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PLUK eNews August 4-8_ 2003 1 PLUK eNews For the Week of August 4 by pengxiuhui

VIEWS: 15 PAGES: 24

									                PLUK eNews For the Week of August 4-8, 2003
                            Volume 2 Issue 5

                          Welcome to the weekly PLUK eNews!

   We are proud to present news of interest for Montana families of children
with disabilities and chronic illnesses, and for the professionals and educators who serve
them, however, it does not constitute an endorsement.

  Edited by: Roger Holt rholt@pluk.org
  Proofed & condensed by: Elisabeth Mills emaymills@hotmail.com

      •    Feel free to reprint and pass on to others.
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      •    If you have activities, events, trainings, news or information you would like to
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      •    Please be aware that some links provided are time sensitive. Contact us if you
           have difficulty accessing any of the information.
      •    View an archive of all Weekly eNews at http://www.pluk.org/eNews.htm

  Highlights:
    Quality Matters Available Online ............................................................................3
    Autism and Sleep Disorders, Billings, September 26 ................................................3
    RJ Cooper is coming to Billings Aug 28th! ...............................................................4
    Join PLUK at the 3 rd annual Founders Day Celebration, September 3rd, Billings ............4
    Reserve your space for Dinosaur Day with Jack Horner, October 11, Billings ...............4
    “Make Me a Millionaire” Coupons ...........................................................................5
    Government/Legal:..............................................................................................5
        THE PRESIDENT'S RADIO ADDRESS, JULY 26, 2003...........................................5
        ADA Certification of State and Local Accessibility Requirements ...........................6
        U.S. Department of Labor Issues WIA Compliance Assistance Checklist To Help
     People With Disabilities.......................................................................................6
        FCC RECOGNIZES TEN YEARS OF NATIONWIDE PROVISION OF
     TELECOMMUNICATIONS RELAY SERVICES AND CERTIFIES AS COMPLIANT THE STATE
     TRS PROGRAMS OF ALL 50 STATES......................................................................7
        R. v FAIRFAX COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, ...........................................................7
        Disabled Children May Be Left Behind if IDEA Law Becomes an Entitlement ...........7
    News: ................................................................................................................8
        Montana Accepts $20 Million Grant for Reading..................................................8
        Local Author 'Does Fine'..................................................................................8
        The ADA's next step: Cyberspace.....................................................................9
        NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DISABILITY SPEAKS OUT ON LONG-TERM CARE FOR
     PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES................................................................................9
        National Council on Disability Speaks Out on the State of Civil Rights for People
     with Disabilities .................................................................................................9
    Health/Medical News: ........................................................................................10
        Cochlear Implants Raise Meningitis Risk..........................................................10
        Incidence of Birth Defects higher in four wheat -producing counties in America ....10
        New Information Service Provides Information On Health and Safety of Everyday
     Products .........................................................................................................11


  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                                            1
     Antidepressants Protect Brain ........................................................................11
     Stress Worsens Kids' Diets............................................................................11
     CDC and Partners Launch Autism Awareness Initiative......................................12
     Rett Syndrome Rosetta Stone of Neurologic Diseases .......................................12
     The Care Notebook and Care Organizer ..........................................................12
     Emergency Preparedness for Children with Special Health Care Needs................13
     Sick Children Locked Up................................................................................13
     The National Resource Center on AD/HD provides science-based information on
  AD/HD............................................................................................................13
 Transition/Employment/Housing/Advocacy: ..........................................................14
     PEPNet: Post Secondary Education and Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of
  Hearing ..........................................................................................................14
     Annual Listing of Summer College Preparatory Programs ..................................14
     Financial Aid Frequently Asked Questions for Students with Disabilities...............14
     Federal Actions Can Assist States in Improving Postsecondary Outcomes for Youth
  .....................................................................................................................14
     The Illinois Division of Specialized Care for Children has recently added a new
  section on their web site that focuses on Transition Information and Resources. ......15
 Technology/Web/Resources:...............................................................................16
     ADA MATERIALS AVAILABLE FREE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE.............16
     Study: Web Use Boosts Student Achievement .................................................16
     HEAR NOW and Salvage Hearing Aid Donations ...............................................16
 Training/Workshops/Conferences: .......................................................................16
     CSPD Region I August workshops: .................................................................17
     “Six Trait Writing”, August 4-5, Glendive & August 6-7, Miles City......................17
     “CRISS” Creating Independence through Student Owned Strategies, August 13-15,
  Glendive .........................................................................................................17
     “Bully Proofing Your Program and Teaching Students How to Stop Bullies”, August
  15-16, Glasgow & August 18-19, Miles City.........................................................17
     REGION V CSPD ROUNDUP ...........................................................................17
     Severe Communication /Autism Conference, August 11-13, Whitefish ................17
     Together We’re Better, August 13-15, Missoula ...............................................17
     Paraeducator Academies, August 18-19, Kalispell ............................................17
     Nurturing Toddlers, Billings, Aug 12 – Oct 28 ..................................................18
     Seminar on "The Management and Control of Refractory Seizures Utilizing VNS
  Therapy™ in People with Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities,
  Particularly Those Who are in Independent Care Facilities (ICF’S).” ........................18
     Autism Montana! 2003, August 15, Butte........................................................18
     Integrating SETT into the Assistive Technology Plan, August 18, Helena .............18
     Positive Approaches to Solving Severe Behavior Challenges, Billings, Aug 19-22..19
     National Down Syndrome Congress, August 22-24, Philadelphia PA ....................19
     “Choices”: Montana’s Senior and Long-Term Care Conference, Sep 3-5, West
  Yellowstone.....................................................................................................19
     Addiction, Recovery and the Family, September 11-13, Whitefish ......................20
     Conference on Social, Emotional and Academic Interventions for Students with
  High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome with a Special Session on Bullying
  Preventions, October 3-4, Boise, ID ...................................................................20
     Augmentative Communication Workshops in the Rockies, October 2, Billings.......20
     Fourth Annual Conference on Autism and Asperger’s: Mapping the Journey, October
  17 & 18, Edmonton, Alberta..............................................................................20
     Echoes of Abuse: Traumatic Brain Injury, October 30-31, Billings ......................21
     Workshops on Communication Strategies for Children with Severe and Multiple
  Disabilities: August 4 - October 6, 2003.............................................................21


PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                                            2
        Technology Conferences, August - October .....................................................21
        Announcing: A Series of Conference Calls on the Social-Emotional Development of
     Young Children ................................................................................................21
        1st International Conference on Family-centered Care, Sep 4-6, Boston MA .........22
        FROM PRACTICE TO POLICY AND BACK AGAIN: 19th Annual Conference on Young
     Children with Special Needs and Their Families, Oct 12-14, Washington, DC ...........23
    Fun Events .......................................................................................................23
        PLUK Founders Day Celebration, September 3rd, Billings ...................................23
        Blue Jack Band Benefit, September 20, Bozeman.............................................23
        Missoula Children’s Theatre Tour, October 5-11, Kalispell..................................23
        Dinosaur Day with Jack Horner, October 11, Billings.........................................23
        Magical Tymes Party, November 11, Missoula..................................................24
        Be sure to mark your calendar with these future events: ..................................24
    Selected Sources:..............................................................................................24
        1.    Monday Morning in Washington, DC, http://www.inclusionresearch.org.......24
        2.    Rocky Mountain DBTAC, http://www.adainformation.org ...........................24
        3.    Transition Newsflash, Montana Center On Disabilities,
     http://www.msubillings.edu/transition................................................................24
        4.    PEN Weekly NewsBlast, http://www.publiceducation.org ...........................24
        5.    Reference Points: Transition updates from the TATRA Project,
     http://www.pacer.org/tatra/tatra.htm ................................................................24
        6.    Lisa Simmons, The Ideal Lives Express: http://www.ideallives.com ............24
        7.    The American Indian Disability Technical Assistance Center Training Calendar
     http://aidtac.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/TrainingCalendar.htm ....................................24

