FY2008 CAPER by wuxiangyu

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									  CITY OF MEMPHIS
     CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL
 PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION
           REPORT
      HOUSING AND COMMUNITY
           DEVELOPMENT




PROGRAM YEAR 2007 (FISCAL YEAR 2008)
    JULY 1, 2007 TO JUNE 30, 2008
        WILLIE W. HERENTON, MAYOR
             CITY OF MEMPHIS

        ROBERT LIPSCOMB, DIRECTOR
    HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
                            City of Memphis
           Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report
                                FY 2008
                           Table of Contents
                                                          Page Number
Introduction                                                     1

PART I      Resources

Federal Entitlement Resources                                        3
Other Sources                                                        3
Leveraging                                                           4
Geographic Distribution                                              5
Maps                                                                 6

PART II     Three-Year Strategies & Priority Areas                  10

PART III    Program Accomplishments

Housing                                                              13
Homeless                                                            20
Special Needs Populations                                           25
Neighborhood, Community & Economic Development                      30
Planning and Administration                                         34

PART IV     Program Narratives

Assessment of Three-Year Goals                                      37
Actions to Affirmatively Further Fair Housing                       46
Affordable Housing Narrative                                        48
Continuum of Care                                                   52
CDBG Narrative                                                      57
       Certificates of Consistency                                  58
       Displacement Narrative                                       59
       Rehabilitation Activities                                    59
       Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy – Benchmarks Progress   60
       Financial Reports                                            61
       Parcels Purchased/Donated/Sold                               62
       Program Income Activities                                    63
       CDBG Loan Status Report                                      65
       CDBG Financials                                              68
       CDBG Financial Summary                                       73

HOME Program Narrative                                              75
       HOME Loan Status Report                                      77
       HOME Financials                                              78
                         Table of Contents - Continued


         HOME APR Report
         HOME Match Report

HOPWA Program Narrative                                                 82
       HOPWA Performance Chart 1&2                                      86
       HOPWA Financial Report                                           87

ESG Program Narrative                                                   88
     ESG Summaries                                                      88
     Financial Reports                                                  90

PART V      Other Actions
     Address Obstacles to Meeting Underserved Needs                     92
     Foster and Maintain Affordable Housing                             92
     Eliminate Barriers to Affordable Housing                           93
     Overcome Gaps in Institutional Structures & Enhance Coordination   94
     Improve Public Housing and Resident Initiatives                    95
     Evaluate and Reduce Lead-Based Paint Hazards                       96
     Ensure Compliance With Program & Comprehensive Planning
     Requirements                                                       97
     Reduce the Number of Poverty Level Families                        98

VI    Self - Evaluation Narrative

      Housing                                                           99
      Homeless                                                          100
      Special Needs Population                                          101
      Neighborhood, Community & Economic Development                    103

VII   PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

      Changes in Program Objectives                                   104
      Citizen Comments                                                104
      Appendix                                            Public Notice
                  Program Year 2007/FY 2008
    CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT
                      CITY OF MEMPHIS
                    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Presented herein is the City of Memphis’ program year 2007/fiscal year 2008 (FY
08) Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report (CAPER). The report
outlines the progress that the City of Memphis, Division of Housing and
Community Development (HCD) has made in carrying out its strategic and
annual action plan for the period of July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008 This report
addresses the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD’s)
Program Year 2007 (PY 07). The grants reported on for this period include the
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnership
funds, the Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Program, and Housing Opportunities
for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA).

Activities carried out with other funding sources are also reported in the CAPER
in that the combination of all resources enables Memphis to implement its
housing and community development programs.

Part I of the CAPER describe the resources, commitments and expenditures
made available during FY 08. Part II summarizes the three year goals for each
priority area and describes the individual activities undertaken within each priority
area, the number of persons assisted, administrative expenditures, and other
actions taken by the City relating to housing and community development. Part
III presents Program Accomplishments while Part IV presents Entitlement
Program Narratives. Part V discusses Other Actions and Part VI contains a
section on Self-Evaluation. Part VII concludes the document with a description
on Public Participation.

The CAPER provides HCD the opportunity to evaluate it efforts in following an
approved Consolidated Plan and to examine the impact of its housing and
community development programs in the Memphis community. To effectively
evaluate the progress made during FY2008, the CAPER references the 2008-
2010 Consolidated Plan’s Three Year Strategy for Housing and Community
Development, which is the foundation for performance reporting. The 2008-2010
Consolidated Plan described the City of Memphis’ housing and community
development needs, strategies, goals, and objectives.

The 2008-2010 Consolidated Plan identified four areas for priority needs:
Housing, Homeless, Special Needs Populations, and Neighborhood/Community-
Public Services/Economic Development. This year’s CAPER is the final report for
the Consolidated Plan’s 2008-2010 Three-Year Strategy. Significant areas of
accomplishment include the following highlights.



                                          1
An objective of the housing need category is to increase the rate of
homeownership. In the report year, the City of Memphis provided down payment
assistance to 59 low-moderate income families through HCD and a local
nonprofit.

The combination of efforts resulting from the housing objective to provide direct
and indirect assistance to rehabilitation was met through the Single-family
Rehabilitation, Volunteer and Senior Citizens’ Home Repair Programs.
Combined, these three programs enabled Memphis to meet the rehabilitation
objective. A combined total of 144 low- income households benefited from these
programs.

In the category of Homeless and Special Needs, over 1000 homeless were
provided either transitional housing, emergency shelter, or essential services.
Ten units of permanent supportive housing were created as well. Additionally,
over 7000 people with special needs were assisted through a variety of
programs.

Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs) also contributed to
meeting housing needs through the creation of 13 new rental units, construction
of 13 new single family homeowner units, rehabilitation of 4 single family units,
and acquisition of three lots for future development. Of the homeowner units, 6
were sold during the reporting period.

In the area of targeted redevelopment, HCD remains a partner with the Memphis
Housing Authority in carrying out its HOPE VI efforts. In FY2008, HCD assisted
in the completion of demolition of the former Dixie Homes public housing
development (to be renamed Legends Park), which will be replaced by 430 rental
units, 30 homeownership units, and 12,000 feet of commercial space. The
second major effort involved acquisition and infrastructure construction and other
public improvements at University Place, which will result in the creation of 461
mixed income rental and homeownership units over four phases of construction.

The draft CAPER was available for public review and comment from September
13, 2008 through September 28, 2008. The final CAPER will be available to the
public and will be presented at a public hearing to be held in January of 2009, the
date and location to be announced by public notice.




                                         2
                                 PART I - RESOURCES

A.     Federal Entitlement Resources and Program Income

The resources received by the City of Memphis during the July 1, 2007 to June
30, 2008 reporting period (PY 2007/FY 2008) are detailed in this section.
Entitlement funds made up the majority of the resources that were received
within the City. These include federal Community Development Block Grant
(CDBG), HOME funds, Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG), and Housing
Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA). The PY 07/FY 08 entitlement
grant funds and program income are outlined in the table below.

Sources and Commitment of Funds

The following table reflects Federal entitlements and program income available,
committed and expended during FY 2008 (Program Year 2007).


Funding Sources                  Committed           Available Funding         Expenditures
                                   Funds
CDBG                             $8,330,778.00           $8,330,778.00         $11,655,742.97

HOME & ADDI                         $4,689,235.00        $4,689,235.00           $2,917,996.75
ESG                               $360,350.00             $360,350.00             $298,320.32
HOPWA                            $1,879,000.00           $1,879,000.00           $2,104,155.24
Estimated Program Income -       $2,409,578.11           $2,409,578.11         Included in above
CDBG                                                                               categories
Estimated Program Income -                                                     Included in above
HOME                              $33,320.00              $33,320.00               categories
       TOTALS
                                 $17,702,261.11         $17,702,261.11         $16,976,216.28



B.     Other Resources Available in FY 08

In addition to the PY 07/FY 08 entitlement funds, other federal, state, City and
private resources were available for housing and community development
activities. These additional resources include unencumbered, prior year CDBG,
HOME, ESG and HOPWA funds that were committed to activities detailed in
previous Consolidated Plans. These other resources are detailed in the following
table.
Funding                                          Use of Funds                   FY 08Funds
Prior Year CDBG               Housing/Community Development                      $1,000,000.00
HUD – Continuum of Care       Chronic homeless                                   $4,865,244.00
State (DHS HelpCare)          Elderly Homemaker Services                          $186,615.00
City of Memphis               Housing, Public Services, Economic Development     $6,770,626.00
City – Capital Improvements   Infrastructure, Housing development               $16,100,000.00



                                               3
Leveraging Resources
HCD maximizes the City’s Federal entitlement dollars to maximize the impact of
its housing and community development programs. Partners that work in
collaboration with HCD include other government agencies, private foundations,
non-profit service providers, mortgage companies, lenders, and private investors.
The efforts to leverage entitlement and other funds with private and other public
resources are described below.

HCD has leveraged significant dollars for neighborhood revitalization efforts in
partnership with the Memphis Housing Authority. A combination of HOPE VI,
private, local government, CDBG, and foundation funding are currently being
utilized in the University Place and Legends Park HOPE VI revitalization projects.
HCD also provided CDBG funds to support Community and Support Services to
residents as part of the College Park HOPE VI in FY2008.

The Renaissance Business Center (RBC) provides technical assistance and
loans to persons who wish to start or expand a small business. The RBC
Business Opportunity Fund is a partnership between the Small Business
Administration, Southeast Community Capital, the City of Memphis, and makes
loans up to $500,000 to small businesses. In FY2008, there were 39 loans made
totaling $1,255,500.00. Primarily, loans were made to businesses in the service
industry. RBC also administers a Contractor’s Assistance Program, which
leverages funds by providing small, minority, and women-owned businesses with
technical assistance, and information on bonding, insurance, and capital.

The HCD Real Estate Development and Non-Profit Housing departments
leverage funds by providing funding to for-profit and non-profit housing
developers to rehabilitate or construct single and multi-family housing units. In
FY2008, the Affordable Single and Multi-Family Housing Development program
leveraged over $6,300,000.00. HCD is in the last year of a HUD Hazard
Reduction Demonstration Grant program, which has leveraged the $4 million in
HUD funds with over $350,000.00 to reduce lead hazards in multi-family rental
units, especially for low-income families with young children. During FY2008,
HCD completed an application for another Lead Hazard Reduction
Demonstration Grant program for $4 million, which will leverage $9 million over
three years, if awarded. In FY2008, the Down Payment Assistance program
leveraged over $5,088,924.00 in private mortgage financing by providing funds to
assist with down payments and closing costs. CHDO projects leveraged
approximately $1,155,055.00.

The HCD Department of Special Needs Department requires leverage from
organizations awarded funds through its competitive grant programs. In FY2008,
HCD leveraged over $146,865.00 in in-kind, volunteers, and primarily cash
match from nonprofit organizations awarded funds through the ESG program. All



                                        4
HOME Match for Housing for Homeless and Special Needs Populations are
required to match a minimum of 100% of the amount that they are applying for. In
FY2008, $897,199.00 was matched under this program. HCD also helps to
coordinate the annual application to HUD for funding under the Continuum of
Care and received an award in the amount of $4,865,244.00 during FY2008.

Geographic Distribution
The maps on the following pages indicate the geographic areas where the
majority of program entitlements funds were distributed. These maps show the
location of the boundaries for CHDO activities; the areas where homeowner
rehabilitation efforts have focused; and, the targeted areas for most of the City’s
competitive grant awards.




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PART II.      Three-Year Strategy and Priority Areas: An Overview
Three-Year Strategy

This section provides a summary of the five areas that were identified as housing
and community development priorities in the 2008-2010 Consolidated Plan. The
priority areas are housing, homeless and special needs housing and services,
community and public services, economic development, and neighborhood and
community development. The three-year goals and objectives for each priority
area are summarized below; however, the reader is referred to pages 1-41
Strategic Plan Section of the 2008-2010 Consolidated Plan for a comprehensive
description of the goals, objectives, and strategies for each priority area.

Housing

Memphis’ goal for housing is to insure access, opportunity, and choice for all
residents of the City of Memphis to decent and quality housing that is affordable
and located in safe and appealing neighborhoods.

Housing objectives include: I: To assist in the development and production of
affordable rental housing. II: To assist in the development and production of
single-family housing. III: To provide assistance to homeowners to preserve and
prevent loss of their properties. IV: To provide direct and indirect housing
assistance to homeowners.

Homeless

The following homeless objectives are proposed for 2008 – 2010:
I: To assist the development of permanent supportive housing for homeless
individuals, persons with children and chronically homeless individuals
II: To assist the development of new emergency shelters
(beds/units) for homeless individuals and women with children who may be
subjected to domestic violence.
III: - To assist the development of a permanent supportive housing
and a quasi-emergency (Safe Haven type) of facility for homeless mentally ill
persons who are unable to access emergency or traditional permanent or
transitional housing
IV: To make available funding that will help to maintain the current inventory of
transitional and emergency housing for homeless persons and families with
children

The Gaps Analysis identified the high priority needs of permanent supportive
housing, housing placement and transitional housing. Sub-populations where
the head of household had serious mentally illness or were infected with
HIV/AIDS were also identified as a high priority need category.




                                         10
Special Needs Populations

Special needs populations were identified as seven special needs populations:
HIV/AIDS, Mentally Ill, Elderly, Chronic Substance Abusers, Developmentally
Disabled, Physically Disabled, and Victims of Domestic Violence (the Elderly
category also includes the Frail Elderly).

The primary Special Needs goal for HCD is to help ensure that low-moderate
income members of special needs populations and their families have access to
decent and affordable housing and to associated services and treatment that
helps them live as independently as possible.

Objectives include:

Special Needs Objective I: To make funding available that will assist the
development of permanent supportive housing for Special Needs sub-
populations
Special Needs Objective II: To continue to give preference to funding requests
that propose to provide supportive services to Special Needs sub-populations
Special Needs Objective III: To make funding available that will respond to the
increase demand for tenant-based rental assistance for income eligible persons
within the Special Needs sub-populations
Special Needs Objective IV: To continue to give preference to funding requests
that propose to develop new or rehabilitate public facilities which provide
supportive services to income eligible Special Needs sub-populations

Neighborhood, Community & Economic Development

I: Infrastructure improvements are needed to encourage re-investment in
targeted areas
II. Commercial improvements, small business development, job-creation and
employment training programs are tools needed to complement all targeted
economic development activities
III. Elimination of slum and blight conditions are needed to support
redevelopment and revitalization efforts in targeted areas;
IV. Neighborhood planning and citizen input is needed to guide area
redevelopment
V. Public services and facilities are needed to provide social services for low-
moderate income youth and their families and the elderly;

Long Term Objectives
1. To encourage participation of Non-Profit Organizations in the redevelopment.
A high level priority is established for funding the following community needs
project categories over the next three years:




                                         11
•   Planning and Administration - $1,500,000 (Estimated Annual Funding)
•   Public Services - $800,000 (Estimated Annual Funding)

Long- and Short-term Objectives

Long Term Objectives

I. To encourage participation of Non-Profit Organizations in the redevelopment of
targeted areas
II. To support organizations that provide public services that create employment
alternatives and training, and help to assist the expansion of small business
opportunities in targeted areas
III. To increase the number of neighborhood and public facilities in targeted areas

Short Term Objectives

I. To implement demolition and clean-up initiatives to remove slum and blight
conditions in areas targeted for redevelopment
II. To provide infrastructure improvements that support the redevelopment of
targeted areas
III. To develop area/neighborhood redevelopment plans
IV. To develop Neighborhood Resource Centers (public facilities) in target areas

Specific objectives included in the 2008-2010 Strategic Plan for Neighborhood,
Community/Economic Development, and Public Services for non-housing
community development follow.

I: To develop and identify funding for plans that propose adaptive reuses of
vacant properties that contribute to slum and blight in targeted areas/
neighborhoods.
II: To give preference to grant requests from organizations and businesses that
provide employment training and job opportunities that provide a living wage and
to expand small business development efforts in targeted areas
III: To fund activities that provide recreational, after school, and life enrichment
opportunities for youth from primarily low/moderate income families.
IV: To fund non-profit organizations that provide essential, supportive and public
services to senior and elderly persons and programs that seek to improve the
self-sufficiency of very-low to moderate-income persons.
V: To provide funding and support for the renovation and development of public
facilities that serve the elderly, special needs populations, and very-low to
moderate income persons




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                 PART III PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS

                            Housing Activities and Expenditures

  Down Payment Assistance
                                            HOME ADDI 06        $68,216.00
                                            HOME ADDI 07        $316,996.00

  The down payment assistance program helps low and moderate income
  homebuyers with down payments and closing costs toward the purchase of
  single family residences. $5,088,924.00 in private loans were used to assist 59
  new homebuyers in FY 08.

                                 Down Payment Assistance
Incomes 61 to     Incomes 51 to       Incomes 31 to 50%     Incomes <30%       Total
   80% MFI           60% MFI                MFI                  MFI
     14                28                    14                   3              59
  ** Median Family Income


  Single Family Rehabilitation
  FY 08 Expenditures:                       CDBG           $212,433.00
                                            HOME           $97,328.07

  The Housing and Rehabilitation Program Department (HARP) offers financial and
  construction assistance to low and moderate income homeowners in making
  repairs to their homes. The major focus of this program is to assist low to
  moderate-income homeowners in bringing their houses into compliance with City
  Housing Codes. In FY 08, the rehabilitation program focused on major home
  repairs including roofing, electrical repairs, plumbing, and interior finish work.
  During FY 08, the single-family rehabilitation program completed 11 income-
  eligible houses.


  Senior Citizens Minor Home Repair
  FY 08 Expenditures:                       CDBG           $434,597.83

  This program provides assistance to senior homeowners by performing a variety
  of minor home repairs on owner-occupied dwellings citywide. The Minor Home
  Repair program focuses on correcting conditions that directly affect the health
  and safety of the occupants, such as leaking roofs, weak floors, and no heat. To
  be eligible for this program, applicants must be at least 60 years old or disabled,
  and be able to demonstrate that family income meets HUD guidelines for low and
  moderate-income households. In FY 08, the Senior Citizens Minor Home Repair
  program completed 113 repairs.



                                           13
      Volunteer Home Repair
      FY 08 Expenditures:                        CDBG           $68,111.00

      The Volunteer Home Repair program is a partnership between the City of
      Memphis and volunteer organizations. The City provides the materials and
      supplies for minor home repairs and program participants provide the volunteer
      labor to make the repairs to owner occupied homes of senior citizens 60 or older
      and/or the disabled. Volunteer groups may include, but are not limited to,
      nonprofit organizations, local businesses, and neighborhood organizations. The
      Volunteer Home Repair program assisted 20 households in FY 08

      Replacement Housing
      FY 08 Expenditures:                        CDBG           $35,722.71

      The Replacement Housing Program was an extension of the single-family
      rehabilitation effort. The HARP Program seeks to rehabilitate housing units that
      are no longer safe to live in due to severe code violations and requires
      demolition. In the past, when the rehabilitation costs exceed a threshold amount
      relative to the value of the house, the HARP Department would construct a new
      house on site, or at another suitable location. Due to the increasing cost of
      housing construction, it has become more feasible to discontinue this program.
      The expenditure made in FY2008 was carried over from a previous case.

                         Owner-Occupied Housing Accomplishments

                    Expenditures       Total Units      Incomes       Incomes     Incomes <
  Program                              Completed        61 to 80%     31 to 60%    30% MFI
                                                          MFI**          MFI
Single Family       $309,761.07            11               1             7          3
Rehabilitation
Senior Citizen      $434,597.83           113              9             40          64
 Minor Home
   Repair
  Volunteer          $68,111.00            20              0             8           12
 Home Repair
TOTALS              $812,469.90           144              10            55          79
      ** Median Family Income



      Mill Creek Apartments – Section 108 Loan Repayment
      FY 08 Expenditures:                    CDBG       $216,483.50

      CDBG funds were used to repay a Section 108 loan that was used to rehabilitate
      a 243-unit apartment complex in 1995.




                                                14
University Place Acquisition & Infrastructure/Lamar Terrace Acquisition
FY 08 Expenditures:                       CDBG        $2,704,205.69

In FY2008, the major activities at University place includes acquisition, site clean-
up, infrastructure development and the completion of Phase I housing
construction and lease-up of an 118 unit elderly housing development. Phase II
including 151 family rental units is completed and lease-up began in June of
2008. Construction of Phase III 136 family rental units began in June 2008.
Several environmental site issues have been resolved through remediation.
Acquisition and demolition of the area to be redeveloped with HOPE VI funds has
been completed. When completed in 2009, the HOPE VI component of this
project will facilitate the development of 461 housing units – a mixture of rental
and owner-occupied, mixed income, and mixed use housing, a police precinct, a
park with a youth-oriented athletic facility, and other amenities.

