Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

TOURISM MASTER PLAN - PDF

VIEWS: 320 PAGES: 206

  • pg 1
									                          2009 STATE OF OKLAHOMA
                   TOURISM MASTER PLAN


Robbers Cave State Park       Bricktown Canal, OKC   Downtown Tulsa         Route 66



               Prepared in conjunction with PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC),
                      Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department and
                            Oklahoma tourism industry stakeholders.
Executive Summary                                                           Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page i



             Background

             PricewaterhouseCoopers (LLP) was engaged by the Oklahoma Tourism and
             Recreation Department to assess the overall tourism needs of the state and develop
             a strategic plan for the industry. PwC’s predecessor firm developed the master plan
             more than twenty years ago. This document will summarize objectives, strategies,
             sub-strategies and actions needed to drive tourism growth in the state.

             In order to develop this plan PwC:
                • Analyzed the tourism industry in Oklahoma in terms of the significance
                  of the industry to the state’s economy and national tourism trends.
                • Interviewed Oklahoma Tourism & Recreation Department and tourism
                  stakeholders to identify the industry’s collective vision for Oklahoma tourism.
                • Assessed major strategic tourism issues facing the industry in terms of product
                  offering, marketing, roles and responsibilities and funding.
                • Conducted a performance audit of Oklahoma’s tourism industry, including
                  identification of internal strengths and weaknesses as well as external
                  opportunities and threats.
                • Identified gaps between current performance and desired performance required
                  for success. Identified strategies that, if followed, would help achieve the
                  tourism vision.
                • Developed specific action steps to execute each strategy and to implement
                  the plan.

             Key Findings

                • According to the TIA’s Economic Impact of Travel on Oklahoma Counties, while
                  the direct impact of domestic travel on Oklahoma’s economy is estimated to be
                  $5.3 billion, the larger tour and travel economy in Oklahoma is probably closer
                  to $10 billion when indirect and induced spending are accounted for.
                • Tourism is the third-largest industry in Oklahoma behind the energy and
                  agricultural sectors. The energy industry still dominates the state, contributing
                  approximately $23 billion to Oklahoma’s economy (per the Economic Impact
                  of Oil and Gas Production, Center for Economic Research, Spears School of
                  Business, OSU, October 2008). Agriculture is far closer to tourism, contributing
                  more than $6 billion to the economy.
                • Travel expenditures have grown from $2.8 billion in 1987 to $5.2 billion in 2007
                  (+90%) and increased again to $6.1 billion in 2008.
                • Domestic travel expenditures generated 55,600 jobs in 1987, 71,900 jobs in 2007
                  and 76,000 jobs in 2008.
                • Travel-generated employees earned $588.6 million in 1987 and $1.6 billion in
                  2007 (+174%). This number increased to $1.7 billion according to the recently
                  released 2008 data.
                • The number of hotel rooms has grown from 37,200 in 1987 to 51,500 in
                  2007 (+39%).
                • Throughout this same timeframe the state has seen significant growth in terms
                  of new products and attractions in many categories including: American Indians,
                  Western heritage, agritourism, forts, scenic byways, gaming, sports, arenas, as
                                                                      Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page ii



      well as numerous museums and other attractions. A summary of the most
      significant of these changes is detailed in the pages that follow.
    • Nearly 200 stakeholders were contacted through in-person interviews,
      phone interviews or internet surveys. Stakeholders included: state legislators,
      state agency representatives, destination marketing organizations, tribal nation
      representatives, not-for-profit organizations, industry associations, business
      leaders and tourism industry representatives and professionals. Based on these
      interviews, the stated vision of the industry set forth as five-year goals are:

       1   The tourism industry will be better recognized as a critical element of
           the Oklahoma economy.
      2 Oklahoma will be more widely recognized as a destination with unique
        and diverse attractions.
      3 Tourism will be a more collaborative effort within the state.
             Public, private, not-for-profit and tribal partnerships

      4 Oklahoma will be recognized as a progressive destination welcoming
        visitors from diverse cultures and backgrounds.
      5 Oklahoma will develop and market a sustainable tourism product that
        is ecologically and culturally sensitive.

    • This plan details 10 strategies to best achieve the five-year plan goals. These
      strategies include:

       Existing      Continue to invest in and enhance existing cultural, historical
                     and natural assets.
            New      Develop new targeted products.
Urban and Rural      Recognize the need to develop both urban and rural
                     tourism products.
  Infrastructure     Enhance the tourism infrastructure and wayfinding for the
                     driving public.
       Promote       Increase investment in high ROI-marketing and promotions to
                     increase out-of-state tourism.
       Planning      Continue to fund and increase research and planning to measure
                     success and trends.
           Labor     Ensure a prefessional and trained workforce to support tourism
                     industry growth.
       Partners      Strengthen partnerships among industry stakeholders.
       Educate       Continue to build programs to educate all constituents about the
                     value of the industry to the state.
      Spending       Ensure tourism funding is competitive within the region.


The pages that follow will summarize the strategies and tactics to achieve each
of these 10 strategic directions, and will identify key partners most responsible for
making these goals a five-year reality.
Introduction                                                                   Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 1



               PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC) was engaged by the Oklahoma Tourism
               and Recreation Department to assess the overall tourism needs of Oklahoma, and
               develop a strategic plan for the industry. Price Waterhouse, PwC’s predecessor firm,
               developed the last strategic master plan for the state more than twenty years ago.
               Given the significant changes in the state’s tourism product throughout the past
               twenty years, PwC was asked to develop a plan to help guide tourism and tourism
               marketing throughout the next five years. This resulting plan is intended to outline
               the objectives, strategy, sub-strategies and actions needed to drive economic
               growth in the state.

               For this strategic plan to be an effective tool, it is important that it provide the
               flexibility and adaptability to allow for changes in the industry, economy and
               competitive environment throughout this five-year planning period. It is this broader
               nature of a five-year master plan that distinguishes it from a traditional marketing
               plan. While broad, an effective master plan must still provide a clear vision and
               actionable next steps. It is important to note that this plan is not meant to replace
               the important due-diligence associated with evaluating the demand for, and
               economic performance of, individual tourism products.

               An industry’s strategic plan typically provides an outline for the direction of that
               industry, an examination of the status of the industry, and the establishment of
               objectives and actions to achieve those objectives. An important element of this
               process was to allow the Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department and its key
               stakeholders the opportunity to envision the future of tourism in the state, and the
               steps needed to achieve that vision. The key questions this plan will address include:

                  • Where are we now?
                  • Where do we want to be?
                  • How will we get there?

               In order to answer those questions PwC did the following:
                  • Analyzed the tourism industry in Oklahoma in terms of the significance of
                    the industry to the state’s economy and national tourism trends. In addition,
                    PwC analyzed the achievements the state has made in its product offering
                    throughout the past 21 years, since the 1987 Master Plan was introduced.
                    Understanding how the state’s industry has grown provides a framework
                    for Oklahoma’s current market position.
                  • Interviewed Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department and tourism
                    stakeholders, to identify the industry’s collective vision for Oklahoma tourism
                    (Where do we want to be five years from now?), and to understand the
                    unique characteristics of the state and the challenges facing Oklahoma’s
                    tourism industry.
                  • Assessed major strategic tourism issues facing the industry in terms of product
                    offering, marketing, roles and responsibilities and funding. Identified the primary
                    drivers for the state and whether or not those drivers should continue to be
                    the focus of the industry throughout the five-year timeframe.
                  • Conducted a performance audit of Oklahoma’s tourism industry, including
                    identification of internal strengths and weaknesses and external opportunities
                    and threats.
                                                                                                                                                                                             Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 2



                • Identified gaps between current performance and desired performance
                  required for success. Identified strategies that, if followed, would help achieve
                  the tourism vision.
                • Developed specific action steps to execute each strategy and to implement
                  the plan.

             Research and findings specific to strategic planning steps one through four are
             described in the Volume II Appendix to this report.


Volume One   The State of Tourism in Oklahoma


             The Breadth of the Tourism Product

             The tourism industry in Oklahoma is driven and supported by a wide range of
             private and public businesses as well as planning and promotional organizations.
             Government organizations, not-for-profits and secondary businesses also directly
             or indirectly support the industry. Creating destination and product awareness,
             generating demand through marketing and promotional efforts and ensuring
             positive visitor experiences are critical steps in the tourism process. While
             stakeholders are involved in this process at various times and to varying degrees,
             it is the Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department that leads this effort on
             behalf of the state and the industry.

             The graphic below illustrates the breadth of the industry and the interconnectivity
             of stakeholders, both in the private and public sectors.


                                                                      Hiking &                                                                                                    Recreational
                                                                      Camping                                                                                                     Vehicle Parks           Vacation
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Campgrounds
                                                           Golf                                Birding                                                                                                    Rentals
                                                                                                                                                    Performing
                   Boating                                                   Fishing &
                                          Windsurfing
                                                                              Hunting                                                                  Arts
                                                                                                           Cycling             Gaming/Horse
                                                                                                                                                                           Resorts
                                                                                                                                 Racing
                                                                                                                                                                                                 Accommodations
                   Skiing                 Water Sports                                                                                                                                                                        Hotels & Motels
                                                                     Outdoor                      Team Sports                                               Concerts
                                                                                                                         Events &
                            Rowing
                                                          Parks                          ATV Sports
                                                                                                                         Festivals
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Bed &
                                                                                                                                                                                                           Friends &
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Breakfasts
                                                                                                                                          Entertainment                                                     Family
                                                                                                                                                                                   Wineries/
                                                                                                                                                                                                           Housing
                 Team Sports                     Indoor                     Recreation                                                                                             Vineyards
                                                                                                                         Spectator
                                                                                                                          Sports                                                                                       Specialty Foods
                             Individual
                               Sports                                                                                                                            Attractions
                                                                                                                                                                 Attr
                                                                                                                                                                                             Culinary
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Ethnic
                                 Motorcycle                         Air
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Quick Service
                                                                                              Rail                      The Oklahoma Tourism
                    Auto                                                                                                     Experience                                                    Industry
                                                                                                                                                                                                                Restaurants
                                                                                                                                                                                            Groups
                                           Highway                                                                                                                                                                                      Bar/Lounge/
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Tavern
                 Motor Coach
                                                                  Transportation
                                                                                                                                                           Marke
                                                                                                                                                           Marketing &                       Government
                                                                                                                                                          Public Relations                    Agencies
                            Recreational                                                                                                                                                                          Family/Casual          Fine Dining
                              Vehicle


                                                                                  Bus-Rail                           Historical Sites
                                                        Waterways                                                                                                                         CVBs
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Exposition
                                                                                                                                                      Museums                                                      Center
                                                                                                                                                                                                   Outdoor
                        Galleries                                                                        Visual Arts                                                                             Amphitheaters
                                                                                                                                                                   Convention/                                                     Fairgrounds
                                                                                                                                     Culture &                     Conference
                                                                                                                                                                     Center
                                                                                                                                     Heritage
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Meeting Facilities
                                                                       Retail                                                                                                                        & Venues
                        Shopping                                                                                     Shopping
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Performing Arts
                         Centers                                                                                      Districts
                                                                                                                                                       Native American/                                                               Centers
                                                                                                                                                           Western
                                                                                                 Farmers &
                                           Gasoline                                               Outdoor                         Performing Arts                                Hotels
                                           Service                        Outlets                 Markets                                                                                               Arena              Educational
                                           Stations                                                                                                                                                                        Institutions
                                                                                            Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 3



The Impact of Tourism

According to the U.S. Travel Association (formerly the Travel Industry of America
or TIA) direct, indirect and induced expenditures* all contribute to the economic
impact of travel and account for the tourism “trickle-down” effect. Rollover and
indirect jobs related to the tourism and travel industry also have significant impact.
While various multipliers are used depending upon who is doing the calculation,
we can assume a rollover of approximately four times for a community. In addition,
according to the Power of Travel, TIA, 2006, indirect and induced employment
more than doubles the direct employment of the travel and tourism industry.

This TIA illustration shows that the travel and tourism industry is just the “tip of the
iceberg” when it comes to the overall impact of travel and tourism on the economy
overall. While businesses such as hotels and motels, restaurants, transportation
and attractions typically comprise the first round of spending by visitors, countless
other industries provide services to, and are supported by, those travel expenditures.

According to the TIA’s Economic Impact of Travel on Oklahoma Counties, while
the direct impact of domestic travel on Oklahoma’s economy is estimated to be
$5.3 billion, the larger tour and travel economy in Oklahoma is probably closer
to $10 billion when indirect and induced spending are accounted for.




                     Travel &
                     Tourism
                     Industry                     Hotels,
                    $5.3 billion               Restaurants,
                                              Entertainment,
                                             Attractions, Sports,
                                           Other Travel Services


                                                                                         Travel &
                                     Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting,           Tourism
                                 Manufacturing, Healthcare, Education, Aviation/         Economy
                                  Aerospace, Energy, Biotechnology, Logistics,
                               Publishing, Utilities, Financial Services, Professional
                              Services, Sanitation Services, Furnishings, Equipment        Likely
                                Suppliers, Security Services, Automobile Repair,         Closer to
                              General Retail, Real Estate, Glass Products, Concrete,     $10 billion
                                Computers, Information & Technology, Beverage
                                Suppliers, Grocery Retailers, Grocery Suppliers,
                                Laundry Services, Oil & Gas Wholesalers, Other
                               Wholesalers, Mining, Plastics, Chemicals, Textiles,
                               Uniform Suppliers, Metal Products, Wood Products,
                                   Oil & Gas Retailers, Construction Services,
                                Shipping, Receiving, Government Services, Etc.




* Induced expenditures is defined as how many industry employees support local
communities by spending their wages in those communities.

Even at the more conservative $5.3 billion direct economic impact, tourism is now
the third-largest industry in Oklahoma behind the energy and agricultural sectors.
The energy industry still dominates the state, contributing approximately $23 billion
to Oklahoma’s economy (per the Economic Impact of Oil and Gas Production,
Center for Economic Research, Spears School of Business, OSU, October 2008).
Agriculture is far closer to tourism, contributing more than $6 billion to the economy.
                                                                 Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 4



Growth in the Tourism Sector

The state has seen significant growth throughout the last twenty years since the
last PwC study was conducted.
    • Travel expenditures have grown from $2.8 billion in 1987 to $5.2 billion
      in 2007 (+90%).
    • Domestic travel expenditures generated 55,600 jobs in 1987 and 71,900 jobs
      in 2007 (+29%).
    • Travel-generated employees earned $588.6 million in 1987 and $1.6 billion
      in 2007 (+174%).
    • The number of hotel rooms has grown from 37,200 in 1987 to 51,500
      in 2007 (+39%).
Note: 2008 economic impact numbers showed $6.1 billion in travel expenditures,
      76,000 jobs and $1.7 billion in travel generated employee salaries.

Specifics of Tourism Product Growth: 1987 Plan

1987 Master Plan Recommendations: What Has Been Achieved
While some of the product development has been a result of unforeseen
developments or organic growth, others of the products were specifically
recommended in the 1987 Master Plan.

American Indian

For example, the 1987 plan recommended a greater focus on American Indian
tourism including the development of a major American Indian Cultural Center and
Museum as well as other enhanced American Indian attractions, events and festivals.

American Indian attractions have improved and the development of the American
Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City greatly enhances the American
Indian cultural product offering in the state. The American Indian Cultural Center
and Museum is projected to open in 2014. It will preserve the culture for Oklahoma’s
39 tribes and serve as a major educational source for all Americans. This 300-acre
site will feature a museum, parks and trails, athletic fields, an outdoor performance
facility, retail shops, a resort and a conference center. It will be a major new tourism
entity for the state of Oklahoma, helping to fulfill the tourism promise of Oklahoma
Native America.
                                                             Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 5




Other new American Indian attractions include:
   • The Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur slated to open in 2010.
   • The Standing Bear Museum and Educational Center at Standing Bear Park
     in Ponca City.
   • The Five Civilized Tribes Museum in Muskogee.
   • The current renovation of the Indian City U.S.A. Cultural Center in Anadarko,
     has a planned opening in 2009.
   • Fall festivals in Tahlequah have grown with additions like the Cherokee Film
     Festival and the Tahlequah Native American Flute Circle Event.
   • Red Earth began in 1986 and has grown to be one of the most respected
     performing and visual arts events of its type, attracting more than 1,200
     America Indian dancers and artists from across North America.
   • In addition, Powwows continue to expand in the state.




Western Heritage

The development of Western heritage attractions was also recommended in the
1987 Master Plan.
   • Developments in this area include the major expansion and renovation
     of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City.
     Since 1994 the museum (previously known as the Cowboy Hall of Fame
     and renamed the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in 2000)
     expanded from 80,000 square feet to 200,000 square feet. It currently
     houses more than 28,000 Western and American Indian artworks and
     artifacts. The facility is also home to the most extensive collection of
     American rodeo, photographs, barbed wire, saddlery and early rodeo
     trophies in the world.
   • Stockyards City became the first urban Main Street program in the late
     1980s. Located minutes from downtown, Stockyards City now has more
     than 70 businesses. These include Western wear (Langston’s was established
     in 1913 and is the oldest Western wear store in Oklahoma), rodeo gear,
     restaurants (Cattlemans was established in 1910), galleries and entertainment
     (the Oklahoma Centennial Rodeo Opry).

In addition the Chisolm Trail Heritage Center was developed in Duncan in 1998.
                                                                 Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 6



Agritourism

The 1987 Master Plan also proposed enhanced ranch experiences and hunting
experiences. These have evolved beyond those examples to include broader
based agritourism products. Currently Oklahoma has more than 500 agritourism
attractions including (but not limited to):
    • Guest ranches                         • Upickem
    • Hunting experiences (gun and bow) • Mazes
    • Wineries and vineyards                • Country stays
    • Farm experiences                      • Specialty crops or products
    • Fair and food events                  • Museums, farms and ranch attractions
    • Farmers markets                       • Exotic animals (emu, buffalo, alpacas, etc.)
    • Birding                               • Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve
    • Trail riding




Forts

The 1987 plan also suggested the redevelopment of historic forts. Fort Reno is
undergoing renovation including the creation of a new visitors center, museum
and commander’s house, as well as the restoration and stabilization of historic
buildings. The U.S. Army Field Artillery Museum was completed in 2008. In 1988 the
legislature designated the old Fort Supply Historic District.

Scenic Byways

Enhancement of scenic byways and roads was recommended in 1987. The
Oklahoma Scenic Byways program was implemented in 1999. It features seven
scenic routes, including Route 66 and the Talimena National Scenic Byway.

Other Major Tourism Product Category Growth: Not Foreseen in the Master Plan

Gaming Growth

A significant change is the emergence of 100 gaming locations – some of which
rival gaming options in Shreveport and Las Vegas in terms of size and scope, and
feature gaming, concerts and hotels. Oklahoma’s gaming industry has experienced
significant growth, especially after certain Class III games were legalized in
Oklahoma at the end of 2004. A number of major tribal casinos were developed
including WinStar, Firelake Grand Casino, Riverwind Casino, Cherokee Casino and
more. Moreover, several of these casinos are currently undergoing expansion or
have recently completed expansion. Cherokee Casino in Tulsa is expanding and
rebranding as Hard Rock Casino. WinStar is expanding as WinStar World Casino.
                                                              Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 7



In addition, the Creek Nation Casino expanded and rebranded to the
300,000-square-feet River Spirit Casino; Quapaw added the $200 million
Downstream Resort on the Kansas border.




Oklahoma Gaming Facts

   • In 2007, gamers spent $2.5 billion in Oklahoma.
   • Gaming in Oklahoma increased 54% during the first full year after legalization
     (2005) versus a 15% increase nationally.
   • From 2003 to 2007, tribal gaming revenues more than tripled.
   • Oklahoma now ranks third in the nation for gaming revenue among the
     28 American Indian gaming states (behind California and Connecticut).
   • In terms of product inventory, Oklahoma ranks first in the U.S. for the number
     of tribal casinos and second for the number of gaming machines. (Remember
     that Oklahoma ranks 28 for total population which means the industry
     depends on out-of-state tourists for revenue.)

Other Major New Tourism Products

The state has added many attractions throughout the last twenty years. This
section is not intended to be inclusive of all new products added, but will highlight
the most major of all new attractions. Products are listed in descending order of
product introduction. Additional new products are included alphabetically at the
end of this section.

     BOK Center in Tulsa | 2008: This multi-purpose arena was developed as
     part of Tulsa’s Vision 2025 plan and opened in August of 2008. Designed
     by world-renowned architect Cesar Pelli & Associates, the 19,200-seat
     arena features concerts by well-known performers such as the Eagles,
     Paul McCartney, AeroSmith with ZZ Top, Britney Spears, Miley Cyrus, Dave
     Matthews Band and others. Concerts geared toward children are also featured
     such as The Wiggles and Curious George. The center also serves as home to
     the Tulsa Oilers (Central Hockey League) and the Tulsa Talons (af2).

     Oklahoma Thunder | 2008: In July of 2008, the NBA’s Seattle Supersonics
     relocated to Oklahoma City and were renamed the Oklahoma City Thunder
     in time for the 2008-2009 basketball season. Season tickets sold out in
     September of 2008; the team attracted 19,100 to its first game. In addition
     to serving as a tourism demand generator, the Thunder may have the added
     benefit of enhancing the state’s reputation on a national level.
                                                        Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 8



Tulsa Air and Space Museum | 2006: The museum originally opened in 1998;
the planetarium was added in 2006. The museum features exhibits displaying
the aviation history of the United States and Tulsa.

Oklahoma History Center | 2005: This 18-acre, 215,000-square-foot learning
center explores Oklahoma’s history of geology, transportation, commerce,
culture, aviation, heritage and more. The center, located across from the
Governor’s mansion in Oklahoma City, was a decade in the making.

Fred Jones Museum of Art | 2005: In 2005 this museum, located on the
campus of the University of Oklahoma in Norman, added the Lester Wing
with more than 34,000 square feet, to the earlier 27,000-square-foot building.
The Lester Wing features galleries for the Weitzenhoffer Collection (the
most important collection of Impressionism ever given to a public university),
additional galleries, a 150-seat auditorium, an orientation room, a classroom,
a museum store and a new main entrance.

Oklahoma Aquarium | 2003: The Oklahoma Aquarium opened in 2003 in
Jenks. In addition to more than 200 marine and aquatic animals, it features
a shark exhibit.

Oklahoma City Museum of Art | 2002: Opened in 2002 as part of the
Don Reynolds Visual Arts Center, the museum features a collection of Dale
Chihuly glass (including his tallest installation to date) as well as permanent
collections of European and American art. The museum also has traveling
exhibitions; past exhibitions have included American Impressionism, Roman
Art from the Louvre, Turner to Cezanne, Paintings from the Phillips Collection
and more. The museum’s movie theater has shown more than 1,000 screenings
of foreign, classic and independent films since opening. The Museum Café
offers lunch, brunch, dinner and high tea.

Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History | 2000: The museum’s
exhibits include a Native American gallery and collections of fossils and
dinosaur skeletons from Oklahoma and throughout the world. The museum
features seven different galleries, as well as the interactive, hands-on
Discovery Room. With twelve collection divisions and more than six million
items, Sam Noble is one of the world’s largest, university-based natural history
museums. On October 25, 2006, it was announced the museum had received
a $1 million gift to build an orientation gallery and Paleozoic Hall, which
opened in the spring of 2009 and May 31, 2008 respectively.

Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum | 2000: The Oklahoma
City National Memorial and Museum opened in April of 2000, to honor the
victims, survivors and rescue workers of the April 19, 1995, bombing of the
Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City. The $29.1 million
development’s design was chosen from an international competition with 624
entries. The final design includes three components: the outdoor symbolic
memorial, the memorial museum and the Memorial Institute for the
Prevention of Terrorism.
                                                                Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 9



       Bricktown | 1993: Once a warehouse district in downtown Oklahoma City,
       Bricktown is an entertainment district comprised of restaurants, hotels,
       nightlife, entertainment, a sports facility (AT&T Bricktown Ballpark) and retail
       shops. Renovation began in the 1980s, Spaghetti Warehouse followed in 1989
       and Bricktown began to flourish with the passage of MAPS (Metropolitan
       Area Projects). Special attractions include the Bricktown Canal, riverwalk
       and water taxi, Harkins Theatre Mulitplex, Bass Pro Shops and the Coca-Cola
       Bricktown Events Center.

There are many other attractions that that are either new or have undergone
significant renovation throughout the past twenty years. A partial listing (listed
alphabetically) includes:
   • Capitol Dome, artwork and gallery        • Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame
   • Chesapeake Boathouse                     • Oklahoma River
   • Conoco Museum, Ponca City                • Oklahoma River Cruises
   • Cox Convention Center                    • Oklahoma State Parks –
   • Jasmine Moran Children’s Museum            capital upgrades
   • National Cowboy and Western              • Philbrook Museum – new gardens
     Heritage Museum – renovation             • Phillips 66 Museum, Bartlesville
     and expansion                            • POPS
   • Oklahoma City Zoo –                      • Price Tower
     the addition of the Great EscAPE,        • Science Museum Oklahoma
     Cat Forest Lion Overlook, and            • Toy and Action Figure Museum,
     Butterfly Garden                            Pauls Valley




All of these new product offerings have shaped the industry throughout the past
two decades. It is now time to establish goals and a vision for the next twenty years
of growth and expansion.
                                                                             Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 10



Volume One    The Tourism Vision: Five-Year Goals


              The tourism vision will serve to shape the direction for the tourism industry and will
              provide definable strategies that, if followed, will help achieve this stated vision. The
              visioning process addresses the question:

                     “Where do we want the tourism industry to be in the next five years?”

              Tourism industry stakeholders from all areas of the state were asked to provide
              input about their view of the current state of the industry, and their vision for the
              future of the industry in the state.

              Nearly 200 stakeholders were contacted for feedback through in-person
              interviews, phone interviews or internet surveys. About half responded. These
              stakeholders included:
                  • State legislators
                  • State agency representatives (including OTRD staff)
                  • Destination marketing organizations
                  • Tribal nation representatives
                  • Not-for-profit organizations
                  • Industry associations
                  • Business leaders
                  • Tourism industry representatives and professionals

              Based on these interviews, the stated vision of the industry for five years
              is as follows:


              Five Goals for the Five-Year Plan



        1    The tourism industry will be better recognized as a critical element of the
             Oklahoma economy.

        2    Oklahoma will be more widely recognized as a destination with unique and
             diverse attractions.

        3    Tourism will be a more collaborative effort within the state.
              Public, private, not-for-profit and tribal partnerships

       4     Oklahoma will be recognized as a progressive destination welcoming visitors
             from diverse cultures and backgrounds.

        5    Oklahoma will develop and market a sustainable tourism product that is
             ecologically and culturally sensitive.
                                                                                 Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 11



                   The Tourism Strategy

                   The tourism vision answers the question: “Where do we want the industry to be?”
                   The next strategic question is:

                      • “How will we get there?”

                   It is essential that Oklahoma continue to leverage and promote its strengths, while
                   weaknesses are overcome or mitigated. The industry’s opportunities offer the
                   direction for future growth, while understanding and reacting to external changes
                   and threats are critical to achieving this growth.

                   One of these threats is the current state of the national economy and the uncertain
                   future economic conditions. Since this is a five-year plan, a number of strategies
                   or actions may need to be adjusted in the event that current economic conditions
                   do not improve during this timeframe, and that as a result of the downturn in the
                   economy, consumers’ travel behaviors and priorities may shift.

                   We have identified 10 strategies and action steps for the industry. These 10
                   strategies, and the action steps needed to achieve these strategies, will be
                   discussed in more detail in the following pages.


                   10 Strategies for the Five-Year Plan


       Existing       Continue to invest in and enhance existing cultural, historical
                      and natural assets.

           New        Develop new targeted products.

Urban and Rural       Recognize the need to develop both urban and rural tourism products.

  Infrastructure      Enhance the tourism infrastructure and wayfinding for the driving public.

       Promote        Increase investment in high ROI-marketing and promotions to increase
                      out-of-state tourism.

       Planning       Continue to fund and increase research and planning to measure success
                      and trends.

         Labor        Ensure a prefessional and trained workforce to support tourism industry growth.

       Partners       Strengthen partnerships among industry stakeholders.

       Educate        Continue to build programs to educate all constituents about the value of the
                      industry to the state.

      Spending        Ensure tourism funding is competitive within the region.
                                                                     Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 12



The remainder of this plan will discuss specific action steps and recommendations
to achieve these strategic objectives. These recommendations are grouped into
four sections:
               Tourism Products         Strategy 1    New
                                        Strategy 2    Existing
                                        Strategy 3    Urban/Rural
                                        Strategy 4    Infrastructure
               Tourism Marketing        Strategy 5    Marketing
                                        Strategy 6    Planning and Research
               Roles/Responsibilities   Strategy 7    Labor Force
                                        Strategy 8    Partnerships
                                        Strategy 9    Education
               Funding                  Strategy 10   Funding


Tourism Strategies and Action Steps

Strategy 1: Enhance the state’s cultural, historical and natural assets.

As previously discussed, many products and attractions have been added within
Oklahoma throughout the past twenty years. That said, there is always a need for
new, fresh products in any product category: The state of Oklahoma is no different.
The state must look for ways to continue to enhance existing products and add new
products to the mix in order to stay competitive. This section will detail specific new
product developments and suggestions for enhancement of the current tourism
offers.

The seven actions to achieve Strategy 1 are detailed below.

 1.1 | Support product development and product enhancement at new
       and existing attractions and events.




New Product Recommendations:
New developments that complement the state’s historical, cultural and natural
strengths should be explored. For example, while the state has many lake and river
recreational options, an upscale, lakeside luxury resort and spa is not currently part
of the Oklahoma tourism mix. Options under review include a planned lakeside
developments by the Muscogee Creek Nation at Lake Eufala, Point Vista at Lake
Texoma and a new hotel at Lake Murray. While these developments should be
supported additional options for an upscale resort and spa should be examined
to enhance the state’s tourism, offering both for Oklahomans as well as serving the
needs of residents in surrounding states. A signature resort offering would take full
advantage of Oklahoma’s water product.
                                                                    Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 13



The development of signature events/festivals at Oklahoma’s lakes and rivers offers
another way to capitalize on existing natural resources and create tourism demand.
This was also recommended in the 1987 Master Plan. While Kaw Fest and a number of
Fourth of July events have been developed, new signature events at Oklahoma’s lakes
should continue to be explored.




New boutique hotels or other lodging tied to Oklahoma’s heritage could also
enhance the state’s tourism product. A Route 66-themed hotel could be developed in
a prime location on Route 66. To enhance the Western experience a Western heritage
or cowboy-themed hotel could be developed in Stockyards City. More guest ranches
or farm experiences could be developed in rural locations. An art deco hotel could be
developed or refurbished in Tulsa.

Existing Products:
Onsite enhancements should be made to existing tourism products to ensure the
product stays fresh and competitive. These enhancements could include signage, new
exhibits, interactive experiences, audio kiosks and so on. Sustainable options should
be explored as we look into the future. As an example, eco-friendly information kiosks
could be added to the entrance at Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve to help visitors
better guide their experience and navigate the area.




In addition to local governments, OTRD, the Native American Cultural and Educational Authority
and many private businesses, partners include:
                                                                       Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 14



1.2 | Maintain the appeal and relevancy of cultural and historical attractions in
       the face of changing social and cultural attitudes, lifestyles and preferences.

While history doesn’t change, cultural attitudes and preferences do over time. To
maintain public interest in historical and cultural attractions it is important to invest in
product and marketing upgrades to tell the same story in new and interesting ways.
This can be accomplished through investments in technology upgrades, traveling
or rotating exhibits, special events tied to exhibitions, events targeted to attract
specific audiences or groups and providing marketing materials including advertising,
websites and brochures that are sustainable, relevant and ethnically diverse.

In addition to private businesses, attractions and local governments, other key partners include:




1.3 | Ensure the successful development of the American Indian Cultural Center
      and Museum (AICCM) as a nationally recognized attraction. Also support
      other American Indian centers throughout the state to enhance the
      American Indian product offering throughout the state of Oklahoma.




The completion and marketing of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum
is a critical element in the state’s tourism plan. This center was identified as an
important new product in the 1987 report. It has taken two decades for this center
to soon become a reality. The center is now expected to open within the timeframe
of this five-year marketing plan. The American Indian Cultural Center and Museum will
feature exhibitions, artifacts from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American
Indian, Family Discovery Center, film and performance venues, a Gathering and
Performance Forum, Orientation Theater, Oral History Theater and Café.

The AICCM is an essential element in growing Oklahoma’s Native American heritage
and tourism product not just in Oklahoma and surrounding states, but across the
United States and potentially worldwide. Organizations statewide should continue to
collaborate on development, funding and marketing efforts for this new center.
                                                                       Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 15



In addition, individual nations are also developing cultural centers such as the
Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, scheduled to open in 2010. These new centers
and existing attractions should continue to be supported and improved to further
enhance Native American heritage tourism throughout the state.

In addition to local governments, Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce, Native American
Cultural and Educational Authority and individual tribal organizations, key partners include:




     Convention & Visitors Bureau


1.4 | Improve, maintain and preserve the state’s natural assets.

The state’s natural assets are one of its key strengths and one of its greatest
differentiators. However, state park conditions have been allowed to deteriorate.
This deterioration has contributed to attendance declines at the parks. While funds
dedicated to additional capital upgrades and maintenance (an additional $10 million
per year which began in 2008) should continue, the development of destination
parks should also be explored. These destination parks would offer amenities and
attractions and provide special unique experiences for visitors.

For example, Arkansas designates certain parks that offer extreme forms of
recreation as “Adventure Parks.” These parks feature extreme sports and activities
such as rock climbing and ATVs. Other states such as Maryland’s Tuckahoe State
Park have offered high and low rope courses. Tuckahoe’s high ropes course features
a 40-foot rock-climbing wall and a newly built pamper pole. Backbone State Park in
Iowa is known for rappelling. Delaware State Parks have implemented an Adventure
Race Series with five different races at five state parks. Events include running,
cycling, kayaking, orienteering (canoeing, compasses and maps are provided) and
team challenges. Oklahoma could develop similar adventure and race products and
positioning for several of its parks.

Other Oklahoma parks may lend themselves toward nature and educational
experiences. Those parks could feature facilities similar to Beavers Bend’s Forest
Heritage and Education Center, and offer other amenities such as nature centers,
educational exhibits, interpretive trails and guided tours and activities.

Additionally, steps should be taken to ensure that Oklahoma’s diverse eco-regions,
parklands and wildlife across the state are sustained. New developments need to
be carefully planned to determine the environmental effects of increased use and
new development.

In addition to Oklahoma’s Scenic Rivers Commission, Byways Commission and local
governments, and other key partners include:
                                                                   Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 16



1.5 | Maintain the integrity and physical preservation of historical
      and cultural assets.

The ongoing viability of existing historical and cultural attractions as tourism assets
is dependent upon their proper maintenance. Steps should continue to be taken to
preserve historic buildings, sites, monuments, historic homes and other attractions
to ensure long-term availability for residents and visitors. In addition, structural and
aesthetic maintenance is required to reflect their historical and cultural character.

The Oklahoma Historical Society’s “Tomorrow’s Legacy: Oklahoma’s Statewide
Preservation Plan” was presented in 2005 and will be in effect until the end of this
year. The 2010 plan (the fourth plan) is already in its second draft. It is a good example
of the kind of planning needed in terms of historical preservation. Similarly, the
Oklahoma Landmarks Inventory (a compilation of thousands of individual properties
throughout the state) is another example of the kinds of information needed to ensure
historical preservation is maintained in the state. Other programs of the State Historic
Preservation Office (SHPO) such as the National Register, Preservation Tax Incentives,
Certified Local Governments, Farm and Ranch and Award Programs are important
elements in maintaining and enhancing these cultural and historical resources, many
of which have direct impact on tourism in Oklahoma.

Partners include: Oklahoma Heritage Association, Native American Cultural and Education
Authority, private businesses, local governments as well as:




1.6 | Ensure infrastructure and amenities appropriately accommodate visitors
      and meet or exceed visitors’ needs and expectations.

It is critical that well-maintained infrastructure and amenities are available to visitors.
These include:
     • Appropriate signage – welcoming signage, directional signage, etc. needs to be
        assessed statewide to be sure that it is sufficiently helpful for visitors.
     • Parking spaces – parking areas need to comfortably accommodate buses and
        RVs, as well as meet handicapped needs.
     • Restrooms – restrooms need to be assessed to sure there are an adequate
        number of facilities along highly tourist-trafficked areas. In addition, existing
        facilities should be assessed to ensure they are well maintained.
     • Grounds – need to be kept well-groomed and landscaped with native flora and
        fauna to look inviting.
     • Byways – need to be well-maintained and landscaped with wildflowers and
        native grasses.

Here are just two examples of areas where the infrastructure could be improved.
Stockyards City reflects the Western heritage in the state and is an established
attraction. However current infrastructure in Stockyard City (signage, parking, etc.) is
not sufficiently developed. Similarly, as Oklahoma considers expanding its agritourism
                                                                       Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 17



product offering it is important to be sure that the infrastructure of signage,
restrooms, etc. are in place to meet the growing demand for agritourism.

In addition to OTRD, local governments and private businesses and attractions, partners include:




  1.7 | Continue to market and promote key cultural, historical and natural
        attractions and events, and encourage the development of new events
        of historical and cultural significance.

Cultural, heritage and nature/recreation assets are currently strongly promoted
at the state, regional and local levels. Continued promotion is needed through all
sources – the internet, print, television, radio, inserts, media coverage, public relations,
travel writers, social media, earned media, travel guides, trade shows and other
marketing sources.

Events can also continue to play a role in attracting in-state and out-of-state visitors.
There are a number of events that celebrate Oklahoma, Western and Native American
heritage. Some events are based on historical events (such as the 89ers celebration
in Guthrie, or the annual commemoration at the Oklahoma City National Memorial
and Museum). Some celebrate beloved Oklahomans (Will Rogers Day in Claremore),
while others celebrate Oklahoman’s culture (Oklahoma Czech Festival). Still, others
are related to Native American culture (Standing Bear Powwow in Ponca City). An
analysis should be conducted to determine a master list of signature events (and their
attendance) to help develop a list of new signature events that have the potential to
generate substantial new tourism dollars.

Partners include: country and lake associations, private businesses, CVBs, tribal tourism
organizations, festival and events associations, as well as:




Strategy 2: Encourage tourism’s growth through the development of new and
improved products and services.

  2.1 | Continue to support the development and enhancement of family-friendly
        visitor attractions and experiences.

Based on Oklahoma’s segmentation study, family is one of the key segments for
the state to target. While many existing attractions already appeal to families, there
should be a continued effort to consistently incorporate family-friendly elements
whenever possible. Four examples of many current family-friendly programs are the
interactive children’s wing at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum,
the flight learning lab at the Tom Stafford Air and Space Museum, displays at the
Jasmine Moran Children’s Museum and exhibits at Science Museum Oklahoma. Even
more interactive family-friendly elements should be added to existing properties.
                                                                       Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 18



In addition, existing product offerings need to be continually refreshed to keep them
new and interesting for children and their families.

Another opportunity for the state of Oklahoma to be family friendly is with sports
facilities capable of hosting youth tournaments that attract both in-state and out-of-
state players and their families. Oklahoma has already done this with soccer (Edmond
Soccer Club), baseball, softball and basketball, including college tournaments such as
the NCAA tournament and ASA softball tournaments. Oklahoma should continue to
look for additional opportunities to bring regional, if not national, youth tournaments
to the state.

In addition to OTRD, partners include: the Native American Cultural and Educational Authority,
various country and lake associations, CVBs, private businesses, as well as:




2.2 | Support growth of tourism through targeted segmented marketing
      and promotion.

The Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department, country and lake associations as
well as local destination marketing organizations, should continue to use segmented
and targeted marketing to promote products to select audiences.

Family/Kids Marketing:
In addition to developing family-friendly products, a statewide family-friendly
marketing program needs to be enhanced and promoted. A number of surrounding
states in the region (Kansas and Arkansas) and outside of the region (Wyoming)
have specific web pages, travel guide pages or brochures devoted to family-friendly
vacations, activities and events. Given the amount of family-friendly product in
the state an Oklahoma Kids’ Vacation webpage or brochure option (with coupons
for attractions, restaurants, etc.) would be a solid strategic addition to the tourism
marketing mix.

This kids’ vacation package could highlight attractions ideal for children, such as
the Science Museum Oklahoma, Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History,
Jasmine Moran Children’s Museum, Toy and Action Figure Museum, Tulsa Zoo,
Oklahoma City Zoo, Oklahoma Aquarium in Jenks, Tulsa Air and Space Museum,
White Water Bay, Frontier City, Upickems, family farms, Harn Homestead, Tiger
Safari, Big Splash Waterpark, National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum,
Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum, Martin Park Nature Center,
Ardmore Tucker Tower Nature Center, Arbuckle Wilderness, Leonardo’s
Discovery Warehouse, plus all state parks and cabins and more.

Youth/Sports Marketing:
Oklahoma has a strong sports base through spectator events at the collegiate
and professional levels, as well as growing participation in youth tournaments,
rowing, marathons and more. A statewide inventory of sports facilities should be
                                                                      Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 19



developed as a tool to assist destination marketing organizations and their sports
marketing arms, to help successfully bid on tournaments, sports festivals and
events as well as growing Oklahoma’s youth sports programs and tournaments.

Chick Trips: Oklahoma has already begun to take advantage of women taking trips
together through its Chick Trip promotion. We suspect this trend will continue to
grow in the future.

Guys Getaways: An opportunity exists to take advantage of the trend for guys to
also take trips together. Oklahoma Guys Getaway packages should be promoted on
the internet and in promotional materials. Guys getaways could include lake trips,
camping, hunting and fishing itineraries, gaming suggestions, dune buggies,
off-road trips and more.

Baby Boomers: As the population ages, baby boomer packages should also be
packaged, developed and promoted. Boomer packages could include a hotel,
dinner, concert/theater, event and museum or gaming package.

RVers: An RVers package could also be developed and promoted showing
RV-friendly parking at major attractions.

Meeting Planners: To encourage convention business throughout the state,
information for meeting planners and destination marketing organizations could be
developed and promoted online.

Partners Include: private businesses and attractions, country and lake associations, CVBs,
Oklahoma Loding Association, along with these others:




2.3 | Encourage development or expansion of events, facilities and attractions
      related to niches in which Oklahoma is perceived as having expertise
      or strength.

      Agritourism: In just a few short years, agritourism has become an established
      niche market offering consumers a variety of farm, vineyard/winery, western/
      ranch and hunting experiences. As this niche continues to grow it will be
      important to ensure that the visitors’ experience remains authentic, while at
      the same time, the infrastructure is developed for signage, roads, parking,
      restrooms, etc. to make this a satisfying user experience.

      Music: Oklahoma has a very rich musical heritage, and is home to a number
      of current and past well-known artists. The completion of the Oklahoma Music
      Hall of Fame and Museum expansion will be an important building block for the
      state’s musical product offering. Similarly, the University of Central Oklahoma’s
      Academy of Contemporary Music (located in Bricktown) may attract students
      and their families from across the nation, as this is the first authorized
      contemporary music academy outside of the U.K. Oklahoma already has several
      signature musical festivals and concerts ranging from DFest and Rocklahoma to
                                                                     Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 20



      OK Mozart. Each of these musical events needs to continue to be supported,
      so that these events can continue to grow over time and attract visitors from
      throughout the region.

      In addition, the state may have the opportunity to promote tourism and musical
      tourism elements using current recording artists to promote the state. Other
      states such as Tennessee (Nashville) and Texas (Austin) have successfully used
      this “star power” tactic in the past. Others (like New York City) use stars in a
      more limited, less expensive way as public service messages.

      Energy:
      Energy is the state’s largest industry. An oil museum was recommended in the
      1987 Master Plan. While the corporate-oriented Conoco and Phillips 66 Museum
      have been developed, there is an opportunity to develop a broader based
      energy attraction. Oklahoma is well positioned to be the energy home for oil,
      natural gas, wind and other alternative energies.

      While a feasibility study would need to be conducted, there is an opportunity
      to develop a comprehensive energy museum and to locate the museum near
      wind turbines and working oil pumps, so that consumers can see energy in
      action. One possible location would be along I-35 near Weatherford. Several
      other locations already have proven that turbines are a viable tourism attraction:
      Denmark, Australia, Scotland, Sweden and California.

      Weather:
      Weather is another area for which Oklahoma is known. Currently, that
      association is not always a positive perception. One way to turn a potential
      consumer negative perception into a positive is to develop a major attraction
      focused on weather. This new weather museum and center would capitalize
      on Oklahoma’s meteorological predictive strengths. This new state-of-the-art,
      hands-on facility would demonstrate Oklahoma’s expertise in terms of tornadoes
      and severe storms. A group of academics, government officials and representatives
      of private industry have gained 501c3 status to begin to raise funds for a center
      like this in Norman. It would be the first national museum dedicated to weather.

      In addition to OTRD, Festival and Events Association, private businesses and attractions,
      local governments and CVBs, partners include:




2.4 | Explore opportunities for product development that are sensitive to and
      target the aging population in the United States.

Just as it is important for cultural, historical and natural attractions to change to stay
relevant, with an aging population (who incidentally still have good discretionary
income) it is important to explore new products that cater to those changing needs.
                                                                      Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 21



According to the Congressional Budget Office, baby boomers (and for that matter
Generations X and Y) are generally estimated to have higher incomes than previous
generations, and the outer edge of boomers are quickly nearing retirement. One
segment that Oklahoma does not capture strongly is affluent/luxury travel due
to the lack of high-end resorts, spas, upscale golf courses, tennis courts, sailing
and boating, etc. Given the adjacency of upscale populations, such as those in
North Texas, Oklahoma might be able to capture this baby boomer demographic
through the development of a high-end upscale travel resort, upscale lakeside
condominium complex or other properties and attractions specifically geared
to the baby boomer population.

Partners include: OTRD, Festival and Events Association, private businesses and attractions
and local governments.

  2.5 | Explore opportunities for public/private partnership
        development opportunities.

Public/private sector partnerships should be explored for both new and existing
tourism products. For example, new partnerships should be considered for park
lodging facilities, such as lease agreements for operations and maintenance of lodging
facilities. This process has already started at some of the state parks, such as Lake
Murray and Lake Texoma. These public/private partnerships could help alleviate
certain state burdens and shift capital improvement and maintenance costs to the
private sector with expertise in these areas.

Partners include: OTRD, Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Travel Industry
Association, private businesses and attractions and local governments.

Strategy 3: Urban and rural development

Continue to enhance and develop tourism products, events and attractions that
feature and benefit both rural and urban Oklahoma.

  3.1 | Continue to leverage and enhance the Route 66 experience.




Route 66 is an iconic connector for many communities and attractions throughout
the state. Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department has done a good job of
promoting Route 66 and should continue to focus on marketing this important asset.
The Route 66 Guide, the National Route 66 Festival in 2007, the Route 66 Music Tour
and PAC Bike tour, securing federal grants and developing new attractions, including
the Chandler Interpretive Center (2007) all can enhance the Route 66 experience.
                                                                     Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 22



In addition, the refurbishment of the Memorial Bridge, the development of Avery
Centennial Plaza in Tulsa (2008) and the planned $15 million Route 66 Xperience
should all help to promote Route 66.

Other states are also capitalizing on the Route 66 experience in ways that Oklahoma
may want to emulate. In Illinois, a Route 66 Trails System has been planned by the
state as a way for visitors to explore Route 66 and rural areas at a slower pace. The
off-road Route 66 path system is targeted at bikers, equestrians and hikers. Similar
recreational paths could be developed in Oklahoma.

Another community (Cuba, Missouri) leveraged its location on Route 66 by
developing a mural program in an effort to beautify and promote the city and
enhance economic development. They have developed twelve murals that show
everything from apple picking to the Civil War and Harry Truman. These murals
have become a roadside attraction in an otherwise very small community. The
Missouri Legislature has recognized the town as “Route 66 Mural City.” While
some communities in Oklahoma also have murals, an expanded series of murals or
sculptures commemorating Route 66 in the state might help further support tourism
in those communities.

