   Each teaching/research laboratory shall be considered a satellite accumulation area.

        4.   Hazardous waste containers from laboratories shall be collected by designated laboratory
             personnel and placed in temporary storage when full or when a given procedure is complete.

        5.   The STORAGE DATE shall be completed on each container when removed from the laboratory
             (i.e. the Satellite Accumulation Area).

        6.   Containers shall be stored in a dedicated storage area of Building NCA (Chemical Storage A) until
             collected by the Hazardous Waste Transporter. Containers in this area may be stored for up to
             180 days. All state and federal regulations governing Hazardous Waste Storage Areas are
             applicable in this area.

    c. Procedures for the Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S):

        1.   The EH&S Department will collect hazardous wastes from generating departments periodically,
             when appropriate, or requested by the generating department.




                                                                                                               17
         2.   The EH&S Department shall verify label information including contents, generating department,
              hazard classification, and storage date. Any incomplete information will be obtained from the
              generator prior to collection and removal from the area.

         3.   All hazardous waste collected by the EH&S Department will be taken to the hazardous waste
              storage building and stored up to 180 days.

         4.   Every waste container shall be identified with the contents and the words HAZARDOUS WASTE.

         5.   A data base shall be maintained including the chemical identity, generating department, quantity
              of material, dates of storage and collection, and other pertinent information.

         6.   All hazardous waste shall be collected by the licensed contractor and removed from campus
              within 180 days of the storage date. All hazardous waste shall be packaged, labeled, manifested,
              and transported as required by applicable EPA, DOT, and state DEP regulations.

5. Waste Minimization

Waste minimization is federally mandated for hazardous waste generators. Each department of The New
College of Florida shall take reasonable and appropriate actions to minimize the amount of hazardous waste
generated by their operations, teaching, and research. Waste minimization techniques shall include, but are
not limited to:

    1.   Eliminate the waste generating process - Change or modify a process so that a hazardous waste is
         not produced. For example, use a computer program or model demonstration.

    2.   Substitute a non-hazardous or less hazardous material - Use surfactant cleaning compounds instead
         of chromic acid; use non-formaldehyde based fixatives in place of formalin, purchase formaldehyde-
         free preserved specimens, use non-hazardous scintillation fluids in place of toluene; use water-based
         latex paints and stains in place of oil based paints, stains, and solvents, etc.

    3.   Purchase small quantities/only purchase what you need - Remember that the cost of disposal often
         exceeds the purchase price. Check with other labs to see if they may have what is needed. Do not
         purchase large quantities of materials because they are less expensive per unit volume.

    4.   Use less material - Reduce the scale of procedures or process.

    5.   Reuse and recycle materials where practical.

6. Training

    1.   State and Federal regulations {40 CFR 262.34(a)(4) and 265.16} require that training be provided to
         all individuals who generate hazardous waste.

    2.   Training shall be provided to all faculty, staff, and OPS student assistants performing activities which
         generate or potentially generate a hazardous waste.

    3.   Training will be provided by the Department of Environmental Health and Safety at mutually
         convenient and prearranged times.

    4.   Hazardous waste training provided by other facilities or recognized organizations (eg. University of
         Florida TREEO Center, Georgia Tech Continuing Education) will be evaluated on a case by case basis
         to determine if required topics have been covered. However, in all cases, individuals must be trained
         in specific procedures used by the College.

    5.   Training topics to be covered will include at a minimum the following:

         a.   Standard operating procedures and safety evaluations.
         b.   Hazardous waste identification and classification.
         c.   Proper labeling.
         d.   Proper containers, segregation, and storage within generating areas.
         e.   Emergency procedures and spill response.
         f.   Penalties for non-compliance.




                                                                                                               18
7. Emergency Notification and Response
State and Federal regulations {40 CFR 262.34(d)(4)} require that the College develop and maintain an
Emergency Response Plan to address spills, fires and other emergencies associated with hazardous waste.

An emergency contact shall be appointed who has authority to take appropriate action and is on call 24 hours
per day. The Emergency contact for the College is the Director of Environmental Health and Safety. A list
of other contacts and phone numbers in order of contact is listed at the end of this section.

Spills and releases of certain chemicals in excess of their Reportable Quantities (RQ) requires immediate
notification of the National Response Center (1-800-424-8802) and the State Warning Point (904-413-9911 or
1-800-320-0519). A list of chemicals and their RQ's is available from the Environmental Health and Safety
Office. The Director of Environmental Health and Safety or other designee should be contacted immediately if a
RQ of a substance has been spilled or released.

Spills of laboratory-quantities occur on occasion. In most cases these spills can and should be handled by
laboratory personnel in a safe manner. Spilled materials and absorbents must be handled as a hazardous
waste if applicable criteria are met.

Spills that cannot be handled safely by laboratory personnel should be referred to the Department of
Environmental Health and Safety.

In most cases, laboratory spills can be contained and absorbed with equipment in-house. Should the spill
exceed the capabilities of EH&S and lab personnel, it shall be handled through the Emergency Notification
System. That system shall be activated as follows:

    a.   Contact Emergency 911 or Campus Police at 487-4210. Inform them of the exact situation, chemicals
         and quantities involved, and the location.
    b.   Campus Police shall contact the Sarasota County Emergency Notification System via the 911 system
         who will notify Emergency Response personnel. Campus Police will also contact the Director of EH&S
         or designee and other personnel as described in the New College Emergency Action Plan.
    c.   The Director of EH&S or designee will determine if RQ's have been exceeded and make appropriate
         notification to the State Warning Point and the National Response Center.

8. References
Chapter 403.704 and 403.721, Florida Statutes, and Chapter 62-730, Florida Administrative Codes, Rules of
the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP); Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapters 260 - 271.
The DEP regulates hazardous wastes from the point of generation to disposal. A fine of up to $25,000 per day
per violation is authorized to be levied against violators of transportation, treatment, storage or disposal
requirements during an enforcement action. Knowingly or repeatedly violating these rules or endangering
another person can result in criminal imprisonment from 5 to 15 years and/or monetary fines from $50,000 to
$1,000,000 per day per violation.

9. Appendix I

LIST OF EMERGENCY CONTACTS

CAMPUS EMERGENCY NUMBER X911
(Inform them of the exact situation, chemicals and quantities involved, and the location)

Mr. Ron Hambrick, Director
Environmental Health and Safety
Office 487-4585

Mr. Wes Walker, Director
Campus Police
Office 487-4211

Mr. Mark Levenson, Director
Human Resources
Office 487-4757

Mr. John Martin, Vice President
Administrative Affairs
Office 487-4444


                                                                                                             19
E. Management and Disposal of Hazardous Wastes from Construction and
Renovation Sites Program

  1. Purpose
  New College of Florida (NCF) shall consistently strive to insure compliance with federal and state hazardous
  waste regulations through development of procedures, training, and understanding, for the need to protect the
  environment in which we live, work, and study. Under the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  (RCRA), New College is responsible for the hazardous waste generated by anyone who works, lives, and visits
  New College. This program is designed to help guide those who may generate that waste to manage it in a
  safe and legal manner.

  The US EPA has determined that contractors and owners share joint and severable liability for hazardous waste
  generated by contractors working on primary sites (45 FR 72024, 72026 October 30, 1980). The Florida
  Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has determined that regulated small and large quantity
  generators of hazardous waste are responsible for all hazardous wastes generated on their sites. Since the
  definition of generator is “any person, by site, whose act or process produces hazardous waste...”contractors
  working on the campus must comply with the same federal and state regulations pertaining to hazardous
  waste management and disposal as the College.

  All contractors, subcontractors, and their employees, intending to bid on projects and do work for
  New College of Florida, must comply with these procedures. Violations of State and Federal
  regulations could result in fines or civil and criminal action against the Contractor or the College.
  The following procedure has been developed to assist the Contractor and the College in meeting
  the requirements of the state and federal regulatory agencies.

  2. Definitions
  Solid Waste - For purposes of this program, a solid waste may be any solid, liquid, or containerized gas which
  no longer has an appropriate and legal intended use for the College. For a legal definition, refer to the Federal
  Solid Waste Disposal Act SWDA).

  Hazardous Waste - Any solid waste (as defined by the Federal Solid Waste Disposal Act) which possess
  hazardous characteristics, including flammability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxic characteristics (TCLP) as
  defined by the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 261).

  Acutely Hazardous Waste - Wastes listed in 40 CFR 261.33(e) often referred to as the "P" Listed wastes.

  Listed Hazardous Waste - Any chemical or product as listed in 40 CFR 261.31 - 261.33. Listed wastes are
  often referred to as "D", "F", "K", "U", and "P" wastes.

  Flammable Characteristic Waste - Any waste with a flash point of less than 140F (60C). Common
  flammable materials include acetone, toluene, methanol, ethers, isopropanol, duplicating fluids, rubber cement
  glue, paint thinner or mineral spirits, oil based paints and stains, rubbing alcohol, nail polish remover, any
  aerosol containers such as spray paints and adhesives, and solvent-soaked rags.

  Corrosive Characteristic Waste - Any liquid waste which has a pH of less than 2 (acidic) or greater than
  12.5 (basic), or corrodes steel at a rate specified by EPA. Corrosive wastes may include, sulfuric acid,
  hydrochloric acid (muriatic acid), sodium hydroxide, drain openers (Drano) and products which contain strong
  acids or bases, which include many cleaning products.

  Reactive Characteristic Waste - Any waste which is unstable, can readily undergo a violent change, reacts
  violently with water, is capable of detonation or explosive reaction, or contains sulfides or cyanides that have
  the potential for generating toxic fumes or vapors. Examples of reactive wastes include sodium and potassium
  metal, dry picric acid, compounds that form explosive peroxides, and cyanide plating operations.

  Toxic Characteristic Waste (or TCLP) - a waste identified through an EPA method (Toxic Characteristic
  Leachate Procedure) that has the potential of forming a leachate that may cause groundwater contamination.
  If any product contains a constituent greater than a specified concentration as determined by the TCLP, it is a
  hazardous waste. Examples are products that contain benzene (many petroleum based products), cadmium
  (nickel cadmium batteries), lead (lead batteries and lead paints), silver (spent photofixer, silver nitrate),
  chromium, mercury (mercury batteries, fluorescent light tubes), etc.

  Storage Area - Area in which hazardous wastes are temporally stored for up to 180 days while awaiting
  transport to a licensed disposal facility. This is a regulated area in which all containers must be labeled, dated,
  and inspected weekly.



                                                                                                                   20
Satellite Accumulation Area - A temporary storage and collection area of hazardous waste, near the point
of generation, which is under direct control of the person or operator generating the waste. Waste in an
approved satellite accumulation area is exempt from the 180 day time limit if other requirements are met.
(NOTE: Subject to considerable interpretation and constraints by various regulators).

Small-Quantity Generator (SQG) - A generator of hazardous waste who generates between 100 kg and
1000 kg of waste (or less than 1 kg of acutely hazardous waste) in a calendar month. At no time can a SQG
have greater than 6000 kg of hazardous waste in storage. The College is considered a small quantity
generator.

Large-Quantity Generator (LQG) - A generator of hazardous waste who generates greater than 1000 kg (or
greater than 1 kg of acutely hazardous waste) in a calendar month.

3. Responsibility
NCF shall take every precaution against hazards normally associated with handling and disposal of hazardous
chemicals and wastes to avoid human and environmental exposure. The College is a Small Quantity Generator
(EPA ID # FLR 000 136 929) of hazardous waste and is thereby required to comply with Federal and State
regulations governing the management and disposal of hazardous wastes. These regulations mandate that the
College determine if any given waste is hazardous, and if so, manage and dispose of that waste strictly in
compliance with applicable standards.

The President of the College has the ultimate responsibility to insure that hazardous wastes and materials are
properly managed. That responsibility has been delegated, via appropriate vice presidents, deans, and
departmental chairs to insure that all users of hazardous materials properly manage hazardous wastes
generated by their operations

Hazardous Materials in Construction and Demolition waste must be properly managed to avoid fines or
environmental liability. Proper management includes identification, accumulation, and disposal. Identification
and accumulation prior to disposal is the responsibility of the contractor or department performing the work
however the liability for not doing this properly is shared by the College. Therefore, all project managers
should be thoroughly aware of the following requirements. All disposal shall be through, coordinated by, or
approved by Environmental Health and Safety.

Billing/Cost Recovery – Hazardous waste from construction projects is to be paid for by the College from
construction funds. The contractor will make arrangements for the waste to be picked up or delivered to the
Waste Management Facility. The building and project number should be clearly identified on the Chemical
Waste Pickup Request form. EH&S will send a bill to Facilities Planning noting the specific project. If the terms
of the contract indicate that the contractor is ultimately responsible for the cost of disposal of hazardous
materials in construction debris, these costs may be billed to the contractor by the UF Project Manager or
deducted from payments.

4. Procedures
Reference the New College of Florida Hazardous Waste Management Program for a comprehensive overview of
the program.

Prior to commencement of all demolition and renovation projects, the contractor shall receive a site inspection
report from the Project Manager identifying any potential building components of an environmental concern
within the scope of the renovation or demolition only.

Prior to contracting for work, each contractor, subcontractor, and their employees, who use hazardous
materials and may generate a hazardous waste, must provide evidence of having received RCRA Hazardous
Waste Awareness Training, and annual refresher training, as required by 40 CFR 265.16 and 262.34.

Contractors and subcontractors shall identify all hazardous materials and maintain Material Safety Data Sheets
(MSDS) for each product on site as required by the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard.

Contractors shall be responsible for estimating the type and quantity of hazardous waste that will be generated
by all contractor employees and sub-contractors prior to start of a project.

The General Contractor shall be responsible for the proper identification, and management of all hazardous
wastes within the scope of a given project. Specifically, contractors must identify a secure waste accumulation
area, store waste in appropriate containers, identify the contents of the containers including the words
HAZARDOUS WASTE, and inspect the containers on a weekly basis. The inspection must be documented.




                                                                                                              21
The Contractor shall turn all properly identified hazardous waste over to the Office of Environmental Health
and Safety, at the end of the project or other agreed upon time. Any other arrangements shall have prior
written approval from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety and the Office of Facilities Planning.

HAZARDOUS WASTE shall not be removed from the campus by contractors or sub-contractors,
unless prior arrangements have been made with the College and the waste is properly manifested
and transported by a licensed hazardous waste transporter. (NOTE: Useable product is not
considered a hazardous waste and is therefore excluded form this statement)

The Office of Environmental Health and Safety will verify the identification of the waste. If the identification is
unacceptable, EH&S will not accept the waste and the contractor shall bear the cost of laboratory analysis for
adequate identification.

All hazardous waste will be shipped off site using the College's hazardous waste contractor, under a manifest
bearing the USEPA ID# of New College of Florida, and signed by an NCF EH&S representative, unless prior
arraignments have been made and approved in writing by NCF Office of EH&S and Facilities Management.

All hazardous waste turned over to the College shall be contained in appropriate, compatible, and closed,
containers for the type and volume of waste generated. Containers may include DOT approved 55 or 30 gallon
open-head or closed-head drums, 5 gallon pails or cans, etc., or possibly the original container. The contractor
shall be responsible for providing the appropriate container for all types of hazardous waste generated.

Paint brushes, rollers, rags, sludges, absorbent, etc. used with oil paints or solvents, that are considered waste
materials shall be placed in 5 gallon sealable buckets, or other appropriate size containers and properly labeled
with the contents and the words “Hazardous Waste” .

In no cases shall evaporation be used to dry solvent laden materials destined for disposal.
Evaporation of waste solvents is considered illegal disposal of hazardous waste.

All hazardous waste must be stored in a secured, locked, and safe location. Incompatible waste
(acids/bases/flammables) must be stored in physically separate locations. Hazardous waste storage locations
shall be coordinated and approved by EH&S.

All hazardous waste containers must be closed at all times except when adding waste.

Fluorescent bulbs and ballasts shall be removed from all lighting fixtures prior to disposal.

    a. Lamps and HID light bulbs – Fluorescent and high-intensity discharge (HID) bulbs must be managed
    as a Universal Waste. Other specialty bulbs which also may contain mercury must also be managed as a
    Universal Waste. All spent lamps, or the container which they are in, must be labeled clearly using the
    following phrases: “Universal Waste—Lamp(s),” or “Waste Lamp(s),” or “Used Lamp(s)” and the date.
    Lamp may be placed in their original box or in 4’ cardboard cylinders available from lamp recycling
    facilities. Protect lamps from breaking and the containers from moisture. Do not tape lamps. Each box
    must be labeled in accordance with FAC 62-737 and dated.

    b. Lamp ballasts – All ballasts (PCB and non PCB) must be collected for disposal in appropriate
    containers. Appropriate containers include 5 gallon plastic buckets with lids or 55 gallon steel drums with
    lids. Barrels must be labeled and closed during accumulation. 55 gallon barrels should not be filled more
    than half way due to the weight. PCB ballasts must be segregated from non PCB ballasts.

Mercury switches – Mercury Containing Equipment – There are many types of equipment that contain
elemental mercury. Before disposing of any of these types of equipment, you should verify that they do not
contain mercury. Mercury containing devices should be handled with caution to prevent spillage. Devices
should be handled intact, sealed, and packaged to prevent breakage. All used mercury containing equipment
must be labeled clearly as “Universal Waste—Mercury Containing Equipment,” “Waste Mercury-Containing
Equipment,” or “Used Mercury-Containing Equipment.” Examples include:

    •    Heating and air conditioning thermostats
    •    Tilt switches used in silent light switches,
    •    Pressure gauges, displacement/plunger relays
    •    Flow meters
    •    Float switches
    •    Drain traps in old buildings.

Batteries – Storage batteries and other batteries which contain hazardous metals such as mercury, lead,
silver and cadmium must be managed as universal Waste and properly recycled. All used batteries must be
clearly labeled using the following phrases: “Universal Waste — Batteries”, “Waste Batteries” or “Used
Batteries” during accumulation. Bagging small batteries in non conductive material will help prevent fires.
                                                                                                                 22
5. References

40 CFR 261 – 270
Florida Statutes, Chapter 403
Florida Administrative Code 62-730; 62-710; 62-737
NCF Hazardous Waste Management Program

6A. Appendix A
EXAMPLES OF TRADES THAT MAY GENERATE HAZARDOUS WASTES
Demolition Contractors
Roofing Contractors
Painting Contractors
Carpet/Floor Finish Applications
Specialty Application Contractors
Plumbers

EXAMPLES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE THAT MAY BE GENERATED
Fluorescent and HID Light Tubes
PCB/non-PCB Ballasts
Lead-containing Paint
Mercury Containing devices (thermostats & controls)
Mineral Spirits
Toluene
Acetone
Oil based paints and stains
Paint Thinners
Aerosol cans (paints, cleaners, adhesives)
Roof Patch/tar
Carpet glue
PVC Primer and glue
Brushes, rollers, and rags used with oil based paint and solvents
Sludge from cleaning oil paints and equipment

Waste product from any container labeled flammable or combustible or that contain "petroleum distillates" or
chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds

6B. Appendix B

SITE ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST FOR DEMOLITION AND RENOVATION PROJECTS

1.   General Information
     1.1 Building Information
         NCF Building Number
         Current Use of the Building
         Occupied or Unoccupied
     1.2 Type of Construction Project
         Demolition             Yes      No
         Renovation             Yes      No
         New construction       Yes      No
         If Demolition/Renovation, Specify Area or Scope
     1.3 Project Design By
         Name of A/E Firm or UWF Project Manager
     1.4 Site Assessment By
         NCF EH&S
         Environmental Consultant
         Date
     1.5 Site Construction
         NCF Maintenance _____________________________________________
         Contractor Name _____________________________________________
2.   Site Inspection
     2.1 Asbestos
         •   Asbestos Survey Conducted        Yes      No
         •   Is ACM Present?                  Yes      No
              If yes, must be abated prior to demolition/renovation
     2.2 Lead Based Paint
         •    Lead-Based Paint Survey Conducted        Yes   No
                                                                                                           23
        •   Lead-Based Paint Present                  Yes   No
            If yes, work practices and disposal issues must be evaluated
  2.3   Lead Containing Building Materials
        •   Are other lead containing products present            Yes      No
        •   Roof Flashing                                         Yes      No
        •   Plumbing                                              Yes      No
        •   Lead Plaster                                          Yes      No
        •   Batteries                                             Yes      No
        •   other
            If yes, must be handled and disposed properly
  2.4   PCB
        •   Are known PCB containing products present?            Yes      No
        •   light ballasts                                        Yes      No
        •   capacitors                                            Yes      No
        •   transformers                                          Yes      No
        •   other
            If yes, must be handled and disposed of properly.
  2.5   Mercury Containing Devices
        •   Fluorescent Lamps                                              Yes   No
        •   HID Lamps                                                      Yes   No
        •   Thermostats                                                    Yes   No
        •   Switches                                                       Yes   No
        •   Other ______________________________________                   Yes   No
  2.6   Radioactive Materials
        •   Tritium EXIT Signs                                             Yes   No
        •   Other Tritium devices                                          Yes   No
        •   Radioactive sources (laboratories/instrumentation)             Yes   No
            If yes, contact EH&S.
  2.7   Fume Hoods
        •   Are Fume Hoods present?                                        Yes   No
        •   If yes, what type? _____________________________
        •   Do they contain ACM?                                           Yes   No
        •   Have contents been removed?                                    Yes   No
  2.8   Solvents/Paints/Flammable Materials
        •   Are solvents/paints stored in the area                         Yes   No
        •   If yes, they must be relocated or addressed.
  2.9   Underground/Aboveground Storage Tanks
        •   Are UST's,/AST's located on site?                     Yes      No
        •   If yes, describe. _______________________________
  3.0   CFC's/Refrigerants
        •   Does the site contain any refrigeration equipment?    Yes      No
            List      ______________________________________
            If yes, freons must be recovered/recycled by qualified individual.
  3.1   Miscellaneous Hazardous Material/Waste
            Identify if any of the following are present
            a) Batteries                                  Yes     No
            b) Adhesive glues/removers                    Yes     No
            c) Pressurized gas cylinders                  Yes     No
            d) Poisons                                    Yes     No
            e) Oxidizers                                  Yes     No
            f) Flammable Materials                        Yes     No
            g) Aerosol Cans                               Yes     No
            h) Other                     _________________________


6C. Appendix C

                                    New College of Florida
                        OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

  RCRA REQUIRED HAZARDOUS WASTE AWARENESS AND HANDLING TRAINING TRAINING
  TOPICS:
     • HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR TRAINING REQUIREMENTS
     • WHAT IS A HAZARDOUS WASTE
     • HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR STATUS
     • ACCUMULATION TIME LIMITS
     • CONTAINER MANAGEMENT & ACCUMULATION POINT REQUIREMENTS
                                                                                      24
           •   SPILL CONTROL PROCEDURES
           •   HAZARDOUS WASTE PICK-UP SERVICE
           •   HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL OVER VIEW

  I acknowledge that I have received instruction and written materials regarding the points listed above on the
  date indicated below.

  Initial Training ____________________ Annual Retraining ____________________________

  ________________________________   __________________________________________
  Trainee’s Name                         Trainee’s Signature Trainee’s
  ____________________________    ___________________________          ___________________
  Trainer's Name                         Trainer's Signature             Date of Training

  Trainee's Title: ___________________________________________________

  Employer/Contractor: ____________________ Phone: ________________ FAX: __________

  Supervisor's Name and Title: ___________________________________________________

  6D. Appendix D

                                          CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION
                                     (Hazardous Waste Turned over to the College)

      This certification shall accompany each completed Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest submitted to the
      NCF Office of Environmental Health and Safety. This is required to obtain the "Generator's" signature.

      CERTIFICATION: By means of this certification, the Contractor hereby declares that the content of this
      consignment are fully and accurately described in the attached description or label including the wording
      "Hazardous Waste", contents, volumes, weights, and percent composition, as applicable.

      I certify that I have made a good faith effort to minimize my waste generation.

      Contract BR#/Name/or Other ID ________________________________________________

      Contractor’s Signature _______________________________________Date _____________

      Contractor’s Name (Printed) __________________________________Date ______________

      Title or Position of Signatory_____________________________________________________



  6E. Appendix E
                                               RCRA in Focus




                                                Hazardous Waste
                                              from Construction Site




F. Bloodborne Pathogens and Biohazardous Materials Management

  1. Purpose
  The NCF Bloodborne Pathogen (BBP) Program requires participation by all employees and non-employees
  (students, volunteers, affiliates, etc.) who have occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. However,
  non-employees may be required to provide HBV vaccination records prior to their acceptance into a project or
  program. Although OSHA’s BBP Standard does not specifically extend to non-employed students conducting
  research or classroom activities, the risk of exposure is still prevalent. Therefore, students working with blood
  or other body fluids on New College related projects shall be held to the same level of compliance.



                                                                                                                25
2. Definitions

Blood
Blood refers to human blood, human blood components, and products made from human blood.

Bloodborne Pathogens
Bloodborne Pathogens are pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease
in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus, and
human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Decontamination
Decontamination is the use of physical or chemical means to remove, inactivate or destroy bloodborne
pathogens on a surface or item to the point where they are no longer capable of transmitting infectious
particles and the surface or item is rendered safe for handling, use, or disposal.

Engineering Controls
Engineering controls are those controls (e.g. sharps disposal containers, self-sheathing needles) that isolate or
remove the bloodborne pathogens hazard from the workplace.

Exposure Incident
An exposure incident is a specific eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, non-intact skin, or parenteral contact
with blood or other potentially infectious materials that results from the performance of an employee's duties.

Needle-less systems
A device that does not use needles for (A) the collection of bodily fluids or withdrawal of bodily fluids after
initial venous or arterial access is stabled, (B) the administration of medications or fluids, or (C) any other
procedure involving the potential for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens due to percutaneous
injuries from contaminated sharps.

Occupational Exposure
Occupational exposure means reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact
with blood or other potentially infectious materials that results from the performance of an employee's duties.

Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM)
Materials other than human blood are potentially infectious for bloodborne pathogens. These include 1) the
following human body fluids: semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid,
pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly
contaminated with blood, and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate
between body fluids; 2) any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or dead); 3)
HIV or HBV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, culture medium or other solutions; and 4) blood,
organs, or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.

Parenteral
Parenteral means piercing mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such events as needle sticks,
human bites, cuts, or abrasions.

Personal Protective Equipment
Personal protective equipment is specialized clothing or equipment worn by an employee for protection against
a hazard. General work clothes (e.g. uniforms, pants, shirts or blouses) not intended to function as protection
against a hazard are not considered to be personal protective equipment.

Sharps with Engineered Sharps Injury Protections
A non-needle sharp or needle device used for withdrawing body fluids, accessing a vein or artery, or
administrating medications or other fluids, with a built-in safety or mechanism that effectively reduces the risk
of an exposure incident.

Universal Precautions
Universal Precautions are an approach to infection control. According to the concept of Universal Precautions,
all human blood and certain human body fluids are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, HBV, and other
bloodborne pathogens (see policy, pg. 10).


                                                                                                                  26
Work Practice Controls
Work Practice Controls are those practices that reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering the manner in
which a task is performed (e.g., prohibiting recapping of needles).

3. Responsibility
Department chairpersons and/or directors are responsible to ensure that individual departments and
divisions are in compliance with the bloodborne pathogen standard.

Faculty members, principal investigators or laboratory supervisors are responsible to ensure that the
requirements and procedures outlined in the Exposure Control Plan that are appropriate to the individual work
areas are carried out.

Employees are responsible for reporting exposures to their supervisors and complying with all components of
the Exposure Control Plan.

The Student Health Care Center (SHCC) on campus is responsible for providing immunizations, post-
exposure follow-up, and keeping medical records for employees and students.

Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) is responsible for reviewing and overseeing the Exposure Control
Plan. This includes coordinating compliance efforts for NCF, acting as a consultant for departments regarding
implementation and enforcement, evaluating work practices and personal protective equipment, providing
educational materials to departments, tracking employee training, and tracking medical monitoring.

4. Hepatitis B Vaccination
The vaccine for hepatitis B shall be offered at no cost to employees identified as at-risk for occupational
exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

Vaccine refusal shall be documented by the employee signing the Hepatitis B Vaccine Declination statement.
The statement shall be maintained in the employee's medical record.

Refusal of the vaccine is not final and the employee may request vaccination at any future time.

5. Exposure Prevention

    a. Universal Precautions

    Universal Precautions shall be practiced to prevent employee exposure to blood and other potentially
    infectious materials.

    b. Engineering and Work Practice Controls
    Engineering and work practice controls shall be used to eliminate or minimize employee exposure.
    Personal protective equipment shall be used when occupational exposure may occur even though the
    engineering and work practice controls are in place.
    Engineering controls shall be examined and maintained or replaced on a regular schedule.
        1. Hand washing facilities shall be provided and maintained with adequate supplies.
        2. Contaminated sharps and needles shall be disposed of in puncture resistant, color-coded, or
             labeled, leak-proof containers.
        3. Resuscitation devices including mouthpieces or resuscitation bags shall be available for use in
             areas where the need for resuscitation is predictable.
        4. All specimens of blood or OPIM shall be placed in closable, leak-proof containers prior to
             transport. If contamination of the outside of the primary container is likely, then a second
             container such as a plastic bag should be placed over the primary container to prevent
             contamination and/or leakage during handling, storage or transport.
        5. Eye wash stations shall be easily accessible and functional.

    c. Syringes, safety syringes and needle-less systems used for direct patient care
    Safety devices such as sheathing needles and needle-less systems will be used for staff protection
    whenever possible. These devices will be reviewed by non-managerial staff representatives and chosen
    by consensus for ease of use and engineering controls.

    Work practice controls include general and site specific safety practices. Examples include:
       1. Hand washing shall be performed after removal of gloves and after contact with blood or OPIM.
       2. Employees who have exudative lesions or weeping dermatitis shall refrain from handling blood or
            OPIM until the condition resolves.

                                                                                                              27
    3.   Contaminated sharps and needles shall not be bent, recapped, or sheared.
    4.   Eating, drinking, smoking, handling contact lenses, and applying cosmetics are prohibited in work
         areas where there is a potential for blood or OPIM exposure.
    5.   Food and drink are prohibited in work areas where there is a potential for blood or OPIM
         exposure.
    6.   All procedures involving blood and OPIM shall be performed in such a manner to minimize
         splashing, spraying, spattering, generation of droplets, or aerosolization of these substances.
    7.   Mouth pipetting and suctioning are not allowed. Mechanical pipetting devices shall be used.

d. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Personal protective equipment, including gloves, gowns, laboratory coats, face shields, face masks, eye
protection, foot coverings and other items shall be provided to employees, as appropriate, to prevent
exposure to blood or OPIM. These items shall be worn selectively, as needed for the task involved. PPE
shall be considered "appropriate" if it does not permit the passage of blood or OPIM through to an
employee's skin, mucous membranes or street clothes.

    Gloves
        1. Disposable use gloves shall be worn when it is reasonably anticipated that the employee will
             have hand contact with blood or OPIM. The gloves shall be replaced when worn, torn or
             contaminated. They shall not be washed or decontaminated for re-use.
        2. Utility gloves may be decontaminated and re-used if not punctured.
        3. Latex free gloves will be provided as necessary.
    Masks, eye protection, face shields
        Masks in combination with eye protection devices (with side shields) or a chin-length face shield
        with a mask shall be worn when there is a reasonably anticipated chance of exposure to blood or
        OPIM through splashes, sprays, spatters or droplets.
    Gowns, coats, aprons and other protective coverings
        Protective coverings shall be worn depending upon the task and the degree of exposure
        anticipated.
    Surgical caps, hoods or boots
        Head and foot covers shall be worn when gross contamination is reasonably anticipated.

There shall be a designated area in each work setting for the dispensing, storage, cleaning and disposal of
PPE. Contaminated PPE that is not immediately decontaminated shall be clearly designated and treated as
biohazardous material. All PPE must be removed before leaving the work area.

Closed-toe shoes must be worn at all times in laboratory/clinical areas and all animal housing/procedure
areas at the New College of Florida.

e. Housekeeping

    Cleaning, Disinfection, and Sterilization Practices
         1.   All environmental and work surfaces shall be properly cleaned and disinfected on a regular
              schedule and after contamination with blood or OPIM (see procedures).
         2.   Appropriate personal protective equipment (e.g. gloves) shall be worn to clean and disinfect
              blood and OPIM spills.
         3.   Cleaning, disinfection, and sterilization of equipment shall be performed, as appropriate,
              after contamination with blood and OPIM.
         4.   Disinfectants must be EPA listed “tuberculocidal.”

    Waste
       1.      Gloves shall be worn by employees who have direct contact with contaminated waste.
       2.      All biohazardous and/or biomedical waste designated for removal and incineration off-site
               shall be labeled according to the US DOT rule and Florida statutes.
         3. Each work area shall develop a written waste plan.
         All infectious wastes shall be managed according to NCF Biological Waste Disposal Policy.

    Labels
       1. Warning labels as specified by the bloodborne pathogen standard shall be used. Red bags or
           red containers may be substituted for labels.
       2. The labels shall include the biohazard symbol and be fluorescent orange or orange red.
       3. Warning labels shall be placed on containers of regulated waste, refrigerators and freezers
           containing blood or other potentially infectious materials. Other containers used to store,
           transport or ship blood and OPIM shall also be labeled.
       4. Warning labels should be affixed to contaminated equipment and state which portions of the
           equipment are contaminated.


                                                                                                           28
6. Exposure Management
Exposure management including post exposure prophylaxis shall be done in compliance with OSHA standard
1919.1030 and Florida statutes.

NCF employees who have been determined to be at risk shall receive education regarding the management of
exposures to bloodborne pathogens that shall include the following:

    1.   Wound and skin exposures shall be immediately washed with soap and water for approximately 15
         minutes.
    2.   Eye and mucous membrane exposures shall be rinsed in running water for 15 minutes.
    3.   Exposures shall be reported to the supervisor. The supervisor is responsible for notifying the Workers
         Comp Office and completing the appropriate paperwork.
    4.   Exposed individuals shall immediately report to the designated Workers Compensation clinic for
         treatment. The health care provider shall provide a confidential medical evaluation and follow-up of all
         exposure events to employees. The follow-up shall include these components:
         a) The route and circumstances of the exposure shall be documented.
         b) The identification of the source individual shall be documented unless it is unfeasible or prohibited
              by state law.
         c) The source individual shall be tested for HIV, HBV, or HCV according to Florida Statutes. Re-
              testing the source individual is not necessary when that individual is known to be positive for
              HIV, HBV, or HCV. Those results shall be disclosed to the exposed employee according to Florida
              statutes.
         d) Serologic testing of the exposed employee shall be offered within the provisions of Florida
              statutes for HIV. If the employee consents to baseline blood collection, but chooses not to be
              tested for HIV at that time, the sample shall be held for 90 days after the incident, enabling the
              employee to have HIV testing within the 90 days.
    5.   The evaluation and follow-up protocols are based upon U.S. Public Health Service recommendations.
         A written follow-up letter shall be provided to the exposed employee with 15 days of the completion
         of the evaluation. The letter shall document:
         a) That the employee has been informed of the results of the evaluation.
         b) That the employee has been informed about any medical conditions resulting from exposure to
              blood or other potentially infectious materials which require any further evaluations or treatment.
         c) The hepatitis B immunization status and the need for immunization.
         d) The letter shall not include any confidential material.
         e) The medical personnel responsible for evaluation of exposures shall be knowledgeable about the
              OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen standard 1910.1030 and Florida Statute. The Worker’s Comp
              provider shall provide the results of the source individual's blood testing and the immunization
              status to the Workers Comp Case Manager. A description of the exposed employee's duties as
              they relate to the incident shall also be given to the case manager and to EH&S.

