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					   RETAIN TO GAIN
The Route Pro Retention Program




                JAMES PEUSTER
CHAPTER ONE:     Defining Retention

CHAPTER TWO:     Retaining Route Customers

CHAPTER THREE:   Retaining Store Customers

CHAPTER FOUR:    Retaining Good Employees

CHAPTER FIVE:    Retaining Tools
PREFACE:
THANK YOU’S

Randy Mearkle
Randy contributed to this book with his experience and input. He continues to be
very influential to the success of The Route Pro Company and many of you have
already utilized his skills and knowledge.

RPI Members
So many of you implemented and created some of the steps involved in this book.
Your successes and failures will save many of the RPI members money, time and
frustration as well as the goal of this book-customers! Your input and BETA
testing is greatly appreciated; but it is your trust in our company we value the
most.

Ken Blanchard
Raving Fans changed my life many years ago. I have read many customer service
books, but this one combined with the EMyth is the best way to establish a
successful small business. I summarize Raving Fans later, but having every
employee read it will ensure the best customer service atmosphere you need to
survive and thrive in the 21st century.

Sandler Sales Training
Anybody who has gone through Sandler Training recognizes that they are geared
towards the 21st century consumer. Staying on top of not only the selling but the
servicing of today’s consumers is more important than ever.
My Wife, Peggy
Larry Long of Long Cleaners announced to the group that Peggy has made
sacrifices in allowing me to travel. Without her support, the knowledge I have
gained from all of you would be non-existent. She not only inspires me to
perform, she edited this book as well!

Al Robson
The brief time I was with BizBuilders alongside with Al were some of the most
instrumental and influential moments of career. His leadership and friendship
blessed many of you and I was privileged to spend time with Al. The cigars and
beers we shared after a seminar is what I miss the most.
CHAPTER ONE:
DEFINING RETENTION


The goal of retention is to increase sales, sales volume and customer loyalty by
creating an atmosphere in which our customers cannot find any reason to leave
us. We will look at route and retail through all 4 levels of a customer. Our goal is
to provide a stability insurance policy so that we are not recycling customers-
losing as much as we gain. While acquiring new customers is considered outside
marketing, a solid customer retention strategy is what I define as internal
marketing. Many dry-cleaners do not consider this position critical to growth;
however, the 21st century consumer looks for personal touch and relationships
more than ever in whom they choose to do business with. Thus, the better the
customer service, the better the communication, the better the retention.

Customer service is so reactive: we respond to emails, phone calls, or live
complaints. Too often we define our level of service solely based on how we fix
issues. We guarantee satisfaction; we quickly credit accounts and tell them I am
sorry. Ok, this is half the battle, but let’s do some preventive maintenance to
limit errors.
         Do I Need A Retention Strategy?
                           (REVISITED)
             You Need It More Than Ever




Why Customer Retention:
1) Cost Effective.
Customer retention is not only a cost effective and profitable strategy,
but in today's business world it's necessary. This is especially true when
you remember that 80% of your sales come from 20% of your clients.
With these accurate and somewhat understated statistics; I am
wondering why most of our marketing and sales efforts are designed
toward solely getting a new customer. After all, many experts will tell
you that it's up to five times more profitable to spend marketing and
advertising dollars to retain current customers than it is to acquire new
customers.

2) Customer Service.
Proactive communication is the key for retention. The consumer needs
to know that we care about them. Also, looking back at discounts, the
message we send trying to get new customers represents our own form
of being disloyal to those who feed us daily. Take for instance the
wireless telephone companies; if you sign a new contract you are given
a large rebate or even a free cellular telephone. If you are a current
customer you have the privilege of paying full price. With this type of
promotion, are we not just pushing current customers and clients to
seek services elsewhere when their contract ends? The same is true for
dish companies.

We also tend to take customers for granted and expect them to come
back. We feel that a great product and satisfactory customer service
will bring them back; this could not be further from the truth. The
economy, your competition as well as the other variables are causing
your stores and routes to decrease in sales, and you do nothing about
it.

As a result, customer loyalty has disappeared and large operators with
storefronts are unable to recognize why many of their disloyal
customers “what caused them to stray.”

3) Problem Solving
By utilizing your computer database, reports and other technology, you
can monitor, document and solve issues in a constructive, organized
way. Here are some bullet points.

        Retention strategies and programs entitle your customers to
         special offers, discounts, or preferential treatment.
        Welcome, acknowledgement, sales recognition, thank you
         statements for concerns.
        After sales satisfaction, complaint inquiries and surveys.
        Enhanced and empowered customer service, after sales, and
         technical support through automatic emails or dialers.

          Many of these can be done automatically in your POS.

      Keeping our customers and getting a new customer is business
101. You might ask “Why is it important to have a plan to keep them as
long as I give them good quality and good service at a fair price isn’t
that all that matters?” It sounds simple enough but if there’s one thing
I’ve learned if you do not have a plan to keep your customers then your
competition will have one.

The advantages of keeping your customers allows you to market to
them by selling them the other services you provide; who’s the best
person to sell to but one who is already sold! The other big advantage
is asking your customers to help sell for you, by asking your customers
for proactive referrals, you will create more leverage to grow. How
many times has a friend recommended a product or service to you and
you either bought or used the service…LWMM (Local Word of Mouth
Marketing) is the best way to grow your business.

Making as many touches to our customers will help us keep them
engaged with us. Once we lose the engagement, then we lose the
customer. Remember, customer service is usually reactive in our four
levels of management.




In reality, retention has to be more proactive. That is the purpose of
this book; our first step is to revisit the four levels of customers.
DEFINING THE 4 LEVELS OF A CUSTOMER.
                                  (REVISITED)
    We Welcome You

    We Love You

    We Miss You

    We Lost You
In order to fully implement a retention strategy, we must first define the status of
each customer. Although basic in nature, not knowing what to do as we look at
reports and just stare at the results. Now let’s do something proactive and
develop a system that will ensure that our customers stay our customers.

LEVEL ONE: WE WELCOME YOU’S
A new customer is someone who is new to the company for at least 30 days. This
is a very sensitive time for a new customer because they are trying us out and
looking for what kind of service and quality we provide. What we do or not do is
what is going to determine whether or not they will stay with us.

New customers come to us through various means. Sometimes we focus too
much on how they heard about us. Usually it is more than 2 to 3 reasons. They
see the van; look us up on the web, or just drove by on the way to Starbucks.
Bottom line is new customers are broken down in 2 categories:

                                 7-Days & 30 Days.

It is critical to separate these into 2 categories for one simple reason, seeing who
has used us the first time and if they have used us more than once. For retail, we
are hoping that they give us a second chance. For route, we can control and
monitor this easier.
LEVEL TWO: WE LOVE YOU’S
A core customer is someone who has used the service at least 4 times within a 13
week period. We will also implement the term CORE CUSTOMER. A core
customer is someone who has used the service at least 4 times within a 13 week
period. But once we get them to this point we have to look at what we are going
to do to keep them engaged if we ignore our customers them we risk losing them
to our competition.

Current customers are active in nature. Sure, they different trends or usage
patterns, but in general, they utilize our services on a regular basis. For retail, we
can accept the four weddings and a funeral customer as well as twice a week
ones. As for the route, we are looking for consumers to use us at least once a
month.

These are those who also have been with you a while and show up in your top
20% list.

LEVEL THREE: WE MISS YOU’S
This is a category that must be monitored and measured equally. Too often we
send out We Miss You coupons for those who just bring a shirt in every 6 months.
We tend to reward those who stop using us. For the sake of measuring, we will
separate the categories for missing customers in both the areas of retail and
route.



ROUTE PRO TIP: The key step in this process is to pre-qualify
your “we miss you’s”
ROUTE:
New customer we miss you’s.
It takes some customers a few weeks to get in the rhythm and after 21-30 days,
they may forget the days.
Core customer we miss you’s.
These are the ones who start going past the 30 – 60 day mark.

RETAIL:
Core customer we miss you’s.
These customers are part of the top 20% customer has not been coming in the
last 30 – 60 days.

These are the ones I call Metamucils – We wish you were more regular.

LEVEL FOUR: WE LOST YOU’S
For both route and retail, these are core customers who have not been in for over
60 days. This is where you must get more proactive in getting them back.
Before we diving in to the complete game plan, let’s look at the one book that
was a main inspiration for The Route Pro manual-Raving Fans by Ken Blanchard.


RAVING FANS-ROUTE PRO
PERSPECTIVE
Definition of Satisfied” Customers
Customers have awful experiences with companies. Services that are so bad that
people expect bad goods and rude service, flight delays from airlines, late
deliveries, lost orders, etc. However, they rarely complain. Check out the for
example a restaurant’s suggestion box and it’s empty. Customer surveys too, say
clients are “satisfied”.

Dry cleaning customers are no different. They feel like robots giving you their
phone number, receiving a bundle of clothes and accepting marginal cleaning
with so-so service from a part-time high school kid whose laptop is on the chair
and a school book on the counter.

Although routes raise the bar of service, the personalized touch is gone and they
are serviced individuals you would never have manage a store. Then when they
go to the store, the counter staff doesn’t support the process. This cycle creates
satisfied customers and then we risk losing them to a competitor.

Customer service needs to be elevated to establish what Ken Blanchard calls
raving fans. It starts with taking customers to the next level, core customers,
then to the final level-Raving Fans! But how?
THREE SECRETS TO “RAVING FANS”
Secret No.1 - DECIDE WHAT YOU WANT
Remember that you are the source for making this decision. Create a “vision” of
perfection centered on the customer. Imagine the “perfect” service you want to
give, the “perfect” store, route, drive-thru, etc. for your customers. That perfect
vision is your goal.

      Make it easier for customers to do business with you e.g. routes, drive-
       thrus and VIP programs which helps your customers want to use you.
      Make doing business with you a warm and pleasant experience for your
       customer. Train staff to be attentive, warm, and knowledgeable so
       customers feel they have good value for their money. Offer free coffee,
       warm greetings, and clean lobbies. Make customers feel happy to come
       back for more.
      Think “how can I not afford” to do these things instead of “how can I afford
       to do this” for the customers.

   On deciding what you want to become for your customer remember:

      Communicate your vision to the rest of your company, staff or team and to
       your customers. Tie up your company’s bonuses, internal metrics,
       promotions and performance evaluations with your customer service.
      Look after your employees. Don’t expect your employees to look after your
       customers if you don’t look after them. Train them to be “good” to your
       customers. We address this later in the book.
      Know when to ignore what customers want. Don’t try to give them
       everything, all at once. It doesn’t work. Look after the needs of your
       customer only within the limits of your vision.
      Focus on constantly achieving your vision.



