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					KENT LAW SCHOOL


  POSTGRADUATE
STUDENT HANDBOOK



    2010/2011
                                  CONTENTS

Introduction                                                      3
Programmes of Study:
Criminal Justice                                                  4
Environmental Law and Policy                                      5
European Law                                                      6
International Commercial Law                                      7
International Criminal Justice                                    8
International Environmental Law                                   9
International Law with International Relations                    10
Medical Law and Ethics                                            12
Public International Law                                          13
General LLM in Law                                                14
LLM in Law (Erasmus-Europe)                                       15
Combined Title LLM                                                16
Postgraduate Modules 2010/11                                      17
General Information:
Induction Programme                                               18
English for Special Purposes                                      18
International Commercial Law Workshop                             19
Centre for Critical International Law                             19
Modules                                                           19
Module Selection                                                  20
Module Transfer                                                   20
Frequency of Classes, Mode of Teaching and Attendance             20
Plagiarism and Duplication of Material                            21
Ethical Review                                                    21
Coursework                                                        22
Coursework/Dissertation Submission and Moodle                     22
Essay Submission Deadlines                                        23
Late Submission – Essays                                          23
Dissertations                                                     24
Dissertation Submission and Deadline                              25
Late Submission – Dissertations                                   25
Marking of Essays and Dissertations and Feedback to Students      26
Criteria to be Applied to Taught Postgraduate Assessment in KLS   27
Progression and Upgrading                                         28
Student Responsibilities                                          28
Support Services                                                  28
IT                                                                29
Student Representation and Feedback                               30
Complaints Procedure                                              30
Library Facilities                                                31
Access to London Libraries                                        32
Student Facilities                                                32
Data Protection                                                   32
Members and Associates of the Kent Law School                     33
Annexes:                                                          36
University Regulations
Credit Framework




                                         2
                                  INTRODUCTION

The requirements for all the Masters and Postgraduate Diploma programmes taught by
the Kent Law School are subject to the University Regulations and Credit Framework for
Taught Programmes. Both documents may be found as an annex to this handbook but are
also available on the University web sites at:-

http://www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/quality/regulations/index.html

http://www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/quality/credit/index.html

Each Masters and Postgraduate Diploma programme is offered on both a full-time and
part-time basis. Full time students complete a programme of study over one academic
year, and part-time students over two academic years. Masters students must follow
taught modules (Stage 1) and submit a dissertation (Stage 2). The Postgraduate Diploma
consists of the coursework element only. There is no dissertation element for the
Postgraduate Diploma.

Each successfully completed module carries 20 credits (10 ECTS credits) and the
dissertation carries 60 credits (30 ECTS credits). The comparative research paper for the
Erasmus-Europe carries 30 credits (15 ECTS credits). Each credit amounts to
approximately 10 hours of ‘learning time’. In total the Masters programme requires 180
credits (90 ECTS credits) and 120 credits (60 ECTS credits) for the Postgraduate
Diploma.

The Programme Convenors will give an introductory talk about their programmes and
modules on Thursday 23rd September, as outlined in the Welcome Week programme.

More details on the individual programmes and module choices can be found later in this
handbook. For some particular Masters programmes you are able to select modules taught
by other Schools. For full details of modules offered by the School of Politics and
International Relations and modules taught by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and
Social Research please refer to the handbooks available from these Schools or via their
websites:-

http://www.kent.ac.uk/politics/
http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/

A variety of other information is posted on the Kent Law School postgraduate home page
and the Moodle pages at:-

http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/currentpg/pgt/ict/index.html
https://Moodle.kent.ac.uk




                                           3
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in Criminal Justice

Programme Description and Organisation

The Criminal Justice programme is designed to give students the opportunity to study key
areas in criminal justice with a view to providing an understanding of the theoretical and
policy issues surrounding the area of criminal justice, both from the legal and social
science perspective. The programme brings an interdisciplinary approach to the study of
crime and disorder. It embraces criminal law and procedure and the traditional theoretical
concerns of criminology. It also examines the criminal justice system from a range of
other perspectives, including the management of relevant organisations, the psychological
and sociological causes of criminal behaviour and social and economic perspectives.
There is also a module on research methods, focusing on the specific requirements of
criminal justice.

The programme is taught in parallel with the MA in Criminology offered by the School
of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. For further information on modules
offered by this School please refer to the handbook available from the School Office or
from their website http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/

All Criminal Justice students are required to take module LW870 and select five
remaining modules (two for Autumn and three for Spring) from the selection below.
Students may choose one module from other LLM programmes or from the MA in
Criminology with the consent of the Criminal Justice Programme Convenor.


                             CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Autumn Term
LW870 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
LW871     Policing
SO827     History of Crime and Punishment
SO830     Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice
SO869     Theories of Crime and Deviance
SO870     Research Methods in Criminology
Spring Term
LW843     The International Protection of Human Rights
LW846     International Criminal Law
LW873     Penology
LW876     Issues in Criminal Justice
LW886     Transnational Criminal Law
LW887     Forensic Evidence – An International Perspective
SO824     Sociological Theories of Violence
SO825     Terrorism and Modern Society
SO881     Cultural Criminology
SO868     Critical Criminology
SO882     Young People, Crime and Place




                                            4
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Law and Policy

Programme Description and Organisation

The Environmental Law and Policy programme allows students to follow environmental
modules offered by the Kent Law School as well as specified modules offered by other
social science departments. The programme is designed to provide students with an in-
depth understanding of environmental laws at national, European Union and international
levels alongside an appreciation of the social and economic contexts in which they
operate. The programme is intended to be accessible both to students with a legal
academic background and those who have previously followed environmental studies.

Students are required to take a minimum of three Environmental Law modules from the
selection below. The remaining modules may be chosen from the full and wide ranging
list of Law modules offered on our other specialised taught LLM programmes, or the
module offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation as indicated below.

For more information on the two modules taught by the School of Anthropology and
Conservation please refer to the handbook available from the School Office or from their
website http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/


                    ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND POLICY
Autumn Term
LW852     European Union Environmental Law and Policy
LW839     Environmental Quality Law
LW889     The Legal Foundations of Environmental Decision Making
LW906     International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations
SE831* Environmental Anthropology
Spring Term
LW837     Conservation and Natural Resources Law
LW838     Land Development Law
LW841     International Trade Law and the Environment
LW884     International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects
LW888     Climate Change and Renewable Energy Law

*SE831 is taught on Thursdays, 1400-1600 in the Dice Lecture Room, Marlowe Building




                                           5
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in European Law

Programme Description and Organisation

The European Law programme is intended to provide students with the opportunity to
study key aspects of European legal integration. The programme is primarily designed to
facilitate students in acquiring an in-depth understanding of key areas of the law of the
European Union. Several of its modules focus on central legal principles and sectors of
EU law, and of the political and economic context from which they arise. In addition, the
programme offers students the possibility to engage in the comparative study of the law
of European states as well as study a range of non-law modules relating to European
governance.

Students are required to take a minimum of three European Law modules from the
selection of modules listed in the table below known as the ‘European stream’.