7. Research and/or Production Laboratories
There are special requirements for research laboratories and production facilities engaged in the culture,
production, concentration, experimentation and manipulation of HIV and HBV (see procedures, pg. 12). These
requirements apply in addition to the other requirements of the BBPP rule. These requirements DO NOT apply
to clinical or diagnostic laboratories engaged solely in the analysis of blood, tissue or organs.

8. Training
    Scope:
    1. All employees with reasonably anticipated exposure to bloodborne pathogens shall receive annual
       training regarding the prevention and control of bloodborne pathogens.
    2. New employees with reasonably anticipated exposure to bloodborne pathogens shall receive training
       upon assignment.
    3. Additional training shall be provided to employees as their job duties change. This will be monitored
       by individual supervisors in consultation with EH&S.

    Record-keeping:
    1. The dates of the training sessions, content outline, attendees list, and presenters list shall be
       maintained by the individual departments for 3 years.
    2. Departmental compliance with the training requirement will be monitored by EH&S. A list of persons
       trained shall be submitted to EH&S annually by each department or division.

    Content:
    The training program shall contain the following elements:
    1. An accessible copy of the bloodborne pathogen standard.
    2. A general explanation of the epidemiology and symptoms of bloodborne diseases.
    3. An explanation of modes of transmission of bloodborne pathogens.
    4. A review of the exposure control plan.

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    5.    An explanation of the appropriate methods for recognizing procedures and other activities that may
          involve exposure to blood and OPIM.
    6.    An explanation of the use and limitations of practices that will prevent or reduce the likelihood of
          exposure. This includes the appropriate use of personal protective equipment and proper work
          practices.
    7.    Information on the types, proper use, location, removal, handling, decontamination, and/or disposal
          of personal protective equipment.
    8.    An explanation of the rationale for selecting personal protective equipment.
    9.    Information on the hepatitis B vaccine, including information on its efficacy, safety, and the benefits
          of being protected against hepatitis B.
    10.   An explanation of the post-exposure evaluation in the event of an exposure including reporting
          mechanisms, time frame for reporting and the medical management that is available.
    11.   Information on the management of emergencies associated with bloodborne pathogens including
          persons to contact and precautions.
    12.   Review of signs, labeling, and containment procedures associated with prevention and control of
          bloodborne pathogens.
    13.   Handling, use and disposal of bloodborne pathogens, syringes, safety syringe devices and biomedical
          wastes.

EH&S will provide a BBP test that is to be used at the end of the training session. After the test is completed,
we recommend the trainer go over the answers with the participants to ensure understanding of the material
and to reinforce the information provided.

9. Assessment Monitoring, Review and Update
    1.    Each department chairperson or director shall be responsible for monitoring his or her department's
          or division's compliance with the bloodborne pathogen standard.
    2.    EH&S shall assist departments in monitoring compliance with the bloodborne pathogen standard.

    Review and Update

    EH&S shall review and assess the Exposure Control Plan annually. Input from the departments and from
    campus-wide monitoring will be used to update this plan as needed. This review must include changes in
    the technologies that reduce or eliminate exposures to bloodborne pathogens and the consideration and
    implementation of available and effective safer medical devices designed to eliminate or minimize
    occupation exposures into use in the workplace.


10. Universal Precautions Policy
According to the concept of Universal Precautions, all human blood, human blood components, products made
from human blood and certain other materials are treated and handled as if known to be infectious for HIV,
HBV and other bloodborne pathogens.

The other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) which require Universal Precautions include 1) the following
human body fluids: semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid,
peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly contaminated with
blood and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids; 2)
any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or dead); 3) HIV-containing cell or
tissue cultures, organ cultures and HIV or HBV-containing culture medium or other solutions; and 4) blood,
organs or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.

The following shall be observed:
    Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
    Personal protective equipment shall be used to prevent skin and mucous membrane contact with blood
    and OPIM. These may include the use of gloves, masks, protective eyewear or face shields and gowns or
    aprons, as appropriate for the task.
    Handwashing
    Hands and other skin surfaces shall be washed immediately after contact with blood or OPIM. Hands shall
    be washed each time gloves are removed.
    Sharps
    Sheathing safety syringes or needle-less systems will be used when possible. All sharps (needles, scalpels
    and razor blades) shall be disposed of in labeled, leak-proof, puncture-proof sharps containers. Needles
    shall not be bent, sheared or recapped. Sharps containers shall be available in the area where sharps are
    being used.


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    Dermatitis
    Employees who have exudative lesions or weeping dermatitis shall refrain from handling blood or OPIM
    until the condition resolves.
    Biological Safety Cabinets (BSC)
    BSC are required for procedures (vortexing, grinding, blending etc.) that may generate an aerosol hazard.

11. Disinfection and Sterilization Procedures
    Blood spills
    All blood and OPIM spills must be decontaminated with a freshly prepared 1:10 dilution of household
    bleach or other properly-prepared, EPA-registered tuberculocidal disinfectant.
    Disinfection and cleaning
    Surfaces contaminated with blood or OPIM should be cleaned using a freshly prepared 1:10 dilution of
    chlorine bleach solution that is prepared daily. The contaminated area should be flooded with the bleach
    solution and then cleaned up using paper towels. Ten minutes of exposure is required for disinfection.
    Gloves should be worn during the clean-up procedures. Chlorine bleach can corrode metal and metal items
    treated with chlorine should be rinsed thoroughly. Thorough soap, water and a final rinse will remove
    chlorine residue. Other high-level disinfectants (i.e. 2% glutaraldehyde) may be used after consultation
    with the Biological Safety Office.

    Work surfaces, biosafety cabinets, and other laboratory equipment may be cleaned and disinfected with a
    freshly prepared 1:100 dilution of household bleach. Other EPA approved disinfectants may be used for
    routine cleaning and disinfection if they are labeled "tuberculocidal.”

    If you have questions about a specific item or about the efficacy of a specific disinfectant, please call the
    Biological safety Office for assistance.
    Sterilization
    Objects to be sterilized should first be thoroughly cleaned to remove blood, tissue, food, and other organic
    residue.

    Steam sterilization is the best way to achieve inactivation of biological agents. If the item may be
    damaged by heat, pressure, or moisture or if it is otherwise not amenable to steam sterilization, please
    call the Biological Safety Office for advice.

12. Biological Waste Disposal Policy
This policy is intended to provide guidance and insure compliance with the NIH/CDC guidelines, the State of
Florida Administrative Code 64E-6, and restrictions of the Sarasota County landfill.

    A. Categories of Biological Waste
    1) Infectious, potentially infectious, or R-DNA waste:
        a) human pathogens
        b) animal pathogens
        c) plant pathogens
        d) recombinant DNA
        e) human blood, blood products and other potentially infectious material (OPIM)
        f) any material containing or contaminated with any of the above (test tubes, needles and
        needle/syringe combinations*, syringes, tubing, culture dishes, flasks, gloves, other PPE, etc.)
        *must be in plastic sharps boxes
    This waste must be inactivated prior to leaving the facility. The preferred method is steam
    sterilization (autoclaving), although chemical inactivation (ex. addition of bleach prior to sewering) or
    incineration may be appropriate in some cases. Storage of non-inactivated waste is restricted to within the
    generating laboratory. The material may not be stored longer than 24 hours prior to inactivation.

    2) Non-infectious Biological Waste
    This category includes waste that is NOT contaminated with any of the biological wastes listed in category
    1 above. Non-infectious biological waste includes the following:

          gloves used in clinical settings test tubes, centrifuge
                                                                        petri dishes
         or biomedical research            tubes
         needles*                          razor blades*                tissue culture flasks


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     syringes                          culture dishes               serological pipettes

     scalpels*                         Pasteur pipettes*            micropipette tips*

     broken glass and plastic ware     needle/syringe               disposable medical
    **                                combinations *               devices/biomedical devices


          This material does not require sterilization prior to leaving the facility.
         * must be packaged in plastic sharps boxes.


3) Mixed radioactive/biological waste
The biohazardous component of mixed radioactive/biohazardous waste shall be inactivated (if possible)
prior to its release to Radiation Safety for disposal as radioactive waste. Steam-sterilization or chemical
inactivation shall be employed as above. Although some radioactive materials can be autoclaved safely,
please check with the EH&S regarding the best method of inactivation.

4) Mixed chemical/biological waste
The biohazardous component of mixed chemical/biohazardous waste shall be inactivated (if possible) prior
to its release for chemical disposal. Precautions should be taken to prevent the generation and release of
toxic chemicals during the inactivation process. In general, autoclaving is not recommended because
flammable or reactive compounds should not be autoclaved due to the explosion hazard. Please check
with EH&S for guidance regarding particular chemicals.

5) Animal carcasses and materials
Dry (drained of most fluids) animal carcasses and parts may be disposed through the biomedical/biological
waste box. Ensure that nor RCRA hazardous wastes are present, and that no free liquids are present. The
containers should be closed at all times except when adding waste materials.

B. Packaging Biological Waste
1) Biohazard bags – used for the initial collection of certain biological wastes.
All biohazard bags must meet impact resistance (165 grams), tearing resistance (480 grams), and heavy
metal concentration (<100 PPM total of lead, mercury, chromium and cadmium) requirements. Written
documentation (a test report) from the manufacturing regarding these requirements must be on file.
These bags must be placed in cardboard boxes (see #3 below) prior to disposal. The generator must order
and supply these red bags.

2) Sharps
Place needles, scalpels, razor blades, pipette tips, and pasteur pipettes in red plastic sharps containers.
These can be ordered from most commercial scientific supply vendors.

3) Corrugated biomedical/biohazardous cardboard boxes
Place all biological waste in rigid, specially-labeled, puncture resistant boxes as the terminal receptacle.
Get these from your custodian or HSC Building Services (392-4414), Rm. AG-133. Do not overfill. Tape all
seams.

C. Labeling
Please note that biohazard bags and sharps containers must be labeled even though they will be placed
inside a secondary container for final disposal. All packages containing biological waste shall be labeled
with indelible ink marker (i.e., Sharpie®) as follows:

1) Date
Biohazard bags shall be labeled with the date they were put into use. Sharps containers shall be
labeled with the date the container is full.
Corrugated boxes (biomedical/biological waste boxes) shall be labeled with the date the
biohazardous waste was treated. Boxes used for non-biohazardous waste collection shall be dated when
the box is sealed.

2) Name/Location/Phone number
Generator’s (principal investigator’s name, lab location (room number) and phone number will be clearly
printed on each container, bag or box.

3) Biohazard sign
Use only manufacturer containers with the preprinted universal biohazard symbol and the words
"biomedical," "biohazardous," or "infectious.”



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    D. Transport
    Transport biohazardous waste outside of the laboratory (i.e., to a storage area) in a closed leak-proof
    container labeled "biohazard". Only trained personnel may transport biological waste. Labeling may be
    accomplished by use of a red biohazard bag or a biomedical/biological waste box with the universal
    biohazard symbol.

    Only corrugated biomedical/biological waste boxes will be accepted for pickup or transport to the
    biomedical/biological waste storage area.

    E. Training
    All employees who handle biological waste shall be trained annually regarding the proper handling of
    biological waste. All new employees shall be trained before they are allowed to handle biological waste.
    Training may be accomplished through the NCF Bloodborne Pathogen Training Program, informally in the
    lab setting, or through formal training programs set up by individual departments or divisions. For
    assistance, please call EH&S.

    According to Florida Administrative Code (64E-16 F.A.C.), records of the training session shall be
    maintained for each employee, along with an outline of the training program. Training records shall be
    retained for a period of three (3) years.


     NCF Bloodborne Pathogen (BBP) Exposure Guidelines
     Medical care guidelines for NCF Faculty, Staff, and Students with potential bloodborne pathogen
     exposures.

    Because some treatment regimens for bloodborne pathogen exposures must be started within 1 to 2
    hours of exposure, the following guidelines are established to ensure prompt and appropriate care for
    those who have sustained a potential exposure-needle stick, sharps injury, or mucous membrane splash.

    After-hours and on weekends, persons with post exposure will be triaged to the closest Emergency Room
    for treatment.

    F. Faculty, Staff or Non-Student OPS Employees, TAs or Student Assistants: You must report all
    potential bloodborne pathogen exposures to your supervisor. Time is critical! You or your supervisor must
    then call the NCF Workers’ Compensation Office (487-4585) immediately and report for treatment at the
    designated Workers Compensation Provider.

    G. NCF Students - Not employed by the College:         Your care must be paid for through your
    student/personal insurance or by some other means.

    If you are on an off-site rotation further than one-hour travel time from NCF, seek care at the nearest
    medical facility.

13. Packaging and Shipping of Biological Materials
This policy is intended to provide guidance and insure compliance with DOT/IATA/ICAO* regulations.

    Relevant Categories:
    1. Category A Infectious substances
    2. Category B infectious substances (now includes diagnostic or clinical specimens)
    3. Exempt specimens
    4. Regulated medical waste or biomedical waste

    Requirements:

    In addition to the OSHA BBP training and compliance, anyone involved in the packaging and/or shipping of
    biological materials, particularly #2 above, must be trained.

    Training is required every 2 years. You should contact the EH&S Office in advance if you plan to ship
    biomedical materials.

    Contact the EH&S Office at 487-4585 or rhambrick@ncf.edu for information.
    *  DOT – Department of Transportation
       IATA – International Air Transport Association
       ICAO – International Civil Aviation Organization




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  14. Recordkeeping
  Employee medical records pertaining to occupational BBP exposure and HBV shall be maintained by EH&S for
  the duration of employment, plus 30 years.

  15. References
      1.   Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.1030, Bloodborne
           Pathogens
      2.   DOT Regulations, 49 CFR, Part 42.


G. Chemical Hygiene Plan

  1. Purpose
  This Chemical Hygiene Plan has been developed by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) to
  assist New College in the recognition, evaluation and control of hazards associated with laboratory chemical
  operations, and is intended to meet the requirements of the OSHA Laboratory Standard, 29CFR1910.1450.

  The primary focus of this core Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) is to provide guidance to the laboratory staff to
  safely use chemicals in the laboratory. The plan shall be made site specific for each laboratory to ensure that
  compliance with this regulation is maintained. To make this CHP site specific, each individual lab must perform
  a "Hazard Assessment" of the lab and of the procedures involved with the storage, use and disposal of
  chemicals.

  These Hazard Assessments shall be used to develop Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for each chemical
  use process in the lab. The SOPs will provide specific information on how to handle, use, store or dispose of
  each potentially hazardous chemical found in the laboratory. The site specific Hazard Assessment and SOP
  must be attached to this core CHP and used in: identifying potential chemical hazards, instructing laboratory
  personnel the potential hazards, training employees in safe practices, correcting work errors or dangerous
  conditions and requiring the proper personal protective equipment.

  This Chemical Hygiene Plan minimally addresses the use of biological or radioactive materials or the disposal of
  chemical, biological or radioactive wastes. Individuals having questions are urged to call EH&S for assistance.

  The CHP must be made readily available to all employees, their designated representatives and regulatory
  officials. The core CHP will be reviewed annually by EH&S, and will be revised as necessary. Records of the
  review will be kept on file at EH&S. Notice of any revisions will be sent to each department using chemicals for
  distribution to laboratories and staff. Lab staff shall review the Hazard Assessments and SOPs as needed, for
  each lab. The lab shall retain records of this review and revision.

  The NCF Chemical Hygiene Plan applies to all locations where hazardous chemicals are used in
  experiments and investigations. Those laboratories which meet the following criteria will be subject to the
  requirements of the chemical hygiene plan:

      1.   Chemical manipulations are carried out on a laboratory scale. That is, the work with
           chemicals is in containers of a size that could be easily and safely manipulated by one
           person.

      2.   Multiple chemical procedures or chemicals are used.

      3.   Protective laboratory practices and equipment are available and commonly used.

      4.   The procedures involved are not part of a production process whose function is to produce
           commercial quantities of materials, nor do the procedures in any way simulate a production
           process.



  2. Definitions
      Action Level - A concentration designated in OSHA 29 CFR 1910 for a specific substance, calculated as
      an 8 hour time weighted average, which initiates certain required activities such as exposure monitoring
      and medical surveillance.

      Carcinogen - Any substance which meets one of the following criteria:

           a)   It is regulated by OSHA as a carcinogen; or

           b)   It is listed under the category, "known to be carcinogens," in the Annual Report on Carcinogens

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         published by the National Toxicology Program (NTP); or;

    c)   It is listed under Group 1 ("carcinogens to humans") by the International Agency for Research on
         Cancer Monographs (IARC) or;

    d)   It is listed in either Group 2A or 2B by IARC or under the category, "reasonably anticipated to be
         carcinogenic" by NTP, and causes statistically significant tumor incidence in experimental animals
         in accordance with any of the following criteria:

         i)     After inhalation exposure of 6-7 hours per day, 5-days per week, for a significant portion of a
                lifetime to dosages of less than 10 mg/m3.

         ii.    After repeated skin application of less than 300 mg/kg of body weight per week.

         iii.   After oral dosages of less than 50 mg/kg of body weight per day.

Combustible - Any liquid having a flashpoint at or above 100F (37.8C) but below 200F (93.3C) Liquid
except any mixture having components with flashpoints of 200F, or higher, the total volume of which
make up 99% or more of the total volume of the mixture.

Compressed -

    a)   A gas or mixture of gases having, in a container, an absolute Gas pressure exceeding 40 psi at
         70F (21.1C); or

    b)   A gas or mixture of gases having, in a container, an absolute pressure exceeding 104 psi at 130F
         (54.4) regardless of the pressure at 70F (21.1C); or

    c)   A liquid having a vapor pressure exceeding 40 psi at 100F (37.8C) as determined by ASTM D-
         323-72.

Designated - An area which may be used for work with carcinogens, reproductive toxins or Area
substances which have a high degree of acute toxicity. A designated area may be the entire laboratory,
an area of a laboratory or a device such as a laboratory hood.

Emergency - Means any occurrence, such as, but not limited to, equipment failure, rupture of
containers or failure of control equipment which results in an uncontrolled release of a hazardous
chemical into the workplace.

Employee - An individual employed in a laboratory workplace who may be exposed to hazardous
chemicals in the course of his or her assignment.

Explosive - A chemical that causes a sudden, almost instantaneous release of pressure, gas, and heat
when subjected to sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature.

Flammable - Means a chemical that falls into one of the following categories:

    a)   Aerosol, flammable means an aerosol that, when tested by the method described in 16 CFR
         1500.45, yields a flame protection exceeding 18 inches at full valve opening or a flashback (a
         flame extending back to the valve) at any degree of valve opening;

    b)   Gas, flammable means:

         i)     A gas at ambient temperature and pressure, forms a flammable mixture with air at a
                concentration of 13% by volume or less; or

         ii)    A gas that, at ambient temperature and pressure, forms a range of flammable mixtures with
                air wider than 12% by volume regardless of the lower limit.

    c)   Liquid, flammable means any liquid having a flashpoint below 100F (37.8C), except any mixture
         having components with flashpoints of 100F or higher, the total of which make up more than
         99% or more of the total volume of the mixture.

    d)   Solid, flammable means a solid other than a blasting agent or explosive, as defined in
         1910.109(a), that may potentially cause fire through friction, absorption of moisture,
         spontaneous chemical change, or retained heat from manufacturing or processing, or which can
         be ignited readily and when ignited burns so vigorously and persistently, as to create a serious
         hazard.

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    Flashpoint - Means the minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off a vapor in sufficient
    concentration to ignite.

    Hazardous - Means a chemical for which there is statistically significant evidence based on at Chemical
    least one study conducted in accordance with established scientific principles that acute or chronic
    health effects may occur in exposed employees. The term "health hazard” includes chemicals which are
    carcinogens, toxic or highly toxic agents, reproductive toxins, irritants, corrosives, sensitizers,
    hepatotoxins, nephrotoxins, neurotoxins, agents which act on the hematopoietic systems, and agents
    which damage the lungs, skin, eyes or mucous membranes.

    Laboratory - A device located in a laboratory, enclosure on five sides with a moveable sash or type
    hood fixed partial enclosure on the remaining side; constructed and maintained to draw air from the
    laboratory and to prevent or minimize the escape of air contaminants into the laboratory; and allows
    chemical manipulations to be conducted in the enclosure without insertion of any portion of the
    employees body other than hands and arms. Walk-in hoods with adjustable sashes meet the above
    definition provided that the sashes are adjusted during use so that the airflow and the exhaust of air
    contaminants are not compromised and employees do not work inside the enclosure during the release
    of airborne hazardous chemicals.

    Medical - Means a consultation which takes place between an employee and a licensed consultation
    physician for the purpose of determining what medical examinations or procedures, if any, are
    appropriate in cases where a significant exposure to a hazardous chemical may have taken place.

    Physical - Means a chemical for which there is scientifically valid evidence that it is a Hazard
    combustible liquid, a compressed gas, explosive, flammable, an organic peroxide, an oxidizer,
    pyrophoric, unstable (reactive) or water-reactive.


3. Responsibility
There are a number of areas on campus that have laboratory settings. Each area presents a different set of
chemical and physical hazards to the laboratory occupants. Due to this variation it is not possible for one
individual to implement a comprehensive laboratory safety program. It takes the participation and
cooperation of many different people.

This section sets forth the various responsibilities of individuals involved in the process of implementing and
maintaining the NCF Chemical Hygiene Plan.

    A.   The President of The NCF has the ultimate responsibility for ensuring that a chemical safety plan is
         implemented and adhered to on campus. The individuals listed below are to act as the President's
         representatives and handle the day to day issues associated with the chemical hygiene plan.

    B.   Vice-Presidents, Deans and Department Heads are responsible for ensuring that principal
         investigators and laboratory managers have implemented and are maintaining a laboratory safety
         plan in their respective laboratories.

    C.   The Director of the Office of Environmental Health and Safety has been designated as the NCF
         Chemical Hygiene Officer (CHO) and as such will assist in the development and implementation of
         CHP's for individual areas, provide general laboratory safety training and guidance to principal
         investigators, laboratory managers and laboratory occupants. Additionally, the CHO will conduct
         periodic inspections to ensure compliance with the program, conduct annual audits of the CHP to
         ensure its effectiveness and monitor the waste disposal program. The CHO shall have enforcement
         authority if unsafe work practices are discovered.

    D.   The Principal Investigator (PI) or Laboratory Manager has the primary responsibility for safety in
         their respective areas. They are responsible for assessing the hazards within the laboratory and
         with that information prepare standard operating procedures and lab-specific CHP relevant to safety
         and health considerations which must be followed when laboratory work involves the use of
         hazardous chemicals. They are responsible for ensuring that their employees follow the general
         policies outlined in the College's CHP.

    E.   Laboratory workers are individually responsible for following safety procedures as outlined in the
         CHP and always using the appropriate personal protective equipment which will be provided to
         them. Additionally, lab workers must report all accidents, injuries and illnesses to their supervisor
         so that the circumstances of these incidents can be investigated and corrective actions taken.

4. Training
Providing information and training to laboratory employees is a key element of the College's Chemical
                                                                                                                  36
Hygiene Plan. The purpose is to ensure that all individuals are apprised of the hazards of the chemicals and
processes present in their laboratory.

Basic laboratory safety training will be provided at the time of initial assignment to all employees where
hazardous chemicals are present. Additional information and training will be provided to laboratory
employees prior to assignments involving new hazardous chemicals or new laboratory work procedures.

The information and training will at minimum inform the employee about:

    1.   The contents and requirements of the OSHA Laboratory Standard.

    2.   The content, location and availability of the NCF Chemical Hygiene Plan.

    3.   The recommended exposure limits for hazardous chemicals used in their labs.

    4.   Signs and symptoms associated with exposures to the hazardous chemicals used in their laboratory.

    5.   The location and availability of MSDSs and other reference materials.

    6.   The methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous
         chemical.

    7.   The measures employees can use to protect themselves from these hazards, including specific
         procedures such as appropriate work practices, personal protective equipment to be used, and
         emergency procedures.

Refresher training will be conducted on at least an annual basis.

Training record forms must be filled out to document any training conducted. The training record forms will be
kept on file at the Office of Environmental Health and Safety.

5. Practices Having Prior Approval
Prior approval must be obtained by persons conducting laboratory activities which present specific,
foreseeable hazards to employees. Some of the activities include:

    1.   Off-hours work procedures - Unauthorized personnel are not permitted to work in the lab after
         hours.

    2.   Lone Occupancy - Research work involving chemicals shall not be performed in the laboratory when
         the worker is the sole occupant of the building unless:

         a.   The work is not considered extremely hazardous and is permitted by the supervisor/principal
              investigator.

         b.   The College Police have been contacted upon entry of the building and upon leaving the
              premises.

    3.   Hazardous Work - All hazardous operations (working with chemicals on the EPA's extremely
         hazardous substance list), are to be performed during a time when at least two persons are present
         at the laboratory. At no time shall a laboratory person, while working     alone in the laboratory,
         perform work which is considered to be extremely hazardous. The determination of these conditions
         shall be made by the P.I. or the Lab Manager.

    4.   Unattended Operations - The Principal Investigator or Lab Manager will review the work procedures to
         ensure the operation can be completed safely.

    5.   If the experiment procedure is new.

    6.   If there is a change or substitution of ingredient chemicals in a known procedure.

    7.   If any equipment used in the procedure fails, especially safeguards such as fume hoods or clamped
         apparatus.

    8.   If there are any unexpected results.

    9.   If members of the laboratory staff become ill and suspect that they or others have been exposed, or
         otherwise suspect a failure of any safeguards.


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6. Standard Operating Procedures
This chapter is designed to provide information of a general nature regarding safety related issues and
procedures to be followed when handling chemicals before, during, or after use in an experimental
procedure.

    Signs and Labels

        1.   Emergency Telephone Numbers - A sticker shall be affixed on the outside door of every
             laboratory and chemical storage area. The sticker must list the names and phone numbers of
             individuals to contact in the event of an emergency. A list of telephone numbers for emergency
             services shall be posted near each phone in the laboratory.

        2.   Hazard Warning Signs - Signs which are clearly visible should be posted on the entrance door to
             the laboratory or storage area indicating the nature of any hazard, such as, biohazards,
             carcinogens, radioactive materials, lasers, etc.

        3.   Safety and Emergency Equipment - Signs shall be posted identifying the locations of eyewash
             stations, safety showers, exits, fire extinguisher, first-aid stations, etc.

        4.   Chemical Containers - All containers in the laboratory or storage area shall be labeled as to their
             contents. This includes chemical containers and waste containers (biological, radiation, chemical,
             etc.). The labels should be durable and at a minimum will identify the contents, source, date of
             acquisition, storage location and an indication of the hazard.

    Personal Hygiene

        1.   Hands should be washed often, even when using gloves. Avoid using solvents for washing.

        2.   Wash promptly whenever a chemical has contacted the skin.

        3.   Avoid inhalation of chemicals; do not sniff to test chemicals.

        4.   Do not drink, eat, smoke or apply cosmetics in the laboratory.

        5.   Do not bring or store food, beverages, tobacco, or cosmetic products into laboratory or storage
             areas.

    Personal Work Practices

        1.   Supervisors must ensure that each employee knows and follows the rules and procedures
             established in this plan.

        2.   All employees must remain vigilante to unsafe work practices and conditions in the laboratory.
             The unsafe practices or conditions must be reported to the laboratory supervisor. It is the
             responsibility of the individual in-charge of the lab to correct the unsafe practices or conditions.

        3.   Do not mouth pipette.

        4.   Do not smell or taste any chemical.

        5.   Use only those chemicals appropriate for the ventilation system.

        6.   Inspect personal protective equipment prior to use and wear the appropriate protective
             equipment when ever necessary to avoid exposure.

        7.   Know the location and how to use the emergency equipment in your area and how to obtain
             additional help in an emergency.

    Housekeeping

        1.   Access to emergency equipment, showers, eyewashes and exits should never be blocked not
             even temporarily.

        2.   Keep all work areas clean and free of clutter, this includes lab benches and aisles.

        3.   All chemicals must be properly labeled.

        4.   All old or outdated chemicals must be disposed of properly through the Office of Environmental

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              Health and Safety (EH&S).

         5.   Wastes must be stored and labeled and dated, until arrangements can be made to properly
              dispose of the material through EH&S.

         6.   All spills and broken glass must be cleaned up immediately.

         7.   All working surfaces and floors should be cleaned regularly.

         8.   At the end of each workday, all chemicals should be placed in their assigned storage areas.

    Personal Protective Equipment

         1.   At a minimum, safety glasses are required to be worn in situations where other than purely
              instrumental studies are being conducted. Ordinary prescription glasses will not fulfill this
              requirement as they do not provide adequate protection to the eyes.

         2.   Chemical safety goggles, and/or full face shields shall be worn as procedures dictate or where
              there is a possibility of splashing chemicals, violent reactions, or flying particles. Specialized
              goggles are necessary for protection against laser hazards, ultraviolet or other intense light
              sources. Contact lenses are prohibited except as authorized by the lab supervisor.

         3.   Appropriate chemical resistant gloves shall be worn at all times when there may be skin
              contact with chemicals. Gloves will be selected on the basis of the material being handled and
              their suitability for the particular laboratory operation. Used gloves shall be inspected prior to
              re-use. Damaged or deteriorated gloves will be replaced immediately.

         4.   Thermal-resistant gloves shall be worn for operations involving the handling of heated
              materials, exothermic reaction vessels and during the handling of cryogens. Thermal-resistant
              gloves shall be non-asbestos and must be replaced when damaged or deteriorated.

         5.   Due to the risk of having chemicals spilled on a lab workers feet; sandals, perforated shoes or
              bare feet are not allowed when experiments are underway.

         6.   Lab coats or rubberized aprons are required when there is a risk of contamination of personal
              clothing. The lab coat will be laundered on a periodic basis. The apron should be cleaned after
              each use. Laboratory coats shall be removed immediately upon discovery of significant
              contamination.

         7.   Use of respirators is highly restricted and shall be worn only after consultation with the Office
              of Environmental Health and Safety.

    Spills and Accidents

         1.   Chemical spills of a minor nature can be cleaned up by trained lab personnel providing they have
              the necessary equipment. For spills of a somewhat larger nature, call personnel from the Office
              of Environmental Health and Safety for assistance. However, should a major spill occur
              immediately call 2911 for emergency assistance.

         2.   If an accident of a minor nature occurs, inform your supervisor. Medical attention will be
              provided if needed. An accident investigation must then be conducted to determine the cause of
              the accident and measures taken to prevent a reoccurrence.

    Waste Disposal

         1.   No regulated chemicals shall be disposed of in an improper or illegal fashion, such as flushing
              them down the sanitary sewer system or placing them in normal refuse containers.

         2.   All regulated chemicals shall be properly stored in a pre-approved location until picked up by
              personnel from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety.

    The Office of Environmental Health and Safety is charged with the responsibility of disposing of chemical
    wastes in a safe and legal manner.

7. General Chemical Safety Procedures
All laboratories must produce specific written safety practices for the procedures performed in their lab.
However, this section will provide some generally accepted safety practices to be used when handling or

                                                                                                                   39
using certain categories of chemicals.

    Transporting Chemicals

    Transporting chemicals can produce, in the right circumstances, the greatest chance of
    experiencing a spill situation. It can be dangerous not only to the individual transporting the
    chemicals but to innocent bystanders unaware of the potential hazard.

    When chemicals are carried, they should be placed in a safety container, acid carrying bucket or
    other appropriate container to protect against breakage and spillage. When they are transported
    on a wheeled cart, the cart should have wheels large enough to negotiate uneven surfaces without
    tipping or stopping suddenly.

    If chemicals are transported on passenger elevators the chemicals should be labeled and carried in
    safety containers. Additionally, the chemicals should if at all possible not be transported during
    busy times, such as change of classes.

    Flammable Liquids

    Flammable substances are generally the most common hazardous material found in the
    laboratory setting. The tendency of the materials to vaporize, ignite, burn, or explode varies with
    the specific type or class of substance.

    An indicator of the flammability of a solvent is its flashpoint; the lowest temperature at which a
    liquid gives off vapor in sufficient concentration to form an ignitable mixture with air. Among the
    most hazardous liquids are those that have flash points at room temperature or lower,
    particularly if their range is broad. When flammable materials are being used in a laboratory,
    close attention should be given to all potential sources of ignition. The vapors of all flammable
    liquids are heavier than air and are capable of traveling considerable distances. This could be a
    significant problem if there were an ignition source at a lower level.

    The following guidelines should be followed when handling or storing flammable materials:
        a. Flammable materials should be handled only in areas free of potential ignition sources.
        b. Flammables should not be heated with an open flame. Another type of heat source, such as
             a steam bath, water bath, or heating mantle should be used.

         c.   The liquid should be dispensed and used in a hood or well-ventilated area so that flammable
              vapors do not collect.

         d.   Transfer flammable liquids carefully. The friction of flowing liquids may be sufficient to
              generate static electricity which in turn may cause a spark and ignition. All large containers
              should be grounded or bonded before pouring from them.

         e.   Non-flammable liquids should be used as substitutes when ever possible.

         f.   No smoking signs should be posted and obeyed where ever flammable liquids are handled or
              stored.

         g.   Storage of flammable materials must comply with rules and regulations of the Office of the
              State Fire Marshal.

         h.   Keep only small quantities on hand.

         i.   Use only approved safety cans with self-closing cover, vent and flame arrester for storing
              flammable liquids or waste solvents.

         j.   Refrigerators and cooling equipment used for storing flammable liquids must be explosion
              proof.

    Reactive Chemicals

    Reactives refer to chemicals that, when mixed as part of an experiment, because reactions to proceed
    at such a fast rate and generate so much heat that they may result in an explosion. Care should
    always be taken, when using reactives, to ensure sufficient cooling and surface area for heat
    exchange. Many chemical reactions may involve hazards like those mentioned above, but can be
    handled safely if some preliminary planning is done prior to the start of an experiment.

    One specific class of compounds that have unusual stability problems that make them among the

                                                                                                               40
most hazardous substances handled in laboratories are organic peroxides. They are sensitive to heat,
friction, impact and light as well as to strong oxidizing and reducing agents. All organic peroxides are
flammable. Some suggestions for safe use of peroxidizable materials are listed below:

    1.   All peroxidizable materials should be stored in a cool place, away from light. Metal cans
         are preferable; do not store ethers in ground glass-stoppered bottles.