SIMPLY PUT: DEFINE THE BOUNDARIES OF YOUR BUSINESS
Secret No. 2 – DISCOVER WHAT YOUR CUSTOMERS WANT
Knowing what you want first helps you understand what your customers want.
Imagine an airline wanting to be the best carrier in the whole world and then
trying to reach out to flyers around the world without first deciding whether it will
be a long haul, international long-haul carrier or a domestic, “no-frills”, low-cost
provider.

Know who your customers are. Then, after finding who they are, discover what
they want, their vision. Normally, customers focus only on two or three needs.
Focus on those needs-not all the wants. Because you know what concerns them,
it is easy to match your vision with theirs. When you try to meet their wants-
you’re done.

Listen to your Customers

      Listen to what they say.
      Listen to what they don’t say.

Listen closely to what your customers say. First, customers may say one thing but
mean another, e.g. clients say they like low prices but whose actual priorities are
on-time deliveries and perfect quality.

Second, listen to your “silent” customers. Your service may be so bad that
customers feel unwanted; they don’t even bother to complain. What’s worse,
they may leave your company even without any viable competitor to take your
place. This is what I see with those who do not staff the counter well enough.
The consumer waits for someone to magically appear from behind the curtain.

Finally, listen to those who say “Fine”. Customers have been so accustomed to
bad service that they rarely complain, and worse, reply “fine” or “satisfied” even
when they mean the clothes were pressed wrong, the service was too slow and
unprofessional. They are satisfied because they think nothing will happen anyway
if they complain or comment.

Ask your Customers Sincerely

So how do you listen to the customer who isn’t talking? Or to the ones who say
“Fine” or “Okay”?
      Start asking sincere questions. Past experiences have taught customers
       that chances are, you don’t really want to know what they think or feel;
       thus their complaints will be left unheard. Change their mindset!!
      Win their confidence. Take time to get a conversation going. Customers
       can sense that you are serious, only then will they open up to you.

A Raving Fan’s customer relationship goes beyond your company’s product or
service. If you don’t listen to your customers’ thoughts and feelings, you fail to
give them what they need because you simply don’t know what that is.
Furthermore, you reject him as a person, that their thoughts have no value.

More than just a Product or Service

People have needs beyond the need for a product or a service. People need to
feel that they belong to a group. People need to feel important. More than just
customers and your company, it is actually people dealing with people. You serve
your clients. Second, you ask their thoughts and opinions. In other words, you
treat them as human beings. Again, asking for a phone number is robotic, asking
for a name is personal.

Know When to Ignore

This may sound heretical to great customer service, but learn to ignore what
customers want if they do not match your vision. Obviously, it would be very
difficult for you to say. When it comes to customer service, those who aim too
high and try to be everything for everybody all at the same time, fail every time.
This is especially true for routes.

If your visions do not meet, ask your customer to take his needs somewhere else
to be fulfilled. This is the most difficult decision for many in these economic times,
but if your boundaries are pushed and pulled in all directions, you will meet the
needs of the few, but miss the needs of the many. Compromise when possible,
but don’t make the exceptions the rule.

EXAMPLES:

A customer comes in and says he would like you to stay open until 9:00pm. He
gets off work at 8:00pm and can only get to you after that. He states that he
would be a good customer is you stayed open later for him. Do you stay open
later, NO! You would then introduce him to the route which fits your vision and
solves his problem. Now if one of your core customers called and asked you to
stay 20 minutes later for him one time, you would gladly do that.

Another example is a route customer who wants you to pick them up before they
go to work and bring it the next day when they get home. Are they sharing your
vision, no! They are trying to dictate how you do business. Sure you can do it, but
is it profitable? The major problem with routes is how inefficient we make them
by doing non-routine service for individuals. Stick to the boundaries of your
business.

Secret no. 3: DELIVER YOUR VISION PLUS ONE PERCENT

To create a raving fan you need to exceed on the delivery of your customer
service promise each and every time the customer deals with you, the customer
needs to believe that they can count on you again and again. Consistency creates
credibility. Seriously, the main secret of creating Raving Fans is delivering
consistency.

Start by making small changes to your current customer service model and
gradually build on these changes, this way you will be able to achieve consistency
of service.

To achieve this level of consistency you will need systems, training, alignment
between your vision and pay/promotion, these systems are required to build your
vision in to the sole of the company. That is why we created the Route Pro
Manual. This model delivers consistency each and every week.

Customer’s expectations don’t remain static so be prepared to continually
enhance your vision. Bottom line: customers want consistency more than
anything else.
Don’t Whore Out Your Product – The 95/5 rule
The bottom line that I preach is to establish your boundaries and go the extra mile
when needed. For example, take a Monday-Thursday route. If someone wants to
sign up only if you can deliver on Wednesday, you would say no. If you were to
sell that you will do anything you want, you will not get the respect you deserve.
However, if a core customer calls and asks for a Wednesday delivery because they
are going out of town, does it! They will respect you and comment on how you
went out of your way. It will stand out more in their mind. In fact, they are 10
times more likely to refer you!

The 95/5 rule is what I define as this: stick to your routine 95% of the time.
Establish your business model and deviate it only 5% of the way. To prequalify for
the 5%, the consumer must be a core customer.

Are you ready to RETAIN TO GAIN? Let’s look at route 1st, then store customers.
CHAPTER TWO:
RETAINING ROUTE CUSTOMERS
Retention of the 4 levels of a route customer
New Customers:
Internal Purpose: The goal is to verify the information, the validity of
the sign-up and to ensure that the client fully understands all aspects of
the route and is reminded of the service. This is also a great time to
combine your effort with the credit card procedures as well.

External Purpose: By touching the new sign-up/customer right away,
they will be 10 times more likely to use the route within 30 days.

INITIAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

Sales staff: In order to ensure growth, the sales staff must follow the
following rules to ensure growth:

   Prequalify the customer. Signing up ghosts or one-hit wonders
    will cause wasted time and effort operationally as well as in the
    retention effort.

   Inform the prospect. Once the sign-up occur, clearly define how
    the route works so that the consumer will know that it is a twice-
    a-week service.
Driver: The driver plays an important role as well in retention as well.

   Introduce yourself to all new customers. Make it a point to
    knock on the doors of all new customers and introduce yourself
    and the service. This way the consumer can place a face to the
    name. Make 2 weeks’ worth of attempts.

   If no bag for first 2 weeks, knock. In conjunction with the above,
    knock on the door of a sign-up who hasn’t used yet. Leave a we
    miss you/reminder on the door and follow-up next visit.

   Communicate. Any information of non-use should be shared in
    the weekly route meetings.

Retention Manager: The retention/route manager must use the
following procedures internally to ensure that new customers not only
get started, but repeats as well.

NEW CUSTOMER ROUTE RETENTION PROCEDURES
WEEKLY REPORTS: Every Wednesday, the following 2 reports must be
printed.

Note: It is critical that all sign-ups must be entered in the system.
               1) New Customers from the past 7 days.
               2) New Customers from the past 30 days.

7 Day Report.
Welcome all new customers to the route by verifying their information.
Thank them for signing up and remind them of their pick-up and
delivery days.
IF THEY HAVE USED THE SERVICE WITHIN 7 DAYS

  1. Tell them thank you for that awesome order and we will see you
     again next (specific day).

  2. Remind them of monthly specials and referral program.

  3. Get feedback if needed.

IF THE HAVEN’T USED THE SERVICE WITHIN 7 DAYS.

  1. Remind them of the days and let them know that we will be
     driving by this (specific day).

  2. Alert the driver to knock on the doors until they do leave a bag.

  3. Alert the sales person if needed to contact as well.

TIPS:

           You may simply just leave a message on their phone.

           Mark their pick-up and delivery days clearly on their bag tag.
            Makes for a nice reminder of the days.

           Email is a nice option as well; however, the personalized
            contact is critical in establishing a relationship that is
            sometimes get lost.

           HIGHLIGHT the manifest of all new customers.

           Phone Tree or any other telephony service is perfect for the
            first 30 days.
30 Day Report.
      The critical element of the 30-day report is to compare this
       data from the previous week. Again, the goal is to train and
       educate any new customer to get into the routine of the
       delivery service.

      First—Mark off all 7-day customers

      Any customer who still hasn’t yet used the service must be
       notified each week through email, phone call and personal
       attempts made by the driver and/or sales person.

      Any customer who used us just once and is drawing closer to
       being 2 to 3 weeks away must be contacted and reminded of
       the service again. Again, the driver’s must knock first, leave a
       reminder second.

      Customers who are using the service on a regular basis need
       not be contacted by phone, but a thank you email would be
       recommended.

      Make notes on all reports.

      Keep reports 5 weeks at a time.

      PhoneTree is again, an excellent option in contacting and
       reminding all clients about the pick-up and delivery days.

      Review sales results with sales staff to hold them
       accountable.
TURNING NEW CUSTOMERS INTO CORE CUSTOMERS
RETENTION MANAGER’S RESPONSIBILITIES IN TURNING NEW
CUSTOMERS INTO CORE CUSTOMERS
Now that we have a new customer what do we do with them? How do we keep
them engaged and using our service? Below are some best practices that have
worked for many of our clients across the country.

1st time usage: Welcome letter introducing them to the route explaining how the
service works and the benefits of the route; provide them with a door hanger, lint
roller and magnet; whatever you have that you can share with them that will
provide them with a gift with your BRAND pasted on. Many call this a “Welcome
Kit”.

2nd time usage: A personalized “Thank You Card” thanking them for their
business. This has to be written by the sales person, route driver or the
route/retention manager and must be written in “blue ink”. It must be a
consistent script with the only thing that changes is the name of the customer.

SAMPLE:
We can’t thank you enough for your patronage. We strive to bring you the very
best quality you deserve with a service unmatched in our industry. Remember, we
are always in your neighborhood Tuesdays and Friday. Thank you again….

3rd time usage: Send an e-mail to them thanking them for using our service and
then introduce our other services…households, area rugs, shoe repair, table
linens, fluff n’ fold and whatever other services you may provide. Provide them
with a list of your monthly specials as well.

SAMPLE:
This is a simple note thanking you for entrusting us to be your number one choice
for all your dry cleaning and laundry needs. We also provide rug and leather
cleaning as well as shoe repair. Check out our website for a complete list of our
services and thanks for using ABC Cleaners.
4th time usage: Send out a survey to our customers asking them 5 questions about
our service, quality and convenience along with a $10.00 credit upon completion
of survey.