                              EUROPEAN LAW
Autumn Term
LW807     European Comparative Law
LW815     European Union Constitutional and Institutional Law
LW826     European Union and International Competition Law: Legal Foundations
LW832     European Union Migration Law
LW852     European Union Environmental Law and Policy
Spring Term
LW836     European Contract Law
LW858     Foundations of European Union Common Market and Economic Law

The remaining three modules may be chosen from the full and wide ranging list of Law
modules offered on our other specialised taught LLM programmes as well as from a
selection of non-law modules on the European Governance programme taught by the
School of Politics and International Relations. It is recommended that students consider
selecting the following modules:-

Autumn Term
LW843 International Protection of Human Rights
PO885 Decision-making in the European Union

Spring Term
PO886 European Public Policy




                                           6
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in International Commercial Law

Programme Description and Organisation

The International Commercial Law programme is designed to give students the
opportunity to study key areas in international commercial law with a view to providing
an understanding of the legal problems encountered and the typical legal solutions in
international business transactions. By choosing a combination of modules together with
a dissertation topic in consultation with their supervisor, students will be able to construct
a programme suited to their particular needs and interests.

A variety of teaching methods are used throughout the degree programme, including
informal lectures, presentations, seminars, research labs, group and individual
supervisions. Classes in all modules are intended to stimulate thought and to encourage
discussion of assigned topics: in some modules students will be required to make
individual presentations. Readings will be assigned and recommended before class and
students are expected to prepare for and actively participate in all teaching sessions.

Students are required to take a minimum of three International Commercial modules from
the selection below. The remaining three modules may also be chosen from the selection
below or from the full and wide ranging list of Law modules offered on our other
specialised taught LLM programmes.


                     INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL LAW
Autumn Term
LW802     International Business Transactions
LW807     European Comparative Law
LW810     International Law on Foreign Investment
LW821     Comparative Law of Obligations
LW826     European Union and International Competition Law: Legal Foundations
LW827     Banking Law I
LW847     World Trade Organisation Law and Practice
LW885     Law and Development
LW907     Commercial Credit
LW908     International and Comparative Consumer Law and Policy
Spring Term
LW801     Intellectual Property Law
LW811     International Commercial Arbitration
LW828     Banking Law II
LW836     European Contract Law
LW841     International Trade Law and the Environment
LW858     Foundations of European Union Common Market and Economic Law
LW899     Corporate Governance
LW900     International Migration Law
LW904     Laws of the Maritime, Air and Outer Spaces




                                              7
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in International Criminal Justice

Programme Description and Organisation

The International Criminal Justice programme is designed to provide a postgraduate
qualification of value to those intending to play a leading role in the field of international
criminal justice; a detailed knowledge and high level of understanding of a range of
specialised subject areas and more broadly-based communication skills of general value
to those seeking postgraduate employment. It will also provide a degree of specialisation
in areas of international criminal justice of individual interest through the dissertation
which requires students to engage with academic work which is at the frontiers of
scholarship. Students are encouraged to develop a critical awareness of the operation of
international criminal justice, particularly in contexts which are perceived to be
controversial or in a state of evolution.

All International Criminal Justice students are required to take modules LW870, LW886
and LW846. For students who have not studied international law previously they are
required to take either LW814 or LW844. The remaining modules may be chosen from
the selection below. Students may choose one module from other LLM programmes or
from the MA in Criminology with the consent of the International Criminal Justice
Programme Convenor.


                      INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Autumn Term
LW870 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
LW814     Public International Law
LW844     Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems
LW871     Policing
SO827     History of Crime and Punishment
SO830     Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice
SO869     Theories of Crime and Deviance
SO870     Research Methods in Criminology
Spring Term
LW846 International Criminal Law
LW886 Transnational Criminal Law
LW843     The International Protection of Human Rights
LW873     Penology
LW876     Issues in Criminal Justice
LW887     Forensic Evidence – An International Perspective
SO824     Sociological Theories of Violence
SO825     Terrorism and Modern Society
SO881     Cultural Criminology
SO868     Critical Criminology
SO882     Young People, Crime and Place




                                              8
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in International Environmental Law

Programme Description and Organisation

The recently established LLM in International Environmental Law builds upon the
substantial expertise in environmental legal issues that has existed for many years at
Kent, and applies this to increasingly complex and significant global issues.

This degree stimulates a critical awareness of the operation of international
environmental law and policy, and features a particular focus on topics that are perceived
to be controversial or in a state of evolution. Students will develop a sound knowledge
and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and
policy and the contexts in which international law operates.

Students are required to take a minimum of three International Environmental Law
modules from the selection below. The remaining three modules may be chosen from the
full and wide ranging list of law modules offered on our other specialised taught LLM
programmes. However, it is recommended that students consider selecting module
LW884: International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects offered in the
Spring Term.


                  INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
Autumn Term
LW852     European Union Environmental Law and Policy
LW889     The Legal Foundations of Environmental Decision Making
LW906     International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations
Spring Term
LW841     International Trade Law and the Environment
LW884     International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects
LW888     Climate Change and Renewable Energy Law




                                            9
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in International Law with International
Relations

Programme Description and Organisation

The International Law with International Relations programme has four complementary
components.

The first provides an appreciation of public international law. One module in this
component considers public international law generally, particularly concerning itself
with the sources, methods and institutions of international law; the other module
considers the practical significance of international law by considering its role and
potential in a range of contemporary international problems. The second component
focuses upon international humanitarian law. Here, the two relevant modules consider the
international protection of human rights, and international criminal law. The third
component consists of two modules drawn from modules offered by the School of
Politics and International Relations for the MA in International Relations. These both
contrast with, and are complementary to, the modules in international law. The final
component is research and writing.

All International Law with International Relations students are required to take modules
LW814 and LW844 in the Autumn term. Students can then choose either LW843 or
LW846 (or both) in the Spring term. The remaining modules may be chosen from the
selection of modules listed below offered by the School of Politics and International
Relations.

For more information on the modules taught by the School of Politics and International
Relations please refer to the handbook available from the School Office or from their
website http://www.kent.ac.uk/politics/



     INTERNATIONAL LAW WITH INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Autumn Term
LW814 Public International Law
LW844 Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems
PO824   International Relations Theory
PO832   Conflict Resolution in World Politics
PO866   Federalism and Federal Political Systems
PO885   Decision Making in the European Union
PO916   International Security in a Changing World
PO917   Terrorism and National Security
PO920   International Political Economy: Conflict, Cooperation and Security
PO926   Designing Democracy




                                          10
Spring Term
LW843 The International Protection of Human Rights
LW846 International Criminal Law
LW886     Transnational Criminal Law
LW900     International Migration Law
PO817     Resistance and Alternatives to Capitalism and Democracy
PO828     Theories of Conflict and Violence
PO859     Human Rights in a World of States
PO867     Comparative Federal Political Systems
PO886     European Public Policy
PO913     American Foreign Policy: Ordering the International
PO918     Regional Conflict and Security Analysis




                                       11
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Law and Ethics

Programme Description and Organisation

The Masters (LLM) or Postgraduate Diploma is a taught programme which may be
undertaken by either part-time or full-time students. The September 2010 cohort of part-
time students will be taught on Wednesdays between 10 am and 3 pm during Autumn and
Spring terms, over two years. Full-time students will be required to attend on Tuesdays
and Wednesdays between 10 am and 3 pm during Autumn and Spring terms for one
academic year. Returning second year part time students normally follow the remaining
modules taught on a Tuesday.

