Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

BIOL 100 rev NOV 09

VIEWS: 52 PAGES: 11

									                                                            Mt. San Jacinto College
            Page 1 of 11                              Integrated Course Outline of Record                                                 Form B

Submitted by:                      Sujatha V. Pamula and Shelley Aguilar                                                  Date:         Oct 19, 2009
                                                               Subject           Course
     Discipline                       Department              (select from this
    (select from this list)           (select from this list)       list)       Number                                Title
Biological                          Biological                Biology           100                         Human Biology
Sciences                            Sciences




History – M                          HIST                           HIST                151                 History and Appreciation of Dance
Dance – M

                                     DAN                            DAN                 100                 History and Appreciation of Dance



Course Number:           a) 001-069 Non-Degree credit, b) 070 and higher: Degree credit, c) 070-079 are intended for students with learning
                         disabilities, d) 100 or higher: Transfer credit (please click here for the transfer form).

Title:                   If this course is having a subject or number change, the course author must include after the Course Title (formerly
                         {Subj}{Course Number}) i.e. Technology in the Classroom (formerly CDE 160).

Units/Hours:
         Each lecture unit requires 1 hour per week of class time, and 2 hours per week of study outside of class.
         Each laboratory unit requires 3 hours per week of class time.



Lecture                            Lab
                                                               Lecture Units                          Lab Units                          Total Units
Units/Hours                        Units/Hours                       3                                    1                                   4
1 unit – 16-18                     1 unit – 48-54
2 units – 32-36                    2 units – 96-108            Lecture Hours                          Lab Hours                          Total Hours
3 units – 48-54                    3 units – 144-162
4 units – 64-72                    4 units – 192-216                  48-54                               48 - 54                           96 - 108
5 units – 80-90                    5 units – 240-270


AA/AS Degree General Ed Breadth Area(s):                                                        A
Courses should be appropriately placed on the General Ed pattern, please select one or more areas from this list.

Maximum                                                                                    Pass/No Pass                                  Yes or No
Enrollment:
                               30         Enter number
                                                                                           ALLOW
                                                                                                                         Yes             (usually Yes)
Pass/No Pass                              Yes or No                                        TOP code                                     (click here for TOP
ONLY
                               No         (usually No)                                     (choose only 1)
                                                                                                                        0499            code website)


Can                           time(s) for credit (max 4) (More detailed information on course repeatability can be found here).
be                 1          (If more than 1, justify with one of the following)
                              Because the course content differs each time it is offered …
taken                                     … and the student who repeats it is gaining an expanded educational experience because skills and proficiencies are
                                          enhanced by supervised repetition and practice within class periods
                                          … and the student who repeats it is gaining an expanded educational experience because active participatory
                                          experience in individual study or group assignments is the basic means by which learning objectives are
                                          obtained.

     Stand Alone Course Check box if Stand Alone course.
    A Stand Alone course is a Non-degree applicable credit course and/or a degree applicable credit course which is not part of an approved educational
    program.
                                                   Mt. San Jacinto College
          Page 2 of 11                       Integrated Course Outline of Record                                           Form B