From 1-5 and 5 being the best please rate our performance:

   1. On a scale of 1-5 did we meet your expectations?

   2. On a scale of 1-5 please rate the convenience of our service?

   3. On a scale of 1-5 please rate the quality of our cleaning & pressing?

   4. On a scale of 1-5 please rate the overall service you have received from us?

We can do all the right things when we sign up a new customer by explaining how
the service works and the days but we have to remember this; we are typically
changing somebody’s habit and by constantly informing them this will help to
keep them engaged and make the transition smoother.

DRIVER’S RESPONSIBILITIES IN TURNING NEW INTO CORE
Door Hangers & Door Knocking: The route driver is responsible for getting second
bags. Knowing that the customer is still going through a learning curve on how the
service works; the driver’s responsibility is to focus on being engaged. They can
do this by knocking on their front door asking them for a second bag and if they
are not home, simply leave a door hanger informing them of their next pick-up
day.

ROUTE PRO TIP: Bonus the drivers $5.00 for getting a second bag within 30 days
of initial order.

Remember in most cases we are changing people’s habits and keeping them
engaged to be long term and creating loyal customers.

SALES STAFF’S RESPONSIBILITIES IN TURNING NEW INTO CORE
PRE-QUALIFY: As stated before, your sales effort must include prequalifying
somewhat at the door. Monitor core rate for your sales personnel.
FOLLOW-UP: Have you sales personnel follow-up with a personal thank you. This
will also be a great time to introduce the referral coupon.

ACCOUNTABILITY: Remember this figure, 75% of all new customers should use
you a second time.

CORE CUSTOMER RETENTION
     Purpose: One major reason to stay on top of your current
     customers is to know your top 100 customers by name and
     frequency. Core customer retention is centered on
     communication. Concerns, referrals, complaints, holidays, claims,
     congrats, etc are all needs that are often missed.

     Reports: Print each respective route customer marketing report
     and analyze the data. Bring reports to all route meetings and
     address any issues on the spot. Your goal is to examine the
     regularity of your top customers and focus on knowing and
     reporting said data.

         Provide accurate data and know your top customers.

         Bi-annual survey or customer service contact.

         Document all claims-respond, reply, resolve, retain.

         Provide accurate and specific information to all managers.

         Customer appreciation specials/month.

         Either utilize the customer service option on computer or
          document in a customer service log.

         Follow up with issues with customer and production.
TOP TEN TIPS FOR DRIVERS-MUST DO’S
KNOW CUSTOMERS NAMES: Drivers have the tendency to learn addresses only.
The key element for success is for them to know who they are delivering to.

USE THE MANIFEST: The single most critical operational, marketing and customer
service element of the routes.

KEEP VAN CLEAN: The van is a rolling billboard for the company.

DRESS PROFESSIONALLY: If your route driver looks like, well a route driver, then
the professionalism is gone. Being a professional shows respect to the customers,
especially in a business.

COMMUNICATE: Come to the route meetings with information that can assist in
operations and marketing. Many drivers just clock in and clock out without
informing managers of non-use, moving our other retention related issues.

9-2-5 PROGRAM: This is no longer just something for your drivers to try; it has
become the necessity. There are plenty of good potential route developers out
there.

BE PART OF THE SOLUTION, NOT THE PROBLEM: Drivers play a critical role in
route growth and maintenance. Yes, there will be quality issues, one-hit wonders
and other variables that make your job just a tad bit harder. This does not give
you the reason to create more chaos.

THANK YOUR SALES STAFF: You should embrace the sales effort; without it, you
may not have a job. Attrition is inevitable, so make sure that your sales team
succeeds by doing all the retention aspects outlined in this book.

DOUBLE CHECK ALL ORDER: You make mistakes as well as controlling the final
process in the delivery. Check the manifest while delivering all orders.

YOU ARE REPLACEABLE: Yes, replaceable! I love it when a driver tells me that no
one else can do their job like they do!
ROUTE PROCEDURES FOR CORE CUSTOMER MAINTENANCE.
Manifest: We preach this every day, but your route manifest is the
most essential element in your day-to-day operations of your route. It
ensures structure and organization while making your route more
efficient and accurate.

Manifest Set Up:

   When setting up and maintaining your manifest, it is absolutely
    mandatory to keep it in route stop order----no exceptions.
   Most computer systems allow you to enter notes under the
    customer-garage codes, special delivery instructions, etc.
   Data must be correct, updated and complete; address and phone
    numbers, as well as the correct spelling of customer’s name.
   Route manager & Driver should regularly meet and keep the
    manifest clean and updated
   Take off inactive customers. They only clog up the manifest and
    make it confusing for a substitute driver or when training a new
    one.

Morning Procedure:

   The manifest must be used each and every day for accurate
    servicing of the clients.
   When printing the manifest, print all stops, not just the ones with
    deliveries. Often the driver will know the route, but if they do not
    see the new additions, they will often be missed.
   Highlight all deliveries in yellow, missing customers in green and
    new customers in pink. This will assist in accuracy and
    accountability.
   Use the manifest as a “pick list” before sending the clothes out.
    Do not assume that the manifest is complete. Have the manager
    and the driver check off the manifest.
   Verify the piece count of each order on the manifest.
   Communicate with production department about clothes that are
    not ready.

Driver Assistance:

   As stated before, the manifest must be in order so that the driver
    can use it to keep track of his stops.
   Have the driver log the mileage and starting time on the top of
    the page and document time of delivery for each order.
   Driver can also see if a customer hasn’t used the service for 21
    days and leave a “sorry we miss you reminder post-it or door
    hanger.
   Have the driver mark a “P” by the customer name when picking
    up a bag.
   Driver can also make notes on the manifest since he often will
    forget when he arrives back.

Check & Balances:
           These steps are not to micro-
         manage the driver, but to assist in
        handling issues when they arise. It
          holds them accountable while
             protecting them as well
   If the above steps are followed accurately, many mistakes will be
    caught before you leave with the clothes.
   Keep the manifest for 3 to 5 weeks after servicing the customers.
    If you have an issue, you can go back to the previous manifest to
     see if clothes were picked up or delivered.
    Hold the driver accountable with the times and mileage. Also, if a
     customer calls and says that they “got missed”, then the manifest
     will report what time they were there, and to see if there is a
     checkmark by the stop.


9-2-5 PROGRAM
The manifest is crucial for the implementation of the 9-2-5 program.


ROUTE PRO RULE: If your driver refuses to use the manifest-fire them.


LONG-TERM CORE CUSTOMER TIPS:
ANIVERSARY GIFT: Look at each core customer’s sign-up/start date. You don’t
have to be exact, but send them a thank you gift/flowers.

BIRTHDAYS: Some computer systems provide birthday information and you can
send a $5.00 credit or gift card as well.

CHRISTMAS: Send out gift baskets, cards, etc for your top 20% customers.

MONTHLY SPECIALS: Again, replace generic discounting with specific monthly
specials. We will give you samples in our last chapter.




WE MISS YOU PREVENTION:
Out of Pattern (21 Days): You can run every Monday and help with finding
customers who are out of their regular usage pattern and will give us another tool
to help us to understand our customers and to keep them engaged. Again, this
should be a standard procedure for your drivers to maintain will running the
route.

The best way for keeping our customers engaged is for the route driver to leave a
“Sorry We Miss You” door hanger/pre-printed post-it reminding the customer
that we were there and we are there 2 times a week. Be specific with the
delivery days! Use your manifest for this by having the route/customer retention
manager or whoever is responsible for getting the manifest in order and
“highlight” the customers who haven’t used you within this time frame.

Danger Zone: (30 Days): All customers who have not used you within this time
frame receive a personalized phone call from whoever is responsible for the route
department or customer retention. You have to continue to make phone calls
different times of the day until you actually talk with someone.

The goal is to find out the following

    Persistent reminder of the service

    Get a bag of clothes or a commitment.

      Are we meeting their expectations?

By finding this out, you will understand what you are doing well and then not so
much. If you are able to find out something the is limiting their expectations, this
is an opportunity to enhance your customer service and provide them with a
WOW moment.

BOTTOM LINE FOR RETENTION SUCCESS:
Your “we miss you reports” must be done every Monday—no
exceptions. From a management/systematic perspective, failure to
manage the process and procedure aspect of monitoring usage will
cause failure and will inevitably be skipped over.

This is just as important as getting new customers.
WE MISS YOU PROCEDURES: 45-60 Days:
Core Customers: Your Monday reports will include core customers who have
exceeded their out of pattern schedule to the “Missing” level. Don’t panic, but
you need to find out what is going on with them.

The key is for a face-to-face interaction within the next 2 weeks. We must make a
personalized attempt in order to find out one of the following:

    Where have they been?

    Why they haven’t used you?

    What can we do better to regain their business?

If it gets this far, then we are going to attempt to make what Randy Mearkle calls
a LAST-ing impression.

Listen to their concern
Apologize for any inconvenience
Sympathize with their concern and their problem
Take action on solving their problem

CONTACT: Again, your driver should make the first face-to-face attempts and
then report back to the manager. Then, a combination of phone calls, letters,
emails and a final attempt from retention manager should be in place in order to
prevent the customer from reaching the next and final level-LOST.

WE LOST YOU PROCEDURES: 61-90 Days:
Core Customers: Your Monday reports will also include core customers who have
not used the service between 61 to 90 days. Again, the goal is to retain, but
attrition is inevitable. When you are having your route meeting, these customers
must be addressed until a clear future is determined.
For the next 30 days, continue to make 1 attempt per week until you either hear a
lesson learned or a renewed commitment. Do not give up, customers may be
trying out your competition and there is no harm to remind them that you care
and miss their patronage.

If attempts have been made with no response, then it may be come time to
remove them from the manifest. Although many programs are designed to allow
them to be inactive, we recommend creating an inactive route and transfer them
on this list. If you do have a lesson learned, transfer them to the inactive route
and put the reason on the notes screen.

If they have moved or you know for 100% sure that they are not coming back,
simply remove them as a route customer.

INACTIVE ROUTE: Keep your inactive route list and revisit it every 90 days. Look
at the lessons learned and look for a pattern. Correct and address any repetitive
issue.

From a sales perspective, have your marketing staff knock on the doors of inactive
customers. If they get them back, treat it as a new start and pay accordingly.
CHAPTER THREE:
RETAINING STORE CUSTOMERS
Retention of the four levels of a store customer
New Customers:
Internal Purpose: Welcome the customer to your store and to treat
them as a special guest.