Teaching will consist of a combination of informal lectures, presentations, seminars and
supervisions. Classes will take the form of presentation and analysis of relevant issues
that arise in current medical and legal practice. Group discussion of topics raised will be
encouraged and students will be required to present individual analyses of case histories
and studies related to specific topical issues. Preparation for each teaching session will
include the reading of recommended texts and cases, and individual research into current
legal, medical, and philosophical debates of the topics concerned. Students are expected
to prepare for, attend, and actively participate in the classes.

The programme consists of six modules, which are common to the Masters and the
Postgraduate Diploma. The three modules in bold are compulsory, and the remaining
three modules may also be chosen from the selection below or from the full and wide
ranging list of Law modules offered on our other specialised taught LLM programmes.


                           MEDICAL LAW AND ETHICS
Autumn Term
LW864 The Foundations of the English Legal System
LW862     Death and Dying
LW865     Issues in Medical Law
Spring Term
LW863 Consent to Treatment
LW866 Medical Practice and Malpractice
LW867     Reproduction and the Beginning of Life




                                            12
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in Public International Law

Programme Description and Organisation

Public International Law programme is concerned both with the governing of relations
between nations and with the relationship between individuals and organisations, with the
international world. The emphasis in the teaching of public international law will be upon
its relevance to contemporary international problems and events. It is taught primarily
through a consideration of current political events.

The focus of the first term is to provide an appreciation of public international law. One
module in this component considers international law as doctrine; the other module
considers the practical significance of international law by considering its role and
potential in a range of contemporary international problems. In the second term the focus
is on international criminal law and international human rights law.

All Public International Law students are required to take LW814 and LW844 in the
Autumn Term. In the Spring Term students must choose either LW843 or LW846, but
may choose both. The remaining modules may be chosen from the full and wide ranging
list of Law modules offered on our other specialised taught LLM programmes. However,
it is recommended that students consider selecting LW900: International Migration Law.


                         PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW
Autumn Term
LW814 Public International Law
LW844 Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems
Spring Term
LW843 The International Protection of Human Rights
LW846 International Criminal Law
LW886     Transnational Criminal Law
LW900     International Migration Law




                                           13
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in Law

Programme Description and Organisation

The LLM in Law allows students to choose any six modules from the full and wide
ranging list of Law modules offered for all our specialised taught LLM programmes.
Students choose three modules in each of the first two terms, and then complete a
supervised dissertation in the area of their choice in the final period of registration. The
Postgraduate Diploma consists of the coursework element only. There is no dissertation
element for the Postgraduate Diploma.
This programme allows students to explore a wide and exciting range of contemporary
legal issues and to tailor an LLM degree to meet their own individual needs and interests.
Modules in any of the taught LLM programmes can be studied alongside each other,
offering a high level of flexibility and the opportunity to study modules in very different
legal areas if desired, subject to timetabling constraints.

A full list of all the modules offered by the Kent Law School can be found at page 17.
Module descriptions can be found in the Module Guide.




                                            14
Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma in Law (Erasmus-Europe)

Programme Description and Organisation

This programme is a variant on the LLM in Law and Combined LLM and shares the
general educational aims of those programmes. The distinctive feature of the Erasmus-
Europe programme is the integration into the core programme of Masters level learning
and teaching of a structured period of credited study outside the United Kingdom.

The programme offers students a rigorous programme of study that includes the
experience of studying and living in another European country as well as the UK. This
experience will allow students to develop their personal/professional skills of flexibility,
adaptability, problem-solving and resourcefulness; to strengthen language skills and
cross-cultural literacy; to broaden horizons and develop their networking skills in an
internationalised setting.

It will increase opportunities for students to engage in comparative study of two distinct
legal systems and provide a sound knowledge, systematic understanding of the
institutional structures and policy environments for the operation of English law and the
law of an Erasmus-Europe partner institution.

The programme is only offered on a full time basis. Students have a free choice of any
three taught modules from the full range of those offered by the Kent Law School in the
Autumn term (30 University credits (15 ECTS)).

The Spring term is spent at the Erasmus-Europe partner where students must complete an
approved programme of study. Marks for modules completed at the Erasmus-Europe
partner will be averaged and treated as s single numerical mark representing 30
University credits (15 ECTS). Students must also complete to the satisfaction of their
Kent Law School supervisor specific stages of research and writing for a Comparative
Law Research Paper (LW911). The Comparative Research Paper is a 7-8,000 word essay
on an approved topic in an area of law studied at KLS and the Erasmus-Europe partner
institution. Primary responsibility for supervising the paper is assigned to a member of
the KLS academic staff. The paper must be submitted by the first day of the Summer term
and equates to 30 University credits (15 ECTS).

The Summer term and remainder of registration is spent at the University of Kent
preparing a dissertation between 15-20,000 words (60 University credits (30 ECTS)).

A full list of all the modules offered by the Kent Law School can be found at page 17.
Module descriptions can be found in the Module Guide.




                                            15
Combined Title Masters (LLM) and Postgraduate Diploma

Programme Description and Organisation

The Combined Title LLM gives students the ability to choose any two areas of legal
interest from the range of taught Law LLM specialisms available at Kent Law School to
create their own personal joint combination LLM.

Students choose one subject area as their ‘major’ subject and study three core modules
required for that programme. They also choose a ‘minor’ subject and study three modules
offered for that programme. (Module choices are subject to approval by the Director of
Graduate Studies.) Students also complete a supervised dissertation in their major area of
study. The Postgraduate Diploma consists of the coursework element only. There is no
dissertation element for the Postgraduate Diploma.

This results in students being awarded with an LLM in one subject with another, for
example an LLM in International Commercial Law with European Law (or any of the
other possible combinations available).

A full list of all the modules offered by the Kent Law School can be found at page 17.
Module descriptions can be found in the Module Guide.




                                           16
       KENT LAW SCHOOL POSTGRADUATE MODULES 2010/2011
Autumn Term
LW802     International Business Transactions
LW807     European Comparative Law
LW810     International Law on Foreign Investment
LW814     Public International Law
LW815     European Union Constitutional and Institutional Law
LW821     Comparative Law of Obligations
LW826     European Union and International Competition Law: Legal Foundations
LW827     Banking Law I
LW832     European Union Migration Law
LW839     Environmental Quality Law
LW844     Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems
LW847     World Trade Organisation Law and Practice
LW852     European Union Environmental Law and Policy
LW862     Death and Dying
LW864     The Foundations of the English Legal System
LW865     Issues in Medical Law
LW870     Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
LW871     Policing
LW885     Law and Development
LW889     The Legal Foundations of Environmental Decision Making
LW906     International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations
LW907     Commercial Credit
LW908     International and Comparative Consumer Law and Policy
Spring Term
LW801     Intellectual Property Law
LW811     International Commercial Arbitration
LW828     Banking Law II
LW836     European Contract Law
LW837     Conservation and Natural Resources Law
LW838     Land Development Law
LW841     International Trade Law and the Environment
LW843     International Protection of Human Rights
LW846     International Criminal Law
LW858     Foundations of European Union Common Market and Economic Law
LW863     Consent to Treatment
LW866     Medical Practice and Malpractice
LW867     Reproduction and the Beginning of Life
LW873     Penology
LW876     Issues in Criminal Justice
LW884     International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects
LW886     Transnational Criminal Law
LW887     Forensic Evidence – An International Perspective
LW888     Climate Change and Renewable Energy Law
LW899     Corporate Governance
LW900     International Migration Law
LW904     Laws of the Maritime, Air and Outer Spaces


                                      17
                             GENERAL INFORMATION

The following is more general information and is relevant to all Masters and Postgraduate
Diploma programmes.