    2.   Order only in small quantities and date the container upon receipt and when it is first
         opened. They should be properly disposed of within a year after receipt if unopened or
         within six months of opening.

    3.   Ethers shall always be handled in a hood to assure proper ventilation. This will protect
         users from inhaling the vapors and prevent accumulation of explosive concentrations of
         the vapor.

Great care should be taken to ensure that incompatible chemicals are not combined or stored
together. Examples of incompatible chemicals as well as lists of other chemical hazards that may
result in explosions or fires can be found in "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals”
(National Academy Press).

Corrosive Chemicals

Corrosives are divided up into four major classes: strong acids, strong bases, dehydrating agents
and oxidizing agents. Inhalation of these substances can cause severe respiratory irritation.
Contact with the skin or eyes can be particularly damaging.

    A.   Acid and alkalis should be stored separately in a cool-ventilated area, away from metals,
         flammables and oxidizing material. Some general suggestions for safe use and storage are
         listed below:

         1.   Always pour acids into water, never the reverse.

         2.   Cap bottles securely and store them securely, but do not store acids and alkalines
              together.

         3.   Clean up spills promptly. Do not leave residues on a bottle or lab bench where another
              person may come in contact with them.

         4.   Wear protective equipment appropriate to the type of work being performed.

         5.   If you have been splashed with an acid or alkalis immediately wash it off and seek
              medical attention if necessary.

         Four acids require special mention due to the hazard they present:

         1.   Nitric Acid - It is very corrosive and its oxides are highly toxic. Because nitric acid is
              also an oxidizing agent, it may form flammable and explosive compounds with many
              materials (ethers, acetone and combustible materials). If paper were used to wipe up
              nitric acid it could potentially ignite spontaneously when dry. Nitric acid should be
              used in a hood and stored away from combustible materials.

         2.   Perchloric Acid - This acid forms highly explosive and unstable compounds with many
              organic compounds and even with metals. Unstable perchlorate compounds may
              collect in the duct work of fume hoods and cause fire or explosions. Therefore
              Perchloric acid shall only be used in special hoods intended for that purpose. These
              special hoods have corrosion resistant duct work and wash down facilities.

         3.   Picric Acid - This acid can form explosive compounds with many combustible
              materials. When the moisture content decreases, picric acid may become unstable
              and may explode if shaken. Picric acid should be dated, stored away from
              combustible materials and not kept for more than one year.

         4.   Hydrofluoric Acid - Hydrofluoric acid (HF) is extremely corrosive and will even attack
              glass. All forms, dilute or concentrated solutions or the vapors, can cause serious
              burns. Inhalation of HF mist or vapor cause serious respiratory tract irritation that
              may be fatal. Burns from hydrofluoric acid heal very slowly. Hydrofluoric acid should,
              therefore, be used only in a fume hood while wearing gloves, safety goggles and a lab
              coat. Avoid allowing HF to contact metals or ammonia since toxic fumes may result.
                                                                                                           41
    B.   Oxidizing Agents present fire and explosion hazards on contact with organic compounds and
         other oxidizable substances. Some suggestions for safe use and storage are listed below:

         1.   Oxidizing agents should be stored separately from flammables liquids, organics,
              dehydrating agents and reducing agents.

         2.   Strong oxidizing agents should be stored and used in glass or other inert containers.
              Corks and rubber stoppers should not be used.

         3.   Oxidizing agents should be used with caution in the vicinity of flammable materials.

         C.   Dehydrating Agents include concentrated sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, phosphorus
              pentoxide and calcium oxide. In order to avoid violent reactions and spattering, these
              chemicals should be added to water, never the reverse. Because of their affinity for
              water, these substances cause severe burns on contact with skin.

Toxic Chemicals
Toxicity is the capability of a chemical to produce injury. Almost any substance is toxic given a sufficient
dose of the material.

The effects of a toxic chemical can be divided into several categories.

    1.   Local Toxicity - is the effect a substance has on body tissues at the point of contact.

    2.   Systemic Toxicity - is the effect a substance has on body tissues other than at the point of
         contact.

    3.   Acute Toxicity - is the effect a substance has after only one or a few exposures.

    4.   Chronic Toxicity - is the effect a substance has as a result of many exposures over a long
         period of time.

Laboratory workers may potentially be exposed to a chemical substance through three major routes
of exposure:

    1.   Inhalation - Inhalation of toxic vapors, mists, gases or dust can result in poisoning through
         the mucous membrane of the mouth, throat and lungs and can cause serious local effects.
         The degree of injury from exposure to a toxic substance depends on the toxicity of the
         material, its solubility in tissue fluids and the concentration and duration of exposure.

    2.   Ingestion - Ingestion of chemicals in the laboratory may lead result in serious injury. To
         prevent ingestion of chemicals, lab workers should wash their hands immediately after using
         any toxic substance and before leaving the laboratory.

    3.   Skin Contact - This is the most frequent route of exposure to chemical substances. A
         common result of skin contact is localized irritation; however, some materials can be
         absorbed through the skin sufficiently to cause systemic poisoning. All persons in the lab
         should wear gloves and safety glasses to prevent contact with chemicals.

Highly toxic materials or materials with unknown toxic properties should be worked with only in a
designated area using the smallest amount of the chemical that is consistent with the requirements of
the work to be done. Only lab workers who have received prior approval of the Principal Investigator
or Lab Manager should be allowed to work with these substances.

Metals

Alkali metals (e.g. sodium and potassium) react violently with water and decompose the water to give
off hydrogen which may be ignited by the heat of reaction. Alkali metals can also ignite
spontaneously in air, especially when the metal is in powdered form and/or the air is moist as here in
Florida.

Some suggestions for safe use and storage of alkali metals are listed below:

    1.   Store alkali metals under mineral oil or kerosene. Avoid using oils containing sulfur since a
         hazardous reaction may occur.

    2.   Use only special dry powder Class D fire extinguisher on alkali metal fires.

                                                                                                           42
    3.   Any waste alkali metals should be placed in a labeled, leak proof container, covered with
         mineral oil and properly disposed of through the Office of Environmental Health and Safety.

Finely powdered metals that come in contact with acids may ignite and burn. Metal powders can also
create a dust explosion hazard when the powders become airborne in areas where a spark or flame is
present. Additionally, metal powders are subject to rapid oxidation which may result in a fire or
explosion.

Cryogenics

The main hazards associated with cryogenic materials are burns from contact with skin, pressure build up
in unvented spaces and fire, explosion or asphyxiation which can result from the evaporation of cryogens.

Below are listed suggestions for safe use and storage:

    1.   Eye protection must be worn whenever cryogenic liquids are handled. Where splashing is a
         possibility, face shields must be worn. Appropriate gloves, shoes and clothing must also be
         worn.

    2.   If an employee were to be splashed by the liquid, immediately flood exposed areas and clothing.

    3.   Avoid wearing jewelry or watches.

    4.   Due to the fact that cryogenics can cause asphyxiation by displacement of air they should be
         used only in well ventilated areas.

    5.   Venting should be provided to avoid quick and violent pressure changes when cryofliud
         vaporizes.

    6.   Handle combustible cryogens such as liquid hydrogen and liquid natural gas in the same way
         combustible gases are handled: provide adequate ventilation, keep away from open flame
         and other ignition sources, prohibit smoking and vent gases to a safe location.

    7.   Exposed glass portions of the container should be taped to minimize the flying glass hazard if
         the container should break or implode.

Compressed Gas Cylinders

The following rules must be observed when using compressed gas cylinders:

    1.   All gas cylinders must be labeled to identify their contents. Do not rely on color codes.

    2.   Know the properties of the chemical contents of the gas cylinders.

    3.   Handle gas cylinders carefully.

    4.   Store and use in well ventilated areas, away from heat or ignition sources. Store oxygen
         away from flammable gases. Reactive gases should be stored separately.

    5.   Cylinders must be chained or strapped in place to prevent them from falling over. Metal
         cylinder caps for valve protection should be kept on at all times when the cylinder is not in
         use.

    6.   Transport cylinders only with a hand truck. Do not "roll" a cylinder on its end even to move
         it a short distance.

    7.   Do not use cylinders without a pressure regulator.

    8.   Close cylinder valves when not in use. Do not rely on a regulator to stop the gas flow
         overnight.

    9.   Close valves on empty cylinders and mark the cylinders "Empty".

    10. Never attempt to refill a cylinder.

Allergens


                                                                                                          43
    A wide variety of substances, such as diazomethane, isocyanates and bichromates can produce skin
    and lung hypersensitivity. Because of the varying responses of individuals to allergens suitable gloves
    must be worn to prevent hand contact with allergens or substances of unknown allergenic activity.

    Embryotoxins

    Certain dangerous chemicals may act as embryotoxins. Special precautions must be taken when
    using these chemicals. The lab supervisor must take appropriate measures in order to ensure the
    safety of those involved with their use.

8. Control Measures and Safety Equipment
Chemical safety is achieved by continual awareness of chemical hazards and by keeping the chemicals
under control by using precautions, including engineering controls such as ventilation. Laboratory
personnel should be familiar with precautions to be taken, including the use of engineering controls and
safety equipment. Laboratory supervisors must ensure the engineering controls are adequate and should
also be alert to detect the malfunction of the existing controls and safety equipment. All engineering
safeguards and controls must be properly maintained, inspected on a regular basis, and never overloaded
beyond their design limits. Some examples of the major types of engineering controls and safety
equipment will be listed below along with pertinent information on the need and use of each.

    Ventilation

    General laboratory ventilation should always be designed such that the laboratory is under a slightly
    negative pressure relative to other parts of the building to prevent odors or vapors from being pushed
    out of the lab due to a positive pressure inside the room. Usually lab ventilation should be about
    eight air changes per hour. This flow is not necessarily sufficient to prevent accumulation of
    chemicals vapors.

    When working with toxic or other types of chemicals with low air concentration limits or that have a
    high vapor pressure always use a fume hood. Chemical fume hoods are intended to remove vapors,
    gases and dusts of toxic, flammable, corrosive or other types of dangerous materials. With the sash
    lowered to an appropriate level, laboratory fume hoods can also afford workers protection from such
    hazards as chemical splashes or sprays and fires. However, they are not designed to withstand
    explosions.

    The following are some guidelines which should be observed when using fume hoods:

        1.   Before performing hazardous operations check to determine that the hood is working; hold a
             small piece of paper at the face of the hood and see if it is being drawn inward.

        2.   When work is being performed within the hood, keep the sash at the recommended height.
             The appropriate sash height needed to obtain the proper airflow is posted on the hood itself.
             The hood will be certified annually by the Office of EH&S to ensure proper functioning of the
             unit.

        3.   Experiments should be conducted well inside the hood. All apparati should be a minimum of
             six inches from the front of the hood. This simple step can reduce vapor concentrations at
             the face of the hood by 90%.

        4.   Fume hoods are not intended for the storage of chemicals. Materials stored in them should
             be kept at a minimum and in such a way that they will not interfere with the flow of air.

        5.   Hoods should be considered as backup safety devices that can contain and exhaust toxic,
             offensive or flammable materials. They should not be considered as a way of disposing of
             chemicals by means of evaporation.

        6.   If the ventilation system fails; immediately stop work, drop the sash down all the way and
             contact the appropriate personnel to have repairs made.

        7.   Chemicals should not be routinely stored in the hood, however, if a minimal amount of
             chemicals are left in the hood, leave the exhaust fan running in order to prevent a build up of
             vapors in the hood or in the lab area.

    The use of perchloric acid requires specially designed wash down fume hoods. Never conduct
    experiments which heat perchloric acid in a hood not specifically designed for the purpose.

    If chemicals of a much more hazardous type are planned for use in a general chemical hood, contact
    the Office of EH&S to have the hood recertified for more hazardous use.
                                                                                                               44
Another means of removing hazardous materials through ventilation is by the use of biological safety
cabinets, glove boxes or isolation rooms. These are usually very specialized pieces of equipment and
as such should be certified for use on an annual basis by individuals with the appropriate credentials
to perform the inspection. The exhaust from these pieces of equipment must pass through special
filters or scrubbers before being released to the atmosphere.

Flammable Storage Cabinets

If relatively large quantities are to be kept in a laboratory they must be kept in a suitable flammable
storage cabinet. Some safety practices to follow regarding their use are listed below:

    1.   Store only compatible chemicals inside a cabinet.

    2.   Do not store paper or cardboard or other combustible packaging material in a flammable-
         liquid storage cabinet.

    3.   Do not overload the storage cabinet.

    4.   The cabinet should be ventilated as needed.

Refrigerators

Often time small amounts of certain chemicals may need to be stored in a cool location; therefore
they are put in a refrigerator. Three types are available for use:

    1.   The ordinary household refrigerator is not equipped with explosion-safe controls or door
         switches and should not be used to cool flammable liquids due to the fact that sparks from
         the controls or switches may ignite the vapor-air mixture.

    2.   The explosion-safe refrigerator is constructed with its controls mounted outside the storage
         compartment. This type refrigerator is suitable for storing flammable liquids.

    3.   The explosion proof refrigerator also has its controls mounted on the outside, but, in
         addition, the controls are of an explosion proof design. This type is needed only where both
         the internal and external environment present a fire or explosion hazard.

Every refrigerator should be clearly labeled to indicate whether or not it is suitable for storage of
flammable liquids. Flammables liquids stored in a refrigerator shall be in closed containers.

Laboratory refrigerators shall not be used for the storage of food or drink.

Fire Extinguisher

All individuals working in a laboratory must be instructed in the location of fire extinguisher. Each lab
must have an appropriate type of adequate size available for immediate use. All employees should be
trained in the proper use of fire extinguishers. There are four main types:

    1.   Water extinguishers are effective against burning paper and trash (class A fire). They should
         not be used on electrical, liquid or metal fires.

    2.   Carbon Dioxide extinguishers are effective against burning liquids and electrical fires (Class
         B&C fires). They are less effective against paper, trash, or metal fires and should not be
         used against lithium hydride fires.

    3.   Dry Powder extinguishers are effective against burning liquids and electrical fires and to a
         lesser extent paper and trash fires (Class A, B&C fires). They are the most commonly found
         type of extinguisher. These extinguishers are generally used where large quantities of
         solvents are used.

    4.   Met-L-X extinguisher and others that have special granular formulations are effective against
         burning metal (Class D fires). Included in this category are fires involving magnesium,
         lithium, sodium and potassium; alloys of reactive metals, metal hydrides, metal alkyls and
         other organometallics. These extinguishers are less effective against paper and trash, liquid
         or electrical fires.

Eyewash and Safety Shower Stations


                                                                                                            45
    All employees who potentially might be splashed by chemicals, during the course of their work
    activities, must be instructed in the location of the nearest eyewash station and safety shower. Each
    employee must also be thoroughly familiar with how to use the safety equipment in case they must
    find and use it with their eyes closed.

    The eyewash/safety shower stations will be inspected at least annually by the Office of EH&S. Any
    problems noticed by lab personnel regarding these pieces of equipment should be immediately
    brought to the attention of the lab supervisor and appropriate actions taken.

    Chemical Inventory

    A complete chemical inventory of all chemicals found at the worksite is required to be maintained at all
    times. This shall be updated annually, made available for staff or compliance officer review and provided
    to EH&S when requested.
    This is inventory form is found in Appendix D

9. Exposure Assessment
There may be times when employees or supervisors suspect that an employee is being or has been
exposed to a hazardous chemical to a degree and in a manner that might cause harm to the individual. It
is extremely important to promptly investigate such incidents.

Events or circumstances that might reasonably constitute overexposure include:

    1.   A hazardous chemical leaked or was spilled or was otherwise released in an uncontrolled manner.

    2.   A laboratory employee had direct skin or eye contact with a hazardous chemical.

    3.   A laboratory employee manifests symptoms, such as headaches, rash, nausea, coughing, tearing,
         irritation or redness of eyes, nose or throat, loss of motor dexterity and;

    a.   Some or all of the symptoms disappear when the person is taken away from the exposure area
         and breathes fresh air.

    b.   The symptoms reappear soon after the employee returns to work with the same hazardous
         chemicals.

    4.   Two or more persons in the same laboratory work area have similar complaints.

Given the set of circumstances just mentioned the Office of EH&S will initiate an exposure assessment.
Information regarding the situation will be collected and if necessary exposure monitoring will be
conducted. All such complaints and their disposition must be documented.

In certain situations medical surveillance programs will be established where monitoring reveals an
exposure level above the action level for an OSHA regulated substance for which there are exposure
monitoring and medical surveillance requirements.

When monitoring is performed, the employee will be notified within 15 working days of receipt of the
results.


10. Medical Consultation
If the circumstances mentioned in the Section IX are relevant to any laboratory employee they will have
an opportunity to receive a medical consultation with a licensed physician. The purpose of the medical
consultation will be to determine whether a medical examination is warranted. Both the consultation and
the examination, including any follow-up, will be provided to the employee without cost. The employee
should, however, obtain a list of physicians designated by the College.

Students working in laboratories on a volunteer basis should seek attention at the Counseling and
Wellness Center located in PKV.

Where possible, the principal investigator, lab manager or other responsible party should provide the
following information to the physician:

    1.   The identity of the hazardous chemicals to which the employee may have been exposed.

    2.   A description of the conditions under which the exposure occurred including exposure data, if
         available.

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    3.   A description of the signs and symptoms of exposure that the employee is experiencing, if any.

For any consultation or examination provided under this program the physician must provide a written
opinion to the Director of Environmental Health and Safety that, at a minimum, includes the following:

    1.   Any recommendation for further follow-up.

    2.   The results of the medical examination and any associated tests.

    3.   Any medical condition that may be revealed in the course of the examination that may place the
         employee at increased risk as a result of exposure to a hazardous chemical found in the
         workplace.

    4.   A statement that the employee has been informed by the physician of the results of the
         consultation or medical examination and any medical condition that may require further
         examination or treatment.

The written opinion should not reveal specific findings of diagnoses that are unrelated to the occupational
exposure.


11. Recordkeeping
In order for the New College of Florida's Chemical Hygiene Program to be successful, it is essential that
accurate records be kept. The necessary documentation must be concise, legible and signed by the
appropriate individuals. It may be necessary to refer to these records many years after they were
originated. Departments may wish to establish a central location for maintaining laboratory safety
records.

The following records will be maintained by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety:
    1. Laboratory Safety Training Records
    2. Employee Medical Surveillance Records
    3. Exposure Assessment Records
    4. Ventilation and Safety Equipment Evaluation Records

The following records should be kept by either departmental or laboratory supervisory personnel:
    1. Copies of Laboratory Standard Operating Procedures that the P.I. or Lab Manager has prepared
    regarding hazardous chemicals or processes.
    2. Records regarding amounts of extremely hazardous substances stored and used.
    3. Records of any laboratory safety meetings

The following records should be kept by the Human Resources Department:
    1. Accident/Injury Reports

The following records should be kept by the Physical Plant:
    1. Repair and Maintenance Records for repairs made to any ventilation or safety equipment.
    2. Records of utility or mechanical upgrades made on building.

12. References

29 CFR 1910.1045 Laboratory Standard

13A. Appendix A
                                    GUIDELINES FOR PREPARING
                                      LABORATORY SPECIFIC
                                 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

Laboratories must provide employees with standard operating procedures to follow when laboratory work
involves the use of laboratory chemicals.

Standard operating procedures (SOP's) are required written safety and health guidelines for work with
hazardous chemicals. "Hazardous Chemicals" are chemicals which, based on at least one study conducted
in accordance with established scientific principles, have statistically significant evidence that exposure
may result in acute or chronic health effects.

Standard operating procedures are required for chemicals currently in use in the laboratory. New
chemicals introduced must be included in existing SOP's or in a new SOP.
                                                                                                              47
Standard Operating Procedures should be written using one or more of the following approaches:

    1.   By process, such as distillation, organic synthesis or glove box use.

    2.   By individual hazardous chemical, such as, benzene.

    3.   By hazardous chemicals class, such as, organic solvents or peroxidizable chemicals.

SOP's should include the following required elements:

    1.   Process - If applicable, list the processes or process types which involve hazardous chemical use
         in the laboratory. Processes may be described in general terms, such as, extraction and
         distillation, or more detailed terms, such as, spectrophotometric analysis of cholesterol
         extraction. If processes do not apply in your laboratory, proceed to #2.

    2.   Hazardous Chemical/Chemical Class - List the hazardous chemicals involved in each phase of the
         process and the expected by-products produced. If the SOP only involves a chemical, list the
         chemical, its aliases and the hazard classification.

    3.   Potential Hazards - Describe the potential hazards for each process or chemical.

    4.   Personal Protective Equipment - Identify the personal protective equipment and hygiene practices
         that are needed for each process, class of chemicals or individual chemical.

         a.   Personal protective equipment includes gloves, coats/garments, eyeglasses, goggles, face-
              shields, and air purifying respirators. Include the specific types of glove needed for each
              phase of the process. If laboratory coats, eye protection or respirators are required, indicate
              when and why.

         b.   For respirator use, include the type of respirator that should be worn, the specific cartridge
              to be used and how often the cartridge should be changed. (note: before assigning
              respirators, each lab must comply with the requirements of the New College of Florida's
              Respiratory Protection Program)

    5.   Engineering/Ventilation Equipment - Describe engineering controls which will be used to reduce
         employee exposures to hazardous chemicals, such as ventilation devices, aerosol suppression
         devices and safety features on equipment.

    6.   Special Handling Procedures And Storage Requirements - List storage requirements for hazardous
         chemicals in your laboratory, including specific storage areas, special containment devices,
         restricted access plans, ventilation systems used, etc.

    7.   Spill And Accident Procedures - Indicate how spills or accidental releases will be handled and by
         whom.

    8.   Special Precautions For Animal Use - Indicate whether any hazardous chemicals are being
         administered to animals. Describe safety procedures that apply when working with animals, such
         as aerosol suppression devices, animal waste disposal, etc.

    9.   Decontamination - Address decontamination procedures for equipment and glassware: include
         controlled areas such as glove boxes, restricted access hoods, perchloric acid hoods, or
         designated portions of the laboratory.

13B. Appendix B
                                   THIS SECTION FOR INDIVIDUAL
                                       LABORATORY SPECIFIC
                                 STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES

13C. Appendix C

                                             OSHA
                           29 CFR 1910.1450, Occupational Exposure
                           to Hazardous Chemicals in the Laboratory.
      http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=standards&p_id=10106


                                                                                                                48
           13D. Appendix D



New College of Florida Laboratory Chemical Inventory                                      Page _____of_______
Name of PI/Supervisor Signature ____________________________________ Date:______________________________________
Building:_______________________________________________RoomNo:____________Deepartment:_____________________
Address:____________________________________________________________________________________
_______________




Product Name                       Primary Chemical Name            CAS Number         Quantity on       Frequency of
                                                                                       Hand




                                                                                                        49
      13E. Appendix E
                           NEW COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
                                  Environmental Health & Safety
                                      Laboratory Safety Inspection
==================================================================================
I. Laboratory Identification:

Principal Investigator:                                               Department:
Lab Contact:                                                          Phone No.:
Building/Room:                                                        Date:

==================================================================================
II. General:

1)  Emergency call list posted on door?                             Yes       No    N/A
2)  Hazard warning stickers on door?                                Yes       No    N/A
3)  Does lab have a CHP?                                            Yes       No    N/A
4)  Training documentation complete?                                Yes       No    N/A
5)  Respiratory protection used?                                    Yes       No    N/A
6)  NCF Resp. Prot. Prog. followed?                                 Yes       No    N/A
7)  Does lab have a first aid kit?                                  Yes       No    N/A
8)  Food in lab refrigerator?                                       Yes       No    N/A
9)  Food allowed in work area?                                      Yes       No    N/A
10) Refrigerator marked "Not for Food Storage"?                     Yes       No    N/A
11) Is any of the following emergency response equipment present?
         a) Fire extinguisher                                       Yes       No    N/A
         b) Safety shower                                           Yes       No    N/A
         c) Eye wash station                                        Yes       No    N/A
         d) Spill clean-up kit                                      Yes       No    N/A
12) Is access obstructed to any of above?                           Yes       No    N/A
13) Fume hood used and functioning properly?                        Yes       No    N/A
14) Are any of the following potential hazards found in the lab?
         a) Chemicals                                               Yes       No    N/A
         b) Radioactive materials                                   Yes       No    N/A
         c) Biohazardous materials                                  Yes       No    N/A
         d) Compressed gases (list)                                 Yes       No    N/A

                  gas #1                  cylinder size             chained
                  gas #2                  cylinder size             chained
                  gas #3                  cylinder size             chained
                  gas #4                  cylinder size             chained
                  gas #5                  cylinder size             chained

15) Is Personal Protective Equipment provided or available?
         a) Safety Glasses                                  Yes No
         b) Gloves                                          Yes No
         c) Lab Coat/Apron                                  Yes No
16) Are walk ways provided with proper clearance?           Yes No
17) Are work surfaces kept clean?                           Yes No
18) Are sharps separate from regular trash?                 Yes No
19) Electrical system adequate?                             Yes No    N/A
20) All proper guarding in place?                           Yes No    N/A
============================================================================
III. Hazardous Materials:

                                                                                          50
21) Chemical inventory available?                                    Yes      No               N/A
22) MSDS' readily accessible to lab staff?                           Yes      No               N/A
23) Labeling:
         a) all chemicals properly labeled?                          Yes      No               N/A
         b) original product names on labels
           (no abbreviations)                                        Yes      No               N/A
24) Chemicals stored by hazard class?                                Yes      No               N/A
25) Are peroxide-forming chemicals dated upon
    receipt & disposed of after 6 month shelf life?                  Yes      No               N/A
26) Highly flammable liquids store away from
    heat sources and ignition?                                       Yes      No               N/A
27) Are all chemicals capped except during use?                      Yes      No               N/A
28) Storage:
         a) flammable storage cabinets used?                         Yes      No               N/A
         b) flammable liquids not stored outside
             of cabinet in excess of 10 gal.?                        Yes      No               N/A

============================================================================
IV. Hazardous Waste:

29) Waste contained according to NCF guidelines?                     Yes      No               N/A
30) Are containers labeled using NCF hazardous
    waste labels with all appropriate sections
    completed?                                                       Yes     No                N/A
31) Synthesized, unnamed chemical wastes
    labeled by their reactants and possible
    products (or by a useful generic description)
    and with their probable hazards?                                 Yes___ No___              N/A

============================================================================
V. Comments:

===========================================================================


Completed By:                                         Date:


Laboratory Representative:                            Date:



H. Personal Protective Equipment Program

    1. Purpose
    Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) developed this program to help departments protect employees from
    exposure to workplace hazards and to facilitate NCF compliance with state and federal safety-related
    regulatory requirements.

    This program complies with the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations
    29 CFR 1910 Subpart I and 29 CFR 1926 Subpart E. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) protects employees
    from the risks of injury by creating a barrier against workplace hazards. PPE must be used when the eyes,
    face, hands, extremities, or other parts of the body are exposed to workplace hazards that cannot be
    controlled by other means. PPE is not a substitute for good engineering controls, administrative controls,
    or good work practices, but should be used in conjunction with those controls to ensure the safety and health
    of employees. The use of PPE does not eliminate the hazard, and if the PPE fails or is used improperly,
    exposure to the hazard may occur. Employees must be trained on the limitations of PPE, and on its proper use
    and maintenance. Employees must also be aware that PPE does not eliminate the hazard. If the equipment
    fails or is used improperly, they will be exposed to the hazard and may suffer injury.

                                                                                                              51
2. Definitions
Administrative Controls involve changing the methods or procedures used to perform specific tasks to
reduce employee exposure to a hazard. An example of an administrative control would be employee rotation to
reduce the time that an employee is exposed to a hazard.

Engineering Controls reduce or eliminate employee exposure to a hazard on a relatively permanent basis,
and are the most desirable type of hazard control. Examples of engineering controls include installing
barricades and shields, or changing the work area layout, tools, lighting, or ventilation.

Metatarsal: The middle part of the foot that forms the instep.

Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a summary sheet provided by the manufacturer of a chemical or
other potentially hazardous product. The MSDS explains the hazards of the material and the precautions that
must be taken to prevent fires, explosions or harmful health effects.

Qualified Person is one who has received training appropriate for the tasks to be performed and has
demonstrated the necessary skills and techniques to perform his or her work safely.

3. Scope
This program applies to all NCF properties, to all work performed on the NCF campus, and to all work
performed by NCF employees regardless of jobsite location.

This program specifically addresses eye, face, foot, hand, and torso protection.

This program does not fully address the details of PPE required for respiratory, noise, or non¬ionizing radiation
(such as laser) hazards, though the need for such PPE may be identified during the hazard assessment
process. If such potential hazards are identified during the assessment process, contact EHS for guidance.

This program does not fully address the details of PPE required for fall or electrical hazards, though the need
for such PPE may be identified during the hazard assessment process. If such potential hazards are identified
during the assessment process, contact EHS.

This program does not fully address the details of PPE required for work involving ionizing radiation.
Information on work practices and PPE required for such hazards may be obtained by contacting EHS.

Supplemental information on PPE required for laboratory operations may be found in the NCF's Chemical
Hygiene Plan (CHP). A copy of the CHP may be obtained by contacting EHS.

This program requires:
•    Designation of responsible persons - by departments - to coordinate the requirements of this program at
     their worksites.
• Training of designated departmental personnel by EHS.
• Performing a hazard assessment of worksites and/or employee job duties by designated departmental
     personnel,
• Assigning PPE to employees based upon the results of the hazard assessment performed.
• Training of employees by designated departmental personnel.
• EHS evaluating the effectiveness of the PPE Program on a periodic basis and by EHS modifying training or
     the written program as needed to address identified deficiencies.

4. Responsibilities

Environmental Health and Safety

The Personal Protective Equipment Program will be implemented by using “Train-The-Trainer” methods. EHS
will assist departments by providing technical support, supervisory-level training, and oversight for the
program upon request. EHS will assist the departments, upon request, by providing training for non-
supervisory personnel. EHS involvement does not relieve NCF departments, supervisors, or contractors of their
individual responsibilities. EHS is responsible for developing, implementing, and administering the PPE
Program. This involves:

•   Assisting in training supervisors or other departmental representative(s) to conduct workplace hazard
    assessments.
•   Assisting with the hazard assessment surveys by serving as a technical resource.
•   Providing guidance on the selection, care, and use of PPE.
                                                                                                              52
•   Maintaining centralized records of hazard assessments, training, and inspections.
•   Providing training and technical assistance to the designated departmental personnel.
•   Developing and maintaining the PPE train-the-trainer manual, videos, and other training resources.
•   Evaluating the overall effectiveness of the PPE Program on a periodic basis, and revising the program as
    needed to assure the safety of NCF employees.
•   Maintaining the NCF Respiratory Protection and Hearing Conservation programs, as needed, and
    evaluating workplace exposure to hazards that would require the use of respirators or hearing protection.
•   Maintaining the NCF Chemical Hygiene Plan. This plan covers the use of protective devices in laboratory
    operations.

Departmental Responsibilities

Individual NCF Departments are expected to maintain safe and healthy learning and working environments for
faculty, staff, students, and visitors to our campus. Departments must require faculty, staff, students, and
visitors to use, where necessary, personal protective equipment and protective work clothing suitable to
protect them from contact with, or exposure to, hazardous conditions or substances within departmental
facilities. It is recommended that each department designate one person to coordinate and implement this
program (e.g., the PPE Coordinator(s)), though any equally effective method may be used if compliance with
the requirements of this program is assured. This individual will conduct or coordinate inspections of all
workplaces to determine the need for PPE and help in selecting the proper PPE for each task performed. This
responsibility will fall to the highest supervisory level of each departmental unit unless otherwise specified. The
name(s) of designated departmental personnel must be provided to EHS.

This PPE Coordinator, or other person(s) designated by the department, will perform the following operations
once they are trained by EHS:

Job Specific Hazards Assessments

Each department is required to assess the hazards in their workplace(s) to determine which operations require
personal protective equipment. In some situations it may be more appropriate for the hazard assessment to
involve a review of an employee’s job duties or duties for a class of employee to determine if work is
performed that that will require the use of PPE. This hazard assessment must be performed in accordance with
the requirements outlined in this program.

Equipment selection

If the work site hazard assessment or the review of employee job duties, indicate that there is exposure to a
hazard(s) that requires the use of PPE, the departmental designee(s) will:

•   Select, and have each affected employee use, the type(s) of PPE that will protect the employee from the
    hazards identified in the hazard assessment.
•   Inform the employee of the reasons for selecting the specific PPE.
•   Select PPE that properly fits each affected employee.
•   Verify that the hazard assessment has been performed through a written certification. This certification
    must identify the workplace or job duties evaluated, the name of the person performing the assessment,
    and the date of the assessment.

Employee-owned equipment

Where employees provide their own protective equipment, the department is responsible for assuring that it is
adequate for the hazardous condition, and that this equipment is properly maintained as required by this
program.

Design

The department must assure that all PPE is of a safe design and construction for the work to be performed.


Defective and damaged equipment

The department must assure that defective or damaged personal protective equipment is not used.

Training

The person(s) designated above, or other assigned departmental representative, must train each employee
who is required to use PPE.

                                                                                                                53
Recordkeeping

Maintain records of hazard assessments, PPE assignments and training, and provide a copy of all records to
EHS.

Assessment

Seek assistance from EHS as needed to evaluate hazards. Reassess the worksite when new hazards are
introduced or when processes are changed or added in the work place.

Employees

Employees are responsible for following the requirements of this program. Employees are expected to:
   •        Attend required training sessions on PPE.
   •        Wear PPE as required.
   •        Clean, maintain, and care for PPE as required.
   •        Inform the departmental PPE Coordinator of the need to repair or replace PPE

Contractors

Contractors must comply with all local, state, and federal safety requirements, and must assure that all of
their employees performing work on NCF property have been suitably trained and supplied with the
appropriate PPE.

Visitors

Visitors to NCF property must abide by the requirements of this program. It is the responsibility of the
person(s) hosting the visitors to enforce this program. PPE used by visitors, whether provided by the visitor or
the host department, must meet the minimum requirements established for NCF employees.

5. Training

Each employee required to wear PPE must receive training in the proper use and care of their PPE. It is
expected that either the supervisor or other person(s) designated by the department will provide this training.
This training must include the following:
• When PPE is to be worn;
• What PPE is necessary;
• How to properly don, doff, adjust, and wear PPE;
• The limitations of PPE;
• The proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of PPE.
The employee must demonstrate an understanding of the training and ability to use PPE properly before being
allowed to perform work requiring the use of PPE. The PPE Coordinator(s) must maintain a written certification
that each affected employee has received and understood the required training. This certification must include
the name of each employee trained, the dates(s) of training, and the subject of the training. A blank training
certificate may be found at the end of Appendix H. When the PPE Coordinator(s) or EHS has reason to believe
that an employee using PPE does not have the understanding and skill required to use this equipment safely,
the employee must be retrained immediately. Retraining is also required when changes in the workplace
render previous training obsolete, or when changes in the type of PPE to be used render previous training
obsolete. When assistance is required, the PPE Coordinator for the department may be provided training by
EHS.