  ##

Quality Matters Available Online
http://www.pluk.org/QMSprSum03.pdf
   Highlights
       • Annual Developmental Disabilities Conference Suspended for 2003
       • Disaster Plans for People with Disabilities
       • Recreational Adventures Vacation Experiences
       • Web Sites to Check Out
       • Staff Training Resources
       • New at the Library

  ##

Autism and Sleep Disorders,
Billings, September 26
    The Sleep Summit scheduled for September 26 in
Billings will include a session on Autism and Sleep
Disorders, Friday, September 26 from 1-2:00pm.
    Dr. David Harrell will share information on his
research on the sleep of autistic children. He also has
experience with autism on the practical side (autism
appears within his family).
    There will be session s all day on sleep issues. The
summit will take place at the Burns East Auditorium in
the Mansfield Education Center (located on 12th Ave across from Saint Vincent Hospital in
Billings). There is no charge for attending.


  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                                         3
  For more information, contact Karen Allen at the Sleep Center, 238-6815.
  http://stvincenthealthcare.org/our_health_services/neurology_sleep_disorders.asp

  ##

                     RJ Cooper is coming to Billings Aug 28th!
                         RJ Cooper, a specialist in assistive technology for adults and children
                      with disabilities, will be coming to MSU-Billings on August 28th for
                      an all-day workshop sponsored by Parents, Let’s Unite for Kids and
                      Region III CSPD. During the workshop, Mr. Cooper will evaluate
                      “learners” for a half-hour while demonstrating hardware/software
developed by his company. Mr. Cooper has 18 years of experience in problem solving with
individuals with various disabilities and ages. Caregivers, parents, professionals and
students are all welcome to attend. There is no charge for the workshop. For more
information on R.J. Cooper and his products, see his website at http://rjcooper.com. (Demo
CDs are available at PLUK and the Region III CSPD at the Montana Center on Disabilities).
   For more information or to sign up for one of the 8 available half-hour evaluation
sessions, contact Roger Holt at Parents, Lets Unite for Kids at 255-0540 or e-mail
rholt@pluk.org.

  ##

Join PLUK at the 3rd annual Founders Day
Celebration, September 3rd, Billings
   This is PLUK's 19th year of serving Montana families and everyone is
invited to the third annual event celebrating the founding of PLUK!
Founder’s Day is scheduled for September 3rd at 6pm at the Mansfield
Center in Billings, Gail Gray will be the keynote speaker. She is the current
director of Montana’s Department of Public Health and Human Services.
Attendance is free, but seating is limited.
   Anyone interested in attending should call Sheryl at the PLUK office at
255-0540 for reservations, as seating is limited.

  ##

                           Reserve your space for Dinosaur Day with
                           Jack Horner, October 11, Billings
                               A special day of activities, featuring paleontologist Jack Horner
                            of the Museum of the Rockies, is planned for October 11.
                               The event, titled Dinosaur Day, will include a Workshop for
                            Kids, where Horner will meet with the participants and give a
                            presentation on the field of paleontology and dinosaurs in
                            Montana. The workshop will be held on the Montana State
                            University-Billings campus.
                               That night, Horner will speak at a dinner for all ages at the
Billings Sheraton Hotel. He will talk about how Montana is a dream state for paleontologists
and about his work in recent years at Montana sites.
    Horner is recognized as one of the most prolific paleontologists in the world. He was the
model for Alan Grant in the "Jurassic Park" movies and served as a consultant on the sets.




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                 4
   For information on Dinosaur Day, ticket prices or to reserve tickets for either the Kids
Workshop or the dinner, call PLUK's Office at 255-0540 or 1-800-222-7585. Space is limited
for both activities.

##

                   “Make Me a Millionaire” Coupons
                        The Billings Gazette has started the 2003 version of “Make Me a
                     Millionaire”. These coupons will be printed in The Billings Gazette daily
                     through September 27. To “buy” items the coupons need to be clipped
                     from the paper and collected and traded for items to be auctioned. The
                     Billings Gazette will be holding weekly auctions as well as the final
                     auction on September 27.
                        PLUK is collecting these coupons in order to bid on some of the items
                     scheduled for the auction. We will use any items we acquire to help raise
                     money at upcoming fundraisers.
   Please collect these coupons and drop them off or mail them to PLUK at 516 North 32 nd
Street, Billings, MT 59101. You don’t even have to clip the coupons! Just bring the
newspapers to us and we will have volunteers clip them.
   SO, START SAVING “MILLIONAIRE” COUPONS NOW!

  ##

Government/Legal:
THE PRESIDENT'S RADIO ADDRESS, JULY 26, 2003
   THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. This weekend marks the 13th anniversary of the
Americans With Disability Act, one of the great compassionate acts of American
government. Since becoming law, the ADA has helped to improve the quality of life for more
than 50,000 million Americans with physical and mental disabilities. As a result, it is easier
today for people with disabilities to find a job, to enter public buildings, and to live more
independently in their communities. These are all welcome changes in American life.
   Many citizens have dedicated themselves to serving the interest of persons with
disabilities, and some of them are here with me at the White House; I am joined by
members of the President's Committee on Mental Retardation. The men and women on this
committee include people with disabilities, as well as parents, teachers, health care workers,
and advocates. They recently voted to change the committee's name to the President's
Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities and I was pleased to sign an executive
order instituting that change.
   There is much more we can do to assure that Americans with disabilities are treated with
dignity and respect. In 2001, I announced the New Freedom Initiative, to further promote
the full participation of people with disabilities in all areas of society. As part of the New
Freedom Initiative, we're giving states funding to help people with disabilities commute to
work, or purchase equipment that allows them to work from home. We are promoting home
ownership for people with disabilities, and educating builders about the need for more
accessible rental housing.
   We are working with Congress to provide record levels of funding for special education
programs, and to make sure the money is used to provide the most help to the most
children and we are making government websites more accessible to people with disabilities
so that they can more easily find information about services and programs of the federal
government. We're also focused on providing better care to people with mental illness. I'm




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                               5
committed to making sure people get the treatment and support they need and don't fall
through the cracks.
   My administration continues to work with states to ensure full implementation of the
Supreme Court's Olmstead decision. That decision rightly mandates that individuals with
disabilities who can receive support and treatment in a community setting should be given
an opportunity to live close to their families and friends whenever possible. People with
disabilities now have more freedom to do productive work and live independent lives. We're
making good progress toward ensuring that persons with disabilities know the American
Dream is meant for them. With changes in old ways of thinking, the development of new
technologies, and the federal government's firm commitment to equality, more and more
people with disabilities continue to become full participants in the American life.
   http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2003/07/20030726.html

