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					  A Transportation

 Vision                                                for          2025
T h e 2 0 0 4 R eg i o n a l T ra n s p o rt a t i o n Pl a n f o r S a n L u i s Ob i s p o C o u n t y




                 ADMINISTRATIVE DRAFT
                  Chapter 5 (portion) & 6

                             January 14, 2005
Chapter 5
System Development: Our Transportation Needs


Highway, Streets, and Roads
This section was presented in December 04. www.slocog.org/projects/rtp1.html

Non Motorized Transportation
This section was presented in December 04. www.slocog.org/projects/rtp1.html



PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
SLOCOG’s VISION 2025 discusses three separate public transportation programs:
Public Transit (buses); Rail Transportation (trains); and Aviation (planes). This chapter
also addresses how goods move through the region (commodities movement), both on the
roads, over the rails or though pipelines. Finally, we discuss the role that ports and
harbors play in the region.

While about 90% of people choose private automobiles as their primary choice of
transportation, almost everybody (100%) wants more transportation options or
alternatives. A reliable backbone of public transportation options should be provided to
all people that choose, or must use available public transportation options.

The Public Transportation Program develops a strategy that
threads together a reasonable and accessible public
                                                                               Public Transportation
transportation system to meet the mobility needs of all                                Modes
persons in the County for access to essential local services,
and interregional travel. Public transit focuses on local and                  •   Public Transit - Bus, dial-a-ride,
regional mobility, while the Rail and Aviation sections focus                      vanpool and specialized transit
on intercity travel.                                                           •   Rail Transportation - Improving
                                                                                   passenger train services
Each of these primary transportation programs examines the                     •   Aviation - Paso Robles, San Luis
current and future ability to accommodate multiple modes of                        Obispo and Oceano airports
travel and meet the mobility needs of the region.                              •   Other System Elements –
                                                                                   Commodity Movement & Harbors
All of these modes of transportation are working in a
“financially-constrained”environment. The amount of
funding for public transit expansion is constrained by the existing local formulas used to
distribute the funds. Major intercity rail service expansions are not likely as they are
funded by the State and Federal governments, each of which is experiencing record
budget deficits. The air travel industry, while passenger traffic has nearly returned to its’
pre-September 11th levels, has continued to experience restructuring and increased
operational costs.

So where is Public Transportation headed over the next 20 years? Like the Highways,
Streets and Roads and Non-Motorized Transportation Elements of this Plan – the public
transportation systems will be challenged to do more with little funding for expansion.


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Transportation planners will continue to identify opportunities for more freeway express
bus services, rail service expansions, and expanding the availability of air travel.


PUBLIC TRANSIT

The region’s population is expected to increase by 41 percent to the year 2025. The
distribution and characteristics of this growth suggest that transit will continue to play a
vital role in the quality of life. In general, the longer-term transit demand in the region
will warrant a mix of:
    1.    Regional fixed-route services connecting communities and activity centers, and
    2.    Local fixed-route and paratransit services linked to inter-community transit and
          essential services.

SLOCOG’s policy goal for public transit in the region is to “Provide reasonable and
accessible region-wide public transit services to allow all persons in the County access to
essential services, to improve air quality and overall mobility. Essential services include
educational, recreational, health care and employment opportunities”. A more detailed
listing of long-term policy objectives and sub-objectives can be found in the 2005 Long
Range Transit Plan (LRTP).

What are the Future Trends in Public Transit?
Demand will Grow: Forecasted population increases, especially in the Highway 101
corridor and near employment and activity centers, will generate more demand for fixed-
route services, especially long-distance, express and commute services. The continued
shift in population to areas that have been less populated in the past, will also place
greater demands on peak and non-peak intercommunity transit service and require more
resources to meet the local needs of these emerging communities.
Decentralized growth will challenge productivity levels: The projected trend is for
smaller, rural communities to absorb an increasing share of the future population growth
and for the densest areas now to become less dominant in the region. This pattern will
tend to spread transit resources more thinly and possibly reduce productivity as more
paratransit or flexibly routed options become the most effective service models. Start up
of such local services or expansion of paratransit services will be constrained by the
current farebox recovery ratios set by state law.
Balancing the type of services will be difficult: As in the past, the people with the
highest transit needs are expected to continue to reside in the County’s larger
communities. Focusing resources in these communities will maximize transit benefits by
targeting the supply of service where demand is expected to be greatest. Yet this cost-
effective strategy will need to be balanced with meeting the special needs of target
population groups with no alternative to transit and addressing the needs of the less
densely populated areas for access to essential services.
Higher growth in demand by those population groups the most expensive to serve is
anticipated: Many seniors are moving into the region and choosing to live in relatively
low-density areas. This influx of retirees could increase demand for curb-to-curb services


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in the future, further increasing the need for the less productive regional and local dial-a-
ride services. Similarly projected growth in the number of low-income persons, residing
in the outlying areas with lower housing costs, might increase demand for off peak and
evening services with higher levels of fare subsidies.
The region has a large number of relatively small transit systems compared to the
total fleet size. The overall number of active transit systems (local and regional
combined), when compared to other peer agencies covering service areas with similar
socio-economic profiles, is disproportionately small relative to the many transit and
paratransit systems currently in the region. The LRTP peer agencies’ review suggest the
need for taking a more regional approach to service delivery and promoting more
integration or greater coordination among the different funding and operating entities,
whether public agencies, community-based groups or private non-profit organizations.
Broadening transit options with a larger mix of services requires either more
funding or a change in the current funding formulas: Projected state and federal
transit funding leveles will not meet future transit needs. Per the LRTP financial analysis,
supplemental funding will be needed to support transit service by the year 2010, if
services are to keep pace with the projected population growth. Supplemental funding
needs are subject to the chosen, future transit and paratransit scenario. If setting aside a
higher share of Local Transportation Funds (LTF) monies toward transit is the chosen
approach to increasing revenues, it will require a change in the current Joint Power
Authority (JPA) funding formula for regional transit. If a new funding source is sought,
such as a local option sales tax measure with a share set aside for transit, a new funding
mechanism will be needed to allocate the supplemental funds among different services.

Existing Transit Services

Over a dozen public transit services currently operate in San Luis Obispo County as
shown in Table X. The majority of these services can be categorized as fixed-route bus
systems, general public paratransit systems, or specialized services. In another sense,
these services can be organized by their primary purpose – to connect communities
through regional service or serve destinations within a community with local service.

Regional Services
The following summaries give a brief description of the regional transit services in San
Luis Obispo County. They include:
        •   Regional Transit Authority;
        •   Ride-On Transportation;
        •   Runabout (ADA complementary paratransit service); and
        •   San Luis Obispo Regional Rideshare.




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Table 5-1 -Current Transit Services by Geographical Areas (November 2004)
                  Long
                  Distance                              Regional                    Senior
                  Inter-City               Local
                               Local Fixed Note 3   DAR Fixed Route                 Services       Local Vintage
                  note 1                                                Note 4      Note 8
                               Route                    (RTA)       ADA                            Trolleys
Arroyo Grande     X            X                        X           X                   note 6
                                                                                    X
Atascadero        X            X (Note 5)   X            X            X
Avila Beach                    X                                      X                            X
Cambria                        X                         X            X                 note 7     X
                                                                                    X
Cayucos                                                  X            X
Grover Beach      X            X                         X            X                 note 6
                                                                                    X
Los                                         X            X            X
Osos/Baywood
Park

Morro Bay                      X            X            X            X                            X
Nipomo                                      X            X            X
Oceano                         X                                      X                 note 6
                                                                                    X
Paso Robles       X            X            X            X            X
Pismo Beach       X            X                         X            X                 note 6
                                                                                    X
San Luis Obispo X              X                         X            X                            X

Santa Margarita                                          X            X

San Miguel                                               X            X
Shandon                                                                                 note 7
                                                                                    X
Templeton                      X                         X            X                 note 6
                                                                                    X
Cal Poly Main X                X                         X            X
Campus
Cuesta College                                           X            X
Main Campus

1-Long distance inter city motor coaches
2-Fixed route services excluding local vintage trolley circulators
3-Dial-A-Ride for the general public is most often used by seniors, youth and children
4-Runabout serves the entire region with focus along the fixed route bus corridors
5-Atascadero and Paso Robles routes connect at the Templeton Twin Cities Hospital
6-The Five Cities have a joint subsidized senior taxi program
7-Shandon and Cambria have senior van clubs programs
8-Ride-On provides a regional senior shuttle service (selected weekdays by subregion)

Regional Transit Authority (RTA)
RTA provides regional fixed-route services within San Luis Obispo County. RTA’s four
routes are described below.
      Route 9 operates on the Highway 101 corridor between San Miguel, Paso
      Robles, Templeton, Atascadero, Santa Margarita, and San Luis Obispo.
      Route 10 operates along the Highway 101 corridor between San Luis Obispo,
      Shell Beach, Pismo Beach, Grover Beach, Arroyo Grande, Nipomo, and Santa
      Maria.


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        Route 11 operates between Morro Bay, Baywood Park, and Los Osos. There
        is also one express trip (in each direction) between Los Osos, Cal Poly and
        San Luis Obispo on weekdays.
        Route 12 operates between San Luis Obispo, Cuesta College, and Morro Bay
        with limited service to Cayucos, Cambria, and San Simeon.

Ride-On Transportation
Ride-On is a non-profit organization that provides social services clients’ transportation
and transportation alternatives to increase mobility while reducing congestion, air
pollution, and parking demand. The agency fills two roles: a Consolidated Transportation
Services Agency (CTSA) and a Transportation Management Association (TMA).

Regional services for specialized users under the CTSA include:
   • Recreational rides for United Cerebral Palsy clients mostly in the evenings and
       on weekends.
   • Contract transportation to non-profit social services agencies for group rides by
       daytime clients (one example is the North County Industries (NCI)) and
   • Support services for smaller social services and community based groups with
       community-based programs such as driver training, dispatch, vehicle
       maintenance or fleet sharing.
    •     Seniors’ Shuttle offers individual rides to seniors (age 55 and over) by
          geographical sector; the shuttle operates between 9 am and 4 pm with coverage
          as follows: North coast on Mondays, South County on Tuesdays and Thursdays
          and North County on Wednesdays. Trips can be local within sub regions or
          regional for access to San Luis Obispo at a flat fee of $4.00 each way.

The regional services for the general public under the TMA include:
    •     Airport Shuttle provides connections to regional transportation – such as
          airports, greyhound terminals, and Amtrak stations.
    •     Special Event Shuttles provide group transportation for a variety of events upon
          request.
    •     Vanpools offer a cost-effective way to transport groups of commuters.
          Individuals may join an existing vanpool or start their own (as employer-based
          drivers). Monthly fees cover the cost of the vehicle, fuel, insurance, and regular
          maintenance.
    •     Guaranteed/Emergency Ride Home provides a trip home to anyone who
          traveled to work using any mode other than driving alone.

Runabout
Runabout is the regional paratransit system that provides the Americans with Disabilities
(ADA) service that complements all fixed- routes in the County. Service is available to
seniors and persons with disabilities for intercity and local trips, with priority given to
ADA-certified individuals within a ¾ mile corridor of the fixed route network (regional
and local, including trolleys). The service days and hours for Runabout are consistent
with those of the local and regional fixed-route buses and trolley circulators. The RTA
administers and manages the operating contractor for the Runabout program.




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San Luis Obispo Regional Rideshare
SLO Rideshare, a division of RTA, provides a variety of information and services to meet
the following goals:
        •   Reduce the number of single-occupant vehicles;
        •   Provide alternatives to driving alone in San Luis Obispo County, including
            carpools, vanpools, transit, and bicycles;
        •   Provide supportive marketing services for local and regional transit
            providers;
        •   Implement grant-funded projects such as Free Ride Months, the Summer
            Youth Pass, and the Rideshare Incentives Program; and
        •   Maintain a trip planner for local and regional fixed-route lines with routing,
            scheduling and fare information on the Rideshare Web site.
In addition to being a clearinghouse of information on transportation alternatives within
the region, SLO Rideshare maintains a database of commuters’ work trips.

Local Transit Services

The following summaries briefly describe the local, general public transit services within
the County. They include:
        •   Atascadero Transit (fixed-route and paratransit);
        •   Avila Beach Trolley (fixed-route trolley);
        •   Cambria Village Transit (fixed-route);
        •   Morro Bay (trolley and paratransit);
        •   Nipomo (paratransit);
        •   Paso Robles Community Area Transit Service (fixed-route and paratransit);
        •   Ride-On (various services within the City of San Luis Obispo);
        •   San Luis Obispo Transit (fixed-route bus and trolley);
        •   South Bay (paratransit); and
        •   South County Area Transit (fixed-route).

Atascadero Transit
Atascadero Transit operates a single route, the El Camino Shuttle, on weekdays from
7:00 am to 7:00 pm. The route runs almost exclusively on El Camino from Paloma Park
in the south to Twin Cities Hospital in Templeton. Atascadero also provides a Dial-a-
Ride that serves residents within the city limits with door-to-door service between 7:30
am and 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday.