Legends Park
FY08 Expenditures                         CDBG          $600,000.00

In FY2008, CDBG funds were used to assist in the demolition of 650 units of
public housing to facilitate the development of 460 units that will include 430
rental units and 30 homeownership units and 12,000 sq. ft. of commercial space
to front Poplar Avenue.

Housing Program Delivery
FY 08 Expenditures                        CDBG          $1,202,716.33

The Division of Housing and Community Development used CDBG funds in the
implementation of the owner-occupied rehabilitation and downpayment
assistance programs described in this report. Staff and overhead costs
associated with departments that are directly involved in carrying out CDBG
eligible housing rehabilitation and development are representative of these
expenditures.

Targeted Rental/Multi-Family Housing Development
      A New Place Apartments
      FY 08 Expenditures:                   CDBG               $152,500.00

       A New Beginning Community Organization, will use CDBG funds for the
       rehabilitation of a 60 unit multi-family complex for the purpose of providing
       safe, decent, and affordable housing to low-to-moderate families in the
       Vollintine/Evergreen community. A total of the four units within the 60 unit
       complex will be converted into an office, laundry facility, and community
       resource center, leaving 56 units for rental use.




                                         15
Chicago Park Place LP
FY 08 Expenditures:                      CDBG          $502,241.94

CDBG funds were used to pay off the project’s existing 1st mortgage and
towards the rehab of a 39 unit affordable multi-family complex, multi-
purpose community facility, and to house a police mini-precinct, all of
which would serve the New Chicago Neighborhood.

April Woods West
FY 08 Expenditures                       HOME          $484,862.06

The April Woods West Apartments are a multi-family project was
developed by a partnership between Bluff City Community Development
Corporation and Project Love, now called Aprilwoods L.P. The project,
located at 268 Chelsea, on an approximate total of four (4) acres, is
formerly the Tri-Arms Apartments. The demolition of the Tri-Arms
Apartments in May of 2005, kicked off the construction of this multi-family
complex. The project a newly constructed, 57 unit garden-style apartment
complex . The site located in the Uptown Community Redevelopment
area, will provide revitalized affordable housing for the residents of this
community.

National Church Residences               HOME          $49,250.00

National Church Residences constructed a 49 unit multi-family complex
for the elderly. National Church Residences has a mission to provide
quality housing and care at affordable prices in communities of caring
persons. The focus of the non-profit is to aid low and moderate income
seniors with housing, which consists of assisted living, nursing homes,
and full service retirement communities. National Church Residences has
been an active recipient of funds under HUD’s Section 202 and 811
programs and currently owns and/or operates 220 Section 202/811
housing complexes. The project site is located on the south side of
Newberry Avenue on 4.75 acres.

Lucca Street/Kansas                      HOME          $11,900.00

The Lucca Street Single Development is a proposed single family housing
project by the Riverview Kansas Community Development Corporation.
The Riverview Kansas CDC has committed to newly constructing 30
affordable single family houses as the new construction of housing has
been almost non existent in the Riverview Kansas Community for the last
10 years. This development will be located on an 3.4 acre site, which will
require the acquisition of an additional 20 lots in the South Memphis area.




                                 16
United Housing Inc. Program Delivery (Operating Grant)
FY 08 Expenditures                     CDBG         $24,999.99

United Housing Inc. operates an affordable housing ownership program that was
provided a grant that assisted 93 low-moderate income Memphis residents to
become homeowners. 12 families received downpayment assistance.

  Housing Activities of Community Housing Development Organizations
                              (CHDOs)

Cooper-Young Community Development Corporation

FY 08 Expenditures:                     HOME          $163,165.84

Cooper-Young Development Corporation utilized HOME/CHDO funds to
complete construction of 5 new homes for homeownership, two of which were
purchased.

Vollintine-Evergreen Community Association CDC
FY 08 Expenditures:                   HOME            $20,698.44

The Vollintine-Evergreen Community Association CDC completed and sold 3
new single-family home for homeownership using HOME/CHDO funds.

The WORKS, Inc.
FY 08 Expenditures:                     HOME          $38,427.50

The WORKS, Inc. used HOME/CHDO funds to complete the rehabilitation of 1
single family house, which was sold to a HOME eligible buyer.

H.E.L.P.I.N.G. CDC
FY 08 Expenditures:                     HOME          $45,250.00

The HELPING CDC used HOME/CHDO funds to construct three new single-
family homes two duplexes to create seven additional special needs, rental units.

LeMoyne-Owen College CDC (LOC-CDC)
FY 08 Expenditures:              HOME                 $19,965.55

The LOC-CDC used HOME/CHDO funds to start the construction of 2 new
homes for sale to HOME income-eligible buyers.




                                       17
Riverview-Kansas CDC
FY 08 Expenditures:                       HOME          $23,811.12

The Riverview-Kansas CDC used HOME/CHDO funds to acquire three lots.

Neighborhood Housing Opportunities Inc.
FY 08 Expenditures:                   HOME                     $189,612.03

Neighborhood Housing Opportunities Inc. (NHO) used HOME/CHDO funds to
complete the construction of six new rental housing units.

New Chicago CDC
FY 08 Expenditures:                       HOME                 $27,850.00

The New Chicago CDC used HOME/CHDO funds to rehabilitate 1 single-family
house. Construction is underway.

Frayser CDC
FY 08 Expenditures:                              HOME          $46,600.00

The Frayser CDC used HOME/CHDO funds to rehabilitate one single family
home and to construct one single-family home, both of which are underway.

Douglas, Bungalow, Crump CDC
FY 08 Expenditures:                       HOME                 $17,887.50

The Douglas Bungalow Crump CDC used HOME/CHDO funds toward the
construction of one single family unit. Construction is underway.

Orange Mound Development Corporation (OMDC)
FY 08 Expenditures:                      HOME                  $63,575.47

The Orange Mound Development Corporation (OMDC) completed the
rehabilitation of 1 single family house and the construction of one single family
house.

CHDO Administration Funds
FY 08 Expenditures:     HOME                                   $192,658.70

In FY 08, CHDO administration funds were used to provide support to 10 CHDO
organizations. Note that the total expenditures for PY 07/FY 08 includes
payments and draws on prior year payments that posted in the current IDIS
report period. The organizations that benefited from CHDO administration
funds include, New Chicago CDC, North Memphis CDC, the Riverview-Kansas
CDC, Cooper-Young Development Corporation, the Vollintine-Evergreen
Community Association CDC, Frayser CDC, Orange Mound Development



                                         18
Corporation, Neigborhood Housing Opportunities, H.E.L.P.I.N.G. CDC, and
LeMoyne-Owen College CDC.




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                 HOMELESS ACTIVITIES and EXPENDITURES


Alpha Omega Veterans Services
FY 08 Expenditures:    ESG                                    $12,836.31

Alpha Omega Veterans Services, Inc. used funds to provide services in their
Homeless Veteran Reintegration Program. This expenditure represents a final
payment that was reported during the last report and paid after the end of the
fiscal period.

Case Management, Inc.
FY 08 Expenditures:        ESG                                $23,803.45

Case Management, Inc.’s Homeless to Housing Program used funds to provide
emergency rent and utility assistance to clients who were in great risk of being
homeless in the Memphis and Shelby County area. This expenditure represents
a final payment that was reported during the last report and paid after the end of
the fiscal period.

Catholic Charities, Inc.
FY 08 Expenditures:        ESG                                  $29,317.66

Catholic Charities used funds to provide services for homeless adult men and
women with severe and chronic mental illnesses; as well as the dually diagnosed
(mentally ill with alcohol and drug addictions). Genesis House provides
transitional care services to assist clients in meeting their needs (e.g. meals,
transportation, shelter, clothing, financial counseling, medical services and legal
services). Case management and transitional shelter were provided to a total of
108 homeless adult men and women during this contract period.

Catholic Charities, Inc.
FY 08 Expenditures:        ESG                                  $6,093.71

Catholic Charities used funds to provide services for homeless adult men and
women with severe and chronic mental illnesses; as well as the dually diagnosed
(mentally ill with alcohol and drug addictions). This expenditure represents a
final payment that was reported during the last report and paid after the end of
the fiscal period.




                                        20
Lowenstein House
FY 08 Expenditures:         ESG                                $237.48

Lowenstein House serves severely and persistently mentally ill consumers who
lack self-sufficiency and have the ability to live independently, but need intense
services and life skills training in order to prevent homelessness. This
expenditure represents a final payment that was reported during the last report
and paid after the end of the fiscal period.

Memphis Family Shelter (EEP)
FY 08 Expenditures:      CDBG                                         $25,284.37

Memphis Family Shelter used funds in The Educational and Enrichment Program
(EEP) to serve homeless children who reside at the shelter. The EEP Program
teaches study skills and learning strategies that will equip homeless children with
the tools needed for academic success. The program provided individual
tutoring sessions guided by a licensed teacher, cultural enrichment field trips, on-
site presentations, and other educational enrichment activities. Services were
provided to 126 children staying at the Memphis Family Shelter.

Memphis Inter-Faith Hospitality Network – Essential Services
FY 08 Expenditures:       ESG                                $20,674.93

Memphis Inter-Faith Hospitality Network (MIHN) used funds to provide essential
services for homeless families needing transitional housing, permanent housing
and supportive services. MIHN provided meals, shelter, transportation other
services to 96 individuals including 27 homeless families.

Memphis Inter-Faith Hospitality Network – Operation & Maintenance
FY 08 Expenditures:       ESG                              $7,788.45

Memphis Inter-Faith Hospitality Network (MIHN) used funds for the operations
and maintenance of the MIHN Program. MIHN served 96 clients providing
shelter, food, clothing, transportation, case management, and other services.

Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association (MIFA), Estival Communities
FY 08 Expenditures:        ESG                             $33,316.35

Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association (MIFA) used funds to provide a
comprehensive transitional housing and service program for homeless families.
Funds were used for the operation and maintenance costs of 77 units of
transitional housing and 12 units of supportive rental housing for homeless
families. Estival Communities provided transitional housing and comprehensive
case management services to 136 homeless families.




                                         21
The Salvation Army - Operation & Maintenance
FY 08 Expenditures:      ESG                                  $20,416.76

The Salvation Army used funds for homeless prevention activities including
food, shelter and case management services to assist clients in achieving
independent living. The goals of the program are to provide a safe environment
for homeless women and their children; and to link clients to resources that lead
to permanent, sustainable housing whenever possible. This expenditure
represents a final payment that was reported during the last report and paid after
the end of the fiscal period.

Salvation Army – Homeless Referral Center
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                             $20,690.11

Salvation Army used funds to implement a Community Intake/Assessment and
Referral Center which includes a supportive housing hotline. This expenditure
represents a final payment that was reported during the last report and paid after
the end of the fiscal period.

Shield, INC. Family Shelter Program
FY 08 Expenditures: ESG                                              $16,690.49

Shield, INC used funds for the Family Shelter Program’s maintenance and
operation costs. The goals of the program are to provide 12 units of emergency
shelter for homeless women and children. Emergency services were provided to
seven (7)adults and (15) fifteen children.

Whitehaven Southwest Mental Health Center
FY 08 Expenditures:    ESG                                    $5,348.55

Whitehaven Southwest Mental Health Center used funds to provide mentally ill
clients with homeless prevention services. Those clients were enrolled in the
P.A.T.H. Program. This expenditure represents a final payment that was
reported during the last report and paid after the end of the fiscal period..

YWCA of Greater Memphis – Operations and Maintenance
FY 08 Expenditures: ESG                                              $16,701.32

YWCA of Greater Memphis used these funds for the operation and maintenance
costs of the emergency shelter in the Abused Women Services Program. The
YWCA provided food and emergency shelter at an undisclosed location to 175
women and their children. The Crisis Line was able to respond to a recorded
1,231 calls from women/children..




                                        22
Cocaine & Alcohol Awareness Program (CAAP)
FY 08 Expenditures: ESG                                                $31,982.57

The Cocaine & Alcohol Awareness Program used ESG funds to renovate a
transitional housing facility that can serve 35 men with shower provisions. Within
the report period, 135 unduplicated clients were served.

Frayser – Millington Mental Health Center (CNN) – Essential Services
FY 08 Expenditures: ESG                                           $15,121.47

The Frayser – Millington Mental Health Center Comprehensive Counseling
Network (CNN) served 17 seriously mentally ill, developmentally disabled and/or
mentally retarded individuals with out-patient and supportive services consisting
of housing and medical support, transportation, and vocational training and /or
placement.

Alpha Omega Homeless Veterans
FY 08 Expenditures: HOME                                               $285,000.00

Alpha Omega started the construction of a 10 unit facility to provide new single-
occupancy housing for homeless veterans. The project is 80% complete as of
the end of the report period.

Door of Hope Homeless Services
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                               $32,272.36

Door of Hope was awarded a community services competitive grant and provided
housing and supportive services to 14 chronically homeless individuals.

Barron Heights Transitional Center
FY 08 Expenditures: ESG                                                $22,317.66

Barron Heights Transitional Housing Center provide transitional housing to 116
homeless persons while also provide supportive services that included
transportation to work sites, drug/alcohol counseling and life skills training. The
program is designed to assist residents with achieving residential stability.

Alpha Omega Homeless Veterans Center (CSG)
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                               $69,502.00

CDBG funds were provided to Alpha Omega in addition to HOME funds to start
the construction of a 10 unit facility which will provide new single-occupancy
housing for homeless veterans. The project is 80% complete as of the end of the
report period.




                                         23
Homeless Program Delivery
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                          $148,120.02

The Division of Housing and Community used CDBG funds in its implementation
of its homeless activities and homeless programs as described in this section.
Staff and overhead costs associated with departments that are directly involved
in carrying out CDBG eligible homeless housing and supportive services are
represented by these expenses.




                                       24
    NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS ACTIVITIES AND
                       EXPENDITURES


Brookhaven Care Home, Inc.
FY 08 Expenditures:     CDBG                                           $9,620.22

Brookhaven assists potentially homeless, mentally disabled clients in becoming
as self-sufficient as possible by providing services such as food, shelter, clothing,
transportation, and basic health care services. This expenditure represents a
final payment that was reported during the last report and paid after the end of
the fiscal period.

The Exchange Club
FY 08 Expenditures:         CDBG                                       $44,195.34

The Exchange Club used funds in The Women & Children’s Adolescent
Domestic Violence Program to provide a comprehensive program of support
services, safety planning, counseling, and assessment of community resources
for children, adolescents and adults who have experienced domestic violence.
Services were provided to 311 clients during this contract period.

Friends-for-Life
FY 08 Expenditures:         CDBG                                       $46,372.98

Friends for Life used funds to coordinate the delivery of medical and supportive
services to clients via their Wellness University Program. Clients received
individualized curriculums, medical treatment, mental health services and daily
living skills. Seven clients completed all facets of the program and a total of 87
clients with HIV/Aids were served.

Help Care Homemaker Service Plus
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                               $42,710.80

The Help Care Homemaker Service Plus provided 24 disabled senior citizens
with core services which included basic homemaker services, meal preparation,
assistance with personal hygiene, errands, escort services to medical
appointments and limited referral services. The program provides homemaker
services for a small fee.

Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS Projects
FY 08 Expenditures: HOPWA                                       $2,104,155.24

These funds were used to provide rental assistance and supportive services for
low income clients with HIV/Aids. A total of 5 organizations and 6 subrecipients
utilized 60% of the funds for housing subsidy and housing placement assistance


                                         25
and 40% on supportive services. More than 570 households received housing /
housing placement assistance while more than 5,400 benefited from HOPWA-
funded supportive services.

Lowenstein House, Inc.
FY06 Expenditures: CDBG                                              $41,869.81

Lowenstein House used CDBG funds to pay the salaries of a Case Manager and
a Job Coach who provided services that included basic living skills training,
educational and recreational activities, job training, job placement, support
groups, and interpersonal skills training skills needed to work and live in the
community. A total of 49 adults diagnosed with a serious and persistent mental
illness were assisted.

Memphis Area Legal Services (MALS)
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                             $13,470.72

MALS’s Abused Women’s Program used funds to provide legal assistance to
women who were victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. The
program provided women with life skills training that help to end the cycle of
violence and abuse leading to personal economic self sufficiency. This
expenditure represents a final payment that was reported during the last report
and paid after the end of the fiscal period.

Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association (MIFA)
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                             $29,149.40

MIFA used funds to operate the Senior Companion Program. This program
paired active, low-income seniors with homebound, frail seniors who needed
assistance with daily living activities. Funds were used to pay the stipends of 27
senior companions hired to assist 22 senior clients during the contract year. Of
the total expended, $5,951.30 represented a final payment that was reported
during the last report and paid after the end of the fiscal period.

Shelby Residential and Vocational Services, Inc. (SRVS)
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                             $39,247.32

SRVS used funds for the its Employment Concepts Program which offers job
retention services and employment opportunities within the community for 33
clients with developmental disabilities.

Synergy Treatment Center
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                             $46,551.64

Synergy used funds to provide long term residential substance abuse treatment
and work therapy services to individuals who are chronic substance abusers.



                                        26
Supportive services were provided to 151 adults who received on-the-job
training, resume writing, interview skills classes, GED preparation; and continued
employment. Synergy also provides direct substance abuse treatment and
prevention services at no charge, to individuals with low or moderate incomes. In
exchange for room, board, and clinical treatment, residents may work in one of
Synergy’s owned and operated businesses or at local businesses with which
Synergy contracts.

Tenant Based Rental Assistance
FY 08 Expenditures: HOME                                      $473,769.06

HCD funded seven organizations that administered Tenant Based Rental
Assistance for persons with mental illness, women and children, and other
persons with special needs. Services were provided to a total of 98 households.

Title XX Program Match – Help Care Homemaker Project
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                             $175,498.18

Help Care Homemaker Services provided 95 elderly and disabled residents with
homemaker/care taker services which included meal preparation, assistance with
personal hygiene, errands and escort services. With the assistance of
homemaker aides, participants are empowered to increase their independence
and become more self-sufficient.

Grace House of Memphis, Inc.
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                             $9,052.53

Grace House used funds in The Phoenix Program to prepare its clients for
transition out of drug treatment and into independent living. The Program is
designed to teach clients greater life skills and to increase the competence level
in job readiness skills. The program offers basic computer literacy skills, job
application assistance, and successful interviewing techniques. Grace House
served 43 women during this contract period.

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Volunteer Training
FY 08 Expenditure: CDBG                                              $46,662.42

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) provided child advocacy services to
552 abused and/or neglected children who were placed in foster care. This
service is made possible through the recruitment and training of volunteer
advocates.




                                        27
Memphis Center for Independent Living
FY 08 Expenditure: CDBG                                               $23,183.77

MCIL will used funds provide rehabilitation assistance to low and moderate
income households that include a disabled individual. In FY08 MCIL provided
assistance to 42 households.

Memphis Child Advocacy Center
FY 08 Expenditure: CDBG                                               $43,335.83

Memphis Child Advocacy Center provides ongoing support and assistance with
accessing community resources for parents whose children have disclosed that
they have been sexually abused. 172 non-offending parents participated in
Family Advocate services that included individual sessions focused on providing
these parents support and assisted them with accessing community resources
and support group sessions.

Meritan (Services for the Legally Blind)
FY 08 Expenditure: CDBG                                               $36,507.99

The Orientation and Mobility Specialist assisted 79 clients with self-protection
techniques, sighted guide techniques, indoor/outdoor cane skills, street
crossings, and special travel environment such as grocery stores, shopping
centers, and college campuses. The clients also reviewed their emergency
escape plans and some clients were introduced to Braille alphabets and
numbers.

Housing Options Inc.
FY 08 Expenditure: HOME                                               $85,500.00

Housing Options used these funds toward the construction of 4 group homes for
developmentally disabled persons. In FY08, the homes were under construction.

Hope House (Strengthening Families for the Future)
FY 08 Expenditure: CDBG                                               $35,026

Hope House used CDBG funds to assist 95 children and families affected with
HIV/AIDS by providing supportive services that include HIV/AIDS education,
violence prevention, health care coordination, life skills/GED, nutrition and health
training.