  ##

ADA Certification of State and Local Accessibility Requirements
   Newly Constructed and Altered Buildings and Facilities
   Title III of the ADA authorizes the Department of Justice to certify that State laws, local
building codes, or similar ordinances meet or exceed the ADA Standards for Accessible
Design for new construction and alterations. Title III applies to public accommodations and
commercial facilities, which include most private businesses and non-profit service
providers. Examples of covered businesses are restaurants, banks and commercial lending
institutions, movie theaters, stadiums, grocery and convenience stores, health care facilities
and professional medical offices to name a few.
   Congress, by authorizing the certification of State and local accessibility requirements
under title III, recognized the important role that state and local building codes and
standards may play in achieving compliance with the building-related aspects of
accessibility. State and local building officials who are involved in plan approval and
construction inspection processes may provide important assistance to construction and
design professionals through their oversight of the accessibility requirements of a certified
State or local code.
   Read the complete article at: http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/certcode.htm

  ##

U.S. Department of Labor Issues WIA Compliance Assistance Checklist To Help
   People With Disabilities
   July 28 - WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L Chao today issued a
compliance assistance "Checklist" designed to ensure nondiscrimination against and equal
opportunity for persons with disabilities under Section 188 of the Workforce Investment Act
(WIA). The checklist was issued to all WIA program operators who receive government
financial assistance.
   The "WIA Section 188 Disability Checklist," which is strictly voluntary and does not create
or change legal requirements, emerged at national One-Stop centers, workforce agencies,
Job Corps contractors and directors, and WIA program grantees. The checklist was issued to
WIA participants in a departmental memo signed by Assistant Secretary for Disability
Employment Policy Roy Grizzard, Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management
Patrick Pizzella, and Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training Emily Stover
DeRocco.
   Read the complete article at: http://www.dol.gov/odep/media/press/wia.htm

  ##




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                6
FCC RECOGNIZES TEN YEARS OF NATIONWIDE PROVISION OF
TELECOMMUNICATIONS RELAY SERVICES AND CERTIFIES AS COMPLIANT THE
STATE TRS PROGRAMS OF ALL 50 STATES
   Washington, D.C. -- Today the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recognizes
ten years of nationwide provision of Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS). TRS enables
individuals with hearing or speech disabilities to utilize the telephone system and
communicate with persons without such disabilities.
   The Commission also announces that the state TRS programs for all 50 states, the
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have been certified compliant with FCC rules. This
certification is for a five-year period, beginning July 26, 2003, and ending July 25, 2008.
   Read the complete article at: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-
237022A1.doc

  ##

R. v FAIRFAX COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD,
   http://laws.lp.findlaw.com/4th/022235p.html
   OPINION
   WILLIAMS, Circuit Judge:
   This case presents the issue of whether the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
(IDEA) requires an educational agency to include in its procedural safeguards notice,
mandated by 20 U.S.C.A. § 1415 (West 2000), an explicit statement that parents in Virginia
have a two-year period in which to request a due process hearing and to indicate when that
period begins to run. Because we find that requirement neither explicit in the IDEA or its
implementing regulations, nor required by the policy and spirit of the IDEA, we reverse the
district court and remand with instructions to dismiss.

  ##

Disabled Children May Be Left Behind if IDEA Law Becomes an Entitlement
  US Senate Republican Policy Committee
  Executive Summary
     • The reauthorization this year of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
         (IDEA) presents an opportunity to address the flaws in the special education
         system that have been pointed out by teachers, parents, and administrators.
     • The President’s principles for reform address these flaws: the need for increased
         accountability; the burdensome procedural requirements; the misidentification of
         children as disabled; and the insufficient role of parents in helping determine their
         disabled child’s educational needs.
     • If Congress fails to reform the system, the consequences will be costly – more
         endangered students, more teachers driven from the field, and, more precious
         resources pulled out of the classroom and into litigation expenses and
         administrative requirements.
     • On June 25, a bipartisan bill (S. 1248) to reauthorize IDEA was unanimously
         reported by the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.
         The Gregg-Kennedy bill would not accomplish all of the President’s principles, but
         it makes a meaningful start.
     • The most significant threat to implementing the President’s principles is an effort
         to convert the law into a protected entitlement program, which the bill as reported
         would not do.
     • Senator Kennedy has indicated he will offer an amendment to make IDEA a
         mandatory program when the reauthorization bill comes before the full Senate.




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                               7
       • Were that amendment to pass, it would become immensely more difficult for
         Congress to make improvements to the law. Special education is an evolving field,
         and so the opportunity to make critical reforms should not be denied for future
         years.
     • Republicans have initiated a 282-percent spending increase over the past seven
         years to respond to the pressing needs of the states. Republicans should continue
         to pursue the goal of improving educational outcomes for children with disabilities,
         and resist efforts that would make it more difficult to address the critical and
         evolving problems facing the special education community.
  Read the complete report at: http://www.bridges4kids.org/pdf/ed072203.pdf

  ##

News:
Montana Accepts $20 Million Grant for Reading
   Aug 1 -- HELENA (AP) -- Superintendent of Public Instruction Linda McCulloch and Gov.
Judy Martz happily accepted a more than $20 million federal grant Thursday to improve
reading skills among Montana children.
   Chris Doherty, director of the U.S. Department of Education's Reading First program, said
the first $5.6 million installment of the six-year grant could be in the state's account by the
time he got back to Washington, D.C. The money could be in schools by mid-August, said
OPI spokesman Joe Lamson. The first year, there will be $2.9 million available to schools
that apply and are accepted to the program. Doherty said each school should get about
$150,000.
   Read the complete article at:
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2003/08/01/build/local/6
2-grant.inc

  ##

Local Author 'Does Fine'
   By MICHAEL MOORE of the Missoulian
   Social worker draws on experiences to tell tale of brain-injured man
   A reviewer recently suggested Tim Laskowski's new novel is something of a cross
between the films "Memento" and "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest."
   It's the sort of praise that's both noteworthy and misleading. It's true that Laskowski has
written a book about a brain-injured man, but Laskowski's lead character, Robert Nyquist,
isn't exactly Jack Nicholson or Guy Pearce.
   Nyquist's triumphs, unlike Nicholson's and Pearce's, are at once more pedestrian and
realistic. In those ways, they mirror real life, which is exactly what Laskowski had in mind
nine years ago when he started "Every Good Boy Does Fine."
   "What I wanted to do was find a way to put the inner life of a disabled man out there,"
Laskowski said this week during a break from his job as a social worker. "A lot of people,
when they look at someone with a brain injury, think there's nothing going on behind the
face. And that's just not true."
   Read the complete article at:
http://www.missoulian.com/articles/2003/07/27/news/mtregional/news08.txt

  ##




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                8
The ADA's next step: Cyberspace
    By Suzanne Robitaille, Business Week Online, July 28, 2003
    Entrepreneur Kevan Worley, blind since birth, relies on the World Wide Web for his
livelihood. As president of Blackstone/Worley Consulting, a contractor of military food-
service facilities, he regularly gets access to his e-mail and food-service industry research
using a screen reader that speaks the text of the messages to him. He also operates a Web
site and e-mail list service in his role as president of the National Association of Blind
Merchants, a division of the National Federation of the Blind (NFB).
    "The Internet is an indispensable tool," says Worley. Yet, he notices that screen readers
still don't work well with many sites because they haven't been designed to be compatible
with assistive technologies for the disability community. "There's clearly much more work to
be done," he says.
    Read the complete article at:
http://www.icanonline.net/news/fullpage.cfm/articleid/F93CC1DC-A78F-4B49-
9772752189B2EF42/cx/news.news/article.cfm