External Purpose: Introduce them to the route; they are more likely to
stay with you if they find out about the route.

INITIAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

Counter Staff: When a new customer comes in to the store, there are
several critical elements of welcoming them to the store.

   Tell them thank you for coming in.
    “We really appreciate you giving us the opportunity to be your dry
    cleaner.”

   Enter correct and complete data.
    Tell them that it takes a moment to enter all the data; inform
    them it is essential for accuracy and for communication of
    specials-especially by email.

   Inform them of the route.
    Finally, let them know that you provide free pick-up and delivery.
    “Would you be interested in our free pick-up and delivery? If you
     are in our delivery area, we would gladly deliver these garments
     at no additional charge!” If they say yes, then tell them that we
     are in your area twice a week and that our route specialists will be
     contacting them shortly.

     If the CSR knows the route well enough, then provide them with a
     bag/welcome kit and get them started right away.

Retention Manager: The retention/retail manager must use the
following procedures internally to ensure that new customers not only
feel welcomed, but appreciated as well.

NEW CUSTOMER STORE RETENTION PROCEDURES
WEEKLY REPORTS: Every Wednesday, the following 2 reports must be
printed.

            1) New Customers from the past 7 days.
            2) New Customers from the past 30 days.

7 Day Report.
Welcome all new customers to the store with a thank you email and
remind them of our free pick-up and delivery service.

30 Day Report.
        The critical element of the 30-day report is to compare this
         data from the previous week. The goal is to monitor second
         usage and volume of orders

        First—Mark off all 7-day customers
          Second, if anyone hasn’t used by the 21st day and is a
           potential route customer, then pass the information to your
           route marketing team. Have them knock on the doors and
           try to sell the route.

TURNING NEW CUSTOMERS INTO CORE CUSTOMERS
Very similar to the route procedures, our goal is to get them to become core
customers in both route and stores.

1st time usage: Welcome email introducing them to the company and send a $10
coupon to either experience the route or come back to the store.

 2nd time usage: A personalized “Thank You Card” thanking them for their
business. This has to be written by the retail/retention manager and must be
written in “blue ink”. It must be a consistent script with the only thing that
changes is the name of the customer.

3rd time usage: Send an e-mail to them thanking them for using our service and
then introduce our other services…households, area rugs, shoe repair, table
linens, fluff n’ fold and whatever other services you may provide. Provide them
with a list of your monthly specials as well.

4th time usage: Send out a survey to our customers asking them 5 questions about
our service, quality and convenience along with a $10.00 credit upon completion
of survey.

From 1-5 and 5 being the best please rate our performance:

   1. On a scale of 1-5 did we meet your expectations?

   2. On a scale of 1-5 please rate the convenience of our service?

   3. On a scale of 1-5 please rate the quality of our cleaning & pressing?

   4. On a scale of 1-5 please rate the overall service you have received from us?
PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE OF CORE CUSTOMERS
Top 7 Customer Service Tips to Handle Complaints and Keep Customers Happy

If customers are the lifeblood of businesses, then customer complaints are the
antidote to a thriving business. Or, is it? While many businesses fear the
onslaught of complaints from customers, in truth, proper handling of these
complaints can work to a business’s advantage.

Whenever a customer complains, he is in fact handing you a lesson in how to
please others or prevent future issues. So, take advantage of this opportunity
with these seven customer service tips on how to handle complaints and keep
your customers happy-again the goal is to be above satisfaction.

   1. Act Quickly
      When a customer complains, the best way to appease the customer’s bad
      feelings is to act on it quickly. Remunerate customers as fast as possible
      with a refund when appropriate, or offer an apology. Acting swiftly to
      correct the wrong consoles the customer and provides them with a sense
      of loyalty as well. You can be sure the customer will want to dry clean with
      you again because you handled his complaint timely and correctly.

   2. Respond to Complaints Professionally
      It’s easy to get carried away with a petulant customer and brush him off
      completely, but that could be costly for your business. Instead, take charge
      of the situation by being polite and listening intently to the customer’s
      problem. Taking this approach has a calming influence on the upset
      customer and more often than not, allows him to see reason and leave
      knowing that he’ll return again to do business with you.

   3. Send Out Customer Survey Forms
      This is important to ferret out customers who are unhappy with your
      business for some reason, but aren’t voicing their concerns. Rather than
      losing them for good to your competitors, get them to fill out customer
      survey forms and follow up with a phone call to as many of these
      customers as possible. Not only will this keep your customers happy, but
      you will have discovered new ways of fine-tuning certain aspects of your
      business.
4. Thank Those Who Complain
   This may sound odd to many, but customers who complain are doing you a
   service by helping you improve your business. The least any business
   should do is to thank them wholeheartedly. It may take these customers by
   surprise, but a simple “thank you” can lighten the atmosphere and allow
   unhappy customers to have a change in attitude and become your most
   loyal customers.

5. Reassure The Customer
   Customers who complain very often feel aggrieved that their complaints
   come to naught because no one is listening. To tackle this situation, recap
   to the customer what you’ve just heard and then deliver an assessment of
   how you’re going to tackle the problem and inform him when it can be
   resolved. Many businesses are too quick to respond with an “Ok, I’ll fix
   that,” without the reassurances the customer sorely needs.

6. Provide A Space For Customers To Vent Their Frustrations
   I don’t mean a physical space, though that could work in the most extreme
   of cases, but create an avenue for them to vent their frustrations without
   getting in the way. Only when they’ve settled down, then approach them
   with your questions to determine the cause of their problems. This works
   very well to get to the bottom of the situation without getting embroiled in
   unnecessary confrontations.

7. Track Customer Complaints
   Once a customer has filed a complaint, it’s best to ensure that the
   particular complaint never arises again. The best way to do this is to track
   complaints, unearth its root cause and make sure it’s addressed once and
   for all. Tracking complaints can usually identify a pattern, giving you vital
   information to potential problems and addressing them before a customer
   can raise the issue. Let your customers know that you have such a system in
   place and they’ll appreciate the fact that you really care about catering to
   their happiness.
TOP TEN TIPS FOR CSR’S-MUST DO’S
ASK FOR NAME, NOT PHONE NUMBER: No more excuses, get personal, not
robotic.

REPEAT THEIR NAME TWICE: Make sure that you repeat their name twice during
the process.

OFFER THE ROUTE ALL THE TIME: Core customers need to know that the route
exists for their benefit.

UNLOCK BOTH DOORS: This drives you nuts when you go to another business,
yet you do the same. This is the first impression that new customers experience
and core customers still attempt to open a locked door.

DRESS PROFESSIONALLY: This should be a no-brainer; people do business with
people they like and can associate with. We must be a product of the product,
instead, we dress in jeans, t-shirts and hats.

LIVE PERSON vs PHONE CALL: A live person should take precedence over a phone
call. Your answering message should say to hold, someone will get to them ASAP.
If possible, answer the phone and tell them to hold.

THEY ARE NOT “YOUR” CUSTOMERS: They belong to the company and you must
treat it as so. One of the biggest hurdles is converting core customers when the
CSR won’t release them. Customers give up loyalty for convenience every day.

KEEP COUNTERS/FLOOR CLEAN: When you survey dry cleaning customers; their
number one fear is lost items. Nothing is worse than a pile of clothes on the floor
or food/cell phone on the counter. This is so critical in the confidence perspective
of the customer.

DOUBLE CHECK ALL ORDER: So simple, so important, yet too often not done.

THANK THEM EVERYTIME: Always thank them and when they thank you—don’t
say “NO PROBLEM”, say “OUR PLEASURE”.
WE MISS YOU PREVENTION:
Out of Pattern (21 Days): You can run every Monday and help with finding
customers who are out of their regular usage pattern and will give us another tool
to help us to understand our customers and to keep them engaged. Although
similar to the route procedures, you do want to prequalify core customer based
on volume, otherwise your list be 100 pages long. Many go with a $40 a month
for a foundation of a good store customer.

The best way for keeping our customers engaged is by email. Again, many POS
programs exist in which an automatic email can be sent.

Danger Zone: (30 Days): All qualified store customers who have not used you
within this time frame should receive a personalized phone call/email from
whoever is responsible for the customer retention. Similar to the route, utilize the
following goals of communication.

    Persistent reminder of the routes

    Are we meeting their expectations?




BOTTOM LINE FOR RETENTION SUCCESS:
Again, this must be done every Monday—no exceptions. From a
management/systematic perspective, failure to manage the process
and procedure aspect of monitoring usage will cause failure and will
inevitably be skipped over.
WE MISS YOU PROCEDURES: 45-60 Days:
Core Customers: Your Monday reports will include core customers who have
exceeded their out of pattern schedule to the “Missing” level. We must make a
personalized attempt in order to find out one of the following:

    Where have they been?

    Why they haven’t used you?

    Can we put you on our free pick-up and delivery service?

WE LOST YOU PROCEDURES: 61-90 Days:
Core Customers: Your Monday reports will also include core customers who have
not used the service between 61 to 90 days. Just like routes, the goal is to retain,
but attrition is inevitable. When you are having your weekly meeting, these
customers must be addressed until a clear future is determined.

For the next 30 days, continue to make 1 attempt per week until you either hear a
lesson learned or a renewed commitment.

If attempts have been made with no response, then you must document the
attempts and revisit in 60 days. Also, pass the information to the route marketing
manager and try to get them on the route—again, they must be prequalified.
OLD INVENTORY
CONVERT!!! We address this in depth in our 60-60 conversion manual, but now is
a great time to call someone and offer the service.

How to convert big inventory to the route:
1) Prequalify by address and order size.

Please Note: Many feel that this could be a waste of time, but if you
look at the history of and/or the order size, you may be able to get a
good route customer out of that. Not picking up clothes or forgetting
about them can be some of the pain consumers feel when it comes to
having to get to and from the drycleaner. This is a perfect time to get
them on the route.

2) Inventory can be as old as 2 weeks to several months.

3) Conversion Process:

Sample Dialogue:
       “(Customer Name)-We noticed that some of your favorite
       garments are here at the store. If you like, we can have these
       delivered to you at no extra charge.”