Avila Beach Trolley
Avila Beach operates a free trolley on Saturdays and Sundays from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm.
The route connects Avila Beach and Shell Beach; the trolley was recently integrated with
the South County Area Transit (SCAT) bus system without any changes in the timetables.


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Cambria Village Transit
Cambria Village operates a free trolley from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm with service days that
vary by season. The trolley route connects Cambria Village with Moonstone Beach
Drive locations and San Simeon Pines Resort along Highway 1.

Morro Bay
The City of Morro Bay operates two seasonal trolley routes seven days a week with
extended evening hours on Fridays and Saturdays with a 25 cent cash fare. Morro Bay
also operates a year-around general public paratransit service from 6:45 am to 6 pm on
weekdays and 8:00 am to 4:00 pm on Saturdays within the city limits.

Nipomo
Nipomo Transit provides general public paratransit service within its core area, Monday
through Friday from 6:30 am to 6:30 pm. Transfers to RTA Route 10 may be made in
Old Town Nipomo for access to Santa Maria, the Five Cities, and San Luis Obispo.

Paso Robles Community Area Transit System (PRCATS)
The City of Paso Robles operates three fixed-route bus lines, Monday through Saturday,
from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm. Each route runs on hourly headways. Route A and Route B
follow the same alignment but in opposite directions, while Route C provides service
outside of town to North Cuesta College and Twin Cities Community Hospital in
Templeton. PRCATS also provides general public paratransit service within Paso Robles.
Service runs from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm Monday through Friday.

Ride-On Transportation
As described above, Ride-On is the Transportation Management Association (TMA).
Ride-On provides a few local services within the city of San Luis Obispo:
   •     Safe Ride Home offers rides to anyone in the city, Thursday through Saturday,
         from 9 pm through 2:30 am at $3.00 per person. The primary users are students
         at the California State Polytechnic Institute, who reside within the City or on
         campus.
   •     Lunch shuttle offers group free rides to downtown employees to reach
         participating restaurants within the City and at midday hours upon advance
         reservations.
   •     The HOP midday shuttle previously provided between 10 am and 2 pm as a
         dial-a-ride program without advance reservations was recently discontinued to
         the lack of stable funding. Seniors primarily used the service for shopping and
         medical appointments.

San Luis Obispo Transit (SLO Transit)
San Luis Obispo Transit operates nine routes within the City of San Luis Obispo (among
which four routes serve California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo Cal
Poly campus); they are described below.

       Route 1 operates on a circular route originating from the Downtown Transit Hub
       with stops downtown, at the French and Sierra Vista Hospitals, and Cal Poly.




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     Route 2 operates on a figure-eight loop servicing major destinations downtown and
     along Higuera, including the Prado Day Center, the Department of Social Services
     and the Department of Motor Vehicles.
     Route 3 operates a circular loop with stops downtown, at the Crossroads Center,
     and at County Health Services.
     Routes 4 & 5 run in opposite directions on a circular route with stops downtown, at
     the Greyhound Bus Station, Laguna Village, and Cal Poly.
     Routes 6a & 6b Route 6a serves downtown, Cal Poly, and Highland. Route 6b
     serves downtown and Cal Poly. From June 15th through Labor Day Routes 6a & b
     run every hour between 8:30 am and 6 pm, Monday through Saturday.
     Route 7 operates a circular loop that makes stops downtown, at Home Depot,
     Laguna Village, and Madonna Plaza. Route 7 provides evening service Monday
     through Thursday from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm.
     Route 8 Service is provided to County Health Services, Orcutt, and Downtown.
     Transfers can be made to other SLO Transit and RTA routes at the Downtown
     Transit Hub.
     The downtown trolley connects the North Monterey motel district with the core
     part of downtown Thursday to Sunday with extended evening hours on Thursdays
     (Farmers’ Market).

South Bay
South Bay Dial-a-Ride provides local, general public door-to-door service in the Los
Osos-Baywood Park area on weekdays from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm.

South County Area Transit (SCAT)
SCAT (administered and managed by the RTA) operates four fixed-route bus lines seven
days a week; the buses operate between 6 am and 8:30 pm on weekdays, between 7 am
and 8 pm on Saturdays and 7am to 5 pm on Sundays. The routes are described below.

     Route 21 operates between Grover Beach, Pismo Beach, Shell Beach, and
     Arroyo Grande
     Route 22 runs between Grover Beach, Oceano, and Arroyo Grande every day
     of the week.
     Route 23 runs between Grover Beach, Oceano, and Arroyo Grande every day
     of the week.
     Route 24 operates along Grand Avenue, Dolliver Street, and East Branch
     Street and services Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach, and Pismo Beach

Other Specialized Services

In addition to the local and regional services described above, a variety of other
transportation services are available. They include additional services operated by Ride-
On Transportation, other public services offered to specific segments of the population
and privately provided transportation services.

Ride-On Transportation
As described previously, Ride-On is a non-profit organization that provides a variety of
transportation services. One of the specialized services Ride-On offers for specific
subpopulations is described below:



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    •   Kids’ shuttle operates 24 hours a day and 7 days a week to provide
        transportation to children within San Luis Obispo County and Santa Maria. The
        service is primarily used during the summer months when school is out.

Cambria Senior Van
Cambria Community Transit offers free paratransit service to seniors and persons with
disabilities within Cambria, Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm (with rides
to Morro Bay and San Luis Obispo on Tuesdays (and monthly trips to Paso Robles).

Five Cities’ Subsidized Taxi
Five Cities offer a subsidized taxi service within and between Arroyo Grande, Grover
Beach, Pismo Beach, Oceano, and Shell Beach for seniors and persons with disabilities.
The service is available 7 days a week between 6:00 am to 8:00 pm (with advance
reservations required for disabled persons) at $4.00 each way (10 ride cards).

Templeton Subsidized Taxi
Templeton offers a subsidized taxi service 7 days a week from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.
Service to the general public is available in Templeton only, while seniors and persons
with disabilities may also travel to Paso Robles and Atascadero.


Other Transportation Services

The following describes those transportation services that do not fall within the scope of
the regional public transit network – with a focus on privately operated transportation.

        •   Taxis – A-1 Crown Taxi, Beach Cities Cab, Central Coast Taxi-Cab, Five
            Cities Taxi, Grover Beach Taxi, Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo Taxi, Santa
            Margarita, Santa Maria Valley Taxi, and Yellow Cab.
        •   Bus Lines/Charters – American Star Tours, At Your Service, Breakaway
            Tours, Greyhound, Quest Charters & Tours, Silver Bay Tours and Silverado
            Stages.
        •   Limousine Services – Adventure Limousine, Allure Limousine, At Your
            Service, Bay Limousine Service, Beach Front Limo, Classic Limo, Cloud
            Nine, Duke Limousine, Elegant Image Limousine Service, Gold Coast Limo,
            Prestige Limousine Services, Quest Limousines, Serenity Limousine &
            Sedan, SLO Discount Limousine, Sultan’s Limousine Service, 1 White Rose
            Limo, and 5 Cities Limo.
        •   Amtrak Thruway Service - Motor coaches are used in the thruway service
            to reach many cities where Amtrak trains do not stop. The buses provide
            coordinated service with trains at most Amtrak stations they serve.
The services offered by private buses and charters play an important role in interregional
travel while taxis and limousines offer important local connections.




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Future Transit Service Levels

The 2005 Long Range Transit Plan (LRTP) tested different service levels over the 20
year planning period (2005-2025). Four conceptual long-range scenarios were developed
and compared based on projected service hours, riders, costs and revenues. The scenarios
include:
         1) Status Quo - no change from today, except for a slight increase in the Five
         Cities area local bus service,
         2) Proportional Growth - an increase in local and regional services at a rate that
         matches the population growth (i.e. 40%)
         3) Medium Growth - a 75% increase over the status quo (or today’s) service
         levels,
         4) High Growth - a 110% increase over the status quo (or today’s) service
         levels.

The LRTP assessment of future transit and paratransit needs recommends the High
Growth Scenario. This is actually quite conservative if one considers that transit service
levels have increased about 160 percent since the mid 1980’s (past 20 years).

The current frequency of regional transit bus routes is shown in Figure 5-1, “Status Quo
2005”. The Long Range Transit Plan recommends transit service hours (on the regional
and local services combined) be increased over the next 20 years as shown by the “High
Growth”scenario map, Figure 5-2.

The High Growth Scenario map shows the projected growth if all regional service levels
were increased by 110 percent over current levels in the next 20 years; the development
of short term transit plans and sub-area transit plans will be needed to refine those
conceptual estimates. For instance, in a growing area like the soon-to-be urbanized Five
Cities, the mid-term local bus service expansion may exceed the corresponding expansion
on the south county portion of the regional bus corridor.

Costs of Anticipated Growth
The High Growth scenario from the LRTP has a 20-year budget of almost $450 million.
Financing for this scenario relies heavily on local and state funds, with 22 percent of
revenues generated locally and 64 percent contributed by the state. Fourteen percent of
the total revenues are federally generated. The above state funding share of the total
budget includes almost $65 million in supplemental funds: warranting either setting aside
90 percent of the total Local Transportation Funds (LTF) funding allocated to the region
(above and beyond the current 68 percent share with the 32 percent balance for streets
and roads) or securing a new source of locally generated funds.




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Figure   5-1   REGIONAL             TRANSIT            –      STATUS     QUO      2005




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Figure 5-2 REGIONAL TRANSIT – HIGH GROWTH 2025




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Table 5-2 Financial Summary of Transit in 2025 (High Growth Scenario)
                                                                    SHORT TERM                 MID TERM              LONG TERM
                                                                      2005-2009                2010-2014              2015 - 2024
REVENUES
 Local - Passenger Fares                                           $       17,599,000      $      22,536,000     $       58,367,000
 State - STA, LTF                                                  $       39,484,000      $      50,621,000     $      132,821,000
 Federal - 5307, 5309, 5310, 5311, 5313                            $       10,016,000      $      23,296,000     $       29,335,000
 Supplemental Funding                                              $        1,396,000      $      15,484,000     $       46,350,000
                                 TOTAL REVENUES                    $       68,495,000      $     111,937,000     $      266,873,000
EXPENSES
 Fixed Route                                                       $       26,860,000      $      39,764,000     $      113,295,000
 Paratransit                                                       $       18,377,000      $      24,554,000     $       66,503,000
                                    Operating Subtotal             $       47,902,000      $      67,765,000     $      188,428,000
Capital                                                            $       12,928,000      $      33,329,000     $       48,296,000
Administration                                                     $        7,664,000      $      10,842,000     $       30,148,000
                                  TOTAL EXPENSES                   $       68,494,000      $     111,936,000     $      266,872,000
NET SURPLUS/DEFICIT (at end of time period)                        $              -        $             -       $              100
Available Carryover                                                $              -        $             -       $              -
Ending Fund Balance                                                $              -        $             -       $              100
Notes: Excludes impact of inflation. Operating subtotal includes costs for fixed, paratransit, and other services. The non-zero
funding balance is due to rounding.



As stated above, to balance the budget, transit would receive 90 percent of LTF funds
annually – rather than the current share of 68 percent. This supplemental funding would
first be needed in FY 2008, i.e. before the end of the short-term. The increment of LTF
funding is shown above as “Supplemental Funding,” since it would likely warrant a
change in the current Joint Power Authority funding formula for regional transit.
Alternatively, a new funding source (such as a local option sales tax) could be used to fill
the gap between current state funding levels and projected transit needs.

The Vision for Public Transit

The primary goal of this plan (and the LRTP) is to ensure that a viable public
transportation system grows to meet the region’s transit needs in the future. A practical,
easy-to-use public transportation system is fundamental in promoting regional mobility
and minimizing the traffic congestion and air pollution caused by over reliance on the
single occupant vehicle. The RTP update consistent with the LRTP recommendations
demonstrates a commitment to developing and promoting a wide variety of alternative
travel modes, including bus and paratransit service, vanpools, bicycles, and walking to
meet not only the needs of the transit dependent but also to encourage use of alternative
modes of travel by choice riders.

Based on the LRTP recommendations, SLOCOG and all transit agencies should:
1. Develop a more customer-oriented perspective to transit service delivery through
   increased service coordination and integration. Consider expanding the scope of the
   Regional Rideshare program based on pending “Mobility Management” legislation to
   coordinate transit with transportation services offered by other organizations (such as
   the TMA, Ride-On Transportation) and disseminate public transit information.




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2. Increase the share of LTF funds allocated to transit in the short-term, while
   considering a local option sales tax in the mid to long-term. A dedicated, local
   funding source will increase flexibility in the choice of transit services, fund
   technology improvements, and help transit keep pace with growing demand.
3. Encourage future service expansion consistent with a “High Growth” in service
   levels.
Finally, based upon input from local agencies and the public, SLOCOG should include an
evaluation of potential applications of the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) concept with support
capital facilities (park-and-ride lots, freeway express bus stops, transit centers) along
major regional travel corridors within the County and for connections to the fast-growing
areas of North Santa Barbara County and South San Luis Obispo County.