Partners include: Route 66 Associations, OTRD, county and lake associations, local
goverments, CVBs, chambers of commerce, Scenic Byways Commission and the
Department of Transportation.

  3.2 | Invest in urban destinations.

Urban communities within Oklahoma should continue to invest in major project
initiatives for visitors and residents. Oklahoma City initiatives such as Core to Shore
(I-40 and crosstown realignment) and Tulsa Vision 2025 should be encouraged.

Partners include: OTRD, private businesses and attractions, local governments and
chambers of commerce.

  3.3 | Leverage programs with direct ties to rural Oklahoma.

Existing programs designed to provide economic assistance and education to rural
communities should be continued in order to help the rural areas tourism product,
events and infrastructure. Investment in destination and product development
programs should continue at the state, regional and local levels, through educational
workshops, planning sessions, grant workshops, customer service training and other
programs. Programs already developed include: the OTRD Training Camp, OK Team!
Tourism Enhancement, assessment and marketing, Tourism Buzz Session, Oklahoma
Treasures as well as grant writing workshops.

Partners include: Resource Conservation & Development, Oklahoma Humanities Council,
OSU’s Extension Services, Department of Commerce, Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma, Oklahoma
Community Institute, the Native American Cultural and Educational Authority, various American
Indian tourism organizations, CVBs, local governments and the OTRD.
                                                                      Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 23



  3.4 | Leverage tribal cultural products in rural Oklahoma.

A number of Native American tourism attractions are in rural communities. Rural
communities should explore opportunities to leverage Native American with other
offerings in their community.

Partners include: the Native American Cultural and Educational Authority, Indian Affairs
Commission, various American Indian tourism organizations as well as local governments,
CVBs and OTRD.

  3.5 | Promote unique and authentic attractions in rural areas.

Rural communities across the state are home to some of the state’s most unique
natural assets, such as Turner Falls in Davis, Little Sahara State Park in Waynoka,
Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge in Indiahoma and the Black Mesa Region
in Cimmaron County. In addition to these natural attractions, other attractions in rural
areas include the Toy and Action Figure Museum in Pauls Valley and the world’s largest
totem pole in Foyil. Additional emphasis on uniquely or authentically Oklahoma
destinations should be considered. For example, this “authentically Oklahoma”
could be a monthly website feature.

Partners include: OTRD, country and lake associations, tribal tourism organizations, CVBs and
private businesses and attractions.

  3.6 | Create and fund grant programs for rural communities.

Funding of rural grant programs should be explored. This should be a competitive
program with the flexibility to aid communities that are at various stages of
development. Funds could be used for product development, marketing, training,
research, etc. as needed.

Partners include: State Legislators, Resource and Conservation and Development, as well as:




3.7 | Explore opportunities and efforts to enhance the “creative class”
      in rural an urban areas.

Dr. Richard Florida, through his series of books – the Rise of the Creative Class (2003),
Cities and the Creative Class (2004) and The Flight of the Creative Class (2007) has
helped to popularize the theory that the creative class in a community drives economic
growth and development. The creative class includes the knowledge-based workforce
(scientists, engineers, professors, etc.) as well as the creative workforce (artists,
musicians, writers, etc.). The creative class is measured in terms of talent, tolerance
and technology. At the time of Florida’s first publication, Oklahoma City was ranked
42 out of 50 cities.

Communities across Oklahoma have recognized the importance of the creative
class and diversity. Events such as Festival of the Arts, Paseo Arts Festival and
the deadCENTER Film Festival in Oklahoma City; OK Mozart in Bartlesville;
                                                                  Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 24



and Dfest in Tulsa, are all example of events enhancing the arts and the creative
class. These kinds of events should continue to grow, and new cultural events should
be added. In addition, visual arts, art and artisan related shopping and products
(Oklahoma treasures) as well as entertainment could all enhance the tourism product
in Oklahoma.

Partners include: OTRD, Oklahoma Department of Commerce, local chambers of commerce,
Oklahoma Arts Council, Festival and Events Associations, CVBs, local governments, Oklahoma
Creativity Project, Oklahoma Small Business Development and Oklahoma Community Institute.

Strategy 4: Infrastructure Improvements

Continue to improve and enhance Oklahoma’s tourism infrastructure.

Oklahoma is largely a driving destination state. With just three commercial airports in
the state, access is somewhat limited for those flying. In addition, even those who fly
to the state need a car once in state. Therefore, conditions of roads and signage are
critical to encourage travel participation.

  4.1 | Improve the wayfinding experience for travelers, to help inform visitors and
        direct them to attractions, accommodations and other amenities.

Wayfinding is an important element in the traveler experience that can easily add
value or detract from the traveler’s reaction to that destination. Wayfinding needs to
be constantly evaluated and improved.

Major interstates generally post good signage notifying travelers of upcoming
cities and towns, and the attractions available in those locations. Similar signage
is suggested for the turnpikes and heavily trafficked state roads. On state roads,
signage should be improved to notify travelers of distances to towns, gas stations,
food and nearby attraction. Efforts to enforce uniformity in signage should continue.

Signage for scenic byways should be enhanced to ensure travelers are aware of the
byway destination and notable scenic area/overlooks. While signage exists to identify
the historic Route 66, additional signage showing notable attractions and distances
to those attractions would be beneficial. Rural attractions should be sure that
directional information is available via websites and navigations systems.

The Oklahoma Historical Society implements the Historical Marker Program, which
helps inform travelers of upcoming historical sites. While this is valuable signage, it is
important that additional signage be added identifying the actual site. Steps should
be taken to ensure that additional clear signage accompanies and complements the
historical marker.

With the level of RV travel to and through the state, Oklahoma should consider
implementing a statewide RV-friendly program. In this program, states display the
RV-friendly logo (a happy face with the letters RV) on highway exit signs to notify RV
motorists of nearby facilities that accommodate RVs. The states shown on the map on
the following page have already implemented/are implementing this program.
                                                                 Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 25



    riendly
RV-friendly states:




Given known travel patterns of snowbirds and Winter Texans through the state,
and acknowledging that many of the surrounding states on the travel corridor have
already implemented this program, Oklahoma should quickly look into implementing
this program in Oklahoma as well.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) granted approval to display the logo
on highways’ food/gas/lodging exit signs, and clears the way to display this logo
on retailers signage. If state or local agencies elect to participate in the RV-friendly
highway sign program, they must have a policy for selecting eligible businesses and
facilities. Among these criteria are high canopies, pull-throughs and an adequate
turning radius.

Partners include:




  4.2 | Enhance tourism infrastructure to allow for greater connectivity within and
        among destinations in the state.

Travelers to Oklahoma largely require cars for transportation to drive to destinations
and attractions and to travel between cities. Currently there are a limited number of
taxis (especially outside of urban areas) and bus, trolley and Amtrak service is very
limited. Enhanced public transportation options that support connectivity among
cities and attractions would be beneficial. High speed monorails or light rail could
be explored through feasibility studies as well as the expansion of existing bus and
trolley service.

Partners include: OTRD, Oklahoma Department of Transportation, Oklahoma Department of
Commerce, chambers of commerce, local governments and private businesses and attractions.

  4.3 | Continue to improve existing transportation conditions maintenance and
        appearance to enhance the visitor’s experience.

Steps should be taken to ensure investment in and upkeep of conditions and
appearances of interstate highways, roadside exits, state roads, bridges and roadside
                                                                 Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 26



facilities, such as information areas, rest rooms and rest areas. Specific attention
should be paid to the most heavily trafficked areas to support the tourism effort.
In addition, the statewide beautification program, Keep Oklahoma Beautiful, should
continue to be supported and coordination with local beautification efforts should
be encouraged.

Partners include: OTRD, Department of Transportation, Scenic Byways Commission and
local governments.

There is one additional product-oriented strategic recommendation.

Recommendation: Analyze all product development and infrastructure
improvements in terms of development zones.

While new product development and enhancements should be encouraged
throughout the state where possible, new tourism assets should be concentrated to
leverage existing visitor and population bases in these areas.

Urban/Metropolitan Growth Zones: This zone includes both the Oklahoma City
and Tulsa metropolitan areas. These zones have the most established and abundant
tourism assets. Product emphasis for urban/metropolitan zones should be on
enhancing existing attractions and events, exploring complementary new product
developments, developing other major signature attractions (such as the American
Indian Cultural Center and Museum), ensuring accessibility to these developments,
and encouraging connections (physical, transportation and marketing) among the
various attractions and events in a given metropolitan area.

Mid-Sized Growth Zones: These zones have a number of tourism assets in mid-sized
communities and niche markets. In addition, these areas are well positioned near
Oklahoma’s borders to take advantage of travelers from surrounding states. Product
emphasis should be on enhancing existing assets in terms of quality, and raising their
profile with potential visitors as well as exploring developments in niche markets. For
example, Lawton could consider further military museums and attractions, or could
develop programs to better promote and expand the area’s natural assets, such as the
Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge.

Targeted Growth Zones: Targeted growth zones need to enhance existing attractions
and embrace niche or targeted market opportunities. For example, Altus could consider
an Air Force museum, or Woodward could develop new wind power attractions.

Rural Growth Zones: The other growth zones are in smaller towns and rural areas
of the state. Agritourism can continue to play a major role in the tourism products
in these zones in the future. Improved infrastructure (signage and roads) will also
play a role in assuring visitors learn of the agritourism products in each of these rural
communities. Agritourism products can include: working ranches, farms, homemade
foods (pies, jams, jellies and preserves, ice cream, candy, salsa, baked goods), meats
(bison, ostrich, barbecues), wines and vineyards, horses/riding, orchards and upickems,
skeet shooting, camping trips, pumpkin patches, farmers markets, wagon rides, cattle
drives, wildlife watching, pecan picking and more.
                                                                     Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 27



Strategy 5: Continued Investment in Marketing and Promotions

Increase investment in high ROI marketing and promotions to increase out-of-state
tourism response as well as maximizing in-state response.

While we need to develop and enhance the tourism product itself, we must also
continue to develop the state’s image through promotional and marketing efforts.

  5.1 | Expand and continue to develop targeted marketing capitalizing on
        the state’s core strengths.

Oklahoma Native America has been the state’s marketing positioning themeline for many
years. As the American Indian tourism product in the state is becoming better developed
(and in anticipation of opening the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum),
it would be useful to develop a new American Indian tourism guide or brochure that
could be available both online and in hard copy. Oklahoma has produced guides like
this in the past; Arizona and New Mexico both produce brochures like this now.

This comprehensive guidebook could include information about the new American
Indian Cultural Center and Museum, all other nations’ museums, a listing of all events
and powwows, historical background information on each of the tribes and a general
overview of all American Indian experiences in the state (in terms of learning, culture,
shopping and the arts). The guide should also include detailed maps showing where
each of these events/attractions/shops is located with approximate driving times
between each and suggested driving itineraries.

In addition, a separate guide could be developed on Indian gaming. This piece would
promote the largest, most tourist-directed casinos in the state. A map could show
where all gaming is in the state, with a clear key to indicate which casinos had a hotel,
entertainment, card games, number of slots, etc.

Additional niche marketed brochures and guides could also be developed for other
uniquely Oklahoma attractions – a guide could be developed for cowboy and
Western attractions (art, shopping, rodeos, etc.); an eco-adventure guide (lakes,
fishing, camping, parks, rappelling, dune buggies, hiking, tallgrass prairie/wildlife)
and so on.

Partners include: various tribal tourism organizations, cultural centers and museums, country
and lake associations, private businesses and local attractions, plus the Oklahoma Department
of Agriculture and OTRD.

  5.2 | Expand the development of travel packages and suggested itineraries
        to better connect and package attractions in the state and make the travel
        experience more customer-friendly.

A challenge for Oklahoma is that attractions are geographically dispersed across
the state, making it difficult for a traveler seeking a specific type of experience –
whether that is American Indian, Western heritage or whatever the area of interest
may be. Even within a given city, attractions are spread out. Using Oklahoma City and
Western heritage as an example, Stockyards City, Langstons, the National Cowboy
and Western Heritage Museum and the Lazy E are dispersed across many miles. It is
                                                                      Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 28



difficult for the person unfamiliar with the market to know how to plan their itinerary
to maximize and take full advantage of their stay.

While Oklahoma has some packaged itineraries many are either for extended five-
or six-day experiences, or are for daytrips. Itineraries should generally be presented
as getaways (three-day excursions) with day trips or two-day add-on options.
Other states such as Missouri, Arkansas, Texas and Tennessee all package these
shorter itineraries.

Texas offers Texcursions (and presents options for everything from family fun
to Lone Star destinations) as well as Texas Treks. Missouri currently uses a sticker
concept on their website to categorize trips by areas of interest – jazz/blues, museums,
re-enactments, rivers, etc. Arkansas has a section devoted to hot deals and packages
in about twenty categories. Tennessee’s “pre-planned trips” include winery tours,
west-Tennessee tours, farm tours, caves and caverns, kids, couples, camping and
many more.

Oklahoma should better package and promote three- to four-day itineraries that
feature American Indians, Western heritage, outdoors/camping, lake adventures,
history, the arts/culture (museums, galleries, festivals, music), gaming, agritourism,
authentic America and Route 66. Cross-marketing opportunities should also be
explored such as a Route 66 Megatour, a Chisholm Trail itinerary with Kansas,
and so on.

Partners include: various tribal tourism organizations, cultural centers and museums, country
and lake associations, private businesses and local attractions, plus the Oklahoma Department
of Agriculture and OTRD.

  5.3 | Ensure successful completion of TravelOK.com redesign and launch.

In 2009 TravelOK.com is undergoing a major redesign to better serve potential visitors,
residents and stakeholders. The website serves as a first impression for potential visitors
regarding the state’s branding, assets and culture, as well as a central location for
information about attractions, events, activities. It is imperative that the state’s website
is competitive with surrounding states (in particular Texas, Missouri and Arkansas) in
terms of content, functionality and overall look.

Key elements that could be included on the new website include: new travel
packages/itineraries, a flippable online version of the travel guide (Missouri does
this currently), information for online travelers, online sign-up for newsletters/events/
promotion offers and industry stakeholder information (Tourism Biz site).

Partners include: OTIA, CVBs, individual attractions, tribal tourism organizations and OTRD.

  5.4 | Encourage destination branding.

Oklahoma has developed the “Native America” brand positioning for the state and has
used this positioning for more than twenty years. It is important that communities across
the state and individual attractions also develop unique, sustainable brand positionings.
Brand positionings should ideally be based on market research and planning and
should be continuously supported to seed each positioning in consumers’ minds.
                                                                       Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 29



  5.5 | Encourage coordination and cooperation among tourism
        promotion partners.

A number of organizations across the industry promote attractions, events, communities,
the region and the state. Each of these organizations has its own objectives, target
markets, strategies and tactics. Their goals often overlap. While there are co-op efforts
and cross-promotional efforts already, and informal communications is ongoing, a more
formalized repository could help ensure cohesive messaging across the state, and
ensure that all parties were informed of each others’ efforts.

This can be accomplished through joint marketing/strategic planning sessions,
enhanced communications through industry briefings and shared information sites
or information repositories.

Partners include: various tribal tourism organizations, country and lake associations, private
businesses and attractions, CVBs and OTRD.

  5.6 | Continue to seek national and regional publicity opportunities related
        to Oklahoma through both legacy and new media formats.

On the legacy or traditional media front, it is important to continue to increase
awareness through earned media coverage (broadcast and print) in the state or
city overall, proposed new products or through event coverage.

Collegiate sports and the new NBA relocation of the Thunder provides opportunities
to showcase the state in the region and nationally. Other major sporting events
held in Oklahoma (rowing competitions, OKC Memorial Marathon, NCAA basketball
and women’s softball tournaments as well as other sporting events) provide an
opportunity to gain national and regional coverage.

“Oklahoma the Beautiful” was an excellent journalistic series. Similar pieces should be
sought out for national network, cable television and cable news series.

Similarly, the Oklahoma Film and Music Office should continue to attract movie and
television productions to the state.

The American Indian Cultural Center and Museum will provide a valuable national
asset, that should garner national coverage and raise Oklahoma’s profile in terms of
its American Indian product offering. Similarly, if either a national weather center or
a national energy museum is developed in the state, they too, should garner national
attention as unique tourism destinations. The Oklahoma National Memorial and Museum
should also continue to seek national public relations opportunities as a one-of-a-kind
museum in the nation.

Well-known Oklahomans such as Garth Brooks, Reba McIntryre, Vince Gill, Toby Keith,
Carrie Underwood and others, may also be used to help tell the story of Oklahoma
through celebrity appeal.

New media also provides a variety of ways to reach the traveler and influence their
travel behavior. Blogs, online travel channels, social networking (Facebook, etc),
mobile media and YouTube are just the beginning of new media formats that have
                                                                        Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 30



already emerged and will continue to emerge throughout the next five years. With the
increasing fragmentation of traditional media, it is critical for the state to be aware of,
participating in and testing all media forms, to get key messaging about the state out
to the prime travel target audience.

Partners include: OTRD, CVBs, tribal tourism organizations, private businesses and attractions
and Oklahoma Travel Industry Association.

5.7 | Continue marketing and promotional efforts targeting regional visitors.

The Conversion Study, Consumer Pulse, Attractions Surveys, Ad Awareness Studies
and Publications Research all have has shown Oklahoma vacationers to come
primarily from the surrounding states of Texas, Missouri, Arkansas and Kansas (as
well as from Oklahoma itself). Marketing efforts should continue to target those areas
that show the highest return on investment. While in-state marketing is important to
educate residents and encourage travel throughout the state, the balance of in-state
and out-of-state spending needs to be constantly evaluated to increase new travel
spending in the state.

There is also the opportunity to increase shoulder season travel with special
promotions, discounts and events. Events such as fall-foliage tours, cabin getaways
fall festivals and holiday events can be target marketed by building a database of
interested travelers who would sign up for alerts (phone- or computer-based) about
special promotional off-season offers.

Testing in markets outside the region should also be considered. Much of this testing
can be done online through paid search, online advertising and social media, or
through mobile marketing. Testing could be conducted in highly populated markets,
such as California and Illinois, or in snowbird markets such as Illinois, Wisconsin,
Indiana, Michigan, Iowa and Minnesota.

Partners include: OTRD, CVBs, Department of Agriculture, tribal tourism organizations,
private businesses and attractions and country and lake associations.

Strategy 6: Invest in research and planning.

Continue and increase investment in tourism planning and research to help ensure
marketing efforts and new product developments fill consumer needs, are research
based and results oriented.

  6.1 | Develop a collaborative process to develop strategic business and
        marketing plans.

Tourism planning should be enhanced with annual marketing plans, business plans
(two- to three-year outlooks), as well as strategic plans at five-year intervals. This
planning process should be collaborative with input from Oklahoma Tourism and
Recreation Department, the Oklahoma Arts Council, Oklahoma Historical Society,
Native American Cultural and Educational Authority, Scenic Rivers Commission,
Scenic Byways Commission, Department of Transportation and the Department
of Wildlife Conservation.
                                                                        Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 31



OTRD should be the lead agency for this newly formed committee, with the goal of
forming a partnership that will develop a strategic plan for each agency, to further the
greater cause of enhanced tourism in the state.

Partners include: Oklahoma Indian Affairs Commission, Scenic Rivers Commission,
Oklahoma legislature, as well as:




6.2 | Continue to provide sufficient funding to lead development of data
      to form the foundation of marketing efforts.

Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department has conducted a variety of research
studies, including conversion studies, web-tracking reports, paid search and online
advertising studies, publication research, focus groups, consumer pulse quarterly
tracking, ad awareness studies, visitor attraction surveys, snowbird research, advertising
dial testing, segmentation studies and more – to get a better understanding of changing
travel habits, ad effectiveness and a profile of the potential Oklahoma visitor. In addition,
Oklahoma monitors secondary research available as well as analyzing other primary
research made available to the state.

Oklahoma should continue to explore a variety of techniques to ensure a thorough
understanding of the target. All research studies should continue to remain formal
RFPS, or sent to multiple vendors to ensure that the state is getting the most
competitive research studies possible.

Partners include: OTRD, CVBs, country and lake associations, tribal tourism organizations,
private businesses and attractions, educational instutions, Department of Commerce and
Oklahoma Travel Industry Association.

  6.3 | Make it easier to share research data among communities, businesses,
        associations, economic development organizations and others.

Various research studies are conducted annually by local governments, organizations,
attractions, destination marketing associations, state agencies and so on. The tourism
industry should be encouraged to share tourism studies. This could be done through
an interactive “Tourism Biz” site or intranet. The site could be an enhanced version of
the Tourism Industry Partners link at the state level, with the ability for users to share
information and upload content.

Partners include: various tribal tourism organizations, multiple private businesses and
attractions, various educational associations, individual attractions, country and lake
associations, CVBs, OTIA and any other party that has conducted tourism research.

  6.4 | Invest in heritage and cultural planning and research.

With heritage and culture (American Indian and Western) being such a significant
asset for the state, planning should also focus on this key theme. Planning should
include a realistic assessment and inventory of all current products focusing on
                                                                    Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 32



heritage and culture, as well as a plan to enhance the product, marketing
and sustainability.

Partners include: Oklahoma Historical Society, Preservation Oklahoma, Oklahoma Heritage
Association, Oklahoma Arts Council and OTRD.

  6.5 | Continue to enhance the tourism-focused handbook for agritourism to be
        used by new agritourism businesses.

The agritourism resource manual is an important element for start-up agritourism
businesses and attractions. It provides useful resources for marketing, operational,
business and funding, etc. This handbook should continue to be refined and enhanced
to help new agritourism businesses as they grow and become better established,
while maintaining the authenticity of the visitor experience.

This manual is a comprehensive document. However it should continue to be updated
with new programs, resource and contact information. New success stories should be
added to further encourage new industry.

Partners include: private businesses and attractions, as well as:




Strategy 7: Continue to build a trained labor force.

Build a solid training base to be certain the most highly trained professional workforce
is available to the industry now and in the future.

  7.1 | Increase professional development opportunities for the industry through
        professional associations and certification programs for those already in
        the field.

Skilled professionals are essential for the future growth of the industry. With industry
stakeholders asking for additional educational opportunities in the state, additional
professional programs and certification programs should be explored with colleges,
universities and community colleges across the state.

DMOs throughout Oklahoma should be encouraged to become members of
the Destination Marketing Association International (DMAI) and other accredited
marketing associations. DMAI provides valuable industry information, assistance and
education to destination marketing associations on an international basis. In addition,
through DMAI, professionals can attain certification as a Professional in Destination
Marketing (PDM) and Certified Destination Management Executive (CDME). The PDM
certification program is available online.

The Pride Program has proven to be successful and should be adopted statewide.
Communities across the state should become “Pride Certified” communities. States
                                                                        Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 33



such as Oregon have implemented a statewide customer service program, Q Cares,
to elevate the level of hospitality and customer experience in the state.

Partners include: OTRD, the Pride Program, various educational institutions, Oklahoma
Department of Labor and Oklahoma Travel Industry Association.

  7.2 | Continue to expand vocational, community college and university programs
        focused on training new professionals to enter the tourism industry.

Oklahoma has a number of vocational, community college and university programs
in the hospitality and tourism fields. With a recognized shortage of trained hospitality
workers it is imperative that these programs are properly funded and expanded
if needed. The content and consistency of these programs should be evaluated to
ensure that the needs of the industry are being properly met.

A few examples of current programs include: the Leisure Studies program at
Oklahoma State University, Hospitality Administration at Oklahoma City Community
College, Hotel, Motel and Restaurant Management at the University of Central
Oklahoma, Hospitality Management at the Kaddo Kiowa Technology Center,
Hospitality Management at Platt College, Tulsa Technology Center’s Hospitality and
Tourism Division, Tourism and Travel Services Management at Northeastern State
University, Hospitality Administration at the Indian Capital Technology Center and
Hospitality as well as Recreation Marketing Operations at Panhandle State University.

Partners include: the Pride Program, various educational institutions and OTRD.

Strategy 8: Strengthen partnerships and communications among
industry stakeholders.

Oklahoma’s tourism industry consists of a broad network of public and private sector
entities. While it is critical tourism roles are well defined, many of the state’s tourism
strategies should be shared. Strong public/private partnerships are essential for the
industry to thrive and grow.

  8.1 | Develop a state industry microsite.

Currently the Tourism Industry Partners link on TravelOK.com contains industry
resource information. This link needs to be broadened to become more than just a link
and a true tourism microsite, that will become the go to source for all tourism industry
information. In addition to resource information this new tourism biz site will contain
the latest tourism industry news, industry trends, legislative issues, publications,
research, shared data, community sites, chat rooms and networking opportunities.
This will be a way for the tourism industry to be virtually connected statewide.

Other states that have developed similar tourism biz sites are California, Oregon
and Minnesota.

Partners include: multiple state agencies, industry associations, destination marketing associations,
local governments, private businesses and attractions, Oklahoma Travel Industry Association and
other interested parties.
                                                                     Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 34



  8.2 | Develop additional educational forums and platforms to build relationships
        among industry stakeholders.

Industry subcommittees on tourism should be encouraged. Interested parties across
the state should be encouraged to meet by teleconference, web conference or at the
annual Governor’s Conference, to discuss the “hot button” issues facing the state.

Potential committees could focus on rural tourism, gaming, sports marketing
or agritourism.

Partners include: CVBs, tribal tourism organizations, local governments, Oklahoma Travel
Industry Association and OTRD.

  8.3 | Encourage the development of an American Indian Tourism Association.

An association of tribal tourism representatives should be encouraged and
supported. This association would provide a forum for American Indian nations to
discuss common issues and understand tourism efforts of other communities. Such
an association could serve as a unified voice with other associations as well as local
governments, state governments and state agencies.

Other states, such as Montana, have similar tribal associations. New Mexico has a
formal tribal tourism department at the state level, to work with communities on
tribal tourism.

Partners include: various tribal tourism organizations, Native American Cultural and Educational
Authority, Indian Affairs Commission, local governments, CVBs, Oklahoma Travel Industry
Association and OTRD.

  8.4 | Develop a state destination marketing association for convention
        and visitors bureaus, chambers of commerce, tribal nations,
        multi-county associations, etc.

An association of destination marketing associations across the state should be
formed to provide a networking forum and a unified voice for destination marketing
in Oklahoma.

Other states that have already formed a destination marketing association include
Texas, New York, California, Florida, North Carolina, Oregon, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin
and more.

Partners include: CVBs, country and lake associations and tribal tourism organizations.

Strategy 9: Build consensus for support of the tourism industry statewide.

  9.1 | Continue to build awareness of the industry through in-state marketing,
        promotions and publicity about tourism and events.

In-state marketing campaigns have always been part of tourism’s plan and should
continue to be part of the plan in order to raise awareness about the state as a
vacation/getaway destination, and the importance of the industry to the state.
Efforts should be made to target both residents and state leaders.
                                                                      Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 35



Awareness should continue to be built through in-state marketing, Discover Oklahoma,
public service announcements, promotions and public relations efforts at the state,
regional and local level.

Partners include: various tribal tourism organizations, Oklahoma Travel Industry Association,
CVBs, country and lake associations and OTRD.

  9.2 | Develop presentations/briefings that can be shared among residents,
        stakeholder groups and government leaders that illustrate major tourism
        initiatives, industry trends and tourism economic data (ROI, state of the
        industry briefings, etc.).

In an effort to keep stakeholders informed, regular briefings on tourism initiatives,
trends and performance should be developed and updated regularly. These briefings
can be presented at local meetings, sent as updates to the legislature, released as a
quarterly press releases, posted on the proposed new tourism biz site and distributed
electronically to industry partners.

  9.3 | Expand educational outreach programs.

Educational outreach programs should continue and be expanded, including any with
existing local tourism organizations.

Examples of existing programs include Resource Conservation and Development
programs, Agritourism Outreach programs, Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation
Department’s Speaker’s Bureau, OK Team! Tourism Enhancement, assessment and
marketing, Tourism Buzz sessions and grant writing workshops. Educational sessions
should also be developed in the form of webcasts that can be viewed during a web
event or can later be posted on the new tourism industry microsite.

Partners include: Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Department of Agriculture,
OTRD, Resource Conservation and Development Program, Oklahoma Travel Industry
Association, local governments and CVBs.

Strategy 10: Ensure tourism funding is competitive within the region.

Tourism Funding:
While listed as one of the last goals in this report, this is not a reflection of this goal’s
importance. Funding is critical to the success of all other strategies discussed in
this report.

  10.1 | Safeguard the stability of the state funding sources.

Funding has increased at the state level since the repeal of the tourism tax and the use
of state appropriations and sales tax. However, stakeholders are genuinely concerned
that the state appropriated funds for tourism may either decline or be eliminated all
together in the future. Securing these funds will be a legislative hurdle. Unanimous and
vocal support among stakeholders will be needed to influence state leaders.
                                                                         Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 36



Tourism partners should work together to propose tourism policy modifications to
state leaders. Proposals should be supported by the clear quantifiable benefits of the
proposed policy and or funding modifications.

Partners include: Oklahoma Travel Industry Association, country and lake associations and OTRD.

  10.2 | Increase available funding for tourism promotion and marketing.

Funding should be increased to be more competitive with other states – particularly
the two strongest competitors of Texas and Missouri. It is estimated that an additional
$4 million would allow Oklahoma to be more competitive with other states.

Securing that amount of additional funding will be a legislative challenge. It will be
critical to gain support of the industry and all its influencers – industry stakeholders,
business leaders, the general public and the media – in order to influence state leaders.

Understanding that $4 million may be difficult to attain, annual increases must at
least exceed inflationary increases with the goal of meeting or exceeding the annual
budget of competitors over time.

Partners include: state legislators, country and lake associations as well as:




  10.3 | Given additional funding, existing grant programs should be expanded
         and a new grant program should be developed.

Additional funding should be developed to assist private businesses, individual
communities and regional areas in terms of product development and marketing
support. Additional funding could come from grants, tax incentives or other programs.

Consideration should be given to the further consolidation of multi-county and lake
associations into regional entities. With a smaller number of organizations, more
matching funds/grants could be made available to these regional entities. Thus
greater returns could be achieved with larger dollar amounts. In addition, stipulations
for marketing should include a certain percentage of funds be devoted to out-of-state
marketing. In other states such as Oregon, state funds granted to regions must be
used exclusively for out-of-state marketing.

Lake associations, along with other destination marketing associations should be eligible
for new competitive grant programs for marketing at the local and regional level. While
lake associations are valuable local and regional marketing associations, additional
marketing groups should also be eligible for public marketing promotion funds.

A grant program, tax incentive program or other alternate forms of funding should
be developed to assist attractions and communities with smaller-scale developments
below the $500,000 threshold established by the Tourism Development Act. Product
development could take the form of product enhancement (exhibit expansion),
                                                                      Strategic Plan for Tourism Marketing, page 37



infrastructure (signage, parking, facilities) or diversification (gift shop, restaurant, etc.).

Partners include: OTRD, State Legislators, Oklahoma Travel Industry Association, tribal tourism
organizations, country and lake associations and CVBs.

  10.4 | Continue to explore alternative funding opportunities.

Alternative funding should continue to be explored, such as public/private
partnerships, federal assistance, multi-state partnerships, etc.

Public/private partnerships for tourism development as well as sponsorships and
joint promotions for marketing and advertising should be explored. Federal grant
programs should continue to be evaluated for tourism product development at the
state and local level.

Partners include: various state agencies, private businesses and attractions, Oklahoma Travel
Industry Association and OTRD.

  10.5 | Collaborate with tourism partners at the state level for
         funding opportunities.

Tourism agencies, including the Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department,
Oklahoma Department of Transportation, Oklahoma Department of Agriculture,
Historical Society and Arts Council, should work together to explore funding that
benefits these groups. State agencies need to do an even better job of working
together and must develop a coordinated effort.

Partners include:




  10.6 | Assist local entities and attractions with funding opportunities.

State agencies should continue to assist local entities and attractions with funding
opportunities on a coordinated basis. Efforts should continue to provide information
and education in terms of state and national funding for local entities. Guides,
educational assistance and grant workshops should all be available; much of this
information can be accessible on the proposed industry microsite.

Partners include:
State of Oklahoma Tourism Master Plan
Appendices




Presented by:   PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Contact:        Robert V. Canton, Director
Phone:          (813) 218-2917
Fax:            (813) 375-7842
                                                                                                              PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
                                                                                                              Suite 200
                                                                                                              4221 West Boy Scout Boulevard
                                                                                                              Tampa FL 33607
                                                                                                              Telephone (813) 218-2917
                                                                                                              Facsimile (813) 375-7842
                                                                                                              www.pwc.com

October 16, 2009




Mr. Hardy Watkins, Executive Director
Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
120 North Robinson, Sixth Floor
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102



Dear Mr. Watkins:


PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC) has performed certain services to assist the Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department (OTRD) in
assessing statewide tourism needs towards the development of a Tourism Master Plan for the State of Oklahoma. Supporting research and data
related to the Tourism Master Plan is presented in the following appendices.
Our services were performed and our deliverables were developed in accordance with our engagement letter dated July 22, 2008 and are subject
to the terms and conditions included therein. Our services were performed in accordance with Standards for Consulting Services established by
the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). Accordingly, we are providing no opinion, attestation, or other form of assurance
with respect to our work, and we did not verify or audit any information provided to us.
Our work was limited to the specific procedures and analysis described herein and was based only on the information made available through
January 15, 2009. Accordingly, changes in circumstances after this date could affect the findings outlined in our deliverables.
This information has been prepared for the use and benefit of, and pursuant to a client relationship exclusively with Ackerman McQueen, Inc. and
the OTRD. PwC disclaims any contractual or other responsibility to others based on its use and, accordingly, this information may not be relied
upon by anyone other than Ackerman McQueen, Inc. and the OTRD. We appreciate the opportunity to assist you with this matter. If you have
any questions regarding this information, please contact Robert Canton at (813) 218-2917 or via email at robert.canton@us.pwc.com.


Very truly yours,


PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Table of Contents
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry     15
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling      32
Appendix C: Tourism Stakeholders            136
Appendix D: Performance Audit               140
Appendix E: Additional Data                 153
Appendix A
The Oklahoma Tourism Industry
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot
In this section, a brief overview of Oklahoma's tourism industry is provided, serving to define the breadth, size, and growth of the industry
throughout the past two decades. As described, this plan is intended to involve both individuals and organizations within the state that impact
and/or benefit from tourism. As such, it is important to define the tourism industry, its demand segments, components, and breadth in terms of
stakeholders involved, industries impacted, and economic significance.

Definition of Travel and Tourism

The terms “tourist,” “visitor,” and “traveler” are often used interchangeably. Tourism is defined as “a stay of one or more nights away from home
for holidays, visits to friends or relatives, business conferences, or any other purpose, except such things as boarding, education, or semi-
permanent employment” (Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, Kotler, 2006). The term "travel," as defined by the U.S. Travel Association
(formerly the Travel Industry Association of America, or TIA), includes "traveling away from home overnight in paid accommodations or on day
trips to places 50 miles or more away from home" (TIA's Economic Impact of Travel on Oklahoma Counties, 2007).

It is important to recognize that tourism includes not only visitor activities taking place at the visitor’s ultimate destination, but also travel to and
from the destination as well as pre- and post-trip activities. For Oklahoma, therefore, tourism includes not only those visitors traveling to
destinations and attractions within the state, but also visitors that stop in Oklahoma on their way to other destinations outside the state. For
example, a tourist that originates in Kansas and stops in Oklahoma while driving his/her family to Texas is considered a tourist in Oklahoma. The
extent to which Oklahoma is able to capture the tourist for more than simply a meal or fuel along the way or other incidental spending is what
defines the level of “impact” of that tourist on the state and its local communities.

Tourism Demand Segments

While tourism is often perceived as a non-resident visiting an area on vacation, tourism actually encompasses a great deal more. Tourism
includes non-resident business visitors traveling for purposes of commercial business, often extending their stays to experience local attractions
and events. A significant segment of tourism revenue is obtained from group visitors, including meetings, conventions, training sessions, sports
teams, organized bus tours, and family reunions. Day trips also represent an important piece of tourism’s overall impact and often result from
community festivals and special events. Finally, transient visitors also spend money while passing through an area en route to their final
destination. Each of these segments provides significant opportunity for revenue generation.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   2
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




Tourism Industry Components

The tourism industry is directly supported by four primary sectors, as defined by The George Washington University’s Department of Tourism and
Hospitality Management: suppliers, intermediaries, carriers, and planning/promotional organizations.

      •      Suppliers provide services and some goods to visitors at or en route to their destination (e.g. hotels, restaurants, attractions).

      •      Carriers transport visitors to and from the destination (e.g. airlines).

      •      Intermediaries assist visitors in reserving or purchasing the products of suppliers and carriers (e.g. travel agents).

      •      Planning/promotional organizations are public and non-profit organizations that facilitate visitor access to the destination and activities
             within it (e.g. ORTD, CVBs, country and lake associations).

Tourism Industry Breadth

Oklahoma's tourism stakeholders consist of all parties with an interest in the state’s destinations. Stakeholders include representatives of the four
primary sectors mentioned above as well as Oklahoma's residents and visitors themselves. Stakeholders also include representatives of other
sectors such as government organizations, non-profit organizations/associations, and countless secondary businesses that indirectly support the
tourism businesses. The graphic on the following page (based on a model developed by Travel Oregon) illustrates the breadth of the tourism
industry and the interconnectivity among industry stakeholders in both the public and private sectors.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   3
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




                                                                           Hiking &                                                                                                    Recreational
                                                                           Camping                                                                                                     Vehicle Parks           Vacation
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Campgrounds
                                                                Golf                                Birding                                                                                                    Rentals
                                                                                                                                                         Performing
                        Boating                                                   Fishing &
                                               Windsurfing
                                                                                   Hunting                                                                  Arts
                                                                                                                Cycling            Gaming/Horse
                                                                                                                                                                                Resorts
                                                                                                                                     Racing
                                                                                                                                                                                                      Accommodations
                        Skiing                 Water Sports                                                                                                                                                                        Hotels & Motels
                                                                          Outdoor                      Team Sports                                               Concerts
                                                                                                                              Events &
                                 Rowing
                                                               Parks                          ATV Sports
                                                                                                                              Festivals
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Bed &
                                                                                                                                                                                                                Friends &
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Breakfasts
                                                                                                                                               Entertainment                                                      Family
                                                                                                                                                                                        Wineries/                Housing
                      Team Sports                     Indoor                     Recreation                                                                                             Vineyards
                                                                                                                              Spectator
                                                                                                                               Sports                                                                                       Specialty Foods
                                  Individual
                                    Sports                                                                                                                            Attractions
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Culinary
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Ethnic
                                      Motorcycle                         Air
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Quick Service
                                                                                                   Rail                      The Oklahoma Tourism
                         Auto                                                                                                     Experience
                                                                                                                                                                                                Industry
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Restaurants
                                                                                                                                                                                                 Groups
                                                Highway                                                                                                                                                                                     Bar/Lounge/
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Tavern
                      Motor Coach
                                                                       Transportation
                                                                                                                                                                Marketing &                       Government
                                                                                                                                                               Public Relations                    Agencies
                                 Recreational                                                                                                                                                                         Family/Casual          Fine Dining
                                   Vehicle


                                                                                       Bus-Rail                           Historical Sites
                                                             Waterways                                                                                                                         CVBs
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Exposition
                                                                                                                                                           Museums                                                     Center
                                                                                                                                                                                                        Outdoor
                             Galleries                                                                        Visual Arts                                                                             Amphitheaters
                                                                                                                                                                        Convention/                                                    Fairgrounds
                                                                                                                                          Culture &                     Conference
                                                                                                                                                                          Center
                                                                                                                                          Heritage
                                                                                                                                                                                                       Meeting Facilities
                                                                            Retail                                                                                                                        & Venues
                             Shopping                                                                                     Shopping
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Performing Arts
                              Centers                                                                                      Districts
                                                                                                                                                            Native American/                                                              Centers
                                                                                                                                                                Western
                                                                                                      Farmers &
                                                Gasoline                                               Outdoor                         Performing Arts                                Hotels
                                                Service                        Outlets                 Markets                                                                                               Arena             Educational
                                                Stations                                                                                                                                                                       Institutions




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                                                            4
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




Such an extensive network of tourism stakeholders enhances the impact of tourism on an economy. According to TIA, direct, indirect, and
induced expenditures contribute to the economic impact of travel and account for the tourism “trickle-down” effect. (Induced expenditures account
for how many industry employees support local communities by spending their wages.) The rollover and indirect jobs that are caused by travel
and tourism have significant impact. “Rollover” is a term applied to money that is spent several times over in a community because of the initial
expenditure by the tourist. Various multipliers are applied depending on who is doing the calculation, but it is not unrealistic to assume a rollover
of four times for a community, especially knowing how many local services are used to support the industry. The same is applied to indirect and
induced employment. From florists to bakers, from vacuum cleaner sales to cleaning solutions, from construction workers to architects, these are
a small sampling of those disciplines that work for the businesses that directly service the traveler. These individuals more than double the direct
employment of the travel and tourism industry (The Power of Travel 2006, TIA).

This "trickle-down" effect is further illustrated in the TIA graphic on the following page, which shows how the travel and tourism industry sectors are
just the “tip of the iceberg” when it comes to the overall impact of travel and tourism expenditures on an economy. While businesses such as
accommodations, restaurants, transportation, and other travel-related services typically comprise the direct or “first-round” of spending by visitors,
countless other industries provide services to and are supported by those travel expenditures. The direct impact of domestic travel on Oklahoma's
economy is estimated at $5.3 billion, according to TIA's Economic Impact of Travel on Oklahoma Counties; however, the larger travel and tourism
economy in Oklahoma is likely closer to $10 billion when subsequent rounds of indirect and induced spending are included.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   5
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




                                                            Travel and
                                                             Tourism
                                                             Industry                                    Hotels,
                                                            $5.3 billion                              Restaurants,
                                                                                                     Entertainment,
                                                                                                    Attractions, Sports,
                                                                                                  Other Travel Services


                                                                                                                                                                                  Travel and
                                                                                   Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting,                                                       Tourism
                                                                               Manufacturing, Healthcare, Education, Aviation/                                                    Economy
                                                                                Aerospace, Energy, Biotechnology, Logistics,
                                                                             Publishing, Utilities, Financial Services, Professional
                                                                            Services, Sanitation Services, Furnishings, Equipment                                                   Likely
                                                                              Suppliers, Security Services, Automobile Repair,                                                    Closer to
                                                                            General Retail, Real Estate, Glass Products, Concrete,                                                $10 billion
                                                                              Computers, Information & Technology, Beverage
                                                                              Suppliers, Grocery Retailers, Grocery Suppliers,
                                                                              Laundry Services, Oil & Gas Wholesalers, Other
                                                                             Wholesalers, Mining, Plastics, Chemicals, Textiles,
                                                                             Uniform Suppliers, Metal Products, Wood Products,
                                                                                 Oil & Gas Retailers, Construction Services,
                                                                              Shipping, Receiving, Government Services, Etc.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                 6
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




Tourism Industry Growth
                                                                                                                                          Summary of Growth Throughout the Past 20 Years
With a $5.3 billion direct economic impact, tourism has grown to become the
third-largest industry in Oklahoma, behind the energy and agricultural industries.                                                                                                 2006/                         Percent
                                                                                                                                                                         1987       2007                         Change
The energy industry has historically been the leading industry in Oklahoma,
contributing approximately $23 billion to Oklahoma's economy. The second-                                                                   Direct Domestic Travel
                                                                                                                                                                                          $2.8          $5.3        90%
largest industry, agribusiness, contributes more than $6 billion to the state's                                                             Expenditures ($ billions)
economy, and in more recent years, Oklahoma has capitalized on its agricultural
                                                                                                                                            Jobs generated by domestic
assets through the emergence of agritourism.                                                                                                                                           55,600        71,900         29%
                                                                                                                                            travel expenditures

Growth in Oklahoma's tourism industry is evident through economic comparisons                                                               Travel-generated Employee
                                                                                                                                                                                          $0.6          $1.6      174%
over the past twenty years as well as through significant product development                                                               Earnings ($ billions)
(visitor attractions) that has taken place throughout the state. Examples of
economic growth include the following:                                                                                                      Hotel/Motel Rooms                          37,200        51,500         39%

 •      Travel expenditures in Oklahoma totaled $2.8 billion in 1987 and $5.3 billion                                                       Note: Monetary figures have not been adjusted to constant dollars.
                                                                                                                                            Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers; OTRD; Smith Travel Research
        in 2007. This is an increase of 90 percent.

 •      Domestic travel expenditures generated 55,600 jobs in Oklahoma in 1987
        and 71,900 jobs in 2007.

 •      Travel-generated employees earned $588.6 million in 1987 and $1.6 billion in 2007, an increase of 174 percent.

 •      The number of hotel rooms has increased by nearly 39 percent, from 37,200 in 1987 to 51,500 in 2007.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                    7
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




Tourism Product Growth

Tourism product growth is highlighted in the following pages, including product developments initially suggested in the 1987 Master Plan, the
emergence of gaming products, and other notable developments added in the previous decade.

1987 Master Plan Product Suggestions

There has been significant progress throughout the past two decades that can be attributed to a number of factors. While some of this progress
was the result of unforeseen developments and organic growth, a number of developments have arisen that were initially suggested in the 1987
Master Plan. For example, the 1987 Master Plan suggested a greater focus on Native American tourism, including the development of a major
Native American cultural center, enhanced Native American attractions and packages, and additional Native American events/festivals. Native
American tourism-related attractions and events have evolved throughout the past two decades, and the development of a major Native American
cultural center is coming to fruition with the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum that is under construction in Oklahoma City. The center
and museum is intended to preserve the culture for Oklahoma's 39 tribes as well as educate visitors. Its 300-acre site will contain a museum,
parks and trails, athletic fields, an outdoor performance facility, retail, and a resort and conference center. In addition, specific fall festivals in
Tahlequah suggested in the 1987 Master Plan have grown with the Cherokee Film Festival and the Tahlequah Native American Flute Circle event.
Other Native American attractions developed include the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur slated to open in 2009, the Standing Bear Museum
at Standing Bear Park in Ponca City, the Five Civilized Tribes Museum in Muskogee, and the current renovation of the Indian City USA Cultural
Center in Anadarko.

In addition to Native American products, the development of other Western heritage attractions was encouraged in the 1987 Master Plan.
Subsequent developments included the expansion and renovation of the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City in 2000
as well as the development of the Chisholm Trail Heritage Center in Duncan in 1998.

Other proposed product development areas from the 1987 Master Plan include areas such as enhanced ranch and hunting experiences, which
have evolved to become part of the growing agritourism segment in Oklahoma. In total, more than 500 agritourism attractions, venues, and
events have been identified and are being marketed under the Oklahoma Agritourism brand. These include Western, hunting, wineries, and farm
experiences.

Likewise, the 1987 Master Plan suggested the redevelopment of historic forts. Recent fort enhancements include the new U.S. Army Field
Artillery Museum at Fort Sill in Lawton, which was completed in 2008. The museum contains exhibits highlighting the values and traditions of the




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   8
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




U.S. Army as reflected in the history of Fort Sill and Field Artillery. In addition, Fort Reno is undergoing renovations, which involves the creation of
a new visitors center, museum, and Commander's house and the restoration and stabilization of historic buildings.

Enhancement of scenic byways and roads was also suggested in the 1987 Master Plan. In 1999, the official Oklahoma Scenic Byways program
was implemented, which features seven scenic routes including Route 66 and the Talimena Drive.

Gaming Growth

In addition, a significant change to the landscape statewide is emergence of 100 gaming locations. Oklahoma's gaming industry has experienced
significant growth in recent years, particularly after certain Class III games were legalized in Oklahoma at the end of 2004. Since that time, a
number of major tribal casinos were developed, including WinStar World Casino and Riverwind Casino, which contributed to Oklahoma's strong
growth in tribal gaming revenues. In addition, despite economic slowdown, several Oklahoma casinos are under construction or undergoing
expansion, including Cherokee Casino Resort in Tulsa (being re-branded as a Hard Rock Casino), Choctaw Casino Resort in Durant, Cherokee
Casino in West Siloam Springs, and Riverwind Casino in Norman. These developments include new casinos and resort-oriented amenities such
as hotels, spas, pools, and entertainment venues. These new developments help to raise the bar in terms of quality and amenities of casinos
throughout the state as well as the appeal of casinos to tourists.