  ##

NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DISABILITY SPEAKS OUT ON LONG-TERM CARE FOR
PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
   July 28 -WASHINGTON--The National Council on Disability (NCD) today released an
excerpt from its annual report, National Disability Policy: A Progress Report, which
concentrates on the crisis in long-term care facing our nation as the population with
disabilities grows and converges with the rapidly increasing demographic composed of older
persons.
   "Many challenges remain for our citizens who are living with disabilities and who wish to
be more independent, more productive, and more engaged in their families and
communities," said Lex Frieden, NCD chairperson.
   In 2002, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) determined that for the fiscal year 2000
the federal government spent $615 billion on persons over the age of 65 and $148 billion on
children. These costs, along with those of providing services and supports for individuals
with disabilities will continue to grow, especially as the baby boomer generation ages.
Furthermore, recent declines in middle class wealth will result in more baby boomers
depending on public sector programs, placing an even greater demand on the long- term
care systems.
   Read the complete release at: http://www.ncd.gov/newsroom/news/r03-423.html

  ##

National Council on Disability Speaks Out on the State of Civil Rights for People
with Disabilities
   Contact: Mark S. Quigley of the National Council on Disability, 202-272-2004 or 202-
272-2074 TTY
   WASHINGTON, July 29 /U.S. Newswire/ -- The National Council on Disability (NCD) today
released an excerpt from its annual report, National Disability Policy: A Progress Report,
http://www.ncd.gov/newsroom/publications/progressreport_final.html, which highlights
issues related to civil rights for people with disabilities, reporting on civil rights advances,
declines, and areas that bear watching or are in need of repair.
   NCD recognizes the greatest achievement of 2002 was the inclusion of access to the polls
for people with disabilities in the new national voting legislation. In other areas, such as
judicial interpretation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the past year brought
notable losses.




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                 9
   "A dozen years after the enactment of this landmark legislation, concern about recent
court decisions, coupled with a degree of backsliding in employment and some critical areas
of access, have suggested to many people with disabilities that a clear intent to weaken the
ADA is underway and that they must close ranks and increase their vigilance," said Robert
R. Davila, Ph.D., NCD member.
   Read the entire article at: http://releases.usnewswire.com/GetRelease.asp?id=101-
07292003

  ##

Health/Medical News:
Cochlear Implants Raise Meningitis Risk
   CDC Advises Vaccination, Other Steps to Improve Safety
   By Daniel DeNoon, WebMD Medical News, Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD on
Wednesday, July 30, 2003
   July 30, 2003 -- Cochlear implants do indeed increase a child's risk of bacterial
meningitis, the CDC confirms.
   The FDA last year sent out an urgent warning that the hearing devices seemed to be
linked to a dangerous brain infection. The FDA asked the CDC to investigate. The results of
that investigation appear in the July 31 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.
   "We found many more cases of bacterial meningitis among children with cochlear
implants than among children in the general population," study leader Jennita Reefhuis,
PhD, tells WebMD. "But some of these cases may also be due to other risk factors.
Meningitis is more common among deaf children. And a lot of children become deaf due to
having had meningitis."
   Read the complete article at:
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/71/81438.htm?z=3734_00000_1000_id_04

  ##

Incidence of Birth Defects higher in four wheat-producing counties in America
   Babies born in high wheat -producing counties are twice as likely to have birth defects as
those born in rural counties with low wheat production, says a new study by the
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dr. Dina Schreinemachers, the lead researcher of
this study, examined more than 43,000 births from 1995 to 1997 in 147 rural counties in
Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota. She concluded that in agricultural
areas with high wheat production with a high use of chlorophenoxy herbicides, rates of
certain defects "significantly increased" - circulatory-respiratory and musculoskeletal defects
were twice as frequent in the counties that produced a lot of wheat. The study is published
in the July 2003 issue of Environmental Health Perspectives. To read an abstract on this
study, visit http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2003/5830/abstract.html, To read a press
article on the study, visit
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2003/07/10/build/local/5
0-birthdefectsherbicide.inc

  ##




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                               10
New Information Service Provides Information On Health and Safety of Everyday
   Products
   The National Institutes of Health unveiled a consumer's guide that provides easy-to-
understand information on the potential health effects of more than 2,000 ingredients
contained in more than 4,000 common household products.
   Some household products contain substances that can pose health risks if they are
ingested or inhaled, or if they come in contact with eyes and skin. The National Library of
Medicine's (NLM) Household Products Database (http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov)
provides information in consumer friendly language on many of these substances
and their potential health effects. For more technical information users can launch a search
for a product or ingredient in TOXNET from the Product Page in the database.
   "The Household Products Database is a natural outgrowth of the work that the Library
has done in recent years, educating the public about environmental risks posed by
chemicals in the air, soil and water," explained NLM Director Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg. "Last
year, we unveiled Tox Town (http://toxtown.nlm.nih.gov), a site that introduces consumers
to the toxic chemicals and environmental risks they might encounter in everyday life, in
everyday places. Tox Town looks at facilities like schools, office buildings and factories, and
the chemicals likely to be in them. With the Household Products site, we
go inside the user's home and provide information about common products and their
potential health effects."

  ##

Antidepressants Protect Brain
   Continuing Medication Could Prevent 'Shrinkage' of Key Brain Region in Depressed
Patients
   By Sid Kirchheimer, WebMD Medical News, Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD, on Friday, August
01, 2003
   Aug 1, 2003 -- Optimism, motivation, and hope aren't the only things stunted by
depression. So is the size of a specific region of the brain.
   Researchers have long known that the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved in
learning and memory, is usually smaller in people with a history of depression than in those
without the disease. But new research suggests that depressed patients who continue to
take antidepressant medication -- even when they're feeling better -- may be more likely to
minimize or possibly prevent this shrinkage.
   Read the complete article at:
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/72/81511.htm?lastselectedguid={5FE84E90-BC77-
4056-A91C-9531713CA348}

  ##

Stress Worsens Kids' Diets
   Children's Nutrition Suffers, Sets Pattern For Adult Years
   By Jeanie Lerche Davis, WebMD Medical News, Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD, on
Friday, August 01, 2003
   August 1, 2003 -- It's a bad pattern that starts early: Young kids, feeling stressed, eat
more high-fat junk foods and fewer nutritious meals.
   In this month's issue of Health Psychology, children's nutrition -- during times of duress -
- gets a closer look. While other studies of stress-related eating have focused on
adolescents and adults, this one looks at the effects on younger kids.
   Read the complete article at:
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/72/81513.htm?lastselectedguid={5FE84E90-BC77-
4056-A91C-9531713CA348}



  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                               11
  ##

CDC and Partners Launch Autism Awareness Initiative
   Agency Seeks Input from Parents of Children with Autism
   PITTSBURGH - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in partnership with
the Autism Society of America (ASA) has announced a joint initiative aimed at boosting
awareness of the importance of early screening and intervention for autism.
   CDC and ASA will work to identify ways to encourage parents with a child showing signs
of developmental delays - particularly in communication or social interaction - to seek help
for their child, even before a clinical diagnosis of autism has been made. Th e effort will
involve input from parents of children who have already been diagnosed with autism as well
as from health care providers.
   "The number of people diagnosed with autism is on the rise," said HHS Secretary Tommy
G. Thompson. "The impact on families as well as autism's profound effect on the nation's
educational and health care systems points to the need for a better understanding of this
troubling condition."
   Read the complete release at: http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r030718.htm

  ##

Rett Syndrome Rosetta Stone of Neurologic Diseases
   Rett Syndrome (RS), a neurological orphan disease seen in children, and long relegated
to obscure articles and the fervent concern of parents, may soon be adopted into a family of
higher-profile neurologic disorders.
   This change from medical oddity to the focus of avid researchers reflects the exciting
discovery of genetic similarities between RS and disorders as disparate as autism and
Alzheimer disease; and if this early promise holds true, RS will no longer be a medical trivia
question. Rather, it could become a medical Rosetta Stone for translating a tangle of genetic
and biochemical evidence into a real understanding of some terrible neurological conditions.
   Read article at: http://www.rettsyndrome.org/main/update-on-rett-syndrome.htm