Rail Transportation
The primary goal of the Rail Transportation program is to provide a comprehensive
strategy to increase passenger train reliability, travel speed and frequencies. The program
supports safe, commercially feasible, economically viable, and efficient movement of
passengers and goods throughout the region, with minimal adverse impact on the
population, the infrastructure or the environment.

Background
Railway transportation, for the purposes of the RTP, can be divided into passenger rail
services and rail commodity movement. One rail corridor through the region serves both
uses. The Union Pacific Railroad Line enters the county near Highway 1 north of
Guadalupe and parallels Highway 1 northwards to Route 101 at Price Canyon Road The
route follows Price Canyon to Highway 227 and then through San Luis Obispo and over the
Cuesta Grade where the tracks parallel the Salinas River and Highway 101 to the Monterey
County Line and beyond.

Passenger Rail Services

Coast Starlight – Amtraks’ Coast Starlight train serves the corridor from Los Angeles.
through the San Luis Obispo region, to Seattle, Washington. It is one of the busiest long
distance trains in the nation, with one passenger train
northbound and one southbound each day. The Coast
Starlight provides a total of four stops per day within the
county, two in the City of San Luis Obispo, and two in the
City of Paso Robles, each in the mid-afternoon. Despite this
relatively limited rail service, the Coast Starlight attracts              Federal
                                                                                               Farebox
heavy use from county residents; an average of 186                           48%
                                                                                                 52%
passengers board or depart on the Coast Starlight each day.
Certain ticketing policies that provide a higher preference to
long-distance travelers (in order to maximize seat revenue)
make boarding the train difficult during the summer months
from San Luis Obispo.          Unfortunately, the southbound              Coast Starlight costs
Coast Starlight is more than 30 minutes late more that half of the time. As a result, the train
is unreliable for time-sensitive travelers. Funding for operation of the Coast Starlight train


                      Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)     DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                       Page 5-14
is provided by fare revenues and federal funding (Amtrak). The State provides funding ($70
million/year) to operate the three state-supported corridors; the Capitol Corridor, the San
Joaquin Corridor, and the Pacific Surfliner.

Pacific Surfliner - The “Surfliner” provides two frequencies to/from San Luis Obispo (and
Grover Beach) and San Diego. The service was implemented on October 28, 1995 and
has proven to successful and popular.         The service provides a convenient morning
departure from San Luis Obispo and Grover Beach to Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and San
Diego, with an evening return. On November 17,
2004, a new Los Angeles-San Luis Obispo roundtrip
was added. This train provides a mid-day arrival and
mid-day departure southbound.                                           State
                                                                                 29%
The service also includes a total of 8 bus connections
                                                                                                   Farebox
to meet trains that begin (or end) in other cities; 4 to                                             54%
the Pacific Surfliners, 2 to Capitol Corridor trains, and                        Federal
2 to San Joaquin trains.        Unstaffed intercity rail                          17%
platforms and stations were constructed in Grover
Beach and Paso Robles in 1996.
                                                                          Fig. 5-3 Pacific Surfliner costs


                                Fig. 5-4 Pacific Surfliner On Time Performance


                                                  95%

        91%
                                                        90% 90% 90%                                       89%
                          88%              88%                             88%
              86%                                                                86%
                                85% 85%
                    84%                                                                            84%
                                                                                             81%
                                                                                       80%




        Jun- Jul- Aug- Sep- Oct- Nov- Dec- Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr- May- Jun- Jul- Aug- Sep- Oct-
         03   03   03   03   03   03   03   04   04   04   04   04   04   04   04   04   04




                      Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)           DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                              Page 5-15
Figure 5-5 State Supported Rail Corridors




Interregional Rail Coordination
Intercity rail development is planned on two overlapping corridors in coordination with
Amtrak, Caltrans, and regional transportation planning agencies on the following two
corridors; the LOSSAN Corridor (San Diego-Los Angeles-San Luis Obispo) and the
Coast Corridor (Los Angeles-San Luis Obispo-San Jose-San Francisco).

Intercity Rail
“LOSSAN” or Pacific Surfliner Corridor - SLOCOG participates in the Los Angeles
to San Diego Rail Corridor Agency (LOSSAN). The group provides a forum for local
agencies to meet with Caltrans, Amtrak, freight and commuter railroad operators and
other interested parties to discuss existing services, proposed service modifications, and
capital improvements.


                     Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)   DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                    Page 5-16
“CRCC” or Coast Corridor - The Coast Rail Coordinating Council (CRCC) is a
coalition of coastal county transportation and planning agencies organized to improve
passenger rail services. The primary focus of the CRCC is to improve the frequency and
speed of passenger trains on the coast route between San Francisco and Los Angeles. The
CRCC acts as an interregional forum to discuss all intercity rail issues of mutual concern,
including, but not limited to; the High Speed Rail Authority’s plans, local and state rail
plans,     freight    railroad
                               Table 5-3 Intercity Rail Ridership 1999-2003
issues,       and      capital
improvement projects.                                                             SLO
                                                                                   Co.         On-Time
In 1992, through the Year Train Route                    PR       SLO      GB     Total % CHG Performance
passage      of     Assembly 1999 Coast Starlight 9,394 44,179                   53,573
Resolution       39,     State
legislators requested that           Pacific Surfliner          29,172 10,644 39,816
coastal         transportation Total                    9,394 73,351 10,644 93,389
planning agencies prepare
                               2000 Coast Starlight 9,858 45,323                 55,181         42.60%
an upgrade study for the
Pacific Coast Railroad               Pacific Surfliner          28,122 10,094 38,216            87.20%
Route between downtown Total                            9,858 73,445 10,094 93,397 0.00%
Los Angeles and downtown
                               2001 Coast Starlight 9,707 43,474                 53,181         33.40%
San Francisco        In June
2000, six CRCC agencies              Pacific Surfliner          29,969 10,974 40,943            87.70%
working with Caltrans and Total                         9,707 73,443 10,974 94,124 0.01%
Amtrak completed the
Coast                Daylight 2002 Coast Starlight 8,892 37,200                  46,092         44.10%
Implementation            Plan       Pacific Surfliner          27,171 11,016 38,187            88.60%
(Wilbur         Smith       & Total                     8,892 64,371 11,016 84,279 -10.50%
Associates) which provided
an operating plan for new 2003 Coast Starlight 8,605 37,032                      45,637           NA
train services on the Coast          Pacific Surfliner          30,913 11,866 42,779              NA
Route.                         Total                    8,605 67,945 11,866 88,416 4.68%

The CRCC includes a Technical Committee, which is made up of staff members from the
various agencies, and a Policy Committee, which is made up of, elected officials from
each of the agencies. The Technical Committee typically meets three or four times per
year, and the Policy Committee meets two or three times per year. SLOCOG, since it is
located in the middle of the corridor, usually hosts the meetings. Since 1992, SLOCOG
has taken on the responsibility for staffing the CRCC, including the preparation and
distribution of the agendas.

Primarily, the CRCC is working with the Caltrans Rail Program and Amtrak West
to initiate a new train from downtown San Francisco to downtown Los Angeles.
The new service is planned in the State’s Passenger Rail Program Report to begin
in 2008. The new service requires approval by the Union Pacific Railroad
Company. A capacity analysis of the corridor was completed by the CRCC to
gain Union Pacific’s authorization to start the service.




                    Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)   DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                   Page 5-17
Commuter Rail
What is the likelihood of beginning a commuter rail system in SLO County? It is not
likely within the 20 years the RTP due to the high start-up costs, the required annual
subsidy, and the relatively small impact on freeway levels-of-service. Commuter rail
development usually becomes more viable when roadway capacity is extremely
constrained.

“Commuter rail” is defined slightly differently that “intercity rail”. Commuter rail is
typified by relatively short-distance travel, operated in metropolitan areas and suburban
areas…usually characterized by reduced fare, multiple ride and peak period operations.

In order to begin new local “commuter” rail services, at least three key issues must be
resolved; 1) Acquisition of rolling stock and construction station improvements, 2)
Agreement from the railroad owners, and 3) Sufficient and stable capital and operating
funding.

    Rolling stock and Station Improvements – Diesel Mobile Units (DMU’s) appear to
    make the sense for the corridor, assuming their possible incompatibility with “heavy
    rail” locomotives can be addressed.     Several new station stops would have to be
    developed, at a minimum in Templeton, Atascadero, Cal Poly.

    Railroad Owner Agreement – The Union Pacific Railroad Company must approve
    any new operation along the existing corridor. Union Pacific has a long history of
    protecting its capacity on the railroad for freight traffic and requesting large amounts
    of funding for permission to use the tracks.

    Capital and Operating funding – A commuter rail system cannot be funded with
    the existing sources of revenue. A new source of local revenue must be developed
    since state or federal support is extremely unlikely. In 1992 it was estimated that
    $42 million in start-up funding would be needed, with at least $1 million per year in
    operations and maintenance cost. In today’s dollars, it would probably cost twice
    these amounts. The only conceivable manner to secure funding of this magnitude
    would be a ¼ or ½ cent sales tax increase, which would bring in $10-20 million per
    year.

High Speed Rail
California’s High Speed Rail Authority has eliminated the Central Coast’s rail alignment
from further consideration for High Speed Rail upgrades. The coastal rail alignment is
considered too sparsely populated, too environmentally sensitive, and too curvy for 125+
mph trains. California voters will decide the fate of a $10 Billion bond measure to begin
the construction of a Los Angeles – San Francisco high speed rail line through the San
Joaquin Valley in November 2006. The entire project is estimated to cost $30 Billion.

Vision and Planned Improvements

Increased intercity travel opportunities, and reduced point to point travel time will be
pursued through incremental improvements of the existing rail line. New state-supported
Los Angeles to San Francisco services (“Coast Daylight”), and new San Diego to San
Luis Obispo (“Pacific Surfliner”) will be pursued. SLOCOG’s adopted position is to
continue working with Amtrak, Caltrans, and coastal transportation planning agencies to


                     Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)   DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                    Page 5-18
fund and incrementally improve rail service to and through the region. SLOCOG has
endorsed the State’s 20-year plan for intercity rail upgrades, which include train travel
time reductions and increases in train frequency as follows:


 Table 5-4 Travel Time & Frequency Goal
                                                   Current-
 Corridor Segment                                  2010           2010-15      2025
 San Diego – SLO                                   9 hrs./1       6.5 hrs./2   6.25 hrs./3
 Los Angeles – SLO                                 6 hrs./2       4.5/hrs./2   4.25 hrs./3
 Los Angeles – San Francisco                       12hrs./1       8.75hrs./2   8 hrs./2




Aviation

It is SLOCOG’s goal to maintain and enhance the regional aviation system serving all the
people of the region and integrate the system with all other modes of transportation.
Well-planned and operated airports are models for multi-modal transportation facilities.
They provide an easy transition from one mode of transportation to another, an interface
of mass transit, trains, planes and vehicles.

This element was developed through discussions with airport managers, reviews of the
California Aviation System Plan (CASP), monitoring airport master plan development, and
in developing the region's Capital Improvement Program (CIP). The CASP is the vehicle by
which the California Department of Transportation conducts continuous aviation system
planning. SLOCOG’s primary role in the CASP process is working with the three airports
on the biennial capital improvement program, which requires regional approval before the
projects can be considered for state funding.

Overall Aviation System - The San Luis Obispo region has three publicly owned and
operated airports: the San Luis Obispo County Airport, a (CS) Commercial Service facility
operated by the County; Paso Robles Municipal Airport, a (GA) General Aviation facility
operated by the City of Paso Robles; and Oceano airport, a (BU) Basic Utility, general
aviation facility owned by the County and operated by a concessionaire. There are two
military airports, Camp Roberts and Camp San Luis Obispo, and several private airports that
are either closed to the public or have restricted use. There is only one permitted Medical
Heliport in the county, which is located at Twin Cities Community Hospital in Templeton.
Other hospitals may have heliport facilities, but do not maintain a permit to regularly
provide emergency services (i.e. French Hospital in San Luis Obispo).

Emerging Issues

Regional Jets - US air carriers have been aggressively incorporating regional jet aircraft
(RJ’s) into their fleets since the mid-1990’s. The popularity of the regional jet has been
fueled in part by the favorable operating economics of this aircraft and the high level of
customer acceptance. RJ aircraft can comfortably fly a longer range (1000 to 2000
statute miles) than turboprop aircraft (250 to 600 statute miles) and still operate
efficiently with a smaller seat capacity. In addition, the operating costs of the aircraft are


                      Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)      DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                        Page 5-19
extremely competitive. RJ’s fly at the speed and altitude of a large jet (35,000 feet) in
addition to offering a comfortable jet cabin feel. The altitude level allows for a smoother
flight and along with the cabin comfort has increased its popularity among the traveling
public. From an economic perspective airlines can realize a profit more readily flying
longer-haul, “thinner” routes, (markets with less passenger demand) without the costs of
filling a large number of seats. In addition, the longer range capability has opened up
market opportunities to hub carrier airports that could not be reached using turboprop
aircraft because of operating limitations or passenger comfort considerations.