Tribal gaming revenues, which totaled $2.5 billion in 2007, increased 54 percent during the first full year following legalization (2005) compared to
only 15 percent for the U.S. average. Also, during the four-year period from 2003 to 2007, tribal gaming revenues more than tripled, positioning
Oklahoma as third in the U.S. behind California and Connecticut in 2007 for tribal gaming revenues. In terms of product inventory, Oklahoma
ranks first in the U.S. for the number of tribal casinos and second for the number of gaming machines.

Other Notable Developments Since 1998

In addition to these developments, a number of other notable attractions have been developed in just the past decade. These include the
following:

 •      BOK Center in Tulsa (2008) - This multi-purpose arena was developed as part of Tulsa's Vision 2025 plan and recently opened in August of
        2008. Designed by architects Cesar Pelli and Associates, the 19,200-seat arena is home to the Tulsa Oilers (Central Hockey League) and
        the Tulsa Talons (af2 - the Arena Football League's minor league). The facility also hosts concerts, sporting events, and other special
        events.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   9
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




 •      Oklahoma City Thunder (2008) - In July of 2008, the NBA's Seattle Supersonics relocated to Oklahoma City and were renamed the
        Oklahoma City Thunder in time for the 2008-2009 basketball season. Season tickets for the Oklahoma City Thunder sold out in September
        of 2008, and the team played its first regular-season game on October 29, 2008, attracting 19,100 attendees. In addition to serving as
        another demand generator for sports-related tourism in the state, the Thunder may enhance the state's recognition on a national level.

 •      Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium (2006) - The museum opened in Tulsa in 1998 and features exhibits displaying the aviation
        history of Tulsa and the United States. The museum added a planetarium in 2006.

 •      Oklahoma Aquarium in Jenks (2003) - The aquarium opened in 2003 in Jenks. It contains more than 200 marine and aquatic animals and
        features a shark exhibit.

 •      Oklahoma City Museum of Art (2002) - The museum opened in 2002 as part of the Don Reynolds Visual Arts Center. It features an
        expansive collection of Dale Chihuly glass as well as other permanent collections of European and American art. The museum contains
        fourteen galleries and an independent cinema. Exhibitions in 2008 included American Impressionism: Paintings from the Phillips Collection,
        Roman Arts from the Louvre, Brett Weston: Out of Shadow, The Tilghman Print Collection, Paris 1900, Mark Klett: Oklahoma City Panorama,
        and Shining Spirit: Westheimer Family Collection.

 •      Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in Norman (2000) - A new facility for the museum opened in 2000 at the University of
        Oklahoma in Norman. The museum's exhibits include a Native American gallery and collections of fossils and dinosaur skeletons.

 •      Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum (2000) - The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum opened in April of 2000 to honor the
        victims, survivors, and rescue workers of the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City.
        The $29.1 million development includes three components: the Outdoor Symbolic Memorial, the Memorial Museum, and the Memorial
        Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism.

 •      Bricktown Enhancements in Oklahoma City (1998) - Once a warehouse district in downtown Oklahoma City, Bricktown is an entertainment
        district consisting of restaurants, hotels, nightlife, entertainment venues, and retail shops. Bricktown also contains the AT&T Bricktown
        Ballpark (opened in 1998 and home to the Oklahoma RedHawks minor league baseball team), Ford Center (opened in 2002 and home to the
        NBA's Oklahoma City Thunder), Cox Business Services Convention Center, the Bricktown Canal and water taxi, Bass Pro Shops, and
        Harkins Theatre.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   10
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




These notable developments represent just a handful of product developments/improvements that have emerged throughout the state. Others
include improvements to the Oklahoma City Zoo, capital upgrades to state parks, renovation/expansion of the National Cowboy & Western
Heritage Museum, and the development of a new Phillips 66 Museum in Bartlesville and Conoco Museum in Ponca City.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   11
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Oklahoma Tourism Industry Snapshot




Tourism Industry Size Comparison

Despite the growth in the industry, when compared to other states, Oklahoma's Share of U.S. Expenditures
Oklahoma ranks 33 out of the 50 states in direct traveler expenditures
based on 2005 rankings released by TIA. Oklahoma expenditures are                              0.9%
lower than the average travel expenditures of $11.3 billion for all states
and the average of border states in the region (excluding Texas) of $7
billion.

Another comparison that helps to illustrate Oklahoma's competitive
                                                                                                               99.1%
position in the tourism industry involves the percentage of U.S. travel
expenditures and the percentage of U.S. population. Oklahoma contains                             Rest of U.S.          Oklahoma
an estimated 1.2 percent of the total population, but Oklahoma's direct
traveler expenditures account for only 0.9 percent of total traveler
expenditures in the United States. As such, it appears that Oklahoma Source: Travel Industry Association
may be generating less than its fair share of travel expenditures. Other
states in the region show mixed results in terms of garnering a fair share
of travel expenditures in relation to resident population, as presented in Regional Share of U.S. Travel Expenditures
the table on this page. However, states in the region (excluding Texas), State            % Expenditures            % Population                                                  Difference
on average, achieve a percentage of state travel expenditures Texas                                      6.6%                7.7%                                                     -1.1%
approximately equal to the percentage of state population.                     Colorado                  1.9%                1.6%                                                      0.3%
                                                                               Missouri                  1.8%                2.0%                                                     -0.2%
These relative standings indicate that despite the tremendous growth of
                                                                               Oklahoma                  0.9%                1.2%                                                     -0.3%
Oklahoma's tourism and development throughout the past 20 years,
                                                                               New Mexico                0.8%                0.6%                                                      0.2%
there is room for Oklahoma's tourism industry to continue to grow. To
                                                                               Arkansas                  0.8%                0.9%                                                     -0.1%
assist in this growth, a clear collective vision for the future of the tourism
                                                                               Kansas                    0.8%                0.9%                                                     -0.1%
industry is an essential element. This vision along with the performance
audit (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) set the stage Source: Woods & Poole, Travel Industry Association
for the strategic future direction of Oklahoma tourism.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                12
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Tourism Trends
While there has been significant progress in the state's tourism                                                   Domestic & International Traveler Expenditures in the U.S. (in billions)
industry throughout the past 20 years, it is important to understand
this growth within the context of tourism growth at the national                                                          $1,000
                                                                                                                           $900
level. Tourism trends in Oklahoma and nationally are presented in
                                                                                                                           $800
the following pages.
                                                                                                                           $700
                                                                                                                           $600
Traveler Expenditures                                                                                                      $500
                                                                                                                           $400
Total domestic and international travel expenditures in the United                                                         $300
States were $737.8 billion (projected) in 2007, of which 87 percent                                                        $200
was attributed to domestic travel and 13 percent was attributed to                                                         $100
international travel. As shown in the tables to the right, total                                                              $0
traveler expenditures declined in 2001 and 2002 but have                                                                                   '00      '01      '02     '03      '04       '05     '06   '07p '08f '09f '10f '11f
increased each year since 2002. The growth rate peaked in 2004                                                                            Domestic Traveler Expenditures                              Int'l Traveler Expenditures
at 8.3 percent and has since slowed to 6.0 percent in 2007.
According to TIA forecasts released in January of 2009, a 6.3
percent increase in tourism expenditures is expected in 2008
followed by a 1.4 percent increase in 2009, despite the U.S.                                                       Change in U.S. Travel Expenditures (Percent Change from Prior Year)
economic recession. In 2010 and 2011, TIA forecasts traveler
expenditure growth by 5.7 percent and 6.5 percent, respectively.                                                         10%

Given the uncertain economic times, actual growth in traveler                                                              8%
expenditures will likely be dependent on the overall recovery of the                                                       6%
U.S. economy.                                                                                                              4%
                                                                                                                           2%
                                                                                                                           0%
                                                                                                                          -2%
                                                                                                                          -4%
                                                                                                                          -6%
                                                                                                                                     '00      '01      '02     '03      '04       '05     '06     '07p    '08f '09f '10f '11f

                                                                                                                    Source: Travel Industry Association

This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                                 13
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Oklahoma's traveler expenditures have experienced growth in each year                                                        Growth in Oklahoma Travel Expenditures
since 2003. Growth in traveler expenditures peaked in 2005 with a rate
of 10.5 percent. According to The Economic Impact of the Oklahoma
Gaming Industry Study, Oklahoma's travel expenditures were forecast to                                                            12%
continue to grow in 2007 and 2008 at rates of 5.7 percent and 4.9                                                                 10%
percent, respectively. However, actual growth will likely depend upon
                                                                                                                                    8%
regional and national economic conditions.
                                                                                                                                    6%

                                                                                                                                    4%

                                                                                                                                    2%

                                                                                                                                    0%
                                                                                                                                   -2%

                                                                                                                                              2001         2002        2003       2004   2005   2006   2007p 2008f

                                                                                                                              Source: The Economic Impact of the Oklahoma Gaming Industry Study




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                  14
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Traveler Person-Trips

In 2007, an estimated two billion person-trips were taken in the U.S.,                                                 Market Size (U.S. Person-trips)
including approximately 1.5 billion leisure person-trips and 500
                                                                                                                                                                                1,600




                                                                                                                                                   Person-trips (in millions)
million business person-trips. The growth in person-trips since 2000                                                                                                            1,400
is attributed to growth in the leisure segment, which experienced                                                                                                               1,200
growth of nearly 14 percent from 2000 to 2007. During the same                                                                                                                  1,000
period, business person-trips experienced a decline of 12.7 percent.                                                                                                              800
Most recently, leisure trips increased 1.3 percent in 2007, while                                                                                                                 600
business trips declined 2.8 percent.                                                                                                                                              400
                                                                                                                                                                                  200
                                                                                                                                                                                    0
Business trip declines are likely due to economic downturns following
9/11 and the current economic recession.           Other social and




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              f

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              f

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              f

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              f
                                                                                                                                                                                       00

                                                                                                                                                                                              01

                                                                                                                                                                                                     02

                                                                                                                                                                                                            03

                                                                                                                                                                                                                   04

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          05

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 06

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            p
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           08

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           09

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           10

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           11
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        07
                                                                                                                                                                                     20

                                                                                                                                                                                            20

                                                                                                                                                                                                   20

                                                                                                                                                                                                          20

                                                                                                                                                                                                                 20

                                                                                                                                                                                                                        20

                                                                                                                                                                                                                               20



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         20

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         20

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         20

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         20
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      20
technological influences such as environmental conservation and use
of technology (video/web conferencing) in place of meetings may                                                                                                                                    Leisure Person-trips           Business Person-trips
have also contributed to recent declines and may impact future
growth.
                                                                                                                       Change in U.S. Person-trips
According to estimates published by TIA in January of 2009, the




                                                                                                                          Percent Change from Prior Year
decline in business travel is forecast to accelerate to 3.6 percent in                                                                                                          8%
2008, and leisure travel is forecast to decline for the first time since                                                                                                        6%
2003. As illustrated in the chart to the lower-right, both business                                                                                                             4%
travel and leisure travel are forecast to continue to decline in 2009                                                                                                           2%
before increasing in both 2010 and 2011; however, growth rates of                                                                                                               0%
leisure travel are more favorable than business travel in future years.                                                                                               -2%
                                                                                                                                                                      -4%
Despite these declines in person-trips estimated for 2008 and 2009,                                                                                                   -6%
overall travel expenditures are still expected to increase by 6.3                                                                                                     -8%
percent in 2008 and 1.4 percent in 2009, according the most recent                                                                                                                   '00    '01     '02    '03    '04    '05    '06     '07p   '08f '09f '10f '11f
TIA forecasts released in January of 2009.                                                                                                                                                        Leisure Person-trips                Business Person-trips

                                                                                                                       Source: Travel Industry Association




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                                                                15
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Gas Prices

Leisure person-trips are compared to average annual gas prices in                                                  Gas Prices and Leisure Travel
the chart to the upper-right. Historically, leisure travel did not
appear to be impacted by moderate increases in gas prices.                                                                                             1,600                                                                                                                                               $4.00
However, the significant jump in gas prices in 2008 may have                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               $3.50




                                                                                                                          Person-trips (in millions)
                                                                                                                                                       1,500




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Gas Price (per gallon)
contributed to a slowdown in leisure travel. Based on recent                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               $3.00
forecasts published by TIA, leisure person-trips are estimated to                                                                                      1,400
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           $2.50
decline 0.2 percent in 2008.
                                                                                                                                                       1,300                                                                                                                                               $2.00

According to a recent Energy Information Administration's (EIA)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            $1.50
                                                                                                                                                       1,200
forecast (published December of 2008), the average gas price for                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           $1.00
                                                                                                                                                       1,100
2008 is estimated to be $3.32 per gallon, up from an average of                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            $0.50
$2.85 in 2007. Although the average annual gas price increased in                                                                                      1,000                                                                                                                                               $0.00
2008, gas prices have declined considerably in recent months.                                                                                                      '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08
Gas prices declined from a peak of $4.05 per gallon in July of 2008
to $1.59 per gallon by the end of December of 2008, the lowest                                                                                                              Leisure Person-trips                                                 U.S. Average Annual Gas Price
price since early 2004. According to the EIA, gas prices are                                                        Source: Travel Industry Association, Energy Information Administration
forecast to remain at relatively low rates during 2009. On average,
2009 prices are forecast to be $2.09 per gallon, which is 37                                                        Historical Gas Prices per Gallon (Average Monthly Estimates)
percent lower than the average 2008 price.
                                                                                                                                          $4.50
                                                                                                                                          $4.00
                                                                                                                                          $3.50
                                                                                                                                          $3.00
                                                                                                                                          $2.50
                                                                                                                                          $2.00
                                                                                                                                          $1.50
                                                                                                                                          $1.00
                                                                                                                                          $0.50
                                                                                                                                          $0.00
                                                                                                                                                          Jul-07




                                                                                                                                                                                      Oct-07
                                                                                                                                                                                               Nov-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                        Dec-07
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Jan-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Feb-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mar-08


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     May-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Jun-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Jul-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Oct-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Nov-08
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Dec-08
                                                                                                                                                                             Sep-07




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Sep-08
                                                                                                                                                                   Aug-07




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Apr-08




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Aug-08
                                                                                                                    Source: Energy Information Administration

This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                                                                                                                 16
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Travelers by Region

The U.S. travel industry was evaluated on a regional basis to better understand the destination and origin of visitors by region. According to TIA,
10.2 percent of travelers visited the West South Central region (including Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas) as their destination, which
is less than the South Atlantic, Pacific, East North Central, and Middle Atlantic regions, but more than the Mountain, West North Central, East
South Central, and New England regions. While the West South Central Region attracted 10.2 percent of visitors, it supplied 11.3 percent of
visitors, indicating that the region supplied more travelers than it attracted. This similar pattern is also observed the Pacific, East North Central,
Middle Atlantic, and New England regions.


Share of U.S. Population & U.S. Travel by Region (2006)

          20%

          15%

          10%                                                                                                                                                                     Share of U.S. Population
                                                                                                                                                                                  Share of U.S. Travel (Origin)
            5%                                                                                                                                                                    Share of U.S. Travel (Destination)

            0%
                        South            Pacific       East North           Middle            West           Mountain            West          East South  New
                       Atlantic                         Central             Atlantic          South                              North          Central   England
                                                                                             Central*                           Central


* West South Central Region Includes Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas.
Source: Travel Industry Association




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                    17
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




International Visitors

Following a period of decline in international travel to the U.S. following                                               International Visitors to the U.S.
9/11, international arrivals have increased since 2003. According to
                                                                                                                                                                     70




                                                                                                                              International Arrivals (in millions)
TIA forecasts released in January of 2009, international arrivals are
estimated to increase from 56 million in 2007 to 65 million by 2012.                                                                                                 60

                                                                                                                                                                     50
The top origin markets for international travel to the U.S. in 2007 were
the neighboring countries of Canada (31.7 percent) and Mexico (25.6                                                                                                  40
percent). Other leading countries included the United Kingdom (8.0                                                                                                   30
percent), Japan (6.3 percent), and Germany (2.7 percent). From 2007
                                                                                                                                                                     20
to 2012, it is estimated that the share of Canadian visitors will increase,
the share of Mexican visitors will remain the same, and the share of                                                                                                 10
overseas visitors will decrease.                                                                                                                                      0




                                                                                                                                                                     20 f

                                                                                                                                                                     20 f

                                                                                                                                                                     20 f

                                                                                                                                                                     20 f
                                                                                                                                                                          f
                                                                                                                                                                        98

                                                                                                                                                                        99

                                                                                                                                                                        00

                                                                                                                                                                        01

                                                                                                                                                                        02

                                                                                                                                                                        03

                                                                                                                                                                        04

                                                                                                                                                                        05

                                                                                                                                                                        06

                                                                                                                                                                        07
                                                                                                                                                                       08

                                                                                                                                                                       09

                                                                                                                                                                       10

                                                                                                                                                                       11

                                                                                                                                                                       12
Although the U.S. is a popular destination for international travelers,




                                                                                                                                                                     19

                                                                                                                                                                     19

                                                                                                                                                                     20

                                                                                                                                                                     20

                                                                                                                                                                     20

                                                                                                                                                                     20

                                                                                                                                                                     20

                                                                                                                                                                     20

                                                                                                                                                                     20

                                                                                                                                                                     20
                                                                                                                                                                     20
Oklahoma is generally not the primary destination among these visitors.
According to a survey conducted by the International Travel Association
in 2007, only 0.2 percent of international visitors were traveling to
Oklahoma. Similarly, only 0.1 percent of overseas visitors (excludes                                                       Top Origin Markets (in thousands)
Mexico and Canada) declared Oklahoma as their primary destination                                                                                         2007                                        2012 Forecast
upon arrival (approximately 35,000 overseas visitors).                                                                     Origin of Visitor                                  Visitors   Percent   Visitors       Percent
                                                                                                                                                                              in 000's             in 000's
Given the proximity of Oklahoma to Mexico and the tendency for
                                                                                                                           Canada                                              17,800      31.7%    21,000            32.3%
Canadians to travel to southern locations in the winter months, a
                                                                                                                           Mexico                                              14,300      25.6%    16,600            25.6%
number of international visitors in Oklahoma originate from these                                                                                                         1
countries. According to the Office of Travel and Tourism Industries,                                                       Total Overseas                                      23,900      42.7%    27,400            42.1%
27,000 visitors from Mexico reported Oklahoma as their primary                                                             Total International2                                56,000     100.0%    64,900          100.0%
destination in 2007 (due to small sample sizes, Canadian visitors not
                                                                                                                           1 Overseas includes all countries except Canada & Mexico
quantified).                                                                                                               2 Int'l travelers include all countries generating visitors to the U.S. for one night or longer.

                                                                                                                           Source: Travel Industry Association




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                       18
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Air Travel Activity

Historical trends in the U.S. airline industry (based on passenger                                                     U.S. Air Travel Activity
enplanements) are presented on this page. After two years of
                                                                                                                                                          800
decline following 9/11, passenger volume has continued to increase,




                                                                                                                             Enplanements (in millions)
including growth of 3.3 percent in 2007. Although the air passenger
                                                                                                                                                          700
activity grew in 2007, recent challenges related to fuel costs have
resulted in increased ticket prices/fees and cutbacks in the number
                                                                                                                                                          600
of flights. This has contributed to a decline in passenger volume,
and as of November of 2008, passenger volume was down 3.6                                                                                                 500
percent.
                                                                                                                                                          400
Similar to the U.S. industry, Oklahoma's two largest commercial
airports (Will Rogers and Tulsa International) experienced a decline                                                                                      300
in passenger volume in the years following 9/11. In 2005 and 2006,                                                                                              '90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07
Oklahoma's growth in passenger volume outpaced the United
States. In 2007, Oklahoma's growth of 2.5 percent lagged slightly                                                     Source: Bureau of Transportation Statistics

behind the United States' growth of 3.3 percent. With the recent
difficulties facing the U.S. airline industry, Oklahoma airports                                                       Growth in Air Travel Activity
experienced a slight decrease of 0.7 percent in activity for year-to-                                                       10%
date November of 2008, compared to a loss of 3.6 percent on the                                                                       8%
national level. Oklahoma's decreased activity may have been                                                                           6%
lessened by the addition of six direct flights to commercial airports in                                                              4%
the prior year.                                                                                                                       2%
                                                                                                                              0%
                                                                                                                             -2%
                                                                                                                             -4%
                                                                                                                             -6%
                                                                                                                             -8%
                                                                                                                                                            2001     2002    2003     2004    2005     2006     2007           Nov-08

                                                                                                                                                                                    U.S.             Oklahoma

                                                                                                                      Source: Bureau of Transportation Statistics; Will Rogers International Airport; Tulsa International Airport



This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                                 19
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Hotel Supply

Since 1987, Oklahoma's hotel supply has increased from                                                       Oklahoma Hotel Supply Trend (1987 to 2009)
37,200 rooms to 51,500 rooms in 2007, an increase of nearly
40 percent. According to Smith Travel Research, Oklahoma's                                                             60,000
hotel supply grew 4.7 percent in 2008 with the addition of
approximately 2,400 net new rooms. Room supply is expected                                                             55,000

to continue to increase approximately 6.4 percent in 2009
                                                                                                                       50,000
(assuming no hotel closures), which is the strongest growth
rate in the past twenty years.              With the addition of                                                       45,000
approximately 3,500 rooms in 2009, Oklahoma is improving its
availability and quality of hotel options to visitors.                                                                 40,000

                                                                                                                       35,000
Oklahoma's 3.4 percent and 4.7 percent hotel supply growth in
2007 and 2008, respectively, outpaced the U.S. growth rates,
                                                                                                                       30,000
as illustrated in the chart to the lower-right. In the future,                                                                      '87 88 '89 '90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09f
Oklahoma's growth rate is estimated to increase to 6.4 percent
in 2009, while the U.S. growth rate declines to 2.4 percent.
                                                                                                              Hotel Room Supply Growth - U.S. & Oklahoma

                                                                                                                   7%
                                                                                                                   6%
                                                                                                                   5%
                                                                                                                   4%
                                                                                                                   3%
                                                                                                                   2%
                                                                                                                   1%
                                                                                                                   0%
                                                                                                                  -1%
                                                                                                                               2003             2004             2005             2006      2007    2008f       2009f

                                                                                                                                                                    U.S.                 Oklahoma


                                                                                                              Note: Room supply in 2008 and 2009 includes existing rooms and those under construction.
                                                                                                              Source: Smith Travel Research (December of 2008)


This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                       20
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Hotel Supply & Demand

On a regional basis, the West South Central region of the U.S. Hotel Supply & Demand - Regional Breakdown
(including Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas)
experienced 4.5 percent growth in demand at year-to-date           5%
November of 2008. This was more than any of the other eight        4%
regions in the U.S., most of which experienced declines in         3%
demand growth. The West South Central region was also the          2%




                                                                                                                Percent Change
only region to experience demand growth that outpaced supply       1%

growth.                                                            0%
                                                                                                                                 -1%
                                                                                                                                 -2%
                                                                                                                                 -3%
                                                                                                                                 -4%
                                                                                                                                 -5%
                                                                                                                                        West    West Middle      New                 East     Pacific    East     South Mountain
                                                                                                                                       South    North Atlantic England              North               South     Atlantic
                                                                                                                                       Central* Central                             Central             Central

                                                                                                                                                                           Supply             Demand

                                                                                                               * West South Central region includes Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas.
                                                                                                               Source: Smith Travel Research




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                         21
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Hotel Performance

Hotel performance is typically tracked in terms of occupancy rates                                                      Hotel Occupancy
and daily room rates. The average occupancy of Oklahoma's hotels
                                                                                                                                70%
has historically been approximately five to seven points lower than
the U.S. average. However, this gap began to close in 2006 and
2007, and Oklahoma's occupancy surpassed the U.S. average in                                                                    65%
2008.
                                                                                                                                60%
In terms of year-over-year occupancy growth, Oklahoma has
outperformed the U.S. in recent months. While the U.S. experienced
year-over-year occupancy declines of 6.0 percent, 6.6 percent, 10.7                                                             55%
percent, and 6.8 percent in September, October, November, and
December of 2008, respectively, in light of the economic downturn,                                                              50%
Oklahoma's occupancy declined only 1.5 percent, 0.3 percent, and                                                                           2001         2002         2003         2004    2005     2006    2007    2008
2.5 percent in September, October, and November, respectively.                                                                                                       U.S.                       Oklahoma
However, occupancy declined by 8.2 percent in December of 2008.

Oklahoma's average daily rate ("ADR") has historically been                                                             Hotel Average Daily Rate
significantly lower than the U.S. average, approximately 33 to 35
percent lower than the U.S. average since 2001. Lower ADRs are                                                              $120
indicative of Oklahoma's relative affordability compared to the U.S. as                                                     $110
a whole.                                                                                                                    $100

In recent months, Oklahoma's ADR has continued to grow despite                                                                $90
declines at the national level. The U.S. ADR decreased 0.5 percent                                                            $80
to $107.60 in October of 2008, which was the first year-over-year                                                             $70
decline since mid-2003, and continued to decline 2.5 percent and 3.2
                                                                                                                              $60
percent in November and December of 2008, respectively.
Meanwhile, hotels in Oklahoma continued to grow ADR with                                                                      $50
                                                                                                                                         2001        2002         2003        2004       2005    2006     2007    2008
                                                                                                                                                                    U.S.                        Oklahoma

                                                                                                                       Source: Smith Travel Research

This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                          22
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




increases of 3.2 percent, 2.9 percent, and 2.1 percent in October, November, and December, respectively.

Gaming

Oklahoma's gaming industry consists primarily of tribal casinos and to a lesser degree, pari-                                                                 Sources of Oklahoma's Total Gaming Revenues
mutuel horse race betting and lotteries. In 2007, 92 percent of Oklahoma's total gaming
revenues were from tribal casinos, and the remaining revenues were from lotteries (4
                                                                                                                                                                                          3% 1%
percent), horse track casino/card rooms (3 percent), and race/sports wagering (1 percent).                                                                                           4%

According to The Economic Impact of the Oklahoma Gaming Industry Study, Oklahoma
generated $2.5 billion in Indian gaming revenues in 2007, which was 9 percent of total Indian
gaming revenues in the United States. Oklahoma was ranked third in the U.S. behind
California (29 percent) and Connecticut (10 percent) in terms the share of tribal gaming
                                                                                                                                                                                                     92%
revenues.

The legalization of certain Class III games at the end of 2004 contributed to a spike in tribal                                                                                   Indian Gaming
gaming revenues in the following years. Oklahoma's tribal gaming revenues more than                                                                                               Lotteries
tripled from 2003 to 2007, increasing from approximately $720 million to $2.5 billion, or a                                                                                       Racetrack Casino/ Card Rooms
compound annual growth rate of 36 percent during the five-year period. Based on The                                                                                               Race/ Sports Wagering
Economic Impact of the Oklahoma Gaming Industry Study, Oklahoma's tribal gaming
revenues are forecast to continue to grow in future years and reach $3.9 billion by 2012.                                                                     Oklahoma's Share of U.S. Tribal Gaming Revenues
However, actual growth may be tied to future economic growth
                                                                                                                                                                                    9%




                                                                                                                                                                                                     91%

                                                                                                                                                                                      Rest of U.S.
                                                                                                                                                                                      Oklahoma
                                                                                                                                                              Source: The Economic Impact of the Oklahoma Gaming
                                                                                                                                                              Industry Study


This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                    23
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




As illustrated, Oklahoma's growth rates in tribal gaming revenues peaked                                                      Oklahoma's Tribal Gaming Revenues (in billions)
at 54 percent in 2005 and continued to grow at rates greater than 20
                                                                                                                                    $5.0
percent in 2006 and 2007, which is significantly higher than the average
growth rates experienced in the U.S. as a whole. Based on PwC's                                                                 Source: The Economic Impact of the Oklahoma Gaming Industry Study
                                                                                                                                  $4.0
Global Entertainment and Media Outlook, U.S. gaming revenue is
estimated to grow between 2 and 7 percent each year from 2008 to                                                                    $3.0
2012, while Oklahoma is estimated to grow by 10 percent each year from
2008 to 2012 based on The Economic Impact of the Oklahoma Gaming                                                                    $2.0
Industry Study.
                                                                                                                                    $1.0
Since 2004, a number of "major" tribal casinos were developed, including
WinStar World Casino and Riverwind Casino, which contributed to                                                                     $0.0

Oklahoma's strong growth in tribal gaming revenues. In addition, despite                                                                        '03       '04      '05        '06       '07   '08p   '09p     '10p    '11p   '12p

recent economic slowdown, several Oklahoma casinos are under
construction or undergoing expansion, including the Cherokee Casino
Resort in Tulsa (being re-branded as a Hard Rock Casino), the Choctaw                                                         Growth in U.S. and Oklahoma Tribal Gaming Revenues
Casino Resort in Durant, the Cherokee Casino in West Siloam Springs,
                                                                                                                                   60%
and Riverwind Casino in Norman.
                                                                                                                                   50%

                                                                                                                                   40%

                                                                                                                                   30%

                                                                                                                                   20%

                                                                                                                                   10%

                                                                                                                                    0%
                                                                                                                                               '04         '05       '06          '07     '08p    '09p      '10p     '11p    '12p

                                                                                                                                                                 U.S. Growth                     Oklahoma Growth

                                                                                                                             Source: The Economic Impact of the Oklahoma Gaming Industry Study, PwC Global
                                                                                                                             Entertainment and Media Outlook




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                                24
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Park Visitation

Visitation to national parks has fluctuated since 1990. Peak                                                           National Park Visitors (U.S.)
visitation occurred in 1999 with 287 million visitors. In Oklahoma,
                                                                                                                                                300
state park visitation has also varied, peaking in 2003 with nearly 14
million visitors. Attendance decreased by 7.1 percent in fiscal year                                                                            290

2007 and by 1 percent in fiscal year 2008. The most significant                                                                                 280




                                                                                                                         Visits (in millions)
attendance declines in recent years occurred at Cherokee Landing,                                                                               270
Fort Cobb, and Lake Texoma State Parks. While the closing of the                                                                                260
Lake Texoma Lodge in December of 2006 contributed to visitor                                                                                    250
declines, overall decreases in attendance were largely the result of
                                                                                                                                                240
deteriorated park conditions. However, beginning in fiscal year
                                                                                                                                                230
2008, an additional $10 million in funding was allocated to parks for
capital improvements on an annual basis, which should help to                                                                                   220
                                                                                                                                                                         '90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07
mitigate further attendance declines.

                                                                                                                       Source: National Park Service


                                                                                                                       Oklahoma State Park Visitors

                                                                                                                                                                         14.0




                                                                                                                                                Visitors (in millions)
                                                                                                                                                                         13.0

                                                                                                                                                                         12.0

                                                                                                                                                                         11.0

                                                                                                                                                                         10.0
                                                                                                                                                                                FY '02   FY '03   FY '04    FY '05   FY '06    FY '07   FY '08


                                                                                                                       Source: Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                                                    25
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Recreation Vehicles

The recreation vehicle (RV) industry, including motor homes, conventional                                                         Number of Households that Own RVs (in millions)
travel trailers, fifth-wheel travel trailers, folding camping trailers, and truck
campers, has been a growing segment of the U.S. tourism industry. In                                                                  9.0
2005, RV ownership reached 7.9 million households, an increase of 14.5                                                                8.0
percent since 2001. According to a University of Michigan study conducted                                                             7.0
in 2005, RV ownership is expected to increase to 8.5 million by 2010. The                                                             6.0
share of vehicle-owning households owning RVs has also increased from                                                                 5.0
6.8 percent in 1993 to 8.0 percent in 2005.                                                                                           4.0
                                                                                                                                      3.0
Growth in RV ownership is attributed to the aging baby boomer population                                                              2.0
and supported by increased ownership among both older and younger
                                                                                                                                      1.0
generations. As shown in the chart to the lower-right, approximately one-
                                                                                                                                      0.0
half of RV owners were age 35 to 54 in 2005. By 2010, the 55+ segment is
                                                                                                                                                1980        1984        1988        1993      1997   2001   2005   2010f
estimated to experience the largest increase in ownership due to the aging
population. RV owners are concentrated in the South (including Oklahoma)
and West regions of the United States. In 2005, 6.8 percent of Southern                                                          Households that Own RVs by Age Groups (in millions)
residents owned an RV, up from 6.3 percent in 2001.
                                                                                                                                      4.5
Although RV ownership was expected to increase, RV shipments were                                                                     4.0
down 9.5 percent in 2007 and down 22.7 percent for year-to-date August of                                                             3.5
2008. The recent decline in shipments may be attributed to the high gas                                                               3.0
prices, credit conditions, higher interest rates, falling household wealth,                                                                                                                                         2001
                                                                                                                                      2.5
slower growth in real incomes, and a weakening in consumer confidence.                                                                                                                                              2005
                                                                                                                                      2.0
However, the University of Michigan estimates that the long-term forecast is                                                                                                                                        2010f
                                                                                                                                      1.5
favorable and ownership will reach 8.5 million in 2010, as originally
                                                                                                                                      1.0
estimated in 2005.
                                                                                                                                      0.5
                                                                                                                                      0.0
                                                                                                                                                   Age 18-34                      Age 35-54          Age 55+

                                                                                                                                 Source: University of Michigan




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                       26
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




According to a 2008 survey by Campfire Canvas released by the RV                                                             Growth in U.S. and Oklahoma New RV Registrations
Industry Association, existing RV owners are making adjustments for
economic conditions, including traveling closer to home and staying                                                                 20%
                                                                                                                                    15%
longer in one place. The survey showed that 29 percent plan to travel
                                                                                                                                    10%
more in the fall/winter of 2008 than the previous year, while 56 plan to
                                                                                                                                     5%
travel the same, and 15 percent plan to travel less than the previous
                                                                                                                                     0%
year. In addition, 60 percent of RVers plan to take more mini-vacations,
                                                                                                                                    -5%
ranging from one to four days than in 2007.
                                                                                                                                  -10%
                                                                                                                                  -15%
The Oklahoma RV industry is compared to the U.S. industry based on
                                                                                                                                  -20%
new RV registrations. Growth in new registrations in Oklahoma has                                                                 -25%
outpaced the U.S. in the past several years. In 2007, new registrations                                                                         2006            2007               YTD        YTD       YTD
in Oklahoma increased 15.5 percent while new registrations in the U.S.                                                                                                            Jul-'06    Jul-'07   Jul-'08
declined 0.3 percent. Although new registrations through July of 2008                                                                                                     U.S.    Oklahoma
are down for both the U.S. and Oklahoma, Oklahoma registrations
declined 14.4 percent while the U.S. declined 21.9 percent.

In 2005, Oklahoma accounted for 1.3 percent of new RV registrations in                                                        Oklahoma's Share of New RV Registrations in the U.S.
the United States. This figure increased to 1.4 percent in 2006, 1.6                                                                                          Oklahoma's
percent in 2007, and 1.8 percent for year-to-date July of 2008. Given                                                                                               Share
that Oklahoma contains 1.2 percent of the U.S. population, it appears
                                                                                                                               2005                                                         1.3%
that RV ownership is becoming more popular among Oklahoma
                                                                                                                               2006                                                         1.4%
residents as compared to other states.
                                                                                                                               2007                                                         1.6%
According to a study conducted by the University of Texas-Pan                                                                  YTD July 2008                                                1.8%
American, Oklahoma has an opportunity to attract "Winter Texans" en                                                           Source: Statistical Surveys
route via RV from northern states and Canada to Texas for the winter
months. The most significant origins of Winter Texans are Minnesota
(16 percent), Iowa (12 percent), Canada and Illinois (each with 8
percent), and Michigan, Wisconsin, and Missouri (each with 7 percent).




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                  27
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




The study estimates that approximately 120,000 to 205,000 Winter Texans migrate to Texas for the winter months.

Convention Center Performance

Two of the largest convention centers in Oklahoma are the Cox Business Services Convention Center in Oklahoma City and the Tulsa Convention
Center, each of which contains approximately 100,000 square feet of exhibit space. In addition, the Tulsa Convention Center is undergoing
expansion of its ballroom and meeting spaces. Based on data collected by PwC in the past six years, total event volume at the centers increased
from approximately 220 events in 2002/2003 to approximately 350 events in 2007/2008. Conventions and trade shows, which generate the
greatest economic impact, more than doubled during the six year period from approximately 50 in 2002/2003 to approximately 115 in 2007/2008.
Consistent with national trends, convention center attendance declined on a per-event basis, resulting in moderate attendance growth throughout
the six-year period. Although total attendance experienced an upward trend, attendance at convention and trade shows declined between
2004/2005 and 2007/2008. This trend is similar to convention centers throughout the U.S. of similar size, which have experienced increases in
consumer show attendance and declines in convention/trade show attendance.


 Event Volume (OKC & Tulsa Convention Centers)                                                                                    Attendance (OKC & Tulsa Convention Centers)

    400                                                                                                                             1,200,000

    350
                                                                                                                                    1,000,000
    300
                                                                                                                                       800,000
    250

    200                                                                                                                                600,000

    150                                                                                                                                400,000
    100
                                                                                                                                       200,000
      50
        0                                                                                                                                        0
              2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08                                                                                          2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08

                                         Other                                                                                                                                    Other
                                         Consumer Show                                                                                                                            Consumer Show
                                         Convention / Trade Show                                                                                                                  Convention / Trade Show



This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                             28
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Tourism Trends




Potential Future Trends

The tourism trends presented earlier represent past and estimated future trends of tourism performance across various sectors. In addition to
these, it also important to recognize other broad trends that have impacted and will likely continue to impact tourism in the future. A critical trend,
requiring continual monitoring, is the faltering global economy and the resulting negative impacts on tourism. In addition, Destination Marketing
Association International (DMAI), through its 2008 Futures Study, has identified eight "super trends" affecting destination marketing organizations
in the coming years. While the study was compiled for destination marketing organizations, the trends identified in the study impact the entire
tourism industry and are important to consider in the formulation of a five-year strategic plan for Oklahoma. These trends are defined as follows:

      •      Customer Sector: “Proliferating Preferences” – The tourism industry has become increasingly diverse and segmented. Tourism
             professionals must develop targeted value packages in response to a growing range of choices in travel products and experiences.

      •      Competitor Sector: “The Battle for Attention” – The tourism industry is becoming increasingly competitive among destinations and
             among various segments in addition to competition for consumer attentions from other industries. Destinations must find ways to
             differentiate themselves and attract attention from consumers.

      •      Economic Sector: “Dodging Asteroids” – Destinations must be prepared for catastrophic contingencies such as terror incidents,
             international health pandemics, etc. and their resulting impacts on travel and tourism.
      •      Technological Sector: “Smart and Friendly Websites” – The tourism industry must keep pace with advances in website design to
             maintain visibility.
      •      Social Sector: “The Electronic Society” – Society has seen shifts from traditional communities to virtual communities. The tourism
             industry needs to embrace the virtual networking trend for marketing purposes, while proactively addressing the potential for virtual
             experiences preferred over "live" visitor experiences.
      •      Political Sector: “The Quest for Relevance” – The tourism industry is increasingly forced to prove its worth, and the relevance of
             tourism to a community often questioned.
      •      Legal Sector: “Mixed Signals from Government” – Legislation may be an advantage or disadvantage for tourism.
      •      Geophysical Sector (Place and Space): “Going Green” – There is pressure from consumers to be “seen as green.” Green destinations
             may emerge as preferred travel destinations, and cost savings should be considered.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   29
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Summary of the Oklahoma Tourism Industry




Summary of the Oklahoma Tourism Industry
The key points regarding the Oklahoma tourism industry include the following:

•     Travel and tourism is commonly perceived as non-resident visitation for leisure purposes, but it also includes non-resident business travelers
      (some of whom extend their stay to experience local attractions and events), group visitors (including meetings, conventions, training
      sessions, sports teams, organized bus tours, family reunions, etc.), day trips, in-state travelers, and transient visitors traveling through
      Oklahoma en route to their final destination. It is the spending generated from all of these types of visitors that comprises Oklahoma's tourism
      industry.

•     With a $5.3 billion direct economic impact, tourism is the third-largest industry in Oklahoma, behind the energy and agricultural industries.
      However, when subsequent rounds of indirect and induced spending are included, the travel and tourism economy in Oklahoma is likely closer
      to $10 billion.

•     Oklahoma's traveler expenditures experienced a period of growth since 2003 and have either outpaced or generally coincided with national
      growth since 2005. Despite historic growth, Oklahoma accounts for approximately 0.9 percent of the share of the United States' $700 billion
      travel industry, while it accounts for 1.2 percent of the U.S. population, indicating that Oklahoma may not be capturing its fair share of tourism
      industry expenditures. On average, states in the region, excluding Texas, achieve a percentage of travel expenditures equal to the state's
      percentage of population.

•     In comparison to national trends, Oklahoma has exceeded growth rates in certain key tourism areas. For example, Oklahoma's tribal gaming
      revenue growth has significantly outpaced the U.S. in recent years and hotel supply is increasing at a faster rate than the U.S. average.
      Oklahoma experienced only a slight decline in air activity in 2008 (likely aided by six flights added in the prior year) versus larger declines
      nationally. However, while visitation to national parks has remained relatively stable ranging from 270 to 280 million visits since 2004,
      visitation to Oklahoma's state parks has declined in recent years.

•     Eight "super trends" will likely affect destination marketing organizations in the coming years. In addition to important economic trends,
      DMAI's identified super trends of the future include proliferating preferences (customer), battle for attention (competitive), dodging asteroids
      (economic), smart and friendly websites (technological), electronic society (social), quest for relevance (political), mixed signals from
      government (legal), and going green (geophysical). While the study was compiled for destination marketing organizations, the trends




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   30
Appendix A: The Oklahoma Tourism Industry - Summary of the Oklahoma Tourism Industry




      identified in the study impact the entire tourism industry and are important to consider in the formulation of a strategic industry plan for
      Oklahoma throughout the next five years.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   31
Appendix B
Strategic Business Modeling
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling




Strategic business modeling involves the assessment of four key strategic thrusts related to tourism in Oklahoma: Tourism Assets, Marketing,
Roles & Responsibilities, and Funding.

1. Tourism Assets - Oklahoma's existing and future tourism assets, including tourism products, infrastructure, and destination characteristics,
   are evaluated to understand these factors impacting tourism demand.

      o      Tourism Products - Tourism products are attractions (including events) that generate demand for visitors across the state. Oklahoma is
             fortunate to contain hundreds of diverse attractions. In this section, an inventory of the tourism products is presented along with examples
             of tourism products by category. (Examples are presented for illustrative purposes and not intended to represent all products available for
             each category nor provide preference in terms of importance/quality of attractions in a specified category.) The state's tourism product
             base is described in terms of four key product categories:
                       Heritage/Culture - Western attractions, Native American attractions, Route 66 attractions, historic places and Main Streets,
                       music/entertainment venues, and museums

                       Nature and Recreation - State/national parks, lakes and rivers, adventure trails, wildlife attractions, campgrounds and RV parks,
                       scenic byways, and agritourism
                       Gaming - casinos and racinos

                       Events - spectator sports, participant sports, meeting and conventions, and cultural events & festivals
      o      Tourism Infrastructure - Tourism infrastructure encompasses the elements of a destination that support visitor demand. This includes
             visitor information and signage that helps to guide travelers, hotel supply to accommodate overnight visitors, and transportation access
             allowing visitors entry and travel through the state.
      o      Destination Characteristics - Destination characteristics include other factors aside from products and infrastructure that influence tourism
             demand. These include the population, size of the business community, number of colleges and universities, climate, and general
             affordability.
2. Marketing - Tourism marketing is evaluated to understand Oklahoma's existing visitor characteristics and perceptions, the national
   motivations for travel and available travel segments, and the existing efforts to attract visitors.

3. Roles & Responsibilities - Critical roles within the tourism industry along with the roles and responsibilities within Oklahoma's tourism
   industry are presented.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   33
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




4. Funding - The current funding structure for tourism assets and marketing at the state, regional, and local level is assessed, including
   comparisons to other states and funding trends.


Tourism Assets
As described, Oklahoma's tourism assets include its products,                                                             Oklahoma’s Tourism Regions
infrastructure, and destination characteristics.                                                                                                                                                  Green
                                                                                                                                                                        Red Carpet
Tourism Products

Attractions and activities are an influential factor in the decisions of all
types of travelers.           Leisure travelers, business travelers,                                                                                                                   Frontier
conventioneers, and group tour participants spend time in a                                                                                                             Great Plains                 Kiamichi
destination visiting attractions and enjoying other entertainment and
activities. Accordingly, these factors also influence the destination                                                                                                                  Arbuckle
selection of meeting planners and group tour organizers, who seek to
maximize the attendance to their events and on their tours.
                                                                                                                           Source: Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
In addition to the categories of heritage/culture, nature and recreation,
gaming, and events, tourism assets were also classified
geographically by the region of the state in which they are located. As
illustrated in the map, Oklahoma is divided into six regions, or "countries."
        •      Frontier Country: Central Oklahoma including Oklahoma City, Norman, Edmond, and Stillwater.
        •      Green Country: Northeastern Oklahoma including Tulsa, Bartlesville, Muskogee, and Tahlequah.
        •      Red Carpet Country: Northwestern Oklahoma including Alva, Enid, Guymon, and Ponca City.
        •      Great Plains Country: Southwestern Oklahoma including Lawton/Fort Sill, Duncan, Elk City, and Weatherford.

        •      Arbuckle Country: South-central Oklahoma including Ardmore, Durant, Pauls Valley, and Tishomingo.
        •      Kiamichi Country: Southeast Oklahoma including Broken Bow, Idabel, McAlester, and Talihina.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                             34
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Heritage/Cultural Assets
Oklahoma's heritage and cultural assets include Western attractions, Native American attractions, Route 66 attractions, historic places and Main
Streets, music/entertainment venues, and museums. This inventory of heritage and cultural assets presented in the following pages is
considerable and is indicative of the importance of heritage and cultural attractions to Oklahoma's tourism product base.


Western Heritage
Western heritage encompasses a wide variety of attractions, ranging from historic trails to Western museums, all of which exemplify the origin and
historical significance of Oklahoma. It is these attractions that enable visitors to experience the Western culture and learn about the events such
as the Indian relocation and the land run, which have helped shape Oklahoma into the state it is today. Since Western heritage covers such a
broad range of visitor experiences, an inventory of all experiences is a challenge. However, examples of notable Western attractions are
described below, followed by additional detail on Native American attractions.

      •      National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum - The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, located in Oklahoma City, preserves
             and exhibits a collection of more than 28,000 Western and American Indian art works and artifacts in a 200,000 square-foot display area.
             In addition, a 14,000 square-foot replica of a Western prairie town known as Prosperity Junction is housed within the facility. The museum
             was established in 1955 and received full accreditation from the American Association of Museums in 2000. This museum attracts
             approximately 200,000 visitors each year.

      •      Oklahoma National Stockyards - Founded October 3, 1910 as a primary source for meat processing and packing, the Stockyards now is
             home to more than 70 businesses specializing in Western wear, farm and ranch needs, fine dining, and entertainment. This historic
             district is part of the Main Street USA program.

      •      Chisholm Trail - The Chisholm Trail was used in the late 19th century to drive cattle from ranches in Texas to railways in Kansas. The
             Chisholm Trail Heritage Center, located in Duncan, Oklahoma, is a museum dedicated to the history of the Chisholm Trail. The facility,
             which opened in 1998 and was awarded the 2003 Rosebud Award for outstanding tourist attraction, includes the largest bronze sculpture
             in Oklahoma, a monumental statue of a cattle drive, and an adjacent museum and visitor center. The Chisholm Trail Museum, located on
             the trail in Kingfisher, portrays the history of the trail and has Native American and pioneer artifacts.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   35
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




      •      Woolaroc Museum and Wildlife Preserve - Woolaroc was established in 1925 as a ranch for oilman Frank Phillips in the Osage Hills of
             northeastern Oklahoma. Today, the 3,600-acre site contains a museum displaying Western and Native American art and artifacts, as well
             as a wildlife preserve.