                                           28
TBRA Case Management
FY 08 Expenditure: CDBG                                            $96,291.28

CDBG funds were used by three agencies (Memphis Family Shelter, Southeast
Mental Health Center, and MIFA) to provide operating funds for the
administration of the organizations tenant-based rental assistance (TBRA)
programs. The agencies assisted 46 clients during the fiscal year. Of the total
expended, $6,127.48 represented a final payment to Grace House and
$20,257.27 represented a final payment to Lowenstein House that was reported
during the last report and paid after the end of the fiscal period.

Special Needs Program Delivery
FY 08 Expenditures: CDBG                                           $148,120.01

The Division of Housing and Community used CDBG funds in its implementation
of its activities and programs as described in this section. Staff and overhead
costs associated with departments that are directly involved in carrying out
CDBG eligible special needs housing and supportive services are represented by
these expenses.




                                       29
Non-housing and Community Development Activities and Expenditures

The following are a list of Neighborhood/Community and Economic Development
expenditures for Fiscal Year 2008.

Fair Housing Enforcement (MALS)
FY 08 Expenditure:         CDBG                              $73,065.84
Memphis Area Legal Services operates the Fair Housing Enforcement program
which is designed to eradicate issues of unfair housing and promote equal
opportunity and fair housing practices in the Memphis area. This project served
30 low and moderate income people this program year.

Girls, Inc.
FY 08 Expenditure:          CDBG                               $37,858.67

Girls, Inc. used these funds to provide a comprehensive peer-led health
promotion program for girls ages 6 to 14 in Greenlaw/Manassas. This project
served 274 extremely and very low families this program year.

Memphis Urban League
FY 08 Expenditure:          CDBG                               $12,534.27

These funds represent expenditures to implement the Education Initiative
Achievement Matters Program in FY2007 which served a total of 69 low to
moderate income people in a program designed to improve academic
achievement in basic subject areas. The students attended the program 1,519
times.

Mt. Vernon Baptist Church - Westwood
FY 08 Expenditure:        CDBG                                 $38,733.20

Funds went towards the Youth Enhancing Study and Social Skills Project to meet
the academic and social needs of low-income youth grades four through eight.
The program provided 30 students from the Westwood community with
transportation from school to the project site, nutritional snacks, recreation, and
structured study time.

The Works
FY 08 Expenditure:          CDBG                               $17,325.66

These funds represent expenditures to implement the Body Masters Community
Sports program in FY2007 which served 394 high-risk youth ages 9 to 18 that
reside in South Memphis with the opportunity to engage in a year-round
organized sports program. The program targeted services for youth who did not
qualify for school sports activities due to behavior issues, absenteeism, financial
distress, and lack of parenting/guardian involvement.



                                         30
Women in Community Services-Employment / Life skills Training
FY 08 Expenditures:    CDBG                              $11,520.55

These funds represent expenditures to operate a life skills program in FY2007

Neighborhood Clean-Up & Demolition
FY 08 Expenditure:      CDBG                                  $251,152.25

Funds were used to implement a special target area clean-up program designed
to remove trash and debris, clean and maintain lots, and to remove hazardous
structures causing slum and blight conditions. 89 dilapidated and/or deteriorated
structures were torn down as a result of this initiative.

Property Maintenance
FY 08 Expenditure:         CDBG                               $76,690.00

HCD used these funds to cut grass, weeds, and other maintenance items on 264
HCD-owned vacant lots which are being held for future redevelopment.

Memphis Food Bank – Prepared and Perishable Food Recovery
FY 08 Expenditure:     CDBG                           $60,657.28

The Food Bank collected and distributed surplus food donated by food
establishments to 16 non-profit agencies that serve onsite meals to low-income
beneficiaries. The agency collected 217,569 lbs. in prepared and perishable
food from donors, distributed 96,271 lbs. in perishable food.

Memphis Urban Gardening (TSU)
FY 07 Expenditure:     CDBG                                   $33,429.63

This expenditure represents a final payment made in the previous reporting
period.

Chicago Park Place Lease
FY 08 Expenditure:       CDBG                                 $50,040.00

This expenditure was used for the annual lease payment for the community
center and service space in the redeveloped building. This public facility is a
Community Center type of space within a targeted area, which benefits low to
moderate income people in this area.




                                        31
Firestone Resource Center (New Chicago CDC)
FY08 Expenditure:        CDBG                                 $59,781.70

Funds were used by the New Chicago CDC to renovate, repair, and improve the
Firestone Union Hall historical building for the purpose of providing community
services to predominantly low-moderate income residents in the immediate New
Chicago/North Memphis area. The facility will be utilized to include: job-skills
training, employment assistance, financial planning, entrepreneur/small business
seminars and networking opportunities, household bill management, community
meeting space, and office incubator services. The project is 90% complete.

Court Square – Section 108 Repayment
FY 08 Expenditures:                  CDBG              $466,769.90

Court Square Center will transform two of the most architecturally significant
buildings in Memphis, while also adding a modern new structure - encompassing
an entire city block - into high style residential and commercial spaces. In doing
so, Court Square Center will regenerate Court Square Park, the heart of
Memphis, as a social center encouraging pedestrian traffic and interaction with
the surrounding community.

College Park HOPE VI Community Supportive Services Program (CSSP)
FY 08 Expenditure:     CDBG                            $199,096.20

These funds were provided as part of a $650,000 matching grant to the Memphis
Housing Authority (MHA) for the College Park HOPE VI grant awarded
previously. These funds were used to provide direct supportive services to
residents of MHA’s College Park (LeMoyne Gardens) who received case
management for employment training/placement and continued education.
Approximately 187 individuals were provided supportive and public services by
the YWCA.

Bank Lending Study
FY 08 Expenditures                CDBG                        $29,584.49

The expenditure of these funds funded the CD Council’s (MACRO’s) 2007 Study
of bank lending patterns for the City of Memphis who also made three public
presentations of the study.

Memphis Farmer’s Market
FY 08 Expenditure:                CDBG                 $23,413.15

In FY2008, Memphis Farmer’s Market used CDBG funds for site improvements
that have enabled them to better serve a growing customer base. The Memphis
Farmers Market (MFM) has served as community-gathering place, where local




                                        32
farmers, producers and artisans offer fresh agricultural and related products to
residents of the Mid-South.

Community Development Program Delivery
FY 08 Expenditures:          CDBG                    $314,316.29

The Division of Housing and Community Development used CDBG funds in the
implementation of the non-housing community development activities described
in this report. Staff and overhead costs associated with departments that are
directly involved in carrying out CDBG eligible design and faith based and
community development are representative of these expenditures.

Memphis Area Legal Services Fair Housing Center
FY 08 Expenditures             CDBG                  $174,511.35

The Fair Housing Center provided fair housing education and outreach to 192
people in Memphis. MALS additionally conducted 9 public information forums
and distributed 150 pieces of fair housing literature to the public.

Kids in Technology
FY 08 Expenditures               CDBG                $20,331.41

The Kids in Technology program provided hands on job readiness and career
opportunities to high school juniors and seniors who attend the parenting
program at Pyramid Academy. During FY2008, the program provided 25
computer classes to 11 students.

Summer Enrichment
FY 08 Expenditures               CDBG                $135,000.00

The Summer Enrichment program was held at several Center-City high schools
and provided recreational opportunities, mentoring, academic tutoring, and
motivation. For FY2008, 984 low and moderate income youth participated in
these activities.




                                       33
       Administration, Planning and Program Delivery Expenditures


Administration

CDBG Administration
FY 08 Expenditures        CDBG                       $1,825,337.30

CDBG program administration funds were expended for the costs and carrying
charges related to the execution of community development activities assisted in
whole or in part with CDBG funds. A more detailed definition of eligible program
administration costs can be found in the Federal CDBG Regulations at 24 CFR
570.206.

Administrative expenditures also supported the administration of community
development activities funded by the City of Memphis, State of Tennessee, and
other Federal funds, received by HCD. The following expenditures reflect those
administrative activities undertaken by HCD during FY 08.

HOME ADMINISTRATION
FY 08 Expenditures: HOME                             $195,943.07

HOME regulations permit the City to use ten percent (10%) of the annual HOME
allocation for HCD staff who are responsible for HOME program administration.
Only those HCD Departments who administered HOME funded-activities utilized
the allocated HOME administrative funds.

HOPWA ADMINISTRATION
FY 07 Expenditures: HOPWA                            $40,545.59

HOPWA program administration funds were used to pay for grantee costs
associated with the administration of HOPWA projects.

Planning and other Program Administration Activities

Partners for the Homeless
FY 08 Expenditure:        CDBG                       $96,120.45

Partners assisted 45 agencies and organizations involved in the provision of
services to homeless persons in the City of Memphis. Partners for the Homeless
and the Greater Memphis Coalition for the Homeless work together to coordinate
the planning and preparation of the annual Continuum of Care application.
Partners also provided training to homeless agency staffs on the use of the
Homeless Management Information System (HMIS).




                                       34
Greater Memphis Interagency Coalition for the Homeless (GMICH)
FY 08 Expenditure:       CDBG                       $100,471.46

GMICH provided technical assistance and training workshops to 151 homeless
agencies throughout Memphis during the program year. Services include
coordinating 1 street count, providing information, developing networks and
government contacts on the local, state, and national levels, and coordinating
services for the homeless.

Internship Program
FY 08 Expenditures:        CDBG                       $91,485.44

This program provided internships opportunities to 25 college students who are
interested in housing and community development and allowed them to learn
first-hand about neighborhood development in Memphis. Students from the
University of Memphis, Rhodes College and LeMoyne-Owen College participated
in this program and were involved in a variety of community based projects.

City-Wide Strategic Plan
FY08 Expenditures:         CDBG                       $18,218.43

Funds were expended to support community and neighborhood development
through professional staffing and technical assistance to research and pursue
funding opportunities, and to support development of long-term strategic
initiatives. Specifically in FY2008, the Center for Community Based
Neighborhood Action registered 91 organizations to assist in a neighborhood
survey and completed surveys in 20 neighborhoods to identify conditions of
housing units.

Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence
FY 08 Expenditures                CDBG                      $39,147.97

The Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence provided assistance to 16 non-profit
organizations to help with the preparation of grant applications. Funds supported
the Grants Center’s costs to provide these services.

Neighborhood Plans
FY 08 Expenditures                CDBG                      $13,903.35

Funds under neighborhood plans were used to assist in the operations of the
Vance Avenue Neighborhood Networks Center, which assisted 531 public
housing residents in learning a variety of technology and economic development
skills.




                                       35
Plan and Mat Development
FY 08 Expenditures               CDBG                       $8,500.00

In FY2008, funds were used for a study of opportunities for joint planning among
a variety of City government departments and other agencies.




                                       36
                           PART IV PROGRAM NARRATIVES

                     Assessment of Three-Year Goals and Objectives

All activities undertaken in FY 2008 (Program Year 2007) address the goals and
objectives that are presented in the 2008-2010 Three-Year Strategic Plan.
Accomplishments are summarized in the following tables for the priority areas of
Housing, Homeless, Special Needs Populations, Neighborhood, Community and
Economic Development. Reference is made to those activities described as high
priorities.
                  Assessment of Three Year Housing Activities

                     OBJECTIVE I: INCREASE THE SUPPLY OF RENTAL HOUSING
                                  2008              2009            2010           3 Year
     3 Year Objective -         Year Actual     Year Actual       Year Actual      Actual

          Programs

CHDOs/non-profits/for-profits
    (Rental rehabs)                 13

   Targeted Multi-Family
                                    57
         Housing
 Multi-Family Projects (New
                                   151
        Construction)

         TOTALS                    219




                      OBJECTIVE II: ASSIST THE PRODUCTION OF NEW HOUSING
                                    2008              2009              2010         3 Year
     3 Year Objective -          Year Actual        Year Actual      Year Actual     Actual

              Programs

     CHDOs/Non-profits
                                     16

   MHA HOPE VI Projects              151


          TOTALS                     167




                                               37
           OBJECTIVE III: PROVIDE DIRECT AND INDIRECT ASSISTANCE TO REHABILITATION EFFORTS

      3 Year Objective -
                                     2008               2009            2010             3 Year
                                   Year Actual        Year Actual    Year Actual         Actual

            Programs

CHDOs/Non-profits/for-profits
                                         4
 (Single-family ownership)
   Volunteer Home Repair
                                        20
          (owners)

 Minor Home Repair (owners)             113

     HARP Major Rehab                   11

Targeted Multi-Family Housing
                                        56
          (Rehab)

            TOTALS                      204



                             OBJECTIVE IV: TARGETED HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

      3 Year Objective -
                                        2008             2009             2010               3 Year
                                   Year Actual         Year Actual     Year Actual           Actual

             Programs

    Targeted Single-Family
                                         0
           Housing
  Multi-Family Projects (New
                                         57
         Construction)

    MHA HOPE VI Projects                151

            TOTALS                      208




                         OBJECTIVE V:   ASSIST FIRST-TIME BUYERS HOMEBUYERS
                                     2008               2009           2010             3 Year
      3 Year Objective -
                                   Year Actual        Year Actual    Year Actual        Actual
Programs

 Downpayment Assistance (DPA)           59


            TOTALS                      59



                                                 38
FY 2008 represents the first year of the Three Year 2008-2010 strategy for the
City of Memphis. The City of Memphis hopes to meet and exceed these
objectives in each of the five objectives identified for housing.

The City’s DPA program continues in it’s efforts to assist low income first-time
homebuyers to purchase their first homes using HOME and ADDI allocations. In
addition, The decrease in demand for entry-level housing in inner-city Memphis
along with an increase in the number of prospective homebuyers whose credit
posed a problem continues to result in first-time homebuyers in the City for FY
2008. Memphis has increase its efforts to support and fund credit and
homeownership counseling programs.

The Targeted Multi-Family and Multi-Family New Construction projects are
designed to increase the supply of rental housing in Memphis. A New Place
Apartments involves the renovation of 56 units of rental housing and April Woods
West is a 57-units garden apartment community and was completed in FY2008.
National Church Residences completed acquisition which will facilitate the
development of a 49 unit rental community for senior citizens. These efforts are a
continuation of the City’s objective of targeted development in specific
neighborhoods. The HOPE VI University Place project completed the
construction of phase II of the project which includes 151 multi-family units and
began construction of phase III which includes 136 family rental units. Overall,
Memphis met the objective for increasing the number of rental units for the 2008
period.

The City’s efforts to preserve and prevent losses to existing housing continued to
be successful during FY 08 The rehabilitation of 11 units was completed by the
HARP Major Rehab program while 20 units were completed by the Volunteer
Home Repair program; 113 units by the Minor Home Repair program; and 4 units
by various CHDOs and non and for profits. With a total of 148 for the reporting
year, the City anticipates meeting its three year housing goals.

In conclusion, Memphis objectives for the preservation of existing housing,
increasing rental housing opportunities, assisting homeownership, increasing
new construction in targeted areas was well met. The City will seek to revise its
goals to more reflect the newly created performance measures as required by
HUD.




                                        39
                       Assessment of Homeless Activities
                      3 Year Homeless Assessment Tables

For FY 2008, the HCD competitive grant process receives proposals for the use
of several funding sources that serve the homeless. These include CDBG
funded Community Service Grants, Emergency Shelter Grants, which are
sources of funds that may be targeted to fund homeless activities, as well as
HOME-funded tenant based rental assistance and HOME-match for construction
of supportive housing for the homeless. All ESG funds were awarded to maintain
existing emergency shelters / transitional housing or services that already
existed. The competitive process used to fund most of the activities that serve
the homeless does not guarantee that applications for projects from service
providers and housing developers will address the established Con Plan
objectives. Objective 1 calls for the development of permanent supportive
housing for homeless persons, persons with children and chronically homeless
persons.

The following tables are used to present the assessment of homeless goals and
objectives for FY 2008, the first year of the three-year 2008 – 2010 strategy.

Objective I: To assist the development of permanent supportive housing for homeless
individuals, persons with children and chronically homeless individuals
Performance Measures
                                                 Proposed     Actual    Actual   Actual
                                                    FY 08    FY2008     FY2009   FY2010
Support the development of permanent supportive      15        10
housing for homeless individuals, and persons
with children
Support the development of permanent supportive      10         0
housing for chronically homeless persons
TOTALS                                               25        10

Objective 1 addresses the need develop permanent supportive housing for
supportive housing for homeless individuals, persons with children and
chronically homeless individuals. Alpha Omega’s Homeless Veterans program
used CDBG and HOME funds to construct a ten (10) unit single-room occupancy
facility that was 80% completed as of the fiscal year’s end. Memphis continues
to emphasize during the Continuum of Care application process the availability of
funding to provide matching funds for the creation of permanent supportive
housing that focuses on persons with children. Future year results should help
the City reach its three-year performance measure.




                                           40
Objective 2: To assist the development of new emergency shelters (beds/units) for homeless
individuals and women without children who are severely mentally ill
Performance Measures
                                                   Proposed      Actual     Actual     Actual
                                                     FY 08      FY2008      FY2009     FY2010
Develop/create additional emergency shelters            4            7
units that can accommodate homeless individuals
Develop/create additional units of transitional         4            0
housing for women without children who have
severe/persistent mental illness
TOTALS                                                  8            7

Objective 2 recognizes the need to develop new emergency shelters (beds/units)
for homeless individuals and women without children who are severely mentally
ill. Memphis was not as successful in funding a project such as last year’s
Behavioral Health Institute (BHI) – Phoenix House which developed 10 units of
permanent supportive housing for homeless individuals with a severe mental
illness.


Objective 3: To assist the development of a permanent supportive housing and a quasi-
emergency (Safe Haven type) of facility for homeless mentally ill persons who are unable to
access emergency or traditional permanent or transitional housing
Performance Measures
                                                   Proposed          Actual    Actual     Actual
                                                      FY 08         FY2008     FY2009 FY2010
To develop/create permanent supportive                 20              0
housing for chronically homeless persons who
have severe mental illnesses
To support the development of a 20 bed Safe          Identify       Door of
Haven emergency facility for homeless persons      developer          Hope
unable to access traditional supportive
homeless housing
TOTALS                                            20 units and         1
                                                  1 safehaven developer
                                                   developer

Objective 3 addresses the need to create a SafeHaven type of facility for
chronically homeless persons. In FY 2008, the Door of Hope was awarded a
CDBG/Community Services Grant to provide drop-in assistance to chronically
homeless persons that assisted 14 individuals by providing access to showers,
laundry facilities, snacks, telephone access, application for disability assistance,
food stamps, housing subsidies, etc. Not quite a “safehaven” in that housing is
not provided, Door of Hope is headed in the direction the City desires. Still
difficult, HCD recognizes the concerns agencies have for continued operations of
a “SafeHaven facility, particularly limited funding availability and concerns for
neighborhood safety where such a facility would be located.




                                              41
Objective 4: To make available funding that will help to maintain the current inventory of transitional
and emergency housing for homeless persons and families with children
Performance Measures
                                                  Proposed         Actual         Actual       Actual
                                                     FY 08        FY2008          FY2009       FY2010
Use Emergency Shelter Grant to assist                 120           285
organizations to provide essential services,        persons       families
rehabilitate facilities, prevent homelessness and                   And
operate/maintain facilities to homeless                             221
persons/families                                                  persons
Use Community Development Block Grant funds to 50 persons           126
provide services to homeless persons/families                     children
                                                                   And 14
                                                                  persons
                          Totals                      170           235
                                                                  persons
                                                                  and 285
                                                                  families
                                                                  and 126
                                                                  children

Objective 4 addresses the need to maintain the current inventory of transitional
and emergency housing for homeless persons and families with children. In
addition to families and individuals assisted with ESG funds, 12 units of rental
supportive housing was maintained by MIFA who along with CAAP and Barron
Heights maintain transitional housing units that assisted 329 homeless persons.

In summary, HCD provided funding for 12 programs serving the homeless. This
included 9 ESG-funded contracts that served 221 homeless individuals and 285
families; 1 CDBG funded program that assisted 126 children from homeless
families and 1 CDBG funded program that established a drop-in center and 1
agency that used HOME and CDBG funds to construct a 10-unit permanent
supportive housing facility for homeless veterans.
            Assessment of Non-homeless Special Needs Activities
                  3 Year Special Needs Assessment Tables


Permanent Supportive Housing
Performance Measures
                                                       Actual      Actual      Actual      Actual
                                                       FY2008      FY2009      FY2010      3-Year
Provide Funding that will help to develop new
permanent supportive housing for income eligible         10*
special needs populations
*under construction

The Permanent Supportive Housing objective seeks to make funding available
that will assist the development of permanent supportive housing for Special
needs subpopulations. HCD provided funding to Housing Options, Inc. to



                                                42
develop 10 units of permanent supportive housing for the developmentally
disabled in FY2008.