In addition, since the tragic events of 9/11/01, RJ’s have served an even more important
role helping the airline industry to immediately react to the dramatic decrease in
passenger demand. Many of the large aircraft that airlines parked in the desert either
temporarily or permanently left a number of capacity gaps in the market. Regional Jet
aircraft were reshuffled into larger markets to help match capacity to the weaker
passenger demand levels and this new flexibility has allowed airlines the ability to
provide continuous service to their customers. Regional Jet aircraft are one of the few
positive growth areas in the airline industry currently. Not only are regional jet orders
continuing, regional carriers have been accepting delivery of these aircraft for the last 12
months at an extremely high rate. Carriers such as United Express/Skywest, America
West/Mesa, Delta Express/Skywest, American Eagle, Northwest/Pinnacle continue to
order and take delivery of Regional Jet aircraft despite the industry conditions. Skywest
expects to take delivery of 93 aircraft from now through 2005 and has options for another
119 RJ’s. Mesa operating as America West Express is expected to take delivery of 95
RJ’s by the end of 2005 and American Eagle has been accepting three RJ’s a month into
its fleet since early 2002. Clearly Regional Jet growth has just begun and will directly
shape the future of the airline industry over the next decade.

Notable Airport Improvements
San Luis Obispo - Among several minor maintenance and upgrade projects, the San Luis
Obispo County Regional Airport has embarked on a runway extension project to better
accommodate RJ’s, and a new passenger terminal. Both of these large capital projects
are included in the Airport’s 2004 Master Plan Update.

Paso Robles – Aviation activity in Paso Robles has remained stable. The construction of
30 new airport hangars has increased the number of based aircraft to over 200. Current
capital projects include maintaining and repairing the existing runways and taxiways,
with a proposed Runway extension (in 3-10 years).

Oceano - Oceano Airport recently received a $1.8 federal grant for pavement repair and
maintenance. Construction is expected to begin in Spring 2005. A Master Plan update is
expected to begin in mid-2005. Finally, a non-aviation issue may have a substantial
financial impact to the airport; that is, the County’s proposed relinquishment of the
Arroyo Grande Creek channel flood district to the State of California.


Commodity Movement
The area’s transportation system of roads, rail lines, airports and seaports serves a diverse
range of needs for the movement of goods. The goods movement transportation system
provides for the movement of local, regional, interregional, interstate and international


                      Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)   DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                     Page 5-20
commerce on an integrated, multimodal network. SLOCOG’s goal is to facilitate and
support safe, commercially feasible, economically viable, and efficient movement of
passengers and goods throughout the region with minimal adverse impact on the
population, the infrastructure, or the environment.

Freight Rail
Freight rail traffic through the region is expected to steadily increase on pace with the
overall state/national economy. Over the next 10 years, statewide freight rail volumes are
projected to increase 20% over current levels. The specific implications for the Coast
Route are unknown and subject to conditions in the preferred San Joaquin Valley route -
as well as a plethora of market influences. Rail’s market share of carrying about 15% of
goods is expected to remain fairly constant (Trucks carry 55%, which will slightly
increase). Freight industry observers do not anticipate a need for an intermodal
(container receiving/shipping) facility. SLOCOG staff will work to ensure that freight
rail movements reduce highway congestion, enhance economic development and improve
public safety. Grade separation projects should be constructed where appropriate, unsafe
crossings should be closed, and increased freight movements should be better coordinated
with passenger train movements to reduce conflicts.

Trucking
Trucking travel is an important yet often overlooked element of the overall transportation
system. In San Luis Obispo County, trucking movements account for approximately 8% of
the total vehicle traffic in the region.

Because the San Luis Obispo region does not produce all the goods and services necessary
to sustain the resident population, there is a recognizable flow of these necessities into the
area from external areas; it is estimated that this trip type accounts for about 20 percent of
the total truck movements in the north-south corridor with the majority of these coming from
the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas. Local trips account for about 50% of the truck
movements in the principal corridors, and much more than that in the total truck movements
throughout the entire region. Commodities carried by trucks cover a wide range of goods,
with construction materials accounting for 36%, and food and farm products accounting for
32% of the total.

Studies have also indicated that over 70% of truck travel is between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Redistribution of truck traffic during the entire 24-hour day may be advantageous as traffic
congestion increases. An origin destination study on Highway 46/41 near Cholame showed
the most west-bound traffic was headed for San Luis Obispo (50%), 32% headed north to
Monterey and beyond, and 18% had southern destinations (Santa Barbara or further). For
east-bound truck traffic, 7% were headed north of Fresno, 56% were headed towards Fresno,
20% were headed towards Bakersfield, 7% were headed south of Bakersfield.

Airfreight
There is relatively little airfreight activity in San Luis Obispo County. Two all-cargo
airlines operate at San Luis Obispo; West Air (Fed-Ex) and Ameriflight (UPS). Paso
Robles Municipal Airport included some limited Fed-Ex activity in 2003, but there is
currently no regular airfreight service. Since 1997, enplaned air cargo at San Luis Obispo
has grown at an average annual rate of 2.4 percent. Current volume is approximately 1.3
annual million pounds of domestic, international revenue freight/express and airmail.




                      Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)    DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                      Page 5-21
Planned Improvements
There are two major projects being planned for commodity movements: 1) Improvements
to the Reststop on Route 46, and 2) providing an interchange at Highway 101 &
Wellsona Road


Harbors
San Luis Obispo County has three harbors, Port San Luis, Morro Bay and San Simeon. The
harbors in the region accommodate three major activities: petroleum shipping, commercial
fishing, and recreational boating. There are no general cargo or passenger ship terminals in
the region. Commercial fishing activity is centered at Morro Bay and Port San Luis (Avila
Beach). Sport fishing boats also operate from these harbors as well as San Simeon Harbor.
Recreational boating is popular at each of these locations with berths and moorings at Port
San Luis and Morro Bay presently being at or near rental capacity. Port San Luis, Morro
Bay and San Simeon have each been designated as a Harbor of Refuge by the State. Port
San Luis is also a United States Customs Port of Entry. Harbor plans have been adopted for
Port San Luis, Morro Bay and San Simeon. Those plans are available at the office of the
appropriate jurisdiction.


Action Policies
            PUBLIC TRANSIT
PT –1       Service Level - Provide regional fixed-route transit services connecting
            major and minor population centers; establish and/or maintain appropriate
            local community transit services; and provide paratransit1 service as
            necessary – all coordinated to meet the identified transit needs of each city
            and major area. The appropriate levels of service shall be determined by the
            Short-Range Transit Plan (SRTP) updates(consistent with sub area transit
            plans) and guided by the LRTP and RTP regional policies.
PT – 2      Convenience and Amenities - Promote improved convenience and amenities
            for public transit service, where feasible and cost- effective, to make transit
            attractive to both transportation-disadvantaged and choice (non-transit
            dependent) riders, with a goal to increase ridership 3 percent each year (all
            services combined).
PT – 3      Specialized Transit Services - Develop and provide specialized services and
            systems to meet the needs of transportation- disadvantaged persons,
            including those with disabilities and mobility impairments, older adults, and
            low incomes.
PT – 4      Pollution Mitigation - Emphasize public transit’s role in the
            coordinated effort to improve air quality in tandem with ridesharing
            incentives programs, proposed regulatory changes and potential
            technological applications (alternative fuels, automated passenger
            information, vehicle locations).

1
  The term “paratransit” encompasses the range of demand-response transit services and includes:
complementary paratransit service required by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990,
general public dial-a-ride, plus other specialized services like life line or community based
transportation options.


                       Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)        DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                              Page 5-22
PT – 5    Cost – effectiveness - Ensure the provision of reliable public transit
          services to meet mobility needs at the lowest reasonable cost and
          encourage better coordination among different transit and paratransit
          systems for more efficient service delivery.
PT – 6    Public Input - Maximize regional input from the general public,
          jurisdictions, and groups on all aspects of public transit.
PT - 7    Corridor Planning – Focus on sub-regional planning in geographically
          similar areas to reduce planning costs instead of studies on single-systems.
PT - 8    Express Bus Services – Encourage streamlined transit services and
          infrastructure projects that create a Bus Rapid Transit network on main
          commute corridors.

          RAIL TRANSPORTATION
RAIL-1    Increase the frequency, reliability, and convenience of intercity passenger
          rail services and the amenities needed for comfortable and convenient travel.

RAIL-2    Support capital improvements that facilitate higher speed and more reliable
          rail transportation, including; improved signaling, curve realignments,
          double tracking, siding extensions, and new train technologies

RAIL-3    Identify, prioritize, and program major improvements as identified in the
          California’s Passenger Rail System - Twenty Year Improvement Plan

RAIL -4   Increase intercity rail services: Add New Coast Daylight Services between
          Los Angeles and San Francisco, and increase SLO/Grover Beach – San
          Diego services.

RAIL -5   Minimize street, road and highway conflicts with railroad facilities by
          encouraging grade separated crossings, safety gates, and closing at-grade
          facilities where possible.

          AVIATION
AVI – 1   Maintain and expand efficient and easily accessible air transportation service
          complementing economic development within the County of San Luis
          Obispo.
AVI – 2   Support airport development which is compatible with nearby communities
          and surrounding land uses, considering the safety of residents and
          minimizing impacts to the environment.
AVI – 3   Ensure local airport development integrates local, regional, state and federal
          policies and priorities
AVI – 4   Improve multimodal ground access to all airports in the County where
          appropriate
AVI – 5   Assist the County in maintaining SLO Airport as the primary airport for the
          county, while recognizing the need to establish Paso Robles Municipal
          Airport as the primary airport for the North County area.


          COMMODITY MOVEMENT
COM – 1   Improve transport efficiency and minimize the adverse impact of commodity
          movement throughout the region.



                     Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)       DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                           Page 5-23
COM – 2   Reduce and eliminate undesirable or unnecessary restrictions to safe,
          efficient and commercially viable commodity movement.

COM –3    Promote the integration of bikeways and other non-motorized modes of
          transportation within existing, replacement, newly proposed pipeline and
          utility corridor easements, where feasible.
COM –4    Establish appropriate control and procedures to assure the safe transportation
          of hazardous materials by all transportation modes

COM –5    Enhance California’s economic vitality by improving multimodal
          access and mobility for goods.

COM –6    Develop and manage the transportation system based on explicit
          understanding of system performance and customer expectations


          HARBORS
HAR –1    Protect, maintain and improve safe multimodal access to Morro Bay and
          Port San Luis Harbors

HAR – 2   Support efforts to secure funding for breakwater rehabilitation and other
          access improvements in both Morro Bay and Port San Luis.




                     Chapter 5 – System Development (Public Transportation)       DRAFT - 1/14/05
                                                                                           Page 5-24
Table 5-16
Draft Project Listing - Planned Improvements - Public Transportation

Public Transportation - Transit, Rail, Aviation Transportation Improvements
                                                                                                 Project Cost          Planning            Com'td Map
  MPO ID#              Project Title
                                                                                                   Estimate             Horizon            funding (Y/N)
 (Sponsor)             (Short Description)                                                                         Short Mid Long
                                                                                                                 (05-09) (10-14) (14-25)   patial/all

Regional
Transit - Op
[SLO1641-01]           Transit Operations Expenses                                                     55,560,000          Short
All Member Agencies (In Regional, Operations expenses to manage all transit systems)
[SLO1642-01]           Transit Operations Expenses                                                     78,600,000           Mid
All Member Agencies (In Regional, Operations expenses to manage all transit systems)
[SLO1643-01]           Transit Operations Expenses                                                    218,570,000          Long
All Member Agencies (In Regional, Operations expenses to manage all transit systems)
[SLO0211-01]           Operating assistance/Santa Maria                                                     160,000        Long
RTA                    (In South/Central County, Operating assistance)
                                                                                                     $352,900,000

Transit
[SLO1590-01]           Ride-On Rolling Stock Procurement                                                    530,000        Short
Ride-On                (In Various Communities, Purchase 4 medium buses, 4 small vans, & 3 small buses)

[SLO1600-01]           Runabout Vehicle Replacement                                                         330,000        Short
RTA                    (In Various Communities, Purchase five vans)

[SLO1591-01]           Ride-On Rolling Stock Procurement                                                    670,000         Mid
Ride-On                (In Various Communities, Purchase 4 medium buses, 4 small vans, & 3 small buses)

[SLO1576-01]           RTA Rolling Stock Procurement                                                      3,370,000         Mid
RTA                    (In Various Communities, Purchase six standard coaches)

[SLO1601-01]           Runbabout Vehicle Replacement                                                        360,000         Mid
RTA                    (In Various Communities, Purchase six vans)