Hazard Assessment and Equipment Selection

    Evaluation of Hazards
    Two types of hazard assessments may need to be performed by the department.

    Workplace hazards should be evaluated when an employee works at one location or performs only one
    class of work.

    Job specific hazards should be evaluated when an employee does not work at a fixed location and is
    exposed to hazards at a number of work locations.

    Workplace Hazards

                                                                                                              54
    The PPE Coordinator(s) will be reviewing departmental workplaces to determine if hazards are present or
    are likely to be present that require the use of PPE. The workplace hazard assessment is conducted using
    the guidance provided in Appendix A and must be documented in writing using the form provided in
    Appendix I. A copy of this assessment must be provided to EHS.
    The first step of the hazard assessment is to perform a walk-through survey of the worksite to observe
    and record potential hazards. Hazards are identified as follows:

     Electrical hazards                Layout of workplace
     Presence of sharp objects or      Stacked or stored objects that could fall or roll
     edges
     Sources of light radiation        Types of chemical exposure
     Sources of rolling or pinching    Sources of high and low temperature
     objects
     Exposed moving parts of           Exposed moving parts of machinery or equipment
     machinery or equipment
     Sources of harmful dust

    After the worksite survey is completed, hazards are grouped into the following

    categories:
    Impact                              Heat
    Penetration                         Compression (roll-over)
    Chemical                            Respiratory
    Light (optical) radiation           Electrical
    Hearing                             Harmful dust, mist, or fumes


    Finally, the data must be organized by hazard, and assess the hazards as to the type, level of risk, and
    seriousness of potential injury. This evaluation should include the possibility of exposure to multiple
    hazards.

    Job Specific Hazards

    When an employee is exposed to hazards on multiple job sites the employee and/or their supervisor
    should be interviewed to identify the hazards to which he or she are exposed. The job specific hazard
    assessment is conducted using the guidance provided in Appendix A. The assessment must be
    documented in writing using the form provided in Appendix H and a copy of this assessment must be
    provided to EHS. The hazard assessment is performed in a manner similar to the evaluation of workplace
    hazards.

    PPE Selection
    Appropriate PPE is selected based upon the hazard(s) identified and using the guidance provided in:

    Appendix   A: Hazard Assessment and Personal Protective Equipment Selection
    Appendix   B: Eye and Face Protection
    Appendix   C: Head Protection
    Appendix   D: Foot Protection
    Appendix   E: Hand Protection
    Appendix   F: Protective Clothing and Body Protection
    Appendix   G: Fall Protection, Hearing Protection, Respiratory Protection, and Electrical Protective   Devices
    Appendix   H: Miscellaneous Forms
    Appendix   I: Who Pays for PPE?

6. References
Published Sources

•   Referenced standards are detailed in the Appendices.
•   A copy of these standards may be obtained from EHS.
•   Related documents or programs include NCF’s:
    •   Hearing Conservation Program
    •   Respiratory Protection Program
    •   Fall Protection Program
    •   Electrical Safety Program
    •   Chemical Hygiene Plan



                                                                                                                55
7. Regulations

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, General Industry Standards:
• 29 CFR 1910.95 Occupational Noise Exposure
• 29 CFR 1910.97 Non-ionizing radiation.
• 29 CFR 1910.133 Eye and Face Protection
• 29 CFR 1910.134 Respiratory Protection
• 29 CFR 1910.135 Head Protection
• 29 CFR 1910.136 Foot Protection
• 29 CFR 1910.137 Electrical Protective Equipment
• 29 CFR 1910.138 Hand Protection
• 29 CFR 1910.1096 Ionizing Radiation
Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Construction Industry Standards:
• 29 CFR 1926. 52 Occupational Noise Exposure
• 29 CFR 1926.53 Ionizing Radiation
• 29 CFR 1926.54 Non-ionizing Radiation
• 29 CFR 1926.95 - Criteria for personal protective equipment.
• 29 CFR 1926.96 - Occupational foot protection.
• 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.
• 29 CFR 1926.101 - Hearing protection.
• 29 CFR 1926.102 - Eye and face protection.
• 29 CFR 1926.103 - Respiratory protection.
• 29 CFR 1926.104 - Safety belts, lifelines, and lanyards.

8A. Appendix A

Hazard Assessment and Personal Protective Equipment Selection

Overview of the Hazard Assessment Process

Hazard Identification

The first step of the hazard assessment is to inspect the worksite and/or review the type of work performed by
an employee if he or she conduct work at multiple sites. The purpose of the inspection and/or job review is to
identify the hazards to which the employee is exposed. The inspection findings should be documented on the
Hazard Assessment Form found in Appendix I. During this inspection/review particular attention should be paid
to the following potential hazards:

• Moving equipment, parts of equipment, processes or personnel that could result in collision, compression
or impact.
• Potential for objects to fall or drop from above an employee.
• Rolling or pinching objects or machinery processes that could crush body parts, catch hair or snag loose
clothing.
• Electrical hazards, either from equipment, wiring, or utilities.
• Presence or use of sharp objects that could cut or pierce the body.
• Hot or cold surfaces that could cause burns or freezing.
• Light (optical) radiation from welding, cutting, brazing or other sources.
• Use of tools or equipment that may generate flying debris, harmful dusts or noise.
• The layout of the workplace and the locations of coworkers and the way in which work is staged or
performed.

Organize the Data

After completing the walk-through survey and/or employee interview, organize the data using the hazard
assessment form found at the end Appendix H.

Analyze The Data




                                                                                                           56
Determine the level of risk and the seriousness and type of potential injury from each of the hazards identified
during the assessment. The possibility of exposure to several hazards simultaneously should also be
considered.

Control or Eliminate the Hazard(s)

Before selecting and providing PPE to an employee, first determine if exposure to the hazard can be reduced or
eliminated through the use of administrative or engineering controls. The following questions should be
asked:

•   Does the manufacturer supply guards for the machinery or equipment? Do these guards completely
    contain or control exposure to the hazard if used properly?
•   Can a shield, barrier, or guard be manufactured or purchased that will contain or control exposure to the
    hazard?
•   Can older equipment be replaced with newer, safer equipment?
•   Can the layout of the worksite be changed to eliminate or reduce exposure to the hazard?
•   Can the product or chemical used be replaced with a less hazardous product or chemical?
•   Can exposure to an airborne chemical or dust be controlled with exhaust ventilation?

If the answer to any of the above is ‘yes’, or ‘maybe’, it may be possible to use administrative or engineering
controls to eliminate or reduce the hazard. Contact EHS for assistance or guidance.

Select PPE Appropriate for the Hazard(s)

Review of the potential hazards, in relation to specific job activities, forms the basis for selecting PPE. The
quick reference charts contained in each Appendix list basic hazards. After identifying the basic hazards, the
general procedure for selection of protective equipment is to:

Review the types of protective equipment that are available. An overview of the various types of PPE is
provided in Appendices B through H.

Compare the specifics of the hazard (i.e., how heavy and/or fast the object is moving, projectile shape, the
type of light being emitted, duration of exposure, etc.) against the capabilities of the available protective
equipment.

Select protective equipment that provides a level of protection adequate to protect the employee from the
hazard.

The PPE must be fit to the individual, and the employee must be given instructions on the care and use of his
or her PPE. It is very important that end users be made aware of all warning labels and limitations of their PPE.

Fitting the Device

Give careful consideration to the comfort and fit of PPE. PPE that fits poorly will not provide the necessary
protection, and the user is less likely to wear the device if it does not fit comfortably. Protective devices are
generally available in a variety of sizes. Care should be taken to ensure the right size is selected for each
individual wearer.

Particular care must be taken in fitting devices for eye protection against dust and chemical splash to ensure
that the devices are sealed to the face. In addition, proper fitting of helmets is important to ensure that it will
not fall off during work operations. In some cases a chinstrap may be necessary to keep the helmet on an
employee’s head. (Chinstraps, if provided, should break at a reasonably low force so as to avoid a
strangulation hazard). Always review and follow the manufacture’s instruction.

Devices with adjustable features

Adjustments must be made on an individual basis for a comfortable fit that will maintain the protective device
in the proper position.

Reassessment

It is the responsibility of the departmental representative to reassess workplace hazards when new equipment,
processes, or other hazards are introduced.




                                                                                                                    57
8B. Appendix B

Eye and Face Protection


Compliance with National Standards

All personal protective clothing and equipment must be of safe design and construction for the work to be
performed and must be maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition. Eye and face protection used by
employees must meet NIOSH (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or ANSI (American
National Standards Institute) standards as follows:

•   Protective eye and face devices purchased after July 5, 1994 must comply with ANSI Z87 .1-
    1989,"American National Standard Practice of Occupational and Education Eye and Face Protection".
•   Eye and face protective device purchased before July 5, 1994 must comply with the ANSI Z87 .1-1968
    "USA Standard for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection."
•   The referenced standards do not apply to hazards related to X-rays, gamma rays, high-energy particulate
    radiation, microwaves, radio-frequency radiation, or work with lasers and masers. Information on PPE
    required for work involving these hazards is available through EHS.

General Requirements

Employees must use appropriate eye or face protection when exposed to eye or face hazards from flying
particles, molten metal, acids or caustic liquids or other liquid chemicals, chemical gases or vapors, or
potentially hazardous light radiation.

Each affected employee must use eye protection that provides side protection when there is a hazard from
flying objects. Detachable side protectors (e.g. clip-on or slide-on shields) are acceptable if they meet the
ANSI requirements.

Eye and face PPE must be marked to identify the manufacturer.

Face shields must be used in combination with goggles when there is a potentially significant chemical splash
hazard.

Face shields must be worn over primary eye protection (safety glasses or goggles) when there is a potentially
severe exposure to flying fragments or objects, hot sparks from furnace operations, potential splash from
molten metal, or extreme temperatures.

Each affected employee who wears prescription lenses, while engaged in operations that involves eye hazards,
must either:

•   Wear eye protection that incorporates the prescription in its design, or,

•   Wear eye protection that can be worn over the prescription lenses without disturbing the proper position
    of the prescription lenses or the protective lenses.

Each affected employee must use equipment with filter lenses that have a shade number appropriate for the
work being performed for protection from injurious light radiation. Tinted and shaded lenses are not filter
lenses unless they are marked or identified as such.

Types of Eye and Face Protection

Safety Glasses

Protective eyeglasses are made with safety frames, tempered glass or plastic lenses, temples and side shields
which provide eye protection from moderate impact and particles encountered in job tasks such as carpentry,
woodworking, grinding, scaling, etc. Prescription safety glasses and tinted lenses are also available.

Standard safety glasses are designed to protect against flying particles. Safety glasses have lenses that are
impact resistant and frames that are far stronger than regular eyeglasses.

Safety Goggles

Vinyl framed goggles of soft pliable body design provides adequate eyes protection from many hazards. These
goggles are available with clear or tinted lenses, perforated, port vented, or non-vented frames. Single lens


                                                                                                                58
goggles provide similar protection to spectacles and may be worn in combination with spectacles or corrective
lenses to ensure protection along with proper vision.

Like safety glasses, goggles are impact resistant and are available with tinted lenses.
Goggles offer the best all-around impact protection of all eyewear types because they form a positive seal
around the eye area.

Welders/Chippers Goggles

Welders and chippers goggles are available in rigid and soft frames to accommodate single or two-eyepiece
lenses. Welders’ goggles provide protection from sparking, scaling, or splashing metals and harmful light rays.
Lenses are impact resistant and are available in graduated shades of filtration.

Chippers/Grinders goggles provide eye protection from flying particles. The dual protective eyecup house
impact resistant clear lenses with individuals cover plates.

Face Shields

Face shields normally consist of an adjustable headgear and face shield of either tinted or transparent acetate
or polycarbonate materials, or wire screen. Face shields are available in various sizes, tensile strength,
impact/heat resistance and light ray filtering capacity.

Face shields are used in operations when the entire face needs protection and to protect the eyes and face
against flying particles, metal sparks, and chemical or biological splash hazards.

Welding Helmets and Shields

The shield assemblies consist of a vulcanized fiber or glass fiber body, a ratchet or button type adjustable
headgear or cap attachment, and a filter and cover plate holder. These shields must be provided to protect
workers’ eyes and face from infrared or radiant light burns, flying sparks, metal spatter and slag chips
encountered during welding, brazing, soldering, resistance welding, bare or shielded electrical arc welding and
oxyacetylene work.

Storage and care

Safety glasses and other eye and face protection should be stored carefully so they won’t be scratched or
damaged. In general, do not store this equipment where it would be exposed to high heat or sunlight.

Inspect eye and face protection prior to use. If the equipment is damaged or broken do not use it because it
may not be able to fully resist impact.
Pitted lenses, like dirty lenses, make it more difficult for an employee to see and should be replaced. Lenses
that are pitted or deeply scratched are more prone to break under impact and should be replaced.

Conduct cleaning of eye and face protection according to the manufacturer’s instructions. If the
manufacturer’s instructions are not available, clean with a mild soap and water solution by soaking in the soap
solution (maintained at 120°F) for ten minutes. Rinse thoroughly and allow to air dry.

PPE that has been previously used should be disinfected before being issued to another employee. PPE may be
disinfected by completely immersing all parts in a solution of germicidal fungicide for 10 minutes. Remove the
parts from the solution and allow to air dry at room temperature.




                                                                                                                 59
          Source                   Assessment of Hazard                                            Protection
IMPACT                            Flying fragments, objects, large chips,   Spectacles with side protection, goggles, face shields. See
                                  particles of sand, dirt, etc.             notes (1), (3), (5), (6) and (10). For severe exposure, use face
                                                                            shield.

HEAT                              Hot sparks                                Face shields, goggles, spectacles with side protection. For
                                                                            severe exposure use face shield. See notes (1), (2) and (3).

                                  Splash from molten metals                 Face shields worn over goggles. See notes (1), (2) and (3).

                                  High temperature exposure                 Screen face shields, reflective face shields. See notes (1), (2),
                                                                            and (3).

CHEMICALS                         Splashing liquids                         Goggles, eyecup and cover types. For severe exposure, use
                                                                            face shield. See notes (3) and (11).

                                  Irritating mists                          Special purpose goggles.

DUST                              Nuisance dust                             Goggles, eyecup and cover types. See note (8).

LIGHT and/or RADIATION-           Optical radiation                         Welding helmets or welding shields. Typical shades: 10 -14.
Welding: Electric arc                                                       See notes (9) and (12).

Welding: Gas                      Optical radiation                         Welding goggles or welding face shield. Typical shades: gas
                                                                            welding 4-8, cutting 3-6, brazing 3-4. See note (9).

Cutting, Torch brazing, Torch     Optical radiation                         Spectacles or welding face shield. Typical shades: 1.5-3. See
soldering                                                                   notes (3) and (9).

Glare                             Poor vision                               Spectacles with shaded or special-purpose lenses, as suitable.
                                                                            See notes (9), (10).




                                    EYE AND FACE PROTECTION CHART
         Notes to Eye and Face Protection Chart:

         1.    Care should be taken to recognize the possibility of multiple and simultaneous exposure to a variety of
               hazards. Adequate protection against the highest level of each of the hazards should be provided.
               Protective devices do not provide unlimited shaded lenses are not filter lenses unless they are marked or
               identified as such protection.
         2.    Operations involving heat may also involve light radiation. As required by the standard, protection from
               both hazards must be provided.
         3.    Face shields should only be worn over primary eye protection (spectacles or goggles).
         4.    As required by the standard, filter lenses must meet the requirements for shade designations
               in 1910.133(a)(5). Tinted and shaded lenses are not filter lenses unless they are marked as such.
         5.    As required by the standard, persons whose vision requires the use of prescription (Rx) lenses must wear
               either protective devices fitted with prescription (Rx) lenses or protective devices designed to be worn over
               regular prescription (Rx) eyewear.
         6.    Wearers of contact lenses must also wear appropriate eye and face protection devices in a hazardous
               environment. It should be recognized that dusty and/or chemical environments may represent an additional
               hazard to contact lens wearers.
         7.    Caution should be exercised in the use of metal frame protective devices in electrical hazard areas.
         8.    Atmospheric conditions and the restricted ventilation of the protector can cause lenses to fog. Frequent
               cleansing may be necessary.
         9.    Welding helmets or face shields should be used only over primary eye protection (spectacles
               or goggles).
         10.   Non-sideshield spectacles are available for frontal protection only, but are not acceptable protection for the
               sources and operations listed for "impact".
         11.   Ventilation should be adequate, but well protected from splash entry. Eye and face protection should be
               designed and used so that it provides both adequate ventilation and protects the wearer from the splash
               entry.
         12.   Protection from light radiation is directly related to filter lens density. See note (4). Select the darkest
               shade that allows task performance.

                                                                                                                                  60
8C. Appendix C

Head Protection

Compliance with National Standards

All personal protective clothing and equipment must be of safe design and construction for the work to be
performed and must be maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition.

Only those items of protective clothing and equipment that meet ANSI (American National Standards Institute)
standards may be used.

Every hard hat conforming to the requirements of ANSI Z89.1-1986 must be appropriately marked to verify its
compliance. The following information must be marked inside the hat: Manufacture’s name; legend, “ANSI
Z89.1-1986; and, the class designation (A, B, or C).

Protective helmets purchased before July 5, 1994 must comply with the ANSI standard “American National
Standard Safety Requirement for Industrial Head Protection," ANSI Z89.1-1969.

Protective helmets purchased after September 1997 must comply with ANSI Z89.1-1997, “American National
Standard for Personnel Protection- Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers-Requirements.”

In 2003, ANSI published a revision to the Z89.1-1997 standard. The most significant changes from the 1997
version were made to harmonize with other national standards for head protection that test and evaluate
equipment performance. In addition, many physical requirements for helmet components that do not provide
added user value or that limited design or performance have been removed.

General Requirements

Each affected employee must wear protective helmets when working in areas where there is a potential for
injury to the head from falling objects or impact. Some examples of occupations for which head protection
should be routinely considered are: carpenters, electricians, linemen, mechanics and repairers, plumbers and
pipe fitters, welders, laborers, freight handlers, timber cutting and logging, warehouse operations, and
construction or renovation operations.

Protective helmets designed to reduce electrical shock hazard must be worn by each affected employee when
working near exposed electrical conductors which could contact the head.

Employees working at higher elevations must wear protective helmets with chinstraps. The chinstrap should be
designed to prevent the hard hat from being bumped off the employees’ head, but must not be so strong that
it presents a strangulation hazard.

Types of Head Protection

Description of Protective Helmets – 1997 Standard

Type 1 Helmets providing crown impact protection

Type 2 Helmets providing lateral impact protection

Class G General service, limited voltage. Intended for protection against impact hazard. Used in mining,
construction, and manufacturing. Provide electrical protection from low-voltage conductors (proof tested to
2,200 volts).

Class E Utility service, high voltage. Used by electrical workers and workers who also need protection from
falling objects. Provides electrical protection from high-voltage conductors (proof tested to 20,000 volts).

Class C Conductive – no electrical protection. Designed for lightweight comfort and impact protection. Used in
certain construction, manufacturing, refineries, and where there is a possibility of bumping the head against a
fixed object. This class of helmet may not be used around electrical hazards.
Bump Caps may be used when head (impact) protection isn’t required, but where an employee may be
exposed to minor head bumps or laceration hazards. Bump caps are not approved for use where impact
protection is required.

Storage and Care

If a helmet needs to be cleaned it should be scrubbed with a mild detergent and rinsed in clear water.

                                                                                                               61
After rinsing, the shell, straps and cradle should be carefully inspected for damage.

The shell, cradle, headbands, sweatbands, and accessories should be visually inspected daily for signs of
cracks, dents, damage, or wear that might reduce the protection of the device. Any helmet with worn,
damaged, or defective parts should be removed from service until the defective part has been replaced per the
manufacturer’s instructions.

Tar, paint, oils, and some chemicals can damage the shell and reduce protection.

Helmets should not be painted, and the manufacturer’s instructions should be consulted if tars, paints, or
similar materials need to be cleaned from the shell of the helmet.

Helmets must be worn properly and must be properly maintained to provide adequate protection.

Do not:
• Drill holes for added ventilation.
• Paint or inscribe the helmet
• Allow the helmet to be exposed to extreme temperatures or direct sunlight for long periods of time.
    Don’t, for example, store your helmet in the back window of your car.
• Wear the hard hat with the shell tilted to one side.
• Wear the hat backward (e.g., with the brim facing your back).
• Stickers can hide signs of deterioration in the hard hat shell and should not be placed on hard hats.


8D. Appendix D

Foot Protection

Compliance with National Standards

All personal protective clothing and equipment must be of safe design and construction for the work to be
performed and must be maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition.

Only those items of protective clothing and equipment that meet ANSI (American National Standards Institute)
standards may be used.

Protective footwear purchased after July 5, 1994 must comply with ANSI Z41.1-1991, "American National
Standard for Personal Protection-Protective Footwear".

Protective footwear purchased before July 5, 1994 must comply with the ANSI Standard "USA Standard for
Men’s Safety-Toe Footwear,” Z41.1-1967

General Requirements

Each affected employee must wear protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot
injury due to falling or rolling objects, chemical hazards, objects piercing the sole, or electrical hazards.

Employees who cannot wear safety shoes for medical reasons must furnish a letter to their supervisor from
their physician stating the reason and the anticipated duration of the condition. Employees must wear toe or
foot guards over regular work shoes until a proper safety shoe is purchased or the condition subsides. The
guards provided under these conditions must be furnished at no cost to the employee.

Protective guards, such as shoe-caps and metatarsal guards, are designed to slip over street shoes. Protective
guards are not recommended if an employee will frequently encounter foot hazards on the job. They are not
intended to replace steel-toed safety shoes or boots. There are no approved ANSI standards for protective
guards.

All footwear requires routine inspection for cuts, holes, tears, cracks, worn soles, and other damage that could
compromise its’ protective quality.

Types of Protective Footwear

There are three basic types of protective footwear:

•   General protective footwear that is worn in place of regular shoes or boots.

                                                                                                               62
•    Overshoes, which are worn over regular footwear.
•    Protective guards, or safety devices that are worn over regular shoes or boots.

The guidance provided in the Selection Chart for Foot and Leg Protection located at the end of this appendix
will assist you in selecting PPE appropriate for the hazards that you identify during the hazard assessment
process.

General Protective Footwear

The five main types of general protective footwear are:

1.   Safety Toe Shoe or Boot. These shoes are designed to protect feet from common hazards, such as
     falling or rolling objects, cuts, and punctures.

     The entire toe box and insole are reinforced with steel (or similar), and steel, aluminum, or plastic
     materials protect the instep.
     Safety shoes are also available that insulate against temperature extremes and/or are equipped with
     special soles to guard against slips, chemicals, and/or electrical hazards (see below).

     The shoe or boot may incorporate metatarsal protection, or a shield that protects the upper surface of the
     foot from impact or compression hazards. This type of footwear would generally be required for work
     around heavy pipes, activities involving manual material carts, or similar activities where heavy loads
     could drop on or roll over an employee’s feet.

     Safety boots offer more protection when splash or spark hazards (chemicals, molten materials) are
     present.

     Chemical protective safety shoes and boots may be required to prevent or minimize chemical penetration
     when working with corrosives, caustics, cutting oils, or petroleum products.

     Safety shoes and boots may need to be used in conjunction with other PPE to provide greater protection
     against some work site hazards. For example, when exposed to molten metals or welding sparks, protect
     the lower legs and feet from heat hazards by using leather leggings or similar PPE. Safety snaps allow
     leggings to be removed quickly.

2.   Conductive footwear – protects the wearer from static electricity by equalizing the differing electrical
     potentials.

     •   Type 1 conductive footwear controls static electricity generated on the body of the worker, thereby
         preventing sparks which could ignite nearby flammable gases or liquids.

     •   Type 2 conductive footwear is designed for linemen working with high-voltage lines where the
         electrical potential of the person and the energized equipment must be equalized.

     NOTE: Conductive shoes are not general-purpose shoes and must be removed upon completion of the
     tasks for which they are required.

     NOTE: Employees exposed to electrical hazards must never wear conductive shoes.
     Safety shoes and boots may need to be used in conjunction with other PPE to provide greater protection
     against some work site hazards. Conductive shoes are not general-purpose shoes and must be removed
     upon completion of the tasks for which they are required. Non-conductive footwear must not be used in
     explosive or hazardous locations.

     NOTE: Employees must be instructed not to use foot powder or wear socks made of silk, wool, or nylon
     with conductive shoes.

3.   Electrical hazard footwear – shoes or boots designed with non-conductive materials (other than the
     steel toe, which is properly insulated to protect the wearer, or a toe made from another material). This
     type of footwear insulates the worker from energized parts. It is intended for secondary protection only,
     for use on surfaces that are already substantially insulated.

     NOTE: Non-conductive footwear must not be used in explosive or hazardous locations; in such locations,
     electrically conductive shoes are required.

     NOTE: Employees using electrical hazard footwear must be trained to recognize that the insulating
     protection of electrical hazard, safety-toe shoes may be compromised if:


                                                                                                                63
     •   The shoe is wet
     •   The rubber sole is worn through
     •   Metal particles become embedded in the sole or heel; or
     •   Other parts of the employees' body come into contact with conductive grounded items.

4.   Sole puncture resistant footwear - provide protection from nails, wire, tacks, screws, large staples, or
     similar objects that, if stepped on, could penetrate the sole of the shoe and result in foot injury.

5.   Static dissipative footwear – insulates the wearer from electrical hazards that may exist in areas where
     static dissipative footwear is required.

Overboots

Overboots protect a worker’s boots and shoes from contact with acids, solvents, or other chemicals, or a dirty
or wet working environment. Overboots do not generally offer impact or compression protection, and may
need to be worn in conjunction with safety shoes to provide adequate protection against workplace hazards. If
chemical protection is required, assure the overboot is compatible with, and will provide adequate protection
against, the expected exposure.

Protective Guards

Protective guards consist of either shoe-caps or metatarsal guards. Protective guards can provide protection
from foot injury, but should not be used to replace steel-toed safety footwear. Protective guards can be used
where an employee is only occasionally exposed to foot hazards on the job.

Other Considerations

Other types of special footwear that may be required for an employee to perform their job safely include:
shoes with skid resistant soles, waterproof footwear, chemical-resistant footwear, and combinations thereof.
Foundry or “Gaiter” style boots, for example, feature quick-release fasteners or elasticized insets to allow quick
removal of the footwear if a hazardous substance or material (such molten metal) were to get into the boot
itself.

Storage and Care

Inspect safety footwear prior to each use. Defective or damaged personal protective equipment must not be
used. Remove the damaged equipment from service and report the condition to your supervisor. Follow the
manufacturer’s instructions for the care and maintenance of safety footwear.

Selection Chart for Foot and Leg Protection

The following chart provides general guidance for the proper selection of foot and leg protection for hazards
associated with the listed hazard “source” operations.




                                                                                                                64
                                   Selection Chart for Foot and Leg Protection
The following chart provides general guidance for the proper selection of foot and leg protection for hazards
associated with the listed hazard “source” operations.

                                                 Typical Occupations
              Source                                                                          Protection
                                                Requiring Protection
Impact – Heavy tools, equipment,        Construction, demolition, or             Safety shoes or boots. Toe guards
or heavy objects that might fall onto   renovation operations; plumbing;         may be used over regular footwear
the feet of an employee.                building maintenance; trenching;         if only if an employee is infrequently
                                        utility work; grass cutting; materials   exposed to this type of foot hazard.
                                        handling
Puncture – Work where wire,             Construction, demolition and             Safety shoes or boots with puncture
tacks, staples, metal, or mails could   renovatio0n operations; building         protection.
be stepped on by employees causing      maintenance.
a foot injury.
Compression – Handling of               Heavy materials handling, such as        Metatarsal footwear. Metatarsal
unusually heavy objects or using        work activities involving skid trucks    guards may be used over regular
heavy tools or equipment that           around heavy pipes; work using           footwear only if an employee is
present a compression hazard to the     jackhammer; pavement breaking.           infrequently exposed to this type of
top of the foot.                                                                 foot hazard. Shin guards may be
                                                                                 required for some operations where
                                                                                 the lower leg is exposed to a rolling
                                                                                 impact hazard.
Heat – Exposure to molten metal or      Furnace operations; pouring,             Foundry or heat resistant shoes or
other super-heated fluids.              casting, hot dipping, welding,           boots as appropriate. Leggings
                                        cutting and brazing.                     should be used as appropriate to
                                                                                 protect the lower legs from molten
                                                                                 metal or welding sparks.
Chemicals – Splash hazards or           Acid and chemical handling               Consult the manufacturer’s
direct contact/work with chemicals      degreasing, plating. Chemical spill      literature for a chemical resistant
                                        response.                                boot appropriate for the chemical
                                                                                 hazard. Footwear may need to
                                                                                 incorporate a safety toe if an impact
                                                                                 hazard is also present.
Conductive – Work near or in            Explosive manufacturing, grain           Conductive footwear.
explosive or hazardous atmospheres      milling, spray painting or similar
                                        work, with highly flammable
                                        materials.
Electrical – Work with or near          Building maintenance; utility work;      Electrical hazard footwear.
exposed energized electrical wiring     construction wiring work on or near
or components.                          communications; computer or
                                        similar equipment; and arc welding
                                        or resistance welding.


    8E. Appendix E

    Hand Protection

    Compliance with National Standards

    All personal protective clothing and equipment must be of safe design and construction for the work to be
    performed and must be maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition.

    Hand protection: There are no ANSI standards for glove selection. Glove selection, therefore, must be based
    on the performance characteristics of the glove in relation to the tasks to be performed.

    General Requirements

    The requirements outlined in this program are generally applicable to all College operations. Personnel who are
    involved in research and laboratory operations or that are exposed to blood or other potentially infectious
    agents, however, should consult the Chemical Hygiene Plan or Bloodborne Pathogens Programs, as
    appropriate, for additional requirements. Information on these programs may be obtained by contacting EHS.

    Supervisory personnel or the departmental PPE Coordinator must select and require employees to use
    appropriate hand protection when the employee’s hands are exposed to certain hazards. These hazards
    include, but are not limited to:


                                                                                                                    65
•   Work with harmful substances that can be absorbed through the skin or that can cause skin irritation,
chemical burns, or similar conditions. Examples would include strong acids or bases and organic solvents.
Consult the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for the product or chemical to determine the type of hand
protection that may be needed. Note that employees using these types of products outside of research
laboratories must be trained to read and interpret MSDS's. This training may be arranged through EHS.

•  Work with tools, equipment, or materials that can cause sever cuts, lacerations, punctures, fractures,
amputations, or abrasions.

•   Work where the employee is exposed to materials or agents that can cause thermal burns or that expose
the employee to harmful temperature extremes.

Selection

Hand protection must be selected based upon a review of the performance characteristics of the hand
protection relative to the task(s) to be performed, conditions present, duration of use, and the hazards and
potential hazards identified. General guidelines are as follows:

•   Most accidents involving hand and arms can be classified under four main hazard categories: chemical,
    abrasion, cut, and burns.

•   When protective hand wear is required for the job to be performed, make sure the gloves fit the employee
    well, are comfortable to wear, and are rated to guard against the particular hand hazards of the
    workplace.

•   When selecting gloves for protection against chemical hazards, the toxic properties of the chemical(s) and
    the ability of the chemical to penetrate through the glove must be determined. In particular, chemicals
    that can cause local effects on the skin and/or pass through the skin and cause systemic effects warrant a
    higher level of protection.

•   There are no gloves that provide protection against all potential hand hazards, and commonly available
    glove materials may provide only limited protection against many chemicals. It is important, therefore, to
    select the most appropriate glove for a particular application and to determine how long it can be worn
    and whether it can be reused. Note that as long as the performance characteristics of the glove are
    acceptable, in many cases it may be more cost effective to regularly change cheaper gloves than to reuse
    more expensive types.

•   Regardless of material or construction, no glove is completely puncture-proof, nor can any PPE be
    expected to take the place of proper engineering or work practice controls.

•   Before purchasing gloves, the supervisor or designated departmental representative should review the
    work activities of the employee to determine the degree of dexterity required, the duration, frequency,
    and degree of exposure of the hazard, and the physical stresses that will be applied.

•   Generally, any “chemical resistant” glove can be used for dry powders.

•   For mixtures and formulated products (unless specific test data is available), a glove should be selected on
    the basis of the chemical component with the shortest breakthrough time, since it is possible for solvents
    to carry active ingredients through some glove materials.

•   Employee must be able to remove the gloves in such a manner as to prevent skin contamination.

•   Store gloves at room temperature—never in extreme heat or cold.

•   Depending upon the material, some manufacturers may specify special storage requirements—check the
    accompanying literature or contact the supplier for information.

•   Train employees to inspect gloves carefully for discoloration, holes, tears, wear, or other imperfections
    prior to each use, and require them to report any damage immediately to their supervisor or other
    designated person..

•   PPE that is contaminated must be disposed of in a manner that will protect employees from exposure to
    the hazard. Specific questions on disposal requirements should be addressed to EHS.



                                                                                                                66
Types of Hand Protection

Five general glove types are available: chemical resistant, disposable, cut or abrasion resistant, temperature
resistant, or combinations thereof.

Chemical Resistant Gloves

These gloves may be made of rubber, neoprene, polyvinyl alcohol, vinyl, or other materials. The glove protects
hands from corrosives, oils, and solvents.

The selection of the proper chemical-resistant glove begins with an evaluation of the type of work to be
performed and the chemical(s) that will be contacted by the employee.

Factors that will influence selection are:

•   The type of chemical(s) to be handled or used.
•   Frequency and duration of chemical contact.
•   Whether the contact will involve total immersion or splash hazards.
•   Concentration of the chemical(s).
•   Temperature of the chemical(s).
•   Abrasion or resistance requirements.
•   Puncture, snag, tear, and cut-resistance.
•   Area to be protected, and whether it involves only the hand, or if it also includes the forearm and/or arm
    (see section on Other Considerations).
•   The amount of finger or hand dexterity that may be required to do the work.
•   Grip requirements, or how well the glove needs to perform under dry, wet, or oily conditions.
•   Whether the glove needs to show a color change if it has become contaminated.
•   Thermal protection that may be required when handling, for example, cryogenic (i.e. very cold) or
    superheated materials or liquids.
•   Size and comfort requirements.
•   The price of the glove.

Different chemicals will affect the protective qualities of a glove in different ways. Select an appropriate glove
material based upon:

•   Permeation, or how quickly a chemical will pass through the glove material.
•   Breakthrough time, or the time it takes for the chemical to pass to the inside of the glove.
•   Degradation, or how the chemical will affect the physical properties of the glove material upon contact.
    Degradation can lead to softening, drying, swelling, shrinkage, or other undesirable side effects that could
    expose the employee to the chemical.