  ##

The Care Notebook and Care Organizer
  http://www.cshcn.org/resources/CareNtbk.htm
                     The Care Notebook and Care Organizer are tools for families who have
                  children with special health care needs. Families use Care Notebooks to
                  keep track of important information about their child's health and care.
                  This makes it easier to find and share key information with their child's
                  care team.
                     The Care Notebook is a 3-ring binder. It contains supplies that make it
                  easier to find information quickly. These supplies include plastic pages
                  that hold business cards and several pocket dividers that hold papers. The
                  Care Notebook also contains forms that families may fill in.
                     The Care Organizer is a plastic expanding file folder with individual
                  pockets labeled to help organize paperwork. Multi-lingual including
English, Spanish, Vietnamese, Russian, Chinese and Somali.
  http://www.cshcn.org/resources/CareNtbk.htm

  ##




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                              12
Emergency Preparedness for Children with Special Health Care Needs
   http://www.aap.org/advocacy/epoverview.htm
   In our rapidly changing high tech health care environment, the
numbers of children with very special health care needs are
increasing. Kids with complex medical conditions and those with
high tech gear such as ventriculoperitoneal shunts, gastrostomy
tubes, indwelling central lines, tracheostomies, pacemakers, and
home ventilators are becoming common in communities. Because of
the complex and varied needs of these children, they are often lost
in the cracks between the specialists and the primary care medical
home. When a crisis occurs and children with special health care
needs must access the emergency system, they are often left
vulnerable because of a lack of access to information about their
medical problems. There can be delays in treatment, unnecessary
tests, and serious errors as a result of a lack of access to
information available to the treating emergency physician.
   http://www.aap.org/advocacy/epoverview.htm

  ##

Sick Children Locked Up
   The U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) released a report (
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d03865t.pdf ) on factors that influence the placement of
children in the child welfare and juvenile justice system solely to obtain mental health
services. The report estimates that over 12,700 children nationwide are placed into these
systems because of mental health needs The report acknowledges that these numbers may
be under reporting the incidents due to the fact that most states do not employ an agency
that tracks this data specifically.
   The child that is placed into these non-mental health systems is most likely a male,
adolescent with multiple other problems. They tend to act in ways that are threatening to
themselves or to others. Because states do not have a system that is designed to care for
these special children, they are often placed inappropriately. Health insurance limitations,
inadequate mental health services, barriers to access current services, and difficulties in
meeting eligibility rules result in a transfer of large numbers of children to inappropriate
placements.
   The statistics evident in this report echo those that are true for Georgia. An abundance of
anecdotal data report that children are routinely sent to the juvenile justice system because
Georgia's mental health services to children and adolescents are not adequate. Service
barriers and limitations result in compromised access to appropriate care. Parents and
guardians often report that the only way to assure that their mentally ill child is safe is to
have their child locked up.
   These reports are too numerous to ignore and Georgia must look at how children and
adolescents mental health needs are being addressed. The juvenile justice system is no
place to care for the mentally ill child.

  ##

The National Resource Center on AD/HD provides science-based information on
   AD/HD.
   Services include a resource center staffed by highly trained information specialists, a
Website with information and resources on AD/HD, and a library open to the public. Contact
the NRC at 800-233-4050 or visit their web site at http://www.help4adhd.org.




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                              13
  ##




    Like to help PLUK? Go shopping!
    That’s right, go head and buy something for yourself –– from Amazon.com, eBay, Dell or
any of the internet’s most popular shopping sites. First join by visiting this link:
http://www.iGive.com/PLUK. Every time you shop at one of the over 410 name-brand
stores in the Mall at iGive.com, we will receive a donation of up to 25% of each purchase
you make, at no cost to you.
    Remember, donating to PLUK will not cost you a thing. We will miss a lot of extra dough,
if you do not join. So, visit http://www.iGive.com/PLUK now. Membership is free and
your privacy is guaranteed.
    Joining and shopping is easy! Visit http://www.iGive.com/PLUK now!

  ##

Transition/Employment/Housing/Advocacy:
PEPNet: Post Secondary Education and Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of
Hearing
   The Northeast Technical Assistance Center (NETAC) is one of four regional postsecondary
education centers that provide technical assistance to postsecondary institutions across the
nation, serving individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing. The four regional centers are
funded by the U.S. Department of Education. The centers work collaboratively and are
known as the Postsecondary Education Programs Network (PEPNet). NETAC provides
publications on line at http://www.netac.rit.edu, including “Financing Your Education:
Options for Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing”.
   Numerous other resources on postsecondary education for deaf and hard of hearing
students can be found on PEPNet’s website at: http://www.pepnet.org

  ##

Annual Listing of Summer College Preparatory Programs
   From GW HEATH Resource Center; their 2003 listing can be found at:
http://www.heath.gwu.edu

  ##

Financial Aid Frequently Asked Questions for Students with Disabilities
   Compiled by the Higher Education Information Center and available at
http://www.heic.org/disabled.htm

  ##

Federal Actions Can Assist States in Improving Postsecondary Outcomes for Youth
   Of all IDEA youth who left high school during the 2000-01 school year, 57 percent
received a standard diploma and an additional 11 percent received an alternative credential.



  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                            14
High school completion patterns of IDEA youth have remained stable over recent years
despite concerns that states’ increasing use of exit examinations would result in higher
dropout rates.
   Students with some types of disabilities were much less likely, however, to complete high
school with a standard diploma, receiving an alternative credential or dropping out instead.
IDEA youth without a diploma have some options for entering employment or
postsecondary education, but national data on their post-school status are over a decade
old. Twenty-one states routinely track students’ post-school status, but these data have
some limitations. While most states used post-school data for program improvement
purposes such as monitoring service delivery, some officials indicated that guidance was
needed on how to best collect and use these data.
   A variety of transition problems, such as lack of vocational training and poor linkages
between schools and service providers; have been consistently reported by students,
parents, and others. While state and local educational agencies have taken actions to
address some of the problems, other problems such as a lack of transportation are less
likely to be addressed at the state level. While state Directors of Special Education reported
being generally satisfied with assistance provided to them by the Department of Education
in addressing transition issues, some expressed concerns about the timeliness of the federal
feedback on their state improvement plans and the inconsistent quality of technical
assistance provided by the six federal Regional Resource Centers.
   The vocational rehabilitation (VR) program, the Workforce Investment Act youth program
(WIA), and the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency (Ticket) program all offer an array of
employment and education -related services that can aid some IDEA youth. However,
several factors may impede participation by the IDEA populations that are eligible for
services. The lack of participation may be explained in part by the insufficient capacity of
the VR and WIA programs to serve eligible populations requesting services, and potential
concerns of Ticket participants about losing public assistance because of employment
income. A general lack of awareness by youth and fam ilies of these programs may also limit
participation.
   View the complete report at: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d03773.pdf