[SLO1592-01]           Ride-On Rolling Stock Procurement                                                  1,620,000        Long
Ride-On                (In Various Communities, Purchase 4 medium buses, 8small vans, & 12 small buses)

[SLO1577-01]           RTA Rolling Stock Procurement                                                      5,620,000        Long
RTA                    (In Various Communities, Purchase ten standard coaches)

[SLO1602-01]           Runabout Vehicle Replacement                                                         480,000        Long
RTA                    (In Various Communities, Purchase eight vans)
                                                                                                      $13,000,000

             Regional Planning Area Total Funding Needs (Unconstrained Only)                       $365,900,000

South County
Transit
[SLO1578-01]           SCAT Rolling Stock Procurement                                                       370,000        Short
SCAT                   (In Five Cities, Purchase one standard coach)

[SLO1579-01]           SCAT Rolling Stock Rehab.                                                            100,000         Mid
SCAT                   (In Five Cities, Rehabilitate rolling stock)

[SLO1580-01]           SCAT Rolling Stock Procurement                                                     2,250,000        Long
SCAT                   (In Five Cities, Purchase four standard coaches)

[SLO1662-01]           Ramada Gardens Transit Center                                                        500,000   Unconstrained
SCAT                   (In Grover Beach, Construct enhancements to bus circulation & passenger amenities)
                                                                                                       $3,200,000


Note: Committed Funding (Partial/All) represents projects that have some level of local or regional funding committed to the project.
Public Transportation - Transit, Rail, Aviation Transportation Improvements
                                                                                                        Project Cost           Planning            Com'td Map
  MPO ID#              Project Title
                                                                                                           Estimate             Horizon            funding (Y/N)
 (Sponsor)             (Short Description)                                                                                 Short Mid Long
                                                                                                                         (05-09) (10-14) (14-25)   patial/all

Rail
[SLO0813-01]           Grover Depot TSM Improvements                                                               140,000         Short
Caltrans               (In Grover Beach, Install automated announciation system in Grover Beach TrainDepot)

[SLO0768-01]           Rail Operational Improvements                                                              5,000,000        Short
Caltrans               (In Grover Beach, Rail operational improvements)

[SLO1931-01]           Rail Operational Improvements                                                              8,500,000        Long
Caltrans               (In Grover Beach, Rail operational improvements)
                                                                                                             $13,600,000

Aviation
[SLO1627-01]           Oceano Aviation Improvements                                                               3,000,000        Short
SLO County - G.S.      (In Oceano, Rehabilitate airfield pavement)

[SLO1629-01]           Oceano Aviation Improvements                                                               4,000,000         Mid
SLO County - G.S.      (In Oceano, Various aviation improvements)

[SLO1633-01]           Oceano Aviation Improvements                                                               5,000,000        Long
SLO County - G.S.      (In Oceano, Various aviation improvements)
                                                                                                             $12,000,000

       South County Planning Area Total Funding Needs (Unconstrained Only)                                  $28,800,000

Central County
Transit
[SLO1857-01]           North Area Regional Facility                                                                100,000
San Luis Obispo        (In , Consultant analysis for planning, engineering and env. Services)

[SLO0021-01]           Bus stop improvements                                                                        40,000         Short
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, SLO Transit - Bus stop improvement program)

[SLO0629-01]           Fare Revenue Security                                                                       350,000         Short
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Install 24 electronic registering fareboxes, vaults&retrival syst)

[SLO0630-01]           ITS Autommatic Voice Enunciator                                                             230,000         Short
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Install automatic bus stop announcement system to meet ADA)

[SLO1572-01]           SLO Transit Bus Procurement                                                                1,120,000        Short
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Purchase three standard coaches)

[SLO0631-01]           Smart bus stops                                                                             100,000         Short
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Provide real-time bus arrival information with displays at stops)

[SLO1573-01]           SLO Transit Bus Procurement                                                                2,240,000         Mid
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Purchase four standard coaches)

[SLO0628-01]           Transit Bus Access Improvement Proj                                                         130,000          Mid
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Replace lifts on 4 older vehicles)

[SLO1574-01]           SLO Transit Bus Procurement                                                                3,370,000        Long
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Purchase six standard coaches)

[SLO1928-01]           Transit Vehicle Replacement                                                                 810,000         Long
SLO County - P.W.      (In Regional, Purchase 4 med. Buses (LO), 1 trolley (Camb), 1 trolley (Avila))
                                                                                                                 $8,500,000

Aviation
[SLO1626-01]           SLO Aviation Improvements                                                                 72,000,000        Short
SLO County - G.S.      (In San Luis Obispo, Various aviation improvements to SLO Airport)



Note: Committed Funding (Partial/All) represents projects that have some level of local or regional funding committed to the project.
Public Transportation - Transit, Rail, Aviation Transportation Improvements
                                                                                                         Project Cost         Planning            Com'td Map
  MPO ID#              Project Title
                                                                                                          Estimate             Horizon            funding (Y/N)
 (Sponsor)             (Short Description)                                                                                Short Mid Long
                                                                                                                        (05-09) (10-14) (14-25)   patial/all

Aviation
[SLO1628-01]           SLO Aviation Improvements                                                             23,000,000            Mid
SLO County - G.S.      (In San Luis Obispo, Various aviation improvements to SLO Airport)

[SLO1632-01]           SLO Aviation Improvements                                                             29,000,000           Long
SLO County - G.S.      (In San Luis Obispo, Various aviation improvements to SLO Airport)
                                                                                                           $124,000,000

       Central County Planning Area Total Funding Needs (Unconstrained Only)                              $132,500,000

North County
Transit
[SLO1833-01]           Purchase new transit shelter and bench                                                            0
Templeton C.S.D        (In Templeton, Purchase & install new shelter and bench for CCAT & other transit)

[SLO1587-01]           ATS Rolling Stock Procurement                                                            140,000           Short
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Purchase rolling stock (2))

[SLO0157-01]           Bus Stop Amenities                                                                        20,000           Short
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Install transit amenities at various locations throughout city)

[SLO0828-01]           Purchase rolling stock                                                                   280,000           Short
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Purchase of 4 Small -Medium bus)

[SLO1588-01]           ATS Rolling Stock Procurement                                                            420,000            Mid
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Purchase rolling stock (4))

[SLO0831-01]           Purchase rolling stock                                                                   310,000            Mid
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Purchase three medium buses)

[SLO1932-01]           Atascadero Transit Center                                                              5,000,000            Mid
SLOCOG                 (In Atascadero, Construct transit center)

[SLO1589-01]           ATS Rolling Stock Procurement                                                            420,000           Long
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Purchase rolling stock (4))

[SLO0832-01]           Purchase rolling stock                                                                   420,000           Long
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Purchase four medium buses)
                                                                                                             $7,000,000

Rail
[SLO1847-01]           Rail Operational Improvements                                                          5,000,000            Mid
SLOCOG/CALTRANS (In Rural - North County, Extend a rail siding in Northern SLO County)
[SLO1930-01]           Rail Operational Improvements                                                          8,500,000           Long
SLOCOG/CALTRANS (In Rural - North County, Extend a rail siding in Northern SLO County)
                                                                                                            $13,500,000

Aviation
[SLO0585-01]           Paso Robles Aviation Improvements                                                      2,800,000           Short
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Block of general aviation projects for Paso Robles Airport.)

[SLO1630-01]           Paso Robles Aviation Improvements                                                      5,000,000            Mid
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Various aviation improvements)

[SLO1631-01]           Paso Robles Aviation Improvements                                                      7,000,000           Long
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Various aviation improvements)
                                                                                                            $14,800,000

        North County Planning Area Total Funding Needs (Unconstrained Only)                                $35,300,000


Note: Committed Funding (Partial/All) represents projects that have some level of local or regional funding committed to the project.
Public Transportation - Transit, Rail, Aviation Transportation Improvements
                                                                                                    Project Cost         Planning            Com'td Map
  MPO ID#              Project Title
                                                                                                      Estimate            Horizon            funding (Y/N)
 (Sponsor)             (Short Description)                                                                           Short Mid Long
                                                                                                                   (05-09) (10-14) (14-25)   patial/all

North Coast
Transit
[SLO0030-01]           DAR Vehicle Replacement                                                                130,000        Short
Morro Bay              (In Morro Bay, Purchase rolling stock)

[SLO1581-01]           Transit Vehicle Replacement                                                            420,000        Short
SLO County - P.W.      (In North Coast/Central Co., Purchase 1 medium bus (Los Osos), 1 trolley (Avila))

[SLO0031-01]           DAR & Trolley Vehicle Replacement                                                      600,000         Mid
Morro Bay              (In Morro Bay, Purchase 2 medium buses & 2 trolleys)

[SLO1582-01]           Transit Vehicle Replacement                                                            610,000         Mid
SLO County - P.W.      (In Regional, Purchase 4 medium buses (Los Osos), 1 trolley (Cambria))

[SLO1927-01]           DAR Vehicle Replacement                                                                400,000        Long
Morro Bay              (In Morro Bay, Replace two medium buses and one trolley)
                                                                                                            $2,100,000

         North Coast Planning Area Total Funding Needs (Unconstrained Only)                                $2,100,000




Note: Committed Funding (Partial/All) represents projects that have some level of local or regional funding committed to the project.
Chapter 6
FINANCIAL STRATEGIES: Achieving                                         Vision 2025
[NOTE: A number of replacement pages will be provided at the TTAC meeting, or
download pages at www.slocog.org/projects/rtp1.html]

This chapter documents the financial assumptions that go into the financially constrained
element of the Draft Vision 2025 Plan, and identifies how much money is available to
address critical transportation needs. This financially constrained element, composed of
federal, state, and local revenues, is what the region expects over the next 20 years with
currently available revenues. Action items in the form of financial policies are included at
the end of this chapter and guide funding shortfalls, strategies, achieve public private
partnerships, outline commitments of local funding sources, and identify regional priorities.
These policies support our overall financial investment strategy as defined in Vision 2025.

Financial Scenarios
Three basic revenue forecast scenarios have been
developed for Vision 2025. A general description of                             952 M
                                                                 Millions
each scenario is provided below.           The key                1,000
                                                                                                       630 M
assumptions used to develop projections of each of
the major revenue sources and a summary of the
                                                                    800
                                                                                           57 %
                                                                    600
analysis of total costs and revenues under each                                                                        89 M
scenario is also provided. Each scenario assesses the               400                                 38 %
three capital program needs (Highway, Streets, and                  200                                               5%
Roads; Public Transportation; and Non Motorized)
                                                                        -
against each of the financial scenario funding                               Highway,           Public     Non Motorized
                                                                            Streets, and    Transportation Transportation
projections. Figure __ summarizes the funding                                  Roads
needs to achieve the desired improvements outlined
in Chapter 5, System Development Needs.

Financially Constrained Scenario
State and federal planning regulations require a “Revenue Constrained” financial scenario
and analysis. Such a scenario is based only on current sources and levels of federal, state, and
local transportation revenue projected out to the year 2025. This scenario includes some
federal and state formula funds as well as federal and state discretionary funds for existing
projects. However, future increases in federal and state gas taxes, or the establishment of
other new revenue sources is not included in the financially constrained scenario.

Reasonably Expected Revenue Scenario
Vision 2025 is based on the “Reasonably Expected Revenue” scenario. This funding
scenario is based on current sources and levels of federal, state, and local transportation
revenue projected out to the year 2025. This scenario includes some additional sources of
transportation revenue that are expected to become available through 2025. The additional
sources include higher levels of state and federal discretionary funds, and minor increases in
state and federal gas taxes based on historical trends. This scenario is based upon the best
current and historical information available and serves as the basis for Vision 2025.

Supplemental Revenue Scenario
Based on the analysis of travel demand in the region to 2025 and beyond, needs have been
identified for transportation improvements and associated operations, maintenance, and
rehabilitation. These needs will require funding above and beyond the levels assumed for the


                                     Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                                   Page 6-1
                                                                                                   Draft - 1/14/05
Reasonably Expected Revenue Scenario. The “Supplemental Revenue Scenario” includes
additional revenue options to fully fund the desired list of projects beyond 2 025. This
scenario identifies: a local option sales tax and other potential revenue sources, the estimated
revenue to be generated, and the implementation steps required.

Revenue Assumptions
The funding assumptions made for the major revenue                1,400
sources are included in the financial analysis for                                                     2,165 M            Local
                                                                  1,200
Vision 2025. Any differences in the assumptions                   1,000
                                                                                                                          State
made for the more optimistic Reasonably Expected                             1,399 M   1.672M                             Federal




                                                            Millions
                                                                       800
Revenue scenario as compared to the Financially
Constrained scenario are described.                                    600

                                                                       400
All revenues have been based on the 3.4 percent per          200
year cost escalation factor adopted by the California
                                                               -
Transportation Commission (CTC) as part of the
                                                                    Constrained      Reasonably            Supplemental
2004 State Transportation Improvement Program                        Revenue      Expected Revenue           Funding
(STIP) Fund Estimate. For flexible funding sources
that can be spent for a variety of purposes, the amounts assumed for highway, transit, and
other purposes under these alternatives also are summarized. A listing of local, state, and
federal funding projections for each of the three financial scenarios is further provided.