The type of chemical being used is the key factor for choosing the type of material from which the glove should
be made. Some of the more common chemical-resistant glove materials are:

•   Butyl. A synthetic rubber with good resistance to weathering and a wide variety of chemicals.
•   Neoprene. A synthetic rubber having chemical and wear-resistance properties superior to those of natural
    rubber.
•   Nitrile. A copolymer available in a wide range of acrylonitrile (propane nitrile) contents; chemical
    resistance and stiffness increases with higher acrylonitrile content.
•   Polyethylene. A fairly chemical-resistant material used as a freestanding film or a fabric coating.
•   Polyurethane. An abrasion-resistant rubber that is either coated into fabrics or formed into gloves or
    boots.
•   Polyvinyl alcohol. A water-soluble polymer that exhibits exceptional existence to many organic solvents
    that rapidly permeates most rubbers.
•   Polyvinyl chloride. A stiff polymer that is made softer and more suitable for protective clothing
    applications by the addition of plasticizers.
•   Rubber. A highly flexible and conforming material made from a liquid tapped from rubber plants.

General guidelines for selecting chemical-resistant gloves are listed in the Selection Chart for Chemical
Resistant Gloves located in Appendix H. Consult the manufacturer's literature or contact EHS for information
on the performance of the various classes of gloves versus specific chemicals.



                                                                                                                67
   Disposable Gloves

   Disposable gloves are typically discarded after a single wearing, and are not designed to provide long term
   chemical protection. General types of disposable gloves are:

   •   Fabric gloves, usually made of cotton or nylon. These gloves will not generally provide adequate
       chemical protection, but function well as glove liners.
   •   Nitrile gloves are more chemically resistant than latex or vinyl, and offer good dexterity, elasticity,
       abrasion resistance, and conform well to the shape of the hand.
   •   Latex gloves offer dexterity and conformity, but should only be used in situations involving minimal
       chemical handling or contact. Some employees may experience an allergic reaction to latex.
   •   Polyethylene gloves are generally loose fitting and provide a high degree of dexterity.
   •   Vinyl gloves are not as flexible as latex, but offer a looser, less binding fit, and somewhat better
        chemical resistance than latex.

   Cut and Abrasion-Resistant Gloves

   General types of cut and abrasion-resistant gloves are:

   •   Leather gloves are used to guard against injuries from abrasions, cuts, extreme temperatures, and
       sparks (such as occur when welding) or burn hazards. They may be used in combination with an insulated
       liner when working with electricity.
   •   Metal Mesh gloves are used to protect hands from accidental cuts and scratches from extremely sharp
       objects such as cutting tools or knives.
   •   Kevlar ® gloves offers exceptional abrasion and burn resistance.
   •   Aluminized Gloves. Gloves made of aluminized fabric are designed to insulate hands from intense heat.
       Persons working with molten materials most commonly use these gloves.
   •   Fabric gloves, usually made from cotton or nylon, do not offer much protection against sharp-edged
       objects, and may present a snag hazard.

   These gloves are generally used to protect from hands from minimal abrasion hazards, or contact with dirt,
   grease, or other contaminants.

   Temperature-Resistant Gloves

   General types of temperature-resistant gloves are:

   •   Leather is a natural insulator, and offers resistance to cuts and abrasion.
   •   Kevlar ® is cut and abrasion-resistant, and will withstand temperatures up to 600 o F.
   •   Cotton terrycloth will work effectively at temperatures up to 600 o F, though dexterity may be a factor.
   •   Cryogenic gloves offer protection against extremely low temperatures, but are not suitable for immersion
       in liquid nitrogen or for use near open flames.
   •   Rubber offers protection against cold temperatures, but will not stand up well to heat.
   •   Other temperature-resistant gloves, including Nomex®, Zetex®, and Flextra®, are available. The
       manufacturer’s literature should be consulted for specific applications.

Other Considerations

   Glove Linings

   Glove linings will tend to improve comfort by absorbing perspiration, but may decrease dexterity.

   General types of linings consist of:

   •   Unlined gloves offer greater sensitivity and dexterity.
   •   Flock linings, or linings of shredded fibers, improve absorption of perspiration.
   •   Knit linings absorb perspiration, and may improve temperature protection.
   •   Jersey linings are generally more comfortable and provide better cushioning than other linings.
   •   Foam linings may be used to improve temperature protection for hot or cold conditions.
   •   Wool linings are natural insulators used outdoors for warmth in cold temperatures.




                                                                                                                 68
Glove length

• Finger cots -- worn on the fingers alone when only minimal protection is required, such as when handling
small parts that do not present a hazard to the rest of the hand.
• Wrist length (9-14”) – protects both the hand and wrist from exposure.
• Elbow length (14-18”) – provide protection if the hand must be immersed in a liquid or extra splash
protection, and also shields the forearm from heat hazards, abrasions, or chemicals.
• Shoulder length (30-31”) – protects the entire arm from exposure.
Cuff style

•   Rolled cuffs – provide a barrier to keep chemicals on the glove from running onto your skin.
•   Straight cuffs – provide extra length and a snug fit to protect from chemical run-off.
•   Slip-on or open cuffs – make it easier to put on and take off the glove.
•   Safety cuffs – provide additional wrist protection, and improve cut and abrasion resistance.
•   Gauntlet-style cuffs – support a looser fit, and allow greater movement of the forearm to improve
    comfort.
•   Knit wrist cuffs – improve the fit of the glove at the opening to prevent materials from entering the
    glove.

8F. Appendix F

Protective Clothing and Body Protection
Compliance with National Standards

All personal protective clothing and equipment must be of safe design and construction for the work to be
performed, and it must be maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition.

Standards are not currently available for all types of protective clothing or body protection. Where such
standards do exist, only those items of protective clothing and equipment that meet NIOSH, ANSI, ASTM, or
NFPA standards, as appropriate, may be used. Questions regarding the suitability of a specific item for a given
hazard should be referred either to the manufacturer or EHS.

General Requirements

An overview of protective clothing required to conduct research operations is provided in the NCF Chemical
Hygiene Plan. Information on this program may be obtained by contacting EHS.

Information on protective clothing required for work involving infectious materials or bloodborne pathogens
may be obtained by contacting EHS.

Protective clothing that is subject to contamination with toxic or hazardous substances may not be removed
from the work area, and must be disposed of properly and in a manner that protects employees from exposure
to the hazard.

If you expect to use protective clothing in the above manner, contact for guidance prior to beginning work.

Care should be exercised in protective clothing selection, since some protective clothing has very limited
resistance to chemicals or fire.

Consult the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) to determine the recommended clothing for a particular
chemical or chemical mixture.

The department must provide body protection for employees if they are threatened with bodily injury while
performing their jobs, and if engineering, work practice, and administrative controls have failed to eliminate
these hazards. Workplace hazards that could cause bodily injury include the following:
• Exposure to intense heat or cold. Note that cold weather clothing is generally considered to be normal
    wear clothing and is not covered by this program.
• Splashes of very cold or very hot metals or liquids.
• Impacts from tools, machinery, or materials.
• Cuts and/or abrasion.
• Exposure to hazardous chemicals.
• Contact with potentially infectious materials like blood.
                                                                                                                 69
•   Radiation.
•   Exposure to electrical arc hazards.

Types of Clothing and Body Protection

As with all protective equipment, protective clothing is available to protect against specific hazards. The
department is required to provide personal protective clothing/equipment only for the parts of the body
exposed to possible injury.

The protective clothing provided must be constructed of material that will protect against the specific hazards
in the workplace. Materials used in protective clothing include the following:

•   Paper-like fiber. Disposable suits made of this material provide protection against dust and varying
    protection against splash hazards. Disposable suits may be coated with a material to increase chemical or
    water resistance. Uncoated disposable suits are typically only suitable for protection from contamination
    with particulate hazards (e.g., asbestos or lead).
•   Treated wool and cotton. Protective clothing made from treated wool and cotton adapts well to
    changing workplace temperatures and is comfortable as well as fire resistant. Treated cotton and wool
    clothing protects against dust, abrasions, and rough and irritating surfaces.
•   Duck. This closely woven cotton fabric protects employees against cuts and bruises while they handle
    heavy, sharp, or rough materials.
•   Leather. Leather protective clothing is often used to protect against dry heat and flame such as are
    encountered during grinding and welding operations.
•   Rubber, rubberized fabrics, neoprene, and plastics. Protective clothing made from these materials
    protects against certain acids and chemicals.
•   Specialized protective clothing may incorporate Kevlar for cut resistance (for example, chainsaw
    chaps), aluminized coatings for protection from radiant heat, and flame-retardant or resistant coatings or
    materials.
•   Electrical hazard clothing. Special clothing may be required for persons exposed to electrical arc
    hazards and/or extreme temperatures resulting from an electrical arc. This clothing is nonconductive and
    contains no metal hardware. Extreme exposure may necessitate use of an ultraviolet/infrared flash hood.
•   Cooling vests or jackets. Cooling vests or jackets provide protection from heat exhaustion or heat stoke
    when employees work in very hot environments or conditions.

Be aware that different materials will protect against different chemical and physical hazards. When chemical
or physical hazards are present, check with the clothing manufacturer to make sure that the material selected
will provide protection from the specific chemical or physical hazards in your workplace or contact EHS for
guidance.

Many types of protective clothing restrict airflow and impede perspiration. The risk of heat exhaustion or heat
stroke, therefore, may be greatly increased with some types of protective clothing. Employee training on the
symptoms of heat stress and the use of engineering controls (e.g., increasing ventilation), administrative
controls (e.g., employee rotation), and personal protective equipment (e.g., cooling vests) may be essential to
assuring employee safety in hot work environments.

8G. Appendix G

Fall Protection, Hearing Protection, Respiratory Protection, and Electrical Protective Devices

Fall Protective Devices

EHS administers the College’s Fall Protection Program. Only personnel that have been trained by EHS or other
approved sources may perform work requiring the use of fall protective devices. Personnel that perform work
on a surface with an unprotected side or edge that is 6 feet or more above a lower level, or 10 feet or more on
scaffolds, must be protected from falling by the use of guardrails, safety nets, or personal fall arrest systems.
The exact requirements for when fall protective devices are required are outlined in the EHS Fall Protection
brochure.

The use of body belts for fall protection and the use of non-locking snaphooks are prohibited as of
January 1, 1998.

If it can be determined that an employee is exposed to potential fall hazards during the hazard assessment
process, the supervisor must contact EHS for guidance.
Hearing Protective Devices



                                                                                                              70
EHS administers the College’s Hearing Conservation Program. A copy of the Hearing Conservation Program
may be obtained by contacting EHS or visiting the EHS web site as listed in the “Departments” directory of the
College’s home page. Noise measurements must be made to determine if employees are being overexposed
and to identify the machines or work processes that are contributing to the exposure. If it is discovered that a
worker is exposed to an excessive amount of noise, these measurements are needed to determine the proper
hearing protection device (HPD) that needs to be used and if engineering and/or administrative controls need
to be implemented. Accurate exposure measurements are also needed so that the affected employee(s) can
be included in the Hearing Conservation Program if they are exposed to excessive noise levels. If it can be
determined that an employee may be exposed to excessive noise levels based upon the hazard assessment
that is performed, contact EHS for guidance. Until such time as the evaluation has been performed, the
potentially exposed employee must be provided with hearing protective devices to limit his or her exposure.

Respiratory Protective Devices

EHS administers the College’s Respiratory Protection Program. NCF employees will be included in the
Respiratory Protection when it is suspected that they are exposed to respiratory hazards that cannot be
alleviated with engineering controls (e.g. ventilation, process confinement, or material substitutions).
Respirators may be used only in cases where alternative controls are not feasible or are in the process of being
implemented. Services that pertain specifically to the respiratory protection program include medical
evaluation, fit testing, hazard monitoring, training and the placing of orders for equipment. These services are
provided only when entry into the respiratory protection program is required due to hazards in the workplace.
Respiratory protection will be required if it is determined that airborne contaminants which pose a health
hazard are present in the workplace. If it is suspected that an employee may be exposed to a chemical or
particulate (e.g., dust) respiratory hazard based upon the hazard assessment performed, contact EHS for
guidance.

Electrical Protective Devices

If an employee performs premise wiring or other electrical work on exposed energized electrical conductors,
they must abide by the requirements outlined in NCF's Electrical Safety Program. These employees must be
trained to the level of qualified person, use appropriate lockout and tagout procedures, and use appropriate
electrical protective devices. Information on the electrical safety program, Lockout/Tagout program, and
electrical protective devices may be obtained by contacting EHS.

8H. Appendix H

Glove Selection Chart for Chemical Compatibility




                                                     NFPA               Natural        Recommended
                                                     Health             Rubber           Alternate
Chemical Name                                        Rating   Nitrile    Latex            Material

ACETALDEHYDE                                           3         P        G
ACETIC ACID (GLACIAL)                                  3         F        G
ACETIC ANHYDRIDE                                       3         F        G
ACETONE                                                1         F        G
ACETONITRILE                                           2         F        F               Butyl (E)
ACRYLIC ACID                                           3         G        G
AMMONIUM ACETATE                                                 E        E
AMMONIUM CARBONATE                                               E        E
AMMONIUM FLUORIDE, 30-70%                              3         E        E
AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE,30-70%                                        E        E
AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE, <30%                                         E        E
AMYL ALCOHOL                                           1         E        G
ANILINE                                                3         F        G
AQUA REGIA                                                       P        P             Neoprene (F)
AZT                                                                       G
BENZALDEHYDE                                           2         P        F               Butyl (E)
BENZENE                                                2         F        P               Viton (G)
BORIC ACID                                                       E        G
BROMOPROPIONIC ACID                                              F        G
BUTYL ACRYLATE                                         2         P        P               Teflon (G)
BUTYL CELLUSOLVE                                                 G        G
                                                                                                               71
CALCIUM HYDROXIDE                     E   E
CARBON DISULFIDE                  3   G   P
CARBON TETRACHLORIDE              3   P   P         Viton (G)
CHLOROBENZENE                     2   P   P         Viton (G)
CHLORODIBROMOMETHANE                  P   P         Viton (G)
CHLOROFORM                        2   P   P   Polyvinyl Alcohol (G)
CHLORONAPTHALENES                 1   P   P         Viton (G)
CHROMIC ACID                      3   F   P            (G)
CISPLATIN                             G   G
CITRIC ACID, 30-70%                   E   E
CYCLOHEXANE                       1   E   P
CYCLOHEXANOL                      1   E   G
CYCLOHEXANONE                     1   P   P        Butyl (G)
CYCLOHEXYLAMINE                   3   P   P
DI-N-AMYLAMINE                    3   E   P
DI-N-BUTYLAMINE                   3   E   P
DI-N-BUTYLPHTHALATE               0   E   F
DI-N-OCTYLPHTHALATE               0   E   F
DIACETONE ALCOHOL                 1   G   F
DIALLYLAMINE                          P   P        Viton (G)
DICHLOROACETYL CHLORIDE           3   P   P        Viton (G)
DIESEL FUEL                       0   E   P
DIETHANOLAMINE                    1   E   E
DIETHYLAMINE                      3   G   F
DIETHYLENE GLYCOL                 1   E   E
DIETHYLENETRIAMINE                3   P   P      Neoprene (G)
DIISOBUTYL KETONE                 1   G   P
DIISOBUTYLAMINE                   3   E   P
DIMETHYL ETHER                        G   P
DIMETHYL SULFOXIDE (DMSO)         1   G   E
DIMETHYLACETAMIDE                 2   F   G
DIMETHYLFORMAMIDE (DMF)           1   P   P        Butyl   (G)
1, 3-DIOXANE                          P   F        Butyl   (G)
1, 4-DIOXANE                      2   P   P        Butyl   (G)
EPICHLOROHYDRIN                   3   P   F        Butyl   (G)
ETHANOL                           0   G   G
ETHYL ACETATE                     1   P   F        Butyl (G)
ETHYL ETHER                       1   G   P
ETHYLENE GLYCOL DIMETHYL ETHER    2   F   F         Butyl (G)
ETHYLENE DICHLORIDE               2   P   P   Polyvinyl Alcohol (E)
ETHYLENE GLYCOL                   1   E   E
FORMALDEHYDE, 30-70%              3   E   G
FORMIC ACID                       3   G   E
FREON 113 OR TF                       E   P
FREON TMC                             F   F   Polyvinyl Alcohol (E)
FURFURAL                          3   P   P         Butyl (G)
GASOLINE, 40-50% AROMATICS        1   E   P
GASOLINE, UNLEADED                1   G   P
GLUTARALDEHYDE, <5%                   G   G
GLYCEROL                              E   E
HEPTANES                          1   E   P
HEXANE                            1   E   P
HYDRAZINE                         3   E   F
HYDROCHLORIC ACID, <30%           3   G   E
HYDROCHLORIC ACID, 30-70%             G   G
HYDROFLUORIC ACID,<10%            4   G   G
ISOBUTYL ALCOHOL                  1   E   P
ISOOCTANE                         0   E   P
ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL                 1   E   E
ISOPROPYLAMINE                    3   P   P        Teflon (G)
JET FUEL <30% AROMATICS 73-248C   1   G   P
KEROSENE                              E   P

                                                                      72
LACTIC ACID                           E   E
LAURIC ACID                           E   E
MALATHION,30-70%                      G
MALEIC ACID                           G   G
METHANOL                          1   F   F      Neoprene (G)
METHYL ACETATE                    1   P   P         Butyl (G)
METHYL ETHYL KETONE               1   P   P         Butyl (E)
METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE            2   P   P         Butyl (G)
METHYL METHACRYLATE               2   P   P   Polyvinyl Alcohol (E)
METHYLENE CHLORIDE                2   P   P   Polyvinyl Alcohol (G)
AMYL ACETATE                      1   F   P         Butyl (G)
BUTYL ACETATE                     1   F   P         Butyl (G)
BUTYL ALCOHOL                     1   E   E
N-METHYL-2-PYRROLIDONE            2   P   E
N-NITROSODIETHYLAMINE                 P            Butyl (G)
PROPYL ALCOHOL                        E   E
NAPHTHA, 15-20% AROMATICS             E   P
NAPHTHA , <3% AROMATICS           1   E   P
NITRIC ACID, <30%                 3   G   G
NITRIC ACID, 30-70%               3   P   P      Neoprene (G)
NITROBENZENE                      3   F   F        Butyl (G)
NITROETHANE                       1   P   G
1-NITROPROPANE                    1   P   F        Butyl (G)
2-NITROPROPANE                    1   P   P        Butyl (G)
OCTANE                            0   G   P
OCTYL ALCOHOL                     1   E   E
OLEIC ACID                        0   E   G
OXALIC ACID                       3   E   E
PALMITIC ACID                         G   F
PCB (POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS)   2   G   P
PENTACHLOROPHENOL                 3   G   P
PENTANE                           1   E   P
PERCHLORIC ACID, 30-70%           3   F   F      Neoprene (F)
PERCHLOROETHYLENE                 2   G   P
PEROXYACETIC ACID                     P   P        Butyl (G)
PETROLEUM ETHERS, 80-110C         1   G   P
PHENOL                            4   F   F           (F)
PHOSPHORIC ACID                   3   G   F
PICRIC ACID                       3   E   G
POTASSIUM HYDROXIDE               3   E   G
POTASSIUM IODIDE                      G   G
PROPYL ACETATE                    1   F   P        Butyl (F)
PYRIDINE                          3   P   P        Butyl (G)
SODIUM CARBONATE                      E   E
SODIUM CHLORIDE                       E   E
SODIUM FLUORIDE                   3   G   G
SODIUM HYDROXIDE,30-70%           3   G   E
SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE                   E   E
SODIUM THIOSULFATE                    G   G
STYRENE                           2   P   P   Polyvinyl Alcohol (G)
SULFURIC ACID, <70%               3   F   G
SULFURIC ACID, >70%               3   P   P        Butyl (G)
TANNIC ACID                       0   G   G
1,1,1,2-TETRACHLOROETHANE             F   P        Viton (G)
TETRAHYDROFURAN                   2   F   P        Teflon (G)
TOLUENE                           2   F   P        Viton (G)
TOLUENE-2,4-DIISOCYANATE (TDI)    3   P   P        Butyl (G)
1,2,4-TRICHLOROBENZENE            2   F   P        Teflon (G)
1,1,1-TRICHLOROETHANE             2   P   P        Viton (G)
1,1,2-TRICHLOROETHANE             2   P   P        Viton (G)
TRICHLOROETHYLENE                 2   P   P        Viton (G)
TRICRESYL PHOSPHATE               2   G   G


                                                                      73
TRIETHANOLAMINE                                           2        E         E
TURPENTINE                                                1        E         P
XYLENES                                                   2        F         P               Viton (G)


[top]
The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has developed a system for indicating the health hazards of
chemicals:
    4     Danger, may be fatal on short exposure. Specialized protective equipment required.

    3     Warning, corrosive or toxic.

    2     Warning, may be harmful if inhaled or absorbed.

    1     Caution, may be irritating.

    0     No unusual hazard.

          No information available. Avoid skin contact or inhalation..


The compatibility of the glove films with each chemical is color coded as follows:
    P     POOR chemical resistance

    F     FAIR chemical resistance

  G-E     GOOD to EXCELLENT chemical resistance


 8I. Appendix I

 Who Pays for PPE?
 Protective equipment, including personal protective equipment for eyes, face, head and extremities, protective
 clothing, respiratory devices, and protective shields and barriers, must be provided, used, and maintained in a
 sanitary and reliable condition.

 The supervising department must provide most types of PPE at no cost to the employee.

 PPE that is very personal in nature and that can be worn off the jobsite— specifically some types of safety
 footwear and safety eyewear—may be partially or fully funded at the discretion the department.

 It is recommended that each department maintain a uniform policy for reimbursement of safety footwear and
 eyewear.

 Departments are encouraged to fully reimburse the cost of safety footwear and eyewear. This will assure that
 adequate and appropriate PPE is provided to and will be used by the employee.

 If the department elects to reimburse only a portion or none of the cost of safety footwear or eyewear, it is
 recommended that the requirement that the employee provide this PPE be included in the position description
 and that this requirement be fully explained during the interview process.

 Safety Footwear

 Specialized safety footwear, such as electrical protective, conductive, chemical resistant, foundry/heat
 resistant footwear or footwear with metatarsal protection must be provided at no cost to the employee.
 Reimbursement for the purchase of all other types of safety footwear is at the discretion of the department.

 If the department elects to reimburse none or only a portion of the cost of safety footwear, remember that the
 department PPE Coordinator is still obligated to assure the adequacy of this PPE for the hazards to which the
 wearer is exposed.

 Safety Eyewear

 Specialized safety eyewear, such as prescription lenses that are fitted to full-face respirators, laser protective
 eyewear, welding helmets, and face shields, must be provided at no cost to the employee. Reimbursement for
 impact resistant prescription safety eyewear is at the discretion of the department.
 If the department elects to reimburse none or only a portion of the cost of safety eyewear, remember that the
 department PPE Coordinator is still obligated to assure the adequacy of this PPE for the hazards to which the
 wearer is exposed.

                                                                                                                 74
                          PPE Certification of Hazard Assessment
Dept:                     Area:                          Job Classification/Task:

HAZARDS (Circle           Describe Specific Hazards      Identify Type of PPE Required for the
Hazards)                                                 Hazards
Eye Hazard
Impact      Penetration
Dust
Chemical    Radiation
Heat
Bioaerosols Projectiles

Head Hazard               Describe Specific Hazards      PPE Required
Burn        Electric
Shock
Impact      Penetration
Chemical    Overhead
loads
Overhead beams

Foot Hazard               Describe Specific Hazards      PPE Required
Chemical Impact
Electrical
Sharp Objects (puncture
risk)
Wet Conditions
Construction

Hand Hazard               Describe Specific Hazards      PPE Required
Burn       Electric
Shock
Impact     Penetration
Chemical Sharp Edges
Biological Agents

Other Safety/Health       Describe Specific Hazards
Hazards
Falls         Guarding
Heat
Electrical    Storage
Lockout       Noise
Respiratory   Clothing

I, ____________________________, conducted the above evaluation of the identified work area
print name
               date
                                                      (Signature)




                                                                                                 75
I. Machine Guarding

  1. Purpose
  Shops for carpentry, metal-working and finishing, heating, ventilating and air conditioning, electrical
  work, machinery, plumbing, electronics, glassblowing, printing, scenery, musical instrumentation, and
  artistry, present special hazards for New College of Florida employees assigned to such areas. The
  operation of powered machinery, hand tools and powered tools in these shops can result in a variety of
  serious accidents.

  NCF shall take every precaution to protect its employees against possible injury from machinery, while
  in the vicinity of the machinery or while in the process of operating the machinery. Personnel shall be
  trained in the safe use of hand tools, power tools and other machinery, and counseled to take every
  precaution to prevent accidents. Personnel shall be properly supervised and provided the correct type of
  equipment, personal protective devices and safely guarded machinery to perform their assigned tasks.

  2. General Requirements
  Electrical Power/Controls
  Each machine must be equipped with a master switch that can be locked and tagged during repair or
  maintenance operations.
  Power controls and operating controls must be located within easy reach of the operator at his/her regular
  work station. Controls should be brightly marked and easily identified allowing the operator to cut off power at
  the point of operation.
  Each machine must be provided with an appropriate electrical ground.
  A trip device must be provided on machinery where injury might result if motors were to restart after power
  failures. This prevents the machine from operating when electric service is restored.
  Main "kill" switches should be centrally installed, easily identified and accessible to shop supervisors or co-
  workers for use in interrupting power in emergency situations.

  Guarding
  Appropriate guards must be provided to protect the operator and other employees from hazards such as
  exposed belts, pulleys, sheaves, drive shafts, drive couplings, chains rotating parts, flying chips and sparks.
  No employee shall operate and/or cause to be operated, any machinery without proper protective devices in
  place.
  Combs (featherboards) or suitable jigs must be provided for use when a standard guard cannot be used as in
  dadoing, grooving, jointing, moulding and rabbeting.

  Personal Protective Equipment
  Appropriate eye protection must be worn by all machine operators and helpers where the operation of the
  machine may produce flying objects or dust.
  Hearing protection must be utilized for jobs that involve the risk of loss of hearing as specified in the NCF
  Hearing Conservation Program.
  Personnel must not wear loose fitting clothing or neckties while operating shop equipment. Gloves, rings, neck
  chains and other jewelry can be hazardous and must not be worn while operating or working on moving
  machinery. Long hair must be restrained to prevent poor visibility and being caught in the machinery.
  Personnel are encouraged to wear heavy aprons when operating machinery that may produce kickbacks of
  stock.

  Housekeeping
  Metal slivers, sawdust and other debris should be cleaned from the machine using a brush or rag. Never use
  bare hands for the task. NEVER clean a machine while it is in motion.
  Compressed air may be used for cleaning purposes only where reduced to less than 30 P.S.I. Eye protection
  must be worn while using compressed air to clean equipment.
  Oily rags, waste, and other materials saturated with combustible substances must be disposed of in approved
  metal containers equipped with self-closing lids. These containers should be clearly marked for disposal of oily
  waste materials and must be emptied on a daily basis.
  Local exhausts should be installed on machines where large amounts of dust are produced, such as sanders
  and planers.
  Safety zones surrounding machines should be established and marked. Machines should be spaced to allow for
  the establishment of safety zones.

  Lockout and Tagging
  Before any maintenance is attempted, the machine must be completely shut down and the control switch
  locked and tagged by the person performing the repairs, following the NCF Lock Out Tag Out Program. This will
  prevent accidental starting during the repair process.


                                                                                                                76
Training
Machines must be operated only by those personnel thoroughly trained by the supervisor in the operation of
the specific piece of equipment. All manufacturer’s operation manuals and diagrams should be kept by the
shop supervisor and made available to employees responsible for operating the machine. The shop supervisor
should contact the manufacturers in writing or contact the Department of Environmental Health and Safety if
insufficient information on the machinery could result in unsafe operations.
Shop supervisors are responsible for constant observation of shop practices to ensure that all safety
regulations are being followed. When unsafe acts are noted, it is the supervisor's responsibility to ensure that
they are corrected and do not recur.
A safety procedure should be written for each machine, kept by the shop supervisor, and made available to
operators. This procedure should include, but not be limited to:
• Clearing the operating area of obstructions. Designating the dimensions of a "safety" zone for the machine
     being used;
• Specifying the personal protection devices required during operation of the machine or when assisting the
     operator within the machine operating zone;
• Removing or checking for the wearing of loose fitting clothing, long free-flowing hair, jewelry, such as
     rings and neck chains, neckties or any other wearing apparel that would increase the risk of accidents;
• Inspection of the machine prior to each start. This should include:
          o check of operating controls;
          o check of safety devices;
          o check of power drives, sharpness of cutting edges and other parts which are to be used. Any
               deficiencies noted must be corrected prior to operating the equipment.

3. Machines used for both Wood-Working and Metal-Working
Buffing and Wire Brushing Wheels
Operators must wear eye protection when using buffing wheels, in order to protect against the dust particles
generated during the buffing operation. Goggles are preferred where the buffing operation is likely to produce
large amounts of dust.
Operating wire brushing wheels can be especially hazardous because the wires tend to break off during
operation, becoming high speed missiles. Goggles or face shields and leather gloves must be worn when
operating wire brushing wheels. Use of an apron is encouraged to allow greater body protection.

Drill Presses
The most common causes of injury in drilling operations are: coming in contact with the drill bit; being struck
by insecurely clamped materials being worked on; flying metal chips, or wood shavings; leaving the key in the
chuck; and brushing shavings away with the bare hand.
General requirements include:
•    Stock must be properly secured to the press to prevent accidental movement during drilling;
•    The operator must not attempt to make measurements near the tool, reach across the table, or adjust the
     machine or stock while the machine is in motion;
•    Operators and assistants must wear eye protection when operating or within close proximity of the drill
     press when it is being operated;
•    All power transmission parts must be effectively guarded. A spring-safety guard is recommended to guard
     the drill bit and catch metal slivers and wood chips.

Lathes
•   The most common cause of injury in lathe operations are: contact with projections on work or stock;
    flying metal chips or wood shavings; hand braking the machine; leaving the key in the chuck; and
    catching loose clothing or wiping rags in the revolving parts.
•   General requirements include:
•   Operators and assistant must wear eye protection when operating the lathe or within close proximity of
    the lathe during operation;
•   Operators must allow lathes to stop of their own accord. Hand pressure should never be used to stop
    spinning chucks after power has been turned off;
•   Each exposed power transmission part must be effectively guarded for complete operator protection;
•   Operators must avoid taking deep cuts when working with wood since this can result in the cutting tool
    being forcibly ejected;
•   Operators must not wear loose clothing, long hair and jewelry that may become tangled in the revolving
    parts of the machinery;
•   Stock must not be measured or calibrated while the lathe is in motion;
•   Cutting heads must be covered as completely as possible by metal hoods or shields. The guard should be
    designed in such a manner as to allow easy access to make adjustments to the stock or cutting head.
    Where an exhaust system is used, the metal guard must form part or all of the exhaust hood.




                                                                                                             77
4. Metal-Working Machines

Milling Machines
•    Most milling machine accidents occur when operators unload or make adjustments. Examples include:
     failure to draw the job back to a safe distance when loading or unloading; leaving the cutter to remove
     chips while the machine is in motion; and using incorrectly dressed cutters.
•    General requirements include:
•    Eye protection must be worn while operating such machinery;
•    Shims, blocks and clamps must be used to hold stock in place. The operator must make certain that such
     clamping devices are mounted low enough to clear the arbor and cutter;
•    The table must be lowered before backing work under a revolving cutter;
•    Adjustments must not be made to the speed of the machine, the rate of feed or coolant flow, or other
     function, while the machine is in operation. If the machine is equipped with hand-adjusting wheels, they
     must be mounted on the shaft by clutches or ratchet devices, so that the wheels do not revolve when the
     automatic feed is used;
•    Horizontal machines must have a splash guard and pans for catching thrown cutting lubricant and
     lubricant running from the tools;
•    Hand tools must not be left on the worktable at any time;
•    Operators must not reach around cutters to remove metal chips or debris. Brushes should be used to
     clean machines.

Metal Shapers
•  The most common causes of injury in shaping operations are: placing the hand or fingers between
   the tool and work; running the bare hand over sharp metal edges; measuring the job while the
   machine is running; and failing to clamp the work or tools securely before starting the cut.
•  General safety procedures include:
•  Eye protection must be worn when operating power presses;
•  Mechanical presses containing full revolution clutches must incorporate a single stroke device and
   an anti-repeat mechanism into the press system;
•  Pressure on hydraulic presses must be bled off and switches locked out before maintenance is
   performed;
•  Point of operation guards must protect the operator by one of the following methods:
   o   by preventing and/or stopping' normal stroking of the press if the operator's hands are
       inadvertently placed in the point of operation;
   o   by preventing the operator from inadvertently reaching into the point of operation;
   o   by designing the controls such that the operator must use both hands to operate the press and
       locating the controls at a safe distance from the point of operation;
   o   by enclosing the point of operation before a press stroke can be initiated.
•  Hand tools must be used to free and remove stuck work or scrap pieces from the die. This should
   never be attempted with hands.
•  A regular inspection program must be established and maintained to ensure that all parts, auxiliary
   equipment and safeguards are in good repair and properly adjusted.

5. Wood-Working Machines

Band Saws
•  The most common type of injury associated with band saws results when the operator's hand(s) make
   contact with the saw blade.
•  General regulations for the use of band saw include:
•  Eye protection must be worn when operating band saws;
•  The cutting edge of the blade must be completely enclosed by an adjustable guard, except at the point of
   operation.
•  Both upper and lower drive wheels must be completely enclosed by solid metal, woven wire mesh or
   expanded sheet metal and securely fastened to the metal framework.
•  Each saw must be provided with a tension control device to ensure proper operating tension at all times.
•  Effective brakes must be provided to stop the wheel in case of blade breakage.
•  The operator must use extreme caution to ensure that his hands do not come in contact with the saw
   blade during operation.

Circular Saws
•   Table saws, radial arm saws, overhead swing saws, straight line pull cutoff saws, electrical miter saws and
    other machines containing circular saw blades are included in this section.
•   Circular saw operators are most frequently injured when their hands slip off the stock while pushing it into
    the saw, or when holding the hands too close to the blade during the cutting operations. Injuries involving
    kickbacks are also quite common.
•   General regulations include:

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•   Eye protection must be worn when operating circular saws;
•   Table saws must be equipped with a guard which protects the portion of the saw above the table. The
    guard must automatically adjust itself to the thickness of the material being cut in order to provide
    continuous protection from the blade.
•   Table saws (unless self-fed with rollers or a wheel in the back of the saw) must be provided with a
    spreader fastened securely behind the saw. Circular ripsaws must be provided with sectional non-kickback
    fingers or dogs.
•   The part of the saw blade underneath the table must be completely enclosed.
•   Swing saws, radial saws and cutoff saws must be designed to return gradually and automatically to the
    starting position when released by the operator.
•   Stock must be held against a gage, never sawed freehand. Freehand sawing endangers the hands and
    may cause work to get out of line and bind on the saw.
•   The operator should stand out of the line of the stock he is ripping to avoid being injured by kick backs. A
    heavy leather or plastic apron or abdomen guard gives additional protection.
•   A circular saw should be stopped when the operator leaves it. Injuries have been caused by saws still
    coasting with the power off.

