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									 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                           1




                                            ABSTRACT

ASPIRA, Inc. of Puerto Rico proposes to continue sponsoring its Upward Bound Program.

ASPIRA, Inc. of Puerto Rico is a non-profit educational service organization created in 1969 to

promote the educational and leadership development of Puerto Rican low-income youth.

Associated with the ASPIRA Association, Inc., a national educational association, ASPIRA of

Puerto Rico operates within broad guidelines to assist youth to increase self image, improve

motivation and fulfill educational and career objectives. It is located in the Municipality of

Carolina on the north-east side of the Island. The city is comprised of 177,806 inhabitants and is

characterized by both rural and urban poverty sectors. About 4 % of the population receives

nutritional assistance and food stamps from the Federal Government (GAO/RCED 92-114

Federal Food Assistance in Puerto Rico).

ASPIRA of Puerto Rico's Upward Bound Project target area is comprised of three middle and

three high schools located within two public high school districts in the Municipality of Carolina

(Target Area Map #I) whose estimated 15-24 years old population is 47,400 (Puerto Rico

Planning Board Population Report, 1990). The target schools are located in a contiguous and

compact geographical area in the center of which the ASPIRA offices are located. The farthest

school is only four miles away, and the average distance between the schools and ASPIRA's

offices is 2.5 miles (See Target Area Map #2). These schools have been selected after a rigorous

review process which analyzed all the schools in the area and identified the schools most in need.

The high concentration of students with vast educational needs in the target area provides a large

pool of potential Upward Bound participants. Furthermore, the 10th-12th grade population in

these three high schools represents approximately 40% of all Carolina public school 10th - 12th

students.
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The need for Upward Bound Program services is strong. The target area lacks the services and

activities provided by Upward Bound. There is an extremely high percentage of low income and

potential first generation college students in the area. Specifically, the target area shows a high

enrollment in the high and middle schools and a continuing problem of high dropout rates.

About 5 % do not reach the 12th grade (1994). In Puerto Rico, students take the CEEB exam

instead of the SAT or ACT exam. Low academic performance, low scores on CEEB exams, low

post-secondary enrollment rates, high counselor to student ratios (1:515) in target high schools

and the lack of counseling and other supporting services are factors that make Upward Bound

services urgent.

We propose a pre-collegiate program designed to select 70 eligible participants annually and to

generate academic skills and motivation necessary for successful completion of secondary and

postsecondary education. The objectives of the program are designed to meet the specific needs

of students in the target area population. Assistance to the participants is provided through

integrated academic year and summer non-residential components. Classes in the Sciences,

Mathematics, English and Spanish are offered to participants during the academic year.

Participants will also receive:

       Supplemental instruction (peer tutoring);

       Monitoring of homework, and;

       Study skills and time management workshops.

Based on ASPIRA's philosophy of whole development of the student, the Upward Bound

program provides:

      Individual and group counseling (academic, vocational and personal);

      Career counseling/assessment;
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       Cultural/social enrichment;

       Dissemination of educational and financial aid information, and;

       Assistance with admissions and financial aid applications.

Likelihood of success is significantly enhanced through our extensive experience in operating

this program since 1983 and the high quality of the staff and program activities.

ASPIRA utilizes a comprehensive system for recording data and evaluation reports. The

evaluation plan looks at the overall process of the program. The evaluation design provides

feedback to program staff on the progress made towards meeting the goals of the program and

assess the efectiveness of program activities.

Institutional and community commitment strongly support all ASPIRA programs and

components. Moreover, the quality of expertise and experience of both administrative and

counseling personnel are insuumental in maintaining this support. The proposed budget is

designed to continue providing the high level of services to the Upward Bound participants on a

cost effective basis.

The success of the Upward Bound Program at ASPIRA of Puerto Rico is well documented by

the achievements of previous year participants. The high school graduation and postsecondary

placement rates during the past three years period of the ASPIRA Upward Bound Program has

reached an exceptional one hundred percent (100%).             We aspire to attain these same

accomplishments during the next grant period.
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I. INTRODUCTION

This introduction presents an overview of the severe socioeconomic conditions of Puerto Rico.

Following this brief overview, we discuss the specific needs for the program in the target area.

As reflected in the 1990 census, its population was of 3,522,037 persons of which 59% have

incomes under the poverty levels. Based on the poverty guidelines issued by the Department of

Health and Human Services, 69,211 families, 1,460,677 persons or, 41% percent of the

population are recipients of the Nutritional Assistance Program (NAP). This population

constitutes 8% of the recipients and funding amount nationwide (GAO-Report to Congressional

Committees Food Assistance Nutritional conditions and Program Alternatives in Puerto Rico

1992). In addition to the Nutritional Assistance Program, other food assistance programs

operating in Puerto Rico include: the Child and Adult Care Food Program; the Emergency Food

Assistance Program; the National School Breakfast and Lunch Program; Nutrition Programs for

the Elderly; the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children; and the

Summer Food Service Program for Children.

                             TABLE I
 TOTAL FEDERAL FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAM PROVIDED TO PUERTO RICO
                     DURING FISCAL YEAR 1990
                                                                          FUNDING                 % OF TOTAL
                         PROGRAM
                                                                          AMOUNT                   FUNDING
Child and Adult Care Food Program                                                536,841                  0.003
The Emergency Food Assistant Program                                           3,800,000                  0.325
National School Breakfast Program                                             20,200,000                  1.728
National School Lunch Program                                                l12,900,000                  9.657
Nutritional Program For The Elderly                                            1,400,000                  0.120
Special Supplemental Food Program For Women
        Infants and Children                                                 90,100.000                     7.707
Summer Food Service Program For Children                                        3,200.000                   0.273
Other Food Donations                                                              674,000                   0.058
        Subtotal                                                              232,310,841                  19.871
Nutritional Assistance Programs                                               936,800,000                  80.129
Total                                                                       1,169,110,841                 100.000
Source: GAO/RCED 92-114 Federal Food Assistance in Puerto Rico. More recent data has not been published
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As Table # 2 demonstrates, the Puerto Rico overall unemployment rate for 1991-1993 ranges

from 14.3% to 16.5%. Officially, there is a 40.2% unemployment rate for the 16 to 19 years old

population, 29.9% for those 20 to 24 years, 17.9% for those 25 to 34 and 2.9% for those 35 to 44

years. (Puerto Rico Planning Board. Annual Report to the Governor, 1993).

                                            TABLE 2

              UNEMPLOYMENT RATES BY GROUP OF AGE AND SEX
                       (in percents years 1992, 1992, 1993)
          AGE            MALES                  FEMALES     BOTH SEXES
                   1991 1992 1993 1991 1992 1993 1991 1992 1993
          16-19          36.5     41.4    40.0    32.5     37.5    40.2     35.2    40.2    40.2
          20-24          26.9     28.7    32.6    23.7     24.4    25.1     25.8    27.2    29.9
          25-34          18.4     19.6    20.6    11.2     12.5    13.9     15.5    16.8    17.9
          35-44          l3.5     13.0    15.3    7.4      7.8     9.3      11.0    10.9    12.9
          45-54          12.0     12.3    13.2    5.5      7.1     7.3      9.6     10.4    11.0
          55-64          8.7      9.4     10.4    4.9      4.2     6.1      7.6     7.9     9.2
         65- more        3.3      3.1     5.0     1.0      5.0     2.1      2.9     3.7     4.4
          Total          16 . 4   17.3    18.7    10.7     11.7    12.7     14.3    15.2    16.5



The unemployment projections remain high, particularly for those who do not attain at least a

high school education (Labor Department Employment Projection for years 1999-2004). This

degree of poverty has far reaching social and educational effects on the population, especially the

youth population. The Puerto Rico illiteracy rate for 1990 was 10.4% or 373,336 persons. There

are 1.5 million of Puerto Ricans who are "functional illiterates:" i.e., that lack of reading

comprehension and interpretation skills or lack of skills necessary for today jobs. (U.S.

Department of Commerce: Economics and Statistics Administration: Bureau of the census,

1990).
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According to 1993 Puerto Rico Department of Education data, for every 100 students enrolled in

first grade in 1981-82 approximately 51% dropped out before reaching the 12th grade (Table

#3). Of those enrolled in seventh grade, only 50.6% reached the 12th grade. Statistics reflect

cumulative dropout rates of 40.4% for grades 10th to 12th and 45.5% for grades 7th to 12th.

Dropout cumulative rates for grades 7th to 12th for years 1989 to 1992 were 44.0%, 44% and

45% respectively.

As Table #3 demonstrates, in 1992-93 the dropout rates grade by grade for Puerto Rico grades

7th to 12th, were as follows:

                                                   TABLE 3

                  DROPOUTSRATESGRADEBYGRADEFORPUERTORICO
                              GRADE 7TH TO 12TH
                    GRADE                    DROPOUT RATE 1992-1993
                          7th                                                    10.4
                          8th                                                    6.8
                          9th                                                    2.9
                            th
                         10                                                      14.4
                         11th                                                    14.9
                         12th                                                    11.0
Source: Puerto Rico Department of Education Retention Rates Reports 1993.



These startling statistics reflect great need for services to improve retention in grades 7th and 8th

and 10th to 12th in Puerto Rico.

In a study sponsored by the ASPIRA Association, Inc., Dr. Ronald Duncan found a high

concentration of low income students enrolled in private institutions, even though tuition costs at

these institutions are high. "By the end of the 1970 decade, the private universities enrolled 34%

of all students in Puerto Rico with a financial base that almost totally depended on the federal

Pell Grants Program. "
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Updated statistics from the Puerto Rico Postsecondary Education Council demonstrate a

decreasing enrollment in public institutions from a 90.8% in 1950 to 36.9% in 1991. In 1950,

public institutions enrolled 90.8% of the students; in 1960, they enrolled 74.3%, and in 1970,

they enrolled 66%. In 1990, public institutions enrolled 41.4%, while in 1991 they enrolled only

36.9% and private institutions enrolled 63. l% of the postsecondary students. See Table #4.

                                                       TABLE 4

  ENROLLMENT AND PERCENTS IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE POSTSECONDARY
        EDUCATION INSTITUTION IN PUERTO RICO YEAR 1950-1991
                    PUBLIC                   PRIVATE
YEARS    TOTAL                   PERCENT                   PERCENT
                 INSTITUTIONS              INSTITUTION
1950   12,497   11,348          90.8      1,149           9.2
1960   24,532   18,232          74.3      6,309           25.7
1970   57,332   37,839          66.0      19,499          34.0
1980   130,195  53,956          41.4      76,339          58.6
1990   156,147  58,940          37.7      97,207          62.3
1991   157,489  58,133          36.9      99,356          63.1
1992   158,316  56,044          35.4      102,272         64.6
1993   159,211  56,201          35.3      103,010         64.7
Source: Postsecondary Education Council Statistical Report 1990-1991.



Financial aid is critical for low income students to enroll in postsecondary education program.

Low income students graduated from public high school graduates must compete for public

universities allocations with students from private schools who obtain higher GPA'S and College

Entrance Test Scores. As a result, low income students enroll in private postsecondary

institutions and pay higher educational costs. This condition contributes to the high

postsecondary dropouts, low rates of bachelors and masters degrees obtained from universities in

Puerto Rico. The 1990 census data demonstrated that in Puerto Rico only 14.3% of persons 25

years and over have a bachelors degree or higher (Report March 1988).
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A. STATEMENT OF NEED: TARGET AREA

1) The Number and Percentage of Low Income Families Residing in the Target Area

The target area is characterized by low per capita income, high number and percent of families

with incomes under the poverty level and high numbers and percent of persons with incomes

under the poverty level.

Table #5 Summarizes income data for the Municipafity of Carolina

                                              TABLE 5

                           TARGET AREA INCOME LEVEL STATUS

                                                     Families with income      Persons all ages under
     Target area            Per capita income in     under poverty level           Poverty level
                                   1989             number       Percent       number       percent
       Carolina                   $5,525             17,822        38.8         73,952        41.8
Source: U.S. Departmento of Commerce 1990 Census of Population and Housing Summary Social, Economic and
        Housing Statistic Puerto Rico, Table 12. Pages 212 to 230.



In the target high schools, the percentage of student from families with incomes under the

poverty level range from 56% in Dr. Gilberto Concepción, to 75% in Lola Rodríguez. The total

number of students under the poverty income level in grades 10th to 12th was 197 or 66% of

these students.

The percentage of students from families with incomes under poverty level, in target middle

schools, range from 75% in Manuel Febres, to 98% in Petra Román Vigo. The total number of

9th grade students under poverty level is 906 or 85% for the three middle schools. Income

information in target schools is contained in Table #6.
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                                                 TABLE 6

   NUMBER AND PERCENT OF LOW INCOME STUDENTS BY TARGET SCHOOL
                               1994
                                             Below the poverty level
            Target School        Number             Percent
Dr. José M. Lázaro                    653              66
Dr. Gilberto Concepción               412              56
Lola Rodríguez de Tió (High)          242              75
Petra Román Vigo                      355              98
Manuel Febres                         379              75
Lola Rodríguez de Tió (Middle)        172              82
Total                               2,213              75
* Carolina(1990)                   73.952              42
* Puerto Rico (1990)            2,057,377              59
Source: Department of Education Enrollment Report Year 1994




2) Education Attainment Levels of Adults in the Target Area

Of the 60,317 adults over 25 that reside in the three barrios where the target schools are located,

86% have not completed a baccalaureate degree. This compares with 83% of individual over 25

in Carolina, and 86% in Puerto Rico who have no reached this level of educational attainment.