Induction Programme

The aim of the induction programme is to provide an academic ‘crash course’ on issues,
concepts and principles which are considered basic to a proper appreciation of
postgraduate study and research within a law school. The extensive induction programme
will facilitate critical research and essay writing capabilities of students. Several sessions
during the second term will discuss how to effectively research and structure an LLM
dissertation. The programme also provides guidance and knowledge to our non-UK
students, those who come from a non-common law background or those who have no
specific legal training. The induction programme will be timetabled during the Autumn
Term and Spring Terms.

English for Special Purposes

A very good grasp of the English language - encompassing a mastery of the four skills of
listening, reading, speaking and especially writing - is required if you are to be successful
in your study of law at Kent Law School. Some of the students accepted into LLM
programmes need to improve their proficiency in these four skills at the time of their
registration and so the Law School has established an English for Special Purposes (Law)
module to try to ensure that you get the fullest possible benefit during your period of
study at KLS. The module will be run by a language specialist, Ms Jane Short of the
University’s English Language Unit. All Masters students in need of language
improvement will be considered for this programme.

All students who may benefit from taking this module (two hours a week during the
Autumn Term) will be tested on their language skills by the English Language Unit
during the first/second week of the Autumn Term. Students who will be required to take
this module will be notified promptly and the module will commence in Week Two of
the term.

The establishment of this special module has involved a considerable investment of
resources by KLS and therefore attendance, which will be checked every week, is
compulsory. Dr Robin Mackenzie of the KLS staff will act as the Co-ordinator for the
module and will monitor student progress.

Professional language instruction for non-native English speakers can lead to quite
significant improvements in English skills over a period of months and we urge you to
take full advantage of this opportunity.




                                             18
International Commercial Law Workshop

An informal workshop for staff and students will be held throughout the year on a topic
of current interest. In 2009 we considered the effects of the world financial crisis. In
addition to a workshop during the Autumn Term two invited speakers gave presentations
during the Summer Term, Dr Paulo dos Santos from the School of Oriental and African
Studies and Professor Niamh Moloney from the London School of Economics. This
year’s topic will be indicated at the beginning of the Autumn Term. The workshop is
open to all postgraduate students.

Centre for Critical International Law

The newly founded University of Kent Centre for Critical International Law will promote
research, conferences and publications in the field of International Law both on the
Canterbury and the Brussels campus. It focuses on the idea that International Law is not
apolitical and its political ideology reflects the interests of those in powerful states. Both
in research and teaching its members put International Law into the context of history and
political theory and extend its reach into International Relations.

It is hoped that the Centre will encourage student participation in activities that the Centre
are developing this year and may include some sort of student advocacy on current issues
of international concern. The Centre will be launched with a human rights day in the
Autumn Term. It intends to screen films of relevance to international law studies as well
as organising and developing other activities for postgraduate students during the year.
Details will be forthcoming and the website will be updated periodically.

The Centre will host the Guest Lecture Series which will normally run every Monday in
Eliot Lecture Theatre 2 commencing at 6 pm. The Centre will host an International Law
Reading Group on a fortnightly basis, open to all students of international law. The
Centre will also run a number of workshops during the Spring and Summer Terms. The
Skills Workshops will take place in weeks 6 and 8 in the Autumn Term. The Dissertation
Workshops will be held in the Summer Term (details to follow). There will also be a
Careers Workshop towards the end of the Spring Term. The Guest Lecture Series and
workshops will be open to all LLM students who are studying with an international law
component. The Centre will also organise a study trip to The Hague in respect of which
there is a small subsidy for 20 students. Further details will be circulated at a later date
and details will also be posted on the website at:
 http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/cecil/index.html

Modules

Whilst every effort is made to offer the Law modules listed, unavailability of staff, low
student demand and unforeseen circumstances may occasionally necessitate the
cancellation of a module. Every effort is made to inform students of modules that will not
run at the earliest opportunity.




                                             19
Module Selection

Students are required to complete the enclosed Module Selection Form and return it to the
Kent Law School Postgraduate Office by Friday 1st October. When registering for
modules, students should note that while all law modules (LW) are assessed by
coursework, which may include an element of participation assessment. Modules with a
PO, SA, SE or SO code, indicating that they are taught by another School, might have
different assessment requirements and should be checked with the relevant School.

Module Transfer

Students may be permitted to transfer from one module to another after 1st October, but
no later than Friday 8th October for the Autumn Term and Friday 28th January 2011 for
the Spring Term. A Module Transfer Form is available from the Kent Law School
Postgraduate Office.

Frequency of Classes, Mode of Teaching and Attendance at Classes

Classes will normally meet once a week for two hours during the Autumn and Spring
Terms. Teaching methods will vary according to the Module Convenor and School, but
are usually taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and presentations. All
students are expected to prepare for, attend and participate in the seminars in addition to
undertaking independent research. Some modules have a participation assessment mark
as an element of the overall final mark for the module.

The Kent Law School Module Convenors will introduce their modules during the first
week of term commencing 27th September as timetabled, together with the first week of
the Spring Term commencing 17th January 2011.

Reading Weeks

The Autumn and Spring Terms each have a reading week. In the Autumn Term it will be
week 5 (25th–29th October); in the Spring Term it will be week 18 (21st-25th February
2011).

Essay Writing Weeks

The last two weeks of the Autumn and Spring Terms will be essay writing weeks. These
are weeks 6th-17th December and 28th March-8th April 2011 respectively.

During the reading and writing weeks there will be no classes, unless a Module Convenor
makes a different arrangement for their module. It should be noted that writing weeks
may not be allocated in modules taught by other Schools.

The Summer Term and Summer vacation will be occupied by the preparation and
submission of a 15-20,000 word dissertation detailed later in this handbook.




                                            20
Plagiarism and Duplication of Material

Please refer to Annex 10 of the Credit Framework on academic discipline procedures:-

http://www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/quality/credit/index.html

Plagiarism is the act of presenting the ideas and discoveries of another as one’s own.
To copy sentences, phrases or even striking expressions without acknowledgement
in a manner which may deceive the reader as to the source is plagiarism; to
paraphrase in a manner which may deceive the reader is likewise plagiarism.

The University does not accept plagiarism and imposes severe penalties if it occurs in
coursework or dissertations. Guidance on referencing is contained within the Kent Law
School Style Guide enclosed with this information pack. The Kent Law School uses
Turnitin plagiarism detection software. All coursework and dissertations are submitted
electronically via Turnitin which operates through Moodle.