Table 6-1 provides funding projections for the Highway, Streets, and Roads Capital Program.
Projections for the Public Transportation and Non Motorized Capital Programs are provided
in Table 6-2 and Table 6-3, respectively.

 Local, State, and Federal Revenue Assumptions

 Local Revenues

 Transportation Development Act (TDA) ¼ Percent Sales Tax Funds - were assumed to
 grow from the $_____ million received in FY 2003 based on growth in the sales tax. The
 total TDA funds projected were reduced by _____ % percent to account for administrative,
 planning, and bicycle project deductions as provided in state law. TDA funds may be used
 for transit operating or capital purposes, but are not eligible for use on non-transit related
 highway or local street and road improvements. For planning purposes, it was assumed that
 _____ % percent would be used to match capital projects and the balance would be
 available for operations.

 Local Street and Road Gas Tax Subventions - The current level of gas tax subventions
 to the Cities and the County of San Luis Obispo for local street and road purposes was
 assumed to continue to be available. (Actual receipts totaled $_____ million in FY 200_.)
 The total of these revenues for the region each year based on the estimated growth rate in
 the number of gallons of fuel consumed in the state based on Caltrans projections reflecting
 future fuel efficiency, vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and vehicle fleet mix projections (i.e.,
 gas, diesel, electric, etc.). The total estimated gas tax was escalated to 200_ dollars

 Local Street and Road General Fund and Other Revenues – Based on information
 provided in the State Controller annual reports for local street and road expenditures and
 revenues, the average amount of general fund contributions and other revenues (including
 fines and forfeitures, interest earnings, and other miscellaneous revenue sources) used for
 local street and road expenditures in recent years was assumed to continue. The 10-year
 average for local general fund contributions to local street improvements regionwide is
 $_____ million per year, while other revenues have averaged $_____ million per year.
 These revenues were increased by 3 percent each year and escalated to 200_ dollars.


                                      Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                          Page 6-2
                                                                                           Draft - 1/14/05
Fare Box Revenue – These revenues mainly come from the funds paid by public
transportation customers boarding transit buses, paratransit vans and commuter vanpools;
such funds combine many forms of fare media such as regular cash fares, monthly, weekly,
visitors’ or day passes with any type of applicable discount fare categories (such as for
seniors, disabled, low-income, students, children, youth etc..). Other types of operating
revenues, which may supplement passenger fares, include local donations or contributions
(from users and non-users) or general operating assistance from public sources (such as
Federal demonstration grants, direct subsidies from educational institutions) or private
sources (employers, businesses, hospitals etc.).

State Revenues

State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Funds – were based on the
amounts programmed through FY 2009 as included in SLOCOG’s approved 2004 STIP.
Beyond 2009, STIP funds were assumed to increase at 3 % per year based on growth rates
in gas tax receipts, truck weight fees, and federal funds flowing into the State Highway
Account. In addition, future STIP revenues were increased to reflect the impact of the
passage of Proposition 42, which should increase STIP revenues for 2009 and beyond.
Based on the provisions of SB 45, the San Luis Obispo region should continue to receive at
least a minimum formula “County Share” level of statewide levels and a comparable
portion of the STIP Interregional program funds over time as well. The total STIP funds
assumed include revenue from both the Regional and Interregional STIP shares. The STIP
funds are flexible and are available for capacity-enhancing highway, transit, and local road
capital projects as well as for transportation demand management (TDM) efforts and
planning, programming, and monitoring activities. For purposes of the RTP, the STIP
funds were assumed to be focused on major highway (86%), transit (2%) projects, and for
implementation of the Non Motorized Transportation program (4%) with 8 % set aside for
regional arterial improvements, TDM, and other purposes.

State Transit Assistance (STA) Funds - were assumed to increase based on the forecasts
of growth in the state Public Transportation Account as provided in the 2004 STIP Fund
Estimate through FY 2009, and at four percent per year after 2009. In addition, future STA
funds were increased to reflect the impact of the passage of Proposition 42, which will
increase STA revenues for 2009 and beyond. These funds are available for transit operating
and capital purposes only. For planning purposes, these revenues were assumed to be used
entirely for transit operations, although they could be used for____________ .

State Highway Operations, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation Funds – it was assumed
that revenues will be available to meet Caltrans’ identified needs for state highway
operations and maintenance. By state law, these expenditures are given priority over new
construction and are funded “off the top” of the State Highway Account before any funding
for new construction projects is allocated. The 2002 base year estimates of $___ million
per year for operations and administration costs and $___ million per year for maintenance
costs were increased at a real growth of one percent per year to reflect a gradual increase in
these costs above the rate of inflation as the size of the system to be maintained grows over
time. The revenues needed to meet the costs for these purposes as identified by Caltrans
have been assumed to be available. For state highway rehabilitation needs, funds were
assumed to be available through the State Highway Operations and Protection Program
(SHOPP) at the current level of $___ million per year, with a two percent per year real
growth based on recent trends. Costs for SHOPP-eligible projects were constrained to the
estimated funds available for both the Revenue Constrained and Reasonably Expected
Revenue scenarios. To the extent estimated needs for SHOPP activities exceed the
estimated revenues, the unfunded needs are identified as part of the unconstrained listing of
projects in Table 5-___.


                                    Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                    Page 6-3
                                                                                    Draft - 1/14/05
Future State/Federal Gas Tax or Equivalent Revenue Increases – were assumed for the
Reasonably Expected Revenue scenario. Over the last 20 years, the gas tax has been
increased an average of 1.2 cents per year. While the gas tax level is assumed to remain
constant through 2025 for the Revenue Constrained scenario, it is reasonable to assume
such an average annual increase in both state and federal gas tax (or an equivalent revenue
source) in the future for the Reasonably Expected Revenue scenario. For the 20-year
period covered by the Plan, this would constitute the equivalent of a 24 cent increase in the
gas tax over time. The passage of Proposition 42 is an example of such an equivalent
transportation revenue increase, already generating approximately 40 percent of the total
estimated revenues from such a future gas tax equivalent increase. The remaining 60
percent in the total funding generated by a 1.2 cent per year gas tax increase was assumed
to be available for regional transportation improvements. Of this total, __ percent was
assumed for highway purposes and __ percent for transit capital purposes.


Federal Revenues

FTA Formula (Section 5307) Funds - the Section 5307 formula funds were assumed to
grow based on the guaranteed funding levels specified in the federal Transportation Equity
Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) to FY 2003 and at four percent per year thereafter. It
was assumed that up to __ percent of the Section 5307 funds could be made available for
operating purposes under the preventative maintenance provisions of TEA-21.

Surface Transportation Program (STP) Funds – the Regional STP fund estimates were
based on the current trends in actual annual apportionments and the estimates included in
the 2004 STIP Fund Estimate through FY 2009, which included a ___ percent increase in
the first year of anticipated new federal reauthorization bill and a ___ percent increase
each year thereafter. These funds are flexible and may be used for a wide range of capital
projects. For purposes of the RTP, it was assumed that ___ percent of these funds would
be set aside for regional arterial improvements or other purposes (RSHA), ___ percent for
local street and road maintenance (USHA), and ___ percent for projects supporting the
non motorized transportation program.

Miscellaneous Federal/State/Private/Other Capital Revenues – there are a variety of
smaller annual state and federal programs as well as periodic “demonstration” program
funds that provide additional funding for the region’s transportation improvements on a
semi-regular basis. It was assumed that about $4 million per year would be available from
such sources for the Financially Constrained scenario and a somewhat more optimistic $4.5
million per year for the Reasonably Expected Revenue scenario. Based on historical trends,
it was assumed that 70% percent of these funds would be used for local street and road or
other purposes, while 30% percent of these miscellaneous revenues were assumed for non
motorized transportation program needs.

Proposition 42
Proposition 42, overwhelmingly approved in 2002 by 69.1% of statewide voters and 71.9%
of voters in San Luis Obispo County, require existing revenues resulting from state sales
and use taxes on the sale of motor vehicle fuel be used for transportation purposes. This
program provides approximately $13.85 million annually to the cities, county, & transit
providers ($4.2 million to the County for road maintenance and rehabilitation ($1.3 m FY
05-06); $1.82 million to cities for road maintenance and rehabilitation ($900 k FT 05-06);
$7.08 million to SLOCOG ($3 m in FY 05-06) in the Regional Trans. Imp. Program
(RTIP); $757,000 to SLOCOG ($325 k in FY 05-06) for allocation to transit operations.




                                   Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                    Page 6-4
                                                                                   Draft - 1/14/05
Table 6-1 Financial Scenarios & Revenue Comparisons (All Revenue Sources)




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Local Funding
Transportation Development Act (TDA)                                        309,313,000             309,313,000               309,313,000
City/County Local Gas Tax (Gas Tax Subventions)                              86,408,800             100,808,800               100,808,800
Passenger Fares                                                              94,532,000              98,510,000               103,094,900
Local Agency Funds/Developer Fees/Other                                     308,633,584             308,633,584               308,633,584
Supplemental Funding - Local Option Sales Tax - Capacity, Widenings,                  -                       -               391,029,263
                                                                                                                                        -
SubTotal                                                                    798,887,384             817,265,384            1,212,879,547


State Funding
State Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP)                             185,540,000             368,440,000              368,440,000
State Transportation Improvement Program (ITIP-R)                            69,561,250             114,922,500              205,645,000
State Transit Assistance (STA)                                               13,849,000              18,849,000               18,849,000
Bicycle Lane Account                                                          2,000,000               4,000,000                6,000,000
State Discretionary Grants (Coastal Resources, Conservancy, State TE)         7,500,000              12,500,000               17,500,000
SubTotal                                                                      23,349,000             35,349,000                42,349,000


Federal Funding
Regional Surface Transportation Program (STP-RSHA)                           19,160,000              24,342,780               24,342,780
Regional Surface Transportation Program (STP-USHA)                           32,583,213              40,729,017               40,729,017
Federal Transit Administration Grants                                        62,647,000              62,647,000               62,647,000
Federal Aviation Administration (Fed/State)                                 150,800,000             150,800,000              150,800,000
Federal Demonstration Project Funding                                        41,248,991              41,248,991               41,248,991
Federal Discretionary Grants (Scenic Byways, Rec. Trails Program)             2,000,000               2,000,000                2,000,000
                                                                            308,439,204             321,767,788              321,767,788




  Table 6-2 Highway, Streets, and Roads (Financial Scenarios & Revenue Comparisons)                                                 l
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  Local Funding
  Transportation Development Act (TDA)                                     50,311,000            28,665,000            28,665,000
  City/County Local Gas Tax (Gas Tax Subventions)                          86,408,800           100,808,800           100,808,800
  Supplemental Funding - Local Option Sales Tax - Maintenance                       -                     -            98,994,750
  Supplemental Funding - Local Option Sales Tax - Capacity, Widenings,              -                     -           197,989,500
  Local Agency Funds/Developer Fees/Other                                 281,343,634           281,343,634           281,343,634
  SubTotal                                                                418,063,434           410,817,434           707,801,684


  State Funding
  State Transportation Improvement Program - (RTIP)                       173,603,000           347,358,000           347,358,000
  State Transportation Improvement Program (ITIP)                          45,361,250            90,722,500           181,445,000
  SubTotal                                                                218,964,250           438,080,500           528,803,000


  Federal Funding
  Regional Surface Transportation Program (STP-RSHA)                       18,202,000            22,024,420            22,024,420
  Regional Surface Transportation Program (STP-USHA)                       32,583,213            40,729,017            40,729,017
  Federal Demonstration Project Funding                                    41,248,991            41,248,991            41,248,991
  SubTotal                                                                 92,034,204           104,002,428           104,002,428


  Total                                                                  729,061,889           952,900,362        1,340,607,112




                                               Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                                           Page 6-5
                                                                                                                     Draft - 1/14/05
Table 6-3 Public Transportation (Financial Scenarios & Revenue Comparisons)




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Local Funding
Passenger Fares                                                           94,532,000         98,510,000        103,094,900
Local Transportation Funds - LTF Transit Only                            209,077,000        209,077,000        209,077,000
Supplemental Funding - Additional LTF                                     43,825,000         63,230,000         63,230,000
Supplemental Funding - Percentage of local option sales tax                        -                  -         49,497,375
SubTotal                                                                 347,434,000        370,817,000        424,899,275


State Funding
State Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP)                            2,800,000          2,800,000          2,800,000
State Transportation Improvement Program (ITIP-R)                         24,200,000         24,200,000         24,200,000
State Transit Assistance (STA)                                            13,849,000         18,849,000         18,849,000
SubTotal                                                                  40,849,000         45,849,000         45,849,000