Moreover, 22,317 adults over 25, fully 37% of all adults living in the barrios where the target

schools are located, have not graduated from high school. Again, this compares closely with 36%

of individuals over 25 in Carolina who have not graduated from high school (Table #7).

                                                 TABLE 7

             EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF TARGET AREA RESIDENTS
                                      Without High School Diploma              Without College Degree
                                       number          percent                 number          percent
Targe Area (Barrios)                     22,317          37%                    51,872          86%
Carolina                                 37,192          36%                    84,472          82%
Puerto Rico                            970,291          50.3%                  279,178          85%
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce: 1990 Census of Population and Housing.
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      3) The High School Dropout Rates in the Target Areas

      Dropout rates for the high school level in the target school districts for 1993-94 (Table #8) range

      from 11 to 20 percent with comparative rates for years 1991-92. For the middle school level, the

      dropout rates for grades 7th to 9th range from 5 to 11 percent (Table #9).

                                                               TABLE 8

        ENROLLMENT AND DROPOUT RATES IN THE TARGET SCHOOLS DISTRICTS
                    SCHOOL YEARS 1991-92, 1992-93 AND 1993-94
                            GRADES 10TH TO 12TH
               Enrollment Grades           No of           Enrollment Grades        No of    Enrollment Grades               No of
                   10th – 12th           Dropouts              10th – 12th         Dropouts      10th – 12th               Dropouts
                  1991 - 1992             10th-12th           1991 - 1992            th
                                                                                   10 -12 th
                                                                                                1991 - 1992                10th-12th
             10 11       12 Total       91-92 %          10 11       12 Total     92-93 % 10    11 12 Total             93-94       %
Carolina II 729 686 610 2,025            138     10     761 675 602 2,038          144 10 676 658 559 1,893              163       11
Carolina III 449 372 318 1,139           170     21     425 356 295 1,076          176 20 386 298 296        980         187       20


                                                               TABLE 9

         ENROLLMENT AND DROPOUT RATES IN THE TARGET SCHOOL DISTRICTS
                    SCHOOL YEARS 1991-92, 1992-93 AND 1993-94
                             GRADES 7TH TO 9TH
                Enrollment Grades          No of           Enrollment Grades         No of       Enrollment Grades           No of
                      7th
                          – 9th          Dropouts               7th – 9th          Dropouts           7th – 9th            Dropouts
                   1991 - 1992             7th-9th            1991 – 1992             th th
                                                                                     7 -9           1991 - 1992              7th-9th
              7     8       9   Total   91-92 %          7     8      9   Total   92-93 %      7     8      9   Total   93-94        %
Carolina II 753 676 761 2,190             35        4   700 718 693 2,111           71      5 657 671 679 2,007           74          5
Carolina III 777 686 605 2,068           164       11   772 650 649 2,071          142 10 804 680 587 2,071              190         11



      As a result of these dropout rates, during school year 1993-94, 614 middle and high school

      students, grades 7 to 12 dropped out of school from the two target school districts. From 1991 to

      1993, 978 high school and 676 middle school students or a total 1,654 middle and high school

      students dropped out of school.

      Dropout rates in the target high schools remain high. School dropout rates for grades l0 to 12

      range from 8% to 14% in school year 1991-92, from 10% to 23% for year 1992-93 and from

      10% to 20% for year 1993-94 (Table #10).
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                                           TABLE 10

    DROPOUT ARTES IN THE TARGET IiIGH SCHOOLS GRADES 10TH - 12TH
                         YEAR 1991-92, 1992-93 ANO 1993-94
        School Years                199 –9           199 –9      199 –9
                                  o                o           o
     Target High Schools         N         %      N         % N         %
Dr. José M. Lázaro                   102        14       75          10       140        20
Dr. Gilberto Concepción de Gracia     48        8        70          12        29        10
Lola Rodríguez de Tió                 22        13       59          23        48        20


Dropout rates of the three target middle schools, grades 7th and 9th, ranged from 5% to 12% in

school year 1992, from 5% to 31% in 1993, and from 8% to 12% in 1994 (see Table #11).

                                           TABLE 11

 DROPOUT RATES IN THE TARGET MIDDLE SCHOOLS GRADES 7th. - 9th. YEAR
                         1992-93 AND 1993-94
       School Years           199 –9          199 –9      199 –9
   Target Middle Schools   No        %     No        % No        %
Petra Román Vigo                      34        15       71          31        28        10
Manuel Febres                         20         5       18          5         28         8
Lola Rodríguez de Tió                 13        12       13          13        11        12


4) College-going Rates in Target High Schools

In Pueno Rico, a high performance on the College Board Entrance Examination and high GPA

(3.5) are necessary in order to gain admission to the University of Puerto Rico system, the

Commonwealth's only state-supported postsecondary institution.

Post-secondary enrollment rates of 12th grade graduates from target high schools range from 60%

to 705 in school year 1991-1992, from 57% to 72% for year 1992-1993, and from 60% to 81%

for year 1993-1994 (Table #12).
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                                               TABLE 12
                       PERCENT OF TARGET HIGH SCHOOLS
                 WHO ENROLLED IN POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
      School Years                      1995-96                     1996-97                      1997-98
  Target High Schools              No             %            No             %           No               %
Dr. José M. Lázaro
Dr. Gilberto Concepcion
Lola Rodríguez de Tió
Source: School Annual Performance Report: Schools Counselors; Post-secondary Placement Report.




Most of the students placed on postsecondary education programs were enrolled in two and four

year private non profit institutions.

The limited capacity of the public university system for new admissions and their requirements

for high GPA and College Board Exam scores hinder the enrollment opportunities for those with

GPA as high as 3.70 or more in some instances. As a result, low-income students with high

potential enroll in private institutions with lower requirements but higher cost increasing the

dropout possibilities due to economic difficulties.

5) The Ratio of Students to Counselor

    One of the greatest limitations of the target area schools is the extremely high

    counselor/student ratio. The average ratio for the target schools is 515 pupils for every

    counselor.

    ―Both the National Association of College Admission Counselors and the American School

    Counselor Association recommended that the counselor to student ratio be between 1 to 100

    (ideal) and 1 to 300 (maximum).‖ ―Schools must also provide adequate clerical and support

    staff to ensure that the counselor’s full attention is devoted tos student service‖ (Frank

    Burhnett, Education Week, April 28, 1993 Page 33).
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    Table #13 demonstrates that in all the target schools, counselor to student ratios are over the

    recommended levels.

                                              TABLE 13

                  TARGET SCHOOLS COUNSELORS TO STUDENT RATIO
                     ACADEMIC YEARS 1991-92, 1992-93 AND 1993-94
 Target High Schools      Counselor Student Ratio    Counselor Student Ratio   Counselor Student Ratio
                                  199 –9                    199 –9                    199 –9
Dr. José M. Lázaro
Lola Rodríguez de Tió
Dr. Gilberto Concepción
Petra Román Vigo
Manuel Febres
Lola Rodríguez(Middle)
          Average
Source: School Performance Annual Report, 1994



The counselor-to-student ratio ranges from 1 to 30 in Lola Rodríguez de Tió (High School), and

to 1 to 980 in Dr. José M. Lázaro High School, for a men counselor to student ratio of to 682.

The counselor to student ratios ranges from 1 to 155 in Lola Rodríguez de Tió Middle School,

and to 1 to 526 in Dr. Manuel Febres Middle School, for mean ratio of 1 – 348 (See Table #11).

These ratios, among others, contribute to the inadequate counseling services in the middle and

high shool levels. In the target high schools, in most instances the sseniors’ requirements for

services are beyond the counselor capability. This counseling services deficiency undermines

the amount and quality of personal, academic and career counseling services and activities

delivered to tenth, eleventh, and twelfth graders.

6) Unaddressed Conditions

        a. Academic
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       To assess the academic achievement of students the Department of Education administer

       the Puerto Rican School Competency Test. According to the published reports, the

       performance of our target school is poor.

       Table 1 shows the percentage changes of competent students in target schools by subject

       matters for years 1995—96 and 1996-97. In most target schools increases have been low,

       fluctuation from 4 to 53. There are three schools with negative increases in several

       subject matters. For example, the percentage changes of competent students in English

       for the middle schools Petra Román Vigo, Lola Rodríguez de Tió, Georgina Baquero and

       Manuel Febres are –10%, -9%, 1 and –11% respectively.

                                                TABLE 1

          PERCENTAGE CHANGES OF COMPETENT STUDENTS IN TARGET SCHOOLS

                                                       Subject Matters
   Middle Schools          Spanish         English         Math          Science      Social Studies
Petra Román Vigo
Lola Rodríguez de Tió
Dr. Manuel Febres
Source: Department of Education: Report 3A: Percentage Changes of Competent Students By Subject
        Matters 1995-96 and 1996-97.

Based on the general index of school competency (Table II) the target schools are below the

average when compared with the indexes of their school districts. Differences between target

schools and its school districts range from seven in Georgina Baquero to 25 in Petra Román

Vigo. The index for Petra Román Vigo was 13 in 1995-96 and 21 in 1996-97 meanwhile for its

district (Carolina III) was 31 in 1995-96 and 46 in 1996-97.

In terms of range order, our target schools are placed in very high positions. By school districts,

range order goes from seven to José M. Lázaro to 16 for Petra Román Vigo. By region (includes

several contiguous towns) ranges goes from 72.5 to 172.5. At state level, high positions
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evidence the disadvantageous conditions of the proposed target schools. At this level, ranges are

from 755 for the José M. Lázaro to 1416.5 for Petra Román Vigo.

                              TABLE 2
      GENERAL INDEX OF SCHOOL COMPETENCY FOR TARGET SCHOOLS

       SCHOOL                                    IGCE                                   RANGE 1996-97
                             1995-96    Difference     1996-97      Difference     District   Region   State
                                       with District               with District
Petra Román Vigo                13          18          21          25         16       172.5 1416.5
Dr. José M. Lázaro              26           5          44           2          7        72.5        755
Carolina III District           31           -          46           -
Gilberto Concepción de Gracia  N/A                     N/A                    N/A        N/A        N/A
Dr. Manuel Febres               21          10          29          17         10        151        1334
Lola Rodríguez de Tió           17          14          30          16          9        146        1315
Carolina II District            31           -          46           -
Georgina Baquero                18          16          40           7         11        117        1041
Canóvanas District              34                      47
Source: Department of Education: Report 4A: General Index of School Competency 1995-96 and 1996-97.



b. Social

In Puerto Rico, there is an increasing tendency in legal transgressions committed by minors. In

1993, the total police interventions with minors increased 20% from 14,535 in 1992 to 18,274.

The Ana G. Méndez Foundation conducted a research in 1992 studying the factors and

consequences of the school dropouts. It was evident that most legal offenders are school

dropouts. 40.6% of the minors that conmmitted law transgressions were not enrolled in school.

Table #17 shows the range and percent of legal offenses committed by minors in the Carolina

Police Region.

                                            TABLE 17

     RANGE AND PERCENT OF LEGAL OFFENSES COMMITTED BY MINORS
               AS REPORTED BY THE CAROLINA POLICE REGION
               Fault             Incidents in Incidents in Rank                                        Percent
                                     PR       Target Area
Violent Crimes
Assassinations
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Rapes
Drugs
Source: Police Department Annual Report, 1993




c. Economic

The target area has a high unemployment rate. The average official unemployment rate in

Carolina for 1994 was 10.5.

There is a large population of economically disadvantaged persons. Many youth face high

unemployment among their families and are in great need of assistance to improve academic

performance and motivation level leading to high school completion and access to post-

secondary programs.      Addressing these needs can have a profound impact on their future

employability and economic stability.

Census data indicates that the median number of years of schooling for Puerto Rico was 9.4, with

about 50.3% of the population over 25 years of age having less than a high education.

Furthermore employment data for 1992 indicate that approximately 64% of the Island's labor

force had only the 12th grade or less of education (Department of Labor and Human Resources).

There are no schools, governmental agencies, or community organizations providing the type of

services offered by the Upward Bound Program at ASPIRA of Puerto Rico.

A survey conducted by ASPIRA of Puerto Rico in November, 1994 (See Table 19),

demonstrated that the target area high schools lacked programs to provide assistance to low

income and first generation secondary students to develop their academic skills and provide

motivation necessary to succeed at postsecondary education level.

These services were:

   Pre-collegiate academic preparation program,

   Summer programs to develop academic and motivational skills,
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   Academic skills development programs for disadvantage students during the school year,

   Enrichment activities/classes in Mathematics, Sciences, Spanish and English for

    postsecondary preparation,

   Individualized counseling contacts for assessments and academic development,

   Recruitment and identification of disadvantaged students,

   Peer tutoring in academic matters,

   Study skills instructions,

   Preparation classes for college admission test (CEEB),

   Career assessment and guidance,

   Socialization skills development,

   Individualized educational plan, and

   Scholarship search.