Catalog Description: (Please do not refer to transferability or degree, certificate, or employment concentration applicability.
Please only describe the course). (75 words or less in gray box below).
This course is an introduction to scientific and biological principles presented in a
human context. Topics covered include the scientific method, cell structure and
function, biochemistry, metabolism, nutrition, cell division, genetics, biotechnology,
disease processes, evolution, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of the human
body.
       To count words, select only the words within the catalog description, then go to Tools, and to Word Count. Careful! If you
       select the entire box that the words are within, it won’t give an accurate count.
Schedule Description: (Please do not refer to transferability or degree, certificate, or employment concentration applicability.
Please only describe the course). (25 words or less in gray box below).
This course studies modern biological concepts in a human context. Topics include
environmental, nutritional, public health issues, and an understanding of the disease
process.
To count words, select only the words within the catalog description, then go to Tools, and to Word Count. Careful! If you select the entire
box that the words are within, it won’t give an accurate count.
Need for the course: (For more information on demonstrating need, click here)
This course is designed for those students interested in the function and health of
their bodies, but not as extensively and with the specificity taught in an Anatomy and
Physiology course. This course also meets the needs of Non-Biology majors in their
acquisition of a science with laboratory requirement for the Associate’s degree. It
also satisfies the UC/CSU science with laboratory requirement for life sciences.
Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisites go through a separate approval process. See Forms E1-E4 for details.
(For further clarification, contact the Prerequisite Subcommittee)
None
Corequisite(s):
Corequisites go through a separate approval process. See Forms E1-E4 for details.
None.
Recommended Preparation:
Recommended Preparation goes through a separate approval process. See Forms E1-E4 for details.
None.
Other Enrollment Criteria:
None.
Learning Objectives: (please number each objective and express in behavioral terms)
Upon the completion of the course the student will be able to do the following:
     1. Assess and interpret the signs and symptoms of common functional disorders, diseases,
           and illnesses.
     2. Describe the disease process, including cancer and sexually transmitted diseases, in
           terms of the cellular and organ components involved.
     3. Analyze human influence and interference on, ecosystems, and ecology the biosphere
           and apply learned conservation techniques in response.
     4. Describe and apply the scientific method in carrying out basic scientific procedures in
           problem solving, including the formulation of a hypothesis when supplied with
           appropriate observations, signs, and symptoms.
     5. Evaluate and critique published literature as to accuracy, plausibility, and feasibility.
     6. Describe some of the complexities of the biological components necessary to maintain
           and propagate human life, including the composition of cells, identity and function of
           various body tissues, and the identity and function of the human organs.
     7. Demonstrate proper use and function of various scientific and medical instruments
              including the dissecting microscope, compound light microscope, and
           sphygmomanometer.
     8. Describe and explain genotype and phenotype, and interpret human genetic conditions.
     9. Compare changes in cardiovascular and respiratory function before and during exercise,
           and relate those measurements to the level of body fitness.
                                       Mt. San Jacinto College
     Page 3 of 11                Integrated Course Outline of Record               Form B

  10. Evaluate and describe homeostasis in terms of normal and abnormal self-regulating
         mechanisms, including the autoimmune diseases, various metaplasms and
         neoplasms, drugs and medications, and common illnesses.
  11. Outline the basic concepts of evolutionary theory and apply them to the evolution of
         humans.
Course Content:   (please number the outline of main topics and subtopics)


  I. Human Organization
     a.  Chemistry of life
         1) Elements and atoms
         2) Molecules and compounds
         3) Macromolecules
               i. Carbohydrates
               ii. Lipids
               iii. Proteins
               iv. Nucleic acids
         4) Water, buffers, and pH balance
     b.  Cellular respiration and metabolism
         1) Enzymes
         2) Metabolic pathways
               i. Glycolysis
               ii. Krebs cycle
               iii. Electron transport system
               iv. Fermentation

  II. Cellular Basis of Life
      a.    Cellular organization
            1) Cell theory
            2) Cell size and microscopy
            3) Organelles
      b.     Cell and organelle structure and function
            1) Plasma membrane
                   i. Active transport
                   ii. Passive transport
                   iii. Tonicity
                   iv. Endocytosis and exocytosis
                   v. Phagocytosis
            2) Nucleus and nuclear envelope
            3) Nucleolus
            4) Ribosomes
            5) Endoplasmic reticulum
                   i. Rough ER
                   ii. Smooth ER
            6) Golgi apparatus
            7) Vacuoles and vesicles
            8) Lysosomes
            9) Mitochondria
            10) Cytoskeleton
            11) Cilia and flagella
            12) Centrioles
                             Mt. San Jacinto College
   Page 4 of 11        Integrated Course Outline of Record         Form B

   c.    Cell cycle
         1) Cell death
         2) Mitosis
         3) Hypertrophy and hyperplasia
         4) Cancer
                i. Cyclins
                ii. Oncogenes
                iii. Tumor suppressor genes
         5) Aging