Sanding Machines
•  General requirements for personnel operating sanding machines including:
•  Eye protection must be worn by operators and assistants;
•  Dust respirators must be worn by those operating the machine, in close proximity of the operation, and/or
   when cleaning up;
•  Belt sanders must have guards placed at each in running nip point on the power transmission and feed roll
   parts;
•  The unused run of the sanding belt must be guarded.
•  Manually fed sanders must have a work rest which is used by the operator to support the work properly;
•  Sanding belts should be the same width as the pulley-drum, should be free of cracks and badly worn spots
   and frays, and should be adjusted tightly against the pulley-drum before use.

Jointers
•   Hand-feed jointers are one of the most dangerous machines in wood working shops. They are responsible
    for injuries caused when operators catch their hands and/or fingers on the knives, especially when short
    lengths of stock are being jointed.
•   General requirements for jointers include:
•   Operators must wear eye protection when working with the jointer;
•   The jointer blade should be guarded as work is fed into it. A guard which adjusts itself covering the table
    on the working side of the gage is recommended. The unused end of the gage should be enclosed at all
    times.
•   Push blocks with handles for both hands should be used for surfacing work or when jointing short pieces of
    stock.
•   Jointers should have rounded heads no deeper than 7/16 inch, no wider than 5/8 inch. The openings
    between the table and the head should be just large enough to clear the knife.
•   The clearance between the edge of the rear table and the cutter head must not be more than 1/8 inch.
    The table throat opening must not be more than 2 1/2 inches when tables are set with each other for zero
    cut.

Wood Shapers
•  Shapers can be dangerous when operator's hands come in contact with revolving knives. Severe accidents
   also result from broken knives thrown by the machine.
•  General requirements for shapers include:
•  Eye protection must be worn by operators;
•  The cutting heads of wood shapers must be enclosed with a cage or adjustable guard;
•  Knives must be of the best shaper steel and set by fully qualified installers;
•  Knives and the grooves in the collars must fit perfectly and be free of dust;
•  Knives must not be used after they are worn down to the middle point of the collar. Knives must be
   balanced perfectly;
•  Operators should avoid deep cuts and should start the work in short starts and stops, bringing the spindle
   up to operating speed slowly. The operator should listen for any evidence that the knives are out of
   balance;
•  There should be a braking device on the shaper to stop the spindle after the power is shut off;
•  Only a long-handled brush should be used to remove chips and dust from the blades;
•  Shaper work should be held against guide pins or a fence.

Planers
General regulations for the use of power-fed planers include:
• Operators and assistants must wear eye protection and dust respirators. It is recommended that hearing
protection if the planer is not sound insulated;

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  • Cutter heads must be completely enclosed in solid metal guards which should be kept closed when the
  planer is running;
  • All belts and pulleys should be completely enclosed on the backside of the planer;
  • Feed rolls must be guarded by a wide metal strip or bar keeping operator's fingers out of the rolls while
  allowing boards to pass. Sectional kickback finger devices must be provided in lieu of feed rolls;
  • The operator should stand out of the way of board travel.


J. Hearing Conservation

  1. Purpose
  It is the intent of New College of Florida (NCF) to provide every employee with a safe and healthful working
  environment. The administration at NCF feels that any faculty or staff members who, during the course of their
  employment activities, are exposed to noise greater than 85 decibels on the A scale (dBA) should be
  protected. Prevention of occupational hearing loss is the primary employee benefit from the Hearing
  Conservation Program (HCP). The HCP will also help to conserve the hearing ability of those workers who have
  been evaluated as having a noise-induced hearing loss.

  2. Definitions
  Action Level - An 8 hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 85 decibels measured on the A-scale (dBA),
  slow response, or equivalently, a dose of 50 percent.
  Audiogram - A chart, graph, or table resulting from an audiometric test showing an individual's hearing
  threshold levels as a function of frequency.
  Noise dosimeter - An instrument that integrates a function of sound pressure over a period of time in
  such a manner that it directly indicates a noise dose.
  Attenuate - To reduce or weaken.
  Standard threshold shift - A change in hearing threshold relative to the baseline audiogram of an
  average of 10 dB or more at 2000, 3000 and 4000 Hertz in either ear.

  3. Responsibility
  Environmental Health & Safety
  •   This manual has been developed by the Department of Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S). EH&S is
      charged with the following:
  •   Administering the Program for NCF and for reviewing the Program on an annual basis to ensure its
      effectiveness.
  •   Conduct noise monitoring upon request from the individual departments that are concerned with loud
      noises in their units.
  •   Training will be provided or contracted by EH&S.
  •   Assist departments in choosing and fitting hearing protection devices.
  •   Recordkeeping.
  •   Coordinate with local Audiologist for to provide services to NCF.
  •   Individual Departments
  •   Identify potential areas of concern. EH&S will then monitor to determine which work areas or procedures
      require participation in the Hearing Conservation Program.
  •   At no cost to the employee, provide at-risk individuals with baseline audiograms and annual audiogram
      follow-ups.
  •   At no cost to the employee, provide a choice of hearing protection devices (earplug or earmuff) and
      ensure that they are being worn.
  •   Budget for annual hearing tests and hearing protection.

  4. Hearing Conservation Program
  When EH&S determines that an employee is exposed to noise equal to or greater than an 8 hour time
  weighted average (TWA) of 85 dBA (slow response) or, equivalently, a dose of 50 percent, the employee's
  department shall institute the Hearing Conservation Program.
  The preferred method of hearing conservation is to control noise at its source through changes in machinery or
  equipment, changes in manual or mechanical materials handling, installing controls on vibrating surfaces,
  enclosing machinery, dampening with absorbents, insulating rooms, administrative controls, or other
  engineering controls.
  The key elements to an effective Hearing Conservation Program are:
  •   Noise exposure measurements
  •   Engineering and administrative noise exposure control
  •   Personal hearing protection
  •   Baseline and annual audiograms
  •   Training

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5. Noise Exposure Monitoring
The supervisor is responsible for identifying potentially harmful noise levels at the work site. The supervisor
may suspect potentially harmful noise levels when noise at the work site routinely interferes with verbal
communication; when noise routinely startles, annoys, or disrupts an employee's concentration; or when it is
the suspected cause of noticeable hearing loss or pain.
When the supervisor suspects harmful noise levels, s/he must contact EH&S. EH&S will then measure the noise
level at the work environment.
When information indicates that any employee's noise exposure may equal or exceed an 8 hour TWA of 85
dBA, monitoring will be conducted to document the exposure and decide whether or not the employee is to be
included in the HCP.
Representative sampling may be conducted to assure that all affected employees who need to be included in
the HCP are identified. The monitoring will be conducted using area noise meters or personal noise dosimeters,
as appropriate.
Monitoring will be repeated whenever a change in production, process, equipment or controls increases noise
exposures to the extent that:
• Additional employees may be exposed at or above the action level, or
• The attenuation provided by hearing protectors being used by employees may be rendered inadequate.

Employees who are exposed at or above an 8 hour TWA of 85 dBA will be notified of the results in writing.
Each employee or their representative shall be given the opportunity to observe any noise measurements as
they are being conducted.
All continuous, intermittent and impulsive sound levels from 80 dB to 130 dB will be integrated into the noise
measurements.

                                   Permissible Noise Exposures
               Duration per day, hours                  Sound level, dBA, slow response
                          8                                            90
                          6                                            92
                          4                                            95
                          3                                            97
                          2                                           100
                         1.5                                          102
                          1                                           105
                         0.5                                          110
                     0.25 or less                                     115

6. Audiometric Testing Program
All employees that are exposed to a TWA of 85 dBA or greater will be included in the audiometric testing
program. This consists of a baseline audiogram and annual audiograms thereafter.
The audiometric testing program will be conducted by a NCF Contract clinic. Audiometric tests and
evaluations shall be conducted by a qualified physician, otolaryngologist, audiologist, or a certified
technician.
Each annual audiogram will be evaluated by the Clinic to determine if a standard threshold shift has
occurred. If a standard threshold shift has occurred, a retest will be given within 30 days. The
audiograms will be reviewed and a determination will be made whether there is a need for further
evaluation, or recommendations will be made.

7. Hearing Protectors
Hearing protectors shall be worn by any employee who is exposed to an 8 hour TWA of 85 dBA or greater and
who:
•   Has not yet had a baseline audiogram.
•   Has experienced a standard threshold shift.

Hearing protectors shall also be worn by any employee (or visitor) who enters an area where hearing
protectors are required.
Employees shall be given the opportunity to select their hearing protectors from a variety of suitable hearing
protectors provided by their department.
Hearing protectors chosen for use in the HCP will provide attenuation of noise to less than 85 dBA (if fitted and
worn properly).
Each department shall ensure proper initial fitting and correct use. Supervisors shall enforce the wearing of
hearing protectors.

8. Training


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  Any employee who is exposed to noise at or above an 8 hour TWA of 85 dBA shall be trained. Training
  will be provided annually. Information provided in the annual training program will be updated to be
  consistent with changes in protection devices and work processes.
  The training will include, but is not limited to, the following:
  • The effects of noise on hearing.
  • The purpose of hearing protectors, the advantages, disadvantages, attenuation of various types,
       and instructions on selection, fitting (hands-on), use, and care.
  • The purpose of audiometric testing, and an explanation of the test procedures.

  9. Recordkeeping
  EH&S will retain noise exposure measurements for at least 2 years.
  EH&S will retain employee training records for the duration of the employee's employment.
  EH&S will retain audiometric test records for the duration of the employee's employment.
  Affected employees are encouraged to keep their own records.

  10. References
  Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.95-1995, Occupational Noise Exposure


K. Fall Protection Program

  1. Purpose
  To establish minimum requirements for practices and procedures to protect employees from hazards of falls
  when working in elevated work areas such as rooftops, platforms and aerial lifts. All employees, students,
  volunteers, and contractors working under direct NCF supervision shall comply with all elements of the NCF
  Fall Protection Program.

  2. Responsibility
  Environmental Health & Safety
  Develop, maintain, distribute, and provide oversight in accordance with all applicable federal and state
  regulations, and best industry practices. EH&S staff, supervisors and PIs have the responsibility and authority
  to halt any unsafe practices not in accordance with this policy. Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) has
  the responsibility for assisting departments in developing appropriate fall protection plans, providing technical
  guidance and assisting with employee training.

  Departments – Comply with all policy and program elements.

  3. Definitions

  Fall Protection System - Fall Protection Systems are designed to protect personnel from the risk of falls
  when working at elevated heights. Recognized systems include:

  Fall Prevention - a structural design to limit a fall to the same level (e.g., guardrails, positioning/restraint
  systems).

  Fall Arrest System - an approved full body harness, shock absorbing lanyard or self retractable lifeline,
  locking snap hooks and anchor points approved for a static load of 5000 pounds or engineered to meet a two
  to one safety factor.

  Aerial Lift - Vehicle mounted elevating work platform (e.g. Boom Lifts, Articulating Telescoping Boom Lifts).

  Competent Person - A person who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the
  surroundings or working conditions which are hazardous to personnel and who has authorization to quickly
  correct the situation.

  Qualified Person - A person with a recognized degree or professional certificate, (e.g. civil or mechanical
  engineering profession or Certified Safety Professional) and extensive knowledge and experience in this area,
  capable of doing design, analysis, evaluation and specifications.

  Certification - ANSI (American National Standards Institute) defines certification as documentation that
  determines criteria meets the requirements of the standard through testing or proven analytical method (e.g.
  engineering calculations) or both, carried out under the supervision of a Qualified Person.




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4. Fall Protection Program
Each year over 100,000 injuries and deaths are attributable to work-related falls. The Bureau of Labor
Statistics show falls as one of the leading causes of occupational death. An OSHA study involving 99 fall-
related fatalities suggests that all of the deaths could have been prevented by the use of fall protection. Fall
protection can be in the form of guardrails, personal fall arrest systems, or under specific conditions, warning
line systems.

All work performed in elevated areas such as aerial lifts, roofs, elevated platforms, on top of industrial
equipment, building ledges, etc. shall be in accordance with this policy and the referenced fall protection
program.

An employee must be protected from falling when working on a surface that has an unprotected side or edge,
which is 6 feet or more above an adjacent lower level, or when working from bucket trucks or other personnel
lifts with articulating booms.

In each of these cases, the fall hazards must be evaluated to determine the preferable method to protect the
employee.

Responsibilities

Supervisors have the primary responsibility for the implementation of the Fall Protection Program in their work
area. The supervisor should be a competent person, as defined by OSHA, or ensure that responsibility for the
competent person is assigned to a qualified individual within the work group. OSHA defines a competent
person as:

1) A person who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or identifying
working conditions which are hazardous or dangerous to employees and;

2) Who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.

Supervisors must assure that only trained individuals are assigned work that requires use of fall protection
systems (other than guardrails).

Employees have the primary responsibility for proper care, use and inspection of their assigned fall protection
equipment.

Departments have the primary responsibility for providing fall protection systems and appropriate training.

Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) has the responsibility for assisting departments in developing
appropriate fall protection plans, providing technical guidance and assisting with employee training.



5. Training
Each employee who may be exposed to fall hazards will be trained to recognize the hazards and the
procedures to follow to minimize the hazards. A competent person will provide the training.

The competent person must train employees in the following areas:

•   fall hazards in the work area
•   correct procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling and inspecting the fall protection systems
    used
•   use and operation of the fall protection systems used
•   role of employees in fall protection plans
•   what rescue procedures to follow in case of a fall
•   overview of the OSHA fall protection standards

A training record will be maintained for each employee. The record will contain the name of the employee
trained, date of training and the signature of the person who conducted the training. Retraining should be
done if there is a change in the fall protection system being used or if an employee’s actions demonstrate that
the employee has not retained the understanding or skills important to fall protection.

6. Fall Protection Systems
One of the following systems should be in place whenever an employee is exposed to a fall of greater than six
feet.


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Guardrail systems

Guardrails are needed at the edge of work areas 6 feet or more in height to protect employees from falling.
This includes the edge of excavations greater than six feet in depth. Guardrail systems need to meet the
following criteria:

•   Toprail is 42 inches, +/- 3 inches above the walking/working level
•   Midrail is located midway between the top rail and the walking/working level
    o   It is important to remember that the working level is that level where the work is being done.
        Someone working on a stepladder next to an edge may raise his/her working surface well above the
        walking surface.
•   Both top and midrails should be constructed of materials at least one-quarter inch in thickness or
    diameter. If wire rope is used for toprails, it needs to be flagged with a high-visibility material at least
    every 6 feet and can have no more than 3” of deflection
•   The toprail needs to withstand a force of 200 pounds when applied in any downward or outward direction.
•   The midrail needs to withstand a force of 150 pounds applied in any downward or outward direction
•   The system should be smooth to prevent punctures, lacerations or snagging of clothing
•   The ends of the top rail should not overhang the terminal posts, except when such overhang does not
    present a projection hazard
•   When a hoisting area is needed, a chain, gate or removable guardrail section must be placed across the
    access opening when hoisting operations are not taking place.

Personal Fall Arrest Systems

Personnel requiring the use of personal fall protection equipment shall employ the "Buddy System" or have an
observer to render assistance when and if required.

There are three main components to the personal fall arrest system. This includes the personal protective
equipment the employee wears, the connecting devices and the anchorage point. Prior to tying off to perform
the work a means of rescue in the event of a fall must be immediately available. The system needs to meet
the following criteria for each component:

Personal Protective Equipment

Full body harnesses are required. The use of body belts is prohibited.
The attachment point of the body harness is the center D-ring on the back.
Employees must always tie off at or above the D ring of the harness except when using lanyards 3 feet or less
in length. Harnesses or lanyards that have been subjected to an impact load shall be destroyed. Load testing
shall not be performed on fall protection equipment.

Connecting devices

•   This device can be a rope or web lanyard, rope grab or retractable lifeline.
•   Only locking snaphooks may be used.
•   Horizontal lifelines will be designed by a qualified person and installed in accordance with the design
    requirements.
•   Lanyards and vertical lifelines need a minimum breaking strength of 5,000 pounds.
•   Lanyards may not be clipped back to itself (e.g. around an anchor point) unless specifically designed to do
    so.
•   If vertical lifelines are used, each employee will be attached to a separate lifeline.
•   Lifelines need to be protected against being cut or abraded

Anchorage
Secure anchor points are the most critical component when employees must use fall arrest equipment. NCF
buildings may have existing structures (e.g., steel beams that may meet the criteria for a secure anchor
point). Other work locations and assignments may require the installation of a temporary or permanent
anchor. As a minimum, the following criteria must be considered for each type of anchor point:

•   Structure must be sound and capable of withstanding a 5000 lb. static load/person attached.
•   Structure/anchor must be easily accessible to avoid fall hazards during hook up.
•   Direct tying off around sharp edged structures can reduce breaking strength by 70% therefore; chafing
    pads or abrasion resistant straps must be used around sharp edged structures to prevent cutting action
    against safety lanyards or lifelines.
•   Structures used as anchor points must be at the worker's shoulder level or higher to limit free fall to 6 feet
    or less and prevent contact with any lower level (exception – when self retracting lifelines and or 3 foot
    lanyards are used)
•   Choose structures for anchor points that will prevent swing fall hazards. Potentially dangerous "pendulum"
    like swing falls can result when a worker moves horizontally away from a fixed anchor point and falls. The

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    arc of the swing produces as much energy as a vertical free fall and the hazard of swinging into an
    obstruction becomes a major factor. Raising the height of the anchor point can reduce the angle of the
    arc and the force of the swing. Horizontal lifelines can help maintain the attachment point overhead and
    limit the fall vertically. A qualified person must design a horizontal lifeline.

Permanent Anchor Requirements

In addition to all the criteria listed above, the following points must be considered:

•   Environmental factors and dissimilarity of materials can degrade exposed anchors.
•   Compatibility of permanent anchors with employee's fall arrest equipment.
•   Inclusion of permanent anchors into a Preventive Maintenance Program with scheduled annual re-
    certification.
•   Visibly label permanent anchors.
•   Anchors must be immediately removed from service and re-certified if subjected to fall arrest forces.

Reusable Temporary Anchors:

Reusable temporary roof anchors must be installed and used following the manufacturer's installation
guidelines.

•   Roof anchors must be compatible with employee's fall arrest equipment.
•   Roof anchors must be removed from service at the completion of the job and inspected prior to reuse
    following the manufacturer's inspection guidelines.
•   Roof anchors must be immediately removed from service and disposed of if subjected to fall arrest forces.

Complete system

If a fall occurs, the employee should not be able to free fall more than 6 feet nor contact a lower level.

•   To ensure this, add the height of the worker, the lanyard length and an elongation length of 3.5 feet.
    Using this formula, a six-foot worker with a six-foot lanyard would require a tie-off point at least 15.5 feet
    above the next lower level.
•   A personal fall arrest system that was subjected to an impact needs to be removed from service
    immediately.
•   Personal fall arrest systems need to be inspected prior to each use and damaged or deteriorated
    components removed from service.
•   Personal fall arrest systems should not be attached to guardrails or hoists.

Work from Aerial Lifts and Self Powered Work Platforms

Body harnesses must be worn with a shock-absorbing lanyard (preferably not to exceed 3 feet in length) and
must be worn when working from an elevated work platform (exception: scissor lifts and telescoping lifts that
can move only vertically do not require the use of a harness and lanyard as long as the work platform is
protected by a guardrail system). The point of attachment must be the lift’s boom or work platform. Personnel
cannot attach lanyards to adjacent poles, structures or equipment while they are working from the aerial lift.
Personnel cannot move an aerial lift while the boom is in an elevated working position and the operator is
inside of the lift platform.

Inspection

The employee will inspect the entire personal fall arrest system prior to every use. The competent person will
inspect the entire system in use at the initial installation and weekly thereafter. The visual inspection of a
personal fall arrest system periodically will follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. An example of a
complete inspection is in Appendix A.

Warning Line Systems and Controlled Access Zones

Warning line systems and work in controlled access zones must be developed in accordance with OSHA
regulation 1926.502 and must be approved by EH&S or their designee before employees are exposed to fall
hazards.

Monitoring System

OSHA emphasizes that safety-monitoring systems are a last resort and may only be used when other systems
are infeasible or present a greater hazard. Monitoring systems must be developed in accordance with OSHA
regulation 1926.502 and must be approved by EH&S, or their designee before employees are exposed to fall
hazards.

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7. Appendix A
Personal Fall Arrest System Inspection

All fall protection equipment shall be inspected before each use in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions. The following is general guidance for the inspection of this equipment.

Harness Inspection

Webbing

•   Inspect the entire surface of webbing for damage. Beginning at one end, bend the webbing in an inverted
    “U”. Holding the body side of the belt toward you, grasp the belt with your hands six to eight inches
    apart. This surface tension makes the damaged fibers or cuts easier to see. Watch for frayed edges,
    broken fibers, pulled stitches, cuts, burns, and chemical damage.

“D” Rings/Back Pads

•   Check “D” rings for distortion, cracks, breaks, and rough or sharp edges. The “D” ring should pivot
    freely. “D” ring back pads should also be inspected for damage.

Attachment of Buckles

•   Note any unusual wear, frayed or cut fiber, or distortion of the buckles.

Tongue/Grommet

•   The tongue receives heavy wear from repeated buckling and unbuckling. Inspect for loose, distorted or
    broken grommets. The webbing should not have any additional punched holes.

Tongue Buckle

•   Buckle tongues should be free of distortion in shape and motion. They should overlap the buckle frame
    and move freely back and forth in their socket. The roller should turn freely on the frame. Check for
    distortion or sharp edges.

Friction and Mating Buckles

•   Inspect the buckle for distortion. The outer bars and center bars must be straight. Pay special attention
    to corners and attachment points of the center bar.

Lanyard Inspection Hardware

•   Snaps: Inspect closely for hook and eye distortions, cracks, corrosion, or pitted surfaces. The keeper
    (latch) should seat into the nose without binding and should not be distorted or obstructed. The keeper
    spring should exert sufficient force to firmly close the keeper. Keeper locks must prevent the keeper from
    opening when the keeper closes.

•   Thimbles: The thimble must be firmly seated in the eye of the splice, and splice should have no loose or
    cut strands. The edges of the thimble must be free of sharp edges, distortion, or cracks.

Web Lanyard

•   While bending the webbing over a curved surface such as a pipe, observe each side of the webbed
    lanyard. This will reveal any cuts or breaks. Examine the webbing for swelling, discoloration, cracks, or
    burns. Observe closely for any breaks in the stitching.

Rope Lanyard

•   Rotation of the rope lanyard while inspecting from end to end will bring to light any fuzzy, worn, broken or
    cut fibers. Weakened areas from extreme loads will appear as a noticeable change from the original
    diameter. The rope diameter should be uniform throughout, following a short break-in period. Make sure
    the rope has no knots tied in it. Knots can reduce the strength of the rope by up to 60%.

Shock-absorbing Lanyard
•  Shock-absorbing lanyards should be examined as a web lanyard. However, also look for signs of
   deployment. If the lanyard shows signs of having been put under load (e.g. torn out stitching), remove it
   from service.

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  References
  OSHA 29CFR 1926 Subpart M, OSHA 29CFR 1910.23, OSHA 29CFR 1910.66, OSHA 29CFR 1910.132, OSHA
      29CFR 1910.269, Governors Executive Order 2000-292.


L. Ladder Safety Program

  1. Purpose
  This procedure covers the use of all portable and fixed ladders used at New College of Florida.
  Temporary steps use on construction sites and steps manufactured for scaffold access shall be governed
  by other OSHA and building codes regulations.

  2. General Requirements

  Construction of Portable Ladders
  Portable ladders are typically made of three materials: wood, aluminum, and fiberglass. Each material
  has its own benefits and disadvantages.
  Wood - Good insulating properties, however, regular maintenance and inspections are required to keep
  these ladders in working condition. Wood ladders must be stored in dry areas and out of direct sunlight.
  Re-varnishing every six to twelve months is required. Can be heavy relative to other materials.
  Aluminum – A rugged, strong, yet light weight material that is resistant to the elements. However,
  these ladders are not appropriate for working around electricity since they are conductive.
  Fiberglass – Non-conductive, strong material, slightly heaver than aluminum. Weathers well without
  drying out or splitting.

  Types of Ladders
  Portable
  Self-supporting
  Non-self-supporting
  Fixed
  Job-Made Ladder

  Minimum Design Criteria

  Self-Supporting Ladders

  Each self-supporting portable ladder: At least four times the maximum intended load, except that each extra-
  heavy-duty type 1A metal or plastic ladder shall sustain at least 3.3 times the maximum intended load. The
  ability of a ladder to sustain the loads indicated in this paragraph shall be determined by applying or
  transmitting the requisite load to the ladder in a downward vertical direction. Ladders built and tested in
  conformance with the applicable provisions of appendix A of this subpart will be deemed to meet this
  requirement.

  Non Self Supporting

  Each portable ladder that is not self-supporting: At least four times the maximum intended load, except that
  each extra-heavy-duty type 1A metal or plastic ladders shall sustain at least 3.3 times the maximum intended
  load. The ability of a ladder to sustain the loads indicated in this paragraph shall be determined by applying or
  transmitting the requisite load to the ladder in a downward vertical direction when the ladder is placed at an
  angle of 75 1/2 degrees from the horizontal. Ladders built and tested in conformance with the applicable
  provisions of appendix A will be deemed to meet this requirement.


  Rungs, Cleats, and Steps

  Ladder rungs, cleats, and steps shall be parallel, level, and uniformly spaced when the ladder is in position for
  use.

  Rungs, cleats, and steps of portable ladders (except as provided below) and fixed ladders (including individual-
  rung/step ladders) shall be spaced not less than 10 inches (25 cm) apart, nor more than 14 inches (36 cm)
  apart, as measured between center lines of the rungs, cleats and steps.

  Rungs, cleats, and steps of step stools shall be not less than 8 inches (20 cm) apart, nor more than 12 inches
  (31 cm) apart, as measured between center lines of the rungs, cleats, and steps.


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Rungs, cleats, and steps of the base section of extension trestle ladders shall be not less than 8 inches (20 cm)
nor more than 18 inches (46 cm) apart, as measured between center lines of the rungs, cleats, and steps. The
rung spacing on the extension section of the extension trestle ladder shall be not less than 6 inches (15 cm)
nor more than 12 inches (31 cm), as measured between center lines of the rungs, cleats, and steps.

The minimum clear distance between the sides of individual-rung/step ladders and the minimum clear distance
between the side rails of other fixed ladders shall be 16 inches (41 cm).

The minimum clear distance between side rails for all portable ladders shall be 11 1/2 inches (29 cm).

The rungs of individual-rung/step ladders shall be shaped such that employees' feet cannot slide off the end of
the rungs.
The rungs and steps of fixed metal ladders manufactured after March 15, 1991, shall be corrugated, knurled,
dimpled, coated with skid-resistant material, or otherwise treated to minimize slipping.

The rungs and steps of portable metal ladders shall be corrugated, knurled, dimpled, coated with skid-resistant
material, or otherwise treated to minimize slipping.

3. Ladder Usage

Portable Ladders

Ladders shall not be tied or fastened together to provide longer sections unless they are specifically designed
for such use.

A metal spreader or locking device shall be provided on each stepladder to hold the front and back sections in
an open position when the ladder is being used.

When splicing is required to obtain a given length of side rail, the resulting side rail must be at least equivalent
in strength to a one-piece side rail made of the same material.

Except when portable ladders are used to gain access to fixed ladders (such as those on utility towers,
billboards, and other structures where the bottom of the fixed ladder is elevated to limit access), when two or
more separate ladders are used to reach an elevated work area, the ladders shall be offset with a platform or
landing between the ladders. (The requirements to have guardrail systems with toeboards for falling object
and overhead protection on platforms and landings are set forth in subpart M of this part.)

Ladder components shall be surfaced so as to prevent injury to an employee from punctures or lacerations,
and to prevent snagging of clothing.

Wood ladders shall not be coated with any opaque covering, except for identification or warning labels which
may be placed on one face only of a side rail.

The minimum perpendicular clearance between fixed ladder rungs, cleats, and steps, and any obstruction
behind the ladder shall be 7 inches (18 cm), except in the case of an elevator pit ladder for which a minimum
perpendicular clearance of 4 1/2 inches (11 cm) is required.

The minimum perpendicular clearance between the center line of fixed ladder rungs, cleats, and steps, and any
obstruction on the climbing side of the ladder shall be 30 inches (76 cm), except as provided in paragraph
(a)(15) of this section.

When unavoidable obstructions are encountered, the minimum perpendicular clearance between the centerline
of fixed ladder rungs, cleats, and steps, and the obstruction on the climbing side of the ladder may be reduced
to 24 inches (61 cm), provided that a deflection device is installed to guide employees around the obstruction.

When portable ladders are used for access to an upper landing surface, the ladder side rails shall extend at
least 3 feet (.9 m) above the upper landing surface to which the ladder is used to gain access; or, when such
an extension is not possible because of the ladder's length, then the ladder shall be secured at its top to a rigid
support that will not deflect, and a grasping device, such as a grabrail, shall be provided to assist employees in
mounting and dismounting the ladder. In no case shall the extension be such that ladder deflection under a
load would, by itself, cause the ladder to slip off its support.

Ladders shall be maintained free of oil, grease, and other slipping hazards.

Ladders shall not be loaded beyond the maximum intended load for which they were built, or beyond their
manufacturer's rated capacity.

Ladders shall be used only for the purpose for which they were designed.
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Non-self-supporting ladders shall be used at an angle such that the horizontal distance from the top support to
the foot of the ladder is approximately one-quarter of the working length of the ladder (the distance along the
ladder between the foot and the top support).

Wood job-made ladders with spliced side rails shall be used at an angle such that the horizontal distance is
one-eighth the working length of the ladder.

Fixed ladders shall be used at a pitch no greater than 90 degrees from the horizontal, as measured to the back
side of the ladder.

Ladders shall be used only on stable and level surfaces unless secured to prevent accidental displacement.

Ladders shall not be used on slippery surfaces unless secured or provided with slip-resistant feet to prevent
accidental displacement. Slip-resistant feet shall not be used as a substitute for care in placing, lashing, or
holding a ladder that is used upon slippery surfaces including, but not limited to, flat metal or concrete
surfaces that are constructed so they cannot be prevented from becoming slippery.

Ladders placed in any location where they can be displaced by workplace activities or traffic, such as in
passageways, doorways, or driveways, shall be secured to prevent accidental displacement, or a barricade
shall be used to keep the activities or traffic away from the ladder.

The area around the top and bottom of ladders shall be kept clear.

The top of a non-self-supporting ladder shall be placed with the two rails supported equally unless it is
equipped with a single support attachment.

Ladders shall not be moved, shifted, or extended while occupied.

Ladders shall have nonconductive siderails if they are used where the employee or the ladder could contact
exposed energized electrical equipment

The top or top step of a stepladder shall not be used as a step.

Cross-bracing on the rear section of stepladders shall not be used for climbing unless the ladders are designed
and provided with steps for climbing on both front and rear sections.

Ladders shall be inspected by a competent person for visible defects on a periodic basis and after any
occurrence that could affect their safe use.

Portable ladders with structural defects, such as, but not limited to, broken or missing rungs, cleats, or steps,
broken or split rails, corroded components, or other faulty or defective components, shall either be
immediately marked in a manner that readily identifies them as defective, or be tagged with "Do Not Use" or
similar language, and shall be withdrawn from service until repaired.

Fixed ladders with structural defects, such as, but not limited to, broken or missing rungs, cleats, or steps,
broken or split rails, or corroded components, shall be withdrawn from service until repaired.

The requirement to withdraw a defective ladder from service is satisfied if the ladder is either:

Immediately tagged with "Do Not Use" or similar language;

Marked in a manner that readily identifies it as defective;

Or blocked (such as with a plywood attachment that spans several rungs).

Ladder repairs shall restore the ladder to a condition meeting its original design criteria, before the ladder is
returned to use.

Single-rail ladders shall not be used.

When ascending or descending a ladder, the user shall face the ladder.

Each employee shall use at least one hand to grasp the ladder when progressing up and/or down the ladder.

An employee shall not carry any object or load that could cause the employee to lose balance and fall.

Fixed Ladders

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Each Fixed ladder: At least two loads of 250 pounds (114 kg) each, concentrated between any two consecutive
attachments (the number and position of additional concentrated loads of 250 pounds (114 kg) each,
determined from anticipated usage of the ladder, shall also be included), plus anticipated loads caused by ice
buildup, winds, rigging, and impact loads resulting from the use of ladder safety devices. Each step or rung
shall be capable of supporting a single concentrated load of at least 250 pounds (114 kg) applied in the middle
of the step or rung. Ladders built in conformance with the applicable provisions of appendix A will be deemed
to meet this requirement.

Through fixed ladders at their point of access/egress shall have a step-across distance of not less than 7
inches (18 cm) or more than 12 inches (30 cm) as measured from the centerline of the steps or rungs to the
nearest edge of the landing area. If the normal step-across distance exceeds 12 inches (30 cm), a landing
platform shall be provided to reduce the distance to the specified limit.

Fixed ladders without cages or wells shall have a clear width to the nearest permanent object of at least 15
inches (30 cm) on each side of the centerline of the ladder.

Fixed ladders shall be provided with cages, wells, ladder safety devices, or self-retracting lifelines where the
length of climb is less than 24 feet (7.3 m) but the top of the ladder is at a distance greater than 24 feet (7.3
m) above lower levels.

Where the total length of a climb equals or exceeds 24 feet (7.3 m), fixed ladders shall be equipped with one
of the following:

•   Ladder safety devices; or

•   Self-retracting lifelines, and rest platforms at intervals not to exceed 150 feet (45.7 m); or

•   A cage or well, and multiple ladder sections, each ladder section not to exceed 50 feet (15.2 m) in length.
    Ladder sections shall be offset from adjacent sections, and landing platforms shall be provided at
    maximum intervals of 50 feet (15.2 m).