Please Note: Once they have responded either way, let them know
that the service is free and we are in their neighborhood twice a week.
ROUTE PRO FAVORITE TIP FOR VIP PROGRAMS
GOLD BAGS: For the past 5 years, many customers give their top customers Gold
bags to ensure great customer service. Give your top 50-100 customers GOLD VIP
bags for FREE!!! When they come in, everyone will know that this is a great
customer and will be proactive in their service.
CHAPTER FOUR:
RETAINING GOOD EMPLOYEES
JAMESISM: Employee Turnover Leads To Customer Turnover



INTRODUCTION:
STEP 1:        INTERVIEW:

STEP 2:        PROFILE/TRAINING:

STEP 3:        EVALUATING:

STEP 4:        PROMOTING & DEVELOPING:
INTRODUCTION:
EVERY JOB IN A COMPANY is important, or it wouldn't exist. In other
words, there is a good job for everyone--one where each individual
makes a valuable contribution, regardless of where that job is in a
company's structure. Finding that person, though, requires a scientific
process. That conviction comes from over 35 years experience
recruiting, interviewing, and selecting nearly 10,000 people.
Many people believe gut instinct works like magic in selecting key
personnel. This is especially true when the person doing the hiring is
also successful at doing the job. For example, an owner may think that
he or she is the best person to pick other people who will be able to sell
successfully. In reality, that likelihood results in less than a 50% success
ratio. With stats like that, a toss of the coin could save owners a lot of
time, energy, and money.
In most job searches, those responsible for doing the hiring, sell the job
before they select a candidate. This approach is backwards. Why sell
the job to someone who isn't a candidate? After all, a savvy applicant
may be a good "interview"--well-groomed, friendly, professional,
enthusiastic, interested, a good listener, etc. What happens in this case
is the recruiter starts doing the talking, telling about the job
requirements before the interview starts. It's the candidate who's doing
the listening, learning how to appeal to the recruiter. The result is that,
since most individuals can mask their true tendencies for at least 45
minutes, the interviewer rarely gets an accurate picture of the job
candidate. Alternatively, why not learn the profiles of interviewees
before taking the time to sell the job? Then, it may not be necessary to
disclose job specifics once this information is gathered, if the candidate
doesn't represent a good fit.
By selling the job before selecting a candidate, the individuals
responsible for hiring often fall prey to pre- and post-selection
variables. It's a sink-or-swim philosophy that says, "Recruit them in
masses; train them in classes; and roll them out on their hockey skates"
That is post-selection. This method is not effective, so some people
camouflage it to make it look different. Pre-selection is when one tries
to learn about the candidates and gather information before putting
them on the job. For instance, customer service representatives
typically have personalities that are relatively high-energy, which
usually indicates a good learning pace, and they must show an interest
in working with people in general. Yet, these traits cannot be assumed
simply because a person is interviewing for a counter position. The only
way to really determine, at the end of an interview, if a job candidate is
a potential match is to take the time up front to learn about an
interviewee.
Competitive salary, flexible schedule options, and benefits are three
basic elements in employee retention. Especially for millennial
employees, these are the Holy Grail for recruitment and reducing
employee turnover. But, employers can reduce employee turnover in
many other ways. Reducing employee turnover is dependent on the
total work environment you offer for employees. These
recommendations about reducing employee turnover are also
common-sense, basic and incredibly hard to find in organizations today.

Tips for Reducing Employee Turnover

Select the right people in the first place through behavior-based
testing and competency screening. The right person, in the right seat,
on the right bus is the starting point.

At the same time, don't neglect to hire people with the innate talent,
ability, and smarts to work in almost any position, even if you don't
currently have the "best" match available. Hire the smartest people you
can find to reduce employee turnover.
Offer an attractive, competitive, benefits package with components
such as flexible hours and free dry-cleaning. Better opportunity =
reduced employee turnover.

Provide opportunities for people to share their knowledge via training
sessions, presentations, mentoring others and team assignments.
Employees like to share what they know; the act of teaching
others ensures the employee's own learning.

Demonstrate respect for employees at all times. Listen to them deeply;
use their ideas; never ridicule or shame them. Via your communication,
always share that you value them.

Offer performance feedback and praise good efforts and results to
reduce employee turnover.

People want to enjoy their work. Make work fun. Engage and employ
the special talents of each individual.

Enable employees to balance work and life. Allow flexible starting
times, core business hours and flexible scheduling (Yes, their son's
soccer game is as important as work.)

Involve employees in decisions that affect their jobs and the overall
direction of the company whenever possible. Involve them in the
discussion about company vision, mission, values, and goals.
This strategic framework will never "live" for them or become "owned"
by them if they merely read it in email or by hanging it on the wall.

Recognize excellent performance, and especially, link pay to
performance to reduce employee turnover.
Base the upside of bonus potential on the success of both the
employee and the company and make it limitless within company
parameters

Recognize and celebrate success. Mark their passage as important
goals are achieved.

Staff adequately, so overtime is minimized, for those who don't want it
and people don't wear themselves out.

Nurture and celebrate organization traditions. Have a costume party
every Halloween. Run a food collection drive every November. Pick a
charity to help. Have an annual company dinner at a fancy restaurant.

Provide opportunities within the company for cross-training and career
progression. People like to know they have room for career movement.
This is a serious deterrent to employee turnover.

Provide the opportunity for career and personal growth through
training and education, challenging assignments and more
responsibility.

Communicate goals, roles and responsibilities, so people know what is
expected and feel like part of the in-crowd.

According to research by the Gallup organization, it is good to
encourage employees to have good, even best, friends, at work.

When an employee is failing at work, I ask the question, “What about
the work system is causing the person to fail?” Most frequently, if the
employee knows what they are supposed to do, they succed.
I find that the answer is time, tools, training, temperament or
talent. The easiest to solve, and the ones most affecting employee
retention, are tools, time and training. The employee must have the
tools, time and training necessary to do their job well – or they will
move to an employer who provides them.



Your best employees, those employees you want to retain, seek
frequent opportunities to learn and grow in their careers, knowledge
and skill. Without the opportunity to try new opportunities, sit on
challenging committees, attend seminars, read and discuss books, they
feel they will stagnate. A career-oriented, valued employee must
experience growth opportunities within your organization.


No matter the circumstances, never, never, ever threaten an
employee's job or income. Even if you know layoffs loom if you fail to
meet production or sales goals, it is a mistake to foreshadow this
information with employees. It makes them nervous; no matter how
you phrase the information; no matter how you explain the
information, even if you're absolutely correct, your best staff members
will update their resumes. I'm not advocating keeping solid information
away from people, however, think before you say anything that makes
people feel they need to search for another job.

Take a look at your organization Are you doing your best to retain your
top talent? Employ these factors in your organization to retain your
desired employees and attract the best talent, too.
Now that you have the list that will reduce employee turnover, why not
work to make your dry cleaner one of the few, the best that truly honor
and appreciate employees? If you treat your employees wonderfully,
you will seriously reduce employee turnover and employee complaints.
DEFINING JOB PERFORMANCE: RPI’S 2 RULES
RULE NUMBER 1:
JOB PERFORMANCE = Behavior + Attitude + Technique

I learned this formula a long time ago when I was doing Sandler Sales
Training. It is so mathematically true in developing the ideal employee.
Yet, many of us fail to look at the three elements that make people
successful.

How simple is this? Everyone is wound up differently and needs a little
encouragement and training to succeed. But we must look at the
individual’s internal DNA and what position is best for them. This is
why we strongly recommend the DISC profiles. They successfully
determine how to motivate and manage your employee.

Attitude stems from the external reactions of the surroundings your
employee exists in. Any number of negative variables can distort and
deter someone’s performance. It is up to the owner to recognize this
and listen to someone’s concerns. For example, we have seen
numerous examples of management downplaying someone else’s
success-especially in sales.

Technique is the tools provided to make the employee successful.
From bar-coding to the driver’s manifest, these assist in increasing the
performance of a driver. Proper training and meetings also play a vital
part in developing your staff.
RULE NUMBER 2:
JOB PERFORMANCE = ABILITY x WILLINGNESS
Nothing is worse than watching someone who has unlimited potential
give more excuses than results. Counter people who make mistakes
due to a lack of focus. It all stems from having the proper structure and
accountability in place.

Also, failing to provide the motivation and expectations causes
frustration and conflict. When we address the four steps of success,
look at yourself and your staff and see who has the potential to success
and what you can do to be a better owner/manager/co-worker.




Now let’s look at the crucial steps from beginning to end.
STEP ONE: INTERVIEWING/HIRING
PLEASE NOTE: It may be best that you look at your exact needs with-in
your organization and hire based on that. A driver that can sell as well
is harder to find than a retention sales manager. If you are looking for a
CSR, look for energetic individuals who want to better themselves.

RECOMMENDATION: Most new applicants in any industry come
looking for a job, not a career. We want to find someone who is
looking to be a part of the company long term, not temporarily. So
much time and money is wasted with employee turnover.

CRAIG’S LIST
We recommend using Craig’s list. The key is to place the ad at least 3
times a week until the position is filled.

Business Development Manager-(sample ad)

-GREAT $$$ POTENTIAL-
-PERFECT FOR SOMEONE LOOKING FOR A CAREER IN AN INDUSTRY
THAT IS RECESSION-PROOF
Requirements: You Must Be Income and Career Motivated With A
Strong Desire To Succeed- We Pay Good Money For Winners

This opportunity is perfect for a career minded individual with strong
communication skills and is task orientated.
Must have a good driving record and license
Sales skills with face-to-face experience preferred, but not neccessary.

Must be trainable, work flexible hours and self-motivated to grow
professionally and personally, working for a proven company in a
proven industry.
Customer service experience essential. Duties include retention calls by
phone and in person.
Starting pay structure is a base pay, plus commission and new customer
bonus.
We are looking for someone needing a career opportunity, not
someone just looking for a job.
Contact us now at…



Interviewing Process
1) Pick Out The Best 10 Prospects-Save The Rest

   Decide What Position(s) You Want For Sure

   Look For Career Minded Person

   Previous Retail A Bonus, But Not Mandatory

   Semi-Retired Not Always the Best

   Be Neutral

   Be Supportive.

   Answer Their Questions Honestly.
2) Preparation for Interview

   Choose a setting with little distraction. Avoid loud lights or
    noises, ensure the interviewee is comfortable (you might ask
    them if they are), etc.
   Explain the format of the interview. Explain the type of interview
    you are conducting and its nature. If you want them to ask
    questions, specify when to do so—during the interview or at its
    completion.
   Indicate how long the interview usually takes. Plan on 30
    minutes at the most.
   Ask them if they have any questions before you both get started
    with the interview.
   Have them read the job description before the interview starts.
    You can do this while they wait for you-they may prequalify or
    disqualify themselves for the position.
   Don't count on your memory to recall their answers. Ask for
    permission to record the interview or to take notes.