Notwithstanding that work may not be identified by Turnitin as potentially problematic,
the essential test is whether a reasonable case can be made out that the work is not yours
or is not in your own writing ‘voice’ and KLS will, as appropriate, viva any student to
establish authorship. You are strongly advised to look at the guidance on academic
integrity, avoiding plagiarism and information on Turnitin can be found on the following
websites:-

http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/currentpg/pgt/coursework/submission.html
http://www.kent.ac.uk/student/studying/index.html#pg
http://www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/ai/students/index.htm

Ethical Review

The University requires that each School has procedures in place to ensure that the ethical
implications of research involving human participants have been considered and that
ethical standards of conduct are achieved. All research proposals that involve any human
participants should therefore be subjected to an ethical review prior to their
commencement. Interviews and surveys of staff, students and other groups are included
in this category alongside scientific interventional techniques and the use of non-
anonymised primary source data.

An ethical review form should be completed and submitted to the Chair of the School
Research Ethics Advisory Group, Dr Eleanor Curran. The headings should be followed
exactly and reflected in the research proposal.

Guidance on the principles that underpin the process of ethical review can be found at:
http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/currentpg/pgt/lookitup/index.html




                                            21
Coursework

For Law modules students are normally required to submit an essay of 4-5,000 words
(excluding bibliography, appendices, quotations and any supplemental material which is
included for ease of reference but which does not form an essential part of the text) for
each of the six taught modules. Essays should be typed, double or 1½ line spaced and
fully referenced. Essays must state the actual word length and must not depart from the
required word length - students may be penalised for exceeding this. The Module
Convenor will set a list of essay topics for the students to choose from or may give
students the opportunity to set their own essay topic after consultation and agreement of
an alternative essay title.

However, for some KLS modules there may be two essays of 2,000-2,500 words each.
The first essay will be due in the middle of the relevant term, and the other on the date
given below. Requirements vary for the LLM in Law (Erasmus-Europe) and the
Comparative Research Paper (LW911) of 7-8,000 words is due at the beginning of the
Summer Term. Where a module has a 20% participation assessment the essay word limit
may be reduced to 3-4,000 words.

Further information for all modules is available in the Module Outlines which are
distributed during the introductory week and are also available on the module Moodle
page at: https://Moodle.kent.ac.uk

Coursework/Dissertation Submission and Moodle

All coursework and dissertations must be submitted electronically. One paper copy of
essays and two paper copies of dissertations must also be handed in.

Electronic Submission

Electronic submission is done using the Turnitin software, accessed on the relevant
Moodle module page. KLS is using Tutnitin to issue the receipt for your
coursework/dissertation, to check it for plagiarism and to archive it. If you fail to submit
electronically via Moodle by the published deadline, then no assessment mark will
be recorded on the Student Data System (whether or not you have handed in a paper
copy). Failure to submit via Moodle will be deemed to be failure to submit.

More detailed instructions on how to submit coursework/dissertations electronically, and
more explanation of what Turnitin does, are given on the handout enclosed in your
information pack. If you have any difficulties you should email kls-
webadmin@kent.ac.uk immediately.

Paper Copy - Essays

One paper copy of your essay must also be handed in for staff to use in marking and
giving feedback. If you fail to submit the paper copy by the deadline your feedback and
your mark are likely to be delayed.




                                            22
Paper copies of essays should be posted (with completed Cover Sheet, having signed the
declaration relating to plagiarism and research ethics) in the box marked ‘Postgraduate
Essay Papers Only’, situated outside the KLS Postgraduate Office.

Essay Submission Deadlines

Autumn Term Essays

Unless indicated otherwise by a Module Convenor in the Module Outline, 5 pm on the
first day of the Spring Term, Monday 17th January 2011.

Spring Term Essays

Similarly unless indicated otherwise by a Module Convenor in the Module Outline, 5 pm
on the first day of the Summer Term, Monday 9th May 2011.

Late Submission - Essays

Please refer to Annex 9 of the Credit Framework on concessions applications:
http://www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/quality/credit/index.html

Students are reminded that they have a responsibility to manage their learning, revision
and assessment activities throughout the duration of each term or assessment period.
Students are expected to plan carefully and manage their workload and should not leave
coursework, learning, revision or similar activities until too late.

Extensions in the submission time for essays will only be considered if there is evidence
of illness or other misfortune, such as to cause exceptional interference with academic
performance over and above the normal difficulties experienced in life. Students are
required to provide supporting concessionary evidence. Extensions will not be considered
in the following circumstances:-

      Completing coursework too late and missing deadlines because of computer or
       transport difficulties.
      Losing work not backed up on computer disk or USB device.
      Failure to make alternative travel plans in the face of known disruptions.
      Normal employment commitments.

Applications for an extension should be made at least five working days prior to the essay
deadline unless there are exceptional circumstances which justify the delay in submitting
the request. ALL late requests for an extension will be referred to the Director of
Graduate Studies. Applications can be made by completing a Concessions Application
Form for a Coursework Deadline available at:

http://www.kent.ac.uk/socsci/studying/undergrad/concessions.html




                                           23
The application should be submitted to the KLS Postgraduate Office who will seek
approval on behalf of the student from the relevant Module Convenor. Students will be
informed by e-mail of the outcome of their application. Students are required to submit
coursework in time for the marks to be considered by the next Board of Examiners
meeting. If a student has concessionary evidence which prevents them from submitting by
the appropriate deadline then they must submit the concessionary evidence to be
considered by the Board of Examiners.

Where an essay is submitted late without an extension being granted it will normally be
given a mark of 0%.

Dissertations

The work on the dissertation will be preceded by attendance at a compulsory short
programme of research training that will be convened by Dr Simone Wong. This will
commence in the Spring Term. Further details as to times and venue will appear on the
Spring Term timetable before the winter vacation. This programme will convey
information about the dissertation project and the research methods that should be used in
undertaking it.

On completion of the research training programme, students must choose their
dissertation research topic in consultation with a dissertation supervisor. Any difficulties
in identifying a potential dissertation supervisor should be referred to the relevant
Programme Convenor. To register their choice of topic students must then complete the
enclosed Dissertation Details Form and return this to the Kent Law School Postgraduate
Office by Friday 1st April 2011. (Students will be informed by e-mail if we are unable to
accommodate their allocated dissertation supervisor.)

Dissertations should be between 15-20,000 words (excluding bibliography, appendices,
quotations and any supplemental material which is included for ease of reference but
which does not form an essential part of the text), typed, double or 1½ line spaced and
fully referenced. Dissertations must state the actual word length. Students may be
penalised for departing from the required word length and must follow the Instructions to
Candidates available on the website at:
http://www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/quality/regulations/index.html

Supervision meetings, which may be face-to-face or may take the form of email and
telephone communication, will include a discussion and review of the structure and plan
of a dissertation and a sample chapter. This will normally involve a minimum of 3
meetings (face-to-face, e-mail or telephone) which should take place between the middle
of the Spring term and the end of the Summer term. Supervisors and students must keep a
note of these meetings. Supervisors will be available from the end of the Summer term
until September only to respond to specific issues or problems and this availability will
normally be by e-mail. Supervisors will not review complete drafts of the dissertation.

Any major difficulties or differences of opinion that might emerge between a student and
a supervisor should be referred to the Programme Convenor of the relevant programme
and, if not resolved, to the Director of Graduate Studies.