Federal Funding
Federal Transit Administration Grants                                     62,647,000         62,647,000         62,647,000
Federal Aviation Administration (Fed/State)                              150,800,000        150,800,000        150,800,000
SubTotal                                                                 213,447,000        213,447,000        213,447,000


Total                                                                   601,730,000        630,113,000        684,195,275




Table 6-4 Non Motorized Transportation (Financial Scenarios & Revenue Comparisons)


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                                                                                                                  pp
                                                                          Co




                                                                                                                Su




Local Funding
Transportation Development Act (TDA) - 2%                                  6,100,000          6,100,000          6,100,000
Supplemental Funding - Local Option Sales Tax (NM Component)                       -                  -         44,547,638
Local Agency Funds/Developer Fees/Other                                   27,289,950         27,289,950         27,289,950
SubTotal                                                                  27,289,950         27,289,950         71,837,588


State Funding
State Transportation Improvement Program - (RTIP)                          9,137,000         18,282,000         18,282,000
Bicycle Lane Account                                                       2,000,000          4,000,000          6,000,000
State Discretionary Grants (Coastal Resources, Conservancy, State TE)      7,500,000         12,500,000         17,500,000
SubTotal                                                                  18,637,000         34,782,000         41,782,000


Federal Funding
Transportation Enhancement Activities                                     19,360,000         23,232,000         23,232,000
Regional Surface Transportation Program (STP-RSHA)                           958,000          2,318,360          2,318,360
Recreational Trails Program                                                2,000,000          2,000,000          2,000,000
SubTotal                                                                  22,318,000         27,550,360         27,550,360


Total                                                                    68,244,950         89,622,310        141,169,948




                                                    Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                                        Page 6-6
                                                                                                                     Draft - 1/14/05
 Reasonably Expected Revenue Scenario Analysis
 Based on the more optimistic set of revenue assumptions described
 above, the Reasonably Expected Revenue scenario provides the                                            Figure 6-
 financial budget for Vision 2025. A total of nearly $1.27 billion in
 revenue through 2025 has been estimated to be available to                        Federal
 implement the proposed improvements included in the Plan. A                         23%
 summary of the major revenue sources is provided in Figure 6-__
 The assumptions regarding increases in the state and federal gas
 taxes (or equivalent revenue sources) comparable to historical
 increases in these funds over the past 20 years, are critical to the                                 $1.672B            Local
 implementation of Vision 2025. Of the total estimated revenues,
                                                                                  State                                   55%
 48% comes from all local revenue sources, 32% from state sources,
 and 20% from federal revenues. [Appendix __ provides analysis of                 22%
 funding projections for the Reasonably Expected Revenue Scenario.

 Highways/Major Arterials (HSR)                                                           Expected Revenue

                                                                                               1,005,006,362
  1. Capacity Increasing, Widening, Operational Im provem ents -                                  846,941,045
    Surplus / (Shortfall)                                                                         158,065,317

  2. Maintenance Needs - Major Arterials, Local Streets and Roads                                 234,000,000
    Surplus / (Shortfall) for local m aintenance needs                                             (75,934,683)

  3. Total Surplus / (Shortfall) for Unconstrained HSR Projects                                            -

 The Highway, Streets, and Roads (HSR) program amounts to                                 Local
 59% of Vision 2025’s expenditures. Projects on the state                              Maintenance
                                                                                          16%
 highway system account for 72% of the HSR needs ($725M) of
 which in the near term approximately $188M of local, state,                 Major Arterials
 and federal funding is committed to deliver projects on the state               12%

 highway system compared to $122M for improvements to
 major arterials. Nearly $158M or 16% of the HSR programs                                                            Highways
 expenditures, are committed to maintaining and rehabilitating                                                         72%
 the region’s local street and road networks.

Transit, Rail, & Aviation (P T)                                                       Expected Revenue

                                                                                               630,113,000
1. Capital Im provem ents                                                                       272,517,000
  Surplus / (Shortfall)                                                                         357,596,000

2. Transit Operations                                                                           352,909,000
  Surplus / (Shortfall) for local m aintenance needs                                              4,687,000

3. Total Surplus / (Shortfall) for Unconstrained PT Projects                                   4,687,000

 The Public Transportation (PT) program accounts for 36%
 of Vision 2025’s total expenditure needs. Over the 20-year                         Aviation
 planning period, reasonably expected revenue projections                         Improvements
                                                                                      24%
 for the PT program is $475M of which transit capital needs
 over the same period are estimated at ___ and supporting
 operational expenses are estimated at _____.                              Rail Expansion                              Transit
                                                                                 4%                                   Operations
                                                                                                                        57%
                                                                              Transit Capital
                                                                                   15%



                                        Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                            Page 6-7
                                                                                                Draft - 1/14/05
Bicycle, Pedestrian, Other Enhancements (NM)                                       Expected Revenue

                                                                                           87,122,310
 1. Capital Im provem ents                                                                  76,089,889
   Surplus / (Shortfall)                                                                    11,032,421

 2. Maintenance of NM Facilities                                                               8,000,000
   Surplus / (Shortfall) for local m aintenance needs                                          3,032,421

 3. Total Surplus / (Shortfall) for Unconstrained Projects NM                                       -

                                                                                   Other                 Maintenance
                                                                                Enhancements                 9%
The Non Motorized Transportation (NM) program’s expenditure                          7%
needs are $76M over the 20 year planning period with a majority
of the improvements committed toward bicycle and pedestrian
enhancements. Chapter 5 – Table 5- provides a detailed listing of
the capital improvements. As funding is directed to this program,
                                                                                                                       Bikeway
a reliable long-term maintenance effort is critical to sustain the                                                     Facilities
financial investments.                                                        Pedestrian                                 66%
                                                                            Improvements
                                                                                18%
Revenue Constrained Scenario Analysis
This scenario provides the most conservative budget for future
transportation improvements. The revenue assumptions do not consider state and federal gas
taxes will increase beyond today’s levels (18 cents and 18.4 cents per gallon, respectively)
through 2025. The result of these and other assumptions is a total revenue estimate of nearly
$1.4 billion, or over $300 million less for improvements that assumed in Vision 2025. A
summary of the major funding sources is provided in the table below. Local funds make up
__ percent of the total revenue, with state and federal funds providing __ percent and __
percent, respectively. A summary of expenditures under this scenario is provided for each of
the three capital programs

Table 6-__ Revenue Constrained (Revenue versus Need)
Highways/M ajor Arterials (HSR)                                             Expected Revenue

                                                                                  781,167,889
 1. Capacity Increasing, Widening, Operational Im provem ents -                     846,941,045
   Surplus / (Shortfall)                                                            (65,773,156)

 2. Maintenance Needs - Major Arterials, Local Streets and Roads                    234,000,000
   Surplus / (Shortfall) for local m aintenance needs                              (299,773,156)

3. Total Surplus / (Shortfall) for Unconstrained HSR Projects                  (299,773,156)
Transit, Rail, & Aviation (P T)                                             Expected Revenue

                                                                                  601,730,000
 1. Capital Im provem ents                                                          272,517,000
   Surplus / (Shortfall)                                                            329,213,000

 2. Transit Operations                                                              352,909,000
  Surplus / (Shortfall) for local m aintenance needs                                (23,696,000)

 3. Total Surplus / (Shortfall) for Unconstrained PT Projects                    (23,696,000)
Bicycle, P edestrian, Other Enhancements (NM)                               Expected Revenue

                                                                                   72,744,950
 1. Capital Im provem ents                                                           76,089,889
   Surplus / (Shortfall)                                                             (3,344,939)

 2. Maintenance of NM Facilities                                                      8,000,000
  Surplus / (Shortfall) for local m aintenance needs                                (11,344,939)

 3. Total Surplus / (Shortfall) for Unconstrained Projects NM
                                         Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies
                                                                                 (11,344,939) 6-8
                                                                                          Page
                                                                                       Draft - 1/14/05
Supplemental Revenue Scenario
Although not developed to the same level of detail as the other two scenarios, an
Supplemental Revenue Scenario was prepared to provide an order of magnitude estimate for
additional projects, programs, and services to meet projected travel demands beyond 2025
and to fully fund local road maintenance and rehabilitation needs regionwide. Such
improvements would require additional funding above and beyond the levels assumed in
Vision 2025.

Funding projections under this scenario are generally equivalent to those developed under the
Reasonably Expected Revenue, however a supplemental funding source such as a ½ cent
sales tax initiative is added. The table below summarizes the major expenditures under the
Supplemental Revenue Scenario as compared to the Revenue Constrained and Reasonably
Expected Revenue Scenarios. The Supplemental Revenue Scenario exceeds the $1.7 billion
Vision 2025 expenditure plan by nearly $361 million. The additional transit improvements
needed to fully implement the Long Range Transit Vision beyond the 90% growth scenario
as defined in Vision 2025 would result in significantly higher investments in transit capital
and operations. Other highway capital improvements as well as Land Use, Systems, and
Demand Management investments would be needed to address remaining congested
segments of the region’s transportation system that could not be accommodated within the
$1.7 billion financial budget established for Vision 2025. Similarly, the local street and road
costs were increased to reflect increased pavement management needs over the 20 year
period beyond the $234 million identified in Vision 2025. These estimates are nearly $___
million higher than the local street and road needs that could be funded under the budget
established for the Reasonably Expected Revenue scenario.


Table 6-__ Supplemental Revenue (Revenue versus Need)

Highways/Major Arterials (HSR)                                              Expected Revenue

                                                                                1,442,210,487
 1. Capacity Increasing, Widening, Operational Im provem ents -                    846,941,045
   Surplus / (Shortfall)                                                           595,269,442

 2. Maintenance Needs - Major Arterials, Local Streets and Roads                   234,000,000
   Surplus / (Shortfall) for local m aintenance needs

 3. Total Surplus / (Shortfall) for Unconstrained HSR Projects                  361,269,442
Transit, Rail, & Aviation (PT)                                              Expected Revenue
                                                                                  630,113,000
 1. Capital Im provem ents                                                         272,517,000
   Surplus / (Shortfall)                                                           357,596,000

 2. Transit Operations                                                             352,909,000
   Surplus / (Shortfall) for local m aintenance needs                                4,687,000

 3. Total Surplus / (Shortfall) for Unconstrained PT Projects                      4,687,000
Bicycle, P edestrian, Other Enhancements (NM)                               Expected Revenue

                                                                                  141,669,948
 1. Capital Im provem ents                                                          76,089,889
   Surplus / (Shortfall)                                                            65,580,059

 2. Maintenance of NM Facilities                                                     8,000,000
   Surplus / (Shortfall) for local m aintenance needs                               57,580,059

 3. Total Surplus / (Shortfall) for Unconstrained Projects NM                    57,580,059



                                       Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                 Page 6-9
                                                                                    Draft - 1/14/05
A specific funding plan for the Supplemental Revenue Scenario has not been prepared. There
are a variety of funding mechanisms that could be investigated to help address the $_____
million (See Table 6-__ for unconstrained projects). The total unescalated cost estimate for
these unconstrained projects is $700 million ($1.2 billion escalated). The magnitude of this
shortfall would be very difficult to address and would most likely require a package of
various revenue mechanisms rather than a large increase to a single revenue source.

A list of possible revenue options is provided in Table 6-__ . Some of these revenue sources
may prove to be more feasible and politically acceptable than others over time. One method
of reducing the shortfall would be an increase in the gas tax at the state or federal level.
Alternatively, a voter approved sales tax initiative, a .5% sales tax, would be needed ($528
million would be generated over the timeframe of this plan – HSR $200M, $100M local
street and road maintenance, $50M transit, $50M NM, and a percentage toward non
transportation programs). Supplemental revenues in term leverage other state and local
revenue sources, thereby capturing additional revenue. Ongoing research into these and other
options will be necessary to provide the revenue needed to fully implement the Supplemental
Revenue Scenario.

TABLE 6- __

Potential Transportation Revenue Sources
   State/Federal Actions
   • Increase gas tax rate per gallon
   • Implement fees per vehicle miles of travel
   • Increase California’s share of Federal Highway Trust Fund
   • Index the State/Federal motor vehicle fuel tax to Consumer Price Index
       (CPI)/Construction Cost Index(CCI)
   • Change the fuel gallonage tax to a sales tax base
   • Increase revenues through State-Local fiscal reform efforts
   Regional Action
   • Institute regional development impact fees for transportation improvements
   • Implement a local transportation sales tax




                                   Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                  Page 6-10
                                                                                  Draft - 1/14/05
                            FINANCIAL POLICIES

The following actions support Vision 2025’s Reasonably Expected Revenue Scenario.