•   Cages for fixed ladders shall conform to all of the following:

•   Horizontal bands shall be fastened to the side rails of rail ladders, or directly to the structure, building, or
    equipment for individual-rung ladders;

•   Vertical bars shall be on the inside of the horizontal bands and shall be fastened to them;

•   Cages shall extend not less than 27 inches (66 cm), or more than 30 inches (76 cm) from the centerline of
    the step or rung (excluding the flare at the bottom of the cage), and shall not be less than 27 inches (68
    cm) in width;

•   The inside of the cage shall be clear of projections;

•   Horizontal bands shall be spaced not more than 4 feet (1.2 m) on center vertically;

•   Vertical bars shall be spaced at intervals not more than 9 1/2 inches (24 cm) on center horizontally;

•   the bottom of the cage shall be at a level not less than 7 feet (2.1 m) nor more than 8 feet (2.4 m) above
    the point of access to the bottom of the ladder. The bottom of the cage shall be flared not less than 4
    inches (10 cm) all around within the distance between the bottom horizontal band and the next higher
    band;

•   The top of the cage shall be a minimum of 42 inches (1.1 m) above the top of the platform, or the point of
    access at the top of the ladder, with provision for access to the platform or other point of access.

Wells for fixed ladders shall conform to all of the following:

•   They shall completely encircle the ladder;

•   They shall be free of projections;

•   Their inside face on the climbing side of the ladder shall extend not less than 27 inches (68 cm) nor more
    than 30 inches (76 cm) from the centerline of the step or rung;

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•   The inside clear width shall be at least 30 inches (76 cm);

The bottom of the wall on the access side shall start at a level not less than 7 feet (2.1 m) nor more than 8
feet (2.4 m) above the point of access to the bottom of the ladder.

Ladder safety devices, and related support systems, for fixed ladders shall conform to all of the following:

They shall be capable of withstanding without failure a drop test consisting of an 18-inch (41 cm) drop of a
500-pound (226 kg) weight;
They shall permit the employee using the device to ascend or descend without continually having to hold,
push, or pull any part of the device, leaving both hands free for climbing;

They shall be activated within 2 feet (.61 m) after a fall occurs, and limit the descending velocity of an
employee to 7 feet/sec. (2.1 m/sec.) or less;

The connection between the carrier or lifeline and the point of attachment to the body belt or harness shall not
exceed 9 inches (23 cm) in length.

The mounting of ladder safety devices for fixed ladders shall conform to the following:

•   Mountings for rigid carriers shall be attached at each end of the carrier, with intermediate mountings, as
    necessary, spaced along the entire length of the carrier, to provide the strength necessary to stop
    employees' falls;

•   Mountings for flexible carriers shall be attached at each end of the carrier. When the system is exposed to
    wind, cable guides for flexible carriers shall be installed at a minimum spacing of 25 feet (7.6 m) and
    maximum spacing of 40 feet (12.2 m) along the entire length of the carrier, to prevent wind damage to
    the system.

•   The design and installation of mountings and cable guides shall not reduce the design strength of the
    ladder.

The side rails of through or side-step fixed ladders shall extend 42 inches (1.1 m) above the top of the access
level or landing platform served by the ladder. For a parapet ladder, the access level shall be the roof if the
parapet is cut to permit passage through the parapet; if the parapet is continuous, the access level shall be
the top of the parapet.

For through-fixed-ladder extensions, the steps or rungs shall be omitted from the extension and the extension
of the side rails shall be flared to provide not less than 24 inches (61 cm) or more than 30 inches (76 cm)
clearance between side rails. Where ladder safety devices are provided, the maximum clearance between side
rails of the extensions shall not exceed 36 inches (91 cm).

For side-step fixed ladders, the side rails and the steps or rungs shall be continuous in the extension.

Individual-rung/step ladders, except those used where their access openings are covered with manhole covers
or hatches, shall extend at least 42 inches (1.1 m) above an access level or landing platform either by the
continuation of the rung spacings as horizontal grab bars or by providing vertical grab bars that shall have the
same lateral spacing as the vertical legs of the rungs.

4A. Appendix A

This appendix serves as a non-mandatory guideline to assist employers in complying with the ladder loading
and strength requirements of 1926.1053(a)(1). A ladder designed and built in accordance with the applicable
national consensus standards, as set forth below, will be considered to meet the requirements of
1926.1053(a)(1):


•   Manufactured portable wood ladders: American National Standards Institute (ANSI) A14.1-1982 -
    American National Standard for Ladders-Portable Wood-Safety Requirements.
•   Manufactured portable metal ladders: ANSI A14.2-1982 - American National Standard for Ladders -
    Portable Metal - Safety Requirements.
•   Manufactured fixed ladders: ANSI A14.3-1984 - American National Standard for Ladders - Fixed - Safety
    Requirements.
•   Job-made ladders: ANSI A14.4-1979 - Safety Requirements for Job-Made Ladders.
•   Plastic ladders: ANSI A14.5-1982 - American National Standard for Ladders - Portable
    Reinforced Plastic - Safety Requirements
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4B. Appendix B

LADDER SAFETY GUIDELINES

Never climb higher than the fourth rung from the top of straight ladders and the second tread from the top of
step ladders.

Watch out for contact with electricity.

Do not use a ladder for unintended purposes, such as in place of scaffold.

Avoid excessive stretching or leaning.

Use fiberlass or metal ladders with clean, rubber feet in good repair, when changing light bulbs.

Tag & remove defective ladders. Notify your supervisor or EHS.

Do not carry tools or materials when
climbing a ladder, instead, use a toolbelt or handline.

Make sure the soles of your shoes are
clean and in good condition.

Do not rest a ladder on any rung. Only
the side rails are designed for this purpose.

Use both hands and face the ladder when climbing or descending.

Make sure the top of the ladder rests against a solid surface, 3 feet above the landing that can withstand the
load

Do not paint or coat any ladder with anything other than a clear wood preservative.

Allow only one person on the ladder and avoid using a ladder in windy, rainy, or other inclement weather
conditions.

Put ladders away in their proper storage area when done. Avoid leaving them unattended in hallways or
classrooms

LADDER TYPES

Whenever you use a ladder make sure you select the right one for the job. Consider the height and weight
restrictions before using it.

Type IA is for extra heavy duty industrial use.

Type I are industrial stepladders for heavy duty, such as utilities, contractors and industrial use.

Type II are commercial stepladders for medium duty, such as painters, offices and light industrial use.

Type III are household stepladders for light duty, and are not in compliance when used by workers at New
College of Florida.

INSPECT LADDERS BEFORE EACH USE:
Rungs must be intact and free from grease or oil.
Make sure there are no splinters.
On extension ladders, make sure the rope is not torn or frayed.
On stepladders, make sure the hinge spreader is working properly.
The ladder’s feet should have nonstick pads that are free to adjust flat.
Support braces, bolts, and/or screws should be tight and in place.
Make sure the ladder is not dented or bent.
Make sure the ladder locking device is
positioned properly.
Only use a ladder for its designed use.




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  LADDER POSITIONING
  When positioning a straight or extension ladder, the distance from the bottom of the ladder to the wall
  (measured along the ground or floor) is 1/4 the distance from the bottom of the ladder to wherever the ladder
  is resting against the wall.

  Place your toes against the feet of the ladder, facing the ladder, and place your hands on the rung directly in
  front of you and the ladder will be at the proper angle.

  WORK OVER 25 FEET

  Any ladder over 25 feet tall must be secured at both the top and bottom of the ladder.

  No type of work shall be performed on a ladder over 25 feet from the ground that requires use of both hands,
  unless a safety harness is worn and secured to the ladder.

  Any work requiring eye protection or respirators shall not be performed from a ladder more than 25 feet from
  the ground.



M. Utility Cart Safety Program
  1. Purpose
  This policy provides guidelines for the use of electric or gas-powered carts and/or similar utility type vehicles
  (carts) on all campuses of the University. The intent is to establish proper safety procedures and practices, as
  well as to promote and provide for a safer environment for students, faculty and staff.

  2. Responsibility
  Environmental Health & Safety
  Develop, maintain, distribute, and coordinate training in accordance with all applicable federal and state
  regulations, and best industry practices.

  Departments – Comply with all policy and program elements.

  The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles and NCF PD restrict golf carts/low speed
  vehicles for use on facility premises only and limited access roads connecting our properties.

  3. Definitions
  A golf cart/service/utility vehicle is any low speed vehicle which is owned, leased or operated on university
  premises, by University employees, volunteers, contractors, vendors or agents, and students, regardless of
  size or energy source.

  4. Cart Safety Program
  All members of the New College community are governed by this policy (students, staff, faculty and
  contractors/vendors). All operators of carts must meet the following criteria before operating a cart on
  property under the jurisdiction of the New College of Florida:
       1. Possess a valid Florida driver's license.
       2. Know and adhere to the State of Florida motor vehicle laws.
       3. Successfully complete Cart Safety Training Program (operator's training will include a signing of a
            statement of understanding).
       Note: NCF employees who will be operating carts are required to obtain a Florida driver's license within
       thirty (30) days after: commencement of such employment or notice that they will be operating a cart as
       part of their job duties. Full-time out-of-state students who have a valid driver's license from their state of
       residence are exempted from the requirement of obtaining a Florida driver's license for only that period of
       time allowed by Florida law.
       4. The safe operation of carts is paramount. Failure to follow this policy, render common practices or
            courtesies, or follow rules of the road for the State of Florida, could result in citation, appropriate
            disciplinary action, and/or suspension of operator's cart driving privileges.
       5. All new cart acquisitions must meet the minimum safety features found in National Highway Safety
            and Traffic Administration (NHSTA), Standard 500 (49 CFR Part 571.500), hereafter "Standard 500."
            As of the effective date of this policy, the purchase of used, remanufactured, or transferred (from
            another University department) carts not meeting Standard 500 is prohibited. Contractors and other
            non-affiliated departments/companies, corporations, etc. carts must meet Standard 500.
       6. Standard 500 carts must be maintained so that all original equipment safety features are kept in good
            working order.


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7.     Minimum Safety features for carts not Standard 500 (acquired by Department prior to effective date
       of this policy) are to include:
       o Carts must be four-wheeled vehicles - No Three-wheeled vehicles.
       o All original equipment safety features must be kept in good working order.
       o All carts and trailers (pulled by carts) must have clearly displayed on the exterior of the cart and
            trailer the slow moving vehicle reflective triangle.
8. Supervisors must monitor and ensure that all persons operating carts have been instructed in the safe
       operation of carts and have attended the Cart Safety Training Program.
9. The speed limit for carts off standard roadways is 15 mph.
10. Due to the configuration of the New College Campus, all carts may operate on College Roadways and
       limited use of Bay Shore Road from the Viking Complex to the Caples Campus, and General Twining
       to the Physical Plant Complex. Due caution should be used at all times when on these roadways,
11. In most cases, sidewalks are to be used while right-of-way is to be rendered to all pedestrians. Note:
       Operators are to use due caution in crosswalks. Carts using pedestrian crosswalks do not have the
       right-of-way. Carts shall cross US 41, Tamiami Trail, using the Pedestrian Cross walk when available.
       Pedestrians and bicyclists shall be given the right-of–way.
12. Large carts, those pulling trailers, and utility equipment will need to cross at the US 41 Tamiami Trail
       intersection.
13. The US 41 Tamiami Trail intersection can be extremely dangerous unless extra caution and care is
       used when crossing. Only cross on a green light and insure that all on-coming traffic has come to a
       complete stop. Be cognizant of traffic coming for all directions, including from behind.
14. Modification or tampering with a cart's governor is prohibited and is a violation of Federal Law.
15. The operator must report any accidents to the Campus Police and to the operator's supervisor.
       Campus Police will forward cart accident information to Environmental Health and Safety (Division of
       Risk Management) for processing.
16. Cart operators are to use extreme caution at all times.
17. The following outlines procedures for the safe operation of carts:
       o    Operators may not wear headsets while operating carts.
       o    Operators are prohibited from operating carts on roadways outside the boundaries of the College.
       o    Carts shall not be operated at night unless properly equipped, i.e. NHSTA Standard 500 Carts.
       o    Operators are prohibited from operating carts inside, under, or through the confines of University
            buildings.
       o    Pedestrians have the right-of-way on campus. Carts must yield to pedestrians on sidewalks.
            SPEED IS TO BE REDUCED TO A MINIMUM WHEN DRIVING ALONG OR CROSSING SIDEWALKS
            SO AS TO AVOID ACCIDENTS WITH PEDESTRIANS.
       o    Cart operators are to be diligent and pay particular attention to the needs of disabled persons, as
            limitations in vision, hearing or mobility may impair their ability to see, hear, or move out of the
            way of carts.
       o    Carts are not to be overloaded, i.e. carrying more passengers than seating provided or
            overloading the cart's recommended carrying or load capacity.
       o    The name and telephone number of the College department, and College identification number
            (provided by Physical Plant at the Department's expense) must be displayed prominently
            on College- owned carts. Contractors and other non-affiliated departments/companies,
            corporations, etc. must display company name and vehicle identification number (VIN) on their
            carts at the owner's expense.
       o    Cart operators are responsible for ignition keys for the period of time in which they are using the
            vehicle. Keys shall not be left in carts.
       o    Operators must park carts away from heavily traveled pedestrian areas or in designated cart
            parking areas.
       o    Cart operators are not to block the path nor limit pedestrian access on walkways.
       o    College-owned carts are to be used for College business only.
       o    All cart operators must attend the Cart Safety Training Program prior to operating a cart.
       o    College-owned carts are to be maintained in accordance with manufacturer and Physical Plant's
            recommended service schedule.
    i.      Repairs and regular maintenance are the responsibility of the Department owning the cart. The
            Departments are financially responsible for all repair and maintenance costs (labor, parts, and
            supplies). The Department is required to keep all preventative maintenance and repair records
            related to the cart; however, for those services provided by Vehicle Maintenance, Vehicle
            Maintenance will keep such records.
   ii.      Departments are responsible for keeping all original equipment and safety features in good
            working order.
  iii.      Personally-owned carts are prohibited from operating on University property. However, special
            consideration will be given to ADA accommodations.




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5. Training
All Utility Cart operators must attend the Utility Cart Safety Training Program prior to operating a cart.
Environmental Health and Safety Department will provide training on an as needed basis.

6A. Appendix A
NATIONAL HIGHWAY SAFETY AND TRAFFIC ADMINISTRATION
    (NHSTA) STANDARD 500 (49 CFR Part 571.500)

    §571.500 Standard No. 500; Low-speed vehicles.

    S1. Scope. This standard specifies requirements for low-speed vehicles.

    S2. Purpose. The purpose of this standard is to ensure that low-speed vehicles operated on the public
    streets, roads, and highways are equipped with the minimum motor vehicle equipment appropriate for
    motor vehicle safety.

    S3. Applicability. This standard applies to low-speed vehicles.

    S4. [Reserved.]

    S5. Requirements.

      (a) When tested in accordance with test conditions in S6 and test procedures in S7, the maximum
      speed attainable in 1.6 km (1 mile) by each low-speed vehicle shall not more than 40 kilometers per
      hour (25 miles per hour).

      (b) Each low-speed vehicle shall be equipped with:
             (1) Headlamps,
             (2) Front and rear turn signal lamps,
             (3) Tail lamps,
             (4) Stop lamps,
             (5) Reflex reflectors: one red on each side as far to the rear as practicable, and one red on the
             rear,
             (6) An exterior mirror mounted on the driver's side of the vehicle and either an exterior mirror
             mounted on the passenger's side of the vehicle or an interior mirror,
             (7) A parking brake,
             (8) A windshield of AS–1 or AS–5 composition, that conforms to the American National Standard
             Institute's “Safety Code for Safety Glazing Materials for Glazing Motor Vehicles Operating on Land
             Highways,” Z-26.1–1977, January 28, 1977, as supplemented by Z26.1a, July 3, 1980
             (incorporated by reference; see 49

6B. Appendix B

SLOW-MOVING VEHICLE REFLECTIVE TRIANGLE

    1. This is an example of the required Slow Moving Vehicle Reflective Triangle:




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  7. References

  49 CFR Part 571.500; (NHSTA) STANDARD 500
  Florida Statutes 316.2122; Operation of a low-speed vehicle on certain roadways;
  F.S. 316.212, 2126, and 21265.
  Governors Executive Order 2000-292



N. Tent Installation Program

  1. Purpose
  To establish procedures for NCF to protect occupants from hazards that may be associated with temporary
  tents and to comply with applicable building and fire codes related to temporary tent installations.

  2. Responsibility
  Environmental Health & Safety - Develop procedures for the college to meet program requirements. Provide
  guidance and interpretations and act as liaison for code officials.
  Departments – Comply with all policy and program elements.

  3. Definitions

  Tent – A canopy structure of 120 ft2 or greater (10’ x 12’)
  Temporary – Less than 180 days.
  Permit – Notification to and permission of the Building Official and the State Fire Marshal (as it pertains to this
  procedure).
  Sunshine State One Call of Florida – A toll-free number to call to locate underground or underwater utilities
  to prevent damage prior to digging. This is a program mandated by Florida Statutes, Ch. 556, which requires
  contractors and other to have utilities marked prior to digging.

  4. Tent Installation Program

  All tents installed on NCF property will comply with these procedures. The Office of the State Fire Marshal, per
  Florida Statutes, is the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) and has the final approval for any tent installation
  and seating. Additionally, the Building Official, per Florida Statutes, must review the installation plans.

  The form in Appendix A should be completed and returned to NCF Environmental Health and Safety Office
  (EH&S) a minimum of five days prior to an event requiring the use of a tent. EH&S will distribute the form to
  the Building Official, State Fire Marshal, and NCF Physical Plant.

  The tent contractor is responsible for contacting Sunshine State One Call Florida at 1-800-432-4770 at least
  two working days in advance to mark underground utilities prior to driving stakes.

  All tent fabric must be flame retardant and indicated as such by a certification attached to each membrane.

  The tent and poles shall be securely anchored using appropriate anchoring systems.

  Tops of metal stakes shall be covered with a protective barrier to prevent injuries.

  Seating, if provided, shall conform to the requirements of the Life Safety Code for adequate row and aisle
  spacing, and means of egress distances.

  A seating plan shall be provided for each tent installation. That plan shall be approved for compliance with
  applicable Fire and Life Safety Code requirements for pertaining to aisle and row width, fire extinguishers,
  lighting, and other egress requirements.

  Pre-approved seating diagrams for established and recurring events are encouraged to prevent the need to
  obtain seating plans for each event.

  Fire extinguishers shall be provided by the tent contractor. The exact number may be determined by the AHJ
  or NCF, however, a minimum of one per tent will be required. All extinguishers will be current on their
  certifications and inspections as per NFPA 10 and SFM Rules and Regulations.

  Side panels if used in tents occupied by the general public will dictate different aisle and seating
  configurations. Depending on conditions and the number of side panels, additional lighting, EMERGENCY
  LIGHTING, and EXIT markings may be required.
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5. References
NFPA 1 Ch. 25.2; FBC Section 3103


6A. Appendix A

                                                    Tent Installation Form

                                      (Must be completed 5 days prior to event’s date)

To: Tom Deckert, CBO, FSU Building Official; Harry Krimmel, Office of the State Fire Marshal; Dick Olney,
Director of Physical Plant

Date of Event:

Name of Event:

Tent Company:

Address:




Company Contact Name / Emergency Phone Number:

Date Tent Installation to begin:

Size/Location of tent:

Total people under tent:

Type of anchor:            Stake     Bucket         Other      Explain if Other

Any Type of Open flame under tent:            Yes                   No

If yes, please indicate:

Cooking

Candles

Sterno

Other

Seating Plan

     Pre-Approved

     Attached

If yes is checked on any of above, extinguisher(s) are required. Exact number to be determined by NCF. Tent company is
required to have utility locations marked by Sunshine State One Call of Florida at 1-800-432-4770 before driving stakes as
required by F.S. 556.

Please Fax or e-mail form to Environmental Health and Safety
                                                Fax: 487-5021
                                         Email: rhambrick@ncf.edu
                                                   487-4585



                                                                                                                        97
O. Lock-Out/Tag-Out Program
  1. Purpose
  New College of Florida requires that all departments within the college community establish and fulfill
  requirements for affixing the appropriate lockout/tagout (LOTO) signage and locks to energy isolating devices,
  and to otherwise disable machines, equipment or processes to prevent unexpected energizing, start-up, or the
  release of stored electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or other energy.

  2. Definitions
  These definitions apply to these terms as they are used in this policy:

  Affected Employee/User - A person whose job requires him/her to operate or use a machine or equipment
  on which servicing or maintenance is being performed under lockout or tagout, or whose job requires him/her
  to work in an area in which such servicing or maintenance is being performed.

  Affected Unit - Any college, department, center, institute, or business within the College community that
  contains machinery or equipment subject to lockout or tagout procedures.

  Authorized Employee/User - A person who locks out or tags out machines or equipment to perform service
  or maintenance on that particular item. An affected employee/user becomes an authorized employee/user
  when that employee's duties include performing service or maintenance on machines or equipment covered
  under this policy.

  Blocking Tag -A tagout device that indicates the use of chains, wedges, key blocks, adapter pins, or self-
  locking fasteners for isolating, securing or blocking of equipment from energy sources.

  Energy Isolating Device - A mechanical device that physically prevents the transmission or release of
  energy, including but not limited to, the following: a manually operated electrical circuit breaker; a disconnect
  switch; a manually operated switch by which the conductors of a circuit can be disconnected from all
  ungrounded supply conductors, and, in addition, no pole can be operated independently; a line valve; a block;
  and any similar device used to block or isolate energy. Push buttons, selector switches and other control circuit
  type devices are not energy isolating devices.

  Going Through a Tag - A procedure in which a piece of equipment or machinery is started when the
  lockout/tagout procedure is in place.

  Hot Tap - A procedure used in repair, maintenance, and service activities that involves welding a piece of
  equipment (pipelines, vessels or tanks) under pressure to install connections or appurtenances.

  Lockout - The placement of a lockout device on an energy isolating device according to an established
  procedure; this ensures that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled cannot be
  operated until the lockout device is removed.

  Lockout Device - A device that uses a lock, either key or combination type, to hold an energy isolating device
  in a safe position and prevent the energizing of a machine or other equipment. Included are blank flanges and
  bolted slip blinds.

  LOTO – acronym for Lockout/Tagout.

  Normal Operations - The utilization of a machine or other equipment to perform its intended function

  OSHA – Occupational Safety and Health Administration, an agency in the Department of Labor. Develops and
  enforces Occupational safety standards.

  Owner's Representative - An individual who represents the college in all aspects of: 1) A project when
  dealing with a contractor; 2) A lease agreement when dealing with a vendor. Caution: Some leases may define
  these owner's representatives as "contact persons" or "program directors”.

  Servicing and/or Maintenance - Work place activities such as constructing, installing, setting up, adjusting,
  inspecting, modifying, and maintaining and/or servicing machines or other equipment. These activities include
  lubrication, cleaning or un-jamming of machines or other equipment and making adjustments or tool changes,
  where the employee/user may be exposed to the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment or
  release of hazardous energy.

  Tagout - The placement of a tagout device on an energy isolating device, according to an established
  procedure, to indicate that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled may not be

                                                                                                                98
operated until the tagout device is removed.

Tagout Device - A prominent warning device, such as a tag and a means of attachment, which can be
securely fastened to an energy isolating device according to an established procedure, to indicate that the
energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled may not be operated until the tagout device is
removed.


3. Scope of this policy

The college wishes to prevent injury to employees/users engaged in service or maintenance activities of
machines, equipment, or processes where the release of energy may put them at serious risk. Examples of
such machinery or equipment include but are not limited to autoclaves, boilers, electron microscopes,
elevators, fan systems, and lasers. Work situations where unexpected energization or start-up can occur
include new construction, installation or set-up of equipment, and the adjustment, inspection, maintenance,
repair, and service of machines and equipment.

Energy types to be considered include electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, and thermal.

This policy contains procedures for the service and maintenance of equipment and machines where the
unexpected energization or start-up could cause injury to employees/users.

Caution: The following situations are not subject to the procedures outlined in this document:

Work on plug and cord type electrical equipment, for which exposure to the hazards of unexpected energizing,
start up, or the release of stored energy of the equipment is effectively controlled by the unplugging of the
equipment from the energy sources and by the plug being under the exclusive control of the employee/user
performing the servicing or maintenance;

Hot tap operations involving transmission and distribution systems for substances such as gas, steam, water,
or petroleum products when they are performed on pressurized pipelines provided that it is clear that
continuity of service is essential, shutdown of the system is impractical, and documented procedures and
special equipment are implemented which will provide proven and effective protection for
employees/users.

Service or maintenance that takes place during normal maintenance operations, such as lubricating, cleaning,
and making minor adjustments and simple tool changes, except when an employee/user is required to place
any part of his/her body into an area on a machine or piece of equipment where work is actually performed
upon the materials being processed (i.e., point of operation) or where an associated danger zone exists during
a machine operating cycle.

Each unit is responsible for the development of specific energy control procedures for each machine or other
equipment within its respective areas of responsibility.

This policy is specifically intended to prevent injuries to employees/users engaged in service or maintenance
activities of machines, equipment, or processes where the release of stored energy may put them at serious
risk. This policy ensures college compliance with OSHA 29CFR 1910.147.

4. Contacts
Direct any general questions about the Lockout/Tagout Policy to your department's administrative office. If you
have specific questions, call the following offices

Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) 487-4585

5. General Policy Provisions
The administrative head of each unit is responsible for the implementation of these procedures to ensure the
safety of the employees/users. These procedures apply to the control of energy sources during service,
installation, removal, or maintenance of machines or equipment.

Procedures that affect the control of hazardous energy require:
• shutting off the equipment or machine;
• locating the energy isolating devices and isolating the equipment or machinery from them;
• locking or tagging out the energy isolating devices;
• reducing or eliminating stored residual energy;
• verifying the effectiveness of the energy isolation.
                                                                                                                99
All employees/users are required to comply with the restrictions and limitations imposed upon them during the
use of a lockout device. The authorized employees/users are further required to perform the lockout according
to requirements in the Lockout/Tagout Policy's "Affected Unit Written Procedures" segment of this document.

All employees/users, upon observing a machine or piece of equipment that is locked out to perform service or
maintenance, must not attempt to start, energize, or use that machine or equipment.

All employees/users must remove a lockout device before leaving the campus upon completion of a job.

Owner's representatives must inform all outside contractors performing work on the campus, of the college's
Lockout/Tagout Policy's procedures and requirements.

The requirements for the use of/installation of energy-isolating devices must be stated in Division I,
Contractor's Obligations of the contract specifications.

Violators should immediately be reported to the appropriate administrative head of each unit.

Whenever a machine or equipment is replaced, repaired, renovated, or modified, or whenever a new machine
or equipment is installed, energy-isolating devices that are designed to accept a lockout device must be used.

6. Regulated Equipment List

Facilities and Maintenance must keep a master list of all machines and equipment covered by this policy, as
well as conduct ongoing surveys of all equipment regulated by this policy. Supplemental lists must be
maintained by the administrative head of each unit for areas for which they are responsible.

The lists must include:
•   The types and locations of the equipment and the location of the operating controls.
•   The types and locations of the energy isolating devices, including any types of stored energy and the
method of dissipation or restraint.
• The types and magnitude of the energy.
• The hazards of the energy and the method of control.
• The names/job titles of affected employees/users and method of notification

7. Sequences of LOTO Systems Procedures

    1.   When servicing or maintaining an activity that necessitates or causes a utility interruption, the work
         must be done in compliance with the Facilities and Maintenance "Utility Shutdown Procedure."

    2.   If a Life Safety System is activated, e.g. fire suppression or fire alarm, the Department of
         Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) and the College Police Department must be notified prior to
         the project start.

    3.   Before starting the project, all affected employees/users must be notified that a lockout or tagout
         system is going to be utilized and give the reason for that utilization. Operators must be consulted
         and notified because those persons will know the type and magnitude of energy that the machine or
         equipment uses and will be able to explain the hazards involved.

    4.   If the machine or equipment is operating, it must be shut down by the normal stopping procedure
         (depress stop button, open toggle switch, etc.).

    5.   Switches, valves or other energy isolating devices must be placed in the “shutoff position so that the
         equipment is disconnected from its energy source(s). Stored energy (such as that in springs, elevated
         machine members, rotating flywheels, hydraulic systems, and air, gas, steam, or water pressure,
         etc.) must be dissipated or restrained by methods such as repositioning, blocking, bleeding down, etc.
         Caution: Substations must be racked down and locked out in case of high voltage electrical
         distribution systems. At the building end of the feeder, the incoming breaker or switch must also be
         racked down or opened and locked out. This prevents a back feed on the system through a local buss
         tie breaker.

    6.   Lockout devices must be attached in such a manner so as to secure the energy isolating devices in
         the "safe" or "off" position before the blocking material may be removed safely




                                                                                                             100
    7.   Supervisors and operators must be certain that energy sources have been disconnected by checking
         the normal operating controls. Caution: Operating controls must be returned to their "neutral" or "off"
         positions after the test.

    8.   When the use of lockout devices and procedures is impossible, a tagout device must be placed to
         indicate that the operation or movement of energy isolating devices from the "safe" or "off" position is
         prohibited.

    9.   When possible, the tags must be placed at the same point at which a lockout would have been
         attached. If this is not feasible, the tag must be placed as closely as safety allows to the device in a
         position that will be immediately obvious to anyone who attempts to operate the device. Caution:
         Tags may promote a false sense of security.

    10. All locked out equipment must be reported to the shift supervisor when locked out and when returned
        to normal service.

    11. Once the locked out or tagged out is placed on the equipment, no person should attempt to operate
        any switch, valve, or other energy isolating device where it is locked out or tagged out.

8. Restoring Machines or Equipment to Normal Operations
When the servicing or maintenance is completed and the equipment is ready to be returned to normal
operating condition, the following steps must be taken:
• Check the equipment and area to ensure that all nonessential items and tools have been removed and
    that the equipment is operationally intact.
• Check to ensure that all employees/users have been safely positioned or removed from the area.
• Verify that the controls are in neutral
• Remove the lockout devices and re-energize
• Caution: Some types of blocking may require re-energization of the equipment
• Report to the shift supervisor when the equipment is returned to normal service.

9. Acquiring New or Modifying Old Equipment
When a machine or other equipment is replaced or repaired, renovated or modified, or newly installed, it must
be a requirement that those machines and equipment are designed to accept a lockout device

When installing new machinery and/or equipment, be certain to forward the appropriate information to
Physical Plant for inclusion on the master list.

The following criteria must also be met:
•   The energy isolating devices must meet requirements outlined in the College Design and Construction
    Standards.
• Requirements for those devices must be included in the Physical Plant guidelines for the estimating of
    short form jobs/contracts.
• Those requirements must also be stated in Division 1, Contractor's Obligations of the contract
    specifications.
• Purchase of equipment that is covered by this policy, whether through contract or the NCF purchasing
    facilities, must comply with the requirements for energy isolating devices.

10.Equipment LOTO: When More than One Person is Involved
When more than one person is required to lockout or tagout equipment, each must place his/her own personal
lockout device or tagout device on the energy isolating device(s).

When an energy isolating device cannot accept multiple locks or tags, a lockout or tagout device (hasp) must
be used which can accept multiple locks, or a single lock with a single key may be used to lockout the machine
or equipment. The single key must be placed in a lockout box or cabinet which allows the use of multiple locks
to secure it.

11.Requirements for Lockout/Tagout Devices
Lockout and tagout devices must be standardized throughout the college. Each lockout and tagout device must
indicate the identity of the authorized employee using the device and must warn against the re- energizing of
the equipment.


                                                                                                               101
Units must supply all of their authorized employees/users with an adequate number of lockout and tagout
devices for their areas of responsibility.

The LOTO device must be readily identifiable and must not be used for any purpose other than energy control.

The following conditions must also be met:
• Locks must be individually keyed.
• One key must remain in the possession of the authorized employee/user; the other must be placed in a
    secure location in the appropriate supervisor's office.
• In case of a dire emergency condition, the supervisor may use the foreman's key to remove the lockout
    after it has been established that all safety precautions for removal of the lockout device have been
    observed.
• Supervisors must maintain a current list of key assignments, signed by the individual receiving the key. A
    duplicate copy of this list must be forwarded to the Office of Facilities and Campus Services.
• Blocking tags must be provided for those disconnect means where no locking ring is available.
• The authorized employee's name and the date when placed will be put on each tag.

12.Training
College departments must provide training to all authorized employees/users to ensure that the purpose and
function of the energy control procedures are understood. Furthermore, each college department must
provide employees/users the knowledge and skills necessary for the safe application, usage, and removal of
the energy controls that are required. Training sessions should be scheduled as quickly as possible for any new
personnel who may require hazardous energy control training. Requests for assistance in locating materials
for LOTO training may be made to the EH&S department



13.Enforcement
Environmental Health and Safety may conduct periodic inspections of the LOTO Policy procedures during
routine inspections to ensure that the energy control procedures and requirements are being followed.
Additionally, the administrative head of each unit must correct any inadequacies in and/or deviations from the
procedure noted during periodic inspection.

•   The administrative head of each unit must respond to EH&S within 7 days that the problem has been
    corrected.
•   The success of the correction must be ascertained by the inspector during a review with the authorized
    and affected employees/users.
•   Enforcement of this procedure must be in accordance with disciplinary procedures established by Human
    Resources or as negotiated with the bargaining units.

14.Affected Unit Written Procedures
Each affected unit is responsible for developing and maintaining specific energy control procedures for each
machine or other equipment within its respective areas of responsibility when any of the following conditions
exist:
• The machine or other equipment has more than one energy source;
• The machine or other equipment has a single energy source and cannot be isolated from that energy
     source and completely de-energized and de-activated by locking out that single source;
• The lockout device is not under the exclusive control of the authorized employee/user performing the
     service or maintenance;
• There has been an accident involving the unexpected activation or re-energization of the machine or
     equipment during servicing or maintenance.
• Affected units must update these procedures whenever there are equipment changes.

15.Responsibilities
The major responsibilities each party has in connection with the college's LOTO Policy are as follows:
• Provide initial training to all employees/users
• Affected Unit - Communicate the provisions of the Lockout/Tagout Policy to all staff.
• Develop and maintain written procedures
• Provide specific training for areas of responsibility
• Develop an internal method of recording compliance with this policy
                                                                                                           102
   •   Support the implementation of this policy

   16.When Outside Contractor is Assisting College Personnel: Equipment LOTO
   The minimum performance standard of contractors is compliance with the OSHA standard. Where College
   personnel are involved and College policy clearly requires additional safety requirements, contractors must
   comply with those requirements. When an outside contractor is assisting college personnel and both are
   involved in the LOTO procedures, each must place his/her own personal lockout device or tagout device on the
   energy isolating device(s).

   Each employee/user must use his/her own lock to secure the box or cabinet. When each person no longer
   needs to maintain his/her lockout protection, that person will remove his/her lock from the box or cabinet
   When an energy isolating device cannot accept multiple locks or tags, a lockout or tagout device (hasp) must
   be used which can accept multiple locks, or a single lock with a single key may be used to lockout the machine
   or equipment. The single key must be placed in a lockout box or cabinet which allows the use of multiple locks
   to secure it.