III. Organization and regulation of body systems
     a.   Tissues
          1) Epithelial
          2) Nervous
          3) Muscular
          4) Connective
     b.   Body cavities
          1) Ventral
          2) Dorsal
          3) Thoracic
          4) Abdominal
          5) Cranial
     c.   Body Membranes
          1) Mucous
          2) Serous
          3) Pleural
          4) Synovial
     d.   Integumentary system
          1) Regions of the skin
          2) Function of the Integumentary system
          3) Accessory organs of the skin
          4) Skin cancer
     e.   Homeostasis
          5) Body fluid composition
          6) Negative feedback mechanisms
          7) Positive feedback mechanisms

IV. Anatomy and Physiology
    a.   Digestive system
         1) Nutrition
               i. Eating disorders
               ii. Nutrient and macronutrient deficiencies
               iii. Basal metabolism and daily energy requirement
               iv. Ideal weight based on bone mass and body composition
         2) Upper
               i. Oral diseases
               ii. Oral and esophageal cancer
         3) Middle
               i. Stomach cancer
                           Mt. San Jacinto College
Page 5 of 11         Integrated Course Outline of Record              Form B

             ii. Ulcers
      4) Lower
             i. Colon polyps and cancer
             ii. Diarrhea and Constipation
             iii. Pancreatic pathologies
             iv. Gall bladder pathologies
             v. Liver disorders
b.    Blood
      1) Red blood cells
      2) White blood cells
      3) Blood clotting
      4) Plasma
      5) Capillary exchange
      6) Blood typing
c.    Lymphatic system and immunity
      1) Nonspecific defenses
      2) Specific defenses
      3) Induced immunity
      4) Lymphatic organs and vessels
      5) Allergic responses
d.    Respiration
      1) Respiratory system anatomy
      2) Mechanism of breathing
      3) Gas exchange
      4) Respiratory pathology
             i. Lung cancer
             ii. Tobacco smoking
             iii. Infectious and noninfectious respiratory diseases
e.    Excretion
      1) Urinary system anatomy
      2) Urine formation
      3) Maintenance of water-salt balance
      4) Maintenance of acid-base balance
      5) Kidney and urinary tract infections and dysfunctions
      6) Influence on red blood cell formation
      7) Influence on blood pressure regulation
f.    Movement and support
      1) Skeletal system
             i. Bone growth
             ii. Bone repair
             iii. Articulations
             iv. Bones of the skeleton
             v. Skeletal prosthesis
      2) Muscular system
             i. Skeletal muscles
             ii. Muscle contraction
             iii. Muscle energy systems
g.    Integration and coordination in humans
      1) Nervous system
                             Mt. San Jacinto College
   Page 6 of 11        Integrated Course Outline of Record              Form B

               i. Central nervous system
               ii. Peripheral nervous system
               iii. Higher mental functions
               iv. Synapses and neurotransmitters
               v. Drug abuse
               vi. Degenerative nervous system diseases
         2) Sensory system
               i. Sensory receptors and sensations
               ii. Proprioceptors and cutaneous receptors
               iii. Equilibrium and balance
         3) Endocrine system
               i. Endocrine glands
               ii. Hormones
               iii. Specific endocrine gland hyper- and hypo-function
  h.     Cardiovascular system
         1) Blood vessels
               i. Arteries and arterioles
               ii. Veins and venules
               iii. Capillaries
         2) Heart
               i. Anatomy
               ii. Blood flow
               iii. Heartbeat
               iv. Intrinsic control
               v. Extrinsic control
               vi. Heart electrophysiology
         3) Cardiovascular function
               i. Pulse and pulse-rate
               ii. The electrocardiogram
               iii. Blood pressure
               iv. Arterial blood flow
               v. Capillary blood flow
               vi. Venous blood flow
         4) Vascular pathways
               i. Pulmonary circuit
               ii. Systemic circuit
               iii. Cardiac circuit
         5) Cardiovascular disease and disorders
               i. Cardiovascular disease risk factors
               ii. Cardiovascular disease prevention
               iii. Hypertension
               iv. Atherosclerosis
               v. Stroke
               vi. Heart attack
               vii. Aneurysms