      •      Pioneer Woman Museum - The Pioneer Woman Museum, located in Ponca City, showcases women who have influenced Oklahoma's
             history and culture. Created in 1958, the museum contains exhibits, educational activities, and artifacts related to the daily life of
             Oklahoma's Cherokee Strip homesteaders. Located outside the museum is a 30-foot bronze statue that was unveiled in 1930 as a
             dedication to all pioneer women in the United States.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   36
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Native American Attractions
With 39 Native American tribes, Oklahoma has the second largest Native American Native American Tribes
population in the nation. As these tribes have strong historical roots in Oklahoma, Oklahoma                                                                                                             American
is often associated with the Native American culture. Consequently, many tourists visit the Country                                                                                                  Indian Tribes
more than 60 Native American-related attractions (including museums, cultural centers, etc.) Frontier                                                                                                          10
in Oklahoma to learn and experience Native American history, heritage, and culture. Green                                                                                                                      16
Examples of Native American attractions include:                                             Red Carpet                                                                                                         4
                                                                                                                                                            Great Plains                                        6
      •      American Indian Cultural Center and Museum - Currently under construction in                                                                   Arbuckle                                            2
             Oklahoma City, it is intended to preserve the culture for Oklahoma's 39 tribes and                                                             Kiamichi                                            1
             educate visitors. This 300-acre site is comprised of four components including the                                                             Total                                              39
             cultural center and museum, landscaped parks and trails, commercially operated                                                                 Source: Spirits of the Land Foundation
             business enterprises (arts and crafts marketplace and resort hotel and conference
             center), and visitor center.
                                                                                                      Native American-related Attractions
             The cultural center and museum will have permanent exhibits which exemplify the                                          American Indian
                                                                                                      Country                             Attractions
             history, values, and culture of Oklahoma's tribal community. The museum will
             feature artifacts from the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Frontier                                                12
             collection, a family discovery center, film and performance venues, a gathering and Green                                             16
             performance forum, an orientation theater, an oral history theater, and a café.          Red Carpet                                    4
                                                                                                      Great Plains                                 18
             The landscaped park and trail system will enable visitors to encounter the four Arbuckle                                               8
             fundamental elements of the universe: earth, wind, water, and fire. It includes the
                                                                                                      Kiamichi                                      4
             Promontory Walk, which begins in the "Garden of Origins" and travels to the highest
             point, overlooking the Cultural Center, athletic fields, the performance circle (outdoor Total                                        62
             performance venue), and the Oklahoma River.                                              Source: 500 Nations Website


             The commercially-operated business enterprises will include an arts and crafts marketplace, which will showcase the artwork of
             contemporary Oklahoma artists, and a resort hotel and conference center. Lastly, the visitor center will serve as a centralized information
             facility and will connect visitors with other destinations across the state.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                      37
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




      •      Chickasaw Cultural Center - Chickasaw Nation is creating a 96,000 square-foot cultural center located on a 110-acre site in Sulphur. The
             center is planned to include an exhibit center, the Holisso Center, a large theater, an administration building, an amphitheater, a sky
             terrace, and traditional village. The Exhibit Center and Traditional Village will house exhibits, demonstrations, and activities, which will
             showcase the Chickasaw culture and heritage. In addition, the Exhibit Center will include an 18th century Council House, which will serve
             as an orientation theater.

      •      The Cherokee Heritage Center - Located in Tahlequah, the center consists of a national museum, a reconstructed ancient village, and a
             1,800-seat amphitheater. The museum, known for its Trail of Tears exhibition, was created in 1974. The ancient village has stickball,
             basket weaving, flint knapping, dugout canoes, and Cherokee storytelling.

      •      The Red Earth Museum - Located in Oklahoma City, the museum contains a display of Native American pottery, paintings, carvings, and
             artifacts. The museum has an annual attendance of nearly 300,000. In addition, the museum is accompanied by the Red Earth Festival,
             which attracts 1,200 American Indians artists and dancers to the area.

      •      The Five Civilized Tribes Museum - Located in Muskogee, the museum commemorates the art, history, and culture of the Cherokee,
             Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek), and Seminole tribes. The Union Indian Agency building, where the museum is located, was
             built in 1875 by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, but it did not become a museum until 1966.

      •      The Standing Bear Museum and Education Center - It is located on the 63-acre Standing Bear Park in Ponca City. The museum features
             tribal exhibits and artwork. Outside the museum is a 22-foot bronze statue of Ponca Chief Standing Bear.

      •      Indian City USA Cultural Center - Located in Anadarko, it was purchased by the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma in 2006. The tribe closed the
             center, which originally opened in 1955, and is currently performing numerous renovations. The center plans to re-open in the spring of
             2009 with a museum, gift shop, tribal villages, and a ceremonial dance ground.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   38
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Historic Route 66 Attractions
                                                                                                          Route 66 Map
Oklahoma contains the second longest segment of a historic
U.S. Highway, Route 66, with approximately 432 miles
running west to northeast across the state. Approximately
375 miles of the former Route 66, which was
decommissioned in 1985, remain in service as part of the
state's present day highway system (more than any other
state).

Oklahoma contains 230 attractions along Route 66, nearly
half of which are located in Green Country. Notable
attractions along the route include: POPS (Arcadia) the
Round Barn (Arcadia), the Blue Whale (Catoosa), the
Coleman Theatre (Miami), the Warehouse Market (Tulsa),
Golden Driller (Tulsa), the Meramac Caverns Barn (Luther),
the Milk Bottle Building (Oklahoma City), Totem Pole Park
(Foyil), Rock Café (Stroud), the Oklahoma Route 66
Museum (Clinton), and the National Route 66 Museum (Elk
City).
                                                                                                         Source: Microsoft MapPoint

Newer route attractions also include:                                                                                                                          Route 66 Attractions
                                                                                                                                                                                                         Route 66
•     Chandler Interpretive Center (2007) - Located on Route 66 halfway between Tulsa and                                                                       Country                                Attractions
      Oklahoma City is the Chandler Interpretive Center. The center, which opened in 2007 in
                                                                                                                                                                Frontier                                       81
      the old Chandler Armory Building, enables visitors to experience "The Mother Road"
      through a video, a "virtual hotel room," old billboards, and other unique items.                                                                          Green                                         101
                                                                                                                                                                Red Carpet                                      0
•     Memorial Bridge and Redevelopment of Avery Centennial Plaza (2008) - The Tulsa County                                                                     Great Plains                                   48
      Vision 2025 project has set aside $15 million for Route 66 projects. The refurbishment of                                                                 Arbuckle                                        0
      the Cyrus Avery Centennial Plaza and Memorial Bridge, which was dedicated in August of                                                                    Kiamichi                                        0
      2008, was the first major project completed. The completion of the Plaza was also the first                                                               Total                                         230
                                                                                                                                                               Source: Oklahoma Route 66 Association



This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                             39
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




      stage of the Route 66 Xperience, which, upon completion, will include interactive exhibits, office/meeting space, a life-size sculpture of Cyrus
      Avery, and a flag display.

Historic Places & Main Streets

Historic Places
A historic place is a site, building, or object that has had a significant impact on American                                                           Number of Registered Historic Places
history. Visitors from around the country travel to these unique attractions for both the                                                                                                                    Historic
physical presence and the underlying story. Oklahoma contains more than 1,000 historic                                                                   Country                                              Places
places recognized through the National Register of Historic Places.                                                                                      Frontier                                                  211
                                                                                                                                                         Green                                                     315
In addition to the official designated historic places, some cities contain architectural                                                                Red Carpet                                                176
features enjoyed by visitors, including Price Tower (Bartlesville), Oklahoma City National
                                                                                                                                                         Great Plains                                              137
Memorial (Oklahoma City), art deco architecture in Tulsa, and the Victorian architecture
                                                                                                                                                         Arbuckle                                                   67
in downtown Guthrie.
                                                                                                                                                         Kiamichi                                                  117
The National Trust for Historic Preservation has also named Guthrie and Bartlesville as                                                                  Total                                                  1,023
"Distinctive Destinations." On an annual basis since 2000, the National Trust selects 12                                                                Source: National Register of Historic Places
vacation destinations that offer visitors authentic experiences. These destinations exhibit
dynamic downtowns, cultural diversity, attractive architecture, cultural landscapes, and                                                                 Number of Main Street Attractions
strong commitment for historic preservation and revitalization. Guthrie was named in
                                                                                                                                                                                                         Main Street
2004, followed by Bartlesville in 2006.
                                                                                                                                                         Country                                         Attractions
Main Streets                                                                                                                                             Frontier                                                    8
Through the Oklahoma Main Street Center (a statewide agency that supports historic                                                                       Green                                                      10
preservation and downtown revitalization), 43 communities in the state are currently                                                                     Red Carpet                                                  9
nationally accredited for meeting the standards of performance for their respective local                                                                Great Plains                                                8
Main Street programs. In addition, the following communities have been honored by the                                                                    Arbuckle                                                    6
National Main Street Center as Great American Main Street Award recipients: Cordell                                                                      Kiamichi                                                    2
(1999), Newkirk (2000), Enid (2001), Okmulgee (2002), and El Reno (2006).                                                                                Total                                                      43
                                                                                                                                                         Source: Oklahoma Main Street Center; National Main Street Ctr.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                      40
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Music and Entertainment Venues

Oklahoma is home to a number of current and past music stars covering a wide                                                              Performing Arts Venues (500+ capacity)
range of musical styles, including country, jazz, opera, and rock & roll.
                                                                                                                                           Name                                   Capacity     City
Oklahoma's rich music heritage is recognized by the Oklahoma Music Hall of
Fame, which is planning an expansion that will further build tourism around                                                                Civic Center Music Hall                   2,481     Oklahoma City
music. In addition, Oklahoma City University (OCU), recognized as a leading                                                                Chapman Music Hall                        2,365     Tulsa
music and performing arts program in the U.S., opened the $38.5 million Bass
                                                                                                                                           Discoveryland                             2,000     Tulsa
Music Center in 2006.
                                                                                                                                           McMahon Memorial Aud.                     1,522     Lawton
Oklahoma's music-related assets include a number of performing arts centers,                                                               Kirkpatrick Auditorium (OCU)              1,100     Oklahoma City
the largest of which is the 2,481-seat Thelma Gaylord Performing Arts Center in                                                            Pollard Theatre                            800      Guthrie
Oklahoma City's Civic Center Music Hall. The theater can host a wide variety of                                                            Oklahoma Opry                              600      Oklahoma City
productions including Broadway shows, dance, theater, opera, meetings, and                                                                 Lyric Theatre                              500      Oklahoma City
music concerts.
                                                                                                                                          Source: Oklahoma Arts Council; Facility Management

Other performing arts venues include the 2,365-seat Chapman Music Hall at the
Tulsa Performing Arts Center. The Center is rented to touring shows and local
organizations that put on productions. Discoveryland is a 2,000-seat outdoor performance theater in Tulsa that presents the OKLAHOMA! Musical
production each summer. The 1,522-seat McMahon Memorial Auditorium, located in Lawton, was dedicated to the community for the
advancement of music, art, and other cultural activities and hosts performances ranging from dance studio productions to touring shows. The
1,100-seat Kirkpatrick Auditorium at OCU hosts a variety of theater and music productions, including main stage productions of OCU's Opera and
Music Theater Company. The newest performing arts venue is the 300-seat Kivisto Performance Hall (Studio K), which opened in April 2008 for
the Tulsa Ballet.

In addition to Oklahoma City University's music program, the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) also has a music program and has partnered
with the Academy of Contemporary Music (ACM) of London to create ACM at UCO beginning in the fall of 2009, located in the Bricktown district of
Oklahoma City. This new program will offer programs in music performance, music production, music business, sound engineering and recording
and will allow students to learn from working musicians and industry professionals. The University also has the UCO Jazz Lab in Edmond, which
is home to the jazz studies program and provides students the opportunity to learn and perform in a jazz club setting.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                           41
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




While performing arts centers are ideal for symphonies, musicals, operas and                                                            Entertainment Venues (5,000+ capacity)
smaller concerts, arenas and entertainment venues are required for larger
                                                                                                                                         Facility                                 Capacity      City
concerts. As shown in the table to the upper-right, arenas that host sporting
events are also used to host concerts. The new BOK Center hosts concerts                                                                 BOK Center                                 18,000      Tulsa
and other entertainment events in addition to scheduled games of their                                                                   Ford Center                                17,400      Oklahoma City
permanent sports teams (Tulsa Oilers and Tulsa Talons). Similarly, the Ford                                                              Cox CC Arena                               15,600      Oklahoma City
Center in Oklahoma City hosts concerts and other entertainment events in                                                                 Gallagher-Iba Arena                        13,600      Stillwater
addition to scheduled games of the Oklahoma City Thunder, Oklahoma City                                                                  Lloyd Noble Center                         12,000      Norman
Blazers, and Oklahoma City Yard Dawgz. Entertainment events at the Ford                                                                  Mabee Center                               11,300      Tulsa
Center will also benefit from upgrades as part of a $121.6 million renovation,                                                           Oklahoma State Fair Arena                  11,000      Oklahoma City
including new upscale restaurants and clubs and additional suites and                                                                    Chisholm Trail Coliseum                     8,000      Enid
concessions. Large outdoor entertainment venues include the Pavilion at the                                                              Lazy E Arena                                7,200      Guthrie
Tulsa State Fair and the Oklahoma City Zoo Amphitheatre.                                                                                 Arena at the Tulsa CC                       7,100      Tulsa
                                                                                                                                         Pavilion at Tulsa State Fair.               6,300      Tulsa
Several casinos also offer entertainment venues such as the WinStar World
                                                                                                                                         Oklahoma City Zoo Amp.                      6,000      Oklahoma City
Casino, Riverwind Casino, Choctaw Casino Resort, and Firelake Grand Casino.
The Cherokee Casino in Tulsa is also developing a 3,000-seat entertainment                                                              Source: Facility management
venue as part of its expansion project, scheduled to open in 2009.
Entertainment venues at casinos generally have capacities less than 5,000, but                                                          Entertainment Venues at Casinos
they often feature performers such as Willie Nelson, Tony Bennett, Bonnie Rait,
Foreigner, and others on a weekly basis.                                                                                                 Facility                                 Capacity      City

                                                                                                                                         Choctaw Casino Resort                       5,000      Durant
The Bricktown district of Oklahoma City has also become an entertainment                                                                 Cherokee Casino
                                                                                                                                                         1
                                                                                                                                                                                     3,000      Tulsa
district containing entertainment venues, sports facilities, restaurants, nightlife,                                                     Firelake Grand Casino                       1,700      Shawnee
and shopping. Entertainment venues include the Ford Center, Coco-Cola
                                                                                                                                         Riverwind Casino                            1,500      Norman
Events Center, Bricktown Live, Bricktown Ballroom, and the Santa Fe Train
                                                                                                                                         WinStar World Casino                        1,200      Thackerville
Depot. As mentioned previously, Bricktown will also be home to UCO's
Academy of Contemporary Music.                                                                                                          1 Entertainment venue scheduled to open as part of facility expansion
                                                                                                                                          project in 2009.
                                                                                                                                        Source: Facility management




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                 42
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Museums
Oklahoma contains more than 500 museums, which cover a wide                                                                Number of Museums by Type
variety of themes. However, nearly 70 percent largely focus on history                                                                            - - - - - - - - - TYPE OF MUSEUM - - - - - - - - -
and culture. As presented in the table, 362 museums are historical, 50                                                      Country                  History          Arts   Science    Other          Total
are related to the arts, and 42 are science museums. Several of
                                                                                                                            Frontier                      77                27    8         36         148
Oklahoma's notable museums include:
                                                                                                                            Green                        115                12    18        10         155
      •      Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum - The Oklahoma                                                        Red Carpet                   47                 5      8        11         71
             City National Memorial & Museum opened in April of 2000 to                                                     Great Plains                 60                 3      2         9         74
             honor the victims, survivors, and rescue workers of the April                                                  Arbuckle                      28                 3     4         7          42
             19, 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in                                                   Kiamichi                      35                 0     2         3          40
             downtown Oklahoma City. The $29.1 million development                                                          Total                        362                50    42        76         530
             includes three components: the Outdoor Symbolic Memorial,
                                                                                                                            Source: Oklahoma Museums Association
             the Memorial Museum, and the Memorial Institute for the
             Prevention of Terrorism. It attracts approximately 500,000
             visitors each year.

      •      Gilcrease Museum - The Gilcrease Museum, located in Tulsa, has focused on Western American art since its inception in 1949 and
             contains the world's largest collection of arts and artifacts from the American West. Native American artifacts, historical documents, and
             maps can also be observed at the museum.

      •      Philbrook Museum of Art - Tulsa's Philbrook Museum of Art was originally a villa created for the Phillips family in 1927. Today, the 72-
             room mansion and the surrounding 23 acres of gardens house art from around the world.

      •      Price Tower Arts Center - The Price Tower Arts Center, located in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, is the only Frank Lloyd Wright-designed
             skyscraper to be developed in the world. The 19-story tower opened in February of 1956 and was named a National Historic Landmark by
             the U.S. Secretary of Interior in 2007. The building houses art, architecture and design collections and exhibitions, a boutique hotel,
             dining, and retail. Attendance for Price Tower is approximately 75,000 per year.

      •      Oklahoma City Museum of Art - The Oklahoma City Museum of Art, located in downtown Oklahoma City, is home to the most
             comprehensive collection of Dale Chihuly Glass in the world, in addition to an extensive collection of American and European art. The




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                43
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




             museum contains fourteen galleries and an independent cinema. Exhibitions in 2008 included American Impressionism: Paintings from
             the Phillips Collection, Roman Arts from the Louvre, Brett Weston: Out of Shadow, The Tilghman Print Collection, Paris 1900, Mark Klett
             Oklahoma City Panorama, and Shining Spirit: Westheimer Family Collection.

      •      Oklahoma History Center - The Oklahoma History Center, located in Oklahoma City, includes an 18-acre site with a 215,000 square-foot
             learning center, which allows visitors to explore Oklahoma’s history of geology, transportation, commerce, culture, aviation, and heritage.
             Outside the museum is the Red River Valley exhibit and an outdoor oil field exhibit.

      •      Sam Noble Museum of Natural History - The Sam Noble Museum of Natural History, located at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, is a
             198,000 square-foot facility with five galleries which feature more than 50,000 square feet of exhibit space. The museum includes exhibits
             on ancient life, natural wonders, the people of Oklahoma, world cultures, a Discovery Room, and other special exhibitions.

      •      Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium - The Tulsa Air & Space Museum & Planetarium opened in Tulsa in 1998 and added a
             planetarium in 2006. The 19,000 square-foot museum features exhibits displaying the aviation history of Tulsa and the United States.
             There are numerous aircrafts on display in addition to other interactive and hands-on exhibits. The planetarium, created as part of the
             Tulsa County Vision 2025 Project, offers many educational shows for both children and adults.

      •      Science Museum (formerly known as the Omniplex) - The Science Museum, located in Oklahoma City, features interactive exhibits, a
             planetarium, a dome theater, galleries, and gardens. Exhibits include Destination Space, GadgetTrees, Explorazone, Tinkering Garage,
             Aviation, Trains, Shipwreck, a gymnastics hall of fame, and an area for kids to play.

      •      Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art - Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, located at the University of Oklahoma, is home to what is considered to be
             "the single most important collection of French Impression ever given to a public university." The museum also features American, Native
             American, Asian, European, and Contemporary art in addition to a collection of photography.

      •      Jasmine Moran Children's Museum - Jasmine Moran Children's Museum, located in Seminole, is a hands-on, award-winning children’s
             museum. It includes an imaginary town, healthcare and science exhibits, and an outside play area.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   44
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Oklahoma also offers a number of unique museums such as the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art, National
Softball Hall of Fame, Oklahoma Frontier Drug Store Museum, Toy & Action Figure Museum, National Four-String Banjo Museum, National
Lighter Museum, and the National Museum of Horse Shoeing Tools and Hall of Honor.

In addition to the variety of art museums throughout the state, Oklahoma City is also home to the historic Paseo Arts District. This district contains
17 galleries in walking distance of each other and is home to more than 60 artists. The district also includes restaurants, retail shops, and other
businesses. The Paseo Arts Festival, held over Memorial Day weekend, features 75 artists and includes musicians and entertainers. The 2009
festival will be the 32nd annual.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   45
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Nature and Recreation Assets

Oklahoma has a naturally diverse and rich landscape with 11 eco-regions across the state. Such diversity allows Oklahoma to offer a range of
outdoor experiences for visitors through state/national parks, lakes and rivers, adventure trails, campgrounds, wildlife attractions, scenic byways,
and agritourism attractions. Such a multitude of nature and recreation tourism products is indicative of the importance of these natural elements to
the tourism product base.

Eco-Regions                                                                                                      Eco-Regions Map
According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Oklahoma is
one of only four states to contain 10 or more "eco-regions,"
which are geographic areas that have a distinct terrain. As
illustrated in the map, Oklahoma's eleven eco-regions include:

      1. Western High Plains
      2. Southwestern Tablelands
      3. Central Great Plains
      4. Tallgrass Prairie
      5. Crosstimbers
      6. Caves & Prairies
                                                                                                                 Source: Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
      7. Ozark Highlands
      8. Ozark Forest
      9. Hardwood Forest
      10. Ouachita Mountains
      11. Cypress Swamps & Forest




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   46
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Generally, the western regions have higher elevations and contain much of the state's cropland, while the eastern regions contain more irregular
terrain and heavily forested areas. The Crosstimbers eco-region is a transition area between the once prairie regions to the west and forested low
mountains to the east.

State Parks

Oklahoma contains 50 state parks, many of which are concentrated in the eastern region of the state. In total, these parks cover 62,000 acres,
each ranging in size from 15 acres to more than 12,000 acres. Six state parks contain lodges, and an additional 17 parks contain cabins. Twelve
of the parks containing lodges or cabins also offer small meeting facilities used for family reunions, religious groups, and corporate groups.

State parks provide visitors recreation and relaxation in a variety of settings and, given the state's diverse eco-regions, offer a wide range of
activities. As summarized below, 47 parks offer opportunities for camping, 35 parks offer boating, 27 parks offer fishing, and 10 parks contain golf
courses. Also, 33 parks contain hiking trails, 15 contain biking trails, eight contain equestrian trails, nine contain volleyball courts, and five parks
contain softball/baseball fields. In addition to the activities summarized in the table, certain state parks offer more unique activities including ATV
trails, rock climbing, rappelling, waterskiing, scuba diving, dune buggies, and cave exploring.

Oklahoma's largest park is Lake Murray State Park, located near the city of Ardmore in southern Oklahoma. The park surrounds the 5,728-acre
Lake Murray and features eight camping areas with 450 campsites, nine RV campgrounds with 300 RV sites, a 50-room inn, and 56 cottages.
Lake Murray State Park draws more than two million visitors annually.


Activities at Oklahoma's 50 State Parks
                          Equestrian                Biking               Hiking                                     Softball            Volleyball                                                      Total
Country                     Trails                  Trails               Trails                  Golf                Fields              Courts                Boating            Fishing   Camping   Activities

Frontier                           0                    1                    1                      0                    0                     0                    1                1         1         5
Green                              2                    6                    14                     3                    3                     4                    19              12        22         85
Red Carpet                         2                    1                    6                      1                    0                     3                    2               2         7          24
Great Plains                       1                    1                    1                      1                    0                     1                    3                3         4         15
Arbuckle                           1                    1                    3                      2                    1                     0                    3               3         4          18
Kiamichi                           2                    5                    8                      3                    1                     1                    7               6         9          42
Total                              8                   15                    33                    10                    5                     9                    35              27        47         189
Source: Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                47
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




National Parks & Areas                                                                                             National Parks & Areas Map

In addition to state parks, there are several national
parks/designated areas throughout the state offering visitors nature
and recreation experiences. These include the following:

      •      Ouachita National Forest - The Ouachita National Forest,
             located in southeastern Oklahoma, is the only national forest
             in Oklahoma. Approximately 352,000 acres of the total 1.8
             million acres of this forest is located in the state, while the
             remainder is in Arkansas. The Winding Stair Mountain
             National Recreation Area is located in the Ouachita National
             Forest and includes the Beech Creek Scenic & Botanical
             Area, Billy Creek Campground, Black Fork Mountain
             Wilderness, Cedar Lake Recreation Area, Indian Nations
             Scenic Area & Wildlife Area, Kerr Nature Center, Robert S.                                             Source: Microsoft MapPoint

             Kerr Botanic Area, Upper Kiamichi River Wilderness, and
             Winding Stair Campground at Emerald Vista.

      •      Chickasaw National Recreation Area - This 10,000-acre area, located in south central Oklahoma, has the unique attributes of both the
             eastern forest and the western prairies areas of Oklahoma and has rolling hills dissected by streams, lakes, springs, and forested areas.
             Activities at the recreation area include swimming, boating, fishing, hiking, hunting, and camping.

      •      Black Kettle National Grassland - West central Oklahoma is home to more than 30,000 acres of the Black Kettle National Grassland. The
             remaining nearly 600 acres of grassland is located in Texas. This mixed grass prairie has five developed recreation areas, three of which
             are in Oklahoma, which offer visitors the opportunity to camp, picnic, fish, hike, and view wildlife.

Oklahoma is also the home to nine nationally designated wildlife refuge areas, which are described further in the Wildlife Attractions section.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   48
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Lakes & Rivers
Oklahoma contains 78,500 miles of rivers and streams, 11,600 miles of                                                                Number of Lakes
shoreline, and more man-made lakes than any other state. With 127 lakes
                                                                                                                                     Country                                                                   Lakes
and six rivers, Oklahoma has many water recreation activities for residents
and visitors to enjoy, including boating, fishing, kayaking, tubing, and                                                             Frontier                                                                     29
waterskiing.                                                                                                                         Green                                                                        35
                                                                                                                                     Red Carpet                                                                   11
Lake Eufaula, which has 600 miles of shoreline and 102,200 surface acres,                                                            Great Plains                                                                 23
is the largest lake in Oklahoma and the 15th largest lake in the United States.                                                      Arbuckle                                                                     14
Lake Eufaula is also contained in one of Oklahoma's state parks.                                                                     Kiamichi                                                                     15

The Arkansas River, more commonly known in Oklahoma as the Canadian                                                                  Total                                                                       127
River, flows from north central Oklahoma to eastern Oklahoma. A seven-                                                               Source: Oklahoma Guide to RV Parks, Lakes & Campgrounds
mile portion of the river, which runs through Bricktown, was renamed the
Oklahoma River in 2004. This popular river hosted the USA Canoe/Kayak
Sprint Olympic Trials, which more than 50,000 people gathered to watch, and                                                          Rivers
the American Collegiate Rowing Championship this past year. Individuals
                                                                                                                                     River                                        Location
can travel along the Oklahoma River from Regatta Park to the Meridian
Landing via a water taxi, which was expanded into a river cruise.                                                                    Arkansas River                               North Central to Eastern Oklahoma
                                                                                                                                     Blue River                                   South Central Oklahoma
In addition, in Tulsa, the Arkansas River Corridor Master Plan was created as                                                        Glover River                                 Southeastern Oklahoma
a part of Vision 2025, to improve the environmental quality of its rivers and                                                        Illinois River                               Eastern Oklahoma
lakes, spark economic development, and increase social well-being.                                                                   Lower Mountain Fork River                    Southeastern Oklahoma
                                                                                                                                     Upper Mountain Fork River                    Southeastern Oklahoma
                                                                                                                                     Total Rivers                                 6
                                                                                                                                     Source: OutdoorsOK.com




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                 49
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Adventure Trails
Oklahoma offers numerous outdoor activities, which are accommodated on adventure trails, including 4x4 trails, equestrian trails, hiking/nature
trails, motorcycle/ATV trails, mountain biking trails, and urban trails. Many of Oklahoma's adventure trails are located within state parks. Lake
Murray State Park, the oldest and largest state park in Oklahoma, offers mountain biking trails, while Roman Nose State Park, Little Sahara State
Park, and Arrowhead State Park also contain adventure trails.

In urban areas, Oklahoma City is the home to Hefner Trail. This nine-mile paved trail circles around Lake Hefner and offers playgrounds, ball
fields, a golf course, sailing, fishing, and docks. The trail underwent improvements in 2008. Tulsa also has an intricate network of trails which was
created by the Indian National Council of Governments (INCOG). Every five years, these trails, which are commonly used by bikers and runners,
are evaluated by INCOG who creates a Regional Transportation Plan. This plan discusses what improvements will be done to the trails in the
next 25 years.


Number of Adventure Trails by Type
                                                                                                       Hiking/                 Motorcycle/                  Mountain
Country                                             4x4                 Equestrian                     Nature                     ATV                        Biking               Urban   Total

Frontier                                              0                         5                           1                           0                          4                7      17
Green                                                 3                         0                           3                           2                          3                5      16
Red Carpet                                            2                         0                           7                           3                          1                0      13
Great Plains                                          0                         0                           5                           0                          1                0       6
Arbuckle                                              0                         1                           5                           1                          1                0       8
Kiamichi                                              1                         2                           5                           1                          0                0       9
Total                                                 6                         8                          26                           7                         10               12      69
Source: Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                   50
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Cabins, Campgrounds & RV Parks
                                                                                                                                                              Number of Campgrounds & RV Parks
Campgrounds & RV Parks
                                                                                                                                                                                            Campgrounds
                                                                                                                                                               Country                         & RV Parks
Visitors from around the state and country travel to stay overnight at one of the 280
campgrounds and RV parks that Oklahoma has to offer. Many of these campgrounds and                                                                              Frontier                              35
RV parks offer another outlet for travelers seeking nature experiences. Green Country,                                                                          Green                                102
which is home to more than half of Oklahoma's state parks, also contains nearly 40 percent                                                                      Red Carpet                            34
of all campgrounds and RV parks in the state.                                                                                                                   Great Plains                          29
                                                                                                                                                                Arbuckle                              39
Cabins & Lodges
                                                                                                                                                                Kiamichi                              41
In addition to campgrounds and RV parks, there are a number of cabins, lodges, and resorts
                                                                                                      Total                                             280
offering nature-based accommodations. As noted, there are six state parks that contain
                                                                                                     Source: Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
lodges and 17 parks with cabins. Other developments include the Quartz Mountain Nature
Park, located in Lone Wolf. It contains nearly 4,300 park acres, a resort lodge, camping, cabins, an outdoor pavilion and amphitheater, hiking
trails, and a nature center. The 6,260-acre lake provides opportunities for boating, fishing, and other water activities. In addition, Broken Bow
Cabins, located on the shore of Broken Bow Lake near Beavers Bend Resort Park in Kiamichi Country, offer a number of privately-owned cabins.
These cabins can sleep eight or more people and are located close to fly fishing, river floats, hiking, and many other outdoor activities.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                    51
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Wildlife Attractions
Wildlife attractions are an important asset to the tourism industry as they                                                          Number of Wildlife Attractions by Type
draw families, school groups, and other tourists from both local and national                                                                                - - - - Type of Wildlife Attraction - - - -
markets. Oklahoma contains a total of 17 wildlife attractions, classified as                                                          Country                   Refuge         Zoo        Aquarium         Total
refuges, zoos, and aquariums.
                                                                                                                                      Frontier                        0           4            0            4
                                                                                                                                      Green                           3           2            1            6
Refuges are protected areas dedicated to wildlife conservation and are part
of the National Wildlife Refuge System. One of Oklahoma's nine wildlife                                                               Red Carpet                      1           0            0            1
refuges is the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, established in 1901, which                                                          Great Plains                    3           0            0            3
covers 59,000 acres in southwestern Oklahoma. It is the home to more than                                                             Arbuckle                        1           1            0            2
50 mammal (including large-grazing mammals such as American Bison,                                                                    Kiamichi                        1           0            0            1
Rocky Mountain elk, and white-tailed deer), 240 bird, 36 fish, 806 plant, and       Total                  9                7                1                                                              17
64 reptile and amphibian species. The other refuges are Tishomingo                  Source: Industry Resources; U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services
National Wildlife Refuge, Washita National Wildlife Refuge, Optima National
Wildlife Refuge, Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge, Ozark Plateau National
Wildlife Refuge, Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge, Little River National Wildlife Refuge, and Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge.

Although not designated as one of the nine National Wildlife Refuges, the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, located in northeastern Oklahoma,
is the largest remaining section of the prairie that once covered fourteen states ranging from Texas to Minnesota. The rich biodiversity and beauty
of the preserve has been maintained by the Nature Conservancy through a patch burn approach, which entails burning one-third of the land each
year.

In addition to the national wildlife refuges, the Woolaroc Museum and Wildlife Preserve maintains more than 30 varieties of native and exotic
animals and birds for the enjoyment of visitors in a natural, protected setting. The 3,600-acre preserve is located in the Osage Hills of
northeastern Oklahoma and also contains nature trails and two living history areas where visitors can experience the natural environment.

Oklahoma contains seven zoos, the largest of which is the Oklahoma City Zoo. It is one of the oldest zoos in the Southwest and contains 2,500
species of animals on 110 acres. In fiscal year 2007, the zoo attracted more than 800,000 visitors, which was the highest attendance in the zoo's
history. It was also named the third most family-friendly zoo in the nation.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                    52
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Oklahoma contains one aquarium, the Oklahoma Aquarium, which is located in Jenks and was considered Oklahoma's top new tourist attraction
when it opened in 2003. This past year, the aquarium received the RedBud Award for Outstanding Attraction at the Governor's Conference. It
contains more than 200 exhibits and draws nearly half a million visitors each year.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   53
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Scenic Byways
Oklahoma contains seven scenic byways that allow visitors to                                                              Scenic Byways Map
experience Oklahoma's natural beauty while driving. In addition to
Route 66, these byways include:

      •      Talimena Drive: This 54-mile byway crosses through the
             Ouachita National Forest in southeastern Oklahoma and
             western Arkansas. The drive features the highest elevation
             points in the U.S. between the Appalachian and Rocky
             Mountains. The Talimena Drive is the only byway in Oklahoma
             designated as a National Scenic Byway.

      •      Mountain Gateway Scenic Byway: The 22-mile drive stretches
             to the Arkansas state line in southeastern Oklahoma, through
             the Ouachita Mountains and the Winding Stair Mountain
             National Recreation area.                                                                                     Source: Microsoft MapPoint


      •      Mountain Pass Scenic Byway:    Similar to the Mountain
             Gateway byway, the Mountain Pass byway crosses through
             the Ouachita Mountains and the Winding Stair Mountain
             National Recreation area.

      •      Wichita Mountains Scenic Byway: This byway is located in the southwestern region of Oklahoma in the Wichita Mountains. Points of
             interest include Medicine Park, the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge, and Fort Sill Military Reservation.

      •      Cimarron Heritage Trail Byway: The Cimarron Byway is located in the panhandle of Oklahoma and stretches to the New Mexico state
             line. Points of interest include the Three State Marker, dinosaur tracks, dinosaur pit, and Black Mesa State Park.

      •      Osage Nation Heritage Trail: This byway travels through the Osage Hills in northeastern Oklahoma, from Ponca City to Bartlesville.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   54
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Agritourism


Agritourism is an emerging tourism niche that combines leisure Agritourism Attractions by Type
activities and vacation travel with agricultural components.                   - - - - - - - - - - - TYPE OF AGRITOURISM - - - - - - - - - -
Given Oklahoma's large agricultural industry, Oklahoma has                        Farms/             Western    Wineries/          Hunting
developed opportunities for tourists to experience agricultural Country            Crops          Experiences Vineyards           Locations                                       Total
components and is promoting more than 500 attractions and
                                                                Frontier              69               15             28                8                                         120
events under the Oklahoma Agritourism banner. Oklahoma's
                                                                Green                 63               15             17                6                                         101
agritourism activities include: dude/guest ranches, spring
                                                                Red Carpet             9               20              4               19                                          52
planting, farmers' markets, mazes, hunting, wineries, cattle
                                                                Great Plains          18                6             11                9                                          44
drives, and horseback riding, among others. As shown in the
                                                                Arbuckle              11                8              3                8                                          30
chart, Oklahoma contains nearly 400 agritourism attractions,
                                                                Kiamichi              17               21              5                4                                          47
most of which are related to farms and crops.
                                                                Total                187               85             68               54                                         394
Farms/Crops                                                     Source: Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department; Industry Resources

Farms/crops attractions include farmers' markets, specialty
crops, Christmas tree farms, pumpkin patches, pick-your-own farms, and mazes. These attractions are largely concentrated in the Frontier and
Green Countries.

Western Experiences
Western experiences include guest ranches and country stays and allow visitors to experience the authenticity and hospitality of Oklahoma's
frontier. Oklahoma contains 85 Western experiences, many of which are located in the Red Carpet and Kiamichi countries. While staying at a
guest ranch or country stay, visitors can enjoy activities such as hiking, fishing, horseback riding, and relaxing with family and friends.

Wineries/Vineyards
The Oklahoma wine industry is a small, but growing industry. Oklahoma currently contains 68 vineyards and wineries, including approximately 46
wineries (just two years ago, Oklahoma contained only 35 wineries). Wineries and vineyards are generally located in rural areas and are
important to small communities as they generate capital investment, create jobs, and generate tourism and economic development. Oklahoma's
wineries and vineyards are generally concentrated in Frontier Country, including seven located in Stroud.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.         55
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Hunting
Oklahoma contains 54 hunting locations, including farms, ranches, and lodges that offer hunting for visitors with an appropriate hunting license.
Hunting locations generally contain cabins or other accommodations and many offer guided hunts. They are spread across Oklahoma, although
Red Carpet Country contains the most.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   56
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Gaming

Oklahoma's gaming industry consists of tribal casinos, pari-mutuel horse                                                            Gaming Locations
race betting, and lotteries. Oklahoma contains a total of 100 gaming                                                                                                                              Other       Total
locations including three racinos (combination of a race track and casino)                                                                                                        Major Tribal    Tribal     Gaming
and 97 tribal gaming facilities (ranked first in the U.S.). Casinos have been                                                        Country                        Racino          Casino       Facility   Locations
classified as follows:                                                                                                               Frontier                            1             3           16          20
                                                                                                                                     Green                               2             8           28          38
•     Major Casinos - Casinos described as "major" are the largest casinos in                                                        Red Carpet                          0             1            9          10
      the state. Each has at least 50,000 square feet of casino space and                                                            Great Plains                        0             1           12          13
      multiple restaurants. Many of these casinos contain an entertainment                                                           Arbuckle                            0             2           13          15
      venue, and several offer a hotel on-site. While there are only 16 major
                                                                                                                                     Kiamichi                            0             1            3          4
      casinos, this is a growing product segment with a number of casinos
                                                                                                                                     Total                               3            16           81          100
      under construction and expansion across the state. These larger
                                                                                                                                     Source: Industry Resources; PricewaterhouseCoopers
      casinos with various food, entertainment, and accommodation options
      are likely to draw visitors from outside their local area in addition to
      serving local residents.                                                                                                      Casino/Racino Ownership
                                                                                                                                                                                  Number of                 Percent of
•     Other Tribal Facilities - All other tribal gaming locations, include mid-size                                                                                                Gaming                    Gaming
      and smaller gaming facilities. Generally, this category contains casinos                                                       Tribe                                        Locations                 Locations
      with less than 50,000 square feet of casino space. As illustrated in the
                                                                                                                                     Chickasaw Nation                                 14                      14%
      chart to the upper-right, the majority of tribal facilities are mid- to
                                                                                                                                     Muscogee (Creek) Nation                          10                      10%
      smaller-sized facilities.
                                                                                                                                     Choctaw Nation                                   9                       9%
                                                                                                                                     Cherokee Nation                                  8                        8%
Twenty-seven of Oklahoma's 39 tribes offer some form of gaming. As
shown in the chart to the lower-right, Chickasaw Nation owns the most                                                                Osage Nation                                     6                        6%
facilities (14 facilities). Other leading tribes include Muscogee (Creek)                                                            Other                                            53                      53%
Nation (10 facilities), Choctaw Nation (nine facilities), Cherokee Nation                                                            Total                                            100                     100%
(eight facilities), and Osage Nation (six facilities).                                                                               Source: Casino Management




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                     57
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Despite economic slowdown and construction halts/project cancellations in other major gaming destinations, such as Las Vegas and Atlantic City,
Oklahoma's casinos continue to grow. Developments include new casinos and resort-oriented amenities such as hotels, spas, pools, and
entertainment venues. These new developments help to raise the bar in terms of quality and amenities of casinos throughout the state as well as
the appeal of casinos to tourists. Recent developments include the following:

      •      Downstream Casino Resort - The Quapaw Tribe opened the Downstream Casino Resort in northeastern Oklahoma in July of 2008,
             containing 70,000 square feet of gaming space, a 222-room hotel, golf course, and spa.

      •      Lucky Star Casino - The Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribes expanded the Lucky Star Casino in Clinton from approximately 16,000 square feet
             to 30,000 square feet. The expanded casino opened in October of 2008.

      •      WinStar World Casino - The WinStar World Casino completed its expansion on December 31, 2008, involving the addition of 110,000
             square feet of gaming space and a 2,500-seat theater/event center. A 400-room hotel at the site is still under construction.

Casino projects under construction and in the planning stages include the following:

      •      Cherokee Casino Resort - The Cherokee Casino Resort in Tulsa is currently expanding its gaming floor to 337,000 square feet and adding
             a 19-story hotel. The property is planned to re-open in the spring of 2009 as a Hard Rock-branded property.

      •      Cherokee Casino Resort - The Cherokee Nation is also expanding their casino in West Siloam Springs by creating additional gaming
             space and adding a 140-room hotel.

      •      Choctaw Casino Resort - The Choctaw Casino Resort in Durant is planning new gaming space, a 10-story casino hotel, and several
             restaurants.

      •      River Spirit Casino - The Muscogee (Creek) Nation is developing the River Spirit Casino in Tulsa with 300,000 square feet of gaming
             space and is scheduled to open in February of 2009.

      •      Riverwind Casino - The Riverwind Casino in Norman is constructing a 100-room hotel which is set to open in February of 2009.

      •      Lastly, the Wichita and affiliated tribes are planning a casino near Hinton.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   58
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Gaming Visitors

Perceptions of Oklahoma as a gaming destination were identified in a                                                              Visitor Perceptions among Non-resident OK Casino Patrons
                                                                                                                                Perceptions of Oklahoma among Gaming Visitors
survey conducted by Oklahoma State University in 2008. Survey
respondents had visited a casino or racino in Oklahoma at least once                                                                           34%
during the previous twelve months. Respondents were asked if they
would visit Oklahoma for tourism purposes even if Oklahoma did not
offer casino facilities. Among all out-of-state respondents (residents of
Texas, Kansas, Missouri, and Arkansas), the majority (66 percent)                                                                                                                    66%
agreed that if Oklahoma had no gaming facilities, they would be
interested in visiting Oklahoma for other purposes. This suggests that
                                                                                                                                             Would Visit Oklahoma for tourism purposes even if
most out-of-state casino visitors recognize the Oklahoma offers potential
                                                                                                                                             Oklahoma had no gaming/casino facilities.
appealing destination activities in addition to its gaming facilities.
                                                                                            Would Not Visit Oklahoma for tourism purposes if
Respondents were also asked to rate their level of agreement or                             Oklahoma had no gaming/casino facilities.
disagreement with certain statements related to gaming attitudes on a five-
point scale. Out-of-state residents rated Oklahoma slightly higher than in-        Source: Oklahoma State University
state residents as a place to recommend to
others for casinos and gaming. Out-of-state Gaming Perceptions - In-state and Out-of-state
residents also rated the Oklahoma gaming                                                                              Oklahoma    Other State
                                                                                                                       Resident      Resident                                                    Total
industry higher than in-state residents for
                                               I would recommend Oklahoma casino/gaming destinations to others to
marketing of products and services. visit.
                                                                                                                           3.69         3.80                                                     3.74
However, in-state residents rated Oklahoma I believe that the Oklahoma gaming industry does a good job in
casinos higher in terms of the variety of marketing its products and services.                                             3.65         3.70                                                     3.67
entertainment and activities offered. Out-of- I believe that Oklahoma casino/racino destinations offer a good variety
state residents rated the value of Oklahoma of entertainment and activities that appeal to all types of visitors.          3.50         3.44                                                     3.46
casinos higher than in-state residents. Both I believe Oklahoma casino/racino destinations offer great value for the
groups of respondents rated building a money.                                                                              3.31         3.43                                                     3.35
vacation around Oklahoma gaming relatively     If time and money allows, I would build a vacation or getaway around
                                               Oklahoma's gaming destinations.                                             2.51         2.66                                                     2.56
low.
                                                                            Source: Oklahoma State University




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                          59
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




 Events

Although events are not necessarily defined by a physical structure or location, they are considered tourism products, since they serve as demand
generators for tourism to Oklahoma. This section includes several types of event-related tourism: cultural events/festivals, meetings/conventions,
sports teams, and sporting facilities. Oklahoma's inventory of such event-related tourism products (whether a one-day festival or a meeting facility
that books events on an ongoing basis) provides another opportunity for Oklahoma to attract visitors.



Cultural Events & Festivals
According to the Oklahoma Events Guide, 825 events and festivals were held in                                                                           Number of Cultural Events & Festivals
Oklahoma in 2008, which celebrate a variety of cultures, holidays, and interests.                                                                                                               Events &
Examples of Oklahoma's events and festivals, including several music and Native                                                                           Country                               Festivals
American events, are described below:
                                                                                                                                                          Frontier                                   219
      •      Oklahoma State Fair - Each September, the Oklahoma State Fair Park, located                                                                  Green                                      264
             in Oklahoma City, hosts the Oklahoma State Fair. This eleven day event, which                                                                Red Carpet                                 100
             attracts about one million in attendance, has a wide variety of entertainment,                                                               Great Plains                               106
             including rides, games, Disney on Ice, a rodeo, pageant, speedway racing,                                                                    Arbuckle                                    60
             concerts, as well as livestock, horseback riding, and other competitions.                                                                    Kiamichi                                    76
                                                                                                                                                          Total                                      825
      •      Tulsa State Fair - The Tulsa State Fair is held each fall in Expo Square. Similar
                                                                                                                                                         Source: Oklahoma Events Guide
             to the Oklahoma State Fair, this eleven day event attracts nearly one million in
             attendance.

      •      Oktoberfest - For the past 30 years, Tulsa has hosted an Oktoberfest of its own. The event includes Bavarian bands from Germany,
             barrel racing, rides, and food and beer. In 2006, this event was considered one of the top 10 Oktoberfests in the country.

      •      Woody Guthrie Folk Festival - For the past 10 years, people from around the United States have gathered at Okemah, the home town of
             Woody Guthrie, to commemorate the life of the American folk musician. More than 100 artists perform at the five-day Woody Guthrie Folk
             Festival. Festivities include concerts, children's activities, open microphone events, and panel discussions.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                       60
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




      •      Dfest Music Conference & Festival - The Dfest Music Conference & Festival, held at Tulsa's Blue Dome District, is the largest music
             festival in the Midwest. More than 150 musicians perform for an audience of over 60,000 people at the two-day event. The music
             conference, which is held at a local hotel, features a trade show, music clinics, music industry panels, and educational workshops.

      •      Oklahoma International Bluegrass Festival - The annual Oklahoma International Bluegrass Festival has been held in Guthrie since it was
             created in 1997. The festival attracts bluegrass fans from across the country to perform and celebrate bluegrass music.

      •      OK Mozart - 2009 will be the 25th season of bringing world-class musicians to Bartlesville. This June event brings members of the
             Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and featured performers, such as Ben Vereen, Peter Nero, Bradford Marsalis, the New York
             Theatre Ballet, and more for a week long festival.

      •      Festival of the Arts - Festival of the Arts is a five-day arts festival that has been held in Oklahoma City since 1967. More than 140 visual
             artists from around the country exhibit their art at the Myriad Gardens, Hudson Avenue, or the large-scale sculpture park exhibit at Center
             Stage Lawn. Culinary artists display their food at International Food Row, and performing artists perform on one of the four stages or on
             the street.