Supportive Services
Performance Measures
                                                     Actual   Actual   Actual   Actual
                                                     FY2008   FY2009   FY2010   3-Year
Fund supportive service programs that will assist
income eligible Special Needs subpopulations          6466

The Supportive Services objective focuses on giving preference to funding
requests that propose to provide supportive services to Special Needs
Subpopulations. HCD provided funding for homemaker services for the elderly
through MIFA and Helpcare Homemaker, to SRVS and Lowenstein House to
provide job opportunities for the developmentally disabled and the mentally ill, to
Grace House and Synergy to assist clients transitioning out of drug treatment,
and others. Additionally, the HOPWA program provided supportive services that
benefited a total of 5400 persons.


Tenant Based Rental Assistance
Performance Measures
                                                     Actual   Actual   Actual   Actual
                                                     FY2008   FY2009   FY2010   3-Year
Increase the number of income eligible persons
within the Special Needs subpopulations to receive     98
tenant based rental assistance

The Tenant Based Rental Assistance objective seeks to make funding available
that will respond to the increased demand for tenant based rental assistance for
income eligible persons within the special needs population. Much success was
achieved with this objective. For FY 2008, HCD provided funds to seven
agencies that provided tenant based rental assistance to 98 families who were
mentally ill women and children, or otherwise in a special needs category.

Public Facilities
Performance Measures
                                                     Actual   Actual   Actual   Actual
                                                     FY2008   FY2009   FY2010   3-Year
Fund improvements to public facilities that will
assist income eligible Special Needs populations

The Public Facilities Objective seeks to give preference to funding requests that
propose to develop new or rehabilitate public facilities that provide supportive
services to income eligible special needs populations. There was one facility
funded for FY2008, which should be underway in FY2009.

The majority of the City’s success that has been achieved in the special needs
categories has been through providing supportive services. High priority was


                                               43
given to the development of supportive housing for special needs populations.
The use of HOPWA funds have provided steady and needed assistance to a
growing AID/HIV population. Over the past year, 5400 clients have received
short-term utility payment, emergency housing, tenant-based rental assistance
from the HOPWA program. Use of HOME funds for tenant-based rental
assistance greatly support the needs of very-low income persons with special
needs to maintain affordable and decent rental housing. Memphis has a high
priority for and remains open to requests for assistance in developing elderly
rental housing. Special Needs Housing developers and their interest and their
capacity appear to be increasing. Project planning is aided through the
Consolidated Planning process and future results are expected to generate
additional units of permanent housing for special needs populations.

                 Non-housing Community Development
     3 Year Non-housing Community Development Assessment Tables

Memphis’ non-housing community development needs are addressed by
program activities that are grouped under the categories of neighborhood,
community and economic development. In FY 08, these activities included public
facility and services that benefited low/moderate income persons (with specific
emphasis on the youth, the elderly, and the unskilled). Assisting with the
creation of public facilities is also another objective that is met through the
construction of neighborhood facilities and buildings that house service
organizations which provide community and public services to low and moderate
income persons. Defining non-housing community development needs continue
to be a challenge for HCD, however future neighborhood planning efforts will
entail performance measures and indicators based upon non-housing community
development objectives/goals. Below are tables that describe FY 2008
outcomes.

        Short-Term Objectives:
•   To implement demolition and clean-up initiatives that remove slum and blight
    conditions in areas targeted for redevelopment
•   To provide infrastructure improvements that support the redevelopment of
    targeted areas
•   To develop area/neighborhood redevelopment plans
•   To develop Neighborhood Resource Centers (public facilities) in target areas
•   To support organizations that provide activities that enhances youth
    academic, vocational, and social skills.

Long-Term Objective:

•   To encourage the redevelopment of targeted areas
•   To support organizations that provide public services to create employment
    alternatives and training, and help to assist the expansion of small business
    opportunities in targeted areas


                                         44
        •   To increase the number of neighborhood and public facilities in targeted
            areas

             3 Year Non-housing and Community Development Assessment Table
        Activity &                 2008 Actual      2009 Actual     2010 Actual        Total
3-Year Projected Spending         Expenditures     Expenditures    Expenditures
 Public Facility and Services -    $387,898.51
         $1,975,000
      Youth - $1,125,000           $261,783.21
  Economic Development -           $466,769.90
       $1,100,000
  OTHER (Neighborhood &            $966,510.22
 Community Development) -
       $22,045,000
        TOTALS                    $2,082,961.84


        A competitive-grant application (Strategic Community Investment Fund) process
        is used by HCD’s to meet public facility and community service needs. Most
        public services are funded thru the applications that are received through the
        SCIF. CDBG funds are used to fund these project activities although the City of
        Memphis provides significant General Revenue funding for economic
        development and other community development initiatives. In developing the
        Consolidated Plan, HCD considers that the primary funding source for non-
        housing community development is the CDBG entitlement that is limited to a 15%
        cap on spending for public services.

        City funds are used to primarily address the economic development objectives of
        job creation and small business development via the services provided by the
        Renaissance Business Center (RBC) located at 555 Beale. During FY 08, the
        RBC approved several small business loans whose value totaled over
        $1,255,000.00 using City resources. In addition, CDBG funds are also used to
        support organizations that provide employment training and job opportunities.
        This fiscal year, HCD funded two (2) economic development initiatives whose
        value totaled more than $526,551.60.

        In summary, Memphis made significant progress in FY 2008 alone. During this
        period, funding was used toward the development of two new public facilities for
        targeted neighborhoods in the New Chicago neighborhoods and a Farmer’s
        Market in the Downtown Area; and, provide public services to almost 2000 low
        income youth and adults. For the one-year period of FY2008, the City of
        Memphis has achieved tremendous success with the provision of public services.
        Plans for economic development and neighborhood redevelopment have
        reached levels of significant mass. The next three year period will increase in
        tangible and visible improvements sustainable projects for neighborhoods and
        the City in general.




                                                  45
      ACTIONS TO AFFIRMATIVELY FURTHER FAIR HOUSING - FY 08


In FY 08, HCD continued to plan and implement activities to affirmatively further
fair housing and to implement recommendations identified in the 2006 Analysis of
Impediments to Fair Housing in Memphis, Tennessee.

 HCD allocated $289,500 in CDBG funds for activities that affirmatively furthered
fair housing in Memphis during the reporting period. This included three
contracts:
       1. The Memphis Area Legal Services (MALS) contract helps operate the
           Memphis Fair Housing Center ($190,000). During the contract period,
           MALS provided fair housing education and out reach to the residents
           of Memphis. MALS received 425 complaints from citizen concerning
           potential housing discrimination; of those complaints, 286 were
           referred for further investigation. In addition, MALS made nine(9)
           group presentations and participated in fifteen (15) meetings and
           public forums. MALS also responded to numerous requests from the
           public to receive copies of Renter’s Right Guide and other
           informational materials.

      2.   A second MALS contract funds the acceptance and investigation of
           complaints related to the Memphis Fair Housing Ordinance ($70,000).
           A second MALS contract funds the acceptance and investigation of
           complaints related to the Memphis Fair Housing Ordinance ($70,000).
           During the reporting period, HCD continued its contract with Memphis
           Area Legal Services Fair Housing Center to accept and investigate
           complaints related to the City's Fair Housing Ordinance. The Fair
           Housing Center accepts and investigates complaints and refers cases
           to the City Attorney for prosecution through the City court system.
           During the reporting period the Center screened fifty-six (56)
           complaints for potential violation of the Memphis Fair Housing
           Ordinance, of which nineteen (19) were resolved and zero (0) were
           referred to the City Attorney for enforcement.

      3.   The Community Development Council of Greater Memphis (CDCGM)
           contract allows update of their bank lending study ($29,500). During
           the contract period, CDCGM contracted with the Center for
           Community Building and Neighborhood Action (CBANA) to conduct
           the lending study using the most recent HMDA data. CDCGM
           conducted three lending study presentations to audiences of CDCs,
           lenders, and HCD staff. In addition, CDCGM conducted 16 community
           presentations on predatory lending that reached 149 homeowners.




                                        46
Additionally, during the grant period, HCD co-sponsored two major fair housing
events. On April 18, 2008, HCD partnered with the Fair Housing Alliance of
Greater Memphis, the local HUD office, Memphis Consumer Credit, Shelby
County Government and other local organizations to present the 8th Annual Fair
Housing Conference. The conference, entitled : “Celebrating the 1968 Fair
Housing Act…. To the Sunlit Path” was presented to approximately 100 people.
The conference held sessions on the history of the Fair Housing Act; the status
of the Memphis Housing Market; information about foreclosure relief; financing
options and credit counseling.

The other fair housing event that HCD co-sponsored was on June 24, 2008.
HUD, HCD, FHAGM and Memphis Area Legal Services (MALS) presented the
Accessibility First Training. Bearing Points, who facilitated this training, held
technical workshops on: design and construction requirements of the Fair
Housing Act; common design violations and solutions; and making housing
accessible through accommodations and modifications. This training was
attended by over 200 architects, lawyers, and community organizers.

By the end of the reporting period, a draft of the Impediments study was being
reviewed by HCD and the County but had not been finalized. It is recommended
that the City Administration convene a Fair Housing Task Force to review the
study, consider the findings and recommendations and to propose “Actions that
Address Impediments to Fair Housing in the City of Memphis”.




                                         47
                   AFFORDABLE HOUSING NARRATIVE

In FY 08, HCD used CDBG, HOME and City funds to implement the following
affordable housing program objectives:

1. provide assistance to first-time homebuyers;
2. increase the supply of available and adequate rental units suitable for the
   elderly, families with children and those that meet the need of disabled
   persons;
3. provide direct and indirect assistance to low/moderate income homeowners
   whose homes require major repair rehabilitation as part of the effort to
   preserve existing housing; and,
4. assist the production of new housing for low/moderate income families.

Evaluation of the progress made in meeting the objectives of these initiatives
includes a report of the numbers of persons assisted in each income category
and the housing types assisted during the report period. All of the programs
implemented by HCD are described in detail in the program accomplishment
section for housing and are further evaluated in Part III of this document.

The first affordable housing objective is to provide assistance to first-time
homebuyers. The following table depicts progress made in accomplishing this
objective.

                    FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYER ASSISTANCE


                                                          ACTUAL
                      2008 Objective
                                                          FY 2008

     Program                           <30 %     31-50%     51-80%       TOTAL

  Downpayment
 Assistance (DPA           100              3      14         42           59
    Program)


     TOTALS                100              3      14         42           59




The number of low and moderate-income families that were assisted by the
Down Payment Assistance Program (DPA) decreased from FY 2008. In addition
to the economic downturn of recent years, the analysis of the housing market for
low-to-moderate income households suggest that that market has been
adequately served by Memphis’ DPA Program over the last decade. The actual
number of downpayment loans that were provided in FY 08 assisted 59 families.


                                       48
In addition, City-funding for the Memphis Housing Resource Center continues to
provide counseling to more than 220 households of which approximately 95%
were first-time homebuyers.

The next affordable housing objective is to increase the supply of available and
adequate rental units suitable for the elderly and families with children. The table
below presents the accomplishments for FY 08.

                                 RENTAL HOUSING

                                                                Actual Units
                                 2008 Objective
                                                                  FY 2008

          Programs                                  <30 %     31-50%    51-80%    TOTAL
   CHDOs and non-profits              10              9                                13
Targeted Multi-Family Housing*        100                                              152
  Multi-Family Projects (New
                                      50                                               151
         Construction)*
          TOTALS                      160                                              316
*Chicago Park Place, A New Place, and April Woods West
**University Place

CHDOS and non-profits produced thirteen (13) rental units in FY 2008. The
City’s Multi-Family program help to rehabilitate a 39 units elderly development
known as Chicago Park Place Elderly Housing, rehabilitate a 56 unit apartment
building called A New Place Apartments, and construct a 57 unit building called
April Woods West. HCD’s repayment of the Section 108 Loan for the Mill Creek
Apartment development does not provide net new rental units, yet continues to
provide well-managed rental units for very-low to low-income families. The funds
used for the 108 payment for Court Square are assisting in the development of
75 new apartment units and economic development.

The next affordable housing objective is to provide direct and indirect assistance
to rehabilitation efforts that preserve existing housing. To that end, the following
table provides an analysis of rehabilitation efforts.

In FY 08, the Single-family Rehabilitation Program(HARP) rehabilitated the
homes of 11 homeowners. This program along with the Senior Citizen Minor
Home Repair and Volunteer Home Repair Programs assist in maintaining the
existing stock of affordable, owner-occupied housing in low- and moderate
neighborhoods. These programs have been very helpful in providing home
improvement repairs and renovations to those unlikely to qualify for conventional,
private sector, loan assistance.




                                            49
            REHABILITATION & MAINTENANCE OF EXISTING HOUSING

                                 2008                                      ACTUAL
                               Objective                                   FY 2008

       Programs                                   <30 %          31-60%     61-80%             TOTALS
Senior Citizen Minor Home
                                    125               64           40            9              113
          Repair
 Volunteer Home Repair                                12           8             0               20
      Single-Family
                                    50                3            7             1               11
  Rehabilitation (HARP)
          CHDOs                                       2                                          4
        TOTALS                      175               81           55            10             148


   The next affordable housing objective is to assist the production of new housing
   for low/moderate income families. Rental housing and single-family homes for
   ownership in various neighborhoods are also constructed by Community Housing
   Development Organizations (CHDOs) within the City.

   The following table depicts progress made in accomplishing this objective:

                                   NEW HOUSING PRODUCTION

                                            2008                            ACTUAL
                                          Objective                         FY 2008


      Activities (Single-family)                           <30 %        31-60%        61-80%   TOTAL

        CHDO’s/Non profits                   30              7                          1        13

              TOTALS                         30              7                          1        13


   HCD, as well as non-profit developers, depend upon the local housing market
   and the desirability of targeted neighborhoods when measuring the outcome of
   new housing development. It is notable that Community Housing Development
   Organizations (CHDOs) also contributed to meeting housing needs through the
   creation of 13 new rental units, construction of 13 new single family homeowner
   units, rehabilitation of 4 single family units, and acquisition of three lots for future
   development. Of the homeowner units, 6 were sold during the reporting period.

   The HOPE VI initiatives in Memphis, University Place (former Lamar Terrace
   public housing) and Legends Park (former Dixie Homes) have sparked both
   private and public development efforts. These HOPE VI projects as well as the


                                                      50
two completed projects at College Park and Uptown have contributed greatly to
the supply of rental and owner housing in Memphis.

There are also other initiatives under way in Memphis such as the Middle Income
Housing Program (funded with CIP funds) which supports the infrastructure
necessary to encourage middle income housing development within the City. As
most Middle Income development is generally associated with suburban
development outside the City, this program seeks to increase this type of housing
within the inner-city. The Middle Income Housing Program also provides an
opportunity for mixed income communities.




                                       51
                     CONTINUUM OF CARE NARRATIVE

During Program Year 2007 (FY 2008) from July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008,
the City continued to work collaboratively to implement the community’s strategy
to address the needs of the homeless and special needs populations.
Entitlement grant-funded activities that served the homeless helped prevent
homelessness, operated existing emergency shelters and transitional housing
facilities for the homeless, provided essential social services, provided tenant
based rental assistance to the homeless, operated permanent supportive
housing and increased the number of permanent supportive housing units for
members of homeless and special needs populations. Additionally, the City
entitlements provided funding for several services and housing programs for
members of special needs populations who are not homeless but require
supportive housing.

Address Performance Measures in 2008-2010 Homeless and Special Needs
Plan

During the year, the City made progress in addressing three of the five
performance measures in the City’s plan.
   • Providing outreach, assessment and placement for 100 SMI homeless
      individuals is being addressed through the CDBG-funded contract with
      Salvation Army. Unfortunately, due to legal problems the contract was not
      executed during the reporting period. However, Salvation Army continued
      providing the services and made 179 referrals to permanent supportive
      housing, most of which is for homeless persons with mental illness or a
      dual diagnosis. The program has become a key element in the intake and
      assessment process for the City’s Continuum of Care, for homeless and
      special needs permanent supportive housing programs, and for discharge
      planners.
   • Maintaining the existing level of emergency shelter and transitional
      housing is addressed primarily through the Emergency Shelter Grant
      Program and the Continuum of Care grants awarded directly to agencies
      by HUD. FY 08 Emergency Shelter Grant funds were awarded to three
      emergency shelters and seven transitional shelters. Seven of these
      shelters / programs are regular recipients of ESGP funds which help them
      maintain their level of operations. In the reporting period HUD renewed
      Continuum of Care grants with nine agencies to maintain the operations of
      12 transitional housing facilities for an additional year. All of these
      programs have been in operation for a number of years and most are
      actively addressing HUD’s goal of funding primarily housing related
      activities. Although funds for a couple of the Continuum of Care funded
      projects were reduced using the Hold Harmless tool, the programs remain
      in operation. (No new transitional housing projects are being developed
      with Continuum of Care funds due to HUD regulatory changes regarding
      Samaritan Housing and Hold Harmless practices.)



                                       52
   •   Creating 50 units of permanent supportive housing is expected to be
       easily achieved through two programs - - the City’s HOME match
       competitive grant program and HUD’s Continuum of Care grant program.
       In the spring of 2008, HUD approved three new permanent supportive
       housing projects, each of which will receive HOME funds as soon as all
       other construction funds are assembled. These projects alone will create
       close to 50 units of permanent supportive housing for homeless and
       chronically homeless individuals by 2010. Additionally, permanent
       supportive housing projects funded in earlier years are moving forward.
       The Alpha Omega Veterans Services SRO project created 10 new units
       for homeless veterans; Housing Options has complete 2 of the 4 group (8
       to 12 units) homes funded with HOME match dollars, and Frayser
       Millington Mental Health Center has begun construction on a 32 unit
       project funded with Continuum of Care, HOME Match, Federal Home
       Loan Bank and other funds. Additionally, the City has executed a contract
       with Serenity House, an alcohol and drug treatment program to help fund
       the development of a 17 unit half way house for homeless individuals with
       alcohol and drug addictions using Federal Home Loan Bank and HOME
       match funds.

Actions Taken to Address Needs of Homeless Persons and Persons with
Special Needs who are not Homeless but Require Supportive Housing

During FY 2008, Memphis budgeted $2.17 million in FY 08 entitlement funds to
address the needs of homeless persons and persons with special needs that
require supportive housing. This included $410,016.50 in Community
Development Block Grant funds, $342,332.50 in Emergency Shelter Grant funds,
and $318,858 in HOPWA funds used specifically for homeless persons. HOME
awards included $500,000 in HOME match to three agencies awarded HUD
Continuum of Care funds to rehabilitate more than 40 units of permanent
supportive housing including units for the chronically homeless.. Additionally,
HOME TBRA funds were awarded in to an agency to provide rental assistance to
10 homeless households ($113,500) and to three other agencies to provide
rental assistance to 38 households of non-homeless special needs populations
($486,500) over a two year period.

 FY 2008 Funds Allocated to Service Homeless & Special Needs / Housing
Funding Source    Total Allocated Total Allocated to    Total Funds
                  to Serve        Serve Special Needs Allocated
                  Homeless        who need Supportive
                                  Housing
CDBG                  410,016.50                      0         410,016.50
ESGP                  342,332.50                      0         342,332.50
HOPWA                 318,858.00                                318,858.00
HOME                  613,500.00             486,500.00       1,100,000.00
           Totals   1,684,707.00             486,500,00       2,171,207.00


                                       53
During the program year, Memphis expended more than $2.1 million in
entitlement funds to address the needs of homeless persons and persons with
special needs that require supportive housing. This included Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG), Emergency Shelter Grant Program (ESGP),
Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS grants (HOPWA), and HOME funds
expended on projects that address the needs of the homeless and those with
special needs who need supportive housing.

