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4D ART -- Demo Overview

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					4D ART -- Demo Overview
Synopsis: Artist Miles Regis and Technology expert Brian Quandt have combined one of the earliest art
forms (painting) with one of the world’s hottest technologies (stereoscopic viewing) to create art which is
fresh, new and inspiring.



Table of Contents
Basic Presentation ............................................................................................................... 1
  Overview ......................................................................................................................... 1
  Logistics .......................................................................................................................... 1
Enhancements (Additions) .................................................................................................. 2
  Show the post process of how the art is made (rendering 3D). ...................................... 2
     Outline......................................................................................................................... 2
     Logistics ...................................................................................................................... 3
  Fly through the art in real-time. ...................................................................................... 3
     Outline......................................................................................................................... 3
     Logistics ...................................................................................................................... 3



Basic Presentation
Overview
Simply show the art! Display the 3D art on any one of a number of 3D TV's or
projection systems (including theatrical). It would be interesting to display the 3D art on
one of the TV displays along with traditional art (paintings). It might also be interesting
to display both forms of art via free-standing traditional easels, ideally in a manner
representative of a gallery opening as opposed to art simply hanging on a wall. This
would provide a way to balance both the old and the new and further emphasize the
contrast of technology allowing us to enjoy old art forms in novel ways.


Logistics
Items needed to display the content include:
    1. A 3D display either:
           Pansonic 3D TV
           Hyundai 3D TV
           JVC 3D TV
           Samsung 3D TV
           Toshiba Autostereoscopic TV
           Aliscopy Autostereoscopic TV
           DCI compliant theatrical system (RealD, Dolby, etc)
    2. 3D Playback system (one of the following options)
           Bluray player which supports 3D
                    PC for Autostereoscopic playback (Alioscopy)
                    PC with stereoscopic player
                    For DCI compliancy, a Doremi or equivalent player

A note about all stereoscopic monitors (not autostereoscopic): these TV's are very easy to
operate and get running in 3D. All that is required is to acquire the TV, create an
appropriate AVI or QuickTime file, and then play it back on the TV using any
contemporary desktop single CPU system. It is also easy to generate Blu-ray discs which
can run stand-alone in a Blu-ray player with the content looping.

Autostereoscopic TV's all require specialized players to drive the displays in the format
they require. These players are simple PC type players which can run from a standard
single CPU desktop computer. This is true of all autosterescopic players with possibly
the exception of the new Toshiba autostereo TV. It is rumored, but not yet confirmed,
that it can display the 3D formats like those of the prior TV category (JVC, Panasonic
TV's, etc). If this is true, the playback process becomes very simple for the Toshiba TV.


Enhancements (Additions)
Show the post process of how the art is made (rendering 3D).
Outline
The art was created via a collection of many images taken during the painting process.
To display the art in 3D, each image is simply stacked on top of the others (each images
background color is set to transparent) and a virtual 3D camera renders the resulting 3D
art and converts it to the format appropriate for the given 3D TV.

Many common applications used for computer animation or VFX can be used to render
the 3D image. This includes Autodesk's Maya, Autodesk's 3ds Max (3D Studio Max),
The Foundry's Nuke, and even Adobe AfterEffects1.

In order to demonstrate this process, we'd establish a project on one of the above systems
with all the content already set up appropriately. Any demonstrator could be quickly
instructed on how to render the output files. (The adventuresome demonstrator could be
taught how to create different views, and or get creative using the tools to generate the
output 3D.)

Once the output images are created, they can easily be displayed on the 3D enabled TV.
In the case of non-autostereoscopic TV's, the files are simply played using Media Player,
or Stereoscopic Player. In the case of autostereoscopic TV's, it (may be) necessary to
render to the format the TV expects, and then play the results to the TV using a player
provided for that particular autostereoscopic TV.


1
    I've not yet tested this process on Adobe, but I've read about others doing so.
Logistics
Equipment needed for this demo includes:
   1. A single CPU Desktop PC (plus probably an Nvidia graphics card)
   2. VFX Application software (Nuke, 3ds Max, or AfterEffects)
   3. Decent computer monitor (possibly 3D enabled as well) for running the VFX
      application software

This demonstration is also very easy. All the demo artist does is provides a means to re-
render the displayed art. This system may be networked or connected to the playback
system allowing the main 3D art to be updated or changed.

Fly through the art in real-time.
Outline

One of the goals of this project has been to enable individuals or the artist to "fly
through" Miles’ art after it was created. The art would be stationary in the 3D world, and
the artist would take control of a joystick that lets him fly through the art in any manner
Miles choses. The art consists of several dozen images all in excess of sixteen
megapixels per layer. The compute power necessary to provide continuous motion
through all the data is a good exercise of the contemporary Intel processors.

The set up is simply a 3D TV connected to a computer with all the data on it. The
interface could be either a joystick or even flight controls from a game console system.

Logistics

At present this is still a goal. There are three routes which seem viable to accomplish for
a January 2010 showing:
    1. Write a custom application with the specific intent to meet this goal. Using both
       Intel and Nvidia OpenGL drivers it is estimated this is about a 20-40 hour project.

   2. Write a custom application with specific intent to meet this goal. Using only
      Intel, Sandy Bridge, and Intel OpenGL code, this is about a 100-150 hour project.

   3. Locate an off the shelf tool capable of providing a "fly through" in 3D. There are
      applications in the architectural world which offer "home fly throughs" which
      may suffice. But do these tools support the newest 3D autostereoscopic displays
      which may be chosen for a given show?

In either item one or two above, it is suggested that a custom approach would also
provide a good demonstration tool for software engineers, especially if released under
opensource/GPL.

				
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posted:8/14/2011
language:English
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