The only program in the target schools that provides these services was the Upward Bound

Program at ASPIRA. This survey dramatically emphasizes our continued need for the

Upward Bound Program.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                                 1999-2004                                                                                                                    20




                                                     TABLE 18

  SURVEY OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES AVAILABLE IN THE
                        TARGET SCHOOLS




                                                                                                                        Dr. Gilberto Concepción
                                                                                               Lola Rodríguez de Tió,
                                                                        José M. Lázaro, H.S.




                                                                                                                                                  Petra Román Vigo




                                                                                                                                                                                     Upward Bound
                        Target Schools/Services




                                                                                                                                                                     Manuel Febres
                                                                                               M.S./H.S.
                        Specialized Academic Enrichment for Low
                        Income
                        Summer Program
                        Supplemental Instruction in Spanish
Academic                Supplemental Instruction in English
Services                Supplemental Instruction in Math
                        Supplemental Instruction in Science
                        Peer-tutoring
                        Study Skills Instructions
                        CEEB Preparation Classes
                        Tutoring
                        Academic Counseling
                        Career Counseling
Counseling              Personal Counseling
                        25 or more contacts with students
                        Career Assessment
                        Individualized Postsecondary Admission
                        Assistance
                        College Admissions Workshops
                        Financial Aid Workshops
Postsecondary           Individualized    Postsecondary   Admission
Financial Aid           Assistance
                        College Admission Workshops
                        Financial Aid Workshops
                        Individualized Assistance with Financial Aid
                        Applications
                        Scholarship Search
Educational             Academic Needs Assessment
Assessment              Individualized Educational Plan
                        Evaluation of Individual Progress
                  Cultural Trips
Culture           Socialization Skills
Source: School Survey, November 1991.

Key:    A     =   Always Provided (100% of need met)
        O     =   Occasionally Provided (50% of need met)
        S     =   Seldom Provided (25% of need met)
        N     =   Never Available as Needed at No Cost
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                           21




B. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

ASPIRA began the Regular Upward Bound Program as a response to the critical need within the

target community for comprehensive educational services to encourage youth to continue and

graduate from secondary school and enroll in postsecondary education programs. Table 20,

ASPIRA Upward Bound Program Comprehensive Plan, shows how the following goals and

objectives and related to the target area population.

The following goals form the program has been established:

GOALS

   1. To generate in participants the skills and motivation necessary for success in education
      beyond high school.

   2. To encourage participants to develop positive self esteem, and leadership skills.

Specific Program Objectives

1. To identify, recruit and select 70 eligible youths with potential for education at the
   postsecondary level and to encourage them to complete secondary school and to undertake a
   program of post-secondary education. The selection process will be accomplished by
   December of each year. Not less than two-thirds of the participants enrolled in the project
   will be low-income individuals who are also potential first generation college students. The
   remaining will be either low income individuals or potential first generation college students.

2. 100% of the newly admitted participants will have their needs assessed, and have an
   Educational Plan developed by February of each year.

3. 95% of ninth to twelfth grade participants will be retained in school each program year.

4. 95% of the seniors will complete high school each program year.

5. 90% of the high school graduates will receive academic vocational and/or personal services,
   as needed, during the summer component each year.

6. 95% of high school seniors will enter to postsecondary education programs each program
   year.

7. 90% of ninth to eleventh graders will continue in Upward Bound each year.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                            1999-2004                              22




8. 65% of participants will increase at least .40 points of grade average in those school courses
   with grade average below 2.49 each year as reflected by school reports. The Puerto Rico
   Department of Education uses a 4.0 points scale.
9. Over each program year at least 75% of the participants will complete the Upward Bound
   Classes with at least 60% of proficiency on each of the skills performed.
10. Over each program year, ASPIRA Upward Bound Program will provide a range of
    educational and motivational services and activities to program participants.
PROCESS OBJECTIVES
1. One hundred percent (100%) of the participants will receive classes on at least one of the
   basic subjects: English, Spanish, Math and Science.

2. At least 15 participants most in need will receive supplemental tutoring in subject matters.

3. One hundred percent (100%) of participants will receive meaningful counseling services.

4. To provide academic advice to one hundred percent (100%) of participants.

5. To improve the participants career awareness and selection process skills providing career
   counseling activities.

6. One hundred percent (100%) of seniors will receive assistance to complete the College
   Admission Test Application.

7. Ninety percent (90%) of seniors will receive information on careers, postsecondary education
   opportunities, and financial aid.

8. To provide participants with information about careers, colleges and universities, fees,
   supporting services and financial aid available at different postsecondary institutions.

9. To expose , at least twenty participants, each program year to careers, facilities and work environment.

10. To assist participants in developing effective time management and study skills.

11. Approximately thirty five (35) of the participants will be exposed to at least two (2) post-
    secondary institutions facilities, programs, services, admission and acquire knowledge of
    process and financial aid available.

12. To assist participants in applying for admission to secondary or postsecondary institutions.

13. Ninety percent (90%) of participants will be provided with cultural enrichment activities.

14. To assist participants in contacting agencies and professionals that provide services as needed.

15. To provide computerized instruction to participants.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                                     1999-2004                                  23




                                               ASPIRA UPWARD BOUND COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

         OBJECTIVE                            ACTIVITIES                      RELATES TO NEED                       DEADLINE                 PERSONNEL
1.    To identify, recruit and        Publicize program services by         Recruitment and selection based      September to December   Supervision
     select 70 eligible youth with    public service announcements          on the increasing number of
     potential for education at the   (TV, radio and/or newspaper)          persons 16-19 years not enrolled                             Counselor
     postsecondary level.                                                   in high school and high school
                                      Meet with all appropriate
                                                                            graduated in the target area.                                Supplemental Instruction
     Not less than two-thirds of     agencies and organizations in
                                                                                                                                         Coordinator
     the participants will be low-    target to inform them about           Recruitment and selection based
     income individuals who are       Upward Bound (UB) services and        on high number and percentages
                                                                                                                                         School Directors,
     also potential first genera-     eligibility criteria.                 of students from families with
                                                                                                                                         Counselors and Teachers
     tion college students. The                                             incomes under poverty level.
                                      Meet with schools directors and
     remaining will be either low                                           From 56% to 98% in target
                                      counselors at the five target
     income individuals or                                                  schools.
                                      schools to inform them about UB
     potential first generation
                                      services and eligibility criteria.    Recruitment and selection based
     college students.
                                                                            on law percentage of individuals
                                      Gain commitment from agencies
                                                                            residing in target area with
                                      and organizations to inform
                                                                            education completion level
                                      clients and make referrals to UB.
                                                                            below the baccalaureate degree
                                      Hold conferences at target            (86%).
                                      schools to inform students about
                                                                            100% of postsecondary
                                      the program objectives,
                                                                            institutions placements of
                                      requirements, services and
                                                                            seniors evidences the availability
                                      activities.
                                                                            in target area of youth with
                                      Revise the Pre-intake forms and       potential for education at the
                                      follow up.                            postsecondary level.
                                      Provide the Intake Form to
                                      candidates.
                                      Revise eligibility documents:
                                      Intake Forms
                                      Transcripts
                                      Low Income verification
                                      Citizenship status, etc.
                                      Interview Candidates
                                      Select the participants
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                                  1999-2004                                   24




        OBJECTIVE                           ACTIVITIES                     RELATES TO NEED                        DEADLINE                 PERSONNEL
                                                                                                               September to February   Supevisor
2.   100% of the newly admitted     Revised the school transcripts,      The high counselor to student
     participants will have their   students performance in              ratio in target schools contributes
                                                                                                                                       Counselor
     needs assessed and an          standardized test and other          to the inadequate counseling
     Educational Plan developed.    documentation.                       services and lack of personalized
                                                                                                                                       Supplemental Instruction
                                                                         attention to individual counseling
                                    Administer the ASPIRA Basic                                                                        Coordinator
                                                                         needs.
                                    Skills Diagnostic Test.
                                                                         The high teacher to student ratio                             Program Teachers
                                    Evaluate the participant’s
                                                                         do not allow the developing of
                                    motivational level through
                                                                         individualized plans of academic                              School Teachers,
                                    interviews and recommendations.
                                                                         services.                                                     Counselor or other.
                                    Assess the participants knowledge
                                    of the career decision making
                                    process.
                                    Create a personal portfolio with
                                    all the documents needed.
                                    Develop an individual plan for
                                    academic development.
3.   95% of ninth to twelfth        Over each program 100% of the        The high dropouts rates in the        September to July       Supervisor
     grade participants will be     participants will receive a range    target area reflects great need for
                                                                                                                                       Counselor
     retained in school.            educational and motivational         service that improve retention.
                                    services and activities. It          Dropout rates in target high                                  Supplemental Instruction
                                    includes:                            schools rage from 10% to 20%.                                 Coordinator

                                    Personal motivational counseling     Low achievement, low-income                                   Teachers
                                    Academic advice                      and un-motivated students don’t
                                    Career counseling                    have alternatives to overcome                                 Tutors
                                    Cultural enrichment activities       their lags. In the target area no
                                                                         school is trying to provide                                   Volunteers from community
                                    See plan to provide services for     academic enrichment services to                               Consultants
                                    detailed activities (page 45)        low-income and first generation
                                                                         students.
                                                                         High dropout rates have been
                                                                         correlated with the high violence
                                                                         and crime rates committed by
                                                                         youngsters in the target area.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                                1999-2004                                   25




        OBJECTIVE                      ACTIVITIES                        RELATES TO NEED                        DEADLINE            PERSONNEL
4.   95% of the seniors will   Determine the specific program          The high dropout rates in the         September to June
     complete high school.     services needed by each                 target area reflects great need for
                               participant.                            service that improve retention.
                                                                       Dropout rates in target high
                               Develop an academic plan which
                                                                       schools rage from 10% to 20%.
                               ensures that the student
                               satisfactory complete all               Low achievement, low income
                               requisites.                             and un-motivate students don’t
                                                                       have alternatives to overcome
                               Provide academic advice, career
                                                                       their lags. In the target area no
                               guidance, personal counseling
                                                                       school is trying to provide
                               and cultural enrichment activities
                                                                       academic enrichment services to
                               (For detailed activities see Plan to
                                                                       low-income and first generation
                               Provide Services on page 45).
                                                                       students.
                                                                       High dropout rates have been
                                                                       correlated with the high violence
                                                                       and crime rates committed by
                                                                       youngsters in the target area.
5.   95% of the high school    Develop an accurate academic            Low income students graduated         May to August       Supervisor
     seniors will enter to     plan which ensure that the student      from public high school must
                                                                                                                                 Counselors
     postsecondary education   complete high school and gain           compete for inexpensive public
     programs.                 admission to college.                   universities allocation with                              Coordinator
                                                                       students from private schools
                                                                                                                                 Teachers
                                                                       who get higher GPA and College
                                                                       Entrance Test Scores. As a                                Tutors
                                                                       result low-income students
                                                                       enroll in private postsecondary
                                                                       institutions and pay higher
                                                                       educational costs.
                               The following activities will be        This conditions contributes to
                               included in the plan:                   the high postsecondary dropouts
                                                                       and low rate of Bachelors and
                               -Collect information on post-
                                                                       Masters degrees in Puerto Rico.
                                 secondary institutions
                                                                       The 1990 census data demonstrated
                               -Visit industries
                                                                       that in PR only 14.3% of
                               -Provide individual and group
                                                                       persons, 25 years and over have
                                 counseling sessions
                                                                       bachelors degree or higher.
                               -Conduct Career days
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                                1999-2004                               26




       OBJECTIVE                        ACTIVITIES                       RELATES TO NEED                     DEADLINE         PERSONNEL
                                -Interview professionals
                                -Provide classes in preparation for
                                  College Entrance Exam
                                -Provide assistance to apply for
                                  admission of postsecondary
                                  institutions
                                -Disseminate financial aid
                                  information and assist to fill
                                  application
                                -See Plan to Provide Services for
                                detailed activities, (page 45)
6.   85% of ninth to eleventh   Over each program year and             The ASPIRA’s Upward Bound         July to October   Supervisor
     graders will continue in   summer component ASPIRA will           target area face social and
                                                                                                                           Counselors
     Upward Bound each year.    provide a range of educational         educational problems which
                                and motivational activities to 70      include:                                            Coordinator
                                program participants. Those
                                                                       -High rates of school dropouts                      Teachers
                                activities will generate in
                                participants the skills and            -Low rates of enrollment in                         Tutors
                                motivation necessary to keep             program of postsecondary
                                enrolled in ASPIRA’s Upward              education.
                                Bound.
                                                                       -High ratios of student to
                                                                         counselor
                                                                       -High level of poverty
                                                                       -Others (See Need Section)
                                                                       There are no schools,
                                                                       governmental agencies or
                                                                       community organizations
                                                                       providing the services provided
                                                                       by ASPIRA’s Upward Bound.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                                   1999-2004                                 27




        OBJECTIVE                           ACTIVITIES                      RELATES TO NEED                      DEADLINE            PERSONNEL
7.   65% of participants will       Prepare an individualized             Based on low academic               July to November   Supplemental instruction
     increase at least 40 points    academic plan for each                achievement attained by students                       coordinators
     of grade average in those      participant.                          in target schools.
                                                                                                                                 Teachers
     school courses with grade
                                    Provide classes on basic subjects:    Target schools are in need of
     average below 2.49.                                                                                                         Tutors
                                    Spanish, English, Mathematics         services such as study skills and
                                    and Science.                          time management workshops,                             Counselors
                                                                          tutoring and adequate
                                                                                                                                 Supervisors
                                                                          monitoring of academic
                                                                          progress.