Funds Spent in FY 2008 to Serve Homeless & Special Needs / Housing
Funding Source    Funds Spent to    Funds Spent to    Total Funds
                  Serve the         Serve Special     Expended
                  Homeless          Needs who need
                                    Supportive
                                    Housing
CDBG                     334,340.75        119,475.05         453,815.80
ESGP                     298,320.00                 0         298,320.00
HOPWA                       170,986        661,260.00            832,246
HOME TBRA                403,214.00         70,555.00         473,769.00
HOME Match               285,000.00         85,000.00         370,000.00
Totals                 1,492,860.75        936,290.00       2,429,150.80



CDBG funds in the amount of $334.340.75 were expended from awards totaling
$410, 016.50 to subsidize six programs that served the homeless. These
included Partners for the Homeless and Greater Memphis Interagency Coalition
for the Homeless, two advocacy agencies for the homeless. The funds awarded
to Partners helped pay the match for their operation of the Homeless
Management Information System (HMIS) system which has enrolled twenty-six
agencies administering 65 programs that serve the homeless. Additionally,
Partners coordinated Memphis’ annual application for Continuum of Care funds
(and preparation of Exhibit I) which resulted in HUD’s award of over $4.6 million
in Continuum of Care funds to maintain the level of transitional and permanent
supportive housing in Memphis as well as create new units of permanent
supportive housing for the homeless, including the chronically homeless.

CDBG funds were also awarded to operate the Salvation Army’s Homeless
Referral and Assessment Center which includes the Supportive Housing Hotline
for health care agencies seeking permanent supportive housing for homeless
individuals leaving hospitals, mental health centers and jails. The Referral
Center served over 6,000 individuals during the program year. (However, this
contract was not executed or funds expended during the reporting period due to
legal issues raised by the Salvation Army.) Other programs serving the
homeless with CDBG funds included:



                                       54
   •    Memphis Family Shelter, a transitional shelter for homeless women with
       children, which used CDBG funds to operate a program for homeless
       children
   •   Door of Hope, a new service center for the difficult to reach homeless.
   •   Alpha Omega Veterans Services’ newly completed 10 unit Single Room
       Occupancy facility used CDBG funds to construct a service center in the
       SRO building.

A total of $298,320.32 in Emergency Shelter Grant program funds were
expended during the year from FY 07 and 08 funds. The ESGP narrative
describes the amount of funds expended. These funds were used to maintain
the level of emergency shelters and transitional housing available for the
homeless

More than $2,104,155.00 HOPWA funds were spent during the reporting period.
While only funds expended on transitional / short term housing facilities served
the homeless, short term rent, mortgage and utility assistance programs helped
prevent homelessness, and tenant based rental assistance programs provided
housing for persons with HIV/AIDS who need case management and supportive
services in addition to housing assistance. (About 60% of HOPWA expenditures
were for housing subsidy assistance.)

Homeless Prevention Activities

Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Program and HOPWA funds were used for
activities designed to prevent homelessness.
    • Memphis provided Emergency Shelter Grant program funds to one
        agency for homeless prevention activities: SHIELD, Inc.
    • The City provided HOPWA funds to two agencies, Family Services and
        Friends for Life, to provide short term rent, mortgage and utility assistance
        to prevent homelessness of persons with HIV/AIDS in Memphis and the
        surrounding counties in the EMSA. The Friends for Life contract serves
        the four counties in Mississippi and Crittenden County, Arkansas and
        Family Services includes the Tennessee counties.
    • HOPWA funds were made available to Family Services to help provide
        homemaker – caretaker services for persons with AIDS that will help them
        remain in their homes.

New Federal Resources

During the reporting period, HUD approved funding for an additional year’s
funding for the Family Services Shelter Plus Care grant. Memphis also
administers two other Shelter Plus Care grants awarded through the SuperNOFA
process. These include Friends for Life ($711,000) for homeless persons with
HIV/AIDS, which will apply for a year of renewal funds in the 2008 Continuum of
Care and SHIELD, Inc. ($739,080.00) for homeless individuals with a mental


                                         55
illness. Together the three projects housed approximately 70 individuals
/households at the end of the reporting period.

Other Federal sources were accessed for programs that serve the homeless.
Frayser Millington Mental Health Center was awarded $1,102,200 by the
Federal Home Loan Bank in Cincinnati to help fund their 32-unit permanent
supportive housing project for chronically homeless mentally ill. Alpha Omega
expended $484,040 in Federal Home Loan Bank funds to match Memphis’ award
of $300,000.00 from the Homeless HOME-match for the Depot project which
created 10 units of Single Room Occupancy permanent housing for homeless
veterans and has also been awarded $304,252 by the Federal Home Loan Bank
AHP funds, $125,748 in HUD Continuum of Care funds as well $250,000 in
HOME Match funds by the City from FY 08.




                                       56
                                CDBG NARRATIVE

Introduction to CDBG Narrative

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding is used by the City of
Memphis’ Single-family Rehabilitation, the Volunteer Housing, and Minor Home
Repair Programs to rehabilitate owner-occupied housing that meets the objective
of providing direct and indirect assistance that seeks to maintain the existing
housing stock. The majority of the beneficiaries of the HARP program are elderly
homeowners on limited income who are unable to maintain house that have
fallen into disrepair and often is in violation of the local housing codes. The Multi-
family Rental Housing Program helps support investor development of affordable
rental housing for families with children and the elderly. Neighborhood
redevelopment is being supported through the partnership with the Memphis
Housing Authority’s (MHA) Lamar Terrace (University Place) and Dixie Homes
(Legends Park) HOPE VI which has used CDBG funds to acquire sites for
development and infrastructure assistance.

CDBG is extensively used for public services that respond to the needs of the
elderly, youth, unemployed, poverty-stricken persons and to help create public
facilities. Likewise, the elderly, mentally ill, and abused children Special Needs
sub-populations are assisted with CDBG funds.




                                          57
                          Certification of Consistency

In FY 2008, HCD pursued a number of resources as indicated in the Annual
Action Plan for FY 2008. These include the Continuum of Care funds (which
were received), Brownfields Economic Development Initiative (which were
received) and Section 108 funds.

HCD also partnered with a number of organizations in their efforts to apply for
funds under the HUD PY2007 SuperNOFA. The partnerships included financial
and other support, such as certifications of consistency with the approved
Consolidated Plan. Certifications were provided in a fair and impartial manner.
The process for obtaining a certification of consistency involved applicants
submitting to HCD a brief program description such that HCD could verify
consistency. HCD also provided organizations with information from the current
Consolidated Plan so that they could include this information in their applications.

Certifications were provided to the following:

       Certification of consistency with Consolidated Plan and support letter for
       Charis Acres, Inc. for a HUD 202 project
       Certification of consistency with Consolidated Plan for MHA for a ROSS
       Resident Service Delivery Models
       Certification of consistency with Consolidated Plan for MHA for a ROSS
       Neighborhood Networks Grant
       Support letters and Certifications of Consistency for Federal Home Loan
       Bank applications for several agencies
       Certification of consistency with Consolidated Plan for various homeless
       services proving agencies under the Continuum of Care grant to HUD
       Certification of consistency with Consolidated Plan for several agencies
       providing housing counseling (including Seedco, CD Council, and CDCs
       for Housing Counseling program to HUD
       Certification of Consistency with Consolidated Plan for Mosaic for a
       Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities
       Certification of Consistency with Consolidated Plan for MHA for a Public
       Housing Family Self Sufficiency Coordinator
       Certification of Consistency with Consolidated Plan for MHA for a Housing
       Choice Voucher Family Self Sufficiency Coordinator/Homeownership
       Coordinator




                                         58
Displacement Narrative

It is the policy of the City of Memphis Division of Housing and Community
Development to make every reasonable effort to avoid the displacement of
households when activities involve the acquisition, rehabilitation, or demolition of
occupied real property. HCD makes its best efforts not to take any housing units
of the housing inventory through a number of efforts. These include the
following:

In cases where HCD is undertaking a housing development project, the City
makes every effort to identify the owners of occupied housing that is the site of a
CDBG-assisted project in order to avoid displacement. These efforts include title
searches and making pending demolitions public. Once the owner has been
identified, every measure is taken to provide them with replacement housing,
temporary relocation costs, or rehabilitation.

Rehabilitation Activities

The types, numbers of units, and the amount of CDBG funds expended for
rehabilitation programs, and other public and private funds involved are as
follows.

The HARP Single Family Rehabilitation Programs is the primary housing
rehabilitation programs that help to maintain existing housing stock by providing
financial assistance to eligible homeowners. In FY 08, the number of units
assisted through this program totaled eleven (11). The total amount of CDBG
funds expended was $212,433.00. HOME funds totaling $97,328.07 were also
used to implement these two programs.

The Senior Citizens Minor Home Repair Program provided grants to elderly,
disabled, and very-low income homeowners for minor and emergency repairs,
and to correct serious code violations or health hazards. During the report
period, 113 units were assisted through the Senior Citizens Home Repair
Program, using $434,597.83 in CDBG funds. No other types of funds were
expended for these programs.

The Volunteer Home Program is an effort in which HCD partners with volunteers
who wish to make basic home repairs for elderly, disabled, or very-low income
homeowners who are unable to maintain their homes due to limited physical and
financial difficulties. In FY 08 this program assisted twenty (20) homeowners,
expending $68,111.00 in CDBG funds. No other types of funds were expended
for this program.




                                         59
Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area – University Place
Progress Against Benchmarks

University Place was designated in FY 2005 as a Neighborhood Strategy
Improvement Area. Since then, much progress has been accomplished with
acquisition, site clean-up, infrastructure development and the completion of
Phase I housing construction and lease-up of an 118 unit elderly housing
development. Phase II including 151 family rental units is completed and lease-
up began in June of 2008. Construction of Phase III 136 family rental units began
in June 2008 and the 56 single family homeownership units will begin
construction in March of 2009. Several environmental site issues have been
resolved through remediation. Acquisition and demolition of the area to be
redeveloped with HOPE VI funds has been completed. When completed in
2009, the HOPE VI component of this project will facilitate the development of
461 housing units – a mixture of rental and owner-occupied, mixed income, and
mixed use housing, a police precinct, a park with a youth-oriented athletic facility,
and other amenities. Planning is underway for the remainder of the NRSA,
including a commercial development study for the Southern part of the area, and
the development of a land bank to begin acquisition in the Northern part of the
area.




                                         60
FINANCIALS




    61
                      Sold Properties By HCD In FY 2007

There were no properties sold during FY2008


                              Properties Received

There were no properties received in FY2008


In FY2008, HCD was working to revise it’s policies and procedures for the
disposition and acquisition of properties, which is the reason that none were
acquired during this time.




                                        62
CDBG Program Income received by:                                         AMOUNT

a.            Revolving Funds:

             Single-unit housing rehab revolving
             fund
             Multi-unit rehab revolving
             fund

             Float funded activities



b.           Other loan repayments by category:


                             Single-unit housing                         118,285.61
                             rehab
                             Multi-unit housing                          346,208.55
                             rehab
                             CDBG/Rental                                 115,815.42
                             Rehab
                             Downtown Multi-unit                         14,733.30
                             housing rehab
                             Economic Development                        47,429.23
                             loan payments
                             Loan Supplement                             0.00
                             Paybacks
                             Income received from the sale of property   0.00
                             by parcel
                             Urban Renewal                               77,080.67
                             lease payments
                             Miscellaneous                               821.61
                             Revenue
                             Resale of property -                        3,404.64
                             Single-units
                             Resale of property -                        0.00
                             Multi-units
                             Property                                    0.00
                             Rental
                             Single Family New                           19,876.69
                             Construction
                             Section 108 M/F                             1,704,647.79
                             Loan
                             Down Payment                                139,918.52



                                             63
               Assistance P&I
               Down Payment Assistance                     20,313.00
               Service Fees
               Down Payment Assistance                     212,915.85
               Refunds
               Late Charges                                17,783.12
               Deferred Payment Loans &                    7,853.61
               Grants


               Total Program                               2,847,087.61
               Income


Prior Period Adjustments:                                  0.00

Reimbursement made for disallowed cost :                   0.00
n/a


Total CDBG Funds available for use during this reporting   2,847,087.61
period




                               64
         CITY OF MEMPHIS, DIVISION OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
                LOAN STATUS REPORT AS OF: 6/30/2008


                                 CDBG FUNDED ACTIVITIES

CDBG SINGLE FAMILY:                              BALANCE                LOAN COUNT

LOANS:
Owner/Investor Rehab Loans                       2,784,428.55           304

DPA Loans                                        2,225,750.56           956

GRANTS/DEFERRED PAYMENT LOANS: ***
DPA Grants                                       3,294,747.93           870

Rebuild Deferred Payment Loans                   3,909,762.48           81

Deferred Payment Loans                           5,943,514.51           484


TOTAL CDBG SINGLE FAMILY:                        18,158,204.03          2,695


CDBG MULTI-FAMILY :

Multi-Family Rehab Loans          Tillman Cove   214,164.41
                                  Dunlap         66,378.48
                                  Apartments
                                  Howell         914,897.08
                                  Gardens
                                  Family         0.00            Paid
                                  Investors                      Off
                                  New Dawn       1,988,979.22
                                  Apts.
                                  Greenlaw       97,479.42
                                  Apts.
                                  Claybrook      12,436.60
                                  Apts.
                                  Peachtree      0.00            Paid
                                                                 Off
                                  Bermar Apts.   283,464.49
                                  Appletree      367,741.78
                                  Apts.


                                       65
Klondyke       38,641.68
Gardens
Longview       782,361.68
Hghts.
Longview       22,559.49
Balloon
Oak Ridge      278,156.94
Apts.
Autumn Park    518,179.11
Parkway        61,931.96
Terrace
Cypress        317,093.51
Garden
Wicks Ave.     57,689.37
Burgess        131,876.22
Manor
New            0.00           Paid
Greenbriar                    Off
Myles, T.      11,679.98
Myles, L.      40,763.71
Myles, T.      0.00           Paid
                              Off
McLemore       0.00           Paid
Apts.                         Off
Cage, L.       12,986.27
Wellington     0.00           Tax
Square Apts.                  Sale
Lemon, P. &    21,943.60
A. &M.
Crockett       303,408.21
Apts.
Padawer        57,864.81
Bros. Props.
Barron Court   160,333.90
Apts.
Springcreek    2,500,000.00
Montgomery     1,740,000.00
Plaza
Fowler         169,637.00
Homes
Cleaborn       440,700.00
Homes
Weaver         168,426.94
Fields
Richmond       3,304,542.50



     66
                               Springdale   500,000.00
                               Chicago Park 467,241.93
                               Place
                               J.M. Exum    77,134.00
                               Towers


TOTAL CDBG MULTI FAMILY:                      16,130,694.29   34

  SECTION 108 LOANS:
                               Millcreek      2,359,285.02
                               1st Parking    3,000,000.00
                               Place
                               Peabody        10,986,371.12
                               Place "E"
                               Court Square   8,500,000.00
                               University     4,000,000.00
                               Place

TOTAL SECTION 108 LOANS:                      28,845,656.14   5


                DOWNTOWN       Commerce       3,000,000.00
                HOUSING:       Title

TOTAL DOWNTOWN HOUSING:                       3,000,000.00    1

                ECONOMIC
                DEVELOPMENT:

                               1st Parking    700,000.00
                               Place #2
                               Peabody        2,750,000.00
                               Place/CDBG
                               Peabody        14,950,000.00
                               Place/UDAG
                               Mahalia's      40,365.30
                               Child Center
                               Electronic     7,700.74
                               Concepts

TOTAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT:                   18,448,066.04   5

TOTAL CDBG LOANS/GRANTS                       84,582,620.50   2,740




                                    67
                    HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
                    COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT
                       ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT
                                7/1/07-6/30/08



PROJECT PROJECT NAME                   EXPENDED    REMAINING    BUDGETED
ID                                     THIS PERIOD ENCUMBRANCE AMOUNT
                                                   AT JUNE 30TH


CD90005   LEGAL

65        FY08/PY07 PROGRAM            206,288.36              206,288.36
          DELIVERY

                              SUB-     206,288.36     0.00     206,288.36
                              TOTAL

CD90009   HARP/REPLACEMENT
          HOUSING

44        HARDSHIP REPLCMT             35,722.71               35,722.71
          HSG PROG
93        VOLUNTEER HOME               68,111.00               68,111.00
          REPAIR
89        FY08/PY07                    321,741.88              321,741.88
          HARP/REPL/MH PD
82        MINOR HOME REPAIR            434,597.83              434,597.83
44        HARP MAJOR REHAB             212,433.00              212,433.00

                              SUB-     1,072,606.42   0.00     1,072,606.42
                              TOTAL

CD90011   FAITH BASED
          INITIATIVES

11        NEIGHBORHOOD                 251,152.25              251,152.25
          CLEAN-UP AND DEMO
95        SOULSVILLE TOWNE                                     0.00
          CENTER
34        CD/FAITH BASED               277,837.28              277,837.28
          PROG. DELIVERY

                              SUB-     528,989.53     0.00     528,989.53



                                      68
                                TOTAL

CD90013   SOCIAL SERVICES

24        SUMMER ENRICHMENT              135,000.00            135,000.00
          PRG

                                SUB-     135,000.00     0.00   135,000.00
                                TOTAL


CD90014   REAL ESTATE
          DEVELOPMENT

39        UNIVERSITY PLACE               717,124.23            717,124.23
          INFRAST
39        UNIVERSITY                     1,544,317.92          1,544,317.92
          PLACE/LAMAR TER
          ACQ
39        UNIVERSITY PLACE               442,763.54            442,763.54
          PHAS I PUB IMPV
12        CHICAGO PARK PLACE             50,040.00             50,040.00
          LEASE
14        PROPERTY                       76,690.00             76,690.00
          MAINTENANCE
88        FY08/PY07 REAL                 179,284.32            179,284.32
          ESTATE DEV PD
19        NEW                            59,781.70             59,781.70
          CHICAGO/FIRESTONE
          RENOV
7         CHICAGO PARK PLACE             502,241.94            502,241.94
          LP
45        A NEW PLACE APTS               152,500.00            152,500.00
94        THD - DIXIE LEGENDS            600,000.00            600,000.00
          DEMO

                                SUB-     4,324,743.65   0.00   4,324,743.65
                                TOTAL

CD90016   DESIGN

66        FY08/PY07 DESIGN PD            36,479.01             36,479.01

                                SUB-     36,479.01      0.00   36,479.01
                                TOTAL




                                        69
CD90019   FINANCE

          FY08/PY07 FINANCE               269,719.38               269,719.38
          PD

                                 SUB-     269,719.38   0.00        269,719.38
                                 TOTAL

CD90021   SPECIAL
          NEEDS/HOMELESS

1         THE WORKS (BMCSP)               17,325.66                17,325.66
48        BROOKHAVEN CARE                 9,620.22                 9,620.22
          HOME
46        FY08/PY07 COMM.SVC              148,120.02               148,120.02
          PD
20        COLLEGE PARK HOPE               199,096.20               199,096.20
          VI
49        COURT APPOINTED                 46,662.42    0.08        46,662.50
          SPECIAL ADVOCATES
25        DOOR OF HOPE                    32,272.36    12,135.14   44,407.50
41        FAIR HOUSING                    73,065.84    20,193.41   93,259.25
          ENFORCEMENT
52        GRACE HOUSE OF                  9,052.53                 9,052.53
          MEMPHIS
26        WELLNESS                        46,372.98    9,856.50    56,229.48
          UNIVERSITY
5         GIRLS, INC.                     37,858.67    14,164.99   52,023.66
47        GMICH                           100,471.46   10,573.20   111,044.66
27        HELP CARE - TITLE XX            175,498.18   42,587.13   218,085.31
          PROGRAM MATCH
53        HELPCARE                        4,513.42                 4,513.42
          HOMEMAKER
          SERVICES
19        HOPE HOUSE                      35,026.64    7,616.36    42,643.00
          STRENGTHN FFF
68        COMM SVC/SPEC                   148,120.01               148,120.01
          NEED PUBLIC FAC PD
20        KID'S IN TECHNOLOGY             20,331.41    2,112.09    22,443.50
54        LOWENSTIEN HOUSE                41,869.81    5,168.61    47,038.42
28        MACRO-BANK                      29,584.49                29,584.49
          LENDING STUDY
3 40      MEMPHIS AREA LEGAL              174,511.35   64,651.84   239,163.19
          FAIR HOUSING CTR
55        MEMPHIS AREA LEGAL              13,470.72                13,470.72
          SVC