                                            24
Masters students may also wish to attend, on a voluntary basis, the Research Methods in
Law modules (LW834 and LW835) primarily run for research students registered on the
MPhil/PhD programme. Although intended primarily for research students, many of the
issues raised in these modules will be of relevance to students undertaking a Masters
dissertation. These modules take place in the Autumn and Spring Terms from 10 am to
12 noon in the KLS Committee Room.

Dissertation Submission and Deadline

The arrangements for the submission of dissertations will be the same as for essays. All
dissertations must be submitted electronically with two paper copies to be handed in, as
detailed above under Coursework/Dissertation Submission and Moodle.

The dissertation must be submitted by 5 pm on the last day of registration, Wednesday
14th September 2011. Part time students who commenced their registration in September
2010 will submit their dissertations on the last day of their registration in September
2012.

Students must make clear that the dissertation is being formally submitted by signing the
Notice of Submission Form, Access Form and submitting these forms with the paper
copy. The supervisor will no longer be permitted to advise on or discuss the content of
the dissertation with the candidate until after the results are released.

Late Submission - Dissertations

Late submission of dissertations will be considered only in grave and exceptional
circumstances. The application form to request an Extension in Submission Time for a
Dissertation is available from the KLS Postgraduate Office. Applications should be
supported by their dissertation supervisor and will also need the approval of the Director
of Graduate Studies.

If a student has concessionary evidence which prevents them from submitting by the
appropriate deadline then they must submit the concessionary evidence to be considered
by the Board of Examiners.

Any extension granted is on the understanding that students become liable to a late
submission fee in line with University of Kent Regulations. The current University
charge is £104 per six months, or part thereof.

Where a dissertation is submitted late without an extension being granted it will normally
be given a mark of 0%. Students should note that any extensions granted for dissertations
may result in delayed graduation.




                                           25
Marking of Essays and Dissertation, and Feedback to Students

Essays and dissertations will be marked by one internal examiner and moderated by a
second internal examiner and an external examiner. Essays and dissertations are marked
out of 100 with a pass mark of 40%.

Essays will be marked by the first internal examiner within three term weeks of the date
of submission. Staff on some modules may be marking online using the Grademark tool
in Turnitin instead of marking on paper. You will be notified in advance where any of
your work is to be marked online. Otherwise essays will be returned to the Postgraduate
Office and a copy of the essay with comments will be returned to students. Students will
be emailed when the essays are available. Comments will be available online where
essays are graded online. Students will only obtain the mark for the essay after it has been
moderated by the second internal examiner. Students will be emailed when the marks
have been posted on the Student Data System. Please note that these marks remain
subject to change until confirmed by the Board of Examiners.

The facility exists for Law Module Convenors to allocate up to 20% of the marks for
their modules on the basis of participation assessment. This allows credit to be given to
verbal contributions to the module and involves an assessment of contributions in
seminar presentations and general discussion. The basis upon which participation marks
will be awarded will be fully explained by convenors of those modules which adopt this
method of assessment at the first session, and an opportunity will be provided for
questions to be raised. In those modules where participation assessment is adopted, the
remaining 80% of the assessment will be determined by an essay submitted in accordance
with the general requirements for the programme. Where a student fails to participate for
whatever reason, a mark of 0% will normally be recorded.

Students are encouraged to check the modules for which they are registered and their
marks/progress via the web on the Student Data System. The student portal is available
on the University web pages at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/student/studying/index.html.
Follow the pathway via the Student Data System On-line.

There will be two meetings of the Board of Examiners each year. The first will usually
take place during June to consider the students’ progress in the taught modules (Stage 1)
and decide formally which students will be allowed to proceed to the dissertation stage
(Stage 2) of the programme. The examiners will normally meet again in the following
December to make final decisions on the award of degrees. Candidates may be required
to attend an oral examination.

Dissertation and final degree results will be released via the Student Data System on
Friday 16th December 2011. Letters of confirmation, transcripts and copies of the
dissertation examiners reports will be posted to permanent home addresses in January
2012. Successful students will then graduate in July 2012. Final degree certificates are
only available after graduation. Results can not be given out by telephone or by any other
means. Results cannot be released if there are any monies outstanding to the
University.




                                            26
Criteria to be Applied to Taught Postgraduate Assessment in KLS

Below is a statement of the assessment criteria to be used in the Kent Law School for the
marking of all assessed work on taught postgraduate programmes:-

The standard categories of marks are: Postgraduate Diploma/Masters Pass 40-59%; Merit
60-69%; Distinction 70% and above.

80% or higher: A superb answer that manages to combine incisive writing and thinking
with an impressive knowledge of the subject area. The answer should show evidence of
reading that goes well beyond that taught in the programme or module, but should
integrate this with novel personal reflections that demonstrate an exceptional perception
of the subject area. The answer is well-reasoned, well-organised and presented with no
serious typographical errors and, with only very minor modification, is of a standard that
could be published in a relevant academic journal.

70-79%: An excellent answer that demonstrates considerable independent thinking and
links this with a broad and detailed knowledge of the subject area. This should be
exemplified by an astute choice of relevant examples where appropriate, derived from
material that goes beyond that suggested for the programme or module. This should be
integrated into a well-reasoned answer that carries a clear, thoughtful and substantiated
line of argument.

60-69%: A meritorious and distinctive answer that integrates material from different
sources into a concise and well-organised account of the subject area. There should be
evidence of independent research effort and evaluative thinking that has been developed
from ideas presented in the programme or module, and the submission should provide a
clear, concise and well-reasoned answer that covers the important points without major
omission.

50-59%: A satisfactory pass answer that demonstrates a generally sound understanding
of the subject area supported by relevant examples that are demonstrably well understood
and presented coherently. Typically, an answer in this category falls short of a merit
classification because of shortcomings in coverage, misunderstandings of critical issues,
or because the presentation, organisation or writing style are deficient.

40-49%: A bare pass level of answer that represents the minimum acceptable standard.
This should indicate an awareness of basic reading materials recommended for the
programme or module and a minimal understanding of the contentious issues relevant to
the topic being covered. A mark in this range might also be awarded where there is a
significant amount of irrelevance or where lines of argument are seriously obscured by
misconceptions, incoherence or dislocated presentation.

30-39%: A fail answer that makes reference to material that was covered in the
programme or module, but reproduces this in an unfocused or uncritical way, showing
little or no evidence of reading around the subject or of independent thinking.
Alternatively, the answer fails to address the question posed or shows a significant lack of
understanding of the area at issue.



                                            27
29% and below: A serious fail answer that completely fails to address the question
posed showing little evidence of understanding of the subject area. The answer may
contain serious errors or be presented in an incoherent, disorganised or illegible way.

Progression and Upgrading

Candidates are only allowed to proceed to the dissertation stage if they have attained an
average mark of 40% or more in their essays. Any essay which has obtained less than
40% on first submission, may be resubmitted except where resubmission is disallowed
for disciplinary reasons. However, no resubmitted essay will be awarded a mark greater
than 40%.

Students who fail the participation element of a module may be given the opportunity to
undergo a viva. However, any mark given for the participation element after a viva has
been conducted will be capped at the pass mark of 40%.