8.   75% of the participants will   Provide time management and           Most of the target school’s         July to November   Supervisor
     complete the UB classes        study skills workshops.               students present great difficulty
                                                                                                                                 Program teachers
     with at least 60% of                                                 to meet the scores required by
                                    Provide academic advice.
     proficiency.                                                         postsecondary institutions.                            Coordinator
                                    Conduct participants follow-up.
                                                                          A high performance on the                              Tutors
                                    Provide computerized academic         College Entrance Examination
                                    instruction.                          Board Exam and high GPA are
                                                                          necessary to gain admissions to
                                                                          the only state supported
                                                                          postsecondary institutions.
9.   Over each program year 70
     or 100 of the participants
     will receive at least one of
     the following counseling
     services and activities.
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                             1999-2004                                 28




    OBJECTIVE                         ACTIVITIES                     RELATES TO NEED                      DEADLINE              PERSONNEL
   a. Personal Motivational   Conduct need assessment              The high counselor to student       September to August   Counselors
      Counseling                                                   ratio, among others, contribute
                              Interviews                                                                                     Consultants
                                                                   to inadequate counseling
                              Provide individualized counseling    services.                                                 Supervision
                              Provide group counseling             In the target area the lack of
                                                                   effective counseling services
                              Provide group dynamic sessions
                                                                   have the following
                              Provide workshops or topics such     consequences:
                              as:
                                                                    -Constitutes a barrier for youth
                                   -self-esteem
                                                                    to identify careers
                                   -motivation
                                   -goal setting                    -Hinder the effective transition
                                   -leadership                      to postsecondary educational
                                   -others                          programs
                                                                    -The long range results are
                                                                    unemployment and under
                                                                    employment
                                                                    -Don’t pay attention to
                                                                    individual needs such ass lack
                                                                    of motivation
   b. Academic Counseling     Conduct need assessment              There are lack of personal and      September to August   Counselors
                              interviews                           budget to provide counseling
                                                                                                                             Consultants
                                                                   services in target schools. This
                              Provide workshops
                                                                   situation lead to inadequate                              Supervisors
                              Provide individual and group         academic services such as
                              counseling sessions                  academic advice, information
                                                                   dissemination on postsecondary
                              Visit postsecondary institutions
                                                                   education opportunities and
                              Collect information on secondary     financial aid available.
                              and postsecondary institutions       The lack of these services
                              Visit industries                     promotes high school dropouts
                                                                   rates, low academic performance
                              Conduct role playing exercises       and low motivational levels.
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                                  29




    OBJECTIVE                     ACTIVITIES                 RELATES TO NEED                       DEADLINE              PERSONNEL
   c. Career guidance     Visit industries                 The high counselor to student        September to August   Counselors
                                                           ratio lead to inadequate career
                          Visit universities                                                                          Consultants
                                                           guidance services. The schools
                          Conduct career days              don’t have a budget for meals                              Supervisor
                                                           and transportation for field trips
                          Interview professionals          to universities and industries.
                          Organize conferences
                                                           Most students made a selection
                          Collect and disseminate          of career and institution without
                          information on:                  adequate professional assistance
                            -job market                    increasing the risk for dropping
                            -intellectual, physical and    out due to an inadequate
                            academic requirements for      selection.
                            different careers
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                         30




C. OPERATIONAL PLAN

I. Plan to Inform Institutions and Community Organizations

  ASPIRA will utilize a structured plan for publicizing the goals of the Upward Bound Program

  within its staff target schools, community agencies, organizations, residents, and applicants.

  All staff member will participate in this process, which includes:

   Participation of the Program Supervisor at the ASPIRA staff meetings. It is ASPIRA

      policy to have monthly staff meetings to discuss issues related to programs. Goals,

      objectives and services are discussed and evaluated. At the beginning of each semester

      program paraphernalia are distributed to other Program Supervisors and/or staff to

      encourage them to publicize and identify candidates. The Program Director and/or

      Supervisor participate regularly in other ASPIRA program meetings.

   Information dissemination concerning the program goals, objectives, services and

      eligibility requirements to target schools, community organizations, governmental

      agencies and other ASPIRA programs. Key personnel in the above organizations will be

      identified and informed about the program.

   Principals, counselors and teachers of the target school will be in continuous contact with

      program staff.

   Brochures, flyers, application forms and newsletters will also be distributed in target

      schools and community organizations such as:


           Drug Abuse Prevention Department Carolina;
           Young Men Christian Association (YMCA);
           CREA - Drug Abuse Prevention Program;
           Carolina Recreational Association;
           Department of Social Services - local offices in target areas;
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                    1999-2004                            31




            Employment services' office in target area
            Puerto Rico Occupational Information Committee;
            Directors Board for Vocational Education - central and local offices;
            Rehabilitation and Education Society of Puerto Rico (Private non
            profit organization);
            Rehabilitation Services of Puerto Rico;
            College of Social Workers of Puerto Rico;
            Runaway youth;
            ATREVETE (a community base organization), and
            Casa Julia de Burgos (provide services to women victims of mental or
            physical abuse).
    Parents will be encouraged to persuade their children to take advantage of opportunities

       offered by Upward Bound. Presentations in target school teachers and parents meeting

       will be provided.

   In addition to contacts with target schools, community agencies and other ASPIRA Programs,

   media coverage from local newspapers, radio and television will be used when appropriate.

          Newspapers                     Radio Stations                 Television Stations
El Nuevo Día                    Radio WVOZ-AM                    WKAQ T.V. Public Service
TODO Carolina,                  X-100 Radio AM                   WIPR T.V. Public Service
      (a free newspaper)                                                Broadcasting System
                                WIPR Radio AM
                                                                 WAPA T.V.
                                                                 WRIK T.V.

   The following means will be utilized for disseminating information on Upward Bound
   Program:

    Brochures and flyers that will inform the program objectives and will describe activities
     and requirements for selection.

    Meetings, workshop and information conferences will be submitted and presentations will
     be made at area churches, civic meetings, community.

    Local News Media
     Press releases and public services announcements will be made on radio and TV stations
     in Carolina area.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                         1999-2004                          32




2. Plan to Identify, Recruit and Select Eligible Participants

Plan to identify and recruit (September to October)

Using its internal and external resources, the ASPIRA Upward Bound Program will initiate its

recruitment efforts by identifying the potential program participants. Two thirds will be low-

income, potential first-generation college students who are most in need of the program's

services, have potential for postsecondary education and are most willing and able to take

advantage of these services.

Given its location, the great majority of project participants will be Puerto Rican. In addition, our

services are provided regardless of race, national origin, gender or disability. ASPIRA'S facilities

are free of architectural barriers, thus accessible to individuals with disabilities.

The identification of participants will focus on 9th graders assuming that the 10th, 1lth and 12th

graders will continue from the previous year. The Puerto Rico school year goes from September

to June. Thus, the process of identification will take place from September to November. As

already documented in the above section, the six target middle and high schools enroll 2,015 that

are low-income and potential first generation college students. ASPIRA will identify an

estimated 300 candidates of which 70 will be recruited. Table 21 illustrates the proposed number

of participants by grade.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                             33




                                            TABLE 21

              PROPOSED PARTICIPANTS BY GRADE LEVEL AND SCHOOL

         TARGET HIGH AND MIDDLE                            ST UDENTS FROM GRADES
                SCHOOLS
                                                   9TH       10TH       11TH      12th     TOTAL
Dr. José M. Lázaro                                   N/A        6          6          6      18
Gilberto Concepción de Gracia                        N/A        6          6          6      18
Lola Rodríguez de Tió                                 6         6          5          4      21
         (Middle and High School)
Petra Román Vigo
         (Middle School)
                                                      7                                      7
Dr. Manuel Febres                                     6                                      6
         (Middle School)

A. Total Participants                                19         18        17          16     70


To meet the identification and recruitment objective the program will have two staff counselors

that will be on a supervised day to day basis and assisted by the Program Supervisor.

Counselors will be key providers of identification, recruitment, selection and assessment services

and will organize and develop activities and delivery of services. They will serve as principal

liaisons between the program and the target school personnel (Director, Social Workers,

Counselors, Teachers, etc.). Meetings will be held periodically with a school contact person,

primarily the school counselors. Through the effort of staff, middle and high school counselors

will receive appropriate information to evaluate eligibility and needs of students.

In order to effectively serve the target population of Puerto Rican youth raised on the Island as

well as those who have been raised in the States and returning to the island, speaking primarily in

English, counselors hired under the program are bilingual (Spanish & English).

As a result of ASPIRA'S prior experience and evaluation, the program will implement

recruitment and service strategies that have demonstrated their effectiveness during the past 11

years.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                    1999-2004                           34




Two counselors will be assigned to the three high schools according to the potential participants

available. Each counselor will recruit an attainable and manageable mean caseload of 35

participants in grades 9th to 12th.

The Program Supervisor, Supplemental Instruction Coordinator and Counselors will make

arrangement with school authorities to hold conferences to inform students about the program

objectives, requirements, services and activities.

Personnel will form teams to provide information to several groups of students on time in each

school. Pre-intake forms will be provided to students who are interested or need more

information. Students will complete and return these and will be contacted afterwards.

As follow up to conferences, counselors assigned to each school will receive the intake forms

and complete the selection process. School administrator, Counselors, Social Workers and

Teachers will refer candidates for program services.

Program Supervisor, Supplemental Instruction Coordinator and Counselors will hold conferences

in community agencies to inform about the program objectives, requirements and services to

participants agencies to identify candidates and obtain referrals to the program. Community and

local governmental agency staff will refer candidates for program service as a result of the

program information dissemination efforts.

Selection Process (October to November)

As potential participants are identified, the program counselors will determine eligibility of

candidate for the Upward Bound program services. In the selection process a combination of

factors will be taking into consideration.

These factors will include:

    Promptness in completing eligibility documents.
    Performance in the selection interview
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                    1999-2004                           35




Participants selection will be done on an ongoing basis as candidates submit the application for

program services with the required documents. Given that there are more potential participants

than those to be served on time submission of these documents serves as a measure of interest

and commitment to the program. Eligibility documents include those contained in the Upward

Bound guidelines and the ones determined by ASPIRA.

Program surf relies on one or more of the following eligibility documentary evidence:

           DOCUMENTATION REQUIRED TO DETERMINE ELIGIBILITY
 Evidence of Citizenship Status    Evidence of First Generation         Low Income Status
                                      College Student Status               Verification
A participant statement attesting The Intake form request         Income tax return
to his/her U.S. citizenship or for information:                   Evidence    of   non    taxable
permanent residency.               parents, educational level, if income      (welfare,   Social
                                   they live with candidate, if Security or other source).
Photocopy of Alien
                                   they financially support the   Evidence of other taxable
Registration Card
                                   candidate or not.              income such as signed by
                                                                  parents or applicant as stated
Photocopy of Arrival
                                                                  in regulation.
Departure Record (1-94)
with appropriate endorsement.


The academic need will be determined by one or more of the following:

    School transcript, GPA Certification or GED test results.

    Results of standardized test such as Information Services for the Educational Counseling

       (S.I.P.O.E.), and General Ability Test.

    School transcripts and recommendations from mathematics, English, Science and

       Spanish teachers will be especially considered.

    In order to determine the need for tutoring services in one or more of these subjects a

       student will be considered in need of tutoring if his/her performance is under his/her
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                          36




       potential: students with grades of C and D in one or more of the basic subjects will be

       considered most in need of tutoring services.

Students with B but with potential to get an A would bc accepted for tutoring in such specific

subject.

Additionally, each student will complete an ASPIRA Upward Bound application form which

includes information about the following areas:

    Personal (address, social security number, etc.)
    Academic (School name, actual grade, etc.)
    Economical gobs, taxable income, etc.)

A complete application will yield several pieces of information that permit staff to make a pre-

qualification. All candidates who submit applications will bc evaluated through the ASPIRA

Intake Structure Interview. The intervention is a face to face procedure that will provide

complementary information on the following areas

    Personal,
    Familiar,
    Academic, and
    Interest in Upward Bound.

Through the interview, counselors will bc able to observe motivational factors that can not be

verified through the documents. Factors like motivation, attitudes, aptitudes and behavior will bc

assessed.

Recommendations from teachers, counselors, employers or other individuals who are in position

to know and evaluate the educational potential and need for program services will be considered.

The final selection of students will be made by the Program Supervisor with the assistance of the

counselors. For this purpose the evaluation sheet will yield an overall punctuation.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                        1999-2004                        37




Additionally, a determination will bc made based on low income and potential first generation

college students criteria. As a result, 70 qualified participants will be selected.