          Financial Strategies (Reasonably Expected Revenue)
F-1       Develop an expenditure and financing strategy plan for projects beyond the short term
          planning horizon. In developing the expenditure plan, priority consideration should be given
          to cost-effective projects that serve regional needs, implement RTP goals, support smart
          growth principles, and leverage other funding sources (State, Federal, Local).
F-2       Maximize opportunities to leverage local transportation sales tax revenues to attract additional
          state and federal funds to the region for transportation and related infrastructure improvements.
F-3       Support federal transportation legislation that provides for the following principles.
             1. Increase Federal Funding: increase the federal gas tax rate; eliminate or reduce;
                  release more funding from the Highway Trust Fund. transfers of tax exemptions that
                  shift transportation revenues to other purposes;
             2. Increase the guaranteed return of federal highway revenues to California;
             3. Consolidate most federal highway categorical programs to provide greater flexibility
                  and local discretion in highway fund usage;
             4. Authorize a minimum five-year highway and transit program to provide needed
                  program stability and continuity of federal transportation policy; and
             5. Provide for the continuation and expansion of the level of transit operating and capital
                  support and providing greater flexibility in the use of such funds.
F-4       Support state transportation legislation that provides for the following principles:
             1. Increase State highway revenues as needed to maintain, rehabilitate and operate the
                  existing State highway system, to match all available federal highway funds, and to
                  fully fund all new construction and right-of-way projects identified in the current State
                  and Regional Transportation Improvement Programs (TIPs); including Bond
                  Measures, indexing/increasing the federal gas tax and authorizing user fees.
             2. Protect the present formula "County Share" funding provisions and/or any other
                  revenue distribution formula does not penalize counties;
             3. Increasing transit revenues to support transit operating and capital improvements,
                  including transit guideway projects.
             4. Constitutionally protect Prop 42 revenues that provide a permanent dedication of the
                  State Sales Tax on fuel with 40% allocated to local agencies for roadway maintenance,
                  40% for the STIP, and 20% for transit (State Transit Assistance Program).




                                   Chapter 6 – Financial Strategies                   Page 6-11
                                                                                   Draft - 1/14/05
Table 6-___
Draft Project Listing - Unconstrained Projects (HSR, PT, NM)

Highway, Streets, and Roads Transporation Program - Planned Improvements
(Draft table does not include maintenance and rehabiltation needs)
  MPO ID#              Project Title                                                                 Project Cost         Planning            Map
                                                                                                       Estimate            Horizon            (Y/N)
 (Sponsor)             (Short Description)
                                                                                                                      Short Mid Long
                                                                                                                    (05-09) (10-14) (14-25)

South County
[SLO0868-01]           Corbett Canyon Rd. Bike lane                                                          1,000,000   Unconstrained
Arroyo Grande          (In Arroyo Grande, construct 2 -6' shoulders for Class II bikelanes on CC Road.)

[SLO0867-01]           Corbett Canyon Rd. Bike Route                                                          260,000    Unconstrained
Arroyo Grande          (In Arroyo Grande, designate as Class III or construct Class II Huasna-227)

[SLO1603-01]           Rte 101 SC 6 Lane (PM .8 -11.8)                                                      40,000,000   Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Rural - South County, Widen Highway 101 to six lanes)

[SLO1604-01]           Rte 101 SC 6 Lane (PM 11.8 - 21.1)                                                   72,000,000   Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Rural - South County, Widen Highway 101 to six lanes)

[SLO0336-01]           Santa Maria River Bridge Replacement                                                 43,160,000   Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Rural - South County, Santa Maria River Bridge widen to 6 lanes)

[SLO0398-01]           Inland Arterial Road Extensions                                                       6,000,000   Unconstrained
Pismo Beach            (In Pismo Beach, Construct lateral road extensions to new inland arterial)

[SLO0370-01]           Oak Park-Price Cyn. Rd. Arterial                                                     13,000,000   Unconstrained
Pismo Beach            (In Pismo Beach, Construct north-south inland arterial w/ bike lanes north of 101)

[SLO1654-01]           Pismo US 101 Bike/Ped Overpass                                                        2,000,000   Unconstrained
Pismo Beach            (In Pismo Beach, An ADA accessible pedestrian and bicycle overcrossing at US 101)

[SLO1662-01]           Ramada Gardens Transit Center                                                          500,000    Unconstrained
SCAT                   (In Grover Beach, Construct enhancements to bus circulation & passenger amenities)

[SLO0519-01]           Pacific Coast RR Bike/Ped Path                                                        3,800,000   Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In Nipomo, Construct 12' wide Class I bike/ped path)

[SLO1907-01]           Arroyo Grande Creek Trail                                                                         Unconstrained
SLOCOG                 (In Oceano, Develop Class I bike and Pedestrian Trail near creek embankment)

       South County Planning Area Total Funding Needs ( unconstrained only)                            $181,700,000


Central County
[SLO1605-01]           Rte 101 NC 6 Lane (PM 21.1 - 24.3)                                                   16,000,000   Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Rural - Central County, Widen Highway 101 to six lanes)

[SLO1606-01]           Rte 101 NC 6 Lane (PM 24.3 - 30.3)                                                   40,000,000   Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In San Luis Obispo, Widen Highway 101 to six lanes)

[SLO1607-01]           Rte 101 NC 6 Lane (PM 30.3 - 32.3)                                                   16,000,000   Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Rural - Central County, Widen Highway 101 to six lanes)

[SLO0332-01]           Rte 227 Widening Phase 2                                                             19,200,000   Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In San Luis Obispo, Widen to 4 lanes w/bikelane Los Ranchos to Price Canyon Road)

[SLO0892-01]           Buckley Road Ext. to South Higuera                                                    5,000,000   Unconstrained
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Extend Buckley Road to South Higuera incl bike lanes/shoulders)

[SLO0764-01]           Mission Plaza Expansion                                                                425,000    Unconstrained
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Closure of Broad Street Dogleg)

[SLO0644-01]           Prado Road Bikelane                                                                    500,000    Unconstrained
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Construct Class II bikeway along Prado extension)




(Note: Cost estimates are under review with member agency staff; some stated non-motorized improvements are a component of a larger street and
road improvment project) - Committed Funding (Partial/All) represents projects that have some level of local or regional funding committed to the project.
Highway, Streets, and Roads Transporation Program - Planned Improvements
(Draft table does not include maintenance and rehabiltation needs)
                                                                                                          Project Cost         Planning            Map
  MPO ID#              Project Title
                                                                                                           Estimate             Horizon            (Y/N)
 (Sponsor)             (Short Description)
                                                                                                                           Short Mid Long
                                                                                                                         (05-09) (10-14) (14-25)
[SLO0647-01]           RR Bike Path Phase III                                                                  3,350,000      Unconstrained
San Luis Obispo        (In San Luis Obispo, Extend bikepath from Amtrak Station to Marsh Street)

[SLO0408-01]           Class II bikeways - Corbett C. Road                                                     2,000,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In San Luis Obispo, Provide Class II bikelanes)

[SLO0785-01]           Lopez Dr. bike lanes                                                                      500,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In Rural - Central County, Construct class II bike lanes.)

[SLO0786-01]           Lopez Drive bike lanes                                                                  4,000,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In Rural - Central County, Construct class II bike lanes)

[SLO0407-01]           Orcutt Road Class II Bikelanes                                                          3,000,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In San Luis Obispo, Upgrade Orcutt road to arterial standards w/ bikelanes)

[SLO0410-01]           RR Bikepath SLO-Oceano                                                                  6,000,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In Rural - San Luis Obispo, Construct class 1 bikeway from SLO to Oceano)

[SLO0790-01]           Rte 227 Shoulders                                                                      10,000,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In San Luis Obispo, Construct class II bikelanes)

[SLO0833-01]           Cal Poly-Cuesta Bikeway Connector                                                       9,000,000      Unconstrained
SLOCOG                 (In Rural - Central County, Construct class I bikepath btw. Cal Poly and Cuesta College)

[SLO0861-01]           O'Conner Way Extension                                                                 10,000,000      Unconstrained
SLOCOG                 (In Rural - Central County, Improve O'Conner Way through Camp SL to Rte. 1)

     Central County Planning Area Total Funding Needs ( unconstrained only)                                $144,900,000


North County
[SLO0317-01]           Rte 101/Curbaril Reconstr. IC                                                          13,700,000      Unconstrained
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Reconstruct Interchange)

[SLO1615-01]           Rte 101/Del Rio Rd IC Mods                                                             18,600,000      Unconstrained
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Interchange Modifications)

[SLO1693-01]           Rte 101/San Anselmo Rd.IC Reconstr.                                                    16,400,000      Unconstrained
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Reconstruct interchange for capacity increasing benefits)

[SLO1692-01]           Rte 101/San Ramon Rd. IC Reconstr.                                                      4,800,000      Unconstrained
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Reconstruct interchange for capacity increasing benefits)

[SLO0678-01]           Rte 101/Traffic Way Reconstruct IC                                                     11,075,000      Unconstrained
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Reconstruct Interchange)

[SLO0792-01]           Rte 41 West Class II Bikelanes                                                            500,000      Unconstrained
Atascadero             (In Atascadero, Widen shoulders, construct and sign class II bicycle facilities)

[SLO0840-01]           Rte 101 Beautification North County                                                     3,200,000      Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Various Communities, Rte 101 Beautification & Modernization project)

[SLO0329-01]           Rte 101 NC 6 Lane (PM 35.2-42.3)                                                       14,000,000      Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Rural - North County, Route 101 widen to 6 lanes)

[SLO0491-01]           Rte 101 NC 6 Lane (PM 42.3-58.0)                                                       64,000,000      Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Atascadero-Paso Robles, Widen to 6 lanes)

[SLO0319-01]           Rte 41 E Operational Impr.                                                             10,000,000      Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Cholame, Construct passing lanes and widen shoulders)

[SLO0324-01]           Rte 46 E Widening - Ph. V                                                              73,210,000      Unconstrained
Caltrans               (In Cholame, Widen to 4 Lane Expressway - SR46/41 E. Jct to Kern County Line)



(Note: Cost estimates are under review with member agency staff; some stated non-motorized improvements are a component of a larger street and
road improvment project) - Committed Funding (Partial/All) represents projects that have some level of local or regional funding committed to the project.
Highway, Streets, and Roads Transporation Program - Planned Improvements
(Draft table does not include maintenance and rehabiltation needs)
                                                                                                     Project Cost         Planning            Map
  MPO ID#              Project Title
                                                                                                      Estimate             Horizon            (Y/N)
 (Sponsor)             (Short Description)
                                                                                                                      Short Mid Long
                                                                                                                    (05-09) (10-14) (14-25)
[SLO0330-01]           4th St RR UnderXing & on-ramp Impr                                                 8,500,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Reconstruct under-xing & 101 on-ramp)

[SLO0272-01]           Airport Rd Widening                                                               10,000,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Widen to 5 lanes with bikelanes)

[SLO0387-01]           Charolais Road Extention/Bridge                                                   40,000,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Construct bridge over Salinas River & RR)

[SLO0418-01]           Creston Rd Widening                                                               15,000,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Widen to 5 lanes with bikelanes)

[SLO0271-01]           Dry Creek Rd Widening                                                             15,000,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Widen to 5 lanes with bike lanes)

[SLO0276-01]           Golden Hill Rd Widening - Ph II                                                    2,000,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Widen to 5 lanes with bikelanes)

[SLO0323-01]           Rte 46E/Golden Hill Road IC Constr.                                               20,900,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Construct interchange)

[SLO0421-01]           Spring Steet Widening - Phase II                                                   1,500,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Widen to 5 lanes with bikelanes)

[SLO0420-01]           Spring Street Widening - Phase I                                                   1,500,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Widen to 5 lanes with bikelanes)

[SLO0070-01]           Vine Street Bikeway                                                                1,000,000      Unconstrained
Paso Robles            (In Paso Robles, Construct Class II Bike Lanes)

[SLO0284-01]           Temp.-Atas. Bikeway Connector                                                      2,865,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - G.S.      (In Atascadero, Construct bike and pedestrian path.)

[SLO0642-01]           Las Tablas Bike Lanes                                                              1,000,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In Templeton, Construct class II bike lanes)

[SLO0639-01]           Nacimiento Lake Dr. Bike Lane Ph II                                                1,000,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In Rural - North County, )

[SLO0638-01]           Nacimiento Lake Dr. Bike lanes I                                                   1,000,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In Rural - North County, )

[SLO0343-01]           Wellsona Road/101 IC Constr.                                                      15,000,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - P.W.      (In San Miguel, Construct Interchange)

[SLO0499-01]           Tassajara Ck Rd - Rte 58 Connector                                                 6,200,000      Unconstrained
SLO County - PLNG      (In Rural - North County, Construct frontage/parallel local road connector)

[SLO0504-01]           Monterey Rd Frontage Connector                                                     1,000,000      Unconstrained
SLOCOG                 (In Rural - North County, Construct frontage road connector)

       North County Planning Area Total Funding Needs ( unconstrained only)                           $372,900,000




(Note: Cost estimates are under review with member agency staff; some stated non-motorized improvements are a component of a larger street and
road improvment project) - Committed Funding (Partial/All) represents projects that have some level of local or regional funding committed to the project.

				
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