Other popular events and festivals include: MayFest, Juneteenth Blues and Jazz Festival, Rocklahoma, Robbers Cave Fall Festival, Rush Springs
Watermelon Festival, Apache Rattlesnake Festival, Elgin's Crawds 'N Rods Festival, Chickasha Festival of Lights, Oklahoma Scottish Festival, the
Oklahoma Renaissance Festival, and Jazz in June. While these are just examples of popular events, hundreds of more events are held across
the state each year.

Rodeos
      •      International Finals Rodeo - The International Finals Rodeo is held annually at the State Fair Arena in Oklahoma City. The week-long
             event includes the Miss Rodeo USA Beauty Pageant, a three-day convention, the IFR Western Trade Show, and the rodeo finals.

      •      PBR Copenhagen Challenger Bullnanza - In 2008, the PBR Copenhagen Challenger Bullnanza was brought back to the Lazy E Arena,
             which is where it originated, after a two-year tour. The top 20 riders in the country gather at the two-day event and compete for purses
             which total more than $1 million. The event is scheduled in Guthrie once again in 2009.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   61
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




      •      PBR Copenhagen Bull Riding Challenge Tour Championship - The PBR Copenhagen Bull Riding Challenge Tour Championship was held
             at the Ford Center in 2008. This weekend-long event had riders competing for $500,000 in prizes. Other activities include PBR's Fan
             Zone and Marketplace in the Cox Convention Center.

      •      U.S. Team Roping Championship - The State Fairgrounds in Oklahoma City was the home to the 2008 U.S. Team Roping Championship
             National Finals. The week-long event attracts ropers from around the country to compete in numerous events.

      •      PRCA Rodeo of Champions - For nearly 70 years, Elk City has hosted the PRCA Rodeo of Champions. Known as one of the most
             renown rodeos in Oklahoma, this event brings thousands of visitors to watch the top ranked cowboys and cowgirls compete.

      •      Lazy E Ranch Rodeo Championship - The Lazy E Ranch Rodeo Championship, located in Guthrie, is Central Oklahoma's largest ranch
             rodeo. Working cowboys from 10 of Oklahoma's largest and most historic ranches compete in six events during the weekend-long event.

      •      Will Rogers Stampede Rodeo - The Will Rogers Stampede Rodeo, located in Claremore, is a PRCA-sanctioned rodeo that has been an
             annual event for the past 62 years.

Powwows
      •      Red Earth Native American Cultural Festival and Powwow: For more than 20 years, the Red Earth Native American Cultural Festival and
             Powwow has been held in Oklahoma City. The three-day event attracts Native Americans from across North America to celebrate their
             heritage and culture. Festivities include a grand parade, a dance competition, the Red Earth run, and an art market where celebrated
             Native American artists display their work.

      •      Choctaw Nation Labor Day Festival and Powwow: The annual Choctaw Nation Labor Day Festival and Powwow celebrates the Choctaw
             Nation heritage and attracts more than 30,000 visitors from 31 states to Tuskahoma. Festivities at the four-day event, which is open to the
             general public, include carnival rides, concerts, dancers, stickball, and arts and crafts.

      •      IICOT Powwow of Champions - The Intertribal Indian Club of Tulsa hosts the IICOT Powwow of Champions each year. Festivities at the
             three-day event include dancing, singing, a princess coronation, and numerous contests.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   62
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Meeting Facilities & Conventions
                                                                                                                                                               Number of Convention Facilities
The presence of and characteristics of meeting facilities directly impact a destination’s
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Convention
ability to attract and accommodate conventions, conferences, trade shows, and other
                                                                                                                                                                Country                                            Facilities
events that draw visitors to and generate exposure for the destination. Oklahoma contains
a total of 20 convention facilities (defined as those with at least approximately 5,000 square                                                                  Frontier                                                        11
feet of function space), 11 of which are located in Frontier Country and seven of which are                                                                     Green                                                            7
located in Green Country.                                                                                                                                       Red Carpet                                                       0
                                                                                                                                                                Great Plains                                                     2
As illustrated on the following page, Oklahoma's largest convention facilities are the Cox                                                                      Arbuckle                                                         0
Business Services Convention Center in Oklahoma City and the Tulsa Convention Center.                                                                           Kiamichi                                                         0
Both of these convention facilities contain approximately 100,000 square feet of exhibit
                                                                                                                                                                Total                                                           20
space, supporting meeting/ballroom space, and an arena. The Tulsa Convention Center is
                                                                                                                                                                Note: Centers with less than 5,000 square feet of meeting
currently undergoing an expansion project which includes a new 31,000 square-foot                                                                               space are excluded.
ballroom and supporting meeting rooms.                                                                                                                          Source: Industry resources


In addition, Expo Square and State Fair Park contain exhibition facilities. Expo Square,
                                                                                                                                                               Number of Hotels with Meeting Space
located in Tulsa, is the home to many of the large events in the area, including the Tulsa
State Fair, the Tulsa Flea Market, and Tulsa Drillers baseball games. Facilities include the                                                                                                                   Hotels with
                                                                                                                                                                Country                                      Meeting Space
448,400 square-foot QuikTrip Center, two live stock arenas, nine barns, the Pavilion, which
has a seating capacity of approximately 5,000 and hosts concerts, rodeos, and basketball                                                                        Frontier                                                        16
games, and the Exchange Center, which has 58,500 square feet of exhibit space. State                                                                            Green                                                           10
Park Fair, located in Oklahoma City, is the home of the Oklahoma State Fair, the                                                                                Red Carpet                                                       0
International Finals Rodeo, and other large events. Facilities include the State Fair Arena,                                                                    Great Plains                                                     1
the 70,000 square-foot Cox Pavilion, the 66,800 square-foot expo hall, nine barns, and the                                                                      Arbuckle                                                         0
grandstand.                                                                                                                                                     Kiamichi                                                         0

In addition to convention and exhibition facilities, Oklahoma also contains meeting space                                                                       Total                                                           27
                                                                                                                                                                Note: Hotels with less than 5,000 square feet of meeting
located in hotels (again, defined as those with at least approximately 5,000 square feet of                                                                     space are excluded.
function space). The largest of these 27 hotels are the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel &                                                                               Source: Industry resources
Conference Center and the Embassy Suites Hotel & Conference Center (Norman), each of
which contains approximately 42,000 square feet of function space.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                            63
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




New convention developments include the recently added 2,500-seat theater/event center at the WinStar World Casino, which is being marketed
towards the meetings/convention market, conference space announced as part of the new Muscogee (Creek) Nation development at Lake
Eufaula, the planned 15,000 square-foot Glenpool Conference Center scheduled to start construction in the summer of 2009, and the planned
conference center at the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum. In addition, studies for potential new convention space have been
conducted for facilities in Lawton (convention center/arena) and in Edmond (conference center).


Convention Facilities (Approximately 5,000 sq. ft. and Larger)
                                                                                                           - - - - - - - - - FUNCTION SPACE (SQ. FT.) - - - - - - - - -                     ADDITIONAL VENUES
                                                                                                          Exhibit       Ballroom          Breakout             Other             Total        Theatre   Arena
 Center                                                    City                    Region                  Space          Space              Space          Function          Function          Seats   Seats

 Tulsa Expo Square                                         Tulsa                   Green                 506,900                     -                -                 -         506,900                5,582
                                  1
 Tulsa Convention Center                                   Tulsa                   Green                 102,600            31,000            46,100                    -         179,700           -    7,111
 Cox Business Services Conv. Center                        Oklahoma City           Frontier               99,900            25,000            28,600                    -         153,400           -   13,399
 Oklahoma State Fair Park                                  Oklahoma City           Frontier               66,800                     -                -                 -          66,800                 N/A
 Payne County Expo Center                                  Stillwater              Frontier                        -                 -                -         31,500             31,500           -        -
 Claremore Expo Center                                     Claremore               Green                  31,000                    -                 -                0           31,000           -    2,400
 Reed Conference Center                                    Midwest City            Frontier                        -          9,000             3,300            6,000             18,300         96         -
 National Center for Employee Dev.                         Norman                  Frontier                        -                 -        15,800                    -          15,800           -        -
 Washington County Fairgrounds                             Dewey                   Green                          -                 -         15,600                    -          15,600           -        -
 Cleveland County Fairgrounds                              Norman                  Frontier                        -                 -          4,200           10,200             14,400           -        -
 Stephens County Fair & Expo Center                        Duncan                  Great Plains                    -                -         13,200                    -          13,200           -        -
 Post Oak Lodge Conference Center                          Tulsa                   Green                           -                -         10,700                    -          10,700           -        -
 Stillwater Community Center                               Stillwater              Frontier                        -        10,000                    -                 -          10,000        710         -
 Coca-Cola Bricktown Events Center                         Oklahoma City           Frontier                        -                 -                 -         9,500              9,500           -        -
 Simmons Center                                            Duncan                  Great Plains                    -                 -          7,900                   -           7,900        750         -
 Metro-Tech Centers Business Conf. Ctr.                    Oklahoma City           Frontier                        -                 -          7,900                   -           7,900        281         -
 Bricktown Ballroom                                        Oklahoma City           Frontier                        -          5,000                   -                 -           5,000           -        -
 Bartlesville Community Center                             Bartlesville            Green                           -                 -          4,900                   -           4,900       1,692        -
 Delaware Community Center                                 Bartlesville            Green                           -                 -          4,900                   -           4,900           -        -
 Sillwater Pulic Library Conference Ctr.                   Stillwater              Frontier                        -                 -          4,800                   -           4,800           -        -

1 Includes expansion under construction.
Source: Facility management




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                  64
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Sports Teams
Oklahoma's sports teams not only provide entertainment for local                                                            Number of Sports Teams by Type
residents, but may also attract non-resident fans who support the visiting                                                                         - - PROFESSIONAL - - -
team. Sports in Oklahoma range from youth/amateur to major league                                                                                      Major    Minor                       Youth/
sports, although Oklahoma has been without a major league team until                                                         Country                  League   League     College          Amateur         Total
recently. In July of 2008, the NBA's Seattle Supersonics relocated to
                                                                                                                             Frontier                      1                      4   24      10            39
Oklahoma City and were renamed the Oklahoma City Thunder in time
                                                                                                                             Green                         0                      4   11      10            25
for the 2008-2009 basketball season. Season tickets for the Oklahoma
                                                                                                                             Red Carpet                    0                      0   2       0              2
City Thunder sold out in September of 2008, and the team played its
                                                                                                                             Great Plains                  0                      0   10       1            11
first regular-season game on October 29, 2008, attracting 19,100
                                                                                                                             Arbuckle                      0                      0   5       1              6
attendees.
                                                                                                                             Kiamichi                      0                      0    0       0             0
Oklahoma contains eight minor league teams, all of which are located in                                                      Total                         1                      8   52      22            83
Oklahoma City or Tulsa. Minor league teams include: Oklahoma City                                                            Note: Youth/Amateur count reflects number of youth/amateur sports complexes/centers.
Blazers (hockey), Oklahoma City Yard Dawgs (arena football),                                                                 Each complex/center contains multiple teams.
                                                                                                                             Source: Industry resources
Oklahoma City Redhawks (baseball), Oklahoma City Lightning
(women's football), Tulsa 66ers (basketball), Tulsa Drillers (baseball),
Tulsa Oilers (hockey), and the Tulsa Talons (arena football).

Collegiate sports, particularly football, are very popular in Oklahoma. Eleven of Oklahoma's colleges and universities compete in the NCAA, with
four participating in the NCAA's highest level, Division I. Twenty-one of Oklahoma's 52 collegiate teams are from the following Division I schools:
University of Oklahoma (Norman), Oklahoma State University (Stillwater), University of Tulsa (Tulsa), and Oral Roberts University (Tulsa).
Perhaps the most significant collegiate program is the University of Oklahoma's football program, which was established in 1895 and holds seven
national championship titles. In 2008, the OU football program attracted an average of 85,000 attendees per game (including a record 85,646 for
the Texas Tech game). In 2007, OU was ranked eleventh in terms of attendance and fifth in terms of the percentage of the stadium filled to
capacity for home games (103.34 percent of capacity).




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                             65
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Sporting Facilities
In order to support Oklahoma's professional, collegiate, and youth/amateur                                                           Sports Facilities by Type
sports teams, Oklahoma contains 73 sports facilities ranging from youth                                                                                        Major/Minor                    Youth/       Total
sports complexes to stadiums and multi-purpose arenas. In addition to the                                                            Country                    League             College   Amateur     Facilities
facilities presented in the chart, Oklahoma also contains 45 motorsports
                                                                                                                                     Frontier                           3            20         10          33
tracks, including 16 in Green Country, 10 in Great Plains Country, and eight
                                                                                                                                     Green                              4            10         10          24
in Frontier Country.
                                                                                                                                     Red Carpet                         0            2           0           2
A new sports facility was recently announced, which is the $10 million rowing                                                        Great Plains                       0             8          1           9
facility being developed in Oklahoma City by the U.S. Rowing Association for                                                         Arbuckle                           0            4           1           5
purposes of training young Olympic athletes. The facility is scheduled to                                                            Kiamichi                           0            0           0           0
open in 2010 along the Oklahoma River. The Chesapeake Boathouse, along                                                               Total                              7            44         22          73
the Oklahoma River, is the existing facility used for rowing, kayaking, and                                                          Note: Ford Center counted as a Minor League venue, but it is also home to the
dragon boating.                                                                                                                      NBA's Oklahoma City Thunder.
                                                                                                                                     Source: Industry resources

Although Oklahoma contains 223 golf courses, it is generally not considered
a golfing destination, as it does not offer a concentration of luxury resort golf                                                    Golf Courses
courses that are more common in states such as California, Arizona, South                                                                                       - - - TYPE OF GOLF COURSE - - -
Carolina, and Georgia. According to Golf Digest's list of America's 100
                                                                                                                                     Country                      Public          Private    Municipal      Total
Greatest Golf Courses (2007-2008), Oklahoma contained only one of the top
100 golf courses in the U.S., Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, home of                                                          Frontier                        28             18          18            64
the PGA Championship in 2007. Eight of the 223 courses are located in                                                                Green                           39             14          17            70
state parks, including courses in Lake Murray, Arrowhead, Fort Cobb, Lake                                                            Red Carpet                      12             3           13            28
Eufaula, Sequoyah, Grand Cherokee, Beavers Bend, and Roman Nose state                                                                Great Plains                    16              6           7            29
parks.                                                                                                                               Arbuckle                        11              2           6            19
                                                                                                                                     Kiamichi                        10              2           1            13
                                                                                                                                     Total                          116             45          62           223
.                                                                                                                                    Source: Industry resources




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                    66
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Equestrian activities in Oklahoma include recreational riding, shows,                                                         Horse Population
rodeos, and other equestrian-related special events. With a population
                                                                                                                                                                      Horse       Percent of
of approximately 326,000 horses (according to a 2005 study released by
                                                                                                                               States                             Population           U.S.
the American Horse Council Foundation), Oklahoma contains 3.5
                                                                                                                               Texas                                    979,000       10.6%
percent of the horse population in the U.S. and is ranked fourth behind
                                                                                                                               California                               698,000        7.6%
Texas (10.6 percent), California (7.6 percent), and Florida (5.4 percent).
                                                                                                                               Florida                                  500,000        5.4%
Major equestrian/rodeo facilities in Oklahoma include three horse track                                                        Oklahoma                                 326,000        3.5%
racinos (Blue Ribbon Downs, Will Rogers Downs, and Remington Park),                                                            Kentucky                                 320,000        3.5%
one horse track (Fair Meadows at Tulsa), and several rodeo/equine                                                              Missouri                                 281,000        3.0%
arenas (Lazy E Arena, OKC State Fair Arena, which positions itself as                                                          Colorado                                 256,000        2.8%
the Horse Capital of the World, and Tulsa Expo Square). In addition,                                                           Indiana                                  203,000        2.2%
some equine events are held at the multi-purpose Ford Center.                                                                  New York                                 202,000        2.2%
                                                                                                                               Louisiana                                164,000        1.8%
In 2007, Oklahoma hosted more than 160 equestrian shows and special                                                            Maryland                                 153,000        1.7%
events. Oklahoma ranked first in the U.S. for special events in 2007 (86                                                       New Mexico                               147,000        1.6%
special events) and fourth for equestrian shows (77 shows) behind                                                              Wyoming                                   99,000        1.1%
Texas, California, and Florida. Oklahoma is one of the leaders in the                                                          New Jersey                                83,000        0.9%
industry, due in part to the formation of the Oklahoma Equine Task Force                                                       Source: American Horse Council Foundation
in 2005, which was charged with promoting Oklahoma as the leading
location for national and international equestrian events in an effort to
capitalize on its equestrian infrastructure.

The largest equestrian events in Oklahoma are held at State Fair Arena and include: AQHYA World Youth Championship Quarter Horse Show,
Grand National and World Championship Morgan Horse Show, National Appaloosa Horse Show, and World Championship Quarter Horseshow.
The largest rodeo events are held at Lazy E Arena, the State Fair Arena, and the Ford Center and include: PBR Copenhagen Challenger
Bullnanza, International Finals Rodeo, PBR’s Copenhagen Bull Riding Challenger Tour Championship, and the U.S. Team Roping Championship.
Although Oklahoma hosts many large equestrian and rodeo events, it did not host any of the Top Five Equestrian Shows or Top Five Equestrian
Special Events in 2007, according to the American Quarter Horse Association.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                67
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




According to a study released by the American Horse Council Foundation in 2005, the U.S. horse industry generates nearly $40 billion a year in
goods and services. While California, Florida, and Texas are the top producing states, Oklahoma ranks as the tenth largest horse economy,
producing goods and services valued at $766 million. Nearly 118,000 people are involved in the industry in Oklahoma, and the industry generates
12,400 full-time jobs in the state.

Horse Shows                                                                             Horse Industry Economic Impact
State                     Shows           Special Events                   Total                                          Value of Goods & Services Total Economic       Number of People
Texas                           169                            32             201        States                                  Produced (millions) Impact (millions) Involved in Industry FTE Jobs
Oklahoma                         77                            86             163        California                                                       $4,100                    $7,000    311,100     54,200
California                      103                            24             127        Florida                                                          $3,000                    $5,100    440,000     38,300
Colorado                         69                             7              76        Texas                                                            $3,000                    $5,200    455,600     32,200
Missouri                         53                            17              70        Kentucky                                                         $2,300                    $3,500    194,300     51,900
                                                                                         Louisiana                                                        $1,600                    $2,400     54,200      5,500
Nebraska                         42                            25              67
                                                                                         New York                                                         $1,400                    $2,400    152,000     12,700
Iowa                              4                            52              56
                                                                                         Maryland                                                         $1,000                    $1,600     65,600     10,000
South Dakota                     19                            14              33
                                                                                         Colorado                                                           $956                    $1,600    102,400      5,800
Kansas                           32                             0              32
                                                                                         Indiana                                                            $779                    $1,300     90,000      8,400
Montana                          23                             0              23        Oklahoma                                                           $766                    $1,200    117,900     12,400
Source: American Quarter Horse Association                                               Missouri                                                            $718                   $1,300    125,100     42,200
                                                                                         New Jersey                                                          $710                   $1,100     55,900      9,600
                                                                                         New Mexico                                                          $503                     $759     91,100     35,700
                                                                                         Wyoming                                                             $191                     $286     33,100      1,400

                                                                                         Total U.S.                                                     $38,800                   $101,580   4,600,000   454,000
                                                                                         Oklahoma Rank                                                     10th                       11th         7th       8th

                                                                                         Source: American Horse Council Foundation




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                          68
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Summary of Tourism Products
A summary of Oklahoma's inventory of tourism products is presented in the following table by product type and by region.

                                                              - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - TOURISM PRODUCTS - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - PERCENT OF TOTAL - - - - - - -
                                                                                                Red           Great                                                                             Red        Great
                                                                Frontier         Green        Carpet         Plains Arbuckle Kiamichi                  Total           Frontier     Green     Carpet      Plains Arbuckle

          HERITAGE & CULTURE
          Native American-related Attractions                         12            16              4            18             8             4           62               19%       26%         6%         29%        13%
          Route 66 Attractions                                        81           101              0            48             0             0          230               35%       44%         0%         21%         0%
          Registered Historic Places                                 211           315            176           137            67           117        1,023               21%       31%        17%         13%         7%
          Main Street Attractions                                      8            10              9             8             6             2           43               19%       23%        21%         19%        14%
          Performing Arts Venues                                       3             1              0             1             0             0            5               60%       20%         0%         20%         0%
          Entertainment Facilities                                     7             4              1             0             0             0           12               58%       33%         8%          0%         0%
          Museums                                                    148           155             71            74            42            40          530               28%       29%        13%         14%         8%
          NATURE & RECREATION                                                                                                                                              37%       27%         12%        13%          6%
          State Parks                                                   1           23              8             4              4            10           50               2%       46%        16%          8%         8%
          Lakes                                                        29           35             11            23             14            15          127              23%       28%         9%         18%        11%
          Adventure Trails                                             17           16             13             6              8             9           69              25%       23%        19%          9%        12%
          Campgrounds & RV Parks                                       35          102             34            29             39            41          280              13%       36%        12%         10%        14%
          Wildlife Attractions                                          4            6              1             3              2             1           17              24%       35%         6%         18%        12%
          Farm/Crop Attractions (Agritourism)                          69           63              9            18             11            17          187              37%       34%         5%         10%         6%
          Western Experiences (Agritourism)                            15           15             20             6              8            21           85              18%       18%        24%          7%         9%
          Wineries & Vineyards (Agritourism)                           28           17              4            11              3             5           68              41%       25%         6%         16%         4%
          Hunting Locations (Agritourism)                               8            6             19             9              8             4           54              15%       11%        35%         17%        15%
          GAMING
          Gaming Locations                                             20            38            10            13             15             4          100              20%       38%        10%         13%        15%
          EVENTS
          Cultural Events & Festivals                                219           264            100           106             60            76          825              27%       32%        12%         13%         7%
          Convention Facilities                                       11             7              0             2              0             0           20              55%       35%         0%         10%         0%
          Hotels with Meeting Space                                   16            10              0             1              0             0           27              59%       37%         0%          4%         0%
          Sports Teams                                                39            25              2            11              6             0           83              47%       30%         2%         13%         7%
          Sporting Facilities                                         33            24              2             9              5             0           73              45%       33%         3%         12%         7%
          Golf Courses                                                64            70             28            29             19            13          223              29%       31%        13%         13%         9%
          Equestrian Facilities                                        4             3              0             0              0             0            7              57%       43%         0%          0%         0%
          Source: Industry Resources


This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                               69
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




New/Recent Developments
Oklahoma's tourism products are continuing to improve with new developments, which will impact the industry in the next five years. Examples of
some of the new and recent tourism products in each of the four product categories (heritage/culture, nature and recreation, gaming, and events)
are presented below.

Heritage/Culture

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum (Oklahoma City) - The 300-acre site, currently under construction, includes a museum dedicated to
preserving the culture of Oklahoma's 39 tribes, a park and trail system, marketplace, lodging facilities, and a visitors center.

Chickasaw Cultural Center (Sulphur) - Chickasaw Nation is creating a 96,000 square-foot cultural center located on a 110-acre site in Sulphur.
The center is planned to include an amphitheater, gardens, an educational village, theaters, exhibits, and galleries, all of which will demonstrate
the Chickasaw culture and heritage.

U.S. Army Field Artillery Museum at Fort Sill - The new museum at Fort Sill will contain exhibits highlighting the values and traditions of the U.S.
Army as reflected in the history of Fort Sill and Field Artillery. The museum is nearing completion and expected to open soon.

Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame & Museum (Muskogee) - Expansion development involving a new $3 million interactive museum is being planned in
Muskogee. The museum will educate visitors on Oklahoma's music heritage and honor inductees to the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame.

Cherokee Nation tours & renovations (Tahlequah area) - Cherokee Nation is improving tourism to its facilities by creating tour packages and
renovating the Cherokee Heritage Center. The tours will begin next spring, but specifics have not been released. The heritage center is
undergoing a $190,000 renovation which will enhance the atrium area as well as other entrance features.

Nature and Recreation

Lake Texoma - Pointe Vista, a private developer, is in the process of acquiring land at the Lake Texoma State Park for purposes of redeveloping
aging facilities. Tentative site components include a campground, golf course, marina, hotel, conference center, restaurants, and condominiums.

New Resort at Lake Murray - A 98-acre site housing the aging Lake Murray Lodge was privatized and developers are currently constructing a new
100- to 150-room resort hotel.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   70
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Muscogee (Creek) Nation Resort at Lake Eufaula - The Muscogee (Creek) Nation purchased a 48-acre site at Lake Eufaula State Park that
housed the aging Fountainhead Resort, which was demolished in August of 2008 to make way for a new resort, consisting of a 188-room hotel,
casino, meeting space, restaurants, and potentially a golf course and marina.

Gaming

WinStar World Casino Expansion (Thackerville) - The Chickasaw Nation's WinStar World Casino, located in Thackerville, recently expanded from
2,100 machines and 190,000 square feet to 6,000 games and 300,000 square feet, making it one of the largest casino floors not just in Oklahoma
but in the world. It also added a 2,500-seat theater that can be used for conference space. While the casino expansion opened on December 31,
2008, a 400-room hotel being added to the site is under construction.

Cherokee Casino Resort Expansion (Tulsa) - The Cherokee Casino Resort in Tulsa is currently undergoing a $125 million expansion and will
rebrand as the Hard Rock, the first Hard Rock-branded property in the Midwest. The gaming floor will expand to 337,000 square feet. It also will
have a new 19-story hotel with more than 350 rooms. This will open in the spring of 2009.

Choctaw Casino Resort Expansion (Durant) - The Choctaw Casino Resort in Durant is planning a 10-story casino hotel and several restaurants, in
addition to expanding its gaming space. The expansion is planned to open in 2010.

River Spirit Casino (Tulsa) - The Muscogee (Creek) Nation is developing the River Spirit Casino in Tulsa. The casino is planned to include
300,000 square feet of gaming space with more than 2,800 gaming machines, 24 table games and 15 poker tables. The $160 million project is
scheduled to open in February of 2009.

Riverwind Casino (Norman) - The Chickasaw Nation is constructing a 100-room hotel at the Riverwind Casino in Norman. The Riverwind Hotel is
set to open in February of 2009.

Events

NBA Oklahoma City Thunder - Formerly the Seattle SuperSonics, the Oklahoma City Thunder relocated to Oklahoma City in 2008, providing
Oklahoma's first professional sports franchise.

BOK Center (Tulsa) - The 17,300-seat arena opened August 30, 2008 at a cost of $196 million.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   71
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Tulsa Convention Center Expansion - The $42 million expansion and renovation project of the Tulsa Convention Center involves the addition of a
31,000 square-foot ballroom and 12 breakout rooms. The project broke ground in September of 2008 and is scheduled for completion in early
2010.

Tulsa Drillers Baseball Stadium - A new baseball stadium for the Tulsa Drillers (AA affiliate of the Colorado Rockies) is being planned for
downtown Tulsa. The $60 million project also includes the acquisition of adjacent properties for mixed-use development. Construction was
scheduled to commence in December of 2008 and be completed in time for the 2010 baseball season.

Embassy Suites Hotel & Conference Center (Norman) - The 289-suite Embassy Suites Hotel and Conference Center, developed and owned by
John Q. Hammons, recently opened at the 585-acre University North Park development in Norman. This $50 million development includes a
28,000 square-foot ballroom, which is the largest in the state. The conference center contains 42,000 square feet of function space and
accommodates groups up to 2,900 people.

Glenpool Conference Center - A $12 million conference center is being planned for Glenpool in the Southwest Crossroads development, which is
a new project containing retail space and several hotels. The conference center is planned to contain a 15,000 square-foot meeting venue
designed more for social and entertainment events than conventions and exhibits. Construction is expected to commence in the summer of 2009
and continue for 12 to 18 months.

Oklahoma River Development (Oklahoma City) - A new $10 million rowing facility is being developed along the Oklahoma River by the U.S.
Rowing Association for purposes of training young Olympic athletes, which is scheduled to open in 2010.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   72
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Tourism Infrastructure

Tourism infrastructure is a critical element of the tourism asset base, which includes signage and visitor information, transportation access, and
hotel accommodations.

Signage & Visitor Information
As many visitors are unfamiliar with Oklahoma's geography, highways/road
system, landmarks, and destinations, it is important for clear, consistent, and
relevant signage to assist visitors as they navigate throughout the state. An
effective signage system improves visitors’ experience in Oklahoma and ensures
that visitors reach their intended destinations and attractions.

In 1999, Oklahoma launched the Tourist Oriented Directional Signing (TODS)
Program, which provides directional information for attractions, points of interest,
                                                                                                                                          Number of Tourism Information Center Visitors
historic sites, cultural sites, religious sites, parks, lakes, sites of natural scenic
beauty, or sites suited for outdoor recreation. This legislation resulted in new                                                                                       3.5
signage, including interstate exit signs, that clearly identify nearby attractions.                                                         Tourism Information Center Traffic
                                                                                                                                               3.0




                                                                                                                                              Visitors (In millions)
Some interstate signage also alerts travelers of scenic outlooks and areas that                                                                                        2.5
are available for travelers to pull off the highway and enjoy scenic views. Despite                                                                                    2.0
these initiatives, some tourism stakeholders have expressed the need for                                                                                               1.5
improved directional signage and signs to identify attractions/tourism assets.                                                                                         1.0
                                                                                                                                                                       0.5
Signage for visitors also includes more than 350 historical markers throughout
                                                                                                                                                                       0.0
the state, which notify travelers of upcoming historical sites. While this signage is                                                                                        2004/05   2005/06   2006/07    2007/08
valuable to travelers, some markers may be unclear to visitors when additional
signage is not available. For example, historical markers may notify travelers of                                                           Note: Visitor counts at Blackwell and Erick centers excluded as data was not
                                                                                                                                            available for all years.
an upcoming site, but the site may not always be evident without the aid of                                                                 Source: Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
additional signage.

In addition to signage, visitors unfamiliar with Oklahoma are assisted by 12
Tourism Information Centers located throughout the state in (or near) the




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                     73
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




following cities: Blackwell, Erick, Walters, Kansas, Oklahoma City (two), Midwest City, Thackerville, Sallisaw, Miami, Colbert, and Tulsa. Each
center is staffed with travel counselors and offers complimentary brochures and state maps, and some centers contain gift shops. The most
frequently visited center is the center in Thackerville, located four miles north of the Oklahoma/Texas border on I-35, which welcomed 1.2 million
visitors in fiscal year 2008. As shown in the chart on the previous page, visitor traffic at Oklahoma's Tourism Information Centers was up 9.7
percent in fiscal year 2008, although lower than the visitor traffic experienced in fiscal year 2005.

Air Access
Oklahoma is served by two international airports, the Will Rogers                                                   Number of Direct Flights per Airport
World Airport in Oklahoma City and the Tulsa International Airport
                                                                                                                     Direct Flight City                           Region          OKC   Tulsa   Lawton   Total
in Tulsa. The Will Rogers Airport serves 18 cities with non-stop
                                                                                                                                                        1
service and the Tulsa Airport serves 15 cities. A third airport, the                                                 Dallas/Fort Worth, TX                        South           13     16         7     36
                                                                                                                                         2
Lawton-Fort Sill Regional Airport, serves two cities (Dallas/Fort                                                    Houston, TX                                  South           11     11         0     22
Worth and Atlanta). As illustrated in the table, the cities with the                                                 Denver, CO                                   West            10     4          0     14
most non-stop flights to Oklahoma include Dallas/Fort Worth (36                                                      Chicago, IL                                  Midwest          6     8          0     14
daily flights), Houston (22 flights), and Denver, Chicago and                                                        Atlanta, GA                                  South            6     6          2     14
Atlanta (each with 14 flights).
                                                                                                                     St. Louis, MO                                South            4     5          0     9

Oklahoma is most accessible from cities in the southern region of                                                    Phoenix, AZ                                  West             3     3          0     6
the United States. While Oklahoma provides direct flight service to                                                  Memphis, TN                                  South            3     3          0     6
eight cities in the South, it provides service to five cities in the West                                            Kansas City, MO                              South            3     2          0     5
and four cities in the Midwest. Oklahoma is directly connected to                                                    Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN                     Midwest          2     2          0     4
only one airport in the Northeast, the Newark Liberty International                                                  Detroit, MI                                  Midwest          2     2          0     4
Airport in the New York City market.                                                                                 Cincinnati, OH                               Midwest          2     2          0     4
                                                                                                                     Salt Lake City, UT                           West             2     1          0     3
Although Oklahoma contains just three commercial airports and
                                                                                                                     Washington, D.C.                             South            2     0          0     2
there is limited direct flight service to certain parts of the country, it
                                                                                                                     Newark, NJ                                   Northeast        1     1          0     2
should be noted that an estimated 92 percent of leisure visitors
                                                                                                                     Las Vegas, NV                                West             1     1          0     2
(based on previous conversion research) drive to the state.
However, air access could be a limiting factor for future visitor                                                    Los Angeles, CA                              West             1     0          0     1
growth in certain segments such as business travelers,                                                               Baltimore, MD                                South            1     0          0     1
                                                                                                                     Total                                                        73     67         9    149
                                                                                                                    1 Total of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and Dallas/Love Field Airport.
                                                                                                                    2 Total of George Bush Intercontinental Airport and Houston Hobby Airport.
                                                                                                                    Source: OAGFlights; Airport Management

This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                            74
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




conventions, and national events, which often depend more heavily on fly-in access.

Highway Access
With such large drive-in visitor traffic as previously described, highway access into and across the state is important. Oklahoma is served by three
interstate highways: Interstate 35, which runs north-south; Interstate 40, which runs east-west; and Interstate 44, which runs northeast-southwest.
As all three interstates cross through Oklahoma City. Together, these interstate highways and several other U.S. and state highways and
turnpikes make the state easily accessible by road from nearly every other major population center in the region including Dallas, Kansas City, St.
Louis, Little Rock, Springfield, and Wichita.

Highway Access Map




Source: Microsoft MapPoint
This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   75
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Rail Access
Oklahoma is also accessible by Amtrak train service by means of one                                                       Amtrak Route Map
line, the Heartland Flyer, which travels from Oklahoma City to Fort
Worth on a daily basis. As illustrated in the map, this line has stops in
Norman, Purcell, Pauls Valley, and Ardmore; however, some
communities have limited transportation infrastructure in place such as
rental car facilities or bus transportation on site, for train passengers to
travel to their final destination from train stops. A bus service, which
connects Oklahoma City and Tulsa, is also available.

Despite the limited availability of lines entering Oklahoma, travelers
from around the country are able to reach the state via trains from Fort
Worth. The Texas Eagle line, which has a stop at Forth Worth, serves
all stations between Chicago and San Antonio on a daily basis, and
has connections with Los Angeles three days per week.

As part of Amtrak and the National Park Service's Trails & Rails                                                          Source: Amtrak
program, the Heartland Flyer trains offer visitor guides for the
Chickasaw National Recreation Area onboard.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   76
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Hotel Supply
An adequate supply of hotel rooms is an essential resource in attracting overnight visitors. The table below illustrates the total room inventory in
Oklahoma by region. According to Smith Travel Research, Oklahoma currently contains nearly 52,000 hotel rooms, which are concentrated
largely in Frontier Country (41 percent) and Green Country (34 percent). Hotel supply is further classified by the following chain scales:

      •      Luxury (e.g. Ritz-Carlton, Four Seasons, St. Regis)
      •      Upper-Upscale Chains (e.g., Marriott, Hilton, Westin, Hyatt)
      •      Upscale Chains (e.g., Doubletree, Courtyard by Marriott, Crowne Plaza, Wyndham)

      •      Midscale Chains (e.g., Four Points by Sheraton, Holiday Inn, Hampton Inn)
      •      Economy (e.g., Days Inn, EconoLodge, Motel 6)
      •      Independents (all non-branded properties; includes properties in all tiers of price and quality)

Among branded hotels, Oklahoma's hotel supply is concentrated in the Midscale and Economy chain scales. Oklahoma contains no properties in
the Luxury chain scale, and fewer than 9,000 rooms in the Upper-Upscale and Upscale chain scales. While the relatively large share of rooms in
the Midscale and Economy chain scales provide affordable options for travelers, more affluent travelers, including many business travelers, are
more limited in their options.


Existing Hotel Supply by Chain Scale & Region
                                                                   Upper
 Region                                 Luxury                    Upscale                    Upscale                   Midscale                  Economy                Independents       Total    % of Total

 Frontier                                    0                      2,869                      2,132                      7,015                      4,199                        5,239    21,454     41%
 Green                                       0                      2,000                      1,762                      4,872                      3,687                        5,071    17,392     34%
 Red Carpet                                  0                        0                          0                         932                        749                         1,643     3,324      6%
 Great Plains                                0                        0                          80                       1,964                      1,197                        1,992     5,233     10%
 Arbuckle                                    0                        0                          80                       1,061                       745                         1,137     3,023      6%
 Kiamichi                                    0                        0                           0                        402                        126                          787      1,315      3%

 Total                                       0                      4,869                      4,054                     16,246                     10,703                        15,869   51,741     100%

 Percent of Total                           0%                        9%                         8%                        31%                        21%                          31%     100%
Source: Smith Travel Research

This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                              77
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




According to Smith Travel Research, approximately 4,000 rooms are currently under construction around the state, and an additional 9,000 rooms
are in the planning phase. Although some planned projects may not move forward, the table below provides an indication of future hotel
development in the next several years. As illustrated, the concentration of new hotel supply by region is similar to that of existing supply with most
rooms located in the Frontier and Green Countries. More than half of new rooms are classified in the Midscale chain scale, suggesting that this
segment experiences relatively strong demand.

The largest hotel under construction is the 400-room hotel at WinStar World Casino near the Texas-Oklahoma border (Arbuckle Country), and the
largest hotel in planning is a 650-room hotel at the River District in Jenks (Green Country).


New Hotel Rooms (Planned & Under Construction)

                                                                                                                                                                                                   Percent of
Region                                  Luxury              Upper Upscale                    Upscale                   Midscale                   Economy                Independents     Total      Total

Frontier                                     0                        283                      1,255                       3,050                       139                         815    5,542      44%
Green                                        0                        350                       605                        1,810                        0                         1,341   4,106      32%
Red Carpet                                   0                         0                         0                          455                         0                           0      455       4%
Great Plains                                 0                         0                         0                          893                        187                         151    1,231      10%
Arbuckle                                     0                         0                         0                          533                         0                          650    1,183      9%
Kiamichi                                     0                         0                         0                          193                         0                           0      193       2%
Total                                        0                        633                      1,860                       6,934                       326                        2,957   12,710     100%

Percent of Total                           0%                         5%                        15%                        55%                          3%                        23%     100%
Source: Smith Travel Research




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                             78
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Destination Characteristics

Destination characteristics, including the size of the population base, business community, collegiate base, weather, and affordability also affect
tourism demand.

Population
Local market demographics directly influence visitation related to the level of visiting family and friends. Market demographics also indirectly
influence the decisions of visitors to the extent that they create a certain destination atmosphere and support destination product infrastructure.
Though a large population is not an essential characteristic to support destination visitation, a destination’s population often may be correlated with
corporate activity, the presence of attractions and activities, accessibility, and other factors that support destination visitation. Population is also a
key determinant of a market’s potential to attract events that draw attendees from the local area or region, such as consumer and trade shows.
Furthermore, population growth is indicative of trends within the community that may impact the destination.

With a population of 3.6 million, Oklahoma contains 1.2 percent of the U.S. population and is ranked 28 among states in the U.S. Oklahoma's
population is largely concentrated in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa metropolitan areas, which account for 58 percent of the state's population
(Oklahoma City MSA is 33 percent and Tulsa MSA is 25 percent of the state's population). The next largest metropolitan area is Lawton, which
accounts for only 3 percent of the state's population. As Oklahoma City and Tulsa are the population centers in Oklahoma, these markets also
contain a large concentration of tourism products and are the most popular markets to visit
among tourists.                                                                              Population within 250 miles


Oklahoma's proximity to population centers outside the state is also important in attracting
drive-in visitors. As illustrated, Oklahoma City is within 250 miles of 14.3 million people,
approximately 10.7 million of which are residents of neighboring states. The Dallas/Fort
Worth market is of particular importance, as it is the fourth largest market in the U.S. and
contains more than six million people. Residents of the Dallas/Fort Worth market are
located approximately three hours from Oklahoma City and 90 minutes from Lake Texoma
at the Texas/Oklahoma border, which is a popular weekend getaway for residents of
Dallas/Fort Worth. In addition, within 400 miles of Oklahoma City, there are a number of
sizable cities, including Kansas City, Missouri/Kansas (population of two million), Austin,




                                                                                                                                                           Source: ESRI

This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   79
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Texas (1.6 million), Little Rock, Arkansas (670,000), Springfield, Missouri (420,000), and Shreveport, Louisiana (390,000).

Business Community
The composition of a destination’s employment provides insight                                                   Employment Composition (2007)
into its economic stability and, when specific industries of                                                                                                 OK Employees Percent Percent Coeff. of
specialization are examined, it can provide an indication of the                                                 Sector                                        (thousands)   (OK)   (U.S.) Special. 1
types     of   business   travel   and    industry   association
                                                                                                                 Services                                                   648.4   30.4%   34.3%      0.9
conventions/trade shows that a destination may have a
                                                                                                                 Wholesale & Retail Trade                                   429.9   20.1%   20.6%      1.0
comparative advantage in attracting. As shown in the table to the
                                                                                                                 Government                                                 355.2   16.6%   13.6%      1.2
right, Oklahoma's employment in 2007 totaled 2.1 million, two-
thirds of which were in the services, wholesale and retail trade,                                                Manufacturing                                              159.8    7.5%    9.0%      0.8
and government sectors.                                                                                          Fin, Insurance, & Real Estate                              150.7    7.1%    8.7%      0.8
                                                                                                                 Agricultural / Farm                                        122.5    5.7%    2.9%      2.0
Oklahoma's employment composition was also compared to the                                                       Construction                                               111.0    5.2%    5.9%      0.9
U.S. average. A coefficient of specialization of greater than 1.0                                                Transp., Comm., Public Util.                                97.9    4.6%    4.6%      1.0
indicates that Oklahoma's employment base is relatively more                                                     Mining                                                      58.3    2.7%    0.4%      6.4
specialized in that sector, while a coefficient of less than 1.0
                                                                                                                 Total                                                   2,133.7    100%    100%          -
indicates that Oklahoma is less specialized in that sector. With
                                                                                                                 1 Coefficient of Specialization equals OK's employment composition (%) divided by the U.S.
coefficients of specialization of 6.4 and 2.0, Oklahoma is much                                                  Source: Woods & Poole
more specialized in the Mining and Agricultural/Farm industries,
respectively, than the United States.

Local corporations tend to generate large amounts of business travel to a destination, thereby creating exposure for it as travelers take in the
destination’s product offerings in their free time. Local corporations also represent potential partners in development of a destination, as these
companies have a vested interest in the future of the destination. Many of Oklahoma's largest corporations reflect Oklahoma's energy industry,
aviation industry, and Native American culture, including ConocoPhillips, Devon Energy, Chesapeake Energy, OGE Energy Corporation, Williams
Companies, Inc., SandRidge Energy, AA-MRO (American Airlines Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul), and Chickasaw Nation Industries, Inc.

Oklahoma's travel industry increased from 55,600 employees in 1987 to 71,900 in 2006/2007; however, a study conducted by the Oklahoma
Employment Security Commission in 2006 revealed that the hospitality and leisure industry experienced 20.3 percent job vacancies (more than




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                               80
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




any other industry). Although high turnover is common in the hospitality and leisure industry, it should be recognized that employee shortages
could limit growth in the industry.

Colleges & Universities
Academic programs draw visitors to a destination to visit family and friends and/or attend conferences, recruiting events, athletics events, or other
special events. Oklahoma contains more than 50 colleges and universities, the 10 largest of which are listed in the following table. The largest
universities are the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University, both of which contain one main campus and multiple satellite
campuses throughout the state. The University of Oklahoma has 26,200 students at its Norman campus and a total of 29,700 students including
satellite campuses in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Oklahoma State University contains 21,200 students at its Stillwater campus and a total of 32,400
students including satellite campuses in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, and Okmulgee.

In addition, although enrollment only totals approximately 3,800 students, OCU is the state's leading private school. It has also been cited by U.S.
News and World Report as one of America's Best Colleges.

Enrollment at Oklahoma colleges/universities is largely driven by residents of Oklahoma. On average, approximately three-fourths of all students
are Oklahoma residents, while approximately one quarter are out-of-state or international students. The level of out-of-state enrollment provides
an indication of the potential visitation opportunities from family and friends.