                                         70
56        MEMPHIS CHILD                   43,335.83      8,406.23     51,742.06
          ADVOCACY CENTER
20        MEMPHIS FOOD BANK               60,657.28      15,588.06    76,245.34
28        MEMPHIS FAMILY                  25,284.37      9,974.36     35,258.73
          SHELTER EEP
6         MEMPHIS URBAN                   12,534.27                   12,534.27
          LEAGUE WORKFORCE
30        MERITAN (SENIOR                 36,507.99      8,380.01     44,888.00
          SERVICES)
57        MIFA                            5,951.30                    5,951.30
47        PARTNERS FOR THE                96,120.45      0.00         96,120.45
          HOMELESS
29        SENIOR COMPANION                23,198.10      9,641.90     32,840.00
          PROGRAM
61        SALVATION ARMY HRC              20,690.11                   20,690.11
64        SHARED COST                     38,197.38      6,690.62     44,888.00
          HOMEMAKER
          PROGRAM
58        SHELBY RESIDENTAL               39,247.32      7,277.62     46,524.94
          AND VOC SVC
62        ALPHA OMEGA VET                 69,502.00                   69,502.00
          SVCS
59        SYNERGY TREATMENT               46,551.64      7,481.30     54,032.94
          CENTER
50        THE EXCHANGE CLUB               44,195.34      2,636.64     46,831.98
32        TBRA CASE                       96,291.28                   96,291.28
          MANAGEMENT
30        TSU - URBAN                     33,429.63                   33,429.63
          GARDENING PROG.
2         WICS                            11,520.55                   11,520.55
67        YESS PROGRAM                    38,733.20      16,417.81    55,151.01

                                 SUB-     2,104,792.43   281,553.90   2,386,346.33
                                 TOTAL

CD90027   IDIS ADMINISTRATION

55        FY08/PY07 IDIS PROG.            67,179.93                   67,179.93
          DELIVERY

                                 SUB-     67,179.93      0.00         67,179.93
                                 TOTAL

CD90028   PORTFOLIO
          MANAGEMENT




                                         71
16        SECTION                         216,483.50              216,483.50
          108/MILLCREEK
16        SECTION 108/COURT               466,769.90              466,769.90
          SQUARE
69        FY08/PY07 PORTFOLIO             158,502.46              158,502.46
          PROG. DEL

                                 SUB-     841,755.86     0.00     841,755.86
                                 TOTAL

CD90030   PLANNING AND
          GRANTS

78        CITY WIDE STRATEGIC             18,218.43               18,218.43
          PLAN
23        INTERN CONTRACTS                91,485.44               91,485.44
22        NEIGHBORHOOD                    13,903.35               13,903.35
          PLANS
27 62     THE GRANT CENTER                39,147.97               39,147.97
31        FY08/PY07 PLAN/GRTS                                     0.00
          PROG. DEL
80        MEMPHIS CTR FOR                 23,183.77               23,183.77
          INDPT LIVING
42        FARMER'S MARKET                 23,413.15               23,413.15
92        UNITED HOUSING PRG              24,999.99               24,999.99
          DEL
25        PLAN & MAT                      8,500.00                8,500.00
          DEVELOPMENT

                                 SUB-     242,852.10     0.00     242,852.10
                                 TOTAL

CD90000   GENERAL
          ADMINISTRATION

29        FY08/PY07 GEN. ADMIN            1,825,337.30            1,825,337.30
          COSTS

                                 SUB-     1,825,337.30   0.00     1,825,337.30
                                 TOTAL



                                 GRAND 11,655,743.97 281,553.90   11,937,297.87
                                 TOTALS




                                         72
IDIS - C04PR26                             U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT                             DATE: 09-29-08
                                              OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT                               TIME:    13:11
                                             INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM                              PAGE:         1
                                              CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2007
                                                        07-01-2007 TO 06-30-2008
                                                              MEMPHIS, TN


             PART I:    SUMMARY OF CDBG RESOURCES

                        01   UNEXPENDED CDBG FUNDS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                             9,734,984.86
                        02   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                                 8,330,778.00
                        03   SURPLUS URBAN RENEWAL                                                                     0.00
                        04   SECTION 108 GUARANTEED LOAN FUNDS                                                         0.00
                        05   CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                                       2,522,399.67
                        06   RETURNS                                                                               2,495.00
                        07   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AVAILABLE                                                     0.00
                        08   TOTAL AVAILABLE (SUM, LINES 01-07)                                               20,590,657.53


             PART II:   SUMMARY OF CDBG EXPENDITURES

                        09   DISBURSEMENTS OTHER THAN SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS AND PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION      10,221,991.87
                        10   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT                             0.00
                        11   AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT (LINE 09 + LINE 10)                            10,221,991.87
                        12   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                                     1,619,270.03
                        13   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS                                        683,253.40
                        14   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                                  0.00
                        15   TOTAL EXPENDITURES (SUM, LINES 11-14)                                            12,524,515.30
                        16   UNEXPENDED BALANCE (LINE 08 - LINE 15)                                            8,066,142.23


             PART III: LOWMOD BENEFIT THIS REPORTING PERIOD

                        17   EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD HOUSING IN SPECIAL AREAS                                             0.00
                        18   EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD MULTI-UNIT HOUSING                                           1,473,526.26
                        19   DISBURSED FOR OTHER LOW/MOD ACTIVITIES                                            8,698,425.61
                        20   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT                                                0.00
                        21   TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT (SUM, LINES 17-20)                                          10,171,951.87
                        22   PERCENT LOW/MOD CREDIT (LINE 21/LINE 11)                                                 99.51%


             LOW/MOD BENEFIT FOR MULTI-YEAR CERTIFICATIONS

                        23   PROGRAM YEARS(PY) COVERED IN CERTIFICATION                              PY2005   PY2006 PY2007
                        24   CUMULATIVE NET EXPENDITURES SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT CALCULATION                32,585,201.08
                        25   CUMULATIVE EXPENDITURES BENEFITING LOW/MOD PERSONS                                32,535,161.08




                                                                    73
                       26   PERCENT BENEFIT TO LOW/MOD PERSONS (LINE 25/LINE 24)                      99.85%




IDIS - C04PR26                              U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT             DATE: 09-29-08
                                              OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT               TIME:    13:11
                                             INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM              PAGE:        2
                                              CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2007
                                                        07-01-2007 TO 06-30-2008
                                                              MEMPHIS, TN




            PART IV:   PUBLIC SERVICE (PS) CAP CALCULATIONS

                       27   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PUBLIC SERVICES                               1,800,622.95
                       28   PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR             56,627.08
                       29   PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                 0.00
                       30   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS                                  0.00
                       31   TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS (LINE 27 + LINE 28 - LINE 29 + LINE 30)        1,857,250.03
                       32   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                   8,330,778.00
                       33   PRIOR YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                           4,155,483.47
                       34   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP                               0.00
                       35   TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP (SUM, LINES 32-34)                         12,486,261.47
                       36   PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PS ACTIVITIES (LINE 31/LINE 35)                14.87%


            PART V:    PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION (PA) CAP

                       37   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                       1,619,270.03
                       38   PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR                  0.00
                       39   PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                 0.00
                       40   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS                                  0.00
                       41   TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS (LINE 37 + LINE 38 - LINE 39 +LINE 40)         1,619,270.03
                       42   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                   8,330,778.00
                       43   CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                         2,522,399.67
                       44   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP                               0.00
                       45   TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP (SUM, LINES 42-44)                         10,853,177.67
                       46   PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PA ACTIVITIES (LINE 41/LINE 45)                14.92%




                                                                   74
HOME NARRATIVE

In FY 08, HOME expenditures totaled $2,917,996.75. HOME funds were utilized
in four different priority categories: Housing, Homeless, Special Needs, and
Administration. HOME funds subsidized the Tenant Based Rental Assistance
(TBRA) Program operated by seven (7) agencies during the reporting period.
These agencies provided housing for special needs populations. The seven (7)
organizations include MIFA, Memphis Family Shelter, Lowenstein House, Grace
House, SRVS, Frayser-Millington MHC, and Southeast MHC that administered
Tenant Based Rental Assistance to persons with mental illness. Services were
provided to a total of 18 households and 80 individuals. Together, the contracts
used $473,769.06 in HOME funds. Memphis’ priorities of meeting the housing
needs of the mentally ill (special needs population) is being met thru the use of
HOME/TBRA funds. The specific targets are on track as a result of the first
year’s effort with respect to Memphis’ 3 Year strategy.

The following table summarizes HOME expenditures for FY 08.

                      Program                          Expenditure       Percentage
Housing                                                $1,685,125.58        57.7%
Special Needs                                           $559,269.06         19.2%
Homeless                                                $285,000.00          9.8%
CHDO Administration                                     $192,658.70         6.6%
HOME Administration                                     $195,943.07          6.7%
TOTAL                                                  $2,917,996.41        100.%

Housing, the largest expenditure of HOME funds, comprised 57.7%of the total
amount of funds expended. The Single-family Rehabilitation Program (HARP)
used $97,328.07 in HOME funds (along with CDBG funds) to complete the
renovation eleven (11) homes where the rehab costs was greater than 50% of
replacement value. Of those HARP assisted rehabilitation activities, seven
households were low-income; 3 were very-low income; and 1 was moderate-
income. The Downpayment Assistance Program (DPA) used $385,212.00 in
HOME funds to assist 50 new homeowners. Three homeowners were very-low
income; 14 were low income and 28 were moderate income.


Eleven (11) Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs)
combined to produce single family development and rehabilitation housing units:
The WORKS, Inc., H.E.L.P.I.N.G. CDC, the Cooper-Young Development
Corporation, the Vollintine-Evergreen Community Association CDC, Orange
Mound Development Corporation, Riverview-Kansas CDC, Neighborhood
Housing Opportunities, Frayser CDC, Douglas/Bungalow/Crump, New Chicago
CDC and LeMoyne-Owen College CDC. CHDO housing development efforts
resulted in: acquisition of 3 lots; rehabilitation of 4 houses (1 sold); 13 new rental
units; and 11 newly constructed houses (6 sold). Again, the city’s specific targets


                                          75
are being met as a result of the first year’s effort in accordance with Memphis’ 3
Year strategy
HOME funded activities that address Special Needs Populations totaled
$559,269.06 and accounted for nineteen per cent (19%) of HOME funds
expended. Included in expenditures for Special Needs populations was HOME
funds expended for Tenant-Based Rental Assistance for mentally ill persons
totaling $473,769.06. HOME expenditures used to assist the end of chronic
homelessness totaled $285,000.00. .
6.6% or $192,658.70 was used for CHDO administration. HOME program
administration expended $195,943.07or about 6.7%.




                                         76
                                               HOME FUNDED
                                              ACTIVITIES
     HOME SINGLE FAMILY:

  LOANS:
   Owner Rehab                                  106,236.78      8

GRANTS/DEFERRED PAYMENT LOANS:
                ***
  Reconstruction                               2,182,859.53    77


    Deferred Payment/HOME                      11,912,966.44   555

  TOTAL HOME SINGLE FAMILY:                    14,202,062.75   640


     HOME MULTI-FAMILY :


      Multi-Family Rehab
                       National Church          497,500.00
                         Residences
                      Harmony Woods            1,035,000.00
                          Parkway              2,171,888.57
                         Commons
                        Oasis/Danny             137,631.50
                          Thomas
                      Oasis/Wellington          240,682.16

TOTAL HOME MULTI FAMILY LOANS:                 4,082,702.23     5



   TOTAL HOME                                  18,284,764.98   645
  LOANS/GRANTS




                                         77
              HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
                                HOME PROGRAM
                    ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT
                            7/01/07 - 6/30/08


                                        EXPENDED     REMAINING
PROJECT                                      THIS ENCUMBRANCE       BUDGETED
   ID   PROJECT NAME                      PERIOD    AT JUNE 30TH      AMOUNT


        HOME PROGRAM ' 00

        COMM HSG DEV ORG                                                   0.00
                                SUB-            0.00         0.00          0.00
                              TOTAL

        HOME PROGRAM '01

        DOUGLASS ,BOUNGALOW, CRUMP                                         0.00
        PROJ
        FRAYSER CDC ADMIN                                                  0.00
        GLENVIEW CDC PROJECT                                               0.00
        HYDE PARK CDC ADMIN                                                0.00
        MANDCO IV ADMIN                                                    0.00
        MANDCO IV PROJECT                                                  0.00
        NEW CHICAGO ADMIN                                                  0.00
        NORTH MEMPHIS CDC                                                  0.00
        PROJECT
        ORANG MOUND CDC                                                    0.00
        PROJECT
        REPLACEMENT HOUSING                                                0.00
                                SUB-            0.00         0.00          0.00
                              TOTAL

        HOME PROGRAM '02

        COOPER YOUNG CDC                   37,500.00                  37,500.00
        PROJECT
        DOUGLASS IV PROJECT                                                0.00
        GLENVIEW CDC ADMIN                                                 0.00
        MANDCO IV ADMIN                                                    0.00



                                   78
          REPLACEMENT HOUSING                                          0.00
          PROGRAM
          S/F REHAB                                                    0.00
          TBRA SEVERELY                                                0.00
          MENTALLY ILL
                                     SUB-     37,500.00   0.00    37,500.00
                                   TOTAL

          HOME PROGRAM 03

          BHI PHOENIX                                                  0.00
          DOUGLASS IV                                                  0.00
          ADMINISTRATION
          NEW CHICAGO CDC                                              0.00
          PROJECT
          REPLACEMENT HOUSING                                          0.00
          PROGRAM
          TBRA SEVERELY                      227,508.71          227,508.71
          MENTALLY ILL
                                     SUB-    227,508.71   0.00   227,508.71
                                   TOTAL

CD90033   HOME PROGRAM 04

  34      CHDO PROJECTS                                                0.00
  34      HELPING CDC                                                  0.00
  34      RIVERVIEW/KANSAS CDC                                         0.00
  34      ORANGE MOUND CDC                                             0.00
  34      VECA CDC                                                     0.00
  34      NEW CHICAGO CDC                                              0.00
  34      COOPER-YOUNG CDC                   125,665.84          125,665.84
  34      LEMOYNE OWEN CDC                                             0.00
  35      COOPER-YOUNG IV                      5,482.81            5,482.81
          ADMIN
  13      REPLACEMENT HOUSING                                          0.00
          PROGRAM
   7      TFHD - APRIL WOODS                 484,862.06          484,862.06
          WEST APTS
   7      TFHD - NATIONAL CHURCH              49,250.00           49,250.00
          RESIDENCES
  35      TENANT BASED RENTAL                175,705.35          175,705.35
          ASSISTANCE
  34      THE WORKS PROJECT                                            0.00
                                     SUB-    840,966.06   0.00   840,966.06
                                   TOTAL




                                        79
CD90048   HOME PROGRAM 05

  15      AMERICAN HOME                                             0.00
          DREAM (DPA)
   4      TBRA-                            68,073.00           68,073.00
          FRAYSER/MILLINGTON
          MHC
   4      TBRA- SHELBY RES &                2,482.00            2,482.00
          VOC SVC
  35      FRAYSER CDC ADMIN                12,385.53           12,385.53
  34      FRAYSER CDC PROJECT                                       0.00
  35      GLENVIEW CDC ADMIN                                        0.00
  34      H.E.L.P.I.N.G. CDC               21,500.00           21,500.00
          PROJECT
  35      LEMOYNE OWEN COLLEGE CDC          8,000.00            8,000.00
          ADMIN
  34      LEMOYNE OWEN COLLEGE CDC         19,695.55           19,695.55
          PROJECT
  34      NEW CHICAGO CDC                  27,850.00           27,850.00
          PROJECT
  35      ORANGE MOUND CDC                 14,890.68           14,890.68
          ADMIN
  34      ORANGE MOUND CDC                 63,575.47           63,575.47
          PROJECT
  34      RIVERVIEW-KANSAS                 16,387.50           16,387.50
          CDC PROJECT
   35     VECA CDC ADMIN                   15,063.64           15,063.64
   34     VECA CDC PROJECT                  8,802.23            8,802.23
   34     THE WORKS PROJECT                38,427.50           38,427.50
  110     HOME ADMINISTRATION                                       0.00
                                  SUB-    317,133.10   0.00   317,133.10
                                TOTAL

 12257    HOME PROGRAM 06

  15      HOME ADMINISTRATION             169,656.99          169,656.99
  60      ALPHA OMEGA HOME                285,000.00          285,000.00
          MATCH CC
  60      HOUSING OPTIONS INC              85,500.00           85,500.00
  19      FRAYSER CDC ADMIN                20,000.00           20,000.00
  19      H.E.L.P.I.N.G. CDC ADMIN          8,283.46            8,283.46
  19      NEW CHICAGO ADMIN                16,113.48           16,113.48
  19      NHO MANAGEMENT                   30,776.73           30,776.73
          ADMIN
  19      RIVERVIEW-KANSAS                  4,176.42            4,176.42
          CDC ADMIN



                                     80
 81     LUCCA STREET/KANSAS                11,900.00             11,900.00
 86     AMERICAN HOME                      68,216.00             68,216.00
        DREAM (DPA)
 85     HELPING CDC                        23,750.00             23,750.00
 85     RIVERVIEW-KANSAS                                              0.00
        CDC PROJECT
 85     NHO MANAGEMENT                    189,612.03            189,612.03
        PROJECT
 85     VECA CDC PROJECT                   11,896.21             11,896.21
 85     FRAYSER CDC PROJECT                20,000.00             20,000.00
                                 SUB-     944,881.32    0.00    944,881.32
                               TOTAL

12301   HOME PROGRAM 07
  9     HARP SINGLE FAMILY                 97,328.41             97,328.41
        REHAB
 15     AMERICAN HOME                     316,996.00            316,996.00
        DREAM (DPA)
 34     FRAYSER CDC                        26,600.00             26,600.00
 34     DOUGLASSS,                         17,887.50             17,887.50
        BUNGALOW,CRUMP
 34     RIVERVIEW/KANSAS CDC                7,423.62              7,423.62
 35     FRAYSER ADMIN                      10,000.00             10,000.00
 35     NEW CHICAGO CDC                    17,677.85             17,677.85
        ADMIN
 35     NORTH MEMPHIS CDC                  16,468.20             16,468.20
        ADMIN
 35     RIVERVIEW/KANSAS CDC               13,339.90             13,339.90
        ADMIN
 37     HOME ADMINISTRATION                26,286.08             26,286.08
        COSTS
                                                                      0.00
                                 SUB-     550,007.56    0.00    550,007.56
                               TOTAL

                                GRAND    2,917,996.75   0.00   2,917,996.75
                               TOTALS




                                    81
                           FY08 HOPWA NARRATIVE

During the period from July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008, the City of Memphis,
acting through five project sponsors and six subrecipients, administered
HOPWA-funded projects that expended more than 2.15 million dollars. The
project sponsors were Family Services of the Mid-South, Friends For Life, Hope
House, United Way of the Mid-South and Whitehaven Southwest Mental Health
Center. They provided a range of housing and supportive services to residents
of eight counties in the Memphis EMSA - - Fayette, Shelby and Tipton counties,
in Tennessee, DeSoto, Marshall, Tate and Tunica counties in Mississippi, and
Crittenden County, Arkansas. Approximately 60% of the funds were expended
on housing subsidy and housing placement assistance and 40% on supportive
services. More than 570 households received housing / housing placement
assistance while more than 5,400 benefitted from HOPWA-funded supportive
services. (Please note the City used HOPWA dollars as gap funding to enable
six agencies to continue providing supportive services to clients during the period
between the termination of Ryan White Part II and the beginning of Ryan White
Part A funds.) All housing assistance was accompanied with case management
and preparation of a housing plan.

Project sponsors were selected by negotiation and competition. The contracts
for Tenant Based Rental Assistance and for STRMU assistance in the
Mississippi and Arkansas counties were negotiated as was the contract with
United Way for the gap funding. All others were competitively awarded through
the City’s annual competitive grant process.

All project sponsors are headquartered in Memphis, the urban center of the
EMSA that includes eight counties in three states. Eligible project sponsors in the
outlying counties are few and no applications for HOPWA funding were received
from them in the past several years. Memphis agencies with significant
administrative capability and capacity have negotiated contracts to provide
housing and case management services to these areas. Additionally, the
Memphis based agencies have coordinated the transfer of clients from the state-
funded HOPWA programs in Mississippi and Arkansas, created collaborative
relationships with organizations in the areas and have established credibility with
the infected populations in these areas after initial difficulties.

The agencies have provided the following information about services provided
and barriers encountered in the provision of services.

United Way of the Mid-South

This activity includes one month of gap funding for six project sponsors who had
previously received Ryan White Part II funds for supportive service activities.
HOPWA funds were used to help ensure that clients at the existing programs
were not deprived of important services while the new, increased funding from



                                        82
Ryan White Part A was put in place. The six subrecipients were: The Med’s
Adult Special Care Unit, Family Services of the Mid-South, Friends For Life
Corporation, Memphis Health Center, Sacred Heart Southern Missions, and East
Arkansas Family Health Center. A total of 3,969 households received HOPWA-
funded supportive services from these agencies.
United Way reported no service delivery barriers under this program. However,
the lack of planning on the part of HRSA as the funding of these services
changed from Title II to Part A was regrettable. Without the HOPWA funds,
numerous persons would have gone without services for a period of several
months.