Where available, efforts will bc made to refer candidates not accepted for the ASPIRA Upward

Bound Program to other community agencies or institutions that offer the specific services

needed.

The program will have a waiting list of qualified candidates to fill the positions of participants

who dropout from the program.

3. Plan to Assess each Participant need for Services and for Monitoring Academic Growth
   (September to February)

Once accepted, participants need for services will be assessed by the counselor to determine the

services most needed.

A fundamental premise of the "ASPIRA Process," including its Upward Bound effort, is that no

activities must bc imposed on the participant. The needs assessment is intended to determine

need in such areas as : tutoring, personal academic and career counseling, financial aid and study

skills.

The participant need assessment will focus on:

     Educational goals and interest,
     Student knowledge about careers,
     Student knowledge about post-secondary educational opportunities and financial aid
          available,
     Need for academic and non-academic support services, and
     Student knowledge of the entry process to education Programs.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                           38




The counselor will utilize one or more of the following tools in conducting the needs

assessments:

    Intake form,
    Structure interviews,
    ASPIRA student's need assessment inventory,
    School transcripts,
    Standardized Achievement Test (APRENDA),
    Interest Inventories (Harrington O’Shea),
    Subject Skills Test, and
    Recommendations from teachers, counselors or other.


The following process is utilized to assess participants.

       a. At the time of admittance into the program, information on the student's needs and

           strengths is collected. Such information as school transcript, grades, teacher/counselor

           recommendations, and results of interviews are used to assess the student.

       b. The ASPIRA Basic Skills Diagnostic Test are administered to all participants upon

           entrance into the program and annually thereafter. These instruments provide

           information about a student level of achievement in the basic skills of Spanish and

           English languages (including composition and literature for each one), math, science.

           The test identifies areas of weakness and the results are used to appraise the student's

           learning difficulties and strengths. The information is also used in preparing the

           individualized educational plan and contract for both the summer and academic year

           phases.

       c. The ASPIRA Basic Skills Diagnostic Test are used also as pre-test. Pre and post-tests

           will bc given to track the propess of individual students in each class. "Grades" as

           such will not bc given. Instead, teacher/student conferences will address the student's
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                            39




           progress or lack thereof. Written evaluations are kept in the student's file. A written

           report including the student academic growth in each classes will be sent each

           semester to the parents. The student should return it signed.

       d. An initial evaluation of the motivational level will bc made through interviews with

           participants, their family, school officials, and recommendations from others. More

           in-depth studies will be made during the student's program year and summer

           component.

       e. The Harrington O'Shea System for Career Selection, will be utilized to assess the

           participant's knowledge of the career decision making process. The ASPIRA Upward

           Bound Intake Structure Interview and other not standardized inventories will bc used.

           Based upon these results, specific actions will bc prescribed. The Harrington O'Shea

           can be re-administered to measure growth in career decision making and awareness.

The plan for monitoring academic growth will be a two way process: academic achievement in

school and mastering of academic skills in Upward Bound. The Upward Bound staff will ask for

a school transcript each semester from all candidates for program services. It is used to assess

academic need of potential participants. This transcript will bc if the student is accepted to

receive services, the transcript will bc the base to compare with subsequent grades.

There will be an academic performance report in the participants file. Program staff will collect

academic reports of participant each semester. Through this process information will be available

to estimate grade average and to provide academic advice and/or career awareness.

In addition academic growth will be monitored by Upward Bound Teachers. At the beginning of

the academic year the ASPWA Basic Skills Diagnostic Test will be provided to all participants.

This test is designed to assess participant school grades proficiency in the basic skills in each of
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                         40




the classes provided by ASPWA'S Upward Bound: Science, English, Spanish and Mathematics.

The results of the test will be the base to prepare the Academic Intervention Plan. The plan will

include development of those skills not mastered by the participant. The lowest performance

point is 60%.

As the academic services are provided, continuous evaluations will be made. Test results will be

written in the plan showing the progress of the students.

The Supplemental Instruction Coordinator will carefully follow up the academic performance of

participants selected for tutoring. This activity will include meeting with school teachers and

tutors and regular performance reports from school.

4. The Plan for Location the Project Within the Applicant Organization Structure

ASPIRA Board of Directors is the governing body of ASPIRA Inc. de Puerto Rico. The Board

consists on non paid members from diverse background and expertise.

The Upward Bound Program is the functional responsibility of the Project Director who is

primarily responsible for overall coordination of the program. The Program Director, assisted by

the Program Supervisor, and provides for the staff hiring and staff development activities. (See

Appendix I for waiver request for a Program Director 12% of time devoted to Upward Bound.)

The Project Supervisor has administrative and managerial responsibility of the program on a

day-to-day basis, formally reporting on a weekly basis to the Program Director, who also serves

as Executive Director of ASPIRA de Puerto Rico and as such reports directly to the ASPIRA

Board of Directors. (See Organizational Chart on page 43). This Administrative structure gives

the Program Director sufficient authority to conduct the program effectively.

The fiscal officer assisted by the administrative office staff maintains effective fiscal

management, record keeping and reporting. The staff of the Upward Bound Program consist of
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                       1999-2004                           41




four full time positions, for both the academic year and summer components. Complementing

this staff on a part-time basis will be one Supplemental Instruction Coordinator, four Teachers,

one Receptionist and fifteen tutors. For the summer, five part-time arts and crafts consultants will

be hired. The Coordinator and Tutors will not work during the summer component.

The four full-time positions (100% of time devoted to project twelve months) are the Program

Supervisor, two Counselors and one Clerk Typist. The following administrative structure gives

the Project Director sufficient authority to conduct the project effectively.

    Project Director and Project Supervisor will monitor the progress of the program to
     ensure effectiveness in attaining the program goals.
    The Project Director oversees the financial compliance aspect of the program and provide
     fiscal management.
    The Project Director is responsible for overseeing the entire project also for sanctioning
     all project expenditures.
    The Project Supervisor maintains constant contact with the program counselors. This is
     accomplished through day-to-day contacts, weekly meeting and written memos or
     reports.
    The Program Supervisor reports to the Project Director on a weekly basis and formally
     through quarterly statistical and narrative Program Progress Reports.

5. Curriculum. Services and Activities

The Upward Bound Program at ASPWA of Puerto Rico provides comprehensive array of

activities to meet the unique needs of participants. A comprehensive plan with expected

outcomes has been developed for each program objective.

The activities and services that follow will be offered to program participants in conjunction with

target schools, service agencies and organizations in the target area.

The expected outcome of these strategies include:

        Increase the probability of participants completing secondary school.

        Increase the probability of participants being admitted to post-secondary institutions.
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                            1999-2004                                     42




                             ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

                                 ASPIRA INC. OF PUERTO RICO

                                   UPWARD BOUND PROGRAM


                                         ASPIRA Board of Directors
                        (Serves as the governing body of ASPIRA Inc. of Puerto Rico)



                                             Executive Director
                     (Serves as Chief Executive Officer of ASPIRA of Puerto Rico (50%)
                      and ASPIRA Upward Bound Program Director). Is responsible for
                       overseeing the Program also sanctioning program expenditures.
                             Ensure effectiveness in attaining the Program goals.



              Program Supervisor
                                                                       Manager, finance and administration
-Has administrative and managerial responsibility
                                                                       -Serves as fiscal officer of ASPIRA and
      of the Program on a day to day basis.
                                                                              Upward Bound Program
     -Monitors Program implementation and
                  effectiveness.


                                                                                Personnel Officer
                                                                             -Preparation of contracts
                                                                            -Personnel record keeping
              Counselors                                                -Administration of marginal benefits
  -Day to day Program implementation
      in schools and community.

                                                                                Executive Secretary
               Teachers                                                   -In charge of the executive office
  -Develops and implements the plan for                                    secretarial and support services.
  academic year component and summer
                 classes
      -Evaluate academic progress
                                                                                   Clerk Typist
                                                                          Provides clerical support for the
                                                                                     Program
   Consultant for summer component
-Develop and implement the plan to provide
        arts and crafts workshops                                                   Coordinator
                                                                       -Has the responsibility to implement the
                                                                         supplemental instruction component




                                                                                          Tutors
                                                                      -Provide tutorial service to participants most
                                                                                          in need
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                       1999-2004                            43




The program will provide information on secondary and post-secondary education opportunities,

assistance in application and preparation for College Entrance Examination Board, dissemination

of financial aid available, and assistance in application for such aid. College conferences,

exploratory trips to universities, exploratory trips to industries will be also offered. Participants

will receive direct assistance in completing admissions applications to post-secondary

institutions.

        Participants will also receive academic improvement services including (a) tutoring in

        basic subjects, (b) supplemental instruction, (c) monitoring of homework and (d) study

        skills and time management workshops.

a) Description of Activities and Services

The objective and goals of the ASPIRA Upward Bound Program will bc met through a variety of

academic, counseling and enrichment services and activities provided to the participants during

the courses of an intensive six-weeks, non-residential summer component and an academic year

component. For the most part, the services and activities of the program will be available during

the duration of both components. Services will be comprehensive and in-depth. The summer

component, however, allows for an even more in-depth provision of services and large number

of activities which are consistent with program overall goals.

This section describes the services and activities offered by the program, during the academic

year and summer component.

1. The Academic Year Component (September to June)

During the academic year, the program will provide participants with guidance and counseling

relative to academic planning, post-secondary admissions and postsecondary financial aid. The

program will also provide academic instruction and tutoring (within the context of courses being
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                            44




studied by in-school participants in the target schools) and enrichment activities. During the

academic year component, it is estimated that each participant will have six weekly hours of

direct contact with the program. Thirty two contacts (estimated 192 contact hours) will bc made

with each       students during the academic year to address his/her educational, cultural,

recreational, and/or social needs.

The activities and services of the academic year component will enable participants to gain

admission to postsecondary institutions and, once admitted, to experience success.

2. The Summer Component (June to July)

The program will offer a six-week, non-residential summer component, during which

participants will be provided with intensive instruction in basic academic skills (such as Spanish,

English. Both including grammar, composition and literature, mathematics through pre-calculus,

and science), guidance and counseling with regard to educational and career opportunities, and a

comprehensive counseling and enrichment program. It is estimate that in this component each

participant will have 30 hours weekly of direct contact with the program. For a detailed academic

year and summer schedule See Tables 22 (Academic) and 23 (Summer).

3. Activities

Activity - I. Classes in Basic Subjects

a) Objectives: 100% of the participants will receive classes on at least one of the basic subjects:

   English, Spanish, Math and Science.

b) Outcomes: Each student will receive up to 128 contact hours of classes during the academic

   year and 180 contact hours of classes during the summer phase. The outcome will be that

   sixty five percent (65%) of participants will increase: .40 points of grade average in those

   school courses with grade average below 2.49 on a 4.0 point scale as reflected by school
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                    1999-2004                           45




  reports; seventy five percent (75%) of the participants will master sixty percent (60%) of the

  skills in the ASPIRA Upward Bound Program classes as reflected in the Educational

  Individualized Plan.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                 1999-2004                 46




                                                         TABLE #22



                                                 ACADEMIC YEAR SCHEDULE

Tuesday               Wednesday             Thursday           Friday                        S a t u r d a y

Counselor visit the Schools to follow-up on                                8:00 a.m.     -     8:25 a.m. Briefing on activities
participants’ progress and to schedule individual                                                        for the day
counseling sessions in accordance to each                                  8:25 a.m.     -     9:15 a.m. Tutorial
participant’s schedule.
                                                                           9:15 a.m.     -    10:05 a.m. Tutorial
                           (8:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.)
                                                                          10:05 a.m.     -    10:20 a.m. Break
                                                                          10:20 a.m.     -    11:10 a.m. Tutorial
Project supervisor meets with teachers and school
officials and identifies/contacts external resources                      11:10 a.m.     -      12:00 m. Tutorial
for program activities.
                                                                           12:00 m.      -     1:00 p.m. Lunch
Counselors schedule office hours from Tuesday                              1:00 p.m.     -     3:00 p.m. Workshop
through Thursday to provide services to students on
                                                                           3:00 p.m.     -     4:00 p.m. Activities and
group activities/workshops, and individual sessions.
                                                                                                             Personal Counseling
Staff meetings: 1) Tuesday (evaluation of previous
                                                                           *See program design for activities and workshops to be
week’s activities, planning for upcoming week)
counselors and project supervisor.                                         offered during the academic year component.
               2) Friday (planning for academic
component and coordination with counselors) all
staff.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                                      1999-2004                                           47