   Each employee/user must use his/her own lock to secure the box or cabinet. When each person no longer
   needs to maintain his/her lockout protection, that person will remove his/her lock from the box or cabinet.


   17.References
   OSHA 29CFR 1910.147; Governors Executive Order 2000-292


O. Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan

   July 25, 2007

   Mr. Ron Hambrick
   Director of Environmental Health and Safety
   New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
   5800 Bay Shore Road
   Sarasota, Florida 34243-2109
   Phone: (941) 487-4585
   Fax: (941) 487-5021
   Re: Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan

   New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
   5800 Bay Shore Road
   Sarasota, Sarasota County, Florida
   FDEP Facility ID # 089102896
   PSI Project No. 552-7G042

   Dear Mr. Hambrick:
   In accordance with Purchase Order No. P3071331 issued by New Florida College and
   Professional Service Industries, Inc. (PSI) proposal No. 552-G7050 dated February 21, 2007,
   PSI has prepared a Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPC) Plan for the above
   referenced facility. Please find three copies of the SPCC Plan enclosed.
   The SPCC Plan includes provisions for upper management commitment to implementation of
   the plan, as well as training requirements for the institution’s employees. Please read and
   follow these provisions carefully.
   The facility owner or operator must review the SPCC Plan every five years. Any amendments
   resulting from this review must be incorporated into the written SPCC plan. The SPCC Plan
   must be amended if any change in the facility design, construction, operation or maintenance
   occurs that materially affects the facility’s potential of discharging oil or petroleum products.
   Regulatory agencies can also require amendments if a spill occurs. A registered engineer must
   certify all amendments.
   Thank you for choosing PSI as your consultant for this project. If you have any questions, or if
   we can be of additional service, please callus at (813) 886-1075.

                                                                                                                 103
Respectfully submitted,

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE INDUSTRIES, INC.
David Bearce Stephen P. Long, P.E., P.G.
Project Manager Chief Engineer
Enclosure

R:\552-Env\Proposals - 2007\G - Proposals 2007\G7065 Charlotte County Airport Road Annex\G7065.doc


TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Introduction………………………………………………………………………………3
II. Professional Engineer Certification…………………………………….……………..5
III. Facility Identification and Manager Certification……………………..……………...6
IV. Oil Spill History………………………..………………………………………………...7
V. Petroleum Storage Equipment…………..…………………………………………….8
VI. Recommendations…………………………………………………………………….15
VII. Spill Response Equipment…………………………………..……………………….19
VIII. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES – SPILL RESPONSE
Tables
Table 1 – Summary of Petroleum Storage Vessels
Table 2 – Emergency Contact Numbers
Figures
Figure 1 – Florida College - Sarasota Campus Site Map
Figure 2 – Physical Plant Fuel ASTs
Figure 3 – Physical Plant Emergency Generator/AST Site Map
Figure 4 – Sudakoff Center Emergency Generator/AST Site Map
Figure 5 – Heisner Natural Science Emergency Generator/AST Site Map
Figure 6 – Pritzer Marine Science Emergency Generator/AST Site Map
Figure 7 – Chiller Building Emergency Generator/AST Site Map
Figure 8 – Palmer Building A Emergency Generator/AST Site Map
Appendices
Appendix A: Facility Inspection Checklist
Appendix B: Site Photos
Appendix C: MSDS
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 3 of 20

I. INTRODUCTION
A Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan has been prepared for the New
Florida College – Sarasota Campus facility located at 5800 Bay Shore Road, Sarasota, Florida.
The Plan was prepared in compliance with EPA Clean Water Act requirements under 40 CFR
Part 112.
The purpose of the SPCC Plan is to provide an engineering and management strategy that first
minimizes the potential for petroleum spills, and second, minimizes the possibility for spilled
petroleum protects, such as fuel and oil, from entering a waterway. New Florida College has
anticipated potential situations that could result in the release of petroleum protects and has
developed a plan to avoid and address these circumstances. A copy of this SPCC Plan must
be maintained on-site and available at all times.
An SPCC Plan is required when there is an aggregate aboveground storage capacity of 1,320
gallons or greater of fuel and/or oil. New Florida College has approximately 4,700 gallons of
aboveground petroleum storage capacity and is, therefore, required to maintain an SPCC Plan.
Completely buried tanks, subject to a state program approved under 40 CFR Part 281, are
exempt from SPCC. However, these underground storage tanks (UST/s) must be shown on the
facility diagram if present at the facility.
The petroleum storage systems at the New Florida College facility provide fuel for vehicle
fueling and emergency electrical power generation in the event of a commercial power outage.
The petroleum storage facilities include 6 above ground storage tanks (with varying fuel storage
capacities) within back-up generators and 2 – 1,500 gallon AST’s containing petroleum
products. Table 1 provides a summary of the storage vessels, contents, type of constructions,
and other information. Some of these storage vessels are subject to deliveries and pick up of
petroleum products and fueling operations on a daily basis. These activities present a risk for
spills and will be addressed in this report.
New Florida College personnel are not directly involved in petroleum transfer operations from
the delivery tank trucks to the fuel storage tanks at the facility. Fuel vendors are responsible for

                                                                                                       104
meeting DOT and EPA regulations regarding fuel delivery operations. New Florida College
personnel maintain equipment, supplies, and procedures for dealing with releases that may
occur during petroleum delivery operations.
The SPCC Plan must be reviewed and evaluated by the Owner or designated representative
every 5 years. The Owner must document (to the file) completion of the review and evaluation,
and sign a statement as to whether or not the plan will be amended. The Plan must be
amended when there is a change in the facility design, construction, operations, or maintenance
that materially affects its potential for discharge. Examples of changes that may require
amendment of the Plan include, but are not limited to the following: commissioning or
decommissioning containers, replacement, reconstruction, or movement of containers;
reconstruction, replacement, or installation of piing systems; construction or demolition that
might alter secondary containment structures; changes of product or service; or revision of
standard operation or maintenance procedures at a facility. An amendment must be prepared
within 6 months of one of these events, and implemented as soon as possible, but not later than
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 4 of 20
6 months following preparation of the amendment. Any technical amendment to the SPCC Plan
must be certified by a Professional Engineer.
The user should note that compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR Part 112 and this SPCC
do not necessarily constitute compliance with Chapter 62-761, Florida Administrative Code
(FAC) (Petroleum storage Tanks). Separate compliance requirements for petroleum fuel
storage may apply under Chapter 62-761, FAC.
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 5 of 20

II. Spill Prevention, Control, and
Countermeasure Plan for the New Florida College-
Sarasota Campus Above Ground Storage Tank
and Emergency Generator System
NEW FLORIDA COLLEGE
Sarasota, Florida
Prepared by
Professional Service Industries, Inc.
5801 Benjamin Center Drive, Suite 112
Tampa, Florida 33634
In accordance with the provisions of 40 CFR Part 112, this Spill Prevention Control and
Countermeasures Plan for the New Florida College – Sarasota Campus located in Sarasota,
Sarasota County, Florida has been prepared under the direct supervision of a Professional
Engineer registered in the State of Florida. This statement attests that the undersigned is
familiar with the requirements of 40 CFR part 112; that he or his agent has visited and examined
the facility; that the Plan has been prepared in accordance with good engineering practice,
including consideration of the applicable industry standards, and with the requirements of this
part; including consideration of the applicable industry standards, and with the requirements of
this part; and that the Plan is adequate for this facility.
_______________________________
Stephen P. Long, P.E., P.G. Date
Florida P.E. License No. 47027
Professional Service Industries, Inc.
5801 Benjamin Center Drive, Suite 112
Tampa, Florida 33634
Engineering Business Certificate of Authorization No. 3684
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 6 of 20

III. FACILITY IDENTIFICATION
1. Facility Name: New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
2. Type of Facility Administrative Offices, Class Rooms, Maintenance, and Fueling
Facility
3. Facility Address: 5800 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota, Florida 34243-2109
4. FDEP Facility ID 08/8631204
5. Date of Initial Facility Operation (Year) – July 1, 2001 (Some of the AST’s were installed
prior to initial date of facility operation)
6. Facility Person Responsible for SPCC Plan Management & Implementation:
Name: Ron Hambrick

                                                                                                   105
Title: Director of Environmental Health and Safety
Address: 5800 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota, Florida 34242-2109
7. Facility Management Approval: Must be signed by and individual possessing the level of
authority to commit the resources needed to fully implement the plan. Typically, this
individual will be the responsible facility manager.
I hereby certify that I have personally examined and am familiar with the information in this
document, and that based on my inquiry of those individuals responsible for obtaining this
information, I believe that the submitted information is true, accurate, and complete.
Name: Ron Hambrick
Signature ______________________________________
Title Director of Environmental Health and Safety
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 7 of 20

IV. OIL SPILL HISTORY
This section describes petroleum product spills that may have occurred at this facility in the 12
months prior to Inspection Date.
Was there a spill incident at this facility in the 12 months prior to Inspection Date?
(Bold One): Yes No
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 8 of 20

V. PETROLEUM STORAGE EQUIPMENT
This section provides specific information regarding the on-site petroleum storage systems.
Since multiple storage vessels are located at the facility, each storage vessel or group of
vessels will be described separately. A summary of all petroleum storage vessels including
installation dates and status of leak detection is contained on Table 1.
STORAGE TANKS – PHYSICAL PLANT
Tank
Number
Installation
Date
AST
or
UST
Capacity
(gallons) Contents Tank Construction
Leak
Detection
Equipment
1 January 2005 AST 1,500 Diesel Double-Wall Steel Veeder Root
2 January 2005 AST 1,500 Diesel Double-Wall Steel Veeder Root
The facility contains three ASTs at the Physical Plant (See Figures 2 and 3). Two of the three
ASTs at the Physical Plant referenced in the table above are both 1,500 gallon storage capacity
ASTs that contain diesel fuel. These two ASTs serve as the primary source of fuel for the
facility fleet vehicles. A spill associated with these two ASTs would most likely be the result of
releases during filling operations (overfilling, etc.) or a breach of a tank wall or piping. The
potential quantity released varies but could be the entire volume of the two ASTs (3,000
gallons). The two ASTs currently sit on a concrete slab with surrounding eight foot tall chain link
fence with privacy slats. The concrete slab is immediately adjacent to surrounding asphalt
driveway and parking areas. The slope of the surrounding asphalt is greater than 2 percent
indicates the most likely flow direction of a potential diesel spill would be towards a depression
in the asphalt area southeast of the ASTs leading to a natural swale along University Parkway.
The following table shows the direction and distance from the ASTs to the nearest out-fall to
surface waters.
Storm Drain Ditch Creek/Gully River Pond/Lake Other
N/A 45 feet
southeast N/A N/A N/A N/A
Spill Overprotection? YES
Corrosion Protection? YES
Secondary Containment? YES
Piping
Piping Type: Galvanized pipe or Black Steel pipe
Piping Location: Above ground

                                                                                                      106
Distance Between Tank and Dispenser: Less than 10 feet
Diameter of Pipe: 2” and ¾”
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 9 of 20
STORAGE TANKS – PHYSICAL PLANT
Tank
Number
Installation
Date
AST
or
UST
Capacity
(gallons) Contents Tank Construction
Leak
Detection
Equipment
3 December
2006
AST 200 Diesel Single Wall Steel None
The emergency generator for the Physical Plant is located near the southwest corner of the
building approximately 3 feet from the face of the building (See Figure 2). A maximum
discharge of 200 gallons could occur during bulk delivery of diesel fuel.
The land is generally flat with a slight slope to the west. A ditch running north/south is
approximately 60 feet away from the emergency generator AST and is the most likely recipient
of a potential spill. The surrounding surface is asphalt with a slope less than one percent. The
ditch runs to a dry retention pond several feet south of the Physical Plant. Spilled diesel fuel,
depending upon quantity, could flow to the ditch and subsequently to the dry retention pond.
The following table shows the direction and distance to the nearest outfall.
Storm Drain Ditch Creek/Gully River Pond/Lake Other
N/A 60 feet west N/A N/A N/A N/A
Spill Overprotection? NO
Corrosion Protection? YES
Secondary Containment? NO
Piping
Piping Type: Galvanized pipe
Piping Location: Above ground
Distance Between Tank and Dispenser: N/A
Diameter of Pipe: ¾”
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 10 of 20
STORAGE TANKS – SUDAKOFF CENTER
Tank
Number
Installation
Date
AST
or
UST
Capacity
(gallons) Contents Tank Construction
Leak
Detection
Equipment
4 August 2005 AST 495 Diesel Single Wall Steel None
The emergency generator for the Sudakoff Center is located on the west side of the building
with protective bollards surrounding it (See Figure 4). A maximum discharge of 495 gallons
could occur during bulk delivery of diesel fuel.
The land is generally flat and the surrounding surface consists of a dirt road and grass. A storm
drain is approximately 30 feet northwest of the emergency generator/AST with a concrete
sidewalk immediately north. The storm drain inlet has an outfall to a dry retention pond
approximately 100 feet north of the emergency generator/AST. Spilled diesel fuel, depending
on quantity, could flow to the storm drain inlet and subsequently to the dry retention pond. The
following table shows the direction and distance to the nearest outfall.
Storm Drain Ditch Creek/Gully River Pond/Lake Other
30 feet

                                                                                                    107
northwest N/A N/A N/A N/A
Retention
pond 100 feet
north
Spill Overprotection? NO
Corrosion Protection? YES
Secondary Containment? NO
Piping
Piping Type: Galvanized pipe
Piping Location: Above ground
Distance Between Tank and Dispenser: N/A
Diameter of Pipe: ¾”
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 11 of 20
STORAGE TANKS – HEISNER NATURAL SCIENCE BUILDING
Tank
Number
Installation
Date
AST
or
UST
Capacity
(gallons) Contents Tank Construction
Leak
Detection
Equipment
4 August 1999 AST 510 Diesel Single Wall Steel None
The emergency generator for the Heisner Natural Science Building is located near the northeast
corner of the building (See Figure 5). A maximum discharge of 510 gallons could occur during
bulk delivery of diesel fuel.
The land is generally flat with a slight slope to the north. Two major utility valves surrounded by
protective bollards are located to the immediate northwest of the emergency generator/AST.
The utility valves cause a slight a depression in the topography within the surrounding grass
and is the most likely recipient of a potential diesel spill. There is a storm drain inlet
approximately 60 feet northwest from the emergency generator/AST that leads to on-site
retention that could potentially take in any overflow from the depressional area. A ditch running
north/south is approximately 100 feet west of the emergency generator AST that could also
possibly receive overflow from the depressional area. The following table shows the direction
and distance to the nearest outfall.
Storm Drain Ditch Creek/Gully River Pond/Lake Other
60 feet
northwest 100 feet west N/A N/A N/A N/A
Spill Overprotection? NO
Corrosion Protection? YES
Secondary Containment? NO
Piping
Piping Type: Galvanized pipe
Piping Location: Above ground
Distance Between Tank and Dispenser: N/A
Diameter of Pipe: ¾”
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 12 of 20
STORAGE TANKS – PRITZER MARINE SCIENCES BUILDING
Tank
Number
Installation
Date
AST
or
UST
Capacity
(gallons) Contents Tank Construction
Leak
Detection
Equipment

                                                                                                      108
5 April 2004 AST 250 Diesel Single Wall Steel None
The emergency generator for the Pritzer Marine Sciences Building is located on the north side
of the building with protective bollards surrounding it (See Figure 6). A maximum discharge of
250 gallons could occur during bulk delivery of diesel fuel.
The land is generally flat and the surrounding surface consists of grass and an asphalt driveway
immediately west of the emergency generator. A dry retention pond is approximately 50 feet
west of the emergency generator/AST. Spilled diesel fuel, depending on quantity, could flow to
the dry retention pond across the asphalt driveway. The following table shows the direction and
distance to the nearest outfall.
Storm Drain Ditch Creek/Gully River Pond/Lake Other
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Retention
pond 50 feet
west
Spill Overprotection? NO
Corrosion Protection? YES
Secondary Containment? NO
Piping
Piping Type: Flexible Steel pipe
Piping Location: Above ground
Distance Between Tank and Dispenser: N/A
Diameter of Pipe: ¾”
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 13 of 20
STORAGE TANKS – CHILLER BUILDING
Tank
Number
Installation
Date
AST
or
UST
Capacity
(gallons) Contents Tank Construction
Leak
Detection
Equipment
6 October 2006 AST 450 Diesel Single Wall Steel Interstitial
Float
The emergency generator/AST for the Chiller Building is located on the east side of the building
(See Figure 7). The emergency generator/AST is surrounded by a 6 foot tall chain link fence
with privacy slats. A maximum discharge of 450 gallons could occur during bulk delivery of
diesel fuel.
The land is generally flat and the surrounding surface consists of grass. A storm drain is
located immediately to the northeast of the chain link fenced compound. The storm drain is
connected to a dry retention pond located approximately 75 feet north of the emergency
generator/AST. Spilled diesel fuel, depending on quantity, could flow to the storm drain inlet
and subsequently to the dry retention pond. The following table shows the direction and
distance to the nearest outfall.
Storm Drain Ditch Creek/Gully River Pond/Lake Other
Immediately
northeast of
the compound
N/A N/A N/A N/A
Retention
pond 75 feet
north
Spill Overprotection? NO
Corrosion Protection? YES
Secondary Containment? YES
Piping
Piping Type: Flexible Steel pipe
Piping Location: Above ground
Distance Between Tank and Dispenser: N/A
Diameter of Pipe: ¾”
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus

                                                                                                   109
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 14 of 20
STORAGE TANKS – PALMER BUILDING A
Tank
Number
Installation
Date
AST
or
UST
Capacity
(gallons) Contents Tank Construction
Leak
Detection
Equipment
7 October 2006 AST 1,200 Diesel Single Wall Steel None
The emergency generator/AST for the Palmer Building A is located on the north side of the
building with an 8 foot tall masonry block wall surrounding it (See Figure 8). A maximum
discharge of 1,200 gallons could occur during bulk delivery of diesel fuel.
The land is generally flat and the surrounding surface consists of. A ditch running east/west is
located 60 feet southwest of the emergency generator/AST. The ditch leads to a dry retention
pond greater than 100 feet west of the emergency generator/AST. Spilled diesel fuel,
depending on quantity, could flow to the ditch and subsequently to the dry retention pond. The
following table shows the direction and distance to the nearest outfall.
Storm Drain Ditch Creek/Gully River Pond/Lake Other
N/A 60 feet
southwest N/A N/A N/A
Retention
pond greater
than 100 feet
west
Spill Overprotection? NO
Corrosion Protection? YES
Secondary Containment? YES
Piping
Piping Type: Steel flex pipe
Piping Location: Above ground
Distance Between Tank and Dispenser: N/A
Diameter of Pipe: ¾”
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 15 of 20

VI. RECOMMENDATIONS
1. At each location where an AST is located, the most likely path of a potential diesel fuel
discharge is directly into a dry retention pond or into a conveyance structure leading to a
dry retention pond. Therefore, it is recommended all foliage be maintained in and
around all dry retention areas, conveyance ditches, and grass areas to quickly identify a
diesel fuel discharge.
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 16 of 20

VII. SPILL RESPONSE EQUIPMENT
Spill control equipment should be readily available during tank filling, storage and maintenance
operations. At a minimum, the equipment will include granular absorbent, absorbent pads and
booms, brooms, shovels, latex gloves, eye protection and an empty 55 gallon drum.
Portable fire extinguishers should be located at each location an AST is located; be well
marked, and easily accessible. Records should be kept on all fire suppression equipment in
service, and regular testing should be performed with established procedures.
Notification Requirements
In the event of a recognized spill, all facility personnel have the authority and responsibility to
report the release to the local fire authority and to the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (FDEP). One discharge greater than a volume of 1,000 gallons or two discharges
greater than 42 gallons within 12 months of each other require reporting to the FDEP.
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 17 of 20


                                                                                                      110
VIII. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES – SPILL RESPONSE
General
US EPA regulations define a spill as the discharge of petroleum into, or upon, the navigable
waters of the United States or adjoining shorelines, in harmful quantities. Harmful quantities are
defined as a discharge that violates applicable water quality standards or causes a sheen upon,
or discoloration of, the surface of the water or the adjoining shorelines. Contaminated ground
water may also have the potential to seep, each, or flow into navigable waters and is included in
this definition. Storm sewers are considered to fall under the definition of a “navigable
waterway” since most storm sewers eventually discharge into a navigable waterway.
An important facet of an effective response procedure during an oil or hazardous substance
release incident is to keep the material separated from water to minimize migration and the
resulting potential increase in human environmental exposure. Every effort should be made to
prevent spills and emphasize substance containment at the source rather than re sort to
separation of the material from expanded portions of the environment or downstream water.
Discovery of a Release
The person discovering a release of material from a container, tank, or operating equipment
should initiate certain actions immediately, including:
1. Extinguish any sources of ignition. Since the material (diesel fuel) is determined to be
combustible, all potential sources of ignition in the area should be removed. Vehicles should
be turned off. If the ignition source is stationary, attempt to move spilled material away from
ignition source. Avoid sparks and movement creating static electricity.
2. Identify the material released. Consult Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) provided in
this report which provides the information for proper identification of the characteristics of
the released material. MSDSs for materials stored in containers greater than 110 gallons in
volume are attached to this plan in Appendix D.
3. Attempt to stop the release at its source. Assure that no danger to human health
exists first. The discoverer may attempt simple procedures (turning valves, plugging leaks,
etc.) if there are no health or safety hazards and there is a reasonable certainty of the origin
of the leak.
4. Initiate spill notification and reporting procedures. Report the incident immediately to
the SPCC coordinator. He/she will in turn contact the appropriate authorities. If there is an
immediate threat to human life (e.g. a fire in progress or fumes overcoming workers), an
alarm should be sounded to evacuate potentially affected buildings, which will initiate a fire
department response. Request the assistance of the fire department's hazardous materials
response team if an uncontrollable spill has occurred and/or if the spill has migrated beyond
the site boundaries.
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 18 of 20
Containment of a Release
If material is released outside a containment area, it is critical that the material be contained as
quickly as possible. Action to be conducted may include:
1. Attempt to stop the release at the source. If the source of the release has not been
found; if special protective equipment is necessary to approach the release area; or if
assistance is required to stop the release, a fire department response should be initiated by
contacting the SPCC coordinator. He/she will then notify the appropriate agencies.
2. Contain the material released into the environment. Following proper safety procedures,
the spill should be contained by absorbent materials and dikes using shovels and brooms. A
discharge will most likely flow in the direction indicated on Figures 2 thru 8. Facility
personnel should place absorbent booms across the outfall to prevent material from
reaching any navigable waters or storm water conveyance structures. Consult applicable
MSDS for material compatibility, and environmental precautions.
3. Recover or cleanup the material spilled. As much material as possible should be
recovered and reused where appropriate. Material, which cannot be reused, must be
discarded as waste. Liquids absorbed by solid materials shall be shoveled into open top,
55-gallon drums, or if the size of the spill warrants, into a roll-off container. When drums are
filled after a cleanup, the drum lids shall be secured and the drums shall be appropriately
labeled identifying the contents, the date of the spill/cleanup, and the site name and
location. Combining non-compatible materials can cause potentially dangerous chemical
and/or physical reactions or may severely limit disposal options. Compatibility information
can be found on the material safety data sheets.
4. Clean up of the spill area. Surfaces that are contaminated by the release shall be cleaned
using an appropriate substance or water. Cleanup water must be minimized, contained and
properly disposed. Occasionally, porous materials (such as wood, soil, or oil-dry) may be
contaminated; such materials will require special handling for disposal.
5. Decontaminate tools and equipment used in cleanup. Even if dedicated to cleanup
efforts, tools and equipment that have been used must be decontaminated before replacing
them in the spill control kit.

                                                                                                       111
6. Notification and reports to outside agencies. The SPCC Coordinator shall determine if a
reportable spill has occurred and shall make all necessary notifications. Verbal notification
to government agencies and emergency planning committees shall be executed, if
necessary. In all cases where verbal notification is given, a confirming written report shall
be sent to the same entity.
7. Arrange for proper disposal of any waste materials. The waste material from the
cleanup must be characterized pursuant to state and federal regulations. Representative
sampling and analysis may be necessary to make this determination. The waste must be
transported and disposed in compliance with applicable laws and regulations.
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 19 of 20
8. Review the contingency and spill plans. Appropriate personnel shall review spill
response efforts, notification procedures, and cleanup equipment usage to evaluate their
adequacy during the episode. Where lessons learned are identified, the plan shall be
revised and amended.
INSPECTIONS, SECURITY AND TRAINING
Inspections
As part of the ongoing administration of the SPCC Plan, an inspection of the facility’s fuel
storage system must be conducted on a regular basis using the Facility Inspection Checklist in
Appendix A. A written copy of each inspection checklist must be maintained with the plan at
the facility for the length of service.
In accordance with 40 CFR Subchapter D – Water Programs, Part 112 – Oil Pollution
Prevention, dated January 27, 2004:
• Aboveground containers must be tested for integrity on a regular basis and whenever
material repairs are made. (According to DEP guidelines, testing is required annually).
Visual inspections must be combined with another testing technique such as hydrostatic
testing, radiographic testing, ultrasonic testing, acoustic emissions testing or another
system of non-destructive shell testing. Comparison records must be kept and the
containers’ supports and foundations must be inspected. In addition, the outside of the
container must be frequently inspected for signs of deterioration, discharge or
accumulation of oil inside diked areas.
• All bulk storage container installations must be constructed to provide a secondary
means of containment for the entire capacity of the largest single container and sufficient
freeboard to contain precipitation. Dikes must be sufficiently impervious to contain
discharged oil or use an alternative system consisting of a drainage trench enclosure
that must be arranged so that any discharge will terminate and be safely confined in a
facility catch basin or holding pond.
Testing of the integrity of each tank is required on a yearly basis. A Facility Integrity Testing
Record is provided in Appendix A. It is recommended that a written copy of the Integrity
Testing Record be maintained with the plan at the facility.
Security
Personnel must make all efforts possible to secure the facility area. The emergency generator
facility should be fully fenced when not in operation or unattended.
Training
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Plan July 25, 2007
New Florida College – Sarasota Campus
PSI Project No. 552-7G042 Page 20 of 20
Facility Management and personnel involved in the inspection and maintenance of the AST
should be familiar with the aboveground storage tank management procedures. The
procedures contain guidance for:
• AST registration
• Record keeping
• Emergency response procedures
• Regulatory reporting and operating requirements
• Discussion of any releases since last training session
Facility Management and personnel involved in the inspection and maintenance of the tanks
should be trained regarding spill prevention and control. An initial training session with new or
reassigned employees should be performed early in the assignment. Annual refresher training
should also be provided to all employees involved with these systems. The materials covered in
these training sessions should include:
• The physical set-up of the tank system (including piping, pumps, dispensers, etc.)
• Standard operation and maintenance procedures (including tank monitoring, inspections
and record keeping)
• Pollution control laws, rules, and regulations
• The SPCC Plan
Training records should be maintained with the SPCC for the length of the project.
TABLES

                                                                                                    112
  Table 1
  New Florida College -Sarasota Campus
  SPCC Plan
  Summary of Petroleum Storage Vessels
  Tank
  Number Tank Location Type Capacity Contents Installation
  Date
  Tank
  Construction Leak Detection Method
  1 Physical Plant AST 200 Diesel Dec., 2006 Double Wall Steel Veeder Root
  2 Physical Plant AST 1500 Diesel Jan., 2006 Double Wall Steel Veeder Root
  3 Physical Plant AST 1500 Diesel Jan., 2006 Single Wall Steel None
  4 Sudakoff Center AST 495 Diesel Aug., 2005 Single Wall Steel None
  5 Heisner Natural Science AST 510 Diesel Oct., 1999 Single Wall Steel None
  6 Pritzer Marine Science AST 250 Diesel April, 2004 Single Wall Steel None
  7 Chiller Building AST 450 Diesel Oct., 2006 Single Wall Steel Interstitial Float
  8 Palmer Building A AST 1200 Diesel Oct., 2006 Single Wall Steel None
  Table 2
  New Florida College -Sarasota Campus
  SPCC Plan
  Emergency Contact Numbers
  Local Site Emergency/Agency Telephone Number
  SPCC Coordinator (Ron Hambrick) 941-487-4585
  Emergencies (Fire, Police, Ambulance) 911
  Hospital (Erb Donald Do - 5350 University Pkwy) 941-917-4500
  Local Poison Information Center 800-282-3171
  Sarasota County Health Department 941-861-5000
  National Response Center (operated by USEPA and USCG) 201-321-6660
  Hazard Assessment Computer System 850-488-0190
  Florida Department of Environemtnal Protection 727-464-4761
  USEPA Environmental Response Team 800-424-8602




APPENDIX A
  APPENDIX A
  FACILITY INSPECTION CHECKLIST
  As part of the ongoing administration of the SPCC Plan, an inspection of the facility’s petroleum
  storage tank system must be conducted on a monthly basis. A written copy of this inspection
  checklist or suitable alternative must be maintained with the plan at the facility for a period of
  three years.
  PETROLEUM STORAGE TANK SYSTEM CHECKLIST (ASTs)
  1. Is the tank free of signs of damage, corrosion, or rust? Yes No
  2. Are all pipes and fittings between the tank and dispenser Yes No
  Free of signs of damage, corrosion, or rust?
  3. If present, are fuel transfer mumps working properly? Yes No
  4. If present, is the automatic tank gauging system functioning Yes No
  properly?
  5. Is the area around the tank and pipes free of staining? Yes No
  6. Is the fuel storage area secure from outside vandalism? Yes No
  Explain any “No” answers” or “Added Observations” here: _____________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  PETROLEUM STORAGE CHECKLIST (55-GALLON DRUMS AND TOTES)
  1. Is the container free of signs of damage, corrosion, or rust? Yes No
  2. Is the area around the container free of staining? Yes No
  3. Is the container storage area secure from outside vandalism? Yes No
  Explain any “No” answers” or “Added Observations” here: _____________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________
  ____________________________________________________________________________

                                                                                                       113
  Facility ID/Site Code: _________________
  ________________ ___________________________________
  Date Inspector
  APPENDIX A
  TANK INTEGRITY TESTING RECORD
  As part of the ongoing administration of the SPCC Plan, testing of the integrity of the facility’s
  fuel storage tank system is required on a yearly basis. A written copy of this inspection
  checklist should be maintained with the plan at the facility.
  Tank No.: ________________
  Date: ________________
  TYPE OF INTEGRITY TESTING (check all applicable test)
  Hydrostatic
  Acoustic Emissions
  ____ _
  ___ __
  Radiographic
  Ultrasonic
  ___ __
  ____ _
  Other: __________________________________________________
  Testing Performed By: _____________________________________
  Integrity Testing Results: Pass Fail
  Comments:
  ______________________________________________________________________
  ______________________________________________________________________
  ______________________________________________________________________
  Next Test Due: _______________________


APPENDIX B
  •   Photo No. 1: PHYSICAL PLANT EMERGENCY GENERATOR/AST (ABOVEGROUND STORAGE TANK).
  •   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
      Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
  •   Photo No. 2: PHYSICAL PLANT EMERGENCY GENERATOR AST FILL PORT AND FUEL TRANSFER HOUSING
  •   Photo No. 3: DITCH LOCATED ALONG THE WESTERN PROPERTY BOUNDARY NEAR THE PHYSICAL PLANT.
  •   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
      Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
  •   Photo No. 4: SUDAKOFF CENTER EMERGENCY GENERATOR/AST.
  •   Photo No. 5: SUDAKOFF CENTER EMERGENCY GENERATOR.
  •   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
      Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
  •   Photo No. 6: SUDAKOFF CENTER EMERGENCY GENERATOR AST FILL PORT.
  •   Photo No. 7: STORMWATER DRAINAGE GRATE NORTH OF THE SUDAKOFF CENTER GENERATOR AND AST.
  •   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
      Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
  •   Photo No. 8: HEISER NATURAL SCIENCES EMERGENCY GENERATOR/AST.
  •   Photo No. 9: HEISER NATURAL SCIENCES EMERGENCY GENERATOR AST FILL PORT AND
  •   FUEL TRANSFER HOUSING
  •   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
      Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
  •   Photo No. 10: HEISER NATURAL SCIENCES HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE TANKS. THE
  •   EMERGENCY GENERATOR IS VISIBLE BEHIND THE HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE
  •   TANKS. A STORMWATER DRAIN AND GREENHOUSE IS VISIBLE TOWARDS THE RIGHT.
  •   Photo No. 11: THE EMERGENCY GENERATOR/AST AT THE PRITZER MARINE SCIENCES BUILDING.
  •   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
      Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
  •   Photo No. 12: CLOSEUP OF THE PRITZER MARINE SCIENCES EMERGENCY GENERATOR.
  •   Photo No. 13: PRITZER MARINE SCIENCES EMERGENCY GENERATOR AST FILL PORT AND FUEL
  •   TRANSFER HOSES.
  •   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
      Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
  •   Photo No. 14: DRY RETENTION AREA LOCATED 5O FEET EAST OF THE PRITZER MARINE
  •   SCIENCES EMERGENCY GENERATOR.
  •   Photo No. 15: EMERGENCY GENERATOR FENCE ENCLOSURE AT CHILLER.
  •   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
      Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
  •   Photo No. 16: CHILLER EMERGENCY GENERATOR/AST.
  •   Photo No. 17: CHILLER EMERGENCY GENERATOR.

                                                                                                       114
•   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
    Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
•   Photo No. 18: CHILLER EMERGENCY GENERATOR AST FILL PORT.
•   Photo No. 19: CHILLER EMERGENCY GENERATOR AST LEAK DETECTOR.
•   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
    Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
•   Photo No. 20: STORM DRAIN LOCATED IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF THE CHILLER EMERGENCY
•   GENERATOR.
•   Photo No. 21: DRY RETENTION AREA LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 100 FEET NORTH OF THE CHILLER
•   EMERGENCY GENERATOR.
•   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
    Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
•   Photo No. 22: CONCRETE WALL ENCLOSURE FOR THE EMERGENCY GENERATOR/AST AT PALMER
•   BUILDING A.
•   Photo No. 23: PALMER BUILDING A EMERGENCY GENERATOR.
•   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
    Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
•   Photo No. 24: PALMER BUILDING A EMERGENCY GENERATOR AST FILL PORT AND FUEL TRANSFER LINES.
•   Photo No. 25: PHYSICAL PLANT FUEL ASTS.
•   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
    Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
•   Photo No. 26: AREA SOUTH OF PHYSICAL PLANT ASTS. UNIVERSITY PARKWAY IS BEYOND
•   THE FENCE.
•   Photo No. 27: REAR AREA OF PHYSICAL PLANT FUEL ASTS.
•   Professional Service Industries, Inc. • 5801 Benjamin Center Drive Suite 112 • Tampa, Florida 33634 •
    Phone 813/886-1075 • Fax 813/249-0301
•   Photo No. 28: DRY RETENTION AREA PRESENT TOWARDS THE EAST OF THE PHYSICAL PLANT
•   FUEL ASTS.




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