Numerous educational programs related to tourism and hospitality are also offered by universities, community colleges, vocational training
programs, and high schools within Oklahoma. Universities and community colleges focus on education and professional development, whereas
vocational and high school programs are geared towards frontline employee training.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   81
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




10 Largest Colleges/Universities
                                                                                                                                              In-State              Out-of-State                Total       Private or
         College/University                                          City                          Region                                  Enrollment                Enrollment           Enrollment            Public
                                                                                                                                                                                                        1
1        University of Oklahoma                                      Norman                        Frontier Country                               17,695                          8,524       26,219           Public
                                                                                                                                                                                                        2
2        Oklahoma State University*                                  Stillwater                    Frontier Country                               16,395                          4,840       21,235           Public
3        Tulsa Community College*                                    Tulsa                         Green Country                                      N/A                          N/A        16,982           Public
4        University of Central Oklahoma*                             Edmond                        Frontier Country                               11,620                          4,133       15,753           Public
5        Oklahoma City Community College*                             Oklahoma City                Frontier Country                                    N/A                         N/A        12,516           Public
6        Northeastern State University*                              Tahlequah                     Green Country                                      N/A                          N/A         9,417           Public
7        Rose State College                                          Midwest City                  Frontier Country                                 8,395                           55         8,433           Public
8        Wayland Baptist University                                   Altus                        Great Plains Country                                N/A                         N/A         6,800           Private
9        Cameron University                                          Lawton                        Great Plains Country                               N/A                          N/A         5,737           Public
10       Northern Oklahoma College                                   Tonkawa                       Red Carpet Country                               3,987                         1,328        5,315           Public
1 Enrollment at the University of Oklahoma's Norman campus is 26,219 students, and total enrollment among Norman, Tulsa, and Oklahoma City campuses is 29,721 students.
2 Enrollment at OSU's Stillwater campus is 21,235 students, and total enrollment among Stillwater, Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Okmulgee campuses is 32,402 students.
* Colleges/Universities offering a hospitality program.
Source: College/University Administration




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                    82
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Climate & Weather

For leisure travelers, meeting planners, and group tour organizers alike,                                                       Average Climate Statistics
climate is an important factor in destination selection. The table and
                                                                                                                                 Temperature (degrees F)
chart present average weather-related statistics for Oklahoma City,
                                                                                                                                  Days warmer than 70 degrees                                            207
which is considered representative of all areas of Oklahoma.
                                                                                                                                  Days cooler than 32 degrees                                             79
                                                                                                                                  Average High Temperature                                                71
Oklahoma is located in a temperate climate region but experiences
                                                                                                                                  Average Low Temperature                                                 49
occasional extremes of temperature and precipitation. On average,
                                                                                                                                  Average Temperture                                                      60
Oklahoma's high temperature is 71 degrees (F) and its low temperature
is 49 degrees. More than half the days each year are warmer than 70                                                              Precipitation
degrees, yet only 70 days are more than 90 degrees. As shown in the                                                               Days with Precipitation                                                127
chart to the lower-right, high temperatures range from a low of 47                                                                Days with Snow                                                          22
degrees in January to a high of 93 degrees in July, and average low                                                               Days with Rain                                                         117
temperatures range from a low of 26 degrees in January to a high of 71                                                            Average Precipitation (inches)                                          33
degrees in July. With the exception of several winter and summer                                                                  Average Snow (inches)                                                   10
months, Oklahoma experiences relatively comfortable temperatures on a
year-round basis. Oklahoma receives minimal snowfall, with an average
of 10 inches per year on an average of 22 days. Rain is much more                                                               Seasonality (Temperature by Month)
frequent, with rainfall on 117 days, including thunderstorms on 50 days.                                                                                    100




                                                                                                                                  Temperature (degrees F)
                                                                                                                                                             90
Although Oklahoma's relatively mild temperatures may be appealing to                                                                                         80
visitors, Oklahoma's location in what is known as "Tornado Alley" and                                                                                        70
                                                                                                                                                             60
frequency of severe tornado activity may be discouraging for some
                                                                                                                                                             50
potential visitors. Tornadoes tend to be most active in April, May, and                                                                                      40
June (months that also experience the most frequent rainfall); however,                                                                                      30
April and May are not typically peak months for tourists to the state.                                                                                       20
                                                                                                                                                             10
                                                                                                                                                              0
                                                                                                                                                                  Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun   Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

                                                                                                                                                                             Average High           Average Low

                                                                                                                                Source: Sperling's Best Places


This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                83
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Affordability
Destination cost is an important factor among tourists, meeting                                                 Daily Travel Costs of Regional Cities
planners, and group tour organizers influencing the                                                                                                   U.S.                                   Car      Total
attractiveness of a destination. According to the AAA's 2008                                                                                         Rank               Hotel      Food    Rental     Cost
Annual Vacation Costs Survey, which ranks affordability of
                                                                                                                 Shreveport, LA                           98          $88.36      $79.08   $72.58   $240.02
states and large cities across the U.S., Oklahoma was ranked
as the sixth least expensive state for a vacation. In addition,                                                  Tulsa, OK                               95           105.22       79.85    70.94    256.01
Tulsa was ranked as the least expensive travel destination                                                       Wichita, KS                              89          105.45       81.21    78.71    265.37
among the 49 largest cities in the U.S., while Oklahoma City                                                     Oklahoma City, OK                       85           120.09       79.46    70.48    270.03
was ranked fourth.                                                                                               Springfield, MO                          71          144.22       81.74    59.48    285.44
                                                                                                                 Baton Rouge, LA                         68           119.92       87.13    79.95    287.00
In addition, the 2008 Corporate Travel Index compares average
                                                                                                                 St. Louis, MO                            64          126.45       88.01    78.54    293.00
daily costs of U.S Cities for corporate travel. The table to the
right presents the average daily costs of lodging, food (three                                                   Little Rock, AR                         57           122.05       86.58    87.22    295.85
meals), and car rental for Oklahoma City, Tulsa, and other                                                       Omaha, NE                               55           130.94       78.66    86.69    296.29
regional cities. With overall rankings of 85 and 95 among the                                                    San Antonio, TX                          46          138.21       82.28    85.63    306.12
100 most expensive cities in the U.S., both Tulsa and Oklahoma                                                   Memphis, TN                              38          135.91       86.29    92.44    314.64
City are considered affordable destinations. In comparison to                                                    Kansas City, MO                         32           128.64       90.15    98.72    317.51
regional destinations, Tulsa and Oklahoma City are also
                                                                                                                 Dallas, TX                               29          136.15      107.63    86.61    330.39
positioned favorably, with only Shreveport (ranked 98 of 100)
                                                                                                                 Houston, TX                             20           145.86      106.96   101.94    354.76
and Wichita (ranked 89 of 100) having lower destination costs
among those cities ranked. While Tulsa and Oklahoma City                                                         Austin, TX                               16          149.30      103.79   107.45    360.54
have total costs of approximately $256 and $270, respectively,
                                                                                                                 Tulsa Rank                                                  96      91       73        95
other competitive regional destinations such as Kansas City and
Dallas have destination costs in excess of $300.                                                                 OKC Rank                                                    78      92       74        85
                                                                                                                 Note: Rank is in terms of city with least expensive cost.
                                                                                                                 Source: Business Travel News 2008 Corporate Travel Index




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                         84
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Map of Tourism Assets

Oklahoma's tourism assets are summarized in the map below to illustrate the concentrations of tourism products, infrastructure, and population.
As illustrated, only Oklahoma City and Tulsa contain greater than 3,000 hotel rooms and have populations exceeding 150,000. These markets
also contain the greatest concentration of activity centers such as museums, lakes, State Parks, and sports facilities. Tourism products and
infrastructure are also concentrated in Lawton, Stillwater, Ponca City, Bartlesville, Ardmore, and Fort Smith/Salisaw.




  LEGEND

      Population:


              over 150,000


              75,001 to 150,000

              20,000 to 75,000

     Hotel Rooms:


              over 3,000


              1,001 to 3,000

              500 to 1,000

          Other:

              Airport

              Activity Center


Note: Population and hotel supply for the Fort Smith, AR-OK MSA represents the population and hotel supply in Oklahoma only.
Source: MS MapPoint



This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   85
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Assets




Rural Oklahoma

Based on the Office of Management and Budget definitions of Oklahoma's 77 counties, 17 are considered “metropolitan” (a county with at least
one population center with a population greater than 50,000), 17 are “micropolitan” (containing at least one population center with population
between 10,000 and 50,000), and the remaining 43 counties have population centers smaller than 10,000. According to Economic Conditions and
Trends in Rural Oklahoma prepared by the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service (January of 2007), from 2000 to 2005, population in non-
metropolitan (micropolitan and smaller) counties of Oklahoma increased by only one half of one percent, while the population of metropolitan
counties increased by 4.2 percent. During this period, 34 counties throughout the State of Oklahoma lost population, with all but one (Comanche),
being non-metropolitan counties. The report concluded that “there appears to be a shift of the state's total population and the state's elderly
population toward the metropolitan areas.” In 1990, non-metropolitan areas accounted for 38.9 percent of the state’s population, decreasing to
36.7 percent by 2005.

A variety of state agencies and other organizations, in addition to OTRD, recognize the importance of rural Oklahoma to the overall economic well-
being of the state and have programs that benefit rural communities. While this list is by no means intended to be all-inclusive, it does suggest a
concerted effort by a number of organizations throughout the state to ensure that investment in and improvement of rural (non-metropolitan)
Oklahoma continues to be a priority as part of the state’s broader economic development strategy. As is discussed throughout this report with
regard to tourism, particularly cultural and heritage tourism, rural Oklahoma plays an important role and is specifically referenced in a number of
the strategies and action steps of this plan.

Examples of these organizations, all of which can be instrumental in supporting tourism development throughout rural Oklahoma, include:

      •      Department of Commerce: Rural Economic Development                                                               •     Oklahoma State University’s Rural Development

      •      Oklahoma Main Street Program                                                                                     •     Oklahoma Arts Council

      •      Oklahoma Century Community Program                                                                               •     Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma, Inc.

      •      Oklahoma Community Institute                                                                                     •     Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science & Technology

      •      Resource Conservation and Development                                                                            •     Oklahoma Small Business Development Center

      •      Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service                                                                           •     Made in Oklahoma Coalition




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.             86
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Tourism Marketing
Aspects related to tourism marketing were evaluated, including Oklahoma's visitor                                                                    Purpose of Trip
characteristics and perceptions, the national motivations for travel and available travel                                                                                                     Ad      Ad
segments, and existing efforts to attract visitors.                                                                                                   Purpose                             Unaware   Aware
                                                                                                                                                      Visit family/friends                   30%     33%
Oklahoma Traveler Motivations                                                                                                                         Visit a specific attraction            16%     14%
                                                                                                                                                      Attend a specific event                11%     12%
To better understand Oklahoma's visitors, OTRD has commissioned various studies on                                                                    Family vacation                         7%     10%
visitor demographics, trip characteristics, activities, perceptions of Oklahoma, lead                                                                 Participate in outdoor recreation       5%      8%
conversions, advertising effectiveness, and other relevant information. In 2007,                                                                      Business trip                           2%      1%
Strategic Marketing and Research, Inc. (SMARI) conducted a conversion study and
                                                                                                                                                      Conference or convention                2%      1%
advertising effectiveness study where more than 4,000 surveys (total surveys for
                                                                                                                                                      Combined business & pleasure           10%      5%
conversion and advertising effectiveness) were completed by potential and actual
visitors. Conversion study respondents were those individuals for which lead            Note: Figures reflect Advertising Effectiveness Study results only.
                                                                                        Source: SMARI
information was available though website and 800-number inquiries, while advertising
effectiveness respondents represented sample travelers in key target markets.
Conversion study research revealed that 46 percent of visitors to Oklahoma were motivated to travel to Oklahoma to visit family and friends and
another 28 percent were passing through the state.

For advertising effectiveness respondents, only 30 to 33 percent visited Oklahoma for family and friends. Other reasons, as shown in the table
above, included visiting a specific attraction, attending a specific event, family vacation, participating in outdoor recreation, business trip,
conference/convention, and combined business/pleasure trip.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                      87
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Another informative study, conducted by Techneos in 2005, was based on
                                                                                                                                 Primary Reason to Visit Oklahoma
more than 3,000 surveys of visitors at various attractions throughout
Oklahoma. Approximately one-third of surveys were conducted at the
Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, and all other surveys were                                                                         To see family/friends
conducted at one of 12 other attractions, including Expo Square, Science
                                                                                                                                       To go to a sporting event
Museum (formerly the Omniplex), Myriad Botanical Gardens, and
Bricktown. Respondents were split roughly equally between in-state and                                                                   To go to a special event
out-of-state visitors, and less than 1 percent had traveled from outside the
United States.                                                                                                                                         For business


Among the 49 percent of out-of-state visitors, nearly half (45 percent) were                                                                          To go to Tulsa

in Oklahoma to visit family or friends, which is consistent with SMARI's
                                                                                                                                          To go to Oklahoma City
Conversion Study Research previously described. Other top reasons for
visiting Oklahoma include attending a sporting event (26 percent),                                                                    Museum/cultural attraction
attending a special event (17 percent), and traveling for business (15
percent). Although a small share of visitors traveled to Oklahoma for the                                                                          To go to the lake

purpose of visiting a museum/cultural attraction (8 percent) or visiting a
                                                                                                                                                  To see a concert
lake (3 percent), many visitors enjoyed these activities while they were in
Oklahoma for other reasons. It should be noted that visiting for purposes                                                                            To go camping
of lakes and camping are likely under-represented based on this survey
since surveys were done at various attractions in the state but were not                                                                                         Other

specifically conducted at a representative sample of campgrounds or lakes.
                                                                                                                                                                         0%       10%   20%   30%   40%   50%



                                                                                                                                  Note: Figures reflect out-of-state respondents only.
                                                                                                                                  Source: Techneos




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                           88
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Oklahoma Traveler Origins                                                                                                            Traveler Origin
                                                                                                                                                                                  % Overnight
Historical research has shown that travelers to Oklahoma originate from                                                               State                                         Travelers
nearly all states, but 10 states (in addition to in-state travel among Oklahoma                                                       Oklahoma                                           20%
residents) have shown to have the highest concentrations of visitors to                                                               Texas*                                             12%
Oklahoma. The two tables on this page present the results of this research                                                            Missouri*                                           8%
conducted by SMARI in a 2004 conversion study and by Techneos' 2005                                                                   Kansas*                                             4%
surveys.                                                                                                                              Arkansas*                                           4%
                                                                                                                                      Minnesota                                           2%
Conversion research has shown that travel among Oklahoma residents                                                                    Ilinois                                             2%
accounts for 20 percent of travel in the state. Texas accounts for the largest                                                        Colorado                                            2%
visitor market with 12 percent of travelers originating from the state, followed                                                      Arizona                                             2%
by the other border states of Missouri (8 percent), Kansas (4 percent), and                                                           California                                          2%
Arkansas (4 percent). Other states outside of the region with concentrations                                                          Other                                              43%
of visitors to the state include Minnesota, Illinois, Arizona, and California,                                                        Total                                             100%
each of which accounted for approximately 2 percent of visitors. Visitors                                                            *Border States,
from Colorado also accounted for 2 percent of travelers.                                                                             Source: SMARI (2004)

                                                                                                                                    Traveler Origin - State of Residence (Out-of-State)
Techneos surveys of visitors at attractions throughout the state indicated that                                                                                                           % of
approximately one-half of visitors were residents of Oklahoma, while the                                                             State                                            Travelers
other half were from states (or countries) outside of Oklahoma. Techneos
                                                                                                                                     Texas*                                               20%
surveys revealed similar results for out-of-state visitors with the largest
                                                                                                                                     Kansas*                                               8%
feeder state as Texas, which accounted for 20 percent of out-of-state visitors.
                                                                                                                                     California                                            6%
Kansas showed concentration of 8 percent, followed by California at 6
                                                                                                                                     Arkansas*                                             4%
percent. Other leading states included Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, and
                                                                                                                                     Florida                                               4%
Missouri (each supplying 4 percent of out-of-state visitors), and Arizona,
                                                                                                                                     Illinois                                              4%
Colorado, and Tennessee (each supplying 3 percent of out-of-state visitors).                                                         Missouri*                                             4%
                                                                                                                                     Arizona                                               3%
Based on this research, Oklahoma's border states (with the exception of New
                                                                                                                                     Colorado*                                             3%
Mexico, which accounts for only 1 percent of out-of-state visitors) are the
                                                                                                                                     Tennessee                                             3%
most significant sources of out-of-state visitation as well as other heavily
                                                                                                                                     Other                                                41%
                                                                                                                                     Total                                               100%
                                                                                                                                    * Border states
                                                                                                                                    Source: Techneos
This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                   89
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




populated states including California, Florida, and Illinois. Arizona, Minnesota, and Tennessee (each of which has direct flights to Oklahoma) also
provide visitors to Oklahoma.

Oklahoma Traveler Activities

As part of SMARI's 2007 conversion and advertising effectiveness research study, visitors were also asked what activities they participated in
while visiting Oklahoma. Conversion visitors participated in 3.9 activities, on average, and visiting historical sites (44 percent), dining (43 percent),
visiting art museums/galleries (35 percent), shopping (33 percent), and visiting a national/state park (25 percent) were the top five activities among
conversion visitors.

Activities among those surveyed as part of the advertising effectiveness study were similar to conversion visitors. The most popular activities of
visitors unaware of advertising were shopping (41 percent), dining (39 percent), gambling (29 percent), visiting historical sites (19 percent), and
visiting a national/state park (19 percent). The "ad unaware" visitors participated, on average, in two activities. Those visitors that recalled
advertising were more active, participating in 2.8 activities, on average. The top five activities among these "ad aware" visitors were dining (51
percent), shopping (51 percent), gambling (29 percent), visiting historical sites (26 percent), and visiting a national/state park (24 percent).

Top Activities - Conversion Research                                                                                   Top Activities - Advertising Effectiveness

Activities                                                               Conversion                                     Activities                                                Ad Unaware Ad Aware
Visit historical sites                                                               44%                                Restaurants/fine dining                                         39%      51%
Restaurants/fine dining                                                              43%                                Shopping                                                        41%      51%
Visit art museums & galleries                                                        35%                                Gambling/casinos                                                29%      29%
Shopping                                                                             33%                                Visit historical sites                                          19%      26%
Visit a state or national park                                                       25%                                Visit a state or national park                                  19%      24%
Attend cultural events & festivals                                                   17%
                                                                                                                        Outdoor recreational water sport                                 9%      19%
Camping or RVing                                                                     16%
                                                                                                                        Visit art museums & galleries                                    9%      17%
Gambling/casinos                                                                     13%
                                                                                                                        Attend cultural events & festivals                              10%      12%
Outdoor receational land sports                                                      12%
                                                                                                                        Camping or RVing                                                 8%      11%
Outdoor recreational water sport                                                     11%
                                                                                                                        Attend sports events                                             3%       7%
Visit theme/amusement parks                                                          10%
Individual sports                                                                     8%
                                                                                                                        Visit theme/amusement parks                                      2%       7%
Attend sports events                                                                  8%                                Outdoor receational land sports                                  5%       7%
Source: SMARI                                                                                                           Individual sports                                                3%       6%


This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                         90
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Oklahoma Traveler Destinations

Among conversion visitors, Oklahoma City was the most popular destination                                                                  Popular Destinations Visited
visited (41 percent of visitors), followed by Tulsa (26 percent of visitors). Lakes                                                         Destination                           Percent
and campgrounds, Tahlequah, Lawton, and Muskogee all garnered
                                                                                                                                            Oklahoma City                            41%
approximately 7 percent of travelers each.
                                                                                                                                            Tulsa                                    26%
                                                                                                                                            Lakes & Campgrounds                       7%
Techneos surveys (many of which were conducted in Oklahoma City) revealed
                                                                                                                                            Tahlequah                                 7%
similar results, where Oklahoma City was visited by 78 percent of respondants in
the past five years. Visitors were also asked which cities in Oklahoma they had                                                             Lawton                                    7%
visited or planned to visit while in Oklahoma. Among the 33 percent of visitors                                                             Muskogee                                  7%
that visited or planned to visit another city, Tulsa and Oklahoma City were the                                                             Guthrie                                   6%
leading cities, attracting 44 percent and 43 percent of visitors, respectively.                                                             McAlester                                 5%
Other cities drew a smaller share: Norman (9 percent), Edmond (8 percent),                                                                  Bartlesville                              5%
Guthrie (7 percent), and Bartlesville and Stillwater (each with 6 percent). Results                                                         Stillwater                                5%
of these studies indicate that Oklahoma City and Tulsa are the leading visitor                                                              Broken Bow                                5%
destinations in the state.                                                                                                                  Claremore                                 5%
                                                                                                                                            Arbuckle Area                             5%
                                                                                                                                            Grand Lake Area                           5%
                                                                                                                                            Ardmore                                   5%
                                                                                                                                            Shawnee                                   4%
                                                                                                                                            Enid                                      4%
                                                                                                                                            Miami                                     4%
                                                                                                                                            Normal                                    4%
                                                                                                                                            Ponca City                                3%
                                                                                                                                            Other                                    31%
                                                                                                                                           Source: SMARI Conversion Study




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.             91
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Oklahoma Traveler Demographics

According to the Techneos survey, nearly one-quarter of Oklahoma's                                                                 Age of Travelers
visitors are 45 to 54 years old (24 percent), followed by visitors in the 35 to
                                                                                                                                     30%
44 age range (22 percent), and visitors in the 25 to 34 age range (18
percent). Compared to the average of U.S. travelers, Oklahoma attracts                                                               25%
more visitors between the ages of 35 and 64, but less visitors in the 25 to                                                          20%
34 age range and 65 and older range. In fact, travelers between 25 and
                                                                                                                                     15%
34 create the largest share of travelers in the U.S. (26 percent), but
Oklahoma captures a significantly lower share of this group. However,                                                                10%
younger travelers between 18 and 24 account for a larger share of                                                                      5%
Oklahoma travelers (9 percent) as compared to U.S. travelers (5 percent).
                                                                                                                                       0%
Survey results of SMARI's conversion and advertising effectiveness                                                                                 18-24           25-34           35-44   45-54   55-64   65 and
studies also support the notion of relatively older travelers to Oklahoma                                                                          years           years           years   years   years    over

compared to the rest of the United States. For conversion study visitors,
                                                                                                                                                                            U.S.              Oklahoma
the average age was 57, while the average age was 48.2 for advertising
effectiveness study visitors. Additional demographic information from                                                              Source: Techneos; Travel Industry Association

these studies revealed that 79.7 percent of conversion visitors were
married and 70.1 percent of advertising effectiveness visitors were                                                                Ethnicity of Oklahoma Visitors
married.                                                                                                                                                                                                      Percent

                                                                                                                                    Caucasian                                                                       81%
According to the Techneos survey, more than 80 percent of visitors are
                                                                                                                                    African American                                                                 7%
Caucasian. Other ethnic groups visiting Oklahoma include African
                                                                                                                                    Hispanic                                                                         3%
American (7 percent), Hispanic and American Indian (each 3 percent), and
                                                                                                                                    Native American                                                                  3%
Asian (2 percent). SMARI's conversion and advertising effectiveness
                                                                                                                                    Asian                                                                            2%
results showed slightly higher percentages of Caucasian visitors at
                                                                                                                                    International                                                                    1%
approximately 89 percent.
                                                                                                                                    Other                                                                            3%
                                                                                                                                    Total                                                                       100%
                                                                                                                                    Source: Techneos




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                92
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Oklahoma Trip Characteristics

Oklahoma's visitors generally travel in parties of at least two people.                                                Number of People in Traveling Party
According to the Techneos survey, only 16 percent of visitors travel
alone, which is significantly lower than the U.S. average of 47                                                              50%
percent traveling alone. Oklahoma's visitors are also much more                                                              40%
likely to travel in large parties. While 23 percent of Oklahoma's
                                                                                                                             30%
visitors travel in parties of at least five, only 4 percent of U.S.
travelers are in parties of this size.                                                                                       20%

                                                                                                                             10%
Oklahoma tends to attract repeat visitors. The survey found that
only 14 percent of visitors were traveling to Oklahoma for the first                                                           0%
                                                                                                                                              One                  Tw o           Three          Four             Five+
time in five years and that approximately one-half of visitors had
been to Oklahoma at least four times before.
                                                                                                                                                                    U.S.                      Oklahoma


                                                                                                                        Source: Techneos; Travel Industry Association


                                                                                                                       Previous Visits to Oklahoma

                                                                                                                            50%

                                                                                                                            40%

                                                                                                                            30%
                                                                                                                            20%

                                                                                                                            10%

                                                                                                                              0%
                                                                                                                                        Not in          Once           Twice      3 times   4 times     5 times   6+ times
                                                                                                                                      the last 5        before         before     before    before      before     before
                                                                                                                                        Years

                                                                                                                        Note: Figures reflect out-of-state respondents only.
                                                                                                                        Source: Techneos




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                           93
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




According to the Techneos survey, the average length of stay is                                                        Length of Trip
greater than three days. More than half of visitors planned to stay in
Oklahoma for at least four days, while only 17 percent of visitors
were in Oklahoma for one day only.
                                                                                                                                               17%
                                                                                                                                                                                        Four or more days
Similarly, conversion study data indicates the average nights spent
                                                                                                                                                                                        Three days
on a trip in Oklahoma is 2.4 nights, which is consistent with the
average stay duration in terms of days.                                                                                           16%                                             52%   Two days
                                                                                                                                                                                        One day
                                                                                                                                              15%




                                                                                                                      Source: Techneos




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                             94
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Visitor Perceptions of Oklahoma
                                                                                                                       Perceptions of Oklahoma
Perceptions of a destination influence traveler decisions and
behaviors. Perceptions of Oklahoma were addressed in a 2008                                                                                                                         Fits Very Well
survey conducted by Decision Analyst. Survey respondents included                                                      Statement                                                   with Oklahoma
those who had visited Oklahoma attractions, those who have shown                                                       I can experience Native American culture there                        61%
interest in visiting Oklahoma attractions, and those who have not                                                      The people are friendly                                               54%
shown interest in visiting. Respondents were asked how well certain                                                    I can experience Western culture and activities there                 53%
statements "fit" with their image of Oklahoma. As shown to the right,
                                                                                                                       There is an abundance of natural beauty                               53%
more than half of respondents recognize that Oklahoma is a place
                                                                                                                       I can participate in many outdoor activities                          51%
where they can experience Native American culture (61 percent),
                                                                                                                       It is a great place for families                                      48%
friendly people (54 percent), Western culture (53 percent), natural
                                                                                                                       It has an abundance of lakes for water sports or outdoor activities   48%
beauty (53 percent), and outdoor activities (51 percent).
                                                                                                                       It is easy to get to and get around in                                45%
Nearly half of respondents recognize that Oklahoma is a great place                                                    There are many charming areas to explore                              44%
for families (48 percent), contains many lakes (48 percent), is easily                                                 It is a good value for the money                                      44%
accessible (45 percent), is affordable (44 percent), offers gambling                                                   It is a clean safe place                                              44%
(40 percent), contains many museums/galleries (37 percent), and                                                        I can gamble and go to casinos                                        40%
offers a variety of activities (35 percent). While these attributes are                                                There are many museums and art galleries to explore                   37%
among Oklahoma's strengths as a tourism destination, they do not                                                       There is a lot to do                                                  35%
appear to be widely recognized according to survey respondents.                                                        There are many activities for children                                35%
Given that the respondents include both past and potential visitors, it                                                There are many opportunities for entertainment and nightlife          26%
is possible that many past visitors agree that the statements fit with                                                 There are exciting urban attractions                                  25%
Oklahoma, while potential visitors either do not agree with the                                                        It is a progressive place with artistic people                        24%
statements or have no perception of Oklahoma at all.                                                                   There is an abundance of art deco architectural beauty                22%
                                                                                                                       It is cool or "hip"                                                   15%
Perceptions of Oklahoma have not changed significantly in the past
twenty years. As presented in the 1987 Master Plan, the most                                                           Source: Decision Analyst

frequently mentioned "first images" of Oklahoma were the oil




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.              95
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




industry, American Indian culture, scenic areas, Western heritage,                                                    Oklahoma as a Tourist Destination
lakes, dry and dusty, and no perception at all. However, perceptions
of the state have shown improvement based on a Zogby survey                                                                                                                    10




                                                                                                                                                      Rating (10 is highest)
commissioned by the State Chamber of Commerce in December of                                                                                                                       9
2008. These survey results showed that 68 percent of Americans
                                                                                                                                                                                   8
surveyed had a favorable view of Oklahoma (excellent - 7 percent,
good - 35 percent, and fair - 26 percent), while 12 percent had an                                                                                                                 7

unfavorable (poor) view of the state. Approximately 20 percent did                                                                                                                 6
not have an opinion. These figures are up from two years ago when                                                                                                                  5
47 percent viewed Oklahoma favorably, 17 percent viewed it
                                                                                                                                                                               1-4
unfavorably, and 30 percent had no opinion. In addition, in the 2008
survey, 21 percent of young adults (ages 18 to 24) gave Oklahoma                                                                                                                       0%        5%          10%         15%      20%        25%
an excellent rating. Zogby attributes sports as one of the causes to
the boost in Oklahoma's image resulting from arrival of the                                                           Likeliness of Visiting Oklahoma Again
Oklahoma City Thunder and the success of Oklahoma's college
football teams.
                                                                                                                                                                          10




                                                                                                                         Rating (10 is Most Likely)
Oklahoma is often viewed as a family-friendly destination. According                                                                                                           9
to Tulsa World, a study conducted in 2008 by the University of                                                                                                                 8
Cambridge in England finds that Oklahomans tend to be friendlier                                                                                                               7
and have a stronger sense of duty than residents of many other
                                                                                                                                                                               6
states. Oklahoma ranked sixth in "conscientiousness," which is
associated with duty, self-discipline, and responsible behavior, and                                                                                                           5
ninth in "agreeability," which indicates compassion, friendliness, and                                                                                            1-4
human warmth. In addition, Family Circle magazine named Broken
                                                                                                                                                                                   0%       5%   10%   15%   20%   25%    30%   35%   40%   45%
Arrow one of the top 10 cities in America to raise a family. The list,
published in the magazine's August 2008 issue, highlights cities that
                                                                                                                       Source: Techneos
offer quality educational and workforce opportunities, low crime
rates, and affordable housing.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                                             96
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




As part of the Techneos surveys, visitors reached in the survey were asked to rate Oklahoma as a tourist destination on a 10-point scale, with 10
being the highest rating. Nearly half of respondents (48 percent) gave Oklahoma an eight to 10 rating, and two-thirds (67 percent) rated
Oklahoma a seven or higher. On average, Oklahoma was rated a 7.1 among all respondents. These figures indicate that Oklahoma is perceived
favorably as a tourist destination; however, one-quarter of visitors rated Oklahoma a five or below, suggesting there is opportunity for Oklahoma to
improve its appeal as a tourist destination.

Visitors also stated their likeliness of visiting Oklahoma again on a 10-point scale, with 10 being the most likely to return. As shown in the chart to
the lower-right on the previous page, 41 percent of respondents indicated that they are extremely likely to return to Oklahoma in the future (rating
of 10). Nearly three quarters (73 percent) of respondents provided a rating of seven or above, indicated that they are likely to return. Similar to
the distribution of Oklahoma's rating as a tourist destination, the minority of visitors (although still significant) provided a rating of five or below,
indicating that they are unlikely to return to Oklahoma for a future visit.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   97
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Oklahoma's Brand

Since the launch of the "Oklahoma Native America" advertising campaign in 1992, Oklahoma's
brand has been centered on its natural assets, while also serving as a reminder of Oklahoma's
Native American heritage. The advertising campaign includes television, national magazines,
billboards, and the Internet as well as special projects such as attracting visitors from overseas.

Oklahoma's Native America campaign has received numerous awards since its implementation
including 17 Mercury awards, the EFFIE from the American Marketing Association, and more than
100 local, regional, and national advertising awards. In addition, the campaign was featured in a
widely used advertising textbook as an example of successful repositioning.

The Native America brand is so well established that it has been on state license plates since 1995.
Currently, the state is preparing for the issuance of new license plates with an updated design,
which will retain the "Native America" mantra and feature the image of the Sacred Rain Arrow
statue at Tulsa's Gilcrease Museum.

As part of the Oklahoma Native America brand, the "OKLA" campaign was launched in 2004, which
features pairings of "Okla" with various anchor words such as OklaModern, OklaCool, OklaGrand,
and OklaStrong. In the campaign's first year, OklaModern was awarded TIA's Americas Mercury
Award for its presentation of Oklahoma's urban, rural, and outdoor tourist attractions in a
progressive and modern way.

In addition, SMARI's advertising effectiveness research showed high ratings for the state's tourism
campaigns. According to SMARI, the goal for strong advertising is to receive a rating of 3.75 or
better, and the best ads receive between a 4.0 and 4.2. Ratings for Oklahoma ranged from 3.61 to
4.11 and are detailed further in the following table.

                 Statement                                                                                                      Rating
                 Makes it seem like an appealing destination to visit                                                            4.11
                 Shows unexpected attractions or activities                                                                      4.03
                 Makes you want to find out more about travel to/within Oklahoma                                                 3.87
                 Makes you want to visit Oklahoma                                                                                3.82
                 Makes you want to visit the Website or call for more information                                                3.61

                Source: SMARI Advertising Effectiveness Study
This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   98
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Oklahoma's Target Markets

Consumer Market Segments

A tourism segmentation study, conducted by TNS in 2006, identified types of consumers that                                                                         Motivations for Leisure Travel
Oklahoma should target for tourism. The study involved surveys of residents of regional states
(60 percent of sample, including 12 percent from Oklahoma) and residents of other states (40                                                                             Motivations for Travel           Percent
percent of sample). This study indicated that the consumer segments termed "homebodies"
                                                                                                                                                                    Active Doers
and "big trippers" were not viable targets as homebodies rarely travel and big trippers are less
                                                                                                                                                                      Been there before                      59%
likely to be convinced of Oklahoma's variety of activities. However, the study recommended
                                                                                                                                                                      Lots to do                             47%
two segments for Oklahoma to target, termed "active doers" and "scenic relaxers." These
                                                                                                                                                                      Good weather                           35%
segments were considered ideal for Oklahoma as they have a higher interest in visiting
                                                                                                                                                                      Very relaxing place                    34%
Oklahoma and have interests in activities that Oklahoma offers, as summarized below.
                                                                                                                                                                      Great place to shop                    27%
      •      Active doers are generally older, affluent visitors who are low-risk explorers and                                                                       Very popular place                     27%
             adventurers and view traveling as a hobby. Activities unique to this segment include                                                                     Can gamble there                       23%
             visiting historic sites, casino/gambling, swimming/beach, and fine dining.                                                                               Historic/educational significance      20%
                                                                                                                                                                      Good night life                        18%
      •      Scenic relaxers are generally young and married (many with children), who enjoy
             traveling, particularly in the off-season when rates are lower. Activities unique to this                                                              Scenic Relaxers
             segment include outdoor recreation, camping, swimming, and visiting theme parks.                                                                         Very scenic, beautiful place           48%
                                                                                                                                                                      Good place for family                  38%
Respondents were asked what motivated them to go on their most recent leisure trip. As                                                                                Reasonable cost of hotels              32%
presented in the table, active doers were motivated by familiarity with a destination, variety of                                                                     Good value for the money               25%
activities, good weather, and relaxing atmosphere. Active doers were also interested in the                                                                           Great for camping                      24%
ability to gamble and the historic/cultural significance of the destination. As scenic relaxers                                                                       Good state parks                       21%
consist of many young families, they were most frequently motivated by scenic beauty, family-                                                                         Locals are friendly                    21%
friendly atmosphere, and affordability of hotels and the destination. This segment was also                                                                           Safe and secure                        21%
interested in camping facilities, state parks, and the friendliness of locals.                                                                                        Wanted to escape city                   8%
                                                                                                                                                                      Good urban areas                        2%
                                                                                                                                                                    Source: TNS




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                            99
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Respondents were also asked what activities they                                                    Activities of Leisure Travelers
participated in on their most recent leisure trip.                                                  Activities                                             Percent                Activities                     Percent
Shopping, visiting family/friends, and visiting historical
                                                                                                    Active Doers                                                                  Scenic Relaxers
sites were cited most often by both active doers and
scenic relaxers. Gambling, swimming, going to a beach                                                  Shopping                                                  59%               Shopping                         55%
resort, fine dining, and visiting museums/art galleries                                                Family/friend event/reunion                               46%               Family/friend event/reunion      49%
were followed in popularity among active doers, while                                                  Historic sites                                            37%               Historic sites/churches          31%
scenic relaxers enjoyed swimming, visiting museums/art                                                 Casino/gambling                                           37%               Swimming                         28%
galleries, camping, and visiting theme parks.                                                          Swimming                                                  35%               Museums/art galleries            27%
                                                                                                       Beach resort                                              34%               Camping                          26%
                                                                                                       Fine dining                                               33%               Theme park                       23%
                                                                                                       Museums/art galleries                                     31%               Special events                   21%
                                                                                                       Theme park                                                29%               Zoos                             17%
                                                                                                       Special events                                            28%               Fine dining                      15%
                                                                                                       Historic homes/mansions                                   19%               Historic homes/mansions          14%
                                                                                                       Health club/exercise room                                 18%               Antiques                         14%
                                                                                                       Nightclub/stage shows                                     18%               Beach resort                     11%
                                                                                                       Wildlife preserve                                         18%               Boating/water skiing             10%
                                                                                                       Boating/water skiing                                      15%               Casino/gambling                   8%
                                                                                                       Golf                                                      15%               Wildlife preserve                 8%
                                                                                                       Antiques                                                  15%               Nightclub/stage shows             6%
                                                                                                       Camping                                                   12%               Health club/exercise room         3%
                                                                                                       Zoos                                                       8%               Golf                              2%
                                                                                                    Source: TNS




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                  100
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Geographic Market Segments

Geographically, Oklahoma's target markets at the state level are the                                                            Television Advertisement Spending
bordering states of Texas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Kansas. As illustrated
in the chart, more than half of the television advertising spending at the                                                                                         6%
                                                                                                                                                 11%
state level (Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department) is targeted in                                                                                                                 Texas
Texas. Key designated media areas within each state include Oklahoma                                                                   12%                                              Missouri
City and Tulsa in Oklahoma, Dallas-Fort Worth, Amarillo, Wichita
                                                                                                                                                                                        Arkansas
Falls/Lawton, and Sherman-Ada in Texas, Joplin, Springfield, and Kansas                                                                                                           52%
                                                                                                                                                                                        Oklahoma
City in Missouri, Fort Smith and Little Rock in Arkansas, and Wichita,
Kansas.                                                                                                                                          19%                                    Kansas


However, television advertisements represent just greater than half of the
media spending at the state level (54 percent). Online marketing consists
of nearly 21 percent of the media spending. Other types of advertising     Source: Ackerman McQueen
include consumer magazines, newspapers, and sports marketing.
Examples of print publications include AARP The Magazine, Home & Away, Family Circle, Southern Living, Good Housekeeping, Midwest Living,
and Ladies Home Journal.

At the regional level (country and lake associations), marketing is also concentrated largely on in-state and bordering state markets. Regional
marketing targets in Texas include Dallas, Ft. Worth, Amarillo, and Wichita Falls. Kansas City, Joplin, and Springfield are the main regional
targets within Missouri, while Fort Smith and Little Rock are the marketing targets in Arkansas.

At the international level, Oklahoma is marketed to German-speaking European markets and the United Kingdom through an international
marketing firm. Oklahoma is marketed jointly with Kansas as the "Heartland of America."




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                 101
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




National Travel Motivations

At the national level, people are motivated to travel for a variety of                                                National Motivations for Travel
reasons. According to TIA, approximately three quarters of travelers                                                                                                                Percent of
were motivated by personal reasons, while approximately one                                                             Purpose                                                   Person-trips
quarter were motivated for business reasons. As shown to the right,                                                     Visit Friends/Relatives                                          26%
26 percent of travelers were motivated to visit family and friends, 12                                                  General Business                                                 16%
percent were seeking a weekend getaway, 8 percent were on a                                                             Weekend Getaway                                                  12%
general vacation, and 28 percent were motivated by other                                                                Convention, Training, Group Meeting                              10%
personal/leisure reasons.                                                                                               General Vacation                                                  8%
                                                                                                                        Other Personal/Leisure                                           28%
Oklahoma is positioned to capture each of these segments to
varying degrees. Previous research by SMARI has shown strong                                                            Total                                                           100%
motivation of travel to Oklahoma for visiting friends and relatives (46                                               Source: Travel Industry Association
percent among conversion respondents and 30 to 33 percent among
advertising effectiveness respondents).

In addition, according to the 2008 Futures Study conducted for Destination Marketing Association International, most people who travel do so for
one or more of seven primary reasons, motives, or expectations of value:

      •      Personal Necessity - travel seen as a means to an end such as attending a wedding
      •      Business Necessity - travel required to accomplish a specific objective such as attending a meeting
      •      Escape - seek respite from pressures of life/work (to “unwind”)
      •      Indulgence - seek an “over the top” experience, almost as a gift to themselves such as a European vacation

      •      Learning and Renewal - seek cultural experiences, learn the history, sample the life experiences of another culture, etc.
      •      Challenge and Adventure - seek risk, danger, adventure, and strenuous activity (the “adrenaline rush”)
      •      Special Activities - related to an activity valued such as research, education, humanitarian contributions, etc.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                  102
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Oklahoma has the resources to provide opportunities for rest and relaxation, recreational and adventurous activities, and to a lesser degree,
opportunities for indulgence. Oklahoma's heritage/cultural assets and natural resources are positioned to capture travelers motivated by escape,
learning and renewal, challenge and adventure, and to a lesser degree, indulgence.

National Travel Segments

Travelers in the U.S. can be classified in numerous travel segments based on traveler characteristics such as age, ethnicity, interests, and trip
purpose. Several of these travel segments are highlighted below.

Generational Travel

        •      The Boomers - This generation (age 44 to 62) accounts for 26 percent of the U.S. population, and as the baby boomers age, the
               population in the 44 to 62 age range is expected to grow 6 percent in 20 years. The baby boomers generated the highest travel volume
               in the U.S. and are the most likely to travel for business.
        •      Gen X/Y - This generation (age 22 to 43) accounts for 30 percent of the U.S. population, and the population in this age range is expected
               to increase 13 percent in 20 years. Younger travelers are more likely to seek out entertainment, night life, sightseeing,
               theme/amusement parks, and national/state parks.
        •      Silent/GI - This generation (age 63 and older) currently accounts for 15 percent of the U.S. population; however, as the baby boomers
               age, the population age 63 and older is expected to increase 75 percent in 20 years. These travelers are more likely to gamble and take
               group tours.
        •      Millennials - This generation (age 21 and younger) represents the next generation of travelers, and their travel preferences and behaviors
               will need to continue to be monitored.
Minority Travel

        •      The Hispanic population, which accounts for 16 percent of the total U.S. population, is expected to increase by 70 percent from 2008 to
               2030. Hispanic travel experiences are often centered around the family, and approximately one-third of trips by Hispanic households
               include children under 18 years old, significantly higher than the U.S. average.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   103
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




        •      The Asian-American population, although only 5 percent of the population, is the fastest growing minority group and is expected to
               increase by 90 percent from 2008 to 2030. This group has an above-average propensity to travel and spends approximately 13 percent
               more (excluding transportation) than other U.S. travelers.
        •      The African-American population is 13 percent of the U.S. population and is expected to grow by 28 percent from 2008 to 2030. Group
               tours are popular among African-Americans with nearly three times as many African-American person-trips involve group tours as
               compared to the U.S. average.
Geo-tourism
Geo-tourism is defined as tourism that sustains or enhances the geographic character of the place being visited, including its environment, culture,
heritage, landmarks, and the well-being of its residents.

Emerging Niches
A number of travel niches have emerged in recent years and some destination marketing organizations have responded by marketing specific
travel packages. Emerging niche markets include the following:



                                                       •      Destination Weddings                                              •      Travelers with Disabilities

                                                       •      Babymoons                                                         •      Medical/Life-Enhancement Travel
                                                       •      Pet Travel                                                        •      Girlfriend Getaways
                                                       •      Space Travel                                                      •      Mancations

                                                       •      Culinary Travel                                                   •      Gay/Lesbian Travel




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   104
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Changing Traveler Patterns

Due to shifts in economic, social, and demographic factors, traveler patterns continue to evolve. Recent research conducted by DK Shifflet and
Associates identified six shifts in patterns of leisure behavior. As summarized below, Oklahoma has the resources to respond to each traveler
pattern.
        •      Americans are traveling closer to home - Oklahoma's geographic position in the central region of the U.S. and proximity to major
               population centers makes Oklahoma well-positioned for the regional drive-in market.

        •      Day trips are growing faster than overnight leisure travel - Oklahoma is located within a reasonable driving distance of several markets in
               the regional area.
        •      Women are more likely to travel together than men, but spend less per trip (except for shopping) - Oklahoma has recognized the growth
               in female travelers and has responded by marketing “chick trips."
        •      On leisure trips, women seek culture while men seek sports - Oklahoma offers a multitude of cultural experiences, spectator sports
               events, and recreational sporting activities.
        •      Boomers show higher trip activity participation rates than the silent generation and gen X'ers - The baby boomer generation accounts for
               the largest share of Oklahoma's visitors (approximately 40 percent), and Oklahoma offers activities most demanded by this generation
               (dining, shopping, entertainment, and sightseeing).
        •      Non-participation rates in activities have risen for all generations - Although outdoor recreation, visiting historic sites, attending festivals,
               and nightlife have decreased in popularity among U.S. travelers in the past decade, Oklahoma has recognized that gaming, performing
               arts events, dining, entertainment, and shopping have increased in popularity.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   105
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




National Traveler Activities
Activities that U.S. travelers participate in while traveling are presented to the                                                         National Traveler Activities
right. In general, business travelers were less likely to participate in activities                                                            Activity                           Leisure   Business
while traveling as compared to leisure travelers. The most popular activity
                                                                                                                                            Nature
among both leisure and business travelers was dining, in which 33 percent of
                                                                                                                                             Parks (National/State)                  6%          3%
leisure travelers and 31 percent of business travelers participated. Other top                                                               Nature/Eco-Travel                       3%          2%
activities among the leisure segment included shopping (28 percent                                                                           Camping                                 2%          1%
participated), entertainment (23 percent), and sightseeing (19 percent).
                                                                                                                                            Recreational
Oklahoma offers numerous opportunities for historical/cultural activities and                                                                Beach/Waterfront                        7%          3%
nature and recreation activities such as visiting state parks, hiking, biking,                                                               Hike, Bike                              4%          1%
hunting, fishing, camping, boating, visiting historic sites, and visiting museums.                                                           Hunt, Fish                              4%          2%
                                                                                                                                             Other Adventure Sports                  2%          2%
At the national level, while these activities may not be ranked at the top of the
                                                                                                                                             Boat/Sail                               2%          1%
list, Oklahoma is positioned to capture travelers that enjoy these wide range of                                                             Golf                                    2%          1%
activities while traveling. In addition, Oklahoma offers opportunities for such                                                              Snow Ski/Snow Board                     1%          1%
activities for travelers to participate in while in Oklahoma, even if their primary
                                                                                                                                            Cultural
purpose for traveling is something other than participating in these activities.
                                                                                                                                             Visit Historic Site                     5%          3%
                                                                                                                                             Museum, Art Exhibit                     5%          3%
                                                                                                                                             Festival, Craft Fair                    5%          3%
                                                                                                                                             Concert, Play, Dance                    5%          3%
                                                                                                                                            Entertainment
                                                                                                                                             Dining                                 33%         31%
                                                                                                                                             Shopping                               28%         17%
                                                                                                                                             Entertainment                          23%         11%
                                                                                                                                             Gambling                                8%          3%
                                                                                                                                             Night Life                              8%          5%
                                                                                                                                             Theme/Amusement Park                    6%          2%
                                                                                                                                             Spectator Sports                        5%          3%
                                                                                                                                            Other
                                                                                                                                              Sightseeing                           19%         10%
                                                                                                                                              Group Tour                             3%          2%
                                                                                                                                              Look at Real Estate                    2%          2%
                                                                                                                                              Shows (boat/auto/antique)              1%          2%
                                                                                                                                           Source: Travel Industry Association

This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                   106
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




According to the Outdoor Industry Foundation, the active outdoor recreation                                                          Top Activities - Participants in Oklahoma Region (In thousands)
economy contributes $730 billion to the U.S. economy each year. On a
regional basis, the Oklahoma regional area (containing Oklahoma, Texas,                                                                          Bicycling
Louisiana, and Arkansas) generated 5.3 percent of the total economic output,
which was the fifth largest (of nine) regional areas. (It should be noted the                                                         Wildlife Viewing

report provided information on a regional basis and did not provided detail by
                                                                                                                                                        Trail
state.)
The most popular outdoor activities enjoyed by residents and visitors of this                                                                      Fishing
region are bicycling (6.5 million participants), followed by wildlife viewing (6.2
                                                                                                                                                Camping
million), trail-related recreation (5.3 million), fishing (4.7 million), and camping
(4.2 million). Oklahoma offers hunting and paddling opportunities, yet these
                                                                                                                                                  Hunting
activities attracted only 2.2 million and 1.6 million participants in the region,
respectively.                                                                                                                                    Paddling

Outdoor recreation participation in Oklahoma's regional area was compared                                                                             Snow
to the U.S. to understand the regional area's specialization in activities. As
shown in the table to the lower-right, a ratio of more than one indicates that                                                                                  0       1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000
the Oklahoma region is more specialized than the U.S., while a ratio of less
than one indicates that Oklahoma is less specialized. With ratios of 1.5 and
                                                                                                                                     Regional Specialization in Outdoor Activities
1.1, the Oklahoma region is more specialized in hunting and fishing,
respectively, than the U.S, suggesting that Oklahoma may be a more                                                                                                                            Oklahoma Region's
                                                                                                                                      Activity                                                     Specialization
attractive destination to visitors seeking hunting and fishing experiences.
                                                                                                                                      Hunting                                                                   1.5
                                                                                                                                      Fishing                                                                   1.1
                                                                                                                                      Bicycling                                                                 1.0
                                                                                                                                      Wildlife Viewing                                                          0.8
                                                                                                                                      Camping                                                                   0.8
                                                                                                                                      Trail                                                                     0.8
                                                                                                                                      Paddling                                                                  0.6
                                                                                                                                      Snow                                                                      0.4
                                                                                                                                     Note: Oklahoma region includes Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas.
                                                                                                                                     Source: Outdoor Industry Foundation


This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                             107
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Oklahoma's Potential Market Segments

Travel segments at the national level are presented in the matrix below to understand which markets Oklahoma is best positioned to capture.
Travel markets are presented in seven categories and those in blue offer highest potential for Oklahoma to target. Snow ski/snow board and
cruise markets are the only two segments that Oklahoma is not in a position to capture. As Oklahoma's strengths are in the areas of
heritage/culture, nature and recreation, sports, and entertainment, it has the resources to target tourism markets in these categories. Among the
other/niche category, Oklahoma has the resources to target the group tour, culinary, and agritourism markets. In addition, each of these national
segments includes a combination of Oklahoma's targeted consumers defined as the "active doers" and "scenic relaxers."