                                                                 ASPIRA INC. DE PUERTO RICO

                                                           REGULAR UPWARD BOUND PROGRAM

                                                                      Program for Summer Courses
Example #I
            MONDAY                               TUESDAY                            WEDNESDAY                                 THURSDAY                   FRIDAY
   HOURS            COURSE             HOURS              COURSE              HOURS          COURSE                  HOURS              COURSE          Excursions
 8:40 – 9:00       MEETING           8:40 – 9:00         MEETING            8:40 – 9:00     MEETING                8:40 – 9:00         MEETING
 9:00 – 10:20  Skills review for     9:00 – 10:20   Computer skills II      9:00 – 10:20 Skills review for         9:00 – 10:20   Computer skills II
               CEEB – Spanish                       Geometry                             CEEB – Spanish                           Geometry
               Conversational                       Spanish redaction                    Conversational                           Spanish redaction
               English                              for media                            Ecology                                  for media
               Ecology                              First Aid                            Statistics                               First Aid
               Statistics                           Reading                                                                       Reading
10:20 – 10:40  Recess               10:20 – 10:40   Recess                 10:20 – 10:40     Recess               10:20 – 10:40   Recess
10:40 – 12:00  Skill review for     10:40 – 12:00   Skill review for       10:40 – 12:00     Skill review for     10:40 – 12:00   Skill review for
               CEEB – English                       CEEB – Math                              CEEB – English                       CEEB – Math
               Computer Skills I                    Spanish Reading                          Computer Skills                      Spanish Reading
               Orthography                          Microscale                               I                                    Microscale
                                                    Writing Journal                          Orthography                          Writing Journal
 12:00 – 1:00    LUNCH               12:00 – 1:00   LUNCH                   12:00 – 1:00     LUNCH                 12:00 – 1:00   LUNCH
 1:00 – 3:00     Academic            1:00 – 3:00    Arts and Craft          1:00 – 3:00      Arts and Craft        1:00 – 3:00    Arts and Craft
                 Olympics                           Workshop                                 Workshop                             Workshop

Example #II
            MONDAY                             TUESDAY                           WEDNESDAY                                  THURSDAY                    FRIDAY
   HOURS           COURSE             HOURS             COURSE             HOURS         COURSE                    HOURS              COURSE           Excursions
 8:40 – 9:00      MEETING           8:40 – 9:00        MEETING           8:40 – 9:00    MEETING                  8:40 – 9:00         MEETING
 9:00 – 10:20  Skills review for    9:00 – 10:20   Computer skills II    9:00 – 10:20 Skills review for          9:00 – 10:20   Skills review for
               CEEB – English                      Geometry                           CEEB – English                            CEEB – Spanish
               Orthography                         Spanish redaction                  Orthography                               Sexual Education
               Algebra                             for media                          Algebra                                   Fractions
                                                   First Aid                                                                    Oral
                                                   Reading                                                                      Interpretation
10:20 – 10:40    Recess            10:20 – 10:40   Recess                10:20 – 10:40     Recess               10:20 – 10:40   Recess
10:40 – 12:00    Oral              10:40 – 12:00   Skill review for      10:40 – 12:00     Oral                 10:40 – 12:00   Skill review for
                 communication                     CEEB – Math                             communication                        CEEB – Math
                 Geometry                          Edition                                 Geometry                             Edition
                 Writing                           Study Skills                            Writing                              Study Skills
                 Composition                       Computer Skills                         Composition                          Computer Skills
                 Computer Skills                                                           Computer Skills
 12:00 – 1:00    LUNCH             12:00 – 1:00     LUNCH                12:00 – 1:00      LUNCH                12:00 – 1:00     LUNCH
 1:00 – 3:00     Team Group        1:00 – 2:00      Review for Aca-      1:00 – 4:00       Arts and Craft       1:00 – 4:00      Arts and Craft
                 Meeting                            demic Olympics                         Workshop                              Workshop
                                    2:00 – 4:00     Academic
                                                    Olympics
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                            48




c) Method:

   1. The academic year classes (October to June)

   The academic year classes will include the following:

English

The main objective of the remedial English course is to develop in the student a broader

knowledge and understanding of the English language. It will stress the development of basic

skills in reading, writing and oral expression. The student will acquire general knowledge of

English grammar (morphology, syntax, and semantics). Other themes covered by the course will

include: composition, grammatical sentence structure, paragraphing and syllabication. The

student will also become acquainted with some social aspects of the English language (its origins

and dialects). The student will also bc acquainted with the origins of English literature, American

literature, etc. Students will read, react, discuss and write about the ideas presented in various

literary works. Emphasis in literature will bc within a variety of experiences in the United States,

in its history, culture, languages, and arts.

Science

A natural science course will be introduced in the ASPIRA Upward Bound Program. The

purpose of the course is: to motivate and awaken the student's interest in the science; to develop

basic skills and the characteristics of a scientific mind (observation, analysis and the formulation

and testing of hypotheses); to give the student using this method a vision of the world

surrounding him/her to motivate the student to reflect on the social and scientific problems of

today's society and the individual. The course will include all the branches of science: chemistry,

physics, biology, mathematics, sociology, economics and psychology.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                       1999-2004                          49




Spanish

The main purpose of the remedial Spanish course will be to develop in the student the skills in

reading, writing, and oral expression necessary to carry out college work successfully. This

course includes also Spanish literature (poetry, drama and novel).

The suggested college outline for the skills that will be offered are:

    oral skills - formal and informal discussion, interviewing, presentation of report;

    writing skills - outlining, content and organization, techniques, style, editing;

    research skills - reference and source materials, note-inking, outlining, styles of

       documentation, bibliography, paraphrasing, quotations;

    reading skills - speed, comprehension, critical analysis of ideas, outlining;

    listening skills - note-taking, questioning, recognition of speaker's purpose;

    semantics - denotative vs. connotative works, basic assumptions – the student's, others;

       implication of the communication, and;

    taking an essay examination - establishing the broad question, limiting your scope of

       coverage outlining for logical development, supporting statement with fact, introduction

       and conclusion.

   Math

   The purpose of this course is to develop basic skills in arithmetic and then to have the student

   learn basic algebra, geometry and pre-calculus. Students will bc pre-tested so as to learn their

   functional levels in mathematics. Individualized instruction and modules will bc the main

   method for teaching this course.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                          50




   2. Summer classes

   During the summer component the above mentioned subjects are enriched with supplemental

   content area materials. The focus of each subject for each grade is as follows:

   For twelve graders the focus will be to prepare them for college work in basic skills areas

   which they are usually expected to have mastered by the time they enter college.

   The summer classes will include the above academic year core curriculum, structured using

   the following strategy:

   During the summer, participants will enroll in a college-simulated six week non-residential

   program. The classes will be elective but consistent with the teachers recommendation. The

   enrollment process will begin during the academic year phase when the program staff

   provide participants a variety of summer class options. This process will include the

   provision of information about the content of classes and requirements. Program staff will

   allow participants to make a pre-enrollment for the summer classes.

The program teachers will evaluate each participant's pre-enrollment They will take into account

the previous test results, high school grades and academic level of the participant. The teachers

might approve or not approve the classes. If a class is not approved, the teacher will make a

recommendation about which class is appropriate for the participant. The enrollment process will

end when the participants are provided with their enrollment sheet approved by the program

supervisor and the subject teacher.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                            51




During this six-week non-residential phase, participants will receive intensive instruction in basic

academic skills such as sciences, mathematics, English and Spanish. In the last two the teachers

will emphasized composition and literature skills. In mathematics, a pre-calculus class will be

designed.

The summer academic skill classes will be integrated with relevant and practical matters such as:

statistics, conversational English, grammar, health care, ecology, sexual education, oral

communication in Spanish, computers, fractions, etc. Other classes will bc developed based on

participants needs assessments and teachers' evaluations. Specifically, for the eleventh graders,

the emphasis will bc on preparing students for the College Entrance Examination Board Exam

(similar to SAT).

Activity - 2. Supplemental tutoring on subjects and monitoring of homework (September to June)

   a) Objective: to provide supplemental instruction in subjects matters such as English,

       Spanish, mathematics, science and social studies as needed. At least fifteen (15)

       participants, most in need will bc served.

   b) Outcomes: a total of thirty two (32) contacts representing approximately sixty four (64)

       contact hours will bc achieved with each participant. Seventy five percent (75%) of

       participants will increase .40 points of grade average each year in those school courses

       identified as low performance (below 2.49 points on a 4.0 points scale).

   c) Methods:

      Supplemental instruction will bc provided to at least 15 participants as needed, in at least

      one subject. In order to select the participants for this service, program staff will rely on

      the participants assessment of the academic need. Selection will be done based on special

      academic need as reflected in school transcripts and specific subjects averages.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                            52




      After-school supplemental instruction will bc offered to the participants in Spanish,

      English, social studies, mathematics and science using small groups (1-3) on an two

      hours-a-week basis per subject. Instruction will be provided after-school hours, twice a

      week, during sixteen weeks per semester. The core strategy for this service will bc Peer-

      tutors. High perforating students will bc hired as tutors. In other cases, when a peer is not

      available, college students or school teachers will serve as tutors.

      School teachers will provide on going feedback to peer-tutors. The supplemental

      instruction coordinator will be in charge of coordinating the students' daily activities. Data

      collected by peer-tutors and teachers will bc used to reinforce the weak areas in each

      subject.

      Data gathered from students will bc used to determine the overall effectiveness of the

      supplemental instruction and tutoring services and to introduce new strategies to improve

      academic performance.

      At the end of each semester a school transcript will be requested of each participant to

      determine the overall academic performance improvement. Performance data by skills and

      subjects will be collected.

Activity - 3 Personal and Motivational Counseling (July to June )

   a) Objectives: One hundred percent (100%) of participants will be provided with

       meaningful counseling services.

   b) Outcomes: Approximately ninety-five percent (95%) of participants will enhance self

       image, clarify personal and educational goals, improve decision making skills, improve

       problem solving skills, improve motivation and stimulate perseverance in pursuing long

       range personal and educational goals.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                       1999-2004                             53




   c) Methods:

   Two strategies will be used to attain these objectives:

   Individual and group counseling sessions. Individual counseling will be used as a forum for

   identification of students' needs related to motivation and personal situations. Within this

   setting, the counselor-student relationship will include a comprehensive dialogue in terms of

   all the elements of the participant's academic achievement and post-secondary aspirations.

   Information exchange and the implementation of strategies to improve the participant's

   motivation are key to the effectiveness of the program. Group sessions will be devoted to

   clarify the relationship between motivation and educational achievement. Group sessions in

   this matter will bc provided mainly on Saturdays from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM. Specific themes

   will be selected in accordance with the needs assessments.

   Two three day field trips will bc provided each program year, one each semester. At least

   one of these activities will be devoted to personal-motivational group counseling. Usually,

   the students are divided into more manageable sub-groups. Three-day field trips provide

   excellent opportunities to develop themes such as self-esteem, communication, interpersonal

   relationships, critical thinking, etc.

Activity - 4 Academic Advice (August to July)

       a) Objectives: To provide academic advice to one hundred percent (100%) of

           participants.

       b) Outcomes: Eighty-five percent (85%) of -participants will be able to select accurately

           pre-requisites and subjects in accordance with their career aptitudes or preferences.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                          54




       c) Methods:

               The ASPIRA'S Upward Bound Progrun counselors will review the individual

                     participant current academic standing, strengths and weaknesses and

                     educational goals.

               After clarifying goals the participants will bc advised individually or in a

                     group, about specific requirements in terms of pre-requisites courses and

                     academic performance.

               Follow-up efforts by the counselor will insure that the participants remain on

                     academic track taking the appropriate courses and showing the needed

                     academic progress.

               The participants of the supplemental instruction component will bc monitored

                     intensively by both counselors and coordinator.



Activity - 5 Career counseling (August to July)

       a) Objectives: To improve the participants career awareness and selection process skills

       b) Outcomes: Ninety percent (90%) of the participants will improve their career

           awareness. Seniors they will bc able to select adequately a post-secondary program

           for college students and they will be able to meet the requirements to attain a college

           degree.

       c) Methods:

       Counselor will relay, in group and individual counseling sessions, a broad exposure to

       careers and job market projections. Representatives of various professions are recruited

       as volunteers to speak about their respective career areas. Special efforts are made, to
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                    1999-2004                           55




     invite persons from similar socioeconomic background to that of the program participants

     so they can act as positive role models. In addition, college admission and career

     counselors are invited to speak to students about a wide range of professions. Sessions

     are also held on decision making skills for career and life planning. ASPIRA'S Upward

     Bound Program Counselors          have developed expertise in career counseling. The

     Counselor collects materials on professions and post-secondary schools for the students

     to read in the office or to take home. In addition, former ASPIRA participants serves as

     volunteer resources, such as, physicians and other professionals that have been assisted

     by ASPIRA'S Upward Bound Program and other ASPIRA programs. Community

     agencies, such as the Department of Labor and the Puerto Rico Occupational Information

     Center, provide participants and staff with information and workshops on areas of high

     occupational demand. The target area (industries, laboratories, pharmaceutical,

     commercial enterprises, banks and organizations,) provide workshops, facilitate for visits

     and cooperate in other activities that provide participants additional information on these

     professions and information an occupational workforce demands. These activities are

     held either through cooperative arrangements with the target schools in ASPIRA'S

     facilities or community organizations facilities.

     To allow for cost effectiveness, these activities are organized in groups whenever

     possible. Moreover external resources are recruited at no cost to the program through our

     agency's positive standing with the community.

     Workshops take place on ASPIRA facilities, on YMCA or other locations with access to

     participants. The workshops have demonstrated their effectiveness in past years by
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                       1999-2004                        56




       increasing motivational level of participants, their commitment and involvement in

       program activities and by the amount of information delivered to participants.