V. Human Reproduction
   a.  Reproductive system
       1) Male reproductive system
                             Mt. San Jacinto College
   Page 7 of 11        Integrated Course Outline of Record   Form B

                i. Anatomy
                ii. Hormonal regulation
                iii. Pathology and dysfunctions
         2) Female reproductive system
                i. Anatomy
                ii. Hormonal regulation
                iii. Ovarian cycle
                iv. Uterine cycle
                v. Pathology and dysfunctions
  b.     Human sexual response
         1) Orgasm in the male
         2) Orgasm in the female
  c.     Contraception
         1) Methods
         2) Infertility
         3) Abortion
  d.     Sexually transmitted disease
         1) Viral infectious diseases
         2) Bacterial infectious diseases
         3) Protozoan and fungal infectious diseases
         4) Microscopic animal infectious diseases
  e.     Human development and aging
         1) Fertilization and pregnancy
         2) Development before birth
                i. Embryonic development
                ii. Extra-embryonic membranes
                iii. Fetal circulation
                iv. Birth defects
         3) Birth
                i. Birthing process
                ii. Female breast and lactation
         4) Development after birth
                i. Life span aging
                ii. Gerontology
                iii. Effects of age on body systems
                iv. Menopause

VI. Human Genetics
    a.  Chromosomal inheritance
        1) Meiosis
        2) Spermatogenesis
        3) Oogenesis
        4) Linkage and cross-over
        5) Nondisjunction
        6) Abnormal chromosomal inheritance
    b.  Genes and medical genetics
        1) Genotype and phenotype
        2) Dominant and recessive traits
               i. Punnett Square
                              Mt. San Jacinto College
   Page 8 of 11         Integrated Course Outline of Record   Form B

                ii. Recessive trait disorders
                iii. Dominant trait disorders
                iv. Pedigree charts
         3) Polygenic inheritance
         4) Multiple alleles and blood typing
         5) Incompletely dominant traits
         6) Sex-linked traits
   c.    DNA and Biotechnology
         1) DNA and RNA structure and function
                i. DNA replication
                ii. Ribosomal RNA
                iii. Messenger RNA
                iv. Transfer RNA
         2) Gene expression
                i. Transcription
                ii. Translation
                iii. Protein synthesis
         3) Biotechnology
                i. Genetic engineering
                ii. Cloning
                iii. Recombinant DNA technology
                iv. Polymerase chain reaction technology
                v. Human genome
                vi. Gene therapy and genetic disorders
   d.    Cancer
         1) Characteristics of cancer cells
         2) Origins of cancer
                i. Oncogenes
                ii. Tumor-Suppressor genes
                iii. p53 and the RB gene
                iv. Mutation
                v. Carcinogenesis
         3) Causes of cancer
                i. Heredity
                ii. Environmental carcinogens
                iii. Viral carcinogens
         4) Diagnosis and treatment of cancers
                i. Routine screening tests
                ii. Tumor marker tests
                iii. Genetic tests
                iv. Prevention
                v. Radiation and chemotherapies
                vi. Bone marrow transplants
                vii. Gene therapy

VII. Human Evolution and Ecology
    a.   Human evolution
         1) Origin of life
               i. The primitive earth
                                                   Mt. San Jacinto College
          Page 9 of 11                       Integrated Course Outline of Record                            Form B

                           ii. Small organic molecules
                           iii. Macromolecules
                           iv. The protocell
                    2) Biological evolution
                           i. Adaptation
                           ii. Common descent
                           iii. Natural selection
                    3) Humans as primates
                           i. Characteristics of primates
                           ii. Primate evolutionary tree
                           iii. Evolution of humans
          b.        Ecosystems and Human interferences
                    1) The nature of the ecosystems
                    2) Energy flow and chemical cycling
                    3) Global biogeochemical cycles
                    4) Speciation
          c.        Conservation and biodiversity
                    1) Distribution of diversity
                    2) Value of biodiversity
                    3) Causes of extinction
                           i. Habitat loss
                           ii. Alien species
                           iii. Pollution
                           iv. Over exploitation
                    4) Conservation techniques
                           i. Habitat preservation
                           ii. Habitat restoration