A student who is initially registered for a Postgraduate Diploma and who has attained the
credits allocated to the six taught module assessments for that programme may, on formal
application, have his or her registration upgraded to the Masters degree.

Please refer to the credit framework for further detailed information.

Student Responsibilities

Any correspondence received for students is held for collection in the Kent Law School
Postgraduate Office. All personal memoranda from the Kent Law School will be sent
there and students are strongly advised to check their e-mail regularly to be notified of
any post for collection. Any change of address must be notified immediately to the
Postgraduate Officer, Lynn Risbridger, in the Kent Law School Postgraduate Office. Up
to four copies of status letters may be requested during your period of registration. For
additional copies there will be an extra charge of £9 per letter.

The respective Programme Convenor is the personal tutor of all students following the
programme, and he or she will be happy to discuss any difficulties or problems
experienced.

Support Services

There are a wide variety of support services available on campus and students are
encouraged to make the most of these services. The web address for the student support
services is: http://www.kent.ac.uk/student/support/index.html




                                           28
    Careers Advisory Service
     www.kent.ac.uk/careers/
    Chaplaincy
     www.kent.ac.uk/chaplaincy/
    College Masters’ Offices
     www.kent.ac.uk/guidance/masters_offices.htm#Masters
    Counselling Service
     www.kent.ac.uk/counselling/
    Disability and Dyslexia Support Service
     www.kent.ac.uk/guidance/disabilityanddyslexiasupport.htm
    English Language Unit
     www.kent.ac.uk/secl/elu/
    Equality and Diversity Manager
     www.kent.ac.uk/guidance/equalopp.htm
    European Office
     www.kent.ac.uk/european-office/
    International Office
     www.kent.ac.uk/international/immigration_support/
    Kent Law Clinic
     www.kent.ac.uk/law/clinic/
    Kent Union
     www.kentunion.co.uk
    Medical Centre
     www.kent.ac.uk/medical/
    Student Learning Advisory Service
     www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/learning/index.html
    Alumni Relations (Communications and Development Office)
     www.kent.ac.uk/alumni/

IT

The University’s computing facilities can make academic and indeed social life much
easier and more pleasant. A good deal of information is available from the IT Services.
Students are urged to use the computing facilities and the support provided at the IT
Services reception. Their website is: http://www.kent.ac.uk/itservices/

Currently the Kent Law School provides £17 (full-time), £8.50 (part- time) of printing
credits for each student per academic year. The credit is added directly to your account
after registration and details of how the account works are available from IT Services
reception.




                                          29
Students are expected to learn to use the e-mail system. Students will be automatically
subscribed to the kls-llm mailing list. This is a general mailing list for all Masters and
Postgraduate Diploma students and all general memoranda and messages from staff will
be sent to students via e-mail. Students are therefore strongly advised to check their e-
mail frequently. There are a number of other programme mailings lists as follows:-

Criminal Law programmes                          kls-criminal@kent.ac.uk
Environmental Law programmes                     kls-elp@kent.ac.uk
European Law                                     kls-european@kent.ac.uk
International Commercial Law                     kls-commercial@kent.ac.uk
International Environmental Law                  kls-iel@kent.ac.uk
International Law with International Relations   kls-international@kent.ac.uk
Medical Law and Ethics                           kls-medlaw@kent.ac.uk
Public International Law                         kls-public@kent.ac.uk

For instructions on how to subscribe and other mailing lists please see the KLS
computing web site via: http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/currentpg/pgt/ict/email.html. If you
have any problems please contact the helpdesk at IT Services.

Student Representation and Feedback

Students should elect a representative from each programme by week four of the Autumn
Term. The Kent Union will assist with these elections online. These representatives will
be members of the Graduate Students’ Liaison Committee. The representatives will be
able to discuss matters concerning the Masters programmes as a whole with Kent Law
School staff at meetings of the Graduate Studies Committee. Representatives are also
invited to attend meetings of the Kent Law School Learning and Teaching Board and the
Departmental Meeting, where they will have the opportunity to pursue matters of concern
further where this is thought necessary. You may wish to consider nominating one
representative to attend the Faculty Graduate School Board.

Evaluation forms will be distributed for every module in week 10 of the Autumn Term
and week 20 of the Spring Term. Please take the time to fill these out and give further
written comments if you wish. These are extremely helpful to Module Convenors in
improving the content and presentation of their modules. Present students have benefited
from previous generations of students having completed these forms and providing
suggestions for the improvement of modules and programmes.

Complaints Procedure

All students are entitled to receive competent teaching on all modules within a
programme and short-comings in this respect, or unsatisfactory administrative
arrangements, may legitimately be the subject of complaint. Module evaluation forms are
intended to provide an opportunity for suggestions for year-on-year improvements to
modules and programmes. However, problems may arise that need to be more
immediately addressed at the most appropriate level so that they can be swiftly rectified.




                                           30
In the first place, problems with particular modules should be raised with the Module
Convenor, who should be available to discuss difficulties following classes or during
office hours. If a satisfactory resolution of the difficulty cannot be reached with the
Module Convenor, the matter should be raised with the relevant Programme Convenor. In
the event of a particularly intractable problem, the matter may be further considered by
the Director of Graduate Studies or the Head of School, providing that it has first been
raised with the appropriate Module or Programme Convenor.

If the problem is of a kind that affects the student body collectively it should be raised by
the student representative for the relevant programme. The relevant Programme
Convenor or the Director of Graduate Studies will be pleased to consider difficulties of a
general kind concerning either teaching or other arrangements concerning a programme.
The student representative is also able to raise general problems at either the Graduate
Students’ Liaison Committee or the Graduate Studies Committee.

The University’s complaints procedures can be found below and these deal with both
academic and non academic complaints:

http://www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/quality/guidance/appeals.html
http://www.kent.ac.uk/regulations/Regulations%20Booklet/Student-Charter-2008.pdf

Library Facilities

The Law Library is located on Level 3 of the Templeman Library, and contains the books,
periodicals and primary materials of law. Many of the books and journals required for
postgraduate study may be found in other areas of the library as well. You can use the
library catalogue to search for materials: www.kent.ac.uk/library/.

Most of your research is likely to be in electronic resources. The Law Library website
consists of three main pages:
 Lawlinks: www.kent.ac.uk/lawlinks. This is a gateway to public domain legal
  information on the web.
 The Electronic Law Library: www.kent.ac.uk/lawlinks/electronic-law-
  library/index.html. This contains links to all the legal databases which we subscribe
  to, together with guides to their use.
 The Researching the Law page: www.kent.ac.uk/lawlinks/researching-the-
  law/index.html contains all the guides and tutorials produced by the Law Library.

In addition, there are many other electronic resources which are available to you and may
be useful for extending your research. These are listed on the main library pages, under
Online Resources. The law librarian and her team can give advice on which are the most
appropriate.

Many journals are accessible exclusively online. Access these via the Templeman
Library’s Online Journals pages. You also have access to a number of other major
libraries such as the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the School of
Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). Details can be found on the Templeman Library
pages under ‘Other Collections’.


                                             31
The Law Library office is adjacent to the printed materials and the Law Librarian, Diane
Raper, and her support staff are available to help with any enquiries in person or by
email. Contact details are listed at the end of this guide.