       Counselors use the Harrington O'Shea Inventory in the individual careers counseling

       sessions. In the absence of other tools this inventory has been useful but expensive, time

       consuming and non-standardized for the Puerto Rican population. Therefore, efforts will

       be made to acquire the computerized system "Opciones" (Options). It was developed by

       Puerto Rico Occupational Information Coordinating Committee and it is the only one

       tailor-made for the Puerto Rican population.

       The "Opciones" system will provide valuable information to both counselors and

       participants. It includes four basic components:

       Exploration - Through the interaction between the participant and the machine, the

       program will provide the occupation that best match participants preferences, skills and

       characteristics.

       Specific - Provide information related to each occupation such as salary, interest,

       aptitudes, educational level and physical and mental requirements.

       Training - Provide information about post-secondary institutions in Puerto Rico including

       address, telephone numbers, registration fees, financial aids and accreditation.

       Administration - Keeps in a file a report and results of each participant. Furthermore, it

       provides a profile of participants together with other practical statistics.

Activity - 6 Assistance in College Entrance Examination Board Application.

(September to April)
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                       1999-2004                            57




       a) Objective: One hundred percent (100%) of seniors will receive assistance to complete

          the College Admission Test Application. They will also receive economic assistance

          to pay for the test fee.

       b) Outcome: One hundred percent (100%) of seniors will properly apply for the test on

          time.

       c) Methods:

        Group sessions and interventions will bc provided at ASPIRA offices.

        The application workshop includes:

          - understanding the importance of the test

          - application deadlines and needed information;

          - clarifying doubts on specific form lines, and;

          - strategies for dealing with the anxiety and other difficulties related to the test-taking

          experience.

Activity - 7 Collect and Disseminate Information on Careers, Postsecondary Education

Opportunities and Financial Aid. (July to June)

       a) Objectives: Ninety percent (90%) of seniors will receive information on careers, post-

          secondary education opportunities and financial aid.

       b) Outcomes: During each program year, ASPIRA will encourage one hundred percent

          (100%) of the senior participants to enter and complete postsecondary education

          programs.

       c) Methods

       Counselor will rely on the following different strategies to accomplish this:

       Career Exhibitions:
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                       1999-2004                          58




        Career exhibitions take place in schools and in ASPIRA facilities; careers and university

        information is displayed. The assigned counselor, ASPIRA club participants and other

        program counselors, acting as resources, clarify doubts about careers and instructions to

        the participants. Approximately 90% of the seniors, and tenth to eleventh grade

        participants will benefit from this service.

Career Fairs:

Representatives of different professions will participate in these programs to motivate students

interested in related professions to complete secondary school and enroll in post-secondary

institutions. By means of presentations and questions and answers sessions participants obtain

information that will bc helpful in their career selection process.

Information Resources Library:

The ASPIRA office has a career resource library whew participants look for information on

careers and information on post-secondary institutions. These include: Encyclopedia of Careers,

College Handbook, Index of Majors, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Dictionary of

Occupational Titles and "Job Market Projections" from the Puerto Rico Occupational

Information Coordination Committee.

This service will bc provided to all participants; however high school seniors, and juniors will bc

particularly targeted for this service.

Activity - 8 College Conferences (September to April)

        a) Objective: To provide participants with information about careers, colleges and

            universities, fees, supporting services and financial aid available at different post-

            secondary institutions.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                           59




       b) Outcomes: Over each program year one hundred percent (100%) of the senior

           participants will be encouraged and empowered to enter and complete postsecondary

           education programs.

       c) Methods:

       The counselors will arrange college conferences with the admission officers of post-

       secondary institutions. Conference will be coordinated with the school counselors, in a

       collaborative efforts, whenever necessary. At these conferences, participants will receive

       information on careers, academic programs, pre-requisites, financial aid available and

       other related information. This service will bc primarily offend to the high school seniors

       and high school graduates. After the college recruitment rush, special arrangements will

       be made to provide this service to ninth to eleventh grade participants.

Activity - 9 Trips to Industries. (November to July)

       a) Objective: To expose participants to careers, facilities and work environment.

           Approximately twenty (20) participants will receive the service.

       b) Outcomes: Participants will bc familiarized with careers whew minority groups are

           misrepresented. It is expected that this experience will help to generate motivation

           necessary to continue studying.

       c) Methods:

       Arrangements will bc made by the program supervisor and counselors with the industries,

       to provide group visits to industries where the participants can see the facilities,

       equipment and machinery used, professionals on their daily duties and also get

       information about responsibility and educational requisites for different fields. Contact
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                           60




       industries or institutions for trips include Goya Food Products, Eli Lilly Pharmaceutical,

       Baxter Health Care Products and Carolina Area Hospital among many others.

Activity - 10 Time Management and Study Skills Workshops. (September to March)

       a) Objective: To assist students in developing effective time management and study

           skills.

       b) Outcomes: Approximately 85% of the participants in grades 9th to 12th will be

           familiarized with the skills necessary for academic success. Workshops will be

           delivered in sessions of at least two hours, followed by individual helping sessions as

           needed. In addition, this service will be complementary to classes in basic subjects,

           thus being instrumental in attaining those objectives for at least sixty five percent

           (65%) of participants will increase .40 points of grade average each year in those

           schools courses with grade average below 2.49 points.

       c) Methods:

       The counselor will work with students in the development of effective study habits.

       An inventory developed by ASPIRA, designed to assess study habits will be

       administered. Students will bc able to recognize effective time management skills and

       study habits that affect their academic performance.

Their services will be delivered in workshops of at least two hours followed by individual

helping sessions as needed.

Activity - II Campus Visits. (October to May)

       a) Objective: Approximately thirty five (35) of the participants Pill bc exposed to at

           least two (2) postsecondary institution facilities, programs, services, admission

           process and financial aid available.
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                            61




      b) Outcome: Ninety percent (90%) of the participants will improve their awareness

         about postsecondary educational programs. Motivational levels to study beyond high

         school will be increased.

      c) Methods:

      Visits to post-secondary institutions are organized for ninth to twelfth grade participants.

      Efforts will be made to arrange for visits when special events are held.

      On college visits participants will see the facilities, meet administrators, counselors and

      teachers and acquire knowledge about courses, academic programs and related areas,

      Visits to post-secondary institutions will give participants the opportunity to meet with

      admission officers, Student Support Services Program staff and college students. Students

      will tour the facilities and receive information on careers, support services, financial aid

      available, academic programs and assess the educational environment they will enter if

      accepted.

      Institutions to be contacted for visits include University of Puerto Rico (Rio Piedras,

      Humacao and Cayey Campuses); Sacred Heart University; Inter American University

      Fajardo and San Juan Campus); Metropolitan University (Rio Piedras and Carolina

      Campus), and the Technological Institute of San Juan.

Activity - 12 Assistance in Application for Admission to Secondary and Postsecondary

         institutions. (July to May)

      a) Objective: To assist participants in applying for admission to secondary or post-

         secondary institutions.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                    1999-2004                           62




       b) Outcome: At least ninety five percent (95%) of participants that need the service will

           submit correctly applications on time.

       c) Method:

       Counselors will keep in contact with school counselors and post-secondary officials to be

       aware of details related to admission process, deadlines, requirements, etc. Ninth graders

       will bc monitored and advised on their selection of academic programs. In Puerto Rico,

       vocational programs are available beginning at tenth grade.

       The application process for admission to the University of Puerto Rico system will begin

       in October and November and will continue from March to June for other public and

       private institutions.

       Special attention will be paid in the selection of academic programs, based on academic

       performance, college entrance results and requisites required for each program.

Activity - 13 Cultural Enrichment Activities. (July to June)

       a) Objective: Ninety percent (90%) of participants will bc provided with cultural

           enrichment activities.

       b) Outcome: Participants will enhance and expand their cultural knowledge through a

           wide variety of cultural activities.

       c) Methods:

       Throughout the year, the participants will be exposed to at least two cultural activities.

       These can include: visits to museums, theaters, art and crafts exhibitions, dramas and

       others cultural and historic sites.

       As part of the Summer component, classes and workshops on art and crafts will be

       provided (See Summer Program Schedule). It could include folklore dancing, handicrafts,
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                           63




       drama, drawing, painting, and other cultural expressions. The learning of new skills will

       reveal participants, undisclosed abilities and aptitudes. Furthermore, it will enhance their

       self-esteem through the fulfillment of projects and the achievement satisfaction.

       Five Fridays during the summer will bc devoted to cultural trips. Participants will have an

       active role through the investigation of different aspects of places visited. Additional,

       skills such as note taking, interpersonal relationships and oral expression will be

       developed.

       At the end of the program year an achievement activity is held and all parents are invited.

       Program participants will make presentations in which they demonstrate the skills learned

       through the workshops during the summer component. The crafts students, with great

       pride in themselves, will exhibit their productions; the theater students will present a

       sketch and the folklore dancing students will make a presentation.

       This component had become one of the most significant of the program and constitutes

       part of the ASPIRA Process. It contributes to the enhancement of the participant's self

       awareness, self esteem and motivational level.

Activity - 14 Referrals for Services. (August to June)

       a) Objective: To assist participants in contacting agencies and professionals that provide

           services as needed. This service will bc available for all 70 participants.

       Among these agencies are:

            Department of Labor and Human Resources,

            Drug Abuse Prevention Department,

            Department of Housing,

            Health Department
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                          64




           Social Services,

           Run Away Youth,

           Legal Services Local Offices,

           Public Health Units,

           Rehabilitation Services for Handicaps, and

           Police Department

       b) Outcome: To assure that the participants will receive the services necessary for the

          academic and personal success.

       c) Methods:

       The ASPIRA Upward Bound counselor, in collaboration with other ASPIRA Programs

       such as: Head Start, JTPA, Health Careers and others, has developed a support group of

       agencies and professionals that will serve as contacts and service providers to the

       program and participants.

Activity - 15 Computerized Teaching Service. (October to June)

       a) Objective: To provide computerized instruction to participants most in need

       b) Outcome: Ninety percent (90%) of participant will enhance the academic

          performance in program classes.

       c) Methods:

       There is evidence that instructional systems can help to raise learning rates by over50%

       (Syllabus, Summer 1992). Now students can explore a world of discovery through open-

       ended simulations, on line tools, and colorful illustrations all of them brought to life by

       the sophisticated graphics and sound of computers.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                       1999-2004                           65




       ASPIRA'S Upward Bound Program will provide to the participants the opportunity to

       learn academic skills through the integration of computers to traditional methods.

       Educational programs are easy to use. Participants will feel specially motivated toward

       the study due to the friendly interfaces used in software. Computerized programs are very

       adaptable allowing a high level of individualization.

       This service will be available during both academic and summer components. Academic

       teachers and computerized teaching instructors will coordinate the service.

6. Timelines

Table 24 shows the planned timelines for accomplishing critical elements of the project.

It includes activities and services related to the following aspects of the Plan of Operation:

        Identification, recruitment and selection of participants;

        Assessment;

        Direct services and activities,

        Graduates follow up, and

        Evaluation process.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                       1999-2004                           66




                PROGRAM ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES BY EDUCATIONAL LEVEL OF PARTICIPANTS TIME TABLE

                                                         Educational Level of Participants
                                                                     Table 24
          Program Services and Activities              High School Seniors      11th grade   10th grade   9th grade         Time Table
1.    Identification and Recruitment                                                                         X        September to October
2.    Need Assessment                                          X                    X            X           X        October to February
3.    Personal Motivational Counseling                         X                    X            X           X        July to June
4.    Academic Advice                                          X                    X            X           X        July to June
5.    Career Counseling                                        X                    X            X           X        July to June
6.    Assistance in College Entrance Examination                                                                      September to April
      Application                                              X
7.    Assistance in Preparation for College Entrance                                                                  September and October
      Examination                                              X
8.    Information dissemination on secondary and                                                                      July to June
      Postsecondary Education Opportunities                    X                    X
9.    College Conferences                                      X                    X                                 September to April
10.   Trips Industries                                                              X            X           X        November to June
11.   Campus Visits                                            X                    X            X           X        November to May
12.   Assistance in Application for Admission or                                                                      July to June
      Readmission to secondary and Postsecondary               X                                             X
      Education Programs
13.   Financial Aid Counseling and Information                                                                        July to June
      Dissemination                                            X                    X            X
14.   Assistance in Application for Financial Aid              X                                                      July to June
15.   Tutoring and Monitoring of Homework                      X                    X            X           X        October to June
16.   Time Management and Study Skills Workshops               X                    X            X           X        September to June
17.   ASPIRA Clubs Activities                                  X                    X            X           X        September to June
18.   Referrals for Services                                   X                    X            X           X        July to June
19.   Graduates Follow up                                      X                                                      June to October
20.   Evaluation                                               X                    X            X           X        July to June
21.   Supplemental Instruction                                 X                    X            X           X        September to June
22.   Cultural Enrichment Activities                           X                    X            X           X        June to July
23.   Computerized Teaching Service                            X                    X            X           X        October to June
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                            67




7. Plan of Management and Coordination

   The ASPIRA Upward Bound Program provides for an effective plan of operation that

   ensures proper and efficient administration of the program.