Methods of Instruction: (reflective of a variety of learning styles in gray box below)Methods of instruction may
include, but are not limited to the following:
  1. Lecture complimented with audio visual materials in the form of video,
     PowerPoint presentations and computer generated animations to assist
     students in understanding complex principles of human biology.
  2. Large and small group cooperative learning activities which involve students
     in critical thinking interactions and activities.
  3. Student presentations on case studies addressing various pathological
     conditions to help students understand the relation between human anatomy,
     physiology and its pathology. In addition, this helps students in critical
     analysis of the current literature.
  4. Hands on study of major organ systems using human models, dissection of
     preserved animals such as a pig or a cat, and preserved organs such as a cow
     eye or sheep brain to help understand human anatomy.
  5. Study of physiological processes through experiments to help understand the
     human physiology.
  6. Study of cells and tissues using prepared slides and microscopes to assist in
     understanding tissues found in the human body.
Methods of Evaluation: A student's grade shall be determined by the instructor using multiple measures of performance
related to the course objectives. Methods of evaluation may include but are not limited to the following:
                                                  Mt. San Jacinto College
          Page 10 of 11                     Integrated Course Outline of Record                                         Form B

     1. Weekly quizzes and assignments requiring critical analysis, synthesis of
        information and problem solving skills related to the material presented in the
        lecture and the text book.
     2. A minimum of 4 Examinations requiring critical analysis and synthesis of
        information presented in the lectures and the textbook.
     3. Laboratory reports which demonstrate cognitive processes such as
        developing a testable hypothesis and following an experimental protocol.
     4. Laboratory practicals that demonstrate competence in laboratory methods
        and content areas.
     5. Oral presentations requiring students to conduct research on case studies in
        the current scientific literature and to apply their newly acquired knowledge to
        predict outcomes and treatments appropriate for specific scenario.

Lecture exams, quizzes and assignments will comprise approximately 75% of the
total grade; laboratory practicals, written reports and examinations will comprise
approximately 25% of the total grade.

All test material will be at the collegiate level with a variety of formats, such as,
multiple choice, true and false, fill-in, definition, short answer, and essay. NO open
book exams are to be administered.
Examples of Assignments: Students will be expected to understand and critique college level texts or the equivalent.
Reading and writing, as well as out of class assignments are required. These assignments may include but are not limited to the following:
Assignment sample questions:
  1. Pediatricians become concerned about the potential for brain damage when
      an infant’s temperature approaches 105oC. Which class of organic molecules
      is mot likely to be damaged by high temperature? Explain why.

     2. Mr. Posibo has had colon surgery. Now he is experiencing weakness of the
        muscles on his right side only, the side in which the incision was made through
        abdominal musculature. Consequently, the abdominal muscles on his left side
        contract more strongly, throwing his torso into a lateral flexion. Mr. Posibo
        needs physical therapy. What abnormal spinal curvature will result if he
        doesn’t get it and why?

     3. Discuss how the brain is protected by bone, membranes, fluid and capillaries.


Textbook (s):         The required college-level textbooks may include, but are not limited to the following:
Required (1):


 Textbook (s): The required college-level textbooks may include, but are not limited to the following:
 Required (1):
 Mader, Sylvia S.                                              Human Biology. 8th ed.
 Author                                                                  Title
 McGraw Hill                                                   0-07-292187-0                             2008
 Publisher                                                     ISBN                                      Publication Date
 Required (2):
                               Mt. San Jacinto College
         Page 11 of 11   Integrated Course Outline of Record                  Form B

Mader, Sylvia S.                           Study Guide to Human Biology
Author                                     Title
McGraw Hill                         0-07-292187-0              2008
Publisher                           ISBN                       Publication Date
Required (3):
Mader, Sylvia S.                           Laboratory Manual for Human Biology.
                                           8th ed.
Author                                     Title
McGraw Hill                         0-07-242100-2              2008
Publisher                           ISBN                       Publication Date
Supplemental (1):

Instructor prepared lab manual
Author                                     Title


Publisher                           ISBN                       Publication Date
Supplemental (2):

Author                                     Title

								
To top