3) Set up a 30 Minute Interview For Each Prospect

   Find Out Work History

   Let Them Know That Sales Experience Is Not Necessary

   Tell Them Up Front About The Position

   Give Them A Brief History Of Routes/Dry Cleaning

   Let Them Know This Has Serious Income Potential

   Basic Compensation

   Let Them Know The Potential Career Opportunity
4) Types of Topics to Used in Questions:

Strive to ask 5 kinds of questions about these topics.

  1. Behaviors - about what a person has done or is doing.

      What do you look for in a job?
      What job did you have that you liked the best?

     Do you feel like you can communicate well?
     How do you feel about deadlines, pressure and goals?
     What are your career goals?

  2. Opinions/values - about what a person thinks about sales.

     Which do you think is more important, new customers or current
     customers?
     Are you willing to learn new work skills?
     Are you money or career motivated?



  3. Relevance – may or may not assist in current position.

     What did you do before that relates to us?
     Describe your work ethic…
     Are you a team player?
     Do you perform better if unsupervised?

  4. Knowledge - to get facts/thoughts about a dry cleaning

     ???: What do you know about the dry cleaning industry?
          Do you know we deliver to our customers for free?
          Where do you think the best areas are for our routes?

  5. Final Thoughts - about position available.
     When can you start?
     Are you willing to work a position that is not necessarily 40 hours
     a week or may require more task than time?
     What questions do you have for me?


5) Decision Making-

   Prequalify for second interview.

   Recognize who you think would represent your business the best.

   All may qualify.

   Review Your Notes

   Schedule a second interview.

6) Second Interview(s)-Could be performed by The Route Pro

   Ask Why They Would Want The Job.

   Ask Again How They Feel About The Position Of Sales.

   Re-emphasize The Sincerity Of The Position.

   Discuss Compensation Plan In More Detail.

   Start off Part-Time if questionable.

7) Final Decision

   Get back with all candidates asap.

   Hire the strongest to be full-time.

   Keep all applications.
STEP TWO: TRAINING
FINDING THE RIGHT INDIVIDUAL IS HARD, BUT PROPER
TRAINING TO ENSURE SUCCESS IS ESSENTIAL.

ROUTE DEVELOPERS:
DISC RECOMMENDATION: SALES PROFILE


1) 4 Days of training by The Route Pro

   1 Day Initial Classroom-The Art Of Face-To-Face Sales/DISC
    Profile.
    We will teach, train, and develop your sales person to learn the
    psychology of sales. In turn, they will “Sell More & Sell More
    Easily”. We will also go over the DISC profile to gain a better
    understanding on how to motivate and manage.

   2 Days Half Classroom/Half Face-To-Face
    Polishing their sales pitch, as well as making them more
    comfortable with the prospects, especially overcoming objections.
    We will also cover the 9-2-5 program as well as conversion
    training.

   1 Day-Retention Focus
    We will focus on internal marketing with our Retain To Gain
    Program.

 1 Month Of Constant Contact With The Route Pro Team
   Weekly Calls For First Month
    We will continue to provide support once a week for a month.

   Email Support As Well

 11 More Months Of On-going Coaching

   Bi-Weekly Calls if Needed-Minimum Once A Month
    Ongoing support for all sales staff.

   Positive Support
    By striving to eliminate the negatives, we will keep them
    motivated.

Participation With RPI Members

   Round Robin Monthly Conference
    Usually 1st Wednesday of the month.

   Occasional Sales Webinars
    Continual participation of the basics is strongly recommended.

Training is the most important element in this entire process. Those
who train by example have not had success. Also, if you haven’t done
the position yourself as the owner/manager/trainer, then you won’t
have the results you strongly need.



Coaching from The Route Pro is essential since we are not the owners,
and do not have emotional ties that can produce negative results.
RETAIL STAFF:
DISC RECOMMENDATION: Customer Service


1) 1 Week Training

   1 Day Initial Orientation/DISC PROFILE.
    Plant Tour, Store Tours, Plant Experience. Also, share the history
    of the cleaner as well as the vision. Also, go over the DISC profile
    with new member.

   1 Day Counter Training by manager or best staff member.
    Spend time by having the new employee shadow 1 or more staff
    members. Have the trainer show the most important bullet
    points/priorities. Do not overload the new hire with information.

   1 Day Hands-on with staff member present.
    This is the key day in training. To ensure proper understanding of
    the business, let the new employee get their feet wet at the
    counter and several small aspects of the business.

   1 Day Lessons Learned, questions asked with upper
    management.
    You want your new employee to be in inquisitive mode here. IF
    they don’t ask any questions, they may be discouraged or disliking
    of the position. Show them support and lead them through some
    of the q&a process.

   1 Final Day of complete hands-on/Evaluate.
    Have the manager supervise and evaluate their strengths and
     weaknesses. Go over the DISC profile with new employee and
     validate the results through work examples.

 1 Week of Evaluations

   Go Over The Positives
    Congratulate all success.

   Polish The Negatives
    Positively support weaknesses and address them.

  THE KEY HERE IS THAT EVERYONE HAS A DIFFERENT LEARNING
  CURVE.

 2 More Months Of Evaluating

   Bi-Weekly Meetings
    Meet twice a month with continuous support.

   Customer Feedback
    Look for any customer feedback you can get.




ROUTE DRIVERS:
DISC RECOMMENDATION: Customer Service


1) 2 Weeks of training by Route Manager and/or The Route Pro
WEEK 1:
  1 Day Initial Orientation
   They must get a basic understanding of dry cleaning, company
   history and the importance of routes to the company. The 9-2-5
   as well as retention/customer service, must be introduced here as
   well.

  4 Days Route Shadowing
   It is critical to have the route manager train the driver, not the
   departing driver. Have the driver ride in the passenger seat and
   take notes.

  Saturday Training Day
   Have the new driver take the manifest and drive part of the
   easiest route theirself. No deliveries, just simple driving with
   directions or GPS assistance.

WEEK 2:
  2 Day Driving With Assistance
   Have the new driver actually drive the route with someone who
   knows the route giving directions.

  Wednesday-Self Driving Day
   The driver should make attempts to drive a route again without
   stops. Have them pick the most difficult route this day.

  2 Day Driving with minimal assistance
   This is when the driver should be able to do most of the route by
   his/her self, but still have back-up if needed.
  Saturday Training Day
   Have the new driver take the manifest and drive the route himself
   that may be their hardest to learn. Again, no deliveries, just
   simple driving with directions or GPS assistance.

WEEKS 3-4:
  5 Day 9-2-5 training by The Route Pro
   This is where they must get a basic to complete understanding on
   how to sell while doing the route.

  Saturday: Door-To-Door Sales
   Go out with other staff/managers or the route pro and sell door-
   to-door from 9-noon.

  WEEK 4: Evaluation.
   This is where we should evaluate the complete effort for the
   route driver.

1 Month Of Constant Contact With The Route Pro Team

  Weekly Calls For First Month
   This is for the 9-2-5 program, drivers should participate.

  Email Support As Well

11 More Months Of On-going Coaching

  Bi-Weekly Calls if Needed-Minimum Once A Month
   Ongoing support for all sales staff.
   Positive Support
    By striving to eliminate the negatives, we will keep them
    motivated.

Participation With RPI Members

   Occasional Sales Webinars
    Continual participation of the basics is strongly recommended-
    Especially when we do the 9-2-5 program

STEP THREE: EVALUATING
FINDING THE RIGHT INDIVIDUAL IS HARD, PROPER TRAINING
ENSURES SUCCESS, BUT LACK OF ACCOUNTABLE AND
MEASURING PRODUCES CHAOS.



Key Measurables-Sales Staff
1) FACTOIDS/REQUIREMENTS

   80% of all sign-ups should use the service at least once

   65% Retention after 5 uses

   Monitor usage from coupons (if applicable)

   Communicate Good & Bad Results

2) SALES MANAGEMENT BASICS

   Set Minimums & Goals (2 different numbers)
   Monitor number of sign-ups and dollars generated by all sign-ups
    (Sales Or Reference Code)

   If Successful, They Are Accountable To Themselves, If Not, They
    Are Accountable To You!

3) DRIVER/SALES

   Monitor time: driving vs. selling

4) MANAGER/SALES

   Must hit goals established by company, dollars and new
    customers

   Manage retention data and results

   Sales comparisons



Goal Setting-REVISITED
Creating S.M.A.R.T. Goals
     Specific
     Measurable
     Attainable
     Rewarding
     Timely
Specific goals

         Write specific goals, in line with your business sales goals
          and needs for the year.
         Are you set up for growth?
         Salesperson’s goals

Measurable Goals
       Measure the progress of the activity.
       There must be a system in place to measure your sales
         effort.
       Look at the revenue gained, retention of new customers,
         profit.

Attainable
         Setting attainable goals yields a sense of accomplishment
          and success.
         If the goals are out of line with reality, you are setting
          yourself up for disappointment and frustration.
         Setting goals that are too low bring a lower motivational
          force.

Rewarding
         You have to be willing and able to work for a particular goal.
         Keeps the passion burning.
         Financial and promotional rewards

Timely & Tangible
       With no time frame, you have no sense of urgency thus
        procrastinating, thereby not achieving your goal.
       Make sure the tangible effects of your achieved goals are
        recognized.


RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SALES STAFF:

    Full Time Schedule & Goals
        Monthly Goal – 48 signups
        Weekly Goal –12 signups
        Daily Goal – 2 signups

    Driver’s Sales Goals
        Monthly Goal – 15 signups
        Weekly Goal –4 signups
        Daily Goal – 1 signup

    Manager’s Schedule and Sales Goals
       Monthly Goal – 40 signups
       Weekly Goal –10 signups
       Daily Goal – 2 signups


REMEMBER: Goals Are NOT The Same As Minimums
STEP FOUR: PROMOTING AND DEVELOPING
The goal is to provide additional motivational factors to ensure the
retention of good employees.

PLEASE NOTE: Use the D.I.S.C. profiles to determine motivational
factors and ideal work environment.

PROMOTION
1) Determine what volume level is needed to for promotion

   Paint a clear cut goal for individual to get a promotion.

   Monitor growth

2) BONUSES

   Determine levels for onetime bonus for any staff member.