   ASPIRA maintains the following Management Plan:

   In the provision of services, ASPIRA de Puerto Rico has developed an effective internal

   communication system for all programs. This facilitates sharing of resources, knowledge,

   information and expertise. In many cases, several programs may be complement to one

   another and, as such, they can mutually benefit from each others recruitment efforts, external

   resources, educational materials, program-related information and many other similar areas

   of expertise.

   Working as a unit adds to the strength to all ASPIRA programs. Each program is operated by

   its own specific management by objectives workplan which clearly defines the areas of

   operation. This program-to-program collaboration does not mean the draining of any

   particular program's resources. Instead, given that the populations and areas of operation

   often coincide, it serves as support and resources for each other.
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                                  1999-2004                         68




                                                             TABLE 25

                                           MANAGEMENT PERT CHART

                     ACTIVITIES                                  PERSONS IN               DATE
                                                                  CHARGE
Review program agreements with funding source and                 Program Director          June
rude changes; plan and prepare for program
implementation.
Provide for staff orientation and planning session.               Program Director     July and August
                                                                 Program Supervisor
Develop brochures and information flyers about the               Program Supervisor    July and August
program.
Begin to publicize program through radio and press               Program Supervisor   July to September
releases to inform potential participants about the
program.
                                                                                       July to October
Disseminate information to target schools and community          Program Supervisor
agencies.                                                           Coordinator
                                                                     Counselors
                                                                                       July to October
Present workshops to inform target middle and high               Program Supervisor
school personnel, students, parents and other groups on             Coordinator
the goals and objectives of the program.                             Counselors
                                                                                      August to October
Collect data for identification, recruitment and selection      Program Coordinator
of program participants.                                            Counselors
                                                                                      August to January
Begin identification of potential speakers and sites to          Program Supervisor
visit.
Order educational material                                       Program Supervisor    July to October
Implement program workplan for program Participants                 Coordinators         July to June
(Counseling, Tutoring, Academic enrichment and other                 Counselors
activities)                                                            Tutors
Provide technical assistance as needed or requested.              Program Director       July to June
                                                                 Program Supervisor
Maintain and expand linkages with Puerto Rico                     Program Director       July to June
Education Department officials. Target Schools, colleges         Program Supervisor
and industries.                                                      Counselors
                                                                  Program Director
Monitor Program Activities                                                               July to June
                                                                 Program Supervisor
                                                                    Coordinator
                                                                     Counselor
Provide for program evaluation and complete annual                Program Director       July to June
program financial report.                                        Program Supervisor
Provide for student follow-up and tracking                          Coordinator        July to October
                                                                     Counselor
 ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                            1999-2004                          69




                                                       TABLE 26

          The following are the ASPIRA Upward Bound Program Management Objectives

       MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES                                PERSONS IN                 DATE
                                                             CHARGE
Employ qualified program staff                              Program Director          July to June
                                                           Program Supervisor
Provide Opportunities for staff development                 Program Director          July to June
                                                           Program Supervisor
Provide for effective coordination and monitoring of        Program Director          July to June
program activities                                         Program Supervisor
Maintain effective fiscal management and record keeping     Program Director          July to June
                                                              Fiscal Officer
                                                          Administration Office
                                                                  Staff
                                                           Program Supervisor
Maintain linkages with target elementary, middle and       Program Supervisor         July to June
high schools                                                 Middle School
                                                              Coordinators
Maintain positive working relationships with service        Program Director          July to June
agencies and target community                              Program Supervisor
Maintain positive working relationships with post-          Program Director          July to June
secondary institutions                                     Program Supervisor
Provide for Program evaluation and student tracking         Program Director          July to June
                                                           Program Supervisor
                                                              Coordinators
                                                               Counselors



        The Program Directors is responsible for overseeing all Program Management objectives

        and activities, and to ensure effectiveness in attaining the program goals.

        Financial Management

        The plan for the program fiscal management involves the Upward Bound Program

        Supervisor, Executive Director, Administration Manager, Fiscal Officer as well as an

        external auditor firm that does an Annual Single Audit.

        Fiscal control is based on controlled procedures in accordance with the institutional

        policy, accounting principles and EDGAR. The Fiscal Officer within the Division of
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                            70




     Administrative and Fiscal Services is responsible for monitoring and approving request

     for expenditures which have been initiated by the Upward Bound Supervisor with the

     approval of ASPIRA'S Executive Director. Each year an audit is conducted by an

     outside auditor firm. Audit report are presented to the ASPIRA Board of Directors.

     Copies are sent to the U.S. Department of Education and other pertinent Federal

     Agencies. Copies are also maintained at the Executive Director's Office for review by

     appropriate individuals and organizations.

     Personnel Management Plan

     ASPIRA has a policy of equal employment opportunity and a commitment with non-

     discriminatory practices regarding personnel management. Decisions regarding

     recruitment, hiring, promotions, training and all other terms and conditions will be

     made without discrimination by reasons of race, color, creed or religion, sex, national

     origin, age, physical or mental handicap.

     The personnel management is based on standard procedures established by Federal and

     local laws. The Executive Director, Program Supervisor and Personnel Officer are

     responsible for all procedures. The Director, assisted by the Supervisor, provides for

     staff hiring and personnel development activities.

     The Personnel Officer is in charge of administrative matters such as preparation of

     contracts, marginal benefits, initial screening of possible candidates and personnel

     record keeping.

     Record Keeping and Reporting

     Effective record keeping is a crucial element of the ASPIRA Grant Management

     System: it ensures that all program components are effectively dealt with.
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                             71




     Management of Stipends

     A standardized auditing system is in place to ensure fiscal control of the stipends.

     During the academic year phase of the projects, stipends will be distributed to students

     four times a year. Students must have fully participated in the tutoring, counseling

     and/or academic components to receive a stipend. However, if there is verification of

     participation in a conflicting school activity, the absence from any Saturday activity will

     be excused and the stipend will be accredited. Students are limited to three excused

     absences per semester.

     The stipend amount will be attached to the Saturdays assistance and to the GPA. The

     Table #27 shows the scheduled stipend distribution.

                                             TABLE 27

               STIPEND SCHEDULE FOR UPWARD BOUND ACADEMIC YEAR

                                                      Bonus by             Estimated Number
      G.P.A.                  Amount
                                                    Grade Increase             of Students
    3:00 – 4:00                $40.00                    $10.00                      29

    2.50 – 2.99                $30.00                    $ 5.00                      23

    2.00 – 2.49                $20.00                    $ 3.00                      15

    1.60 – 1.99                $12.00                    $ 1.00                      4



     Students are required to maintain a minimum school Grade Point Average (G.P.A.) of

     1.50 on a 4.0 scale. If the G.P.A, falls below 2.49 in any subject matter, students are

     required to participate of the Supplemental Instruction Component in order to continue

     to receive stipend.

     During the summer component, the stipends will be distributed each three weeks to
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                              72




     those students who have completed that period. Written record will be maintained to

     track the disbursement of stipends. Full documentation is required to approve stipend

     and a student signature is inquired to document receipt.

     The project maintains records related to compliance with program requirements to

     ensure that the program serves only those eligible participants. The project has a

     written application process to determine if the participant is first generation, low

     income, in need of academic support, a citizen, and a resident of a target area. Prior to

     receiving services, participants will be required to submit information such as family

     tax forms, verification of welfare assistance, or a statement signed by parent/guardian

     declaring family income. These records will be maintained in an individual participant

     file in a secure place.

     The project will maintain records related to the performance of the project and each

     participant. Records of counseling contacts, student assessments, achievement tests,

     academic improvement, student progress, grades, courses completed tutoring,

     secondary school completion, and post-secondary school completion, and post-

     secondary placement will be maintained in individual participant ides. This information

     will be available to program staff allowing them to effectively evaluate the performance

     of participants and the project in accomplishing objectives.

     The following are the record keeping aspects of the project:

        1. Quarterly Reporting - The AS PIRA counselor is required to submit statistical and

            narrative reports to the Program Supervisor who compiles all the counselors

            reports into a Summary Program Statistical and Narrative Report which is
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                    1999-2004                            73




            submitted to the Program Director. The Program Director reviews the report and

            prepares a quarterly progress report which is submitted to the Board of Directors.

        2. Annual Report - The Program Supervisor compiles data for the annual statistical

            and narrative report, indicating total students served, overall outcomes of the

            program, and comparative results of the project with the proposed objectives. This

            information is reviewed by the Program Director who submits an annual

            performance report to the Board of Directors and to the funding sources.

        3. Financial Report - Financial reports are prepared on a monthly basis by the

            accountant with the assistance of the administrative officer staff. Audited financial

            statements are prepared at the end of the fiscal period. These statements are

            reviewed by the Program Supervisor and Program Director who submit them to

            the Board of Directors.

     8. Plan to Use Applicant's Resources and Personnel to Achieve Program Objectives and

         to Coordinate the Upward Bound

     With more than 23 years experience in operating a successful Upward Bound Programs,

     ASPIRA, Inc, of Puerto Rico has numerous resources available to successfully

     accomplish program goals. The most effective resource available is the committed and

     dedicated staff. Because of ASPIRA of Puerto Rico experience in operating Upward

     Bound Programs, as well as other programs serving groups traditionally under

     represented in post-secondary education, the institution has many institutional and

     community resources. The Comprehensive Plan, previously shown, describes how

     ASPIRA plans to use these resources and personnel to achieve each objective.
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                      1999-2004                        74




     As already stated, there is a lack of services for disadvantaged students in the targeted

     area, especially in relation to the academic support. In Puerto Rico, there are no private

     or public organizations that provide support services for youth to pursue academic goals.

     Nevertheless, ASPIRA keeps in contact with local government and community based

     organizations that provide services to individuals. There is a reciprocal relation between

     these organizations and the ASPIRA Upward Bound Program. Both, program staff and

     participants benefit from this kind of cooperation.

     Supporting services are received by the following targeted institutions:

          Hogares CREA (drug abuse treatment and prevention),
          Runaway Youth,
          ATREVEIE (a community based organization),
          Casa Julia de Burgos (provide services to women victims of mental or physical
            abuse),
          Rehabilitation and Education Society of Puerto Rico (Private non profit
            organization),
          Caribbean Association of TRIO Programs,
          Rehabilitation Services of Puerto Rico,
          College of Social Workers of Puerto Rico,
          Drug Abuse Prevention Services Department, and


     The contribution of these organizations include the following:

        - Assistance in recruitment of participants,

        - Direct services to participants and/or their families, and

        - Assistance to evaluate participants.

     9. Plan to Work in Cooperation with Parents and Key Administrative. Teaching- and

         Counseling Personnel at the Target Schools
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                     1999-2004                          75




     Parents are key elements in the development and implementation of the educational

     plans of their children. For this reason it is important to gain their involvement in

     Upward Bound activities and to encourage them to enhance their parental skills.

     ASPIRA's Upward Bound will use several strategies to accomplish the following

     objectives:

          To provide at least two sessions with parents each semester to discuss program

            activities;

          To provide one summer activity to reinforce the participants accomplishments

            during the academic year and summer components;

          To send educational material on how to become involved in their child education

            and how to enhance their parental skills;

          To achieve the Program objectives it is necessary to work in cooperation with key

            administrative, teaching and counseling personnel at the targeted schools.

            Because of this, effective communication procedures have been established. The

            Program staff visits the targeted schools at least once a week. Meetings with

            counselors, teachers, directors and/or participants are held in order to exchange

            information and/or solve difficulties.

          At the beginning of each program year Upward Bound will provide a current list

            of participants to school directors and counselors. In addition, agreements will be

            established to use school facilities to recruit candidates, to provide tutorial

            services, etc.; and

          To monitor participants academic growth, a performance report will be requested

            for each semester. Letters with detailed information about the program and
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                   1999-2004                         76




            schedule activities will be sent at the beginning of each academic year, The

            effectiveness of these strategies have been demonstrated through success and

            cooperation through the year.

     10. Follow-up Plan for Tracking Graduates (June to October)

     The program will track the educational progress of students, follow their acceptance and

     their completion of a postsecondary education. This service is particularly targeted to

     post-secondary placement candidates in the month of June, August and September.

     During this period student academic plans will be finalized. Efforts will be made by

     counselors to secure information on:

             Applications made to postsecondary institutions,

             Post-secondary institutions in which students are accepted,

             Enrollment status,

             Participation in special programs,

             Whether course load will be full or part-time,

             Type of financial aid secured,

             Whether the student will be working, and

             Change of address.

     The following methods will be utilized for tracking students:

             Correspondence will be sent to Upward Bound graduated students asking for

                their enrollment and to monitor their academic progress. This survey will

                conducted annually during the months of September to November.

             Students and/or parents will be asked to authorize release of students college

                transcripts to the ASPIRA office, as requested.
ASPIRA’s Regular Upward Bound Program                 1999-2004                          77




             Verification of enrollment in postsecondary schools will be requested of all

                graduated participants during the summer component.

             All postsecondary placed participants will be encouraged to seek personal,

                academic and career advice and if possible submit grade reports each

                semester.

     Follow-up information will be kept on each current and former participant's record, and

     will be considered in improving and further refining the Upward Bound Program.

								
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