Potential Market Segments
  Visiting Family &                                                         Sports &                          Heritage /                                                                            Business
       Friends                             Nature                          Recreation                          Culture                      Entertainment                         Other/Niche        Travel
  Holidays / Special                       Parks
                                                                           Waterfront                   Visit Historic Site                        Dining                         Group Tour        Meetings
      Occasions                         (Nat'l / State)
                                          Nature/                             Hiking /                      Museum, Art
   Family Reunions                                                                                                                              Shopping                           Culinary        Conventions
                                         Eco-Travel                          Bicycling                        Exhibit

                                           Camping                   Hunting / Fishing                   Festivals / Fairs                  Entertainment                         Agritourism      Trade Shows

                                                                      Other Adventure                       Music, Play,
                                                                                                                                                Gambling                          Educational        Training
                                                                          Sports                              Dance

                                                                            Boat / Sail                     Sightseeing                         Night Life                         Religious      Temporary Work

                                                                                                                                            Theme Park /
                                                                                 Golf                                                                                               Medical
                                                                                                                                           Zoo / Aquarium
                                                                                                                                                                                  Shows
                                                                                  RV                                                      Spectator Sports
                                                                                                                                                                             (boat, auto, etc.)

                                                                     Participant Sports                                                                                              Spa

                                                                       Snow Ski / Snow
                                                                                                                                                                                    Cruise
                                                                           Board




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                  108
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Marketing




Geographic markets presented in the table to the right illustrate Potential Geographic Targets
areas that Oklahoma may be best positioned to capture. Border
                                                                       Border States        Other States                                                                           International
states listed in blue indicate the areas likely offering the strongest
potential for Oklahoma. The border states are natural markets to           Texas              California                                                                          United Kingdom
attract visitors and pass-through travelers given their proximity and
large population bases. Border states are current key target markets                                                                                                              German-speaking
                                                                          Kansas               Illinois
                                                                                                                                                                                      Europe
for Oklahoma at the state, regional, and local levels, and surveys
have shown concentrations of visitors from these states.                 Arkansas              Florida                                                                                Canada

Other states and international markets represent secondary markets
                                                                              Missouri             Minnesota
with potential for Oklahoma to draw visitors. California, Illinois, and
Florida, for instance, have shown relatively high concentrations of         New Mexico               Iowa
visitors to Oklahoma based on prior research. Research regarding
Winter Texans has also shown high concentrations from Minnesota,             Colorado
Iowa, and Canada. As these markets, (along with Missouri and
Kansas) are located along I-35, there may be potential for Oklahoma to capture demand from these pass-through travelers.

In addition, several of the "other states" in secondary markets contain cities with direct flights to Oklahoma's commercial airports, including Los
Angeles, Chicago, and Minneapolis. While Oklahoma is recognized as a drive market for leisure travel with an estimated 92 percent of visitors
driving into the state, cities with direct flights to commercial airports in the state present the opportunity to target concentrations of visitors that are
accessible to the state. Direct flights are also offered from cities in border states, including Dallas, Houston, Denver, St. Louis, and Kansas City,
thereby providing travelers from these border states convenient access to Oklahoma.

Along with Canada, other secondary international markets include the United Kingdom and German-speaking regions of Europe. These markets
are currently targeted in a joint effort with Kansas. In addition to these states and countries, the in-state population is another target market for
travelers. In-state marketing promotes travel within the state and helps to retain travelers that may have otherwise ventured outside of Oklahoma
for leisure travel. Pass-through travelers in Oklahoma may also be influenced through in-state marketing. Through Discover Oklahoma, print and
TV advertisements, and public service announcements, in-state marketing also helps to raise awareness of tourism assets and the importance of
tourism in Oklahoma.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                     109
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




Tourism Roles & Responsibilities
In this section, an overview of critical tourism industry roles is provided along with Oklahoma's existing framework for fulfilling these roles.


Overview of Tourism Industry Roles

Visitors’ experiences during previous trips, recommendations from friends and relatives, individual events and attractions, visitor infrastructure,
destination attributes, stories in print and broadcast media, and destination marketing and promotional efforts all influence the ability to convert
potential visitors to actual visitors. The following is a description of the areas where various stakeholders influence the conversion of potential
visitors to actual visitors:

•     Tourism Policy - Because tourism plays such an important role in state economies—generating sales, income, employment, and taxes—the
      state’s tourism role in setting tourism policy is critical. This is particularly evident for rural communities that may have once been more
      dependent on manufacturing, farming, ranching, etc., but are now looking for economic development alternatives to supplement or even
      replace these industries. Tourism policy is the government’s involvement in eliminating or reducing barriers to travel, or legislating incentives
      to encourage tourism directly and indirectly, thereby enhancing the economic impact of tourism for the destination.

•     Tourism Planning - Tourism planning may take several forms, including product planning, marketing planning, long-range strategic planning,
      and sustainable tourism planning. The state is often involved in all of these areas and may be best positioned to undertake statewide planning
      initiatives, while regional and local entities often conduct similar planning in a more concentrated scale.

•     Tourism Development - While local government’s role in tourism development is often more focused on the funding and operation of “brick-
      and-mortar” facilities such as convention centers, sports venues, museums, main street initiatives, and other such developments, the state’s
      role in this area is typically focused on supporting local initiatives.

•     Tourism Marketing - One of the primary roles of state tourism offices is to serve as the tourism marketing arm for the state, promoting
      Oklahoma to other states and countries. At the local and regional level, marketing by associations, destination marketing organizations, and
      attractions also target out-of-area visitors, including in-state and out-of-state visitors.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   110
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




•     Tourism Education - Tourism education includes the education of residents, policy leaders, and stakeholders as well as training and
      professional development of industry employees.

•     Tourism Research - Tourism research is an essential component of tourism policy, planning, product development, targeted marketing, and
      education to guide decision makers in ensuring the right products are developed, the right message is targeted to consumers, and tourism
      experience is appropriately executed.

•     Tourism Funding - Funding for tourism development and marketing comes from a variety of sources at the local, regional, and state levels.



Oklahoma Tourism Stakeholder Roles & Responsibilities

As previously described, Oklahoma's tourism industry consists of a broad network of public sector and private sector stakeholders. Strong
partnerships among the public and private organizations are essential for tourism to thrive and grow. In Oklahoma, there are a number of key
organizations that serve as cornerstones for the tourism industry. These include state government departments and agencies, industry
associations, destination marketing organizations, local governments, tourism business and attractions, and federal organizations.

•     State Government Departments and Agencies
                   o      Agriculture, Food & Forestry                                                                                            o     Music Hall of Fame
                   o      Arts Council                                                                                                            o     Native American Cultural & Education
                   o      Commerce                                                                                                                o     Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science &
                   o      Conservation Commission                                                                                                       Technology
                   o      Education                                                                                                               o     Oklahoma Schools, Colleges, and Universities
                   o      Environment                                                                                                             o     Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority
                   o      Film and Music Office                                                                                                   o     Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
                   o      Historical Society                                                                                                      o     Scenic Byways Commission
                   o      Homeland Security                                                                                                       o     Scenic Rivers Commission
                   o      Horse Racing Commission                                                                                                 o     Transportation
                   o      Indian Affairs Commission                                                                                               o     Wildlife Conservation
                   o      Labor                                                                                                                   o     Will Rogers Memorial Commission




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                     111
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




•     Industry Associations/Organizations
                   o      Agency Action Coalition                                                                                                 o     Oklahoma Humanities Council
                   o      Center for Non-profits                                                                                                  o     Oklahoma Lakes & Country Association
                   o      Councils of Governments                                                                                                 o     Oklahoma Marina Association
                   o      Festivals & Events Association of Oklahoma                                                                              o     Oklahoma Municipal League
                   o      Leadership Oklahoma                                                                                                     o     Oklahoma Museums Association
                   o      Made in Oklahoma Coalition                                                                                              o     Oklahoma Restaurant Association
                   o      Oklahoma Bed & Breakfast Association                                                                                    o     Oklahoma Route 66 Association
                   o      Oklahoma Bicycle Society                                                                                                o     Oklahoma Society of Association Executives
                   o      Oklahoma Centennial Commission                                                                                          o     Oklahoma Scenic Byways Association
                   o      Oklahoma Century Community Program                                                                                      o     Oklahoma Small Business Development Center
                   o      Oklahoma Community Institute                                                                                            o     Oklahoma State University Extension
                   o      Oklahoma Grape Growers & Wine Makers Assn.                                                                              o     Oklahoma Travel Industry Association
                   o      Oklahoma Heritage Association                                                                                           o     Preservation Oklahoma
                   o      Oklahoma Horse Industry Council                                                                                         o     Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma
                   o      Oklahoma Hotel & Lodging Association

•     Destination Marketing Organizations
      Destination marketing organizations within the state include regional marketing associations (country and lake associations), convention and
      visitors bureaus, chambers of commerce, tourism authorities, local government organizations, and tribal tourism organizations.

      Multi-county Organizations - There are 11 multi-county marketing organizations that are eligible to receive state matching grants to market
      their respective tourism areas.

                   o      Arbuckle Country                                                                                                        o     Kiamichi Country
                   o      Frontier Country                                                                                                        o     Lake Eufaula
                   o      Grand Lake                                                                                                              o     Lake Texoma
                   o      Great Plains                                                                                                            o     Red Carpet Country
                   o      Green Country                                                                                                           o     Tenkiller Lake
                   o      Kaw Lake




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                      112
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




      CVBs/Authorities/Chambers - There are 25 local destination marketing organizations responsible for promoting tourism for local destinations.

                   o      Ardmore CVB                                                                                                             o     Lawton Fort Sill Chamber of Commerce - Tourism
                   o      Bartlesville Area CVB                                                                                                         Dept.
                   o      Broken Arrow CVB                                                                                                        o     McCurtain County Tourism Authority
                   o      City of McAlester Tourism Department                                                                                    o     Miami CVB
                   o      Claremore CVB                                                                                                           o     Midwest City CVB
                   o      Duncan CVB                                                                                                              o     Norman CVB
                   o      Edmond CVB                                                                                                              o     Oklahoma City CVB
                   o      El Reno CVB                                                                                                             o     Okmulgee Tourism Development Program
                   o      Enid CVB                                                                                                                o     Pauls Valley Chamber of Commerce Tourism
                   o      Greater Muskogee Area Chamber of Commerce and                                                                                 Committee
                          Tourism                                                                                                                 o     Ponca City Tourism Bureau
                   o      Greater Shawnee Area CVB                                                                                                o     Stillwater CVB
                   o      Guthrie CVB                                                                                                             o     Tahlequah Area Tourism Council
                   o      Guymon Convention and Tourism Dept.                                                                                     o     Tulsa CVB


      Tribal Tourism Organizations - A number of tribal nations have official tourism departments including the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Comanche,
      Muscogee (Creek), and Osage nations.

•     Local Governments and Organizations - Local government organizations through mayors, city/county councils, departments of economic
      development, and Native American nations are involved in tourism policies, planning, funding, product development, and marketing.

•     Tourism Businesses and Attractions - Private businesses such as hotels, restaurants, retail establishments, transportation companies, tour
      companies, travel-oriented businesses, and others as well as private not-for-profit organizations such as museums, cultural attractions,
      foundations, etc. are the largest and most diverse segment of the tourism industry stakeholders in Oklahoma.

•     Federal Organizations/Programs - Several federal organizations/programs provide funding, educational resources, and technical assistance
      on a community level within Oklahoma. These include the Heritage Preservation Program, US Department of Agriculture's Rural and
      Community Development Program, and the Resource Conservation & Development Program.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                   113
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department Roles & Responsibilities

Of all the state agencies, the Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department may have the most prominent and direct role in tourism as the
primary marketing organization for tourism statewide and the operator of the state park system, which as previously described, is a key tourism
asset. The organizational chart of the department is presented
below along with descriptions of its key activities.                                                   Tourism and
                                                                                                                                                                             Recreation
                                                                                                                                                                            Commission
•     Tourism and Recreation Commission - OTRD is
      overseen by the Tourism and Recreation Commission, an
      eight-member commission comprised of various tourism,
      recreation, and business leaders throughout the state and                                                                                                                OTRD
                                                                                                                                                                             Executive
      led by the lieutenant governor.                                                                                                                                         Director



•     State Parks - In addition to operations and maintenance
      of the diverse and large 50 state parks, the parks division
                                                                                                                          Oklahoma                     State                  Travel &        Film and            PIO/
      helps to drive and support park demand through cabin and                                                             Today                       Parks                  Tourism          Music           Government
                                                                                                                          Magazine                                                                               Affairs
      resort bookings. The division also provides research and
      planning assistance to communities and helps to
      administer federal grants for outdoor recreation
      development.
                                                                                                             Marketing              Travel            Multi-County           Discover      Destination    Public          Fiscal
                                                                                                             Operations          Development          Coordinator            Oklahoma     Development    Relations      Operations
•     Film and Music Office - This office promotes and ensures
      that the state is an attractive, film-friendly environment for
      movies, television, and video production.

•     Oklahoma Today Magazine - Published since 1956,
      Oklahoma Today is an award-winning interest magazine
      about Oklahoma living. It circulates to 38,000 and has a
      readership of approximately 150,000.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                      114
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




•     Travel & Tourism - The Travel & Tourism Division is involved in a number of activities as described below. In addition, the fourteen-member
      Tourism Promotion Advisory Committee, comprised of tourism industry stakeholders, professionals, and business leaders, serves to advise
      OTRD in tourism matters.

      o      Print and Media Advertising - An essential element in tourism marketing and promotions is print and media advertising. OTRD contracts
             with the Ackerman McQueen advertising agency to execute marketing campaigns and promote Oklahoma's Native America brand. This
             process includes ad creation and placement, marketing on behalf of the Department of Agriculture for agritourism, website
             (TravelOK.com) operations contracting, marketing research contracting, and contracting for international marketing representation.

      o      Public Relations, Information and Publications - Public relations is responsible for increasing consumer travel through media coverage
             efforts and publications. In addition, OTRD produces the state travel guide and events guide for the state. It also operates a call center
             for consumers and 12 tourism information centers around the state to provide firsthand traveler assistance.

      o      Travel Development - Travel development works to increase consumer and group tour travel through travel shows and relationship
             development with tour operators, travel professionals, and consumers.

      o      Destination Development - OTRD's destination development provides educational, technical, and advisory assistance to communities for
             destination development and marketing through tourism buzz sessions (eight per year about the tourism industry), grant-writing workshops
             (four per year), and outreach presentations.

      o      Discover Oklahoma - This 30-minute, weekly television program is dedicated to the promotion of Oklahoma tourism. It is broadcast in
             Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Lawton, and Sherman, Texas.

      o      Multi-county Grant - OTRD administers the multi-county grant program that provides matching fund grants to the Lake and Country
             associations for marketing and promotions of regional areas.

      o      Tourism Research - OTRD, through Ackerman McQueen, contracts for market research, including economic impact studies, visitor
             studies, advertising effectiveness studies, conversion studies, visitor surveys, segmentation studies, etc. In addition, a partnership with
             the OSU Center for Tourism & Hospitality Research was established in 2007.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   115
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




      o      Tourism Education - OTRD, through its public relations, marketing, and destination development efforts, works to educate citizens, policy
             makers, stakeholders, and communities on tourism. In addition, OTRD works with the Oklahoma Travel Industry Association to develop
             the annual Governor's Conference on Tourism.



Oklahoma's Existing Responsibility Framework

In this section, the existing stakeholder roles and responsibilities in Oklahoma's tourism industry are identified.

•     Policy - While tourism policies are determined largely by state legislators and local government leaders, various state agencies, industry
      associations, local organizations, business leaders, and citizens help to shape and influence policy. Existing roles include the following:

      o      State Agencies - OTRD, Department of Transportation, Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Historical
             Society, Oklahoma Arts Council, Horse Racing Commission, Scenic Byways Commission, Scenic Rivers Commission, Music Hall of
             Fame, Wildlife Conservation, Indian Affairs Commission, and others

      o      Industry Associations - Oklahoma Travel Industry Association, Oklahoma Hotel & Lodging Association, Oklahoma Restaurant Association,
             Oklahoma Lakes & Counties Association, Horse Industry Council, Festivals & Events Association of Oklahoma, Oklahoma Heritage
             Association, Oklahoma Museums Association, and others

      o      Local Organizations - Chambers of Commerce

      o      Private Businesses and Attractions - Including for-profit and not-for-profit organizations

      o      Citizens - Oklahoma residents

•     Planning - Planning for tourism is largely conducted on an individual basis by independent state agencies, local governments, destination
      marketing organizations, and private businesses and attractions.

•     Development - Tourism development is largely driven by state agencies, local governments, and private businesses and attractions.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   116
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




      o      State Agencies - OTRD (park developments, destination development efforts, etc.), Oklahoma Historical Society (preservation efforts),
             Oklahoma Arts Council, Native American Cultural & Education Authority (American Indian Cultural Center and Museum), the Oklahoma
             Music Hall of Fame (expansion efforts), and others

      o      Local Government - Through local tax programs and statues, local governments are large drivers of new tourism developments such as
             Oklahoma City through its MAPS program, Tulsa through its Vision 2025 program, and Native American nations through heritage efforts
             and gaming developments.

      o      Private Businesses and Attractions - Private businesses and attraction enhancements

•     Marketing - Tourism marketing in Oklahoma is largely defined by geographic areas on a statewide, regional, local, and attraction-specific
      basis. The following organizations cover these defined areas.

      o      Statewide - OTRD markets the entire state to Oklahomans, the region, and internationally.

      o      Regional - While OTRD promotes the various regions of the state, the multi-county country and lake associations concentrate on
             promotion of their specific regional areas.

      o      Local - Similarly, while OTRD and regional associations promote various local areas, destination marketing organizations, including
             chambers of commerce, city departments, tourism authorities, and tribal tourism organizations, focus on these defined market areas.

      o      Private Businesses and Attractions - Promotes individual visitor attractions

•     Education - Tourism education, including professional development, training, and awareness is largely executed through state agencies,
      industry associations, educational institutions, and established programs. Despite these efforts, stakeholders have expressed the desire for
      additional educational and networking opportunities for the tourism industry.

      o      State Agencies - OTRD's education efforts include its marketing, public relations, and destination development efforts. In addition,
             educational outreach and assistance is provided to local entities through the Department of Commerce's Rural Economic Development.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   117
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




      o      Industry Associations - Industry associations throughout the state serve as education resources to their members. The Oklahoma
             Tourism Industry Association serves as a leader for tourism industry through the Governor's Conference on Tourism and educational
             workshops that it offers.

      o      Educational Institutions - A number of institutions, including universities, community colleges, and vocational programs, provide
             educational, professional development, and training opportunities for the industry. Oklahoma State University offers a Leisure Studies
             Program, a school of Hotel & Restaurant Management, and the Center for Tourism Hospitality Research. University of Central Oklahoma
             (Edmond), Oklahoma Panhandle State University (Goodwell), Oklahoma City Community College, Northeastern State University
             (Tahlequah), and Tulsa Community College also offer hospitality programs. In addition, Caddo Kiowa Technology Center (Ft. Cobb),
             Indian Capital Technology Center (Muskogee), and Tulsa Technology Center (Peoria) are all part of the CareerTech vocational system
             and provide hospitality programs.

      o      Other Programs - Other programs in the state include educational outreach and assistance through the Federal Resource Conservation
             and Development programs and OSU's extension services. Lastly, the Pride Program, created in Payne County, teaches frontline tourism
             employees about customer service and local tourist attractions. Communities can become certified Pride Program communities.

•     Research - Tourism-related research throughout the state is largely conducted by state agencies, destination marketing organizations, local
      governments, and private businesses and attractions (and respective organizations’ third-party contractors).

      o      State Agencies - OTRD (marketing, visitor, economic impact, and other research) and Department of Commerce (employment,
             demographics, and other state statistical information)
      o      Destination Marketing Organizations - Research typically involves visitor surveys, conversion studies, benchmarking, etc.
      o      Local Governments - Research typically involves feasibility and planning studies for specific developments.
      o      Private Businesses and Attractions - Research is typically market and development-oriented.

•     Funding - Existing tourism funding is described further in the next section; however, major funding for tourism efforts in Oklahoma stem from
      the following sources:

      o      State Agencies - state agencies such as OTRD and Department of Transportation
      o      Destination Marketing Organizations - local taxes, typically hotel occupancy taxes




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   118
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Roles & Responsibilities




      o      Local Governments - special taxing districts, bonds, and general revenue programs
      o      Private Businesses and Attractions - Private investments and non-profit organizations (donors)




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   119
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




Tourism Funding
Funding is an essential element in executing tourism policy, planning, product development, marketing, research, and education. Product
development and marketing are two of the largest segments requiring funding. At a local level, funds for tourism development are driven largely
by the private sector investments and city/county public sector investments. Similarly, marketing of these products is done on an individual
product basis by the private sector through attraction management and on a collective/destination basis by the public sector through destination
marketing organizations (convention and visitors bureaus, chambers of commerce, tourism authorities, tribal nations, etc.). At a regional level, the
designated country and lake associations are provided matching fund grants by the state for marketing efforts.

At the state level, tourism product development and marketing are funded through a variety of state agencies. OTRD is responsible for both the
operations and maintenance of the state park system and promotion of the state. The portion of OTRD's budget dedicated to product
development (the parks, resorts, and golf) operations and maintenance accounts for approximately 70 percent of OTRD's overall budget. For
fiscal 2009, this budget totals $46.5 million. Additional state funds for capital improvements totaling $10 million per year have been dedicated to
park improvement. The graphs below illustrates OTRD's overall budget and the parks budget compared with inflation during the past 10 fiscal
years. As illustrated, these budgets have not kept pace with inflation.

OTRD Budget                                                                                                                  Parks Budget

    $80,000,000                                                                                                                  $70,000,000
    $75,000,000                                                                                                                  $65,000,000
    $70,000,000                                                                                                                  $60,000,000
    $65,000,000                                                                                                                  $55,000,000
    $60,000,000                                                                                                                  $50,000,000
    $55,000,000                                                                                                                  $45,000,000
    $50,000,000                                                                                                                  $40,000,000
    $45,000,000                                                                                                                  $35,000,000
    $40,000,000                                                                                                                  $30,000,000
                         '00     '01      '02     '03      '04     '05      '06      '07     '08      '09                                             '00      '01      '02       '03   '04   '05   '06   '07   '08   '09

                                       Total Budget                                 Inflation Case                                                                      Parks Budget                 Inflation Case

Source: OTRD; InflationData.com                                                                                              Source: OTRD; InflationData.com




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                         120
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




OTRD, along with other state agencies, also provides tourism product assistance with grants and tax credits. These grants are described below.

      •      OTRD - The department offers the Land and Water Conservation Fund matching grant program in conjunction with the National Park
             Service for the acquisition and development of outdoor recreation projects as well as the Oklahoma Recreational Trails Program for the
             development and maintenance of recreational trails. The trails program is a reimbursement grant that has provided $7 million for
             statewide trail projects.

      •      Department of Transportation - In addition to its valuable role in maintaining critical tourism infrastructure such as roads/bridges,
             signage, and welcome centers, the department offers a Transportation Enhancement program for several tourism-related activities,
             including scenic byways, tourist/welcome centers, historic preservation, landscaping and beautification, transportation museums, and
             others.

      •      Arts Council - The council provides matching grants annually to cultural organizations, schools, and local governments, including the
             Organizational Support, Major Grant Support, and Small Grant Support (operating budgets less than $25,000).

      •      Humanities Council - Through the National Endowment for Humanities Challenge Grant program, the council provides non-profit
             organizations matching funds through third-party donations up to $15,000.

      •      Historical Society - Preservation Oklahoma and BancFirst offer the PlanFirst Grant Program which provides planning assistance
             (condition assessment, feasibility studies, master plans, etc.) for preservation projects.

      •      Agritourism - The Oklahoma Enhancement and Diversification Program provides funds in the form of grants or loans to agribusinesses to
             diversify their business, including expansion into agritourism activities.

      •      Tourism Development Act - This act provides tax credits to tourism-related projects with costs in excess of $500,000. Although this
             program has been in place since 2000, it has never been utilized. According to discussions with stakeholders, the threshold of $500,000
             has deterred the use of the credit and excluded some smaller organizations with product development needs.

Despite these programs, the need for enhanced product development, along with the need for additional dedicated tourism promotion funding at
the state level, has been identified by stakeholders. OTRD's Travel & Tourism division budget (including Discover Oklahoma) in fiscal 2009 is
approximately $12.6 million. Marketing and promotions account for approximately 45 percent of this budget, or $5.7 million. This budget is funded
through a combination of state appropriations (28 percent) and a portion of the state sales tax (72 percent). OTRD also provides matching grants




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   121
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




to country and lake multi-county marketing organizations to assist in marketing and promotional efforts at the regional level. In fiscal 2009,
matching funds for multi-county organizations totaled $1.2 million.

The charts on this page compare the growth (decline) in the Travel & Tourism Division's budget and the multi-county matching funds during the
past 10 years to expected growth if these budgets had only grown by inflation. As illustrated, the Travel & Tourism division's growth has outpaced
inflation, while multi-county funds have not kept pace with inflation.


OTRD Travel & Tourism Budget vs. Inflation                                                                                 OTRD Multi-County Matching Funds vs. Inflation
   $14,000,000
                                                                                                                               $1,400,000
   $13,000,000
                                                                                                                               $1,200,000
   $12,000,000
                                                                                                                               $1,000,000
   $11,000,000
                                                                                                                                  $800,000
   $10,000,000
                                                                                                                                  $600,000
     $9,000,000
     $8,000,000                                                                                                                   $400,000

     $7,000,000                                                                                                                   $200,000
     $6,000,000                                                                                                                             $0
                          '00      '01     '02      '03      '04     '05      '06      '07     '08      '09                                          '00      '01      '02        '03   '04   '05   '06   '07     '08   '09

                                Travel & Tourism Budget                                  Inflation Case                                                 Multi-County Organization Budget                        Inflation Case

Source: OTRD; InflationData.com                                                                                            Source: OTRD; InflationData.com




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                            122
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




The following table also illustrates the breakdown of the estimated multi-county grants by association and the counties that each association
covers. While OTRD has budgeted for $1.2 million for multi-county matching funds, the sum of matching funds estimated by each association is
slightly less than $1.2 million.

In addition, each lake association is responsible for certain counties surrounding their respective lakes that are also included in some country
associations. A total of 16 counties overlap between the country and lake associations. Nine of these overlapping counties are located in Green
Country.

                              Multi-County Organization Budgets
                                                                                                   Share of   % Share of
                                                                                                  Matching Matching Fund                                     Number of      Number of
                              Multi-County Organization                                        Fund Budget        Budget                                      Counties Shared Counties

                              Arbuckle Country                                                          $88,000                         7.7%                                7       3
                              Lake Eufaula                                                               63,300                         5.6%                                4       0
                              Frontier Country                                                          220,700                        19.4%                               12       0
                              Grand Lake                                                                103,300                         9.1%                                4       0
                              Great Plains                                                               85,800                         7.5%                               14       0
                              Green Country                                                             245,900                        21.6%                               18       9
                              Kaw Lake                                                                   50,100                         4.4%                                2       0
                              Kiamichi Country                                                           61,500                         5.4%                               10       3
                              Lake Texoma                                                                78,800                         6.9%                                4       0
                              Red Carpet Country                                                         68,400                         6.0%                               16       1
                              Tenkiller Lake                                                             74,100                         6.5%                                2       0

                              Total                                                                $1,139,900                           100%                              93       16
                              Source: Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.          123
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




The following series of tables compare Oklahoma's state                                                      State Tourism Office Budget (Projected FY2007-2008)
tourism budget, marketing budget, international marketing                                                                                                         Annual                                     Annual
budget, and research budget with those of the other 49 states,                                                Rank         State                                  Budget          Rank   State               Budget
including the states bordering Oklahoma in the regional area                                                  1            Hawaii                        $85,100,000              26     Massachusetts   $11,765,000
(Texas, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, and New                                                         2            Texas                         $63,169,000              27     Wyoming         $11,744,000
Mexico). State budget information was compiled by TIA for the                                                 3            California                    $57,988,000              28     Maryland        $11,682,000
projected 2007-2008 time period. As such, Oklahoma's fiscal                                                   4            Illinois                      $50,400,000              29     Oregon          $11,130,000
2009 budget differs somewhat from the reported TIA budgets.                                                   5            Florida                       $42,123,000              30     Minnesota       $10,944,000
However, the 2007-2008 projected budget reported to TIA is                                                    6            Pennsylvania                  $31,840,000              31     South Dakota    $10,784,000
presented in order to compare other states on an "apples to                                                   7            Louisiana                     $28,963,000              32     Montana         $10,497,000
apples" basis. Oklahoma's reported total budget of $12.4
                                                                                                              8            South Carolina                $28,097,000              33     Alaska          $10,063,000
million reported for FY 2007-2008 is similar to OTRD's Travel                                                 9            Arizona                       $24,987,000              34     New Jersey       $9,000,000
& Tourism budget for FY 2009.                                                                                 10           Colorado                      $22,672,000              35     Mississippi      $8,923,000
                                                                                                              11           Tennessee                     $20,782,000              36     Maine            $8,530,000
As illustrated in the table to the right, Oklahoma ranks 24
                                                                                                              12           Missouri                      $20,660,000              37     Ohio             $8,237,000
among the 50 state tourism budgets, yet falls below the
                                                                                                              13           Utah                          $19,584,000              38     West Virginia    $7,943,000
national average ($17.4 million) by approximately $5 million
                                                                                                              14           Nevada                        $19,280,000              39     Idaho            $7,877,000
and the average of the border states, excluding Texas, ($16.2
                                                                                                              15           Virginia                      $18,500,000              40     Connecticut      $7,102,000
million) by approximately $4.2 million. In fact, the only
                                                                                                              16           New Mexico                    $16,853,000              41     Indiana          $6,751,000
bordering state with a lower total tourism budget than
                                                                                                              17           Arkansas                      $16,425,000              42     Washington       $6,639,000
Oklahoma is Kansas at $4.4 million. However, Kansas is in
                                                                                                              18           New York                      $16,000,000              43     New Hampshire    $5,731,000
the process of developing a new tourism funding structure, and
                                                                                                              19           Kentucky                      $15,831,000              44     Nebraska         $4,833,000
its budget may increase in the future.
                                                                                                              20           Wisconsin                     $15,143,000              45     Iowa             $4,825,000
                                                                                                              21           North Carolina                $13,684,000              46     Kansas           $4,422,000
                                                                                                              22           Alabama                       $12,642,000              47     North Dakota     $4,060,000
                                                                                                              23           Georgia                       $12,614,000              48     Vermont          $3,929,000
                                                                                                              24           Oklahoma                      $12,426,000              49     Delaware         $2,200,000
                                                                                                              25           Michigan                      $11,994,000              50     Rhode Island     $1,430,000

                                                                                                              Average, All States                                                                        $17,376,000
                                                                                                              Average, Border States                                                                     $24,034,000
                                                                                                              Average, Border States (excluding Texas)                                                   $16,206,000
                                                                                                              * Border States
                                                                                                              Source: Travel Industry Association
This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                             124
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




The portion of the states' budgets dedicated to marketing                                              State Tourism Office Marketing & Promotion-Related Budget (Proj. FY07-08)
and promotion is presented in the chart to the right. Similar                                                                                         Marketing                                            Marketing
to the total budget comparison, Oklahoma falls short of the                                            Rank         State                               Budget                    Rank   State               Budget
average of all states ($8.2 million) by approximately $3.8                                             1            Texas                         $46,441,000                     26     Oregon           $4,856,000
million and the average of bordering states, excluding                                                 2            California                    $41,523,000                     27     Minnesota        $4,586,000
Texas, by $4.4 million. Overall, Oklahoma's marketing                                                  3            Florida                       $26,888,000                     28     Oklahoma         $4,432,000
budget is ranked 28 among the 50 states.                                                               4            Missouri                      $15,465,000                     29     Ohio             $4,250,000
                                                                                                       5            South Carolina                $15,298,000                     30     Maryland         $4,145,000
It should be noted that while the state-to-state illustrations
                                                                                                       6            Hawaii                        $15,236,000                     31     Washington       $4,028,000
are intended to be relative comparisons, each state employs
                                                                                                       7            Colorado                      $14,472,000                     32     Maine            $3,941,000
its own structures, programs, and regulations that affect
                                                                                                       8            Arizona                       $13,980,000                     33     New Hampshire    $3,912,000
their budget levels. As such, comparisons in total dollar
                                                                                                       9            Louisiana                     $13,199,000                     34     West Virginia    $3,628,000
figures by category may be a more fair comparison than
                                                                                                       10           Utah                          $10,330,000                     35     Connecticut      $3,581,000
analyzing the allocation as a percentage of the total budget.
                                                                                                       11           Pennsylvania                  $10,027,000                     36     New Mexico       $3,443,000
                                                                                                       12           Illinois                       $9,530,000                     37     Alabama          $3,440,000
                                                                                                       13           Nevada                         $9,502,000                     38     Indiana          $2,685,000
                                                                                                       14           Arkansas                       $9,021,000                     39     Idaho            $2,467,000
                                                                                                       15           Massachusetts                  $8,409,000                     40     Mississippi      $2,433,000
                                                                                                       16           South Dakota                   $7,719,000                     41     North Dakota     $2,290,000
                                                                                                       17           Tennessee                      $7,698,000                     42     Vermont          $2,114,000
                                                                                                       18           Virginia                        $7,558,000                    43     Iowa             $2,083,000
                                                                                                       19           Michigan                        $7,425,000                    44     Kansas           $1,706,000
                                                                                                       20           Wisconsin                       $7,111,000                    45     Kentucky         $1,300,000
                                                                                                       21           North Carolina                  $7,107,000                    46     Nebraska         $1,256,000
                                                                                                       22           Wyoming                         $6,892,000                    47     Delaware          $625,000
                                                                                                       23           Alaska                          $5,726,000                    48     Rhode Island      $512,000
                                                                                                       24           Montana                         $5,257,000                           New York                 N/A
                                                                                                       25           Georgia                         $5,097,000                           New Jersey               N/A

                                                                                                       Average, All States                                                                                $8,221,000
                                                                                                       Average, Border States                                                                            $15,091,000
                                                                                                       Average, Border States (excluding Texas)                                                           $8,822,000
                                                                                                        * Border States
                                                                                                        Source: Travel Industry Association
This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                  125
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




The international advertising and sales promotion budget                                                 State Tourism Office International Adv. & Sales Promo Budget (Proj. FY07-08)
includes the sum of international media purchases, media                                                                                            International                                        International
production, and sales promotion allocations. As shown in                                                   Rank         State                       Sales Budget                  Rank   State           Sales Budget
the table to the right, the responding states’ international                                               1            California                    $17,802,200                 26     Montana            $402,200
advertising and sales promotion budgets ranged from a                                                      2            Texas                          $6,833,300                 27     Maryland           $387,000
low of $0 (Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Nebraska, and                                                       3            Florida                        $5,530,700                 28     Mississippi        $361,800
Ohio) to a high of $17.8 million (California). Oklahoma                                                    4            Hawaii                         $3,637,100                 29     Missouri           $344,700
ranks 38 among the 48 reporting states and is significantly                                                5            Arizona                        $2,686,300                 30     South Dakota       $315,000
lower than the average of all states ($1.2 million).                                                       6            Colorado                       $1,896,800                 31     Tennessee          $285,000
Oklahoma's international sales budget is also below the                                                    7            Massachusetts                  $1,795,000                 32     Idaho              $273,000
average of the border states, excluding Texas, ($654,000)
                                                                                                           8            Pennsylvania                   $1,545,000                 33     Vermont            $266,100
by $564,000.                                                                                               9            Nevada                         $1,521,500                 34     Kansas             $198,700
                                                                                                           10           Illinois                       $1,497,600                 35     Arkansas           $184,900
                                                                                                           11           South Carolina                 $1,482,600                 36     Connecticut        $133,000
                                                                                                           12           Oregon                         $1,355,000                 37     Rhode Island       $100,000
                                                                                                           13           North Carolina                 $1,100,000                 38     Oklahoma            $89,800
                                                                                                           14           Virginia                         $757,300                 39     Michigan            $75,000
                                                                                                           15           New Mexico                      $643,800                  40     West Virginia       $44,400
                                                                                                           16           Louisiana                       $610,000                  41     Wisconsin           $30,000
                                                                                                           17           Washington                       $603,000                 42     Iowa                $15,000
                                                                                                           18           Minnesota                         $582,900                43     Delaware             $5,000
                                                                                                           19           Georgia                           $582,300                44     Alabama                  $0
                                                                                                           20           New Hampshire                     $534,100                44     Indiana                  $0
                                                                                                           21           North Dakota                      $515,000                44     Kentucky                 $0
                                                                                                           22           Alaska                            $494,800                44     Nebraska                 $0
                                                                                                           23           Utah                              $471,200                44     Ohio                     $0
                                                                                                           24           Maine                             $429,000                       New York                 N/A
                                                                                                           25           Wyoming                           $415,200                       New Jersey               N/A

                                                                                                           Average, All States                                                                            $1,226,000
                                                                                                           Average, Border States                                                                         $1,684,000
                                                                                                           Average, Border States (excluding Texas)                                                        $654,000
                                                                                                           * Border States
                                                                                                           Source: Travel Industry Association
This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                 126
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




In terms of the states' budgets dedicated to research,                                                 State Tourism Office Research Budget (Projected FY2007-2008)
                                                                                                                                 Research                                                              Research
Oklahoma ranks second to last of reporting states with
                                                                                                       Rank State                  Budget     Rank State                                                 Budget
$50,000, which is well below the overall average of
                                                                                                       1            Hawaii                          $2,296,100                    26   Arkansas        $200,400
$336,000 and the border state average, excluding Texas,
                                                                                                       2            Texas                           $1,129,500                    27   North Dakota    $200,000
of $325,000.
                                                                                                       3            California                      $1,052,000                    28   New Mexico      $183,300
                                                                                                       4            Arizona                          $915,000                     29   Indiana         $165,500
                                                                                                       5            Florida                          $812,700                     30   Washington      $150,000
                                                                                                       6            South Carolina                   $805,600                     31   Maryland        $148,500
                                                                                                       7            Colorado                         $584,500                     32   Wyoming         $139,000
                                                                                                       8            Michigan                           $554,500                   33   Tennessee       $130,000
                                                                                                       9            Missouri                           $450,000                   34   Connecticut     $125,000
                                                                                                       10           Virginia                           $440,700                   35   Oregon          $107,500
                                                                                                       11           Nevada                             $340,000                   36   Mississippi     $104,800
                                                                                                       12           Ohio                               $325,000                   37   Minnesota        $92,300
                                                                                                       13           Wisconsin                          $325,000                   38   West Virginia    $90,000
                                                                                                       14           Louisiana                          $300,000                   39   Nebraska         $80,000
                                                                                                       15           Maine                              $300,000                   40   Alabama          $75,000
                                                                                                       16           North Carolina                     $300,000                   41   New Hampshire    $75,000
                                                                                                       17           Alaska                             $292,700                   42   Iowa             $61,000
                                                                                                       18           Illinois                           $291,000                   43   Idaho            $52,000
                                                                                                       19           Pennsylvania                       $280,000                   44   Delaware         $50,000
                                                                                                       20           Utah                               $256,800                   45   Oklahoma         $50,000
                                                                                                       21           Montana                            $250,000                   46   Georgia          $30,000
                                                                                                       22           Massachusetts                      $225,000                        Kentucky              N/A
                                                                                                       23           South Dakota                       $220,000                        New Jersey            N/A
                                                                                                       24           Kansas                             $206,700                        New York              N/A
                                                                                                       25           Vermont                            $206,000                        Rhode Island          N/A

                                                                                                       Average, All States                                                                             $336,000
                                                                                                       Average, Border States                                                                          $459,000
                                                                                                       Average, Border States (excluding Texas)                                                        $325,000
                                                                                                        * Border States
                                                                                                        Source: Travel Industry Association

This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                             127
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




The following series of charts compares the growth (decline)                                               Oklahoma's State Tourism Office Budget
in each bordering state's total tourism budget since 1998 to
the growth of the budget if each state's budget grew by                                                      $14,000,000
inflation. Oklahoma's trend is presented on this page,                                                       $12,000,000
followed by trends for the bordering states. As illustrated in
these tables, most of the states in the region, including                                                    $10,000,000
Oklahoma, have outpaced inflation. However, Colorado,
                                                                                                               $8,000,000
New Mexico, and Missouri are clear stand-outs among the
region that have significantly invested in their state's tourism                                               $6,000,000
industries. In addition, the Texas budget also increased
significantly in the most recent reporting year (more than                                                     $4,000,000
doubling in size from approximately $30 million to $63
                                                                                                               $2,000,000
million) due to a change in the state's allocation of tourism
occupancy tax towards state tourism efforts.                                                                                 $0
                                                                                                                                     1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

                                                                                                                                                   Historical Budget              Inflation Case

                                                                                                           Source: Travel Industry Association; InflationData.com




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                    128
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




 Colorado State Tourism Office Budget                                                                                         Missouri State Tourism Office Budget

   $25,000,000                                                                                                                   $25,000,000


   $20,000,000                                                                                                                   $20,000,000


   $15,000,000                                                                                                                   $15,000,000


   $10,000,000                                                                                                                   $10,000,000


     $5,000,000                                                                                                                    $5,000,000


                 $0                                                                                                                             $0
                         1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008                                                                        1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

                                       Historical Budget                             Inflation Case                                                                  Historical Budget    Inflation Case



  Texas State Tourism Office Budget                                                                                             Kansas State Tourism Office Budget

   $70,000,000                                                                                                                   $8,000,000

   $60,000,000                                                                                                                   $7,000,000

   $50,000,000                                                                                                                   $6,000,000

                                                                                                                                 $5,000,000
   $40,000,000
                                                                                                                                 $4,000,000
   $30,000,000
                                                                                                                                 $3,000,000
   $20,000,000
                                                                                                                                 $2,000,000
   $10,000,000                                                                                                                   $1,000,000

                 $0                                                                                                                           $0
                       1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008                                                                         1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

                                    Historical Budget                               Inflation Case                                                                  Historical Budget     Inflation Case

Source: Travel Industry Association; InflationData.com


This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                            129
 Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




Arkansas State Tourism Office Budget                                                                                         New Mexico State Tourism Office Budget

 $18,000,000                                                                                                                    $18,000,000
 $16,000,000                                                                                                                    $16,000,000
 $14,000,000                                                                                                                    $14,000,000
 $12,000,000                                                                                                                    $12,000,000
 $10,000,000                                                                                                                    $10,000,000
   $8,000,000                                                                                                                    $8,000,000
   $6,000,000                                                                                                                    $6,000,000
   $4,000,000                                                                                                                    $4,000,000
   $2,000,000                                                                                                                    $2,000,000
               $0                                                                                                                             $0
                      1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008                                                                         1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

                                      Historical Budget                            Inflation Case                                                                 Historical Budget    Inflation Case

Source: Travel Industry Association; InflationData.com




 This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                        130
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




The following table presents detail regarding the operating budgets of the 25 CVB/Authority/Chamber destination marketing organizations for
2007. As illustrated, these budgets in aggregate exceed $11.5 million, and the Tulsa and Oklahoma City CVB's budgets account for
approximately $6.5 million of this total. These funds are used in marketing individual destinations throughout the state and are in addition to the
budget of the state's Travel & Tourism Division and the budgets of the country and lake associations.

Oklahoma Destination Marketing Organizations Annual Budgets
                                                                                                     Annual                                                                             Annual
Organization                                                                                         Budget                    Organization                                             Budget

Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                    $3,454,500                     Ardmore Convention & Visitors Bureau                   $191,000
Tulsa Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                             3,000,000                     Guthrie Convention and Visitors Bureau                  140,000
Lawton Fort Sill Chamber of Commerce - Tourism Dept.                                               780,000                     Duncan Convention and Visitors Bureau                   125,000
Stillwater Convention & Visitors Bureau                                                            475,600                     Midwest City Convention & Visitors Bureau               119,600
Norman Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                              400,000                     Enid Convention and Visitors Bureau                     100,000
City of McAlester - Tourism Department                                                             392,000                     Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau                       85,000
Edmond Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                              336,000                     Pauls Valley Chamber of Commerce Tourism Committee       80,000
Bartlesville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                   320,600                     Claremore Convention & Visitors Bureau                   75,000
Greater Shawnee Area Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                320,000                     Tahlequah Area Tourism Council                           70,000
Greater Muskogee Area Chamber of Commerce and Tourism                                              240,000                     El Reno Convention and Visitors Bureau                   69,500
Broken Arrow Convention & Visitors Bureau                                                          235,000                     Guymon Convention and Tourism Department                 60,000
McCurtain County Tourism Authority                                                                 195,000                     Okmulgee Tourism Development Program                     55,000
Ponca City Tourism Bureau                                                                          191,700

Total                                                                                                                                                                               $11,510,500
Source: Oklahoma CVB & Tourism Organization Information



Like Oklahoma, other states in the region are also supported by the destination marketing efforts of individual communities. Oklahoma's available
destination marketing funds by community are compared to others in the region based on the ratio of marketing budget per hotel room. Since
destination marketing funds in these communites are often derived from hotel occupancy taxes, this ratio provides for comparisons across
destinations. The tables on the following pages detail the estimated 2007 budget, hotel rooms, and budget per hotel room ratio for communities in
Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Arkansas, and Missouri. Communites are categorized as high (greater than 29,000 rooms), medium (3,300 to 13,500
rooms), and low (fewer than 2,800 rooms) number of hotel rooms. Destinations categorized as "high" had ratios of budget per hotel room ranging




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.            131
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding




from $172 to $445 and averaged $277 in budget per room. Communities in the medium category, which include Oklahoma City and Tulsa, had
ratios that ranged from $256 to $525 and averaged $396 in in budget per room.