3) NEW COMPENSATION-RAISES

   Have a defined benchmark for your staff member to achieve a
    new pay rate.
CHAPTER FIVE:
RETENTION TOOLS
We will be creating a page on our website that will provide
you downloads to many job descriptions, retention guides and
spreadsheets.
Go to our members section and look under the categories,
retention tools. We have included some samples in this final
chapter.
                            WEEKLY RETENTION CHECKLIST
Monday: We Miss You Monday

      ____   Print Appropriate “We Miss You” List

      ____   Called All Contacts

      ____   Document all responses

      ____   Document all follow-ups

      ____   Phone Tree list updated

Wednesday: We Welcome You Wednesday

      ____   Printed New Customer list (7 Days)

      ____   Printed New Customer list (30 Days)

      ____   Welcome all new customers to the route

      ____   Thank all new customers after 1st contact

      ____   One-time users, call after last drop is 14 days out

      ____   Communicate with sales people (if appropriate)

Thursday: We Thank You Thursday

      ____   Print Appropriate Customer List

      ____   Monitor Usage/Pattern

      ____   Contact/Thank/Survey 10 random customers

      ____   Document contacts/responses

Friday: Follow-Up Friday

      ____   Prospects/New Customers

      ____   Thank You Customers

      ____   “We Miss You’s”
CUSTOMER SERVICE FEEDBACK
We just can’t thank you enough for your continued
service and trust this year. As always, we value your
input and strive to raise the bar each and every year.
As a token of our appreciation, we would love for you
to answer 3 simple questions. Upon completion, we will
instantly credit your account $10.00. Thank you again
for your patronage.
  1) What is the one thing we do best?


  2) What is the one thing we don’t do?


  3) What is the one thing we need to improve on?
              Retention Monthly Specials
MONTHLY SPECIALS:

January     4 Sweaters For The Price Of 3
February    20% off 5 pieces or more Dry Cleaning-We Love You
March       20% off Skirts/Ties
April       20% Off Comforters/Bedspreads
May         20% Off Prom Dress
June        20% Off All Dresses
July        20% Off Alterations
August      20% Off Wedding Gowns
September   20% Off Sleeping Beds
October     20% Off Leathers/Suedes
November    20% Off Table Clothes
December    20% Off Formal Wear

TOP 20% CUSTOMERS-One Coupon:

January     $5.00 Coupon Off Of Dry Cleaning
April       25% Off Bed Linens
July        20% Area Rugs
October     20% All Coats

TOP 50 CUSTOMERS:

February    We Love You Card: $5.00 Starbucks/Dunkin Donuts Gift Card
July        Summer Thanks: $5.00 Jamba Juice/Panera Card
Christmas   XMAS Gift: Bottle Wine/Dinner Coupon

Be structured, routine and maybe use emails to promote the specials…
                      NEW HIRE EMPLOYMENT
                       POSITION AGREEMENT
Position Title: Customer Service Manager Department:     Delivery
___________________________________________________________________

Supervisor:               General Manager
Positions Supervised:     Limited to CSR’s

Position Responsibilities:

The position needs to be scheduled, routine, managed and measured in order to
be both productive and constructive. A candidate may be someone within the
organization such as a CSR or our retail manager. The title can be Customer
Service Manager, Customer Retention Manager, Client Care Agent or any other
variation of this.

The goal is to establish a position or system within the company in which
Customer Service is pro-active instead of reactive where customers are retained,
and furthermore, become referral sources to maintain growth of your business.

The individual must comply with all of the company policies to ensure the best
quality customer service and attention.

Daily/Routine Functions:

   1.   Makes calls to all new customers welcoming and verifying information.
   2.   Identifies top 100 customers for route and retail.
   3.   Must utilize manifest in all aspects to verify accuracy of orders.
   4.   Records all clients’ complaints into log or journal.
   5.   Must represent the company with complete professionalism.
   6.   Records and reports all concerns and complaints to supervisor.
   7.   Direct line of communication with operation and production manager.
   8.   Strive to retain missing or lost customers.
   9.   Works with Operations Manager in maintaining regular customers.
   10.Must be willing to perform other assigned duties.
   11.Direct and proactive flow of communication between customers and
      company as well as the route drivers.

Key Measurables and Accountability of Position:

   1.   Documents all claims, concerns and reports solution.
   2.   Reports lesson learned for all lost customers.
   3.   Provides specific information to supervisor.
   4.   Monitors retention levels.
   5.   Professional service is demonstrated at all times.
   6.   No reported conflicts with company personnel.

Qualifications:

Education/Knowledge:            High School Diploma, GED or equivalent.
                                Business major preferred.
                                Prior management experience preferred.

Skills/Abilities:               Works well without direct supervision.
                                Makes quick judgment decisions.
                                Strong Leadership Skills.
                                Basic computer skills and typing.

Appearance/Other:               Clean appearance.
                                Professional in appearance.

Decision Making:                Must be able to carry out detailed instructions.
                                Problem solving when needed.

Work Habits:                    Performs as a team player.
                                Committed to long-term growth.

Physical Requirements of the position.

Strength:                       Able to sit in an office atmosphere for prolonged
                                periods of time.
Communication:                  English required, Spanish is preferred.
                                Speak in complete sentences.
                                Must be attentive to customers concerns.
                                Must be willing to listen to direction given.
                                Able to hear normal conversations.
                                Strong phone skills.

Dexterity:                      Able to type accurately and write legibly.


Visual Abilities:               Able to see computer screen clearly
                                Average peripheral, distance and color vision.



                           Purpose Of Job Description:

The overall intent of this form is to assist organizations in the hiring process

so it is fairly administered and qualified employees are chosen. The

essential element is to be effective during the appraisal process for promotions,

transfers, layoffs and terminations.



All Descriptions have been reviewed to ensure that only essential functions and

basic duties have been included and described as minimum standards, in order to

successfully perform the job at hand. Additional functions and requirements may

be assigned by supervisors as deemed needed and appropriate. In compliance

with the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is possible that any requirements may

be modified to reasonably accommodate disabled individuals. However, none

will be made which may present a serious health or safety risk to the employee,
customer or others or which also may cause undue hardships on the organization.



I have read the above job description and understand the requirements. I am

able to perform all the above mentioned functions. I have disclosed all

concerns to the supervisor that may limit or hinder my overall performance.



If any accommodation is required and agreed upon, please list below.




__________________________                            ____________________

Supervisor Signature                                  Employee Signature



__________________________

Date.
                      NEW HIRE EMPLOYMENT
                       POSITION AGREEMENT
Position Title: Business Development Manager
Department:     Delivery
___________________________________________________________________

Supervisor:                General Manager/Owner
Positions Supervised:      Sales Staff, Drivers

Position Responsibilities:

The overall duty of the Business Development Manager is to ensure growth by
regularly adding customers to the route while retaining customers as well.

The individual must comply with all of the company policies to ensure the best
quality customer service and attention.

Daily/Routine Functions:

   1. Scouts out new areas for development.

   2. Strives to make route efficient.

   3. Must utilize manifest in developing efficiency.

   4. Direct all sales staff.

   5. Must represent the company with complete professionalism.

   6. Records and reports all concerns and complaints to supervisor.

   7. Direct line of communication with operation and production manager.

   8. Strive to retain missing or lost customers.

   9. Hits standards and set goals for sales staff.

   10.Orders, updates and maintains all marketing pieces
   11.Must be willing to perform other assigned duties.

   12.Monitors growth.

   13.Meets same requirements as sales staff.

Key Measurables and Accountability of Position:

   1. Must average a minimum 32 new customers a month.

   2. Monitors growth by providing accurate sales data and results.
      Make presentations and foster relationships with key personnel at selected
      businesses and various networking events.
   3. Monthly meeting with all route personnel.

   4. Hires, coaches and fires all sales staff.

   5. Provides specific information to supervisor.

   6. Provides accurate sales data and results.

   7. Professional service is demonstrated at all times.

   8. No reported conflicts with company personnel.

Qualifications:

Education/Knowledge:             High School Diploma, GED or equivalent.
                                 Business major preferred.
                                 Prior sales management experience preferred.

Skills/Abilities:                Works well without direct supervision.
                                 Make quick judgment decisions.
                                 Strong Leadership Skills.
                                 Results oriented with a career mindset.
                                 Basic computer skills and typing.

Appearance/Other:                Clean appearance.
                                 Safe Driving Record.
                                 Professional in appearance.
Decision Making:                Must be able to carry out detailed instructions.
                                Problem solving when needed.

Work Habits:                    Performs as a team player.
                                Career-Minded
                                Committed to long-term growth.

Physical Requirements of the position.

Strength:                       Able to walk 3 to 5 hours a day.

Communication:                  English required, Spanish is preferred.
                                Speak in complete sentences.
                                Must be willing to listen to direction given.
                                Able to hear normal conversations.
                                Strong phone skills.

Dexterity:                      Able to type accurately and write legibly.


Visual Abilities:               Average peripheral, distance and color vision.



                           Purpose Of Job Description:

The overall intent of this form is to assist organizations in the hiring process

so that it is fairly administered and that qualified employees are chosen. The

essential element is to be effective during the appraisal process for promotions,

transfers, layoffs and terminations.

All Descriptions have been reviewed to ensure that only essential functions and

basic duties have been included and described as minimum standards in order to

successfully perform the job at hand. Additional functions and requirements may
be assigned by supervisors as deemed needed and appropriate. In compliance

with the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is possible that any requirements may

be modified to reasonably accommodate disabled individuals. However, none

will be made which may present a serious health or safety risk to the employee,

customer or others of which also may cause undue hardships on the organization.



I have read the above job description and understand the requirements. I am

able to perform all the above mentioned functions. I have disclosed all

concerns to the supervisor that may limit or hinder my overall performance.



If any accommodation is required and agreed upon, please list below.




__________________________                               ____________________

Supervisor Signature                                     Employee Signature



__________________________

Date.
Business Development Manager Job Description – Full Time
Job Title:      Business Development Manager – (full time)

Reports to:     Owner

Starting Salary Level:          $400 Per Week; 3% of the route and new customer bonus.
Management Salary Level:        8% of the route and new customer bonus.



OBJECTIVE

The objective of the Business Development Manager position is to grow the route business according to
the organization’s Business Plan by:

       BDM shall individually obtain a minimum of 8 to 12 New Customers weekly for home delivery
        services through face-to-face presentations, and by fostering relationships with key personnel at
        elite condominiums, boutiques, office buildings and neighborhoods.


REQUIREMENTS

       “People person” with sales skills, not afraid of direct sales.
       Three years managerial experience leading a successful sales team preferred.
       Excellent English communication skills are imperative.
       Energetic, results oriented individual with a career mindset.
       Able to go in and out of work vehicle constantly, during scheduled work hours.
       Able to walk from house to house during scheduled work hours.
       Ability to follow instructions accurately and implement them with minimum supervision.
       Basic computer skills.
       Safe driving record.