Access to London Libraries

Under the SCONUL access scheme (details on the Templeman Library website under the
‘Other Collections’ topic) postgraduate taught students may use the facilities of several
libraries in London including the best law library in the UK, the Institute of Advanced
Legal Studies (IALS), the British Library (one of the best libraries in the world) and
specialist law libraries such as that of the School of Oriental and African Studies of the
University of London (SOAS). Students are advised to avail themselves of these
facilities, especially for their dissertation research. Information about the library access
scheme is available on the library web page or in the library itself.

Students may be refunded for two (off-peak or cheap day) return tickets from Canterbury
to London by public transport per year for dissertation research purposes. This may be
claimed by completing an Expense Claims Form (EXP1) and attaching the tickets or
original receipts. Expense Claims Forms are available from the Kent Law School
Postgraduate Office. To avoid having to complete an expense claims form etc travel can
also be pre-booked by KLS and this can be done by emailing your requirements to kls-
travel@kent.ac.uk.

Student Facilities

The Kent Law School provides a postgraduate common room for all KLS taught
postgraduate students to use. The room has also been fitted with storage lockers,
tables/chairs, a fridge and a kettle. In addition to the computing facilities generally
available to all students, the Kent Law School has its own air conditioned computing
suite for KLS taught postgraduates to use. There are 16 computers, a printer and scanner.
Both rooms have wireless networking. (To install the printer select \\staffprinting\dpklsp.)

Please note that the computing suite is a quiet study area. Both the doors have an
electronic door lock. To gain access to these rooms you will need to have the rooms
added onto your Kent ID card by Eliot College reception.

The Kent Law School will not be responsible for any loss or damage to items left by
students in the postgraduate common room or computing suite.

Data Protection

The Kent Law School adheres to the Document Retention and Archiving Policy set out
by the Office for Quality Assurance and Validation which complies with the Data
Protection Act 1998. More detailed information on data protection and the Kent
Guidelines can be found at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/data-protection/




                                            32
 MEMBERS AND ASSOCIATES OF THE KENT LAW SCHOOL

KLS Office:           Liz Cable (e.a.cable@kent.ac.uk)            Extension: 7826
                      School Administration Manager

                      Lynn Risbridger (l.risbridger@kent.ac.uk)   Extension: 3405
                      Postgraduate Officer

                      Dylan Williams (d.williams@kent.ac.uk)      Extension 4595
                      Postgraduate Assistant

                      Mark Dean (g.m.dean@kent.ac.uk)             Extension 3551
                      IT Support Officer

Law Library:          Diane Raper (d.raper@kent.ac.uk)            Extension: 3111
                      Law Librarian

                      Law Library Staff:                         Extension: 7866
                      Lesley Lawrence (l.j.lawrence@kent.ac.uk)
                      Angela Lopez-Real (a.s.lopez-real@kent.ac.uk)

Academic Staff                                Extension           Room

Dr Anneli Albi                                3343                Eliot N3W5
(a.albi@kent.ac.uk)

Dr Donatella Alessandrini               4289                      Eliot E2E1
(d.alessandrini@kent.ac.uk)
Co- Convenor: International Commercial Law

Dr Yutaka Arai                                3751                Eliot N3W4
(y.arai@kent.ac.uk)

Mr Jonathan Austin-Jones                      4860                Eliot N2W6
(ja41@kent.ac.uk)

Dr Kate Bedford                               4868                Eliot W3N4
(k.bedford@kent.ac.uk)

Dr Deborah Cheney                             3352                Eliot W4-5
(d.cheney@kent.ac.uk)

Dr Brenna Bhandar                             4774                Eliot Extension L31
(b.bhandar@kent.ac.uk)

Dr Emilie Cloatre                                                 Eliot N3W2
(e.cloatre@kent.ac.uk)




                                         33
Professor Joanne Conaghan                 7544             Eliot Extension L37
(j.a.f.conaghan@kent.ac.uk)
Head of School

Ms Lisa Dickson                           7538             Eliot S3W1
(l.m.dickson@kent.ac.uk)

Ms Máiréad Enright                        7996             Eliot W2N4
(m.enright@kent.ac.uk)

Dr Emily Haslam                        4489                Eliot W4-5A
(e.haslam@kent.ac.uk)
Programme Convenor: Public International Law

Mr Martin Hedemann-Robinson               3331             Eliot E4E8
(m.hedemann-robinson@kent.ac.uk)
Programme Convenor: European Law

Professor Bill Howarth                 3341                Eliot W3N6
(w.howarth@kent.ac.uk)
Programme Convenor: Environmental Law and Policy
Programme Convenor: International Environmental Law

Professor Paddy Ireland                   3344             Eliot W4N1
(p.w.ireland@kent.ac.uk)

Ms Siân Lewis-Anthony                     4509             Eliot N4W1c
(s.lewis-anthony@kent.ac.uk)

Dr Robin Mackenzie                       3356              Eliot W4N6
(r.mackenzie@kent.ac.uk)
Programme Convenor: Medical Law and Ethics
Convenor: Graduate Studies Student Liaison Committee

Dr Alex Magaisa                           7103             Eliot E4E2
(a.t.magaisa@kent.ac.uk)

Professor Wade Mansell                 3339                 Eliot W4N5
(w.m.mansell@kent.ac.uk)
Programme Convenor: International Law with International Relations

Mr Donald McGillivray                     4293             Eliot Extension L30
(d.mcgillivray@kent.ac.uk)

Mr Francesco Messineo                                      Eliot E4E7
f.messineo@kent.ac.uk

Dr Gbenga Oduntan                         4817             Eliot N3W3
(o.t.oduntan@kent.ac.uk)


                                     34
Professor Iain Ramsay               4866             Eliot E4S1
(i.d.c.ramsay@kent.ac.uk)
Director of Graduate Studies
Programme Convenor: LLM in Law and Combined Title

Dr Bernard Ryan                           3310       Eliot E3E1
(b.ryan@kent.ac.uk)

Professor Geoffrey Samuel                 3445       Eliot S4E1
(g.h.samuel@kent.ac.uk)

Dr Harm Schepel                           7103       Eliot N3E1
(h.f.c.schepel@kent.ac.uk)

Professor Sally Sheldon                   4899       Eliot N4W6
(s.sheldon@kent.ac.uk)

Dr Alisa Stevens                          8948       Gillingham G2.10
(a.stevens@kent.ac.uk)

Mr Alan Story                             3316       Eliot E2S1
(a.c.story@kent.ac.uk)

Professor Steve Uglow                  3342          Eliot E3S1
(s.p.uglow@kent.ac.uk)
Programme Convenor: Criminal Justice
Programme Convenor: International Criminal Justice

Professor Toni Williams               4934           Eliot Extension L32
(g.a.williams@kent.ac.uk)
Programme Convenor: International Commercial Law
Programme Convenor: LLM in Law (Erasmus-Europe)

Dr Simone Wong                            3332       Eliot W4.4
(s.w.y.wong@kent.ac.uk)




                                     35
REGULATIONS FOR TAUGHT PROGRAMMES OF STUDY



   CREDIT FRAMEWORK FOR TAUGHT PROGRAMMES




                      36

				
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posted:8/13/2011
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