Whitehaven Southwest Mental Health Center – Housing Operations and
Supportive Services

Whitehaven Southwest Mental Health Center operates Peabody House, a 12-
bed short-term supportive housing facility that provides shelter, nutritious meals
and other supportive services to 85 homeless persons with HIV/AIDS during the
reporting period. The supportive services included alcohol and drug sessions
and depression groups.

Whitehaven identified the following service delivery barriers:

A.     Supportive Services – Whitehaven identified the lack of a literacy program
       as a supportive service barrier.
B.     Multiple Diagnosis – Residents with mental health issues, physical
       disabilities, substance abuse, and HIV/AIDS at the same time find it
       difficult to cope.
C.     Credit History – Residents usually have poor credit as a result of past life
       styles or activities.
D.     Housing Availability – There is a lack of affordable permanent housing
       units for program participants to transition into.
E.     Eligibility and Rental History – Background checks and poor rental history
       make it difficult or impossible for program participants to housing.
F.     Criminal Justice History – Whitehaven states that most homeless
       individuals have a criminal background due to present and past
       environmental situations. A history of a recent felony makes renting
       housing difficult.

Friends For Life – Housing Operations and Supportive Services Contract

Friends For Life operates a 16 unit Shelter Plus Care (S + C) assisted permanent
housing facility at 35 North Claybrook. Each household pays a third of his or her
income for rent and the HUD S + C funds pay the balance of the rent. HOPWA
funds are used for repairs and for staffing and operations of the permanent
housing project. Friends For Life served 16 unduplicated households in the S +
C-funded units during the reporting period.



                                         83
In addition, to the housing operations, Friends For Life provides a variety of
supportive services which range from alcohol and drug abuse services, legal
services, meals and nutritional services, day respite, Wellness University, GED,
and leadership development which are available to individuals whether or not
they are receiving HOPWA-funded housing assistance. A tot al of 1,159
unduplicated households received supportive services including 16 households
receiving permanent housing assistance and 56 households receiving HOPWA-
funded TBRA. Friends For Life reported no service delivery barriers under this
program.

Friends For Life – Short-Term Rent, Mortgage and Utility Assistance

Friends For Life provided STRMU assistance to 45 eligible households in
DeSoto, Tate, Tunica, and Marshall Counties in Mississippi and Crittenden
County in Arkansas. Case management supportive services were also provided
to all clients. Efforts were made to find decent affordable housing for clients
when expenses were financially infeasible. Additionally, some STRMU clients
became TBRA program participants improving the stability of their housing
arrangements. Again, Friends for Life reports no service delivery barriers for this
program.

Family Services of the Mid-South – STRMU, Permanent Housing Placement
and Supportive Services

Family Services provides a STRMU program to eligible households in Shelby,
Tipton and Fayette Counties in Tennessee. One hundred and ninety-two (192)
households received STRMU assistance during the reporting period. Permanent
housing placement provided first months rent / security deposits and utility
deposits for 40 households. Ninety-eight (98) households received housing
information services. All STRMU assistance included supportive case
management services. Homemaker services were also provided to 24
households along with case management.

United Way identified several barriers to their program
   A.    HOPWA/HUD Regulations prohibit utility assistance under STRMU for
         persons receiving rent subsidy/utility allowance benefits although utility
         allowances rarely fulfill the entire utility debt for the usage period. This
         impacts the eligibility of at least 50 persons seeking utility assistance
         through this program.
   B.    Housing Availability for those in the target population needing suitable,
         low-income units is in short supply in Shelby County.
   C.    Planning for regular outreach to Tipton and Fayette counties is difficult
         with current program structure.




                                         84
Actions taken in response to barriers include the grantee convening a meeting
with project sponsors to review regulations and identify opportunities for
procedural adjustments while maintaining regulatory compliance, and housing
referrals to private owners when subsidized options fail, and improved program.

Hope House Day Care - TBRA

Hope House Day Care Center provides assistance to children and families
infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. The Hope House TBRA project provides
assistance to families served by the Day Care Center. And served a total of
thirteen (13) households in one year. All thirteen (13) were provided Tenant
Based Rental Assistance and Supportive Services during the year.

Hope House lists the following as barriers to service:

      A.     The TBRA-supported utility allowance does not cover the full utility
             bill. We have attempted to overcome this barrier by assisting our
             clients with budgeting and by providing emergency financial
             services when needed.
      B.     Many affordable rental properties are not located in safe areas or
             have cooperative landlords. In order to address this barrier we
             have located several landlords that have worked with our program
             and we have developed positive relationships with. This has
             allowed us to ensure we have landlords that take good care of their
             properties and find homes in safer areas.
      C.     Fear and stigma regarding HIV/AIDS is problematic. Although our
             families are placed in safer and more affordable housing, there
             continues to be fear on the part of many of our tenants that their
             nieghbors will learn of their infection

Friends For Life Corporation - TBRA

Friends For Life’s tenant based rental assistance program (TBRA) served 56
households in Shelby, Fayette, and Tipton counties in Tennessee, Crittenden
County in Arkansas and Desoto, Tunica, Tate and Marshall Counties in
Mississippi. The TBRA program provides a subsidized housing coupon or
voucher that allows participants to pay no more that 30% of their income for rent.

The main barrier that Friends for Life’s TBRA program faced in this fiscal year
was the fact that the potential residents live in rural areas where AIDS-related
bias, stigma and prejudice are still experienced by persons living with the
disease. In addition, some resistance was experienced by several of the potential
referring agencies due to unknown reasons. Education has been provided to the
residents/potential residents about facing and dealing with AIDS-related stigma
and relationship building has taken place with referral sources with a positive
outcome.



                                        85
                                                                       City of Memphis

                  Accomplishments Data - CAPER Chart 1 (planned goal) and Chart 2 (actual)

                                                                                                              Outputs Households
                                                                                                            HOPWA                                                                  Funding
                                                                                                            Assistance             Non-HOPWA
                                 HOPWA Performance
                                                                                                            a.          b.          c.          d.               e.                 f.                  g.
                                 Charts 1 (planned goal)




                                                                                                                                                                                                              Leveraged
                                     and 2 (actual)




                                                                                                                                                                       HOPWA




                                                                                                                                                                                         HOPWA




                                                                                                                                                                                                              HOPWA
                                                                                                                          Actual




                                                                                                                                                     Actual



                                                                                                                                                                       Budget




                                                                                                                                                                                         Actual
                                                                                                                 Goal




                                                                                                                                         Goal




                                                                                                                                                                                                              Non-
1.                                                                                                                                                                              375,677
     Tenant-based Rental Assistance                                                                        70           75          -0-         -0-           402,286                                   70
2. Units in facilities supported with operating costs: Number of households supported                      16           16          16          16            285,583           285,583                 16
3. Units in facilities developed with capital funds and placed in service during the program year:
   Number of households supported                                                                          85           85          85          85            283,358           170,986                 85
4. Short-term Rent, Mortgage and Utility payments
                                                                                                           -0-          -0-         -0-         -0-             -0-                -0-                  -0-
     Housing Development (Construction and Stewardship of facility based housing)                                             -0-                               -0-                -0-                  -0-
5.   Units in facilities being developed with capital funding but not yet opened (show units of housing
     planned)
                                                                                                           225          268         -0-         -0-           458,781           421,532                225
6.    Stewardship (developed with HOPWA but no current operation or other costs) Units of housing
     subject to 3- or 10- year use agreements
                                                                                                           -0-          -0-         -0-         -0-                                                     -0-
7.   Adjustment to eliminate duplication (i.e., moving between types of housing)
                                                                                                           398          444        101- -101- 1,430,008                          1,253,778             398
     Total unduplicated number of households/units of housing assisted
                                                                                                          Output
                                                                                                          Units                                                                                      Output Units
     Supportive Services
                                                                                                                              -0-                                -0-               -0-                  -0-
8.   i) Supportive Services in conjunction with HOPWA housing activities1
                                                                                                           -0-          -0-          -0-        -0-                                                     -0-
     ii) Supportive Services NOT in conjunction with HOPWA housing activities2
                                                                                                           -0-          -0-          -0-        -0-             -0-                -0-                  -0-
9. Adjustment to eliminate duplication
                                                                                                          Output
                                                                                                          House                                                                                      Output
                                                                                                          holds                                                                                   Households

     Total Supportive Services
                                                                                                           556          590                                   597,654           622,222                556
     Housing Placement Assistance3
                                                                                                          5,641 5,128                                         250,197           231,216                5,641
10. Housing Information Services                                                                           -0-           0           -0-        -0-                                                     -0-
11. Permanent Housing Placement Services                                                                  5,782 5,718                                         847,851 853,438                          5,782
     Total Housing Placement Assistance

     Housing Development, Administration, and Management Services                                                                                                                 2,725
                                                                                                            95           98                                    5,284                                    95
12. Resource Identification to establish, coordinate and develop housing assistance resources
                                                                                                           30            40                                                                             30
13. Grantee Administration (maximum 3% of total) (i.e., costs for general management, oversight,
    coordination, evaluation, and reporting)
                                                                                                                         16
14. Project Sponsor Administration (maximum 7% of total) (i.e., costs for general management,
    oversight, coordination, evaluation, and reporting)                                                    125          122                                    5,284              2,725                125
     Total costs for program year




                                                                                    86
                   HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
               HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS
                      ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT
                               7/1/07-6/30/08



                                        EXPENDED     REMAINING
 PROJECT                                     THIS ENCUMBRANCE           BUDGETED
    ID     PROJECT NAME                   PERIOD    AT JUNE 30TH          AMOUNT

CD90021    HOPWA

   0018    HOUSING                          2,063,609.65   309,208.44    2,372,818.09
           OPPORTUNITIES
           FOR PERSONS WITH
           AIDS
    38     HOPWA PROGRAM                      40,545.59     15,824.41      56,370.00
           ADMINISTRATION


                              TOTALS        2,104,155.24   325,032.85    2,429,188.09




                                       87
                 Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Program Narrative

Memphis continues to improve its ability to serve the homeless with ESG funding
through addressing the needs identified in the Homeless Needs Assessment and
the Consolidated Plan. While working with the recipients of ESG funds to
improve their ability to better serve the homeless, the City has also ensured that
needs identified in the Homeless Needs Assessment become a part of the
criteria used to select projects for funding.

The extent to which ESG funds directly addressed homeless and homeless
prevention is best reflected in the number of people served and the number
referred to transitional and permanent housing. During the reporting period over
$298,320.32 in ESG funds from FY 07 and 08 were expended to serve 869
persons. This included homeless persons who received shelter and services
through emergency and transitional housing programs. Also, at least 30
households obtained permanent housing after leaving the transitional housing
programs.

A summary of the ESG expenditures by funded activity for the FY07 and FY 08
ESG Programs is shown below. Also, information pertaining to the ESG caps is
documented. The ESG caps for essential services, homeless prevention,
operations/staffing and administration were not exceeded for corresponding
program years and are also shown in the table on the next page.



   ESG Activity        ESG 2007      ESG 2007             ESG 2008      ESG 2008
     & Cap               Caps        Expended               Caps        Expended

Entitlement Amount    $ 353,964.00       NA           $ 360,350.00           NA
Essential Services
30%                   $ 106,189.20   $   9,414.57     $ 108,105.00      $   65,129.77
Homeless
Prevention 30%        $ 106,189.20   $ 14,042.99      $ 108,105.00      $         0.00
Operations/Staffing
10 %                  $ 35,396.40    $         0.00   $     36,035.00   $   22,317.66
Administration 5%
                      $ 17,698.20    $         0.00   $     18,017.50   $         0.00
Rehabilitation
                          N/A        $         0.00         N/A         $   13,532.57
Operations &
Maintenance               N/A        $ 74,287.44            N/A         $   99,595.32

Total                     N/A        $ 97,745.00            N/A         $ 200,575.32




                                          88
A summary of the sources and amounts of ESG Program matching funds is
found below for FY 2007 and FY 2008 Entitlements
FY 2007
Agency                     Matching Source              Match Required    Match Provided
Alpha Omega Veterans
Services                   In Kind Donations            $   34,000.00     $     34,000.00
                           Private Funds, Client
                           Fees, Local Gov’t, Other
                           Federal Gov’t, Food
Catholic Charities         Stamps                       $   38,500.00     $    540,361.00

Case Management, Inc.      Federal Gov’t, Local Gov’t   $   36,000.00     $   3,320,000.00
Cocaine & Alcohol
Awareness Program          Other Federal Grant          $   18,450.00     $     18,450.00
                           United Way, TennCare,
Lowenstein House, Inc.     Fundraising                  $   15,925.00     $     15,766.00

Memphis Family Shelter     Private Fundraising, SHP     $   49,000.00     $    115,679.00

MIFA-Estival Comm.         In Kind Volunteer Hours      $   34,000.00     $     34,000.00

MIHN                       Private Donations            $   37,000.00     $     46,370.00

Salvation Army             In Kind Donations            $   49,000.00     $     49,000.00

SHIELD, Inc.               Other Federal Grants         $   20,000.00     $     13,688.00
Whitehaven Southwest       In Kind Donations,
Mental Health Center       Fundraising                  $    4,391.00     $      5,476.77

FY 2008
Agency                     Matching Source              Match Required    Match Provided

Barron Heights             Private Funds / Fees         $     30,375.00   $        88,365.00
                           Private Funds / Local
Catholic Charities         Gov’t /Other Federal Gov’t   $     32,000.00   $      104,913.00
Cocaine & Alcohol
Awareness Program          Other Federal Grant          $     25,000.00   $        25,000.00
Frayser Millington MHC /
CCN                        Other Federal Grant          $     36,000.00   $        36,000.00
                           Private Funds /
Lowenstein House, Inc.     Federal Gov’t                $     22,373.00   $     1,121,261.00

Memphis Family Shelter     Private Fundraising, SHP     $     43,100.00   $      116,347.00

MIFA-Estival Comm.         In Kind Volunteer Hours      $     33,529.50   $        33,529.50
                           Private Donations /
MIHN                       Fundraising / United Way     $     32,605.00   $        58,500.00
YWCA of Greater
Memphis                    Fundraising                  $     21,000.00   $        21,000.00




                                               89
                     HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
                         EMERGENCY SHELTER GRANT
                        ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT
                                 7/1/07-6/30/08



                                        EXPENDED     REMAINING
PROJECT                                      THIS ENCUMBRANCE        BUDGETED
   ID     PROJECT NAME                    PERIOD    AT JUNE 30TH       AMOUNT

          ESG XVII

  21 66   ALPHA OMEGA                        12,836.39                 12,836.39
          CASE
  19 68   MANAGEMENT, INC                     8,694.44                  8,694.44
  19 69   GENESIS HOUSE                                                     0.00
          MEMPHIS FAMILY
   17     SHELTER                                                           0.00
          MIFA ESTIVAL
   58     PLACE                              33,316.35        0.00     33,316.35
   75     SALVATION ARMY                      3,083.38                  3,083.38
          SHIELD, INC Family
   76     Shelter                            16,690.49                 16,690.49
          WHITEHAVEN SW
   108    MENTAL HEALTH                                                     0.00
                                 SUB-
                               TOTAL         74,621.05        0.00     74,621.05

CD90021   ESG

   81      CATHOLIC                           6,093.71
          CHARITIES
          (ESSENTIAL
          SERVICES)                                                     6,093.71
   38      ESG                                    0.00
          ADMINISTRATION                                                    0.00
   36      HOUSING CASE                      11,009.11   11,363.89
          MANAGEMENT O/M                                               22,373.00
   39     CAAP                               31,982.57   11,467.43     43,450.00
   77     WHITEHAVEN                          5,348.55
          SWMHC                                                         5,348.55
   89     LOWENSTEIN                           237.48
          HOUSE (ESSENTIAL
          SERVICES)                                                      237.48



                                        90
 28      LOWENSTEIN
        HOUSE (HOMELESS
        PREVENTION)                                                      0.00
 25      LOWENSTEIN
        HOUSE
        (OPERATION &
        MAINT)                                                           0.00
 17      MEMPHIS FAMILY                    39,757.27    6,918.49
        SHELTER
        (OPERATION &
        MAINT)                                                      46,675.76
 1       MEMPHIS                           20,674.93    1,330.07
        INTERFAITH
        HOSPITALITY
        NETWORK
        (ESSENTIAL
        SERVICES)                                                   22,005.00
 42      CNN FRAYSER MI                    15,121.47   20,878.53
        LL-MHI                                                      36,000.00
 46      BARRON HEIGHTS                    22,317.66    8,057.34
        TRANS CTR                                                   30,375.00
 50      GENISIS HOUSE ES                  29,333.37    2,666.63    32,000.00
 20      MEMPHIS                            7,788.45    2,566.70
        INTERFAITH
        HOSPITALITY
        NETWORK
        (OPERATION &
        MAINT)                                                      10,355.15
60 74    SALVATION ARMY                    17,333.38
        (OPERATION &
        MAINT)                                                      17,333.38
 75      YWCA                              16,701.32    9,700.10    26,401.42

                              SUB-
                            TOTAL         223,699.27   74,949.18   298,648.45

                             GRAND
                            TOTALS        298,320.32   74,949.18   373,269.50




                                     91
                           PART V. OTHER ACTIONS

Actions to Address Obstacles to Meeting Underserved Needs

One major obstacle to meeting underserved needs in Memphis is the
concentration of poverty in inner-city neighborhoods. HCD targets such
neighborhoods with a variety of programs in order to maximize the impact within
these communities. Projects and programs include housing rehabilitation and
development, social services, and elimination of slum and blight.

HCD funds programs and projects that range from job training and life skills for
adults, to after-school programs for children. Projects that are funded through
economic development are tied to job creation. HCD believes that education and
job creation strategies are critical to overcome this obstacle. Projects under this
category included the Memphis Urban League, Girls Inc., Mt. Vernon Baptist
Church, New Chicago Community Development Corporation, and others
identified in the non housing community development section of this document.

The lack of rental multi-family units is also an obstacle to meeting the housing
need in Memphis. HCD recognizes this and awards funds for multi-family
housing projects on a competitive basis. HCD continues to examine and refine
its multi family housing program to meet the rental needs in the community. In
FY2008, HCD had several projects underway to address this need, including
April Woods West (57 units), A New Place Apartments (56 residential units), and
National Church Residences (49 units of senior housing). Additionally, HCD’s
partnership with MHA toward its HOPE VI and other public housing revitalization
initiatives are assisting in the creation of significant affordable rental housing
development. In FY2008, University Place and Legends Park were underway
and HCD remains an active partner in each of these projects.

The address the cost associated with meeting the demand for permanent and
transitional housing for the homeless and special needs populations had led to
the City using both CDBG and HOME funds to address the housing and service
needs of these sub-populations. HCD also expended funding for tenant based
rental assistance for persons with special needs. In FY2008, HCD again
allocated $500,000 in HOME funds available through its competitive grant
program for projects focusing on housing for homeless persons and those with
special needs. HCD continued its relationship with Partners for the Homeless to
provide more information on the needs of the homeless and those with special
needs. Partners for the Homeless as well as the Greater Memphis Interagency
Coalition for the Homeless collaborate with service providers in order to leverage
resources and funds to better assist these underserved populations.

Actions to Foster and Maintain Affordable Housing

HCD supports the creation of new affordable housing construction by contracting
with nonprofit and for-profit housing developers. Housing rehabilitation efforts


                                        92
were directly carried out by HCD’s rehabilitation programs, as well as partnering
with nonprofit CDC's and CHDO's to further their rehabilitation efforts. In
FY2008, HCD provided funding for the demolition of Dixie Homes in order to
facilitate the development of 430 units of rental housing. Also in FY2008, funds
were utilized for acquisition, site clean-up, and infrastructure development to
support phase II and phase III of University Place, which will include 287 family
rental units and a 118 unit senior building. Other ongoing programs included
targeted multi-family and single-family housing development, down payment
assistance, owner-occupied rehabilitation, minor home repairs, and supportive/
transitional housing.