DUTIES:

       Maintain professional integrity in all business matters.
       Develop home delivery route by attaining minimum personal quota of 40 *New Customers per
        month, (*New Customer as defined below).
       Make door-to-door presentations about our free home delivery services, following established
        sales and marketing procedures.
       Make presentations and foster relationships with key personnel at selected businesses and
        various networking events.
       Collaborate in the development, revision, and implementation of policies and procedures,
        systems, programs and standards to promote delivery services.
       Hire and assist in developing and managing a team of Sales Associates.
       Work closely with CS Management in order to provide coaching for delivery service personnel to
        ensure routes’ growth and customer retention.
       Oversee all customer service route activities – sales related such as customers’ retention,
        contacting non-active, etc.
       All managerial responsibilities related to the Sales Department such as Sales Reports, Sales
        Analysis, etc.
       Weekly Meeting schedule with President on Wednesdays. Discuss weekly results, review reports
        including Tracking, Sales Reports, etc.
       Weekly meeting with CS Manager and/or CS Assistant Manager to review operational and
        service delivery matters.
       Weekly meeting with Delivery Service personnel, and CS Management to coordinate service,
        quality issues, and other retention related matters.
       Courteous and professional interaction with the public in general, prospects, customers, and co-
        workers at all times.
       Comply with all traffic and personal safety guidelines.




*New Customer is defined as:

1. New business; that is, if an active customer at one of the stores or routes is transferred, such
customer will not be considered a “New Customer”, except when:

a) A route customer had discontinued services for 4 months or more.

b) A customer at one of the stores had discontinued services at for 4 months or more.

c) A customer had services at one of the stores only twice or less, even recently, and Sales Manager or
Sales Rep earns their business for the route. New customers referred from one of drop stores to the
route will be credited to Sales Manager only.

2. Additionally, a prospect will be considered a *New Customer only when they have provided
authorization to pay for services by credit card, and they supply the number to be on file.

3. Prospect has actually provided garments to be cleaned.

(Person making the sale completes New Customer Form, including credit card information, and brings
first pick up).

4. New customers from condos or office buildings would be credited to the sales person assigned to
work, with said condo or office building.

5. New customers referred by a drop store would be credited to the sales person assigned to work with
sales lead provider.
Dress Code:    a. Well-groomed, business appearance. Uniform must be worn on job related activities.
               Refer to Company’s Policy for shared uniform’s cost.

               b. Uniform blouse / shirt – w/ logo, (3).
               c. Skirt/ pants – navy blue, (3).
               d. Shoes: comfortable rubber sole. No slippers, no sneakers or open toe.


SALES TOOLS:

      Company vehicle.
      Marketing material: Laundry Bags, Free Garment Offer, and Coupon Package.
      Sales Book.
      Cellular phone with tracking device.
      The Route Pro coaching program


Follow Up Tools:       Welcome package, Thank you notes, refrigerator magnets, Phone procedures to
                       call right after first delivery. 20/20 Referral coupones

Record Keeping:        Complete Daily Sales Reports and prepare Sales Analysis for Upper Management
                       review.

Weekly meetings with President to follow up on assignments, and to implement new ones. Review sales
reports and discuss results at this time.

COMPENSATION

This compensation package should not be construed to constitute contractual obligations of any kind or
a contract of employment between company and the employee.

New Customer Earnings Sales:

*New Customers Commission: $25 per new start for 1st 5. $50 After 5 (weekly)

All compensation ends upon separation regardless of separation’s cause.

Other Benefits: Company’s management status benefits apply:

                              One week paid vacation after first year.
                              Use of company vehicle.


Sick Days:              As per Company’s policy for Management, 3 paid sick days annually, calculated
according to base salary.
RECOMMENDED SCHEDULE BREAKDOWN (EXAMPLE):
Mondays:  7:00 to 8:00  New customer entry
          8:00 to 9:00  We Miss You Retention
          9:00 to 10:00 Route Prep/Staging
          10:00 to 2:00 Route Delivery/9-2-5 Program/Cherry Picking
          2:00 to 3:00  Plant:
          3:00 to ??    Route Sales

Tuesdays:     7:00 to 8:00     New customer entry
              8:00 to 11:00    Cherry Pick Sales
              11:00 to 2:00    Lunch/Business Sales
              2:00 to ??       Route Sales

Wednesdays:   7:00 to 8:00     New customer entry
              8:00 to 9:00     Meet with Owner
              9:00 to 10:00    Work on welcome calls/letters/follow-up
              10:00 to 11:00   Company management meeting
              11:00 to 12:00   Route Meeting
              12:00 to 1:00    Lunch
              1:00 to 2:00     Welcome to the route calls
              2:00 to 3:00     Route Staging
              3:00 to ????     Route Sales

Thursdays:    7:30 to 9:00     Networking/BNI
              9:00 to 10:00    New customer entry
              10:00 to 12:00   Cherry Picking
              12:00 to 1:00    Lunch
              1:00 to 3:00     Businesses/Appointments
              3:00 to ??       Route Sales


Fridays:      8:00 to 10:00 New customer entry/manifest clean-up
              10:00 to 12:00 Cherry Picking
              Noon to 2:00 Retention: Follow-Up Friday Phone Calls
              2:00 to 3:00    Follow-ups, Cherry Picks
              3:15 to 4:00    Prepare for next week.



Saturdays:    Saturday sales to achieve a minimum of 8 New Customers. It is strongly
              recommended that Saturdays is the best day to canvass neighborhoods.

              Also, use time for follow-up appointments
Route Driver Job Description – Full Time


Job Title:      Route Sales Driver – (full time)

Reports to:     Owner

Salary Level:   $300 Per Week, 3% of total route sales plus $50 per new customer.



OBJECTIVE

The objective of the RSD position is to grow route business according to the organization’s Business Plan
by:

       Individually obtaining a minimum of 5 New Customers weekly for home delivery services
        through face-to-face presentations, and by fostering relationships with key personnel at elite
        condominiums, boutiques, and office buildings..
       Gain and retain all customers.


REQUIREMENTS

       People’s person with sales skills, not afraid of direct sales.
       Excellent English communication skills are imperative.
       Energetic, results oriented individual with a career mindset.
       Able to stand on feet for 8 hours a day.
       Able to walk from house to house during scheduled work hours.
       Ability to follow instructions accurately and implement them with minimum supervision.
       Basic computer skills.
       Safe driving record.


DUTIES:

       Maintain professional integrity in all business matters.
       Develop home delivery route by attaining minimum personal quota of 20 New Customers per
        month, (New Customer as defined below).
       Make door-to-door presentations about our free home delivery services; following established
        sales and marketing procedures.
       Make presentations and foster relationships with key personnel at selected businesses and
        various networking events, if possible.
       Attend BNI regularly, all business after hours for chamber.
       Collaborate in the development, revision, and implementation of policies and procedures,
        systems, programs and standards to promote delivery services.
       Maintain counter relations with all customers when at store.
       Weekly reports of new customers and missing ones as well.
       Participate in all Route Pro Webinars, phone conferences.
       Weekly mailing of new customers welcoming them, while providing service personnel to ensure
        routes’ growth and customer retention.
       Oversee all customer service route activities – sales related such as customers’ retention,
        contacting non-active, etc.
       Weekly Meeting schedule with management on Wednesdays. Discuss weekly results, review
        reports including Tracking, Sales Reports, etc.
       Maintain communication on all issues.
       Courteous and professional interaction with the public in general, prospects, customers, and co-
        workers at all times.
       Comply with all traffic and personal safety guidelines.




New Customer is defined as:

1. New business; that is, if an active customer at one of the stores or routes is transferred, such
customer will not be considered a “New Customer” when:

a) A route customer had discontinued services for 3 months or less.

b) Customer is known to be seasonal.

2. Prospect has actually provided garments to be cleaned-leaves a bag.

3. New customers from condos or office buildings would be credited to the sales person assigned to
work, with said condo or office building.




Dress Code:     a. Well-groomed, business appearance. Uniform must be worn on job related activities.
                Refer to Company’s Policy for shared uniform’s cost.

                e. Professionally dressed


RECOMMENDED SCHEDULE BREAKDOWN:
Mondays:  8:00 to 9:00  Route Prep - Staff
          9:00 to 4:00  Drive/9-2-5 Program
          4:00 to 4:30  Return To Plant/Meet with Route Manager.


Tuesdays:       8:00 to 9:00     Route Prep - Staff
                9:00 to 4:00     Drive/9-2-5 Program
                  4:00 to 4:30    Return To Plant/Meet with Route Manager.
                  4:30 to 6:00    Sell with Route Manager

Wednesdays:       7:00 to 9:00    BNI
                  9:00 to 11:00   Appointments/Business Selling
                  11:30 to 1:00   Van maintenance/route prep
                  1:00 to 2:30    Weekly route meeting
                  3:00 to 6:00    Sell with Route Manager

Thursdays:        8:00 to 9:00    Route Prep - Staff
                  9:00 to 4:00    Drive/9-2-5 Program
                  4:00 to 4:30    Return To Plant/Meet with Route Manager.
                  4:30 to 6:00    Sell with Route Manager

Fridays:          8:00 to 9:00    Route Prep - Staff
                  9:00 to 4:00    Drive/9-2-5 Program
                  4:00 to 4:30    Return To Plant/Meet with Route Manager.

Saturdays:        Saturday sales to achieve quota of 5 New Customers. It is strongly recommended that
                  Saturdays is the best day to canvass neighborhoods.

                  Also, use time for follow-up appointments

SALES TOOLS:

          Company vehicle when possible.
          Marketing material: Laundry Bags, Free Garment Offer, and Coupon Package
          The Route Pro coaching program


Follow Up Tools: Welcome package, Thank you notes, Refrigerator magnet, Phone to call right after first
               delivery. 20/20 referral coupons.
D.I.S.C. PROFILES
We strongly recommend the use of DISC profiles. DISC is used to
determine the type of personality you are hiring and working with, by
determining how they communicate and handle situations around
them. We have profiles for three different positions:

Management, Customer Service, Sales

D = Dominance: I = Influential: S = Steadinesses: C = Compliance

The 23 page report generated provides the following results:

   How to manage

   How to motivate

   How they respond under stress

   Perceptions

   Ideal work environment

   Strengths & Weaknesses

   How to communicate with them

   How they need to communicate with others

   How they respond to rules and structure

   How they contribute to the job position

   Action plan for success – personally and professionally.

My sample is available on our website as well.

				
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