  ##

The Illinois Division of Specialized Care for Children has recently added a new
   section on their web site that focuses on Transition Information and Resources.
   This site provides access to information and forms developed by DSCC, as well as other
resources, including: The Transition Information Sheet for Families, Teaching Sheets
(Kentucky Commission for Children with Special Health Care Needs), Transition Timeline
(Office of Children with Special Health Care Needs, Washington State), The Health Care
Checklist (adapted from other health care checklists), School to Work Checklist (adapted
from Young Adult Services Program, South Bend, Indiana), Employment Information Sheet
(adapted NICHYC), Preparing for the Future: Transition to Adulthood (Illinois Chapter of
AAP), Questions to Ask Potential Adult Care Bridging the Gap Between Pediatric and Adult
Services - a guide.
   To access the DSCC site directly, go to:
http://internet.dscc.uic.edu/dsccroot/parents/transition.asp
   To visit the Institute for Child Health Policy's Web site Health Care Transition site at:
http://hctransitions.ichp.edu or http://hctransitions.ichp.edu/resources.html

  ##




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                              15
Technology/Web/Resources:
ADA MATERIALS AVAILABLE FREE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
   The U.S. Department of Justice provides free ADA materials. Printed materials may be
ordered by calling the ADA Information Line (1-800-514-0301 (Voice) or 1-800-514-0383
(TDD)). Automated service is available 24-hours a day for recorded information and to order
publications.
   Publications are available in standard print as well as large print, audiotape, Braille, and
computer disk for people with disabilities.
   Many of these materials are available from an automated fax system that is available 24-
hours a day. To order a publication by fax, call the ADA Information Line and follow the
directions for placing a fax order. When prompted to enter the document number, enter the
specific number from the following publication list:
   http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/publicat.htm

  ##

Study: Web Use Boosts Student Achievement
   By Corey Murray, Assistant Editor, eSchool News, July 30, 2003
   Does the Internet make kids smarter? A July 28 report from a team of researchers at
Michigan State University (MSU) contends that children who use the internet perform better
on standardized tests and generally achieve higher grade-point averages than their less
web-savvy peers.
   The 16-month HomeNetToo project—funded with $1.5 million in National Science
Foundation grant monies—surveyed 140 school-age children and 120 adults from
predominantly low-income households and was intended to demonstrate how low-income
families use the Internet at home. In particular, researchers were interested in uncovering
what motivates children to use the Internet and how web use, in general, affects their lives.
   Read the complete article at:
http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/ssunreg.cfm?ArticleID=4536&ul=%2Fnews%2FshowSto
ry%2Ecfm%3FArticleID%3D4536

  ##

HEAR NOW and Salvage Hearing Aid Donations
   Since 1995, HEAR NOW has provided more than 65,000 children and adults with hearing
aids when they otherwise wouldn’t have been able to afford them . It is truly awesome to
help a man keep his job so he can support his family; to help a grandmother hear the
                   precious voice of a grandchild; to assist a young mother hear her baby
                   cry; and to make learning possible for a child in school.
                      HEAR NOW accepts donations of old, used and no longer used
                   hearing aids. Donated aids are sold to a repair lab, and money
                   generated through these sales is used to purchase the aids used in the
                   program’s hearing aid assistance program. In 2000, more than 23,000
                   hearing aids were recycled generating more than $150,000 to fund the
                   program.
                      http://www.sotheworldmayhear.org/forms/hearnow.php

                       ##

Training/Workshops/Conferences:



  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                               16
CSPD Region I August workshops:

“Six Trait Writing”, August 4-5, Glendive & August 6-7, Miles City
   This training focuses on basic understanding of the popular six trait writing model.
   This training is pertinent to all grades K-12. It will give many hands on activities and
strategies about how to teach the six traits to all students and will show how to get them
involved in the assessment process.
               Presenter: Diana Knutson
                       8:00 – 4:30
                       August 4,5 – Dawson Community College in Glendive
                       August 6,7 – Miles City Community College

“CRISS” Creating Independence through Student Owned Strategies, August 13-15,
Glendive
   This workshop is directed to all content area teachers. Project CRISS represents an
integration of research-based practices in reading comprehension, vocabulary instruction
and in the models of teaching. Teachers will learn various strategies to present material to
help students learn content information. Through application of the strategies, students will
gain the ability to apply processes of learning to new experiences. Visit
www.projectcriss.com for more information.
                Presenter: Maureen Danner
                       8:30 – 3:00
                       August 13, 14, 15 (1/2 day) at the Carney Center (Glendive Medical
                       Center) in Glendive, MT (Glasgow site was cancelled)

“Bully Proofing Your Program and Teaching Students How to Stop Bullies”, August
15-16, Glasgow & August 18-19, Miles City
   This workshop is very important for teachers, childcare providers and parents to be
aware of the characteristics of a bully and the warning signs of a victim. It will provide
research on the prevalence of bullying in our country. Bullies that are not stopped and
taught new ways to deal with differences will grow up to use these same behaviors in
relationships and workplace settings. Every student has a right to an environment that is
free from harassment and physical harm.
   The objectives of this workshop are: 1) Identify the characteristics and warning signals of
a bully. 2) Identify the characteristics of a victim. 3) Identify the emotional trauma caused
from bullying. 4) List techniques to teach children to use to stop bullying. 5) Identify
strategies to bully-proof the building.
               Presenter: Terry Becker-Fritz
                       8:00-4:00
                       August 15, 16 – Glasgow High School Auditorium
                       August 18,19 – Miles City Community College (rooms 106 & 107)

  For more information or to register, please contact:
             Helen Murphy at 406-485-2143 (H) or dmurphy@midrivers.com

##

REGION V CSPD ROUNDUP
  Severe Communication /Autism Conference, August 11-13, Whitefish
  Together We’re Better, August 13-15, Missoula
  Paraeducator Academies, August 18-19, Kalispell
      Region V has an online registration website. Sign on at http://www.cspd.net. Once
you have signed on, you will receive information about upcoming trainings.


  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                 17
                August 11–13 • Severe Communication /Autism Conference • Grouse
Mountain Lodge in Whitefish. This second annual conference includes workshops on
TEACCH, Sensory Integration Toolkit, Assistive Technology, and Asperger Syndrome.
Sponsored by NWCASE.
                August 13–15 • Together We’re Better • Region V CSPD ’s sixth Annual
August Institute, UM Education Building, Missoula. Get geared up for the new year with
strategies to help you work with all students. Workshops on Reading & Literacy, low
incidence disabilities, behavior, differentiated learning, legal issues, early childhood, social
skills, paraeducator academies, transition, and more.
                August 18–19 • Paraeducator Academies • Kalispell 2-day Academy:
Choice of Behavior Management, Instructional Strategies, or Student Supervision.
         Interested? Register at the Region V CSPD Online Registration Web site:
http://www.cspd.net or contact Nancy Marks at nmarks@mcps.k12.mt.us or 728-2400 ext
5036 for more information.

##

Nurturing Toddlers, Billings, Aug 12 – Oct 28
The Family Tree Center in Billings is offering this 12-week course to parents. Contact them
at 252-9799.

##

Seminar on "The Management and Control of Refractory Seizures Utilizing VNS
Therapy™ in People with Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities,
Particularly Those Who are in Independent Care Facilities (ICF’S).”
        This seminar is scheduled for August 14, 2003, from 7:00 PM until 9:00 PM.
Continuing Medical Education (CME) accreditation will be offered, and a blue-ribbon panel of
experts will be presenting and moderating these sessions. You will be able to interact with
these experts online to respond to any questions you might have.
        You can register through EP (http://www.eparent.com) to participate. To view more
details of the seminar, please click on this link: http://www.eparent.com/webinar/

   ##

Autism Montana! 2003, August 15, Butte
Speakers:
       Raun Melmed, M.D. a nationally recognized Pediatrician will consider “Diagnosis,
Treatment, Toilet Training, Sleep, Behavior, Medication Challenges”
       Eustacia Cutler, the mother of Temple Grandin, brings insight into “Raising Temple
Grandin.”
For more information/registration contact:
Future Horizons, 721 W. Abram St., Arlington, TX 76013 Tel 800-489-0727
Register on line at: http://www.FutureHorizons-autism.com

##

Integrating SETT into the Assistive Technology Plan, August 18, Helena
   Terry Lankutis, Education and Technology Consultant, and Leslie Mullette, MonTech
Technology Coordinator will present the basics of the SETT process (student, environment,
tasks and tools) as a team -based approach to make assistive technology decisions. The
session will be from 9am -4pm at the Front Street Learning Center. For information, contact
Cheri Larson at 447-8585 or 431-9246.


   PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                 18
##

Positive Approaches to Solving Severe Behavior Challenges, Billings, Aug 19-22
       The IABA and Bitterroot Valley Education Co-op, MSU-Billings and OPI are sponsoring
four seminars to promote positive practices in the field of challenging behavior. Visit
http://www.iaba.com/brochures/billings_flyer.pdf for more information.

##

National Down Syndrome Congress, August 22-24, Philadelphia PA
http://www.ndsccenter.org/newsAndEvents/convention03/convention.html
        As you think about your summer plans, I hope that high on your list is participating
in the National Down Syndrome Congress’ 31st annual convention in Philadelphia.
When I look back over the past thirty years at the life of my son, Todd, I see that my
dreams and hopes for him were often conceived or shaped by individuals I met and heard at
national events. In addition, those occasions were key in helping me figure out concrete
next steps and strategies to make the dreams become reality.
        This year’s NDSC convention features outstanding speakers including self-advocates,
parents with professional expertise, and committed professionals. Their presentations will
cover the life span. Whether your child is an infant, toddler, school age, young adult, or
mature adult, there will be many choices for you.
        Participants tell us they are especially inspired by the involvement and example of
the self-advocates whom you will see as leaders in all parts of the convention.
        The NDSC is committed to making the convention as affordable as possible for
families. By carefully managing our costs and through the generosity of our speakers who
donate their time, we are able to keep the cost of registration low for a national convention
of this scope and quality.
        Whatever the age of your family member or student with Down syndrome, you are
sure to find both information and inspiration at our convention August 22-24.
I hope to see you there!

Sincerely,
Judy Mart, President

  ##

“Choices”: Montana’s Senior and Long-Term Care Conference, Sep 3-5, West
   Yellowstone
   The Community Services Bureau (part of the Senior and Long Term Care Division of the
Department of Public Health and Human Services) is having its fifth annual conference in
West Yellowstone on September 3, 4 and 5, 2003. The theme of the conference is
"Choices", emphasizing that Montanan's have the right to choose how to live in their
communities. On a professional, or a personal level, the sessions are designed to
encourage and excite you with their content and presentation!
   Some of the session topics include: a multi-disciplinary panel discussion on ethical
dilemmas; the benefits of laughter and music to improve mood and reduce pain; cultural
competence; the New Freedom Initiative; burnout and compassion fatigue; Children's
Special Health Services; Sexuality and Aging; Medicaid eligibility; the long term care
ombudsman program; and challenges of caregiving and Alzheimer's.
   The keynote speaker is Fred Cowie, whose theme will be "Caregiving, Collapsing, and
Continuing On." Fred has a varied background in disaster and emergency services, and is
currently a consultant with Montana Department of Justice regarding meth lab conferences.


  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                             19
He is an entertaining and highly sought after speaker, having spoken at many conferences
and training sessions on topics such as stress management, emergency preparedness, and
personal development. Fred is also an artist, and the father of a young man with Duchenne
Muscular Dystrophy. In recent years he has gone from his role as parent, to caregiver, to
paid caregiver, and now has once again reverted to his role as "Dad."
   For more information, or to register for the conference, call Karen Antonick at
406-444-6995.

  ##

Addiction, Recovery and the Family, September 11-13, Whitefish
       The 8th Annual Rocky Mountain Mental Health Symposium, sponsored by Pathways
Treatment Center & Kalispell Regional Medical Center, is scheduled for September 11-13, in
Whitefish, MT.
       This symposium will provide a forum for exploring the most up-to-date information
on addiction issues facing families, as well as the treatment applications facilitating
recovery.
       For information & registration, call 866-755-4658, or visit
http://www.mtreservations.com or http://www.krmc.org.

##

Conference on Social, Emotional and Academic Interventions for Students with
High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome with a Special Session on
Bullying Preventions, October 3-4, Boise, ID
http://www.asperger.net/conferences.htm
Speakers: Brenda Smith Myles, Ph.D. & Rebekah Heinrichs, MSN, M.S.Ed.
CONFERENCE OUTCOMES
As a result of attending this conference, participants will be able to:
       •       Understand the characteristics of Asperger Syndrome
       •       Understand and implement sensory interventions Implement academic, social
               and behavioral interventions that facilitate school success
       •       Teach hidden curriculum items to their students
       •       Understand how to prevent bullying from occurring in schools

##

Augmentative Communication Workshops in the Rockies, October 2, Billings
       This CAMA sponsored session will present a number of the leading manufacturers of
AAC hardware and software at the Billings Hotel and Convention Center on October 2, 2003.
For complete information, go to http://www.aacproducts.org

##

Fourth Annual Conference on Autism and Asperger’s: Mapping the Journey,
October 17 & 18, Edmonton, Alberta
   http://www.keystotreasures.com/
   Take advantage of our early registration special by September 15, 2003.
   Oct. 17, 2003, Carol Gray
   Carol is the editor of the Jenison Autism Journal, and is a consultant to students with
ASD through the Jenison Public Schools (Jenison, Michigan). She is also the president of the
Gray center, a facility dedicated to individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and
those who work alongside them to improve mutual understanding.


  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                             20
   Oct. 18, 2003, Dr. Tony Attwood
   Dr. Attwood is a world-renowned expert on Asperger's Syndrome and author of the best-
selling book of that name.
   "The most significant issue that parents face is a lack of understanding and inappropriate
attitudes towards those with Asperger's Syndrome." -Dr. Attwood

  ##

Echoes of Abuse: Traumatic Brain Injury, October 30-31, Billings
         The Brain Injury Association of Montana and Billings Area Family Violence Task Force
are sponsoring the 14th annual McGuire Memorial Conference on Fam ily Violence to be held
in Billings October 30-31.

##

Workshops on Communication Strategies for Children with Severe and Multiple
   Disabilities: August 4 - October 6, 2003
   Presented by Oregon Health & Science University, and in association with the Oreg on
Institute on Disability & Development (UCEDD) these two-day workshops are designed for
professionals and parents and address Pre-symbolic Communication and Tangible Symbol
Systems. A special half-day seminar for parents is also offered, free of charge. Strategies
are especially appropriate for children with low-incidence disabilities including severe
cognitive limitations, deaf blindness, autism spectrum disorders and multiple disabilities.
Academic, continuing education credit, and ASHA credit will be available. Presented at three
locations this summer and fall.
   For more information contact: Alexandra Dorinson, 1-800-410-7069 ext. 102,
dorinson@ohsu.edu. Visit the website at http://www.designtolearn.com .