Regional Destination Marketing Organizations Annual Budgets - High and Medium

                                                                                                                                                        Annual Budget             Hotel Rooms
CVB                                                                                                 City, State                                            (Rounded)                (Rounded)   Budget/Room
HIGH NUMBER OF TOTAL HOTEL ROOMS
Dallas                                                                                              Dallas, TX                                               $14,750,000               70,100          $210
Austin                                                                                              Austin, TX                                                 6,160,000               35,800           172
St. Louis                                                                                           St. Louis, MO                                             13,510,000               35,800           377
San Antonio                                                                                         San Antonio, TX                                           15,280,000               34,300           445
Kansas City                                                                                         Kansas City, MO                                            5,300,000               29,300           181
Average                                                                                                                                                                                                $277
MEDIUM NUMBER OF TOTAL HOTEL ROOMS
Oklahoma City                                                                                       Oklahoma City, OK                                          $3,450,000              13,500          $256
Irving                                                                                              Irving, TX                                                  6,090,000              11,600           525
Fort Worth                                                                                          Fort Worth, TX                                              5,300,000              11,400           465
Tulsa                                                                                               Tulsa, OK                                                   3,000,000              10,400           288
Wichita                                                                                             Wichita, KS                                                 2,230,000               8,000           279
Springfield                                                                                         Springfield, MO                                             2,860,000               6,600           433
Lubbock                                                                                             Lubbock, TX                                                 2,280,000               4,400           518
Waco                                                                                                Waco, TX                                                    1,670,000               4,100           407
Bryan/College Station                                                                               Bryan/College Station, TX                                   1,300,000               3,300           394
Average                                                                                                                                                                                                $396

Source: Destination Marketing Association International, Smith Travel Research, Oklahoma CVB & Tourism Organization Information




Destinations categorized as "low" had destination marketing budgets per room that ranged from $160 to $998 and averaged $339 in budget per
room. Most Oklahoma destinations had less than 2,800 hotel rooms (in 2007), and thus, were categorized as having a "low" number of rooms.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                         132
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Tourism Funding



Regional Destination Marketing Organizations Annual Budgets - Low
                                                                                                                                        Annual Budget                 Hotel Rooms
CVB                                                                                         City, State                                    (Rounded)                    (Rounded)         Budget/Room
LOW NUMBER OF TOTAL HOTEL ROOMS
Abilene                                                                                     Abilene, TX                                         $900,000                          2,800          $321
Topeka                                                                                      Topeka, KS                                           794,000                          2,700           294
Rogers                                                                                      Rogers, AR                                           479,000                          2,600           184
Norman Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                       Norman, OK                                           400,000                          2,500           160
Ft. Smith                                                                                   Ft. Smith, AR                                        691,000                          2,300           300
Wichita Falls                                                                               Wichita Falls, TX                                    478,000                          2,200           217
Joplin                                                                                      Joplin, MO                                         1,010,000                          2,100           481
Long View                                                                                   Long View, TX                                        395,000                          2,000           198
Jefferson City                                                                              Jefferson City, TX                                   481,000                          1,400           344
Lawton Fort Sill Chamber of Commerce - Tourism Department                                   Lawton/Ft. Sill, OK                                  780,000                          1,400           557
Ardmore Convention & Visitors Bureau                                                        Ardmore, OK                                          191,000                          1,100           174
Lake Conroe                                                                                 Lake Conroe, TX                                      476,000                          1,000           476
Sherman                                                                                     Sherman, TX                                          207,000                            950           218
Greater Muskogee Area Chamber of Commerce and Tourism                                       Muskogee, OK                                         240,000                            900           267
Frisco                                                                                      Frisco, TX                                           798,000                            800           998
City of McAlester - Tourism Department                                                      McAlester, OK                                        392,000                            770           509
Stillwater Convention & Visitors Bureau                                                     Stillwater, OK                                       476,000                            760           626
Enid Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                         Enid, OK                                             100,000                            730           137
Bartlesville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau                                            Bartlesville, OK                                     321,000                            720           446
Greater Shawnee Area Convention and Visitors Bureau                                         Shawnee, OK                                          320,000                            710           451
Broken Arrow Convention & Visitors Bureau                                                   Broken Arrow, OK                                     235,000                            680           346
Boerne                                                                                      Boerne, TX                                           218,000                            640           341
Edmond Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                       Edmond, OK                                           336,000                            620           542
McCurtain County Tourism Authority                                                          McCurtain County, OK                                 195,000                            620           315
Midwest City Convention & Visitors Bureau                                                   Midwest City, OK                                     120,000                            620           194
Ponca City Tourism Bureau                                                                   Ponca City, OK                                       192,000                            580           331
Duncan Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                       Duncan, OK                                           125,000                            440           284
Guymon Convention and Tourism Department                                                    Guymon, OK                                            60,000                            430           140
Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau                                                          Miami, OK                                             85,000                            400           213
El Reno Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                      El Reno, OK                                           70,000                            390           179
Tahlequah Area Tourism Council                                                              Tahlequah, OK                                         70,000                            380           184
Claremore Convention & Visitors Bureau                                                      Claremore, OK                                         75,000                            290           259
Pauls Valley Chamber of Commerce Tourism Committee                                          Pauls Valley, OK                                      80,000                            280           286
Guthrie Convention and Visitors Bureau                                                      Guthrie, OK                                          140,000                            260           538
Okmulgee Tourism Development Program                                                        Okmulgee, OK                                          55,000                            160           344
Average                                                                                                                                                                                          $339

Source: Destination Marketing Association International, Smith Travel Research, Oklahoma CVB & Tourism Organization Information




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                         133
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Summary of Strategic Business Modeling




Summary of Strategic Business Modeling
The key points regarding strategic business modeling process include the following:

•     An assessment of Oklahoma's inventory illustrates that Oklahoma has a significant number of attractions and events covering a wide variety of
      traveler interests. These attractions are heavily weighted to heritage/culture and nature and recreation products. In addition, attractions are
      most concentrated in the Frontier Country and Green Country regions, which contain the state's largest population centers of Oklahoma City
      and Tulsa. New developments planned for the state are expected to enhance the existing product base, including new/improved Native
      American, music, recreation, meetings, gaming, and sports products.

•     Oklahoma's tourism infrastructure, including transportation access, hotel supply, and signage is another key element of the tourism base.
      While the state's well-connected interstate system provides driving tourists (estimated at 92 percent of leisure visitors) with access from each
      neighboring state, limited direct flight access through the state's three commercial airports may limit tourism growth potential for certain
      tourism segments, such as business travel, conventions, and national special events, which often depend more heavily on fly-in access. Hotel
      supply is largely concentrated in the mid-scale and economy categories, and while offering affordability for travelers, it may limit growth
      potential related to more affluent segments. While tourist-oriented directional signage programs and historical markers have been established,
      additional signage may be needed.

•     Oklahoma's attributes, including its affordability, relatively mild climate, and proximity to large population base enhance the state's tourism
      assets. Other attributes, such as a limited trained employee base in the hospitality industry, may limit potential future tourism growth.

•     According to consumer surveys, visitors to Oklahoma were primarily motivated by visiting family/friends, specific attractions, specific events,
      outdoor recreation, family vacation, and business. Top activities while in Oklahoma were visiting historical sites, dining, shopping, visiting art
      museums, and visiting state/national parks. The most frequently visited destinations included Oklahoma City, Tulsa, lakes and campgrounds,
      Tahlequah, Lawton, and Muskogee.

•     Oklahoma's sources of visitors include the border states (primarily Texas, Kansas, Missouri, and Arkansas) and to a lesser degree, heavily
      populated states such as California, Florida, Illinois, and Minnesota. The largest geographic target market is Texas, which accounted for the
      largest share of out-of-state visitors and was allocated more than one-half of Oklahoma's TV advertising spending.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   134
Appendix B: Strategic Business Modeling - Summary of Strategic Business Modeling




•     Perceptions of Oklahoma as a tourist destination may challenge Oklahoma's ability to increase tourism. Negative perceptions include
      Oklahoma as a state with little appeal, limited activities, being "behind the times", and no perception at all, which signals a lack of
      understanding of Oklahoma's tourism assets. However, positive perceptions include recognition of Oklahoma's Native American and Western
      cultures, friendly people, outdoor recreation, and scenic beauty. Based on the results of several studies highlighting perceptions of Oklahoma,
      it appears that positive perceptions are most common among those who have previously visited Oklahoma, while negative perceptions are
      most common among people who have not visited the state. In addition, recent Zogby survey results indicate improving perceptions of
      Oklahoma among Americans with a 68 percent favorable rating for the state, up from only 47 percent two years ago.

•     The U.S. travel industry is comprised of numerous travel segments, some of which are ideal targets for Oklahoma and others that are not ideal
      targets. As Oklahoma's strengths are in the areas of heritage/culture, nature and recreation, sports, and entertainment, it has the resources to
      target tourism markets in these categories, particularly state parks, nature/eco-travel, hiking/bicycling, hunting/fishing, RV travel, lake/river
      recreation, historic sites, museums, music, gaming, group tour, and agritourism segments.

•     Tourism stakeholders play a role in tourism policy, planning, product development, marketing, education, research, and funding. While the
      Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department plays a large role in each of these areas, a number of state agencies and departments,
      industry associations/organizations, destination marketing organizations, local governments/organizations, tourism businesses/attractions, and
      federal organizations/programs support the tourism industry directly and indirectly at the local, regional, and national level.

•     Oklahoma's state tourism budget is ranked 24 among the 50 states in the U.S. and is relatively low in comparison to the average of all U.S.
      states as well as border states. Oklahoma is also below average in terms of its marketing and promotion-related budget (ranked 28 of 48
      participating states), its international advertising and sales promotion budget (ranked 38 of 48 participating states), and its research budget
      (ranked 45th of 46 participating states). Although the growth of Oklahoma's state tourism office budget exceeded inflation since 1998,
      Oklahoma has not invested in its tourism industry to the same level as several other border states have invested, including Texas, Colorado,
      New Mexico, and Missouri.

•     Based on its overall tourism budget and its marketing and promotion budget, the State of Oklahoma appears to fall approximately $4 million
      short in its annual budget compared to its most direct competitors (excluding Texas). This shortfall places the state, and the OTRD
      specifically, at a disadvantage when it comes to its ability to perform in the highly-competitive tourism market.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   135
Appendix C
Tourism Stakeholders
Appendix C: Tourism Stakeholders - Tourism Stakeholders Input




The tourism visioning process serves to shape the direction for the tourism industry and helps to define strategies that, if followed, would help to
achieve the tourism vision. The visioning process along with the performance audit address the question of "where do we want to be?" Tourism
industry stakeholders were asked to provide input regarding the current state of Oklahoma tourism (including the current characteristics and
challenges) and the desired vision for future tourism in the state. Input from stakeholders is critical to the formation of collective vision for tourism
that all stakeholders can strive to achieve.


Tourism Stakeholders Input
Nearly 200 tourism industry stakeholders were contacted for feedback through in-person interviews, telephone interviews, and internet surveys,
and more than 100 individual stakeholders throughout the state provided valuable input to this process. These stakeholders included state agency
representatives (including OTRD staff), state legislators, destination marketing organizations, tribal nation representatives, non-profit
organizations, industry associations, major business leaders, tourism business representatives, and other tourism industry professionals (a list of
responding stakeholders is included in Appendix E: Additional Data).

Stakeholders interviewed and surveyed provided a wide variety of viewpoints and opinions which, although sometimes conflicting, were shared by
a number of stakeholders. The most frequently cited comments on tourism products, marketing, roles & responsibilities, and funding are provided
below.

Tourism Assets

      •      Western heritage "cowboys and Indians" was noted as Oklahoma's greatest strength.

      •      Consumers want more Native American experiences, but there is a challenge with promoting these experiences in relationship to the
             tribes.

      •      State parks and Oklahoma's natural beauty are also strengths for the state, but overwhelmingly, stakeholders noted the issue with lack of
             park maintenance. Fewer state parks or investment in a select number of parks were suggested as solutions.

      •      There is a desire among stakeholders to have more connections between attractions. Stakeholders recognized a need for trails,
             packages, or itineraries, so that the traveler can visit a number of attractions.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   137
Appendix C: Tourism Stakeholders - Tourism Stakeholders Input




      •      Stakeholders expressed that future tourism emphasis should be placed on product enhancements, improvements, and consistency.

      •      Oklahoma is not perceived as having "end destination" sites or big anchors to draw people to the state.

      •      Condition and cleanliness of roads/bridges was cited by stakeholders as an issue for both state residents and visitors.

      •      Poor wayfinding signage (directional signage and attraction signage) for travelers was noted as an issue.

Tourism Marketing

      •      Most stakeholders liked the Native America theme, but there were conflicting thoughts on where the state should focus. Some think the
             state should focus on the more cosmopolitan areas versus natural and historic assets.

      •      Many stakeholders believe that the Native America theme should be fully embraced and promoted, whereas others think that Oklahoma
             has more to offer and should promote areas such as the arts, cities, other cosmopolitan attractions, etc. Some Oklahomans don't want to
             be perceived as "cowboys and Indians."

      •      Negative perceptions of Oklahoma were cited as one of the state's biggest challenges. Perceptions of dust bowl, that there is "nothing
             there," and that there is no perception were frequently mentioned.

      •      The state tourism department is generally regarded as a resource for others across the state and that it does a great job with the available
             funding, but many people outside of Oklahoma City feel that they are underrepresented with the state's existing promotional campaigns.

      •      Being on the cutting edge of technology was noted as an important element of the future for tourism through websites enhancement, use
             of internet marketing tools, GPS systems, etc.

      •      While many stakeholders embrace the country names for the regions of the state, they were seen as confusing and not helpful to those
             unfamiliar with the state.

      •      Diversity in both landscape and heritage was noted as a strength for the state. However, there is so much diversity and so many
             attractions that marketing all aspects of the state can be a challenge.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   138
Appendix C: Tourism Stakeholders - Tourism Stakeholders Input




      •      The "Okla" advertising campaign was considered by some to be "getting tired" and in need of an update.

      •      Gas prices and the economy were seen as current issues impacting tourism.

Tourism Roles & Responsibilities

      •      It was recognized that most professionals involved in the higher levels of the tourism industry understand the importance of tourism, but
             some Oklahomans have a mindset that they do not consider Oklahoma as a place to visit and may be less accommodating to visitors. It
             was noted that Oklahomans should be educated on what the state has to offer and the state should be marketed to Oklahomans. In
             addition, stakeholders noted that legislators need to be better educated on tourism.

      •      Stakeholders expressed that more education is needed to develop a professional workforce, including an understanding of what
             customers needs are and how to accommodate large groups.

      •      Stakeholders identified a need for additional forums for education and networking.

Tourism Funding

      •      Funding was also noted as a significant challenge. Stakeholders consider the state to be under-funded. There is a fear that funding will
             disappear since state tourism efforts are funded, in part, from state appropriation.

These common opinions along with other stakeholder comments and the strategic modeling process help to serve as the basis for the
development of the tourism performance audit and to define the strategies and action steps of the five-year plan.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   139
Appendix D
Performance Audit
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Strengths




A cornerstone of the strategic planning process is the assessment of the internal strengths and weaknesses and external opportunities and
threats. This "performance audit" or "SWOT analysis" of Oklahoma's tourism industry lays the foundation for planning Oklahoma's future tourism,
further helping to address the question "where do we want to be?" in terms of tourism. It is important for the Oklahoma tourism industry to ensure
that its strengths continue to be leveraged and promoted, while weaknesses are overcome, if possible, or mitigated. The industry's opportunities
offer the directions for future growth, while understanding and reacting to external threats is critical to achieving this growth. This assessment of
the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats is based on findings described related to state of the tourism industry, strategic thrusts for
tourism products, marketing, roles & responsibilities, and funding, and stakeholder input.



Strengths
Oklahoma's tourism strengths lie in the state's inherit assets (heritage/culture, natural assets, existing tourism attractions, industry base) and its
destination attributes.

Assets

      •      Western/Cowboy Heritage - Oklahoma has a unique Western heritage that has helped form the basis of Oklahoma's culture. Western
             heritage attractions/events (cowboys, Native Americans, pioneers, oil, etc.), working stockyards, and ranches continue to shape these
             images and themes throughout the state.

      •      Native American Heritage - Native American heritage is one of the standout elements of the state's Western heritage, as Oklahoma is
             home to the second largest Native American population in the United States. Visitors seek experiences to learn about this Native
             American heritage and culture. Cultural centers, museums, historic sites, and events form the basis of these Native American
             experiences. The American Indian Cultural Center and Museum along with other tribal cultural center developments will continue to
             enhance this asset for the state.

      •      Natural Assets - The number and variety of natural attractions in diverse eco-regions throughout the state are one of Oklahoma's key
             assets. These natural assets provide an array of outdoor recreational options for travelers at state/national parks, lakes, and rivers
             throughout the state.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   141
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Strengths




      •      Authentic America/Communities - Oklahoma's image as a friendly destination also helps to reinforce positive images of Oklahoma as
             "Authentic America" with its Southern/Midwestern location in the heartland of America, a large number of certified Main Streets, and iconic
             Route 66. This is important for visitors seeking authentic Oklahoman and American experiences.

             In addition, many of the tourism assets and strengths described have a significant presence throughout the rural communities of
             Oklahoma. This is particularly evident in the state’s strengths as they relate to areas of heritage, Route 66, Main Streets, Authentic
             America, and agricultural assets. The communities, individually and collectively, of Oklahoma comprise a significant tourism asset of the
             state.

      •      Route 66 and Scenic Byways - Although seven other states can claim and promote Route 66, Oklahoma has more drivable miles of this
             historic road than any other state. While some may seek out the specific experience of driving on and visiting the road's unique
             attractions, Oklahoma also offers six other attractive scenic byways/trails for these "driving" travelers (RVs, motorcycle clubs, pass through
             travelers, and family vacations).

      •      Gaming - There are a considerable number of gaming establishments throughout the state, including 16 "major" casinos that are growing
             in number and quality. Gaming in Oklahoma is both a specific demand generator for some residents of neighboring states, and it is also
             an attractive destination activity for other leisure and business visitors.

      •      Sports Heritage - Oklahoma's sports teams are prominent on the collegiate level with the OU Sooners and the OSU Cowboys. The
             recent addition of the Oklahoma City Thunder and certain Olympic trials provide other nationally recognized elements. In addition, eight
             minor league teams create many opportunities for spectator sports tourism, while numerous sports venues allow Oklahoma to host and
             drive participant sports tourism.

      •      Music Heritage - Oklahoma has a rich music heritage as home to numerous well-known musicians, including several current day stars
             such as Toby Keith, Reba McIntyre, Garth Brooks, Carrie Underwood, Vince Gill, The Flaming Lips, Hinder, All American Rejects, and
             Leona Mitchell, as well as historical greats such as Woody Guthrie, Hoyt Axton, Leon Russell, Jimmy Rushing, Claude Williams, Merle
             Haggard, Patti Page, and Jay McShann. The Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame is currently undergoing expansion, and the University of
             Central Oklahoma is creating the Academy of Contemporary Music, which will give students the opportunity to learn from working




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   142
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Strengths




             musicians and industry professionals beginning in fall of 2009. In addition, the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame and music festivals such as
             Jazz in June and OK MOZART provide an opportunity for visitors to experience Oklahoma's music history.

      •      Urban Investments - Significant public and private investments have taken place in the state's major urban centers of Oklahoma City and
             Tulsa for purposes of economic, quality of life, and tourism enhancement. Many of these investments such as the Oklahoma City National
             Memorial & Museum, Bricktown, BOK Center, etc., have evolved into major visitor attractions and have helped grow the tourism asset
             base and profile for the state.

      •      Arts & Culture - Oklahoma is the home to world-class arts and cultural attractions. A sample of prominent museums include the Gilcrease
             Museum featuring American Western and Native American art, the Philbrook Museum of Art with art from around the world, the Oklahoma
             City Museum of Art that showcases Dale Chihuly Glass, and the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, which is home to French impressionist
             collections. Well-known performing arts venues include the Civic Center Music Hall in Oklahoma City, Chapman Music Hall in Tulsa,
             Pollard Theatre in Guthrie, and Oklahoma Opry in Oklahoma City. These attractions provide an opportunity for visitors to experience the
             arts and culture Oklahoma has to offer.

      •      Agricultural Assets - Oklahoma's economy is strongly rooted in agribusiness, as agriculture is the state's second largest industry. As
             such, the agricultural assets that have (or have the potential for) tourism experiences are present throughout the state.

      •      Energy Industry - Even more so than agriculture, Oklahoma's economy is tied to the energy industry. As such, the energy industry
             serves as a draw for business tourism. The strong role of energy in the economy, coupled with its visibility across the state (oil pumps,
             wind turbines, etc.) and existing attractions such as museums, present the opportunity for additional tourism experiences connected with
             the industry.

Destination Attributes

      •      Friendly State - Surveys show that consumers generally have positive perceptions of Oklahoma as friendly. These images give visitors a
             level of comfort with a destination even though they may not be familiar with it. Additionally, these images are important for attracting
             vacationing families.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   143
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Opportunities




      •      Location - Oklahoma's central location in the U.S. offers proximity to six bordering states from which to draw out-of-state visitors. In
             addition, there are significant population bases in North Texas and the Kansas City market that increase the pool of potential visitors.

      •      Interstate System - Oklahoma has a well-connected interstate system that offers regional travelers convenient access to destinations in
             Oklahoma. In addition, the system allows Oklahoma to capture a number of pass-through travelers with interstate highways running east
             to west, north to south, and northeast to southwest across the state.

      •      Affordability - Oklahoma is a highly affordable destination, which is an attractive element to nearly all potential visitors. According to the
             AAA's 2008 Annual Vacation Costs Survey, Oklahoma is the sixth least expensive state for a vacation. AAA also ranked Tulsa as the
             least expensive travel destination among the 49 largest cities in the U.S., while Oklahoma City was ranked fourth.

      •      Architectural Appeal - Oklahoma has a number of unique architectural elements throughout the state that not only serve to drive tourism,
             but also to enhance visitor experiences. These include the art deco buildings of Tulsa, the Price Tower Arts Center (the Frank Lloyd
             Wright skyscraper) in Bartlesville, and the Victorian architecture in downtown Guthrie to name a few.




Opportunities
The state's strengths set the stage for a variety of potential tourism opportunities. As described below, opportunities are categorized as "General"
and "Specific." General opportunities, which include heritage, family, urban, rural/community-based, gaming, and business tourism, refer to types
of opportunities that could cover a wide range of tourism products and visitor experiences. Specific opportunities focus on particular tourism
themes, product types, and visitor experiences.

General

      •      Heritage Tourism - Oklahoma's tourism assets are strongly routed in the history and culture, including Western, Native American, and
             Authentic America themes. These themes are materialized through a variety of existing experiences for visitors, including museums,




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   144
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Opportunities




             historical sites, and events. Oklahoma is well-positioned to protect physical assets, preserve cultural traditions, and educate residents and
             visitors through heritage tourism.

      •      Family Tourism - As discussed, Oklahoma is perceived as a friendly state, where the largest motivation for travel is visiting family and
             friends. While consumer surveys show that Oklahoma is recognized as a great destination for families by just less than half of
             respondents, Oklahoma is well-positioned to further improve on this image through enhanced marketing targeted towards families and
             enhanced family tourism experiences.

      •      Urban Tourism - With significant investments in urban areas (arts, culture, sports, etc.), there is an opportunity to continue to leverage
             these investments for increased tourism to these cities as well as attractions in nearby communities.

      •      Rural/Community-based Tourism - Active Main Street programs help increase economic sustainability of historic downtown districts and
             can be leveraged to attract more visitors. Oklahoma’s scenic byways and Route 66 provide exposure, access, and opportunities for rural
             Oklahoma to showcase its architecture, art, culture, cuisine, customs, geography, history, and people. While much has been done to take
             advantage of these rural strengths in the past, positioning Oklahoma to explore additional ways to leverage this strength is a continued
             opportunity. This is particularly evident given the limited funding that has been available to promote development of tourism products and
             events throughout rural Oklahoma.

      •      Gaming - While gaming is an existing strength of the state, the number of new "major" casinos under development or expansion provides
             the opportunity for Oklahoma to elevate its position as a gaming destination. These new developments/expansions are offering the resort-
             style amenities, such as restaurants, entertainment, spas, and accommodations, which some casino patrons have come to expect given
             the gaming experiences offered in other destinations throughout the country. The addition of the international Hard Rock brand can also
             help to raise the profile of gaming in Oklahoma.

      •      Business Tourism - With new, expanding, and planned meeting and convention venues in the state, Oklahoma has the potential to
             further penetrate the meetings and convention market. Additionally, with Oklahoma's relatively robust economy (despite economic
             downturn), there is opportunity to continue to increase business travel to the state through the creation of new/expanding businesses,
             improving air accessibility, and adding new hotel supply.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   145
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Opportunities




Specific

      •      Cowboy/Western/Equine Tourism - With such a strong Western heritage in the state, there is an opportunity to continue to build upon
             these themes through further enhancement and promotion of Western, cowboy, and equine attractions and events.

      •      Native American Tourism - With rich Native American heritage, Oklahoma has the opportunity to further grow tourism products (including
             visitor experiences and events) and marketing related to Native American tourism. In particular, the American Indian Cultural Center and
             Museum will be a unifying attraction for American Indian heritage and opportunity for visitors to connect to other Native American
             attractions within the state.

      •      Eco/Adventure Tourism - With Oklahoma’s large state park system, diverse landscape, and available adventure trails, there is an
             opportunity to enhance tourism in the eco/adventure segment.

      •      RV Tourism - With a significant increase in RV ownership in the past decade, Oklahoma is well positioned to capture this niche market by
             capitalizing on its significant section of Route 66, scenic byways, central location, and interstate highways.

      •      Sports Tourism - Sports tourism, including the amateur and youth markets has been a growing niche throughout the country in recent
             years. With Oklahoma's sports venues, friendly perception, and affordability, it is well positioned to attract tournaments for this market.

      •      Music Tourism - Rich music history and prominent current stars provide the opportunity to further develop this area through existing and
             additional music events and the expansion of the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame Museum.

      •      Agritourism - Agritourism is still in the developing stages. There is opportunity for this market to continue to grow and for Oklahoma to
             become a leader in this niche market.

      •      Culinary Tourism - Given the agricultural base in the state, there is an opportunity to further capitalize on "home grown" foods and
             culinary experiences through events, restaurants, and agricultural attractions.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   146
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Weaknesses




      •      Energy/Green Tourism - Oil and gas is the state's largest industry. With Oklahoma's strong oil history and with recent national focus on
             alternative energy issues, there may be opportunity to build upon the strong economic base and create tourism opportunities related to
             energy.




Weaknesses
Weaknesses of the state are intended to highlight areas of improvement for the state to enhance tourism. Weaknesses have been categorized as
asset-related, marketing-related, roles & responsibilities, and funding in accordance with the cornerstones of the strategic modeling process.

Asset-related

      •      Lack of Products - While Oklahoma has a number of tourism strengths and there have been a number of product developments in the
             past twenty years, Oklahoma, as a whole, is still limited in tourism products to attract visitors.

      •      Product Connectivity - While Oklahoma has numerous and diverse tourism attractions, many attractions are geographically dispersed
             throughout the state, and connectivity among attractions and themes is limited. While some suggested itineraries and defined trails such
             as the Discovery Trail in Fort Sill/Lawton and Choctaw/Chickasaw Heritage Corridor are available, it is important to provide visitors with
             travel ideas, trails, and itineraries to enhance their visitor experience both within specific communities as well as throughout the state.

      •      State Park Conditions - In recent years, additional capital funds of approximately $10 million per year have been provided for state park
             improvements. However, it is still recognized that state park resources, including lodges, cabins, grounds, and roads are in need of
             repairs and upgrades. With the state's natural assets as strong tourism assets for the state, it is important that these investments and
             maintenance continue in order for the state parks to continue to serve as demand generators for residents and visitors. Otherwise, there
             is the potential that residents and visitors alike will seek out other nature-oriented opportunities in nearby states.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   147
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Weaknesses




      •      Transportation Infrastructure - With limited public transportation options and reported road conditions and wayfinding deficiencies by
             stakeholders, the state's transportation infrastructure could be improved. Wayfinding, for instance, is a key element of the visitor
             experience. More visible, frequent, and informative signage, as well as enhanced GPS technologies could help further the tourism
             industry.

      •       Awareness of Products - With such a multitude of tourism products throughout the state combined with a wide range of tourism
             stakeholders, a strong awareness of existing, new and improved, and planned tourism products is a challenge for stakeholders. An
             awareness of improved or planned projects is particularly important for planning new developments and marketing/positioning tourism
             products.

Marketing-related

      •      Perception Issues - While there are positive perceptions of Oklahoma such as a being a friendly state, the state is challenged in
             overcoming pre-existing perceptions (nothing there, nothing to do, dust bowl, Grapes of Wrath, etc.). Another perception issue is that
             many consumers have no perception at all, which provides Oklahoma with a blank slate to create those images, perceptions, and brands
             in the public's mind. Additionally, some perceptions, such as the thought of Oklahoma as the dust bowl, have been suggested by many as
             a "self-inflicted" perception of how non-residents perceive the state. Likewise, many residents lack "buy-in" that Oklahoma is a great place
             for family and friends to visit and lack a broad recognition of the importance of tourism to the economy.

      •      Planning/Research - At the state level, tourism planning has been somewhat limited, evidenced by the update of the strategic master
             plan after more than 20 years. A number of tourism research studies in recent years have been conducted at the state, local, and
             individual business level to understand traveler behaviors, motivations, and perceptions as well as the demand for specific developments
             in an effort to guide strategic development, marketing, and funding decisions. However, coordination among research efforts could help to
             improve the efficiency and quality of results. Additionally, consistent research on a year-over-year basis could also provide better
             benchmarks and tracking of performance.

      •      Country Names - The state is divided into six geographical regions (Frontier, Kiamichi, Red Carpet, Arbuckle, Green, and Great Plains).
             Each region is marketed at the state level and its regional level. However, the region names are not recognizable or meaningful to new
             visitors to the state. As such, the region names don't necessarily help travelers navigate the state or plan their visit. Additionally, the
             regions don't necessarily help to define the tourism assets of a particular area.



This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   148
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Weaknesses




      •      Business Tourism Support - Business travelers are a significant contributor to Oklahoma's tourism expenditures, accounting for
             approximately 32 percent of direct travel expenditures. As business travelers are often considered an inherit demand source, tourism
             promotion efforts are often oriented to the leisure traveler. While business travelers are typically a key target segment on an individual
             destination level by CVBs through the meetings and conventions market, there is limited support for business tourism on a regional and
             state level.

Roles & Responsibilities

      •      Stakeholder Relationships - The state has a multitude of private and public sector organizations supporting the tourism industry directly
             or indirectly. Each of these organizations plays an important role in tourism, yet separate objectives and agendas of each organization
             create limited coordination and cohesion in achieving similar goals. As such, the leveraging of partnerships among these organizations
             could be improved to enhance stakeholder involvement and investment in the tourism industry.

      •      Tribal Relations - Tribal nations are key stakeholders in the state's tourism industry given their gaming operations and heritage
             attractions and assets. However, cohesion of efforts to build and promote tourism between tribal nations and the local, regional, and state
             tourism organizations throughout the state could be improved.

Funding

      •      Limited Budget - As evidenced in comparisons with other states, tourism funding on a state level is less than competitive. To continue to
             grow and enhance tourism, sufficient funding is critical in an increasingly competitive environment for travelers. Likewise, to grow tourism,
             the products must also grow and be developed, yet there are limited opportunities for funding assistance at the state level for product
             development and enhancement.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   149
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Threats




Threats
Threats are categorized as existing threats that the industry faces and potential threats, which could negatively impact the industry.

Existing

      •      Economic Conditions - Economic conditions are a continual concern for destinations with travel declines during economic downturns.
             Current conditions, including decreased consumer spending, concerns of inflation, changing gas prices, and unemployment, impact the
             level of travel. During times of economic downturn, the importance of the strategic planning process is heightened given a greater
             emphasis that resources are employed effectively.

      •      Competition - Competition from other states, including those within Oklahoma's region, continues to increase as other states place
             emphasis on tourism growth and invest in tourism development and promotion.

      •      Increasing Capital Costs - High capital costs and tightening credit markets threaten to restrict public and private investment in
             infrastructure and tourism products.

      •      Gaming Competition - Tribal gaming in Oklahoma continues to grow with new casinos/expansions. However, gaming continues to
             emerge in other states with gaming legalization and new gaming developments. While Kansas has a number of tribal casinos,
             construction began in December of 2008 on the first state-owned casino located in Dodge City.

      •      Workforce Shortage - The hospitality/tourism industry in Oklahoma has been cited as an area of labor shortage in the state. Without a
             sufficient supply of trained employees, tourism will not be able to thrive and grow.

      •      Stakeholder Competition - While coordination and partnerships among tourism industry stakeholders is critical, many stakeholders
             compete with each other for visitors to varying degrees. As such, there is the threat that this competition can keep tourism industry
             stakeholders from working together to achieve a common vision and strategic objectives.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   150
Appendix D: Performance Audit - Threats




Potential

      •      Reduction in Funding - A share of funding for tourism promotion at the state level is appropriated by the legislature. Tourism
             stakeholders strongly shared the concern that funding may decline in the face of budget cuts. There is concern that funding would be
             redirected to projects or industries that are considered to be higher priorities such as healthcare, education, etc.

      •      Loss of Historic Nature - Due to inaction and/or apathy, there is a threat to the loss of a destination's historic nature, unique attributes,
             and authenticity without the appropriate investment in existing historic assets and standards for new developments.




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   151
Appendix D: Performance Audit - SWOT Summary




SWOT Summary
The following table presents a summary comparison of Oklahoma tourism's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. These key issues
are addressed in the tourism strategies and action steps of the plan.


SWOT Summary
Strengths                                                                                                               Weaknesses
Assets                                                      Attributes                                                  Asset-related                                             Marketing-related
Western/Cowboy Heritage                                     Friendly State                                              Lack of Products                                          Perception Issues
Native American Heritage                                    Location                                                    Product Connectivity                                      Planning/Research
Natural Assets                                              Interstate System                                           State Park Conditions                                     Country Names
Authentic America/Communities                               Affordability                                               Transportation Infrastructure                             Business Tourism Support
Route 66 and Scenic Byways                                  Architectural Appeal                                        Awareness of Products
Gaming
Sports Heritage                                                                                                         Roles & Responsibilities                                  Funding
Music Heritage                                                                                                          Stakeholder Relationships                                 Limited Budget
Urban Investments                                                                                                       Tribal Relations
Arts & Culture
Agricultural Assets
Energy Industry


Opportunities                                                                                                           Threats
General                                                     Specific                                                    Existing                                                  Potential
Heritage Tourism                                            Cowboy/Western/Equine Tourism                               Economic Conditions                                       Reduction in Funding
Family Tourism                                              Native American Tourism                                     Competition                                               Loss of Historic Nature
Urban Tourism                                               Eco/Adventure Tourism                                       Increasing Capital Costs
Rural/Community-based Tourism                               RV Tourism                                                  Gaming Competition
Gaming                                                      Sports Tourism                                              Workforce Shortage
Business Tourism                                            Music Tourism                                               Stakeholder Competition
                                                            Agritourism
                                                            Culinary Tourism
                                                            Energy/Green Tourism


This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                              152
Appendix E
Additional Data
Appendix E: Additional Data - Responding Stakeholders




Responding Stakeholders
The following stakeholders provided feedback regarding the tourism industry through in-person interviews, telephone interviews, and internet
surveys.



Abby Cash                                            Oklahoma Department of Agriculture
Andi Holland                                         Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center
Angela Williams                                      Fun Country
Barbara Johnston                                     Ackerman McQueen
Barbie Elder                                         Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
Bill Byer                                            Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
Bob Fraser                                           Woolaroc Wildlife Preserve
Brenda Granger                                       Oklahoma Museums Association
Bruce Divis                                          State Parks Western/Central Regional Manager
Bruce Houseman                                       Remington Park
Carolyn Hill                                         Oklahoma City Museum of Art
Cathy Williams-White                                 Edmond Convention & Visitors Bureau
Charity O'Donnell                                    McCurtain County Tourism Authority
Christy Alcox                                        Oklahoma Heritage Association
Chuck Mai                                            Tourism Promotion Advisory Committee
Cristy Morrison                                      Stillwater Convention & Visitors Bureau
Cynthia Reid                                         Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce
Dana Davis                                           Lawton/Ft. Sill Chamber of Commerce
Danna Fowble                                         Oklahoma State Chamber




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   154
Appendix E: Additional Data - Responding Stakeholders




David Keathly                                        Marland Mansion
Debby Johnson                                        Ackerman McQueen
Debra Bailey                                         Oklahoma Travel Industry Association
Don Nowlin                                           Tenkiller Area Lake Association
Donna Windel                                         Noble Foundation
Dr. Duane King                                       Gilcrease Museum
Dr. Hailin Qu                                        Oklahoma State University
Ellen Censky                                         Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History
Erin Adams                                           Clinton Chamber of Commerce
Frank Sims                                           Tourism and Recreation Commissioner
Gary Ridley                                          Oklahoma Department of Transportation
Gena Howard                                          Tourism Promotion Advisory Committee
Gina Timberman                                       American Indian Cultural Center and Museum
Gregory Pyle                                         Choctaw Nation
Hardy Watkins                                        Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
Hossein Moini                                        Adventure Travel
Jackie Stewart                                       Green Country Marketing Association
Janet Raines                                         Time Lines
Jeff Erwin                                           Colcord Hotel
Jenifer Reynolds                                     Horse Industry Representative
Jess Nelson                                          Guymon Convention & Tourism
Jessika McDonnell                                    Duncan Area Economic Development Foundation
Jill Simpson                                         Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
Jim Cowan                                            Bricktown Entertainment District
Jo Ann Keirsey                                       Frontier City and White Water Bay




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   155
Appendix E: Additional Data - Responding Stakeholders




Joan Henderson                                       Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
Joe Alexander                                        Oklahoma State University
Joe Kyle                                             Heartland Flyer
Joe Martin                                           Oklahoma Hotel/Lodging Association
John Ford                                            Legislator (Senate)
John Reid                                            Reid Group
Kari Watkins                                         Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum
Kate Kelly                                           Tahlequah Tourism
Kathy Tippin                                         Tourism Promotion Advisory Committee
Kevin Stark                                          Toy & Action Figure Museum
Kim Little                                           Arbuckle Country Marketing Association
Kin Thompson                                         Northeastern State University
Kris Marek                                           Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
Kristi Davis                                         Festival of Light
Larry Andes                                          Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium
Leslie Spears                                        Oklahoma City Museum of Art
Linda Barnett                                        Oklahoma Department of Commerce - Main Street Program
Lindsay Vidrine                                      Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
Lois Dawn Jones                                      Duncan Convention & Visitors Bureau
Lori Hill Broken                                     Arrow Tourism Office
Lowell Caneday                                       Oklahoma State University
Lt. Gov. Jari Askins                                 Lieutenant Governor's Office
Lynn Thurman                                         Stafford Air & Space Center
Mary Beth Moore                                      Ponca City Chamber of Commerce
Matt Gregory                                         Choctaw Nation




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   156
Appendix E: Additional Data - Responding Stakeholders




Maxine Thomas                                        City of Mangum
Melvin Moran                                         Tourism and Recreation Commissioner
Michael Cawley                                       Noble Foundation
Mick Cornett                                         Oklahoma City Mayor
Mike Carrier                                         Oklahoma City Convention & Visitors Bureau
Mike Hickey                                          Oklahoma Route 66 Association
Mike Woods                                           Oklahoma State University
Nancy Phillips                                       Tourism Promotion Advisory Committee
Natalie Shirley                                      Secretary of Commerce & Tourism
Nolan Crowlwy                                        N/A
Pat Smith                                            Oklahoma Route 66 Museum
Paul Fisher                                          Medicine Park Area Foundation, Inc
Ramona Clark                                         Tourism Promotion Advisory Committee
Rand Suffolk                                         Philbrook Museum of Art
Randy McDaniel                                       Legislator (House)
Reuben Gant                                          Greenwood Chamber of Commerce
Robin Elliot                                         Chickasaw Nation
Roxanne Cook                                         Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium
Roy Williams                                         Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce
Sandy Pantlik                                        Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
Sandy Sarette                                        Tatanka Ranch
Shoshana Wasserman                                   Native American Cultural & Educational Authority
Stan Clark                                           Eskimo Joes Restaurants
Steve Hendrickson                                    Boeing Tulsa
Sue Harris                                           Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame & Museum




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   157
Appendix E: Additional Data - Responding Stakeholders




T.L. Walker                                          Tourism and Recreation Commissioner
Terry Bowers                                         Oklahoma Aquarium
Timothy Boruff                                       Price Tower Arts Center
Tina Gilliland, CAE                                  Tourism Promotion Advisory Committee
Todd Stallbaumer                                     Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department
Tony Benson                                          Tourism and Recreation Commissioner
Tony Vann                                            Frontier Country Marketing Association
Towana Spivey                                        Fort Sill Historic Landmark & Museum
Treasure Ruttman                                     Greater Muskogee Area Chamber of Commerce and Tourism
Vera Nelson                                          Talihina Chamber of Commerce




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.   158
Appendix E: Additional Data - Previous State Research




Previous State Research
The following list includes recent research conducted at the state and local level.


      •      Conversion Research (2004)                                                                                             •      Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce Economic Data,
                                                                                                                                           Forecasts & Trends (2007/2008)
      •      Advertising Tracking Study (2004)
                                                                                                                                    •      Oklahoma City Memorial Tourism Research Topline Results
      •      Focus Groups in Wichita & Dallas on Consumer Perceptions
                                                                                                                                           (2008)
             (2004)
                                                                                                                                    •      Winter Texan Research (2008)
      •      Co-Op Research Report (2005)
                                                                                                                                    •      Tulsa Vision 2025 Monthly Reports (2008)
      •      Tulsa Vision 2025 Route 66 Master Plan (2005)
                                                                                                                                    •      Tulsa Economic Profile (2008)
      •      Hospitality Tourism & Recreation Cluster Analysis (2005)
                                                                                                                                    •      The Economic Impact of the Oklahoma Gaming Industry
      •      Department of Commerce Industry Analysis Report (2005)
                                                                                                                                           Study (2008)
      •      Oklahoma Tourism Segmentation (2006)
      •      Oklahoma Job Vacancy Survey (2006)

      •      Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan (2006)
      •      Kansas City Vacation Study Results (2007)
      •      Conversion & Advertising Effectiveness Research (2007)

      •      The Economic Impact of Travel on Oklahoma Counties
             (2007)
      •      Oklahoma Department of Commerce Performance Report
             (2007)
      •      Oklahoma Restaurant Association at a Glance (2007)




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.               159
Appendix E: Additional Data - Select Comparisons to Other States




Select Comparisons to Other States
In the following pages, select comparisons of                                                  Travel-Related Expenditures (2005, in millions)
Oklahoma to other states are presented in terms of
                                                                                                                                           Travel-Related                                          Travel-Related
travel and tourism expenditures and employment and                                              Rank         State                          Expenditures                    Rank   State            Expenditures
tribal gaming revenues.
                                                                                                1            California                             $71,314.2               26     Connecticut            7,791.0
                                                                                                2            Florida                                 49,981.5               27     Indiana                7,612.3
Expenditures                                                                                    3            Texas                                   37,245.2               28     Alabama                6,546.2
                                                                                                4            New York                                33,039.5               29     Kentucky               6,385.4
In the pages that follow, Oklahoma is compared to the
                                                                                                5            Nevada                                  28,220.8               30     Oregon                 6,358.2
other 49 states to understand its position in terms of
                                                                                                6            Illinois                                24,504.9               31     Mississippi            5,881.0
travel related expenditures, travel-related employment,
                                                                                                7            Pennsylvania                            17,154.6               32     Iowa                   5,363.7
dependence on tourism, and gaming revenues.
                                                                                                8            New Jersey                              16,663.2               33     Oklahoma               4,924.6
As presented previously, Oklahoma's travel-related                                              9            Georgia                                 16,572.5               34     New Mexico             4,769.0
expenditures totaled $4.9 billion in 2005, which was                                            10           Virginia                                16,479.7               35     Arkansas               4,746.9
ranked 33rd among all states and lower than the                                                 11           North Carolina                          14,215.9               36     Utah                   4,621.5
average of $11.3 billion. (2005 was the most recent                                             12           Ohio                                    13,928.6               37     Kansas                 4,474.9
year the study was conducted.)                                                                  13           Michigan                                13,459.8               38     Nebraska               3,232.2
                                                                                                14           Tennesee                                12,084.4               39     New Hampshire          3,047.6
Oklahoma was also compared to its border states,                                                15           Massachusetts                           11,691.7               40     Idaho                  2,703.4
including Texas, Colorado, Missouri, New Mexico,                                                16           Arizona                                 11,122.0               41     Montana                2,392.8
Arkansas, and Kansas. On average, these states had                                              17           Colorado                                10,771.4               42     Maine                  2,170.3
$12.0 billion in travel expenditures; however, this                                             18           Maryland                                10,289.2               43     West Virginia          2,116.4
figure drops to $7.0 billion when Texas is excluded.                                            19           Missouri                                10,178.7               44     Wyoming                2,073.7
Regardless, in comparison to both border states and                                             20           Washington                               9,262.2               45     South Dakota           1,806.0
all states, Oklahoma's travel related expenditures are                                          21           Minnesota                                9,016.3               46     Rhode Island           1,574.0
relatively low.                                                                                 22           Hawaii                                   8,663.0               47     Alaska                 1,551.9
                                                                                                23           South Carolina                           8,525.7               48     Vermont                1,511.0
                                                                                                24           Wisconsin                                8,042.6               49     North Dakota           1,423.8
                                                                                                25           Louisiana                                7,888.6               50     Delaware               1,258.6
                                                                                               Source: Travel Industry Association



This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                              160
Appendix E: Additional Data - Select Comparisons to Other States




Employment
                                                                                             Travel-Related Employment (2005)
With 71,300 employees in the travel industry,
Oklahoma is ranked 31 among all states, which is a                                                                                       Travel-Related                                           Travel-Related
position similar to travel-related expenditures. On                                          Rank          State                           Employment                      Rank   State             Employment
average, travel-related employment was 131,000                                               1             California                                696,400               26     Indiana                91,800
among all states, 151,000 among border states, and                                           2             Florida                                   562,100               27     Mississippi            87,800
84,000 among border states excluding Texas. In all                                           3             Texas                                     486,200               28     Kentucky               87,000
comparisons,         Oklahoma's         travel-related                                       4             Nevada                                    400,200               29     Alabama                74,500
employment is comparatively low.                                                             5             New York                                  293,000               30     Oregon                 73,100
                                                                                             6             Illinois                                  279,600               31     Oklahoma               71,300
                                                                                             7             Georgia                                   217,000               32     Utah                   66,000
                                                                                             8             Virginia                                  206,500               33     Iowa                   62,400
                                                                                             9             Pennsylvania                              200,000               34     Connecticut            60,100
                                                                                             10            New Jersey                                188,000               35     Arkansas               58,400
                                                                                             11            North Carolina                            185,200               36     Kansas                 55,100
                                                                                             12            Ohio                                      159,700               37     New Mexico             55,000
                                                                                             13            Michigan                                  141,700               38     Nebraska               40,400
                                                                                             14            Tennessee                                 140,800               39     Wyoming                27,900
                                                                                             15            Minnesota                                 139,000               40     West Virginia          27,800
                                                                                             16            Colorado                                  131,500               41     Maine                  27,700
                                                                                             17            Arizona                                   131,100               42     Montana                26,000
                                                                                             18            Missouri                                  118,900               43     South Dakota           24,700
                                                                                             19            Maryland                                  111,200               44     Alaska                 23,500
                                                                                             20            Wisconsin                                 110,700               45     New Hampshire          23,100
                                                                                             21            Massachusetts                             110,500               46     Idaho                  22,400
                                                                                             22            South Carolina                            110,300               47     North Dakota           20,100
                                                                                             23            Louisiana                                 106,300               48     Vermont                18,500
                                                                                             24            Washington                                 95,100               49     Delaware               14,900
                                                                                             25            Hawaii                                     95,000               50     Rhode Island           12,400
                                                                                             Source: Travel Industry Association



This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                            161
Appendix E: Additional Data - Select Comparisons to Other States




Gaming

In 2007, Oklahoma generated $2.5 billion in tribal gaming revenues,                                                               Indian Gaming Revenue (2007, in millions)
ranked third in the U.S. behind California and Connecticut, and accounted                                                                                                           2007 Gaming      % of Total U.S.
for 9.2 percent of total tribal gaming revenues in the United States.                                                                Rank State                                   Rev ($ millions)        Revenues

                                                                                                                                          1      California                              $7,802.9            29.4%
                                                                                                                                          2      Connecticut                              2,532.0             9.5%
                                                                                                                                          3      Oklahoma                                 2,449.7             9.2%
                                                                                                                                          4      Arizona                                  2,034.2             7.7%
                                                                                                                                          5      Florida                                  1,600.9             6.0%
                                                                                                                                          6      Washington                               1,566.7             5.9%
                                                                                                                                          7      Minnesota                                1,507.4             5.7%
                                                                                                                                          8      Wisconsin                                1,335.2             5.0%
                                                                                                                                          9      Michigan                                 1,036.5             3.9%
                                                                                                                                         10      New York                                 1,022.8             3.9%
                                                                                                                                         11      New Mexico                                 776.9             2.9%
                                                                                                                                         12      Oregon                                     502.7             1.9%
                                                                                                                                         13      Louisiana                                  480.7             1.8%
                                                                                                                                         14      Kansas                                     202.1             0.8%
                                                                                                                                         15      Idaho                                      169.9             0.6%
                                                                                                                                         16      North Dakota                               156.8             0.6%
                                                                                                                                         17      Iowa                                       139.1             0.5%
                                                                                                                                         18      South Dakota                                97.1             0.4%
                                                                                                                                         19      Montana                                     14.2             0.1%
                                                                                                                                                 Other States                             1,086.3             4.1%

                                                                                                                                    Source: The Economic Impact of the Oklahoma Gaming Industry Study




This information, prepared pursuant to our engagement letter is solely for the use and benefit of Ackerman McQueen & OTRD and is not intended for reliance by any other person.                                  162

								
To top