Actions to Eliminate Barriers to Affordable Housing

Barriers to affordable housing for include housing for large families and the
elderly, a shortage of quality rental units, zoning issues, credit problems and
public sentiment of not wanting large developments of public housing or housing
choice vouchers in their neighborhoods. A more effective relationship with
lenders and developers in which the City provides investment incentives is being
developed to better respond to the affordable housing needs of large families, the
elderly and rental housing units. Zoning is being dealt with through planning
efforts that include rezoning recommendations. The Memphis and Shelby County
Divisions of Planning and Development is near completion of a unified
development code for zoning and subdivision regulations. The goal of this is to
update the ordinances and make the regulations more appropriate for the City
and County, with an emphasis on neighborhoods in the center City.

Persons with credit problems are encouraged to visit the Housing Resource
Center, the RISE Foundation, and a number of other nonprofit agencies who
provide credit counseling. During FY2008, HCD funded an update to a lending
study that examines lending patterns across the City. Additionally, the Memphis
Debt Collaborative has been in place for some time to help combat the high rates
of foreclosures and bankruptcies in the City of Memphis and HCD is a member of
the collaborative.

Through MHA’s HOPE VI and other public housing revitalization efforts, former
public housing has been transformed into smaller, mixed-use, mixed-income, and
scattered site developments as means to complementing and blending into
existing neighborhoods; this strategy intends to effectively respond to a national
trend and local concern toward the location of new public housing developments.
Additionally, HCD has a tenant-based rental assistance program for persons
affected by mental illness, and other disabilities.




                                        93
Actions to Overcome Gaps In Institutional Structure and Enhance
Coordination

The City of Memphis continues to search for ways to improve the delivery of
services. Collaborative efforts are one of the most effective ways to maximize
the benefits for the City. Throughout FY 2008, almost every project undertaken
through HCD has been a collaborative effort between HCD and the public,
private, or nonprofit sectors.

The HOPE VI and redevelopment efforts in other target areas represent a
partnership between the Memphis Housing Authority (MHA), the Office of
Planning and Development, Engineering, Public Works, Memphis Police
Department, the Community Enhancement Division, private developers,
nonprofits, foundations, other City Divisions, and HCD. These projects are being
implemented through public-private efforts that will create mixed-income
communities of single-family homeownership and rental opportunities.
Partnerships in each of the neighborhoods targeted by HCD for redevelopment
continue to spur positive activities.

HCD also recognizes the ongoing partnership with the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Staff at the Community Planning and
Development Division provide valuable technical assistance and support in
consolidated planning and reporting through the CAPER, responding to requests
for assistance in eligibility determinations, training opportunities, and other areas.

HCD works with other City Divisions in ways that benefit Memphis communities.
HCD and the Office of Planning and Development (OPD) and HCD coordinate
planning efforts in the neighborhoods targeted by HCD. Not only does this
respond to a critical need to rezone the entire inner city to enable affordable
housing and correct inappropriate and non-conforming land uses, it seeks to
redevelop and revitalize neighborhoods. OPD is currently working on the Unified
Development Code that recommends appropriate re-zoning and special overlays
in the inner-city.

The Memphis Police Division, as a key strategy to combat crime in our
communities, has implemented data-driven crime reduction strategies including
the Real-Time Crime Center and Blue Crush. Based on community need and
data, the police have instituted bicycle patrols, monitoring opportunities,
promoted business and neighborhood watch groups, and established a police
ambassador program to hear from communities. Additionally, the Memphis
Police Department has been involved in planning the construction of new
precincts in conjunction with MHA and HCD redevelopment projects. Currently,
the Police Department has a new precincts in their budget in the University Place
HOPE VI revitalization area and potentially in the new Chicago community.




                                          94
The Public Works Division is responsible for infrastructure and improvements for
the City of Memphis, including water mains, lighting, and sidewalks. HCD works
with Public Works on a number of levels related to affordable housing and
neighborhood development. Public Works has also coordinated closely with
HCD on clean-up efforts by placing dumpsters in key areas and providing special
pickups when necessary.

Memphis Light Gas and Water (MLGW) provides a special utility rebate program
to provide incentives for developers of low-income housing. MLGW has an Eco-
Build program, with “green” building standards in order to make housing more
energy efficient. These standards have been utilized in Uptown and are being
implemented in the single family components of University Place and Dixie
Homes. HCD encourages this for developers funded through the competitive
single-family development grant program.

The Memphis Park Division works with HCD to ensure that there are quality
recreational facilities near the affordable housing developments initiated by HCD.
Additionally, the Parks Division builds and maintains recreational equipment
throughout the City.

The Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA) works with HCD to find solutions for
low-income people needing transportation to work. Currently, we are working
with MATA to identify routes in HCD target areas.

In FY2008, the Mayor established a new Division of Government called the
Community Enhancement Division which oversees Code Enforcement, Lot
Maintenance, and Memphis City Beautiful. The new division is very supportive of
the revitalization efforts of HCD and MHA has addressed a number of problem
areas within these areas.

In addition to these efforts, Divisions within the City continue to coordinate to
identify funding opportunities for the City of Memphis. Division representatives
not only look at opportunities for City government, but also work with the Alliance
for Nonprofit Excellence to identify opportunities for organizations outside of City
government. The major focus of this effort is to enhance communication and
coordination to bring new dollars and new projects to Memphis. In FY2008, HCD
worked on applications for BEDI funds, EDI-SP funds, Lead Based Paint Hazard
Reduction, Continuum of Care, Neighborhood Networks, Family Self-Sufficiency,
and Resident Opportunities for Self-Sufficiency grant programs for MHA and
HCD.

Actions to Improve Public Housing and Resident Initiatives

HCD makes every effort to promote ongoing programs for which public housing
residents are eligible. The Down Payment Assistance Program has special
provisions to assist public housing residents seeking to become homeowners.



                                         95
Residents of public housing qualify for up to $10,000.00 in down payment
assistance. HCD also funds a number of youth programs and economic
development assistance for which MHA residents are eligible. The City provides
annual funding to the RISE Foundation who works in partnership with MHA to
provide job-training and placement services to public housing residents who
agree to participate in structured activities designed to encourage work, savings,
and upward mobility.

In addition to targeting neighborhoods for revitalization efforts, HCD works in
conjunction with MHA on neighborhood redevelopment plans that have public
housing projects located within. Criteria for targeted neighborhoods are levels of
physical distress or code enforcement emphasis, significant public investment
and infrastructure improvements, and planned major housing initiatives. It is
believed that redevelopment areas that contain making major public housing
improvements such as HOPE VI initiatives will create the critical mass needed to
form the basis for creating viable communities of choice.


Actions to Evaluate and Reduce Lead-Based Paint Hazards

HCD’s Lead Hazard Risk Reduction Initiative (LHRRI) is a federally funded
program to reduce lead-based paint hazards in single-family and multi-family
rental units. This is a coordinated effort between inter-governmental agencies
that include the Memphis and Shelby County Health Department, Memphis
Housing Authority, the State of Tennessee Department of Environment and
Conservation, the State of Tennessee Department of Health, Middle Tennessee
University, Department of Human Services, Associated Catholic Charities,
LeBonheur Children’s Medical Center, and Shelby County Department of
Housing. The goal of this concerted effort is to complete 350 lead inspection/risk
assessments and reduce lead hazards in 268 units over the life of the grant
which ends October 31, 2008. To date, LHRRI has enrolled 403 units and tested
260 units. Lead hazard reduction has been completed in 230 units.

Memphis Shelby County Health Department (MSCHD) provides free blood lead
level screening for children under age six. During the first three quarters of 2007,
MSCHD screened 16,075 children, with 68 children screening positive for
elevated blood lead levels. Memphis/Shelby County continues to rank at one half
the national average for lead-poisoned children. MSCHD provides testing of
children at day care centers, head start centers, WIC clinics and health fairs.
The MSCHD Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program also provides
educational materials, information on nutrition and proper cleaning
demonstrations to reduce lead paint dust hazards.

Memphis Housing Authority, the State of Tennessee Department of Environment
and Conservation and Shelby County Department of Housing provide referrals of
properties that meet the criteria to participate in the program.



                                         96
HCD will be taking an active role in raising public awareness of lead-based paint
hazards through the creation of a database that will be maintained by the
Memphis and Shelby County Health Department. This database will track the
childhood lead poisoning incidents in Shelby County. The MSCHD also
 provides educational materials, information on nutrition and proper cleaning
demonstrations to reduce lead paint hazards.

Actions to Ensure Compliance With Program and Comprehensive Planning
Requirements

This section describes the monitoring standards and procedures that HCD will
use to monitor CDBG, HOME, ESG and HOPWA program activities and to
ensure long-term compliance with federal and other program requirements. HCD
uses its Integrated Disbursement Information System (IDIS) to ensure that
applicable program requirements are followed for every project funded through
HUD. Additionally, HCD’s staff maintains a file for each project that they monitor,
which contains information pertinent to eligibility, environmental and other
reviews as required. Many of HCD departments have completed an Operations,
Policy & Procedures Manuals. HCD recognizes that staff can better comply with
monitoring and administrative regulations if trained and written documents were
developed and used.

The Compliance Department oversees HCD’s standards and procedures for the
following areas: eligibility determinations for CDBG and ESG programs,
environmental and Section 106 reviews, labor standards, Section 504 and
Section 503 compliance, and fair housing. HCD has assembled a project review
team comprised of compliance, legal, planning, and accounting staff who meet at
the request of departments needing eligibility determinations or other guidance
on their projects. The Planning and Development Department manages the
development of the Consolidated Plan, relevant amendments, citizen
participation requirements, and CAPER. This Department also ensures that
activities outlined in the Annual Action Plan are consistent with the Consolidated
Plan. HOME Program and CDBG Program training will be provided to all staff
and the Compliance and Human Resources departments are in the process of
identifying other training needs. All HCD staff are responsible for understanding
the administrative and regulatory requirements which govern their projects and
for carrying out biannual monitoring visits and tracking their projects over a long-
term time period.

HCD ensures that all program requirements are included in legal agreements
with subrecipient agencies. A “Project Tracking and Underwriting” form
continues to be refined for use by HCD. In addition, a legal review is conducted
by staff attorneys for all contracts and an internal auditor for the Division assists
in ensuring compliance with HUD financial standards.




                                          97
Actions to Reduce the Number of Poverty-Level Families

HCD participated in several activities to help reduce poverty in Memphis. The
three most notable activities are: 1) The Down Payment Assistance (DPA)
Program 2) Job creation through economic development and 3) Community
Services Grants that combat hunger, illiteracy, and substance/alcohol abuse.

The DPA program provides homeownership assistance to low/moderate income
families, who without assistance would not be able to purchase a house. The
DPA Program provides down payment and closing costs. The down payment
and closing costs are either a grant or deferred loan based on the level of need.
The City’s Economic Development initiatives seek to create a specific number of
jobs reserved for low-income persons. The number of jobs is based on the
amount of funding and the scale of the project. Projects such as New Town
Center and job-training programs funded by the Community Services Grants
have made significant contributions in creating job opportunities. The
Community Services Grants also aim to fund agencies who address needs that
people have that may be an impediment to finding and retaining jobs.




                                        98
                       PART VI SELF-EVALUATION
Part VI assesses the progress made in FY 08 by the City of Memphis in meeting
the priority needs and specific objectives identified in the 2008-2010 Three- Year
Strategic Plan and FY 2008 Annual Action Plan. The Division of Housing and
Community Development (HCD), Memphis continues in its efforts to target area
and neighborhood redevelopment initiatives. HCD and the Memphis Housing
Authority continues to implement its plans via the use of HOPE VI funding as a
major housing development tool in the Uptown community and redevelopment of
the Lamar Terrace area. During FY 08, the Memphis Housing Authority used
CDBG funds to demolish the Dixie Homes development and the start of the most
recent HOPE VI award received from HUD. In re-naming the proposed
development “Legends Park”, MHA, and its partners (LeBonhuer, and other
hospitals in the area) have proposed a mixed-income housing, medical, office
plan that will provide new low and moderate income rental units and houses for
ownership. The planning process used in the preparation of the Consolidated
Plan will continue to be the basis used to determine how best all resources may
be used to met the needs of low-moderate income citizens in accordance with
HUD’s statutory goals.

The reporting format used in this CAPER’s “Assessment of Three-Year Goals”
and the “Affordable Housing Narrative” sections reflects the method used by
Memphis to measure productivity and results. HCD has improved a
“performance management system” in accordance with HUD guidelines.

Evaluation of Memphis achievements, and shortcomings was conducted with the
overall statutory purpose of HUD’s community development planning programs in
mind. For each priority need, HCD presents what it considers is a true and
accurate self-evaluation of FY 2008 actions.

FY 2008 represents the first year of the Three Year 2008-2010 strategy for the
City of Memphis. The City of Memphis made considerable efforts to meet and
exceed these objectives in each of the five objectives identified for housing.

Housing Evaluation

In using the HOME and ADDI funds, the City’s DPA program continues in it’s
efforts to assist low income first-time homebuyers to purchase their first homes.
In total, the City’s was able to assist 59 first-time homebuyers which almost met
the one year goal of 100. Approximately 85% of those buyers were primarily
African American. Adjustments are being made to the program which take into
account the increased cost of housing and the low credit ratings of the low –
moderate income population that Memphis seeks to serve. Emphasis will be
placed on post-credit counseling as well as increased underwriting reviews that
will attempt to ensure that owners are less likely to lose homes to foreclosure
caused by insufficient incomes.



                                        99
The Targeted Multi-Family and Multi-Family New Construction projects as part of
the competitive award process, are designed to increase the supply of rental
housing in Memphis. To this end, ninety-five (95) units were rehabilitated by the
Targeted Multi-Family Housing rehabilitation efforts. Using additional CDBG, the
University Place HOPE VI (Lamar Terrace) development acquired additional
properties and constructed infrastructure as part of its development of Phase II
mixed-income rental housing. CHDO’s, in FY 07, made a substantial increase in
helping the provision of new, rental housing with the production of 13 units. HCD
expects this trend to continue with additional funding increase for CHDO set-
aside allocations to support rental/multi-family development.

The University Place and Legends Park demolition, infrastructure, and
acquisition will provide land for 921 units of housing as well as other amenities
such as parks and commercial space. These efforts are a continuation of the
City’s objective of targeted development in specific neighborhoods.

The City’s efforts to preserve and prevent losses to existing housing continued to
be successful during FY 08. The rehabilitation of 11 units was completed by the
HARP Major Rehab program; 20 units were completed by the Volunteer Home
Repair program; 113 units by the Senior Citizen Minor Home Repair program;
various CHDOs and non and for profits rehabilitated four (4) homes for
ownership, thirteen (13) units for rental and began or completed sixteen (16)
units of single family new construction for homeownership; and 56 multi-family
units were rehabilitated and 57 constructed through the Targeted Multi-Family
Housing program. In all 290 units of affordable housing has contributed to
Memphis’ meeting its one year goal.


HOMELESS EVALUATION

In addition to the annual Continuum of Care application process, HCD uses the
Strategic Community Investment Fund (SCIF) competitive bid process to provide
funding to projects and activities that would implement the goals and objectives
of the 3 year Con Plan that serve the homeless population of Memphis. This
process allowed HCD to select the best possible service providers. Regarding
Homeless Objective III, Memphis has achieved some success in the
establishment of a drop-in center. The Door of Hope organization provides for
FY 08 provided services akin to the “safe haven” concept; they were was
awarded a CDBG/Community Services Grant to provide drop-in assistance to
chronically homeless persons that assisted 14 individuals by providing access to
showers, laundry facilities, snacks, telephone access, application for disability
assistance, food stamps, housing subsidies, etc. HCD thinks that agencies have
legitimate concerns regarding the operations of a “SafeHaven facility especially
with respect to limited funding availability and concerns for neighborhood safety
where such a facility would be located.



                                        100
HCD was able to accomplish the Homeless Objectives I (Performance
Measures) of developing permanent supportive housing for homeless individuals.
Alpha Omega’s Homeless Veterans program used CDBG and HOME funds to
construct a ten (10) unit single-room occupancy facility that was 80% completed
as of the fiscal year’s end. In coordination with the Continuum of Care
application process, and the City’s continued effort of providing matching funds to
develop permanent supportive housing, future year results should help the City
reach its three-year performance measure.

With respect to Objective II, HCD was able to develop seven (7) new emergency
shelters (beds/units) for homeless women with children, but in FY 08 did not
create additional units of transitional housing for women without children who
have severe/persistent mental illness.

Homeless Objective 4 addresses the need to maintain the current inventory of
transitional and emergency housing for homeless persons and families with
children. HCD provided funding for 12 programs serving the homeless. This
included 9 ESG-funded contracts that served 221 homeless individuals and 285
families; 1 CDBG funded program that assisted 126 children from homeless
families and 1 CDBG funded program that established a drop-in center and 1
agency that used HOME and CDBG funds to construct a 10-unit permanent
supportive housing facility for homeless veterans. In addition to families and
individuals assisted with ESG funds, 12 units of rental supportive housing were
maintained by MIFA who along with CAAP and Barron Heights maintain
transitional housing units that assisted 329 homeless persons.

HCD will continue to work diligently with non-profits who serve the homeless
population of Memphis and with those who seek to make a positive impact in
providing safety nets and supportive services for the homeless population.
Additional funding, the development of permanent supportive housing for
homeless families; and continued planning by service providers targeting the
homeless mentally ill will make an even greater impact in the City of Memphis.

SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION EVALUATION

Using the competitive bid process also allowed HCD to select the best service
providers to serve the Special Needs population. In creating permanent
supportive housing, Housing Options, Inc. had ten units under construction in
year one of the three-year strategy, which brings HCD well on its way to meeting
the three-year goal of 15 units.

The supportive service objective of 4000 families was exceeded in the first year
on the three year strategy given that HOPWA alone funded supportive services
to 5400 people. Other programs providing a variety of services as described in
the program narratives assisted an additional 1066 persons.



                                        101
The tenant based rental assistance program provided assistance to 98
households, which is 70% of the three-year goal of 140.

The public facilities objective has a goal of producing two public facilities in a
three-year period. While there were no funds expended in year one, HCD did
funds a public facility being developed by Porter Leath, called Sarah’s Place.
There were some delays in the contracting process, but the facility should be
underway in FY2009.

HCD continues to seek service providers committed to serving the Special Needs
population and this evaluation indicates that overall, HCD has done an excellent
job in serving the Special Needs Population.




                                         102
Non-Housing Community Development Evaluation

HCD continues neighborhood planning efforts that will better define non-housing
community development needs. Memphis’ non-housing community development
needs are addressed by program activities that are grouped under the categories
of neighborhood, community and economic development. Memphis demolished
89 dilapidated and/or deteriorated structures in FY 2008 thereby creating greater
opportunities for neighborhood redevelopment activities.

Memphis increased support to organizations that provide essential, supportive,
and public services to very-low to moderate income persons. Many of the
agencies funded exceeded expectations. For example, College Park CSSP
HOPE VI program had proposed to assist 90 people with community and
supportive services programs. In FY 2008, College Park helped 187 families,
and youth individuals with support and educational programs. Other activities
funded included neighborhood support services benefited low/moderate income
persons (with specific emphasis on the youth, the elderly, and the unskilled). For
PY 07/FY 08, non-housing, community development programs expended
approximately $2,094,481. These program activities served more than 1,800
youth, adults, and families. Economic Development projects funded with CDBG
funds included the New Chicago Resource Center which will emphasize job
training and business incubators and the repayment of the Section 108 loan for
the Court Square Center will go toward job creation activities. When combined
with City support for economic development projects and small business loans,
Memphis annually contributes over $2M to economic and business development.

Public facilities development over the last assessment period has resulted in one
new resource center being completed in New Chicago and a Farmer’s Market
Downtown. HCD’s efforts to respond to and community service needs are
primarily based on applications received through its Community Services Grant
Program, a competitive-grant application process. However, the use of these
funds are limited to a 15% cap on public services. CDBG funds are used to fund
these project activities although the City of Memphis annual provides significant
General Revenue funding for community initiatives.

HCD will request assistance from HUD in developing goals, objectives and
indicators that will help to better measure its performance in creating and
meeting non-housing community development objectives.




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                     VII. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
Changes In Program Objectives

No changes have been noted in program objectives. Amendments to the FY
2008 Annual Plan were made available to the public during the Public Hearing
held on April 10, 2008. The FY 2008 (PY 2008) CAPER summary was made
available through public notice and placement at various locations on September
13, 2007.


Citizen’s Comments

September, 28, 2008 was the end of the fifteen day review period during which
the Annual Performance Report was available for public review. No citizen’s
comments were received.




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