  ##

Technology Conferences, August - October
Distance Teaching and Learning, Madison, WI, August 13-15.
See http://www.uwex.edu/disted/conference/

Information Technology: "From the Classroom to the Boardroom," Philadelphia, PA, August
13-17
http://www.bdpa.org/ccentral2003.cfm?CFID=710318&CFTOKEN=38639016

“Making Information Technology Work for Rural Communities: High Speed
Telecommunications Services are the Future Building Blocks of Rural America.” Washington,
DC, September 28-October 1. See http://ruraltelecon.org/RTC03/rtc03.htm

Closing The Gap: Computer Technology in Special Education and Rehabilitation,
Minneapolis, MN, October 14-18. See http://www.closingthegap.com/

##

Announcing: A Series of Conference Calls on the Social-Emotional Development of
Young Children
       The Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, with support
from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, is launching a series of 10 conference calls
focusing on the social -emotional development of young children (birth through five years
old). The target audience for these calls includes early care and education providers, agency


  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                              21
administrators, technical assistance providers and others working with young children and
their families.

THESE CALLS WILL TAKE PLACE FROM 1:00-2:30 pm (EST) ON THE LAST WEDNESDAY OF
EVERY MONTH.

  TOPICS WILL INCLUDE:

  Date              Topic
  9/24/03              • Ensuring Cultural Competence in Practices with Young
                          Children and Families
  10/29/03             • Brain Research
                       • Attachment
  *11/19/03            • Curricula for Promoting Healthy Social -Emotional
                          Development
  *12/17/03            • Screening & Assessment for Infants, Toddlers and
                          Preschoolers
  1/28/04              • The Impact of Maternal Depression and/or Substance Abuse
                          on Young Children
  2/25/04              • Addressing the Mental Health Needs of Young Children
                          Involved with Child Welfare
  3/31/04              • ECMH Consultation Models
  4/28/04              • Relationship-based Interventions
  5/26/04              • Children & Trauma


        National experts will serve as presenters, as will practitioners who are involved in
promising practices. Presentations will highlight effective strategies for delivering family-
driven, culturally appropriate services in community-based settings.
Up to 200 individuals per call will be able to participate on a first-come-first serve basis.
Handouts, including PowerPoint presentations, will be provided to people who register for
the calls.
****Please send an email to mk73@georgetown.edu (MelKisha Knight) if you want to be
added to the list for the first call.
Materials will be emailed to you. More information to come!

##

1st International Conference on Family-centered Care, Sep 4-6, Boston MA
   WHEN: September 4, 2003 - September 6, 2003
   WHERE: Boston, Massachusetts
   HOSTED BY: Institute for Family-Centered Care
   DESCRIPTION: Family-centered care is an approach to the planning, delivery, and
evaluation of health care that is grounded in mutually beneficial partnerships among
patients, families, and health care providers. It is founded on the understanding that the
family plays a vital role in ensuring the health and well being of family members of all ages.
FOR MORE INFORMATION: http://www.earlyonmichigan.org/Conferences.htm#5

##




  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                   22
FROM PRACTICE TO POLICY AND BACK AGAIN: 19th Annual Conference on Young
Children with Special Needs and Their Families, Oct 12-14, Washington, DC
  WHEN: October 12, 2003 - October 14, 2003
  WHERE: Washington, DC
  HOSTED BY: Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children
  FOR MORE INFORMATION: http://www.earlyonmichigan.org/Conferences.htm#6

  ##

Fun Events
PLUK Founders Day Celebration, September 3rd, Billings
   Everyone is invited to this 3rd year event to celebrate PLUK! It is scheduled for
September 3rd at 6pm at the Mansfield Center in Billings. Gail Gray will be the keynote
speaker. There's no fee for attending. This is PLUK's 19th anniversary.
   Anyone interested in attending, should call Sheryl at the PLUK office at 255-0540 for
reservations, as seating is limited.

  ##

   Blue Jack Band Benefit, September 20, Bozeman
       The Bozeman area Associate Board is planning a benefit concert on September 20
featuring The Blue Jack Band. The Blue Jack Band plays a wonderful mix of jazz and blues
and has broad national recognition. In recent years they opened for legendary blues
performer B.B. King and others. Further details on locations, times and other
announcements will com e soon. Call PLUK’s office if you are interested in being involved,
255-0540.

##

   Missoula Children’s Theatre Tour, October 5-11, Kalispell
       The Flathead Valley Associate Board is working on a fall event. They have been
meeting regularly and finalizing details at this time. It will involve a weeklong project for
children to perform a play in the Kalispell area. The dates are October 5 though the 11th.
This event will link up with the Missoula Children’s Theatre. The Theatre will send staff to
Kalispell to handle the auditions, training and direction for the entire week. For more
information or to be involved with the event, call Stephanie Luehr, PLUK’s representative in
Kalispell at 881-4421. Details and plans on the event will be provided and there are
presently positions to be filled on the planning committee. Volunteers are needed.

##

   Dinosaur Day with Jack Horner, October 11, Billings
   Jack Horner, Paleontologist from Montana State University in Bozeman will join PLUK on
October 11 in Billings for two events. Kids can “get their hands dirty” in learning about the
world of Paleontology at 1pm on MSU-Billings campus. That evening, a dinner (with limited
seating) will be held at 6pm at the Sheraton and Mr. Horner will speak about “Dinosaurs in
Montana.”
   For information on the event, call PLUK’s office at 255-0540. Participation in both the
workshop for kids, and the dinner, is limited --tickets must be purchased to attend.

##



  PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                                23
   Magical Tymes Party, November 11, Missoula
       The Missoula Associate Board third annual “Magical Tymes Party,” has been
scheduled for November 11, 2003. Deborah Hayes Hyde is the Chair of the event and
Ramona Holt is chairing the Sponsorship Sub-Committee. For the last two years, this event
has been held in conjunction with a play at the Missoula Children’s Theatre. In addition to
the play, participants may attend a “wine and cheese party” and a silent auction.
       This year the play is Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Companies and
groups are now lining up to sponsor the event and the committee assures us that it will be
the best to date, by far! For more information on how to become involved, call PLUK’s office
at 800-222-7585 and we can put you in touch with the planning committee.

    Be sure to mark your calendar with these future events:
•      Kids at Heart Banquet, February 7, 2004, Billings
•      Sports Festival, March 2004, Billings

##
Selected Sources:
1.     Monday Morning in Washington, DC, http://www.inclusionresearch.org
2.     Rocky Mountain DBTAC, http://www.adainformation.org
3.     Transition Newsflash, Montana Center On Disabilities,
http://www.msubillings.edu/transition
4.     PEN Weekly NewsBlast, http://www.publiceducation.org
5.     Reference Points: Transition updates from the TATRA Project,
http://www.pacer.org/tatra/tatra.htm
6.     Lisa Simmons, The Ideal Lives Express: http://www.ideallives.com
7.     The American Indian Disability Technical Assistance Center Training Calendar
http://aidtac.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/TrainingCalendar.htm

##

PLUK eNews is published by:

Parent's, Let's Unite for Kids – PLUK
516 N 32nd St
Billings MT 59101-6003
800-222-7585; 406-255-0540; 406-255-0523 (fax)
plukinfo@pluk.org
http://www.pluk.org

Mission Statement: Parent’s Let’s Unite for Kids unites parents, professionals, families and
friends of children with special needs to support one another, and share information for the
benefit of their children.

Vision Statement: Given information and support, individuals with disabilities and their
families will feel empowered to advocate for themselves and participate fully in educational
and community opportunities.

    Statement on accessibility: Today, we endeavor to be conscious of the need for making
all electronic information accessible as we are aware of physical accessibility issues in our
community. For design guidelines visit: http://ncam .wgbh.org/cdrom/guideline/.




    PLUK eNews August 4-8, 2003